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Venice gondolier sun. ( July 14, 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
Venice gondolier sun.
Uniform Title:
Venice gondolier sun
Added title page title:
Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher:
Venice Gondolier Sun,
Venice Gondolier Sun
Creation Date:
July 14, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers. -- Venice (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Sarasota County (Fla.)
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates:
27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

General Note:
Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
General Note:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002730652
notis - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
issn - 1536-1063
System ID:
UF00028295:01140

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Venice gondolier sun.
Uniform Title:
Venice gondolier sun
Added title page title:
Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher:
Venice Gondolier Sun,
Venice Gondolier Sun
Creation Date:
July 14, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers. -- Venice (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Sarasota County (Fla.)
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates:
27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

General Note:
Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
General Note:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002730652
notis - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
issn - 1536-1063
System ID:
UF00028295:01140

Full Text



VENICE R A75




Lon doler Sun
r LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S NO.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER


Venice'flashers'? Calm down. This, too, shall pass


With the arrest Tuesday of
the third suspected Venice
flasher, we can all hope that
life in the city will return to
normal. And it will, very soon.
Venice Police Chief Tom
McNulty and Capt. Tom
Mattmuller went looking for
Josh Moss on Tuesday to arrest
him on a charge of lewd and
lascivious behavior. They
located him in a place where
homeless people are known to
gather, called for backup and
arrested him.
Two other men were arrested
for similar activity about
10 days ago (see the info box


accom-
panying
this story).
There have
IA. been no

Reports,
and there
doesn't
look to be
another
BOB MUDGE copycat
lurking,
literally, to accost any other
innocent citizens.
Unless one appears, this rash
of flashing will quickly vanish
from our consciousness, other


than, perhaps, as a topic of
cocktail party conversation.
The fact is, Venice has dealt
with much worse and come
out the other side just fine.
Remember, this is a city
born shortly before the Great
Depression, which made our
recent economic downturn
look like a pothole next to the
Grand Canyon. It survived
that, and, decades later, the
departure of the Kentucky
Military Institute, which
had played a large role in
its recovery from the Great
Depression.
MUDGEI7


Another 'flasher' arrested


By GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR
The Venice police chief's
hunch resulted in the arrest
of what local media were
calling a copycat flasher.
Venice Police identified
Joshua D. Moss, 30, home-
less, as the suspect who
frequented area bridges and
a local ice cream store last
week. They issued a warrant
for Moss's arrest on Friday.
On Tuesday (Aug. 27),


during a break
in the city
council meet-
ing, Police Chief
Tom McNulty
and Capt. Tom
Matmuller
decided to
take a ride in
an unmarked


MOSS


vehicle to places where
homeless people are known
to frequent.
FLASHER 7


The mayor of Venice got
an earful from fellow council
members this week unhappy
with his approach to recouping
certain public safety related
costs from the county.
Frustrated with 15 months of
unanswered questions at the
county level, Mayor John Holic
was ready to propose the city
simply begin billing the county
for providing fire engine service
assistance to county EMS
ambulance crews.
The EMS subsidy is a le-
gitimate revenue stream, he
said, in place in other munici-
palities like Pasco County and
Okeechobee County.
Holic also proposed a
Metropolitan Service Taxing
unit that would, in essence, tax
residents at the level of service
they receive.
City residents currently pay
what every county resident
pays for fire and police
service, and more for local
service, even though the


Mayor John Holic
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office largely doesn't work
within city limits, and ambu-
lance fee revenue isn't shared
with the city.
Holic said he wants to recoup
some of those costs in a fair
manner.
Sarasota County
Administrator Randall Reid
said earlier the county wasn't
interested in the "EMS sub-
sidy" discussion, warning it
could damage the cooperative
relationship between both
governing entities.
COUNCIL 17


Giant gator caught


Provided by MAX WINTIZ
ABC-7
Alligator hunting season
got underway in Florida on
Aug. 15, and already, two
Venice men have likely bagged
one of the largest gators the
public will hear about this year.
The night of Aug. 19, Shawn
Koss and Hank Duyn managed
to catch a 12-foot, 6-inch alliga-
tor just south of the Snook Haven
Restaurant on the Myakka River.
"When it came up out of the
water, we noticed the back was
significantly longer than anything
we have ever seen before," Koss
said. "We knew we had a big one."
After an hour fight, the gator
boys finally managed to get the
gator on board the 14-foot boat
they were riding in.
"Pulling him in the boat was
a little bit difficult. We about
sunk the boat," Koss said.
The alligator was taken to
Bad to the Bone Taxidermy in
East Venice, where it is being
prepared for its next move.
Sometime soon, it will be hang-
ing on the wall at Snook Haven.
"It surprised me how big it
was, and I have seen a lot of
big gators," said Eddie Vitale,
who runs the taxidermy store.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY ABC-7
This 12 1/2-foot gator was caught in
the Myakka River on Aug. 19 by two
Venice men. The gator is now at the
taxidermist, and a portion of it -
including the head will be put on
display at Snook Haven Restaurant.
"By far, this is the biggest gator
from this area."
The gator will be donated to
Snook Haven sometime within
the next six months. According
to Everglades National Park,
the largest alligator recorded in
Florida was 17 feet 5 inches.


Good morning,
Gondolier Sun
subscriber
Patricia McWilliams


FRONT SECTION OUR TOWN SECTION IN THIS EDITION


BUSINESS....................................6A
LEGALS........................................ 4A
LET'EM HAVE IT.......................... 8A
LOTTERY................................... 2A
OBITUARIES................................4A


OPINION................................... 8A AROUND TOWN........................8B
POLICE BEAT................................ 3A CLASS ACTS...............................5B
SPORTS.................................. 10-11A CROSSWORD............................. 6B
TIM SMOLARICK........................ 8A SOUTH TRAIL............................4B
WEATHER...................................... 2A WELL-BEING..............................2B


AMERICAN PROFILE
CLASSIFIED
LET'S GO!


COUPONS


DEATHS


Stein Mart.......................................... 5A Betty Boese
Permanent Makeup............................7A Ernest Cutler
A lthea's .....................................................9A
Brindley's Liquor.................................. 9A Margaret Martin
Venice CarWash.....................................A Stanley Parzych
Gulf Coast Carpet ................... 3 Lowell Selders
AmericanAir...................................... 5B


S05252 100755 o


4EItMDINMiI'EATNORY
REDUCTINSLCHEVROLET

mmr'
........ Sorn u l
\Pl [sW tWoWWOE~OEIncluding--2014 Models.
-. .. *.-LP:GO~ ~SEBE~OBO OUONow Thro~ugh.kAmgu.si~


)n' Council pushes back


S against pushing county

By GREG GILES
.7 NEws EDITORII


LLILLrLLA7-LTA I n


--'~"- ""' '-""' I







2A SUN NEWSPAPERS




* CASH 3
Aug. 26N .................................... 0-9-6
Aug. 26D .................................... -0-5
Aug. 25N .................................... 3-7-7
Aug. 25D .................................... 0-7-2
Aug. 24N .................................... 0-3-3
Aug. 24D ............................. ...... 6-0-1
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Aug. 26N.................................9-9-4-2
Aug. 26D .......................1.......1-4-8-1
Aug. 25N .................................0-0-8-3
Aug. 25D .... ................ ..... 2-7-8-7
Aug. 24N .................................0-1-9-3
Aug. 24D .................................6-8-8-9
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Aug. 26 ....................... 6-16-18-20-29
Aug. 25 ......................... 3-4-24-34-35
Aug.24 ........................... 3-4-7-25-27
Aug. 23 ......................... 4-5-11-18-28
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 25
1 5-digit winners ...........$172,793.07
191 4-digit winners ..............$145.50
6,542 3-digit winners .............$11.50
MEGA MONEY
Aug. 23 .......................1....17-35-37-39
M egaBall......................................... 19
Aug. 20 ...........................18-25-31-43
M egaBall......................................... 16
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 23
4-of-4 MB ......................$500,000
2 4-of-4............................... $2,835.50
36 3-of-4 MB ............................. $345
689 3-of-4................................$53.50
908 2-of-4 MB............................... 28
r-mmr- -


ALMANAC


0 LOTTO
Aug. 24 ................11-24-36-45-46-47
Aug. 21 ....................3-6-36-46-48-52
Aug. 17 ................... 2-7-11-15-43-45
PAYOFF FOR AUG.24
1 6-digit winners .....................59M
37 5-digit winners ................. $5,766
2,198 4-digit winners .................$81
47,748 3-digit winners .................$5
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$2 million
* POWERBALL
Aug. 24 ..................... 12-17-25-45-59
Pow erball .................................... ....19
Aug. 21 ..................... 30-40-42-46-48
Powerball ........................................ 23
PAYOFF FOR AUG.24
- 5 of 5 + PB...........................$92M
- 5 of 5...........................$1,000,000
5 4of5 + PB.........................$10,000
90 4of5 ................................... 100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$116 million
* MEGA MILLIONS
Aug.23 ......................... -9-17-20-53

Aug. 20 ................. 13-28-35-38-41
Pow erball ........................................33
PAYOFF FORAUG.23
5 of 5 + MB........................$51M
- 5 of 5.............................. 250,000
- 4 of 5 + MB..................... 10,000
53 4 of5 ..................................... 150
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$69 million


I SUNRISESUNSET M VENICEThIDES I


Sunriselset
T:.rn. l'l : :uri:,91
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonset
Moonrise


E 'TEilri ZT ChI41'Ti rlE
S',4 l' I'' HI,,H HIH LO'AI LO'AI
7:08 a.m. M. A.M. RM. A.M.
WED 28 8:54 5:01 11:42 1:41p
THU 29 10:23 6:08 2:59 -
FRI 30 11:06 7:30 4:04 1:11
2:16 p.m. SAT31 11:35 8:48 4:56 2:45
1:14a.m. SUN1 11:57 9:51 5:37 3:55
a A.M. p-P.M.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


PHOTO PROVIDED


Planning for the future

Tamara Schells participates in one of the recent High Tech, High Touch community workshops being held
throughout the county. The workshop addresses the question, "What kind of community do we want to live in?"
A workshop was held recently in Venice, with another scheduled for Thursday morning, Aug. 29, at the Morgan
Family Community Center in North Port. There is no charge, but those wishing to attend are asked to register. Call
941-365-8751 or visit www.ScopeExcel.org.


ABC 7 WEATHER

VENCE OU


High Low

11 II I


High Low

S. 74.al


High Low

41I1 l[rwIII[II i- II


High Low

411 l I-r I i- I[ I .l ,l i.II


iD FORESTRY v
C RESOURCES c.
Committed to a betterenvironment
EARTHCURB EDGING :
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DYLOX INSECT CONTROL i
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S 850 N. Indiana
A (Hwy. 776) v
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A4 4.4 .44^44 4 .4 44 4v444^


Call Stephen or Stacey today for All Your Insurance Needs!
Visit us online! www.evolveinsuranceagency.com
stacey.evolve@gmail.com steve.evolve@mail.com
Stephen Cell: 941.586.6239 I Ph: 941.244.2760 11 Stacey Cell: 941.504.5802
2017 B. South Tamiami Trl.* Venice, FL 34293


Dr. Eric M. Bar6era

S941-497-7400


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*~ ~ ~ ~ ~ rn *'*- - Ay *


WOMEN





American Business Women's Day
is September 22,2013 and we are
celebrating your achievements!

The "Venice Gondolier Sun" and "Sun" will be publishing
our annual "Women in Business" feature.

Each advertisement will feature your provided picture
and personal biography in 50 words or less.

PUBLICATION DATE
WEDNESDAY, SEPT 18,2013

DEADLINE
THURSDAY, SEPT 5,2013- 5PM
Ads include process color


1 will be* i nvited-.toour




Each attending advertiser will have the opportunity
to win a beautiful piece of jewelry donated piece of
jewelry donated by, owner, Liz Maggio.

REFLECTIONS


Presented by the


GCndolier Sunh


C ay rni





:WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


Reputation gives away shoplifters

as deputy silently observes


An off-duty deputy
recognized all three
people traveling in a
pickup and knew they
were up to no good.
According to a Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office
report:
On Wednesday of last
week, the deputy, who
was traveling with his
teenage son, recognized
the occupants as people
he had previous dealings
with.
All three live together.
The deputy followed
the truck until it pulled
into the Walmart in
Osprey. Then, with his
son in tow, he followed
two of the people into
the store where he
watched them take a
Keurig coffee machine
and plastic containers
without paying for them.
He notified the Sheriff's
Office but all available
officers were on call else-
where so he left the store's
protection
coordinator
a detailed
note
describing
what he
witnessed.
The next
FULTZ day, the
Walmart
security
confirmed
the crime
on security
video.
On Friday,
all three
WINNINGS room-
mates were
arrested:
Helena
Fultz, 43,
and Michael
Allen
Winnings,
55, the driver
MCMASTERS during the


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction. Guilt is determined by the
courtsystem.


alleged shoplifting incident,
200 block ofWashington
Ave., were charged with
petty theft (third or subse-
quent offense). Their bonds
were set at $25,000 and
$10,000, respectively.
Christine Ruth
McMasters, 40, who was
issued a no-trespass
order byWalmart in May,
was charged with petty
theft (third or subsequent
offense) and trespassing.
Bond was set at $27,000.

Venice Police
Department arrest
B Christopher Everett
Ball, 51, 800 block of
Pineland Ave., Venice.
Charges: two counts of
battery. Bond: none.

Sarasota Police
Department arrest
John E. Rink III,
30, homeless, Venice.
Charges: burglary and
violation of probation
(original charge: grand
theft). Bond: none.

Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office
arrests
James Robert Harris,
34, 400 block of Plantation
Road, Venice. Charges:
three counts of violation
of probation (original
charges: fraud, grand
theft, trafficking in stolen
property and giving false
information to a pawn
broker). Bond: none.
Robert T. Lee, 72, 800
block of Dahoon Circle,


Venice. Charges: posses-
sion of crack cocaine,
possession of cocaine,
possession of a controlled
substance and two counts
of possession of narcotic
equipment. Bond: $5,500.
Ryan Gerid Day, 35,
3300 block of Rustic
Road, Nokomis. Charge:
violation of probation
(original charge: grand
theft). Bond: none.
Timothy Alan Francis,
48, 700 block of S.
Tamiami Trail, Venice.
Charges: battery and
contempt of court (origi-
nal charge: violation of
domestic violence injunc-
tion). Bond: $50,000.
Joshua Thomas
Linehan, 32, W Oak St.,
Osprey. Charge: fraud.
Bond: $1,500.
Gerardo Hernandez
Moreno, 30, Plaza Mayor,
Venice. Charges: DUI
blood alcohol level .15 or
higher and operating a
motor vehicle without a
valid license. Bond: $620.
Alicia Sportelli,
25, 800 block of W
Damoon Circle, Venice.
Charges: possession of
a controlled substance,
possession of narcotic
equipment and resisting
arrest. Bond: $2,500.

Criminal
registration
James Demaio, 30
1000 block Rosdale Road,
Venice.
Stephen Lawrence
Testa, 23, 200 block
Fareham Dr., Venice.
Compiled by Drew
Winchester


Pets in parks gets in-depth look


By GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

An advisory board's
recommendation to
allow pets in more city
parks came one step
closer to reality after
city leaders this week
voted to give it a full staff
vetting.
Currently, pets are
only allowed in a
handful of parks, most
notably Paw Park on the
Gulf and the Venetian
Waterway Trail.
Linda Kenfeld, Parks
and Recreation Advisory
Board chairwoman, said
the board was consid-
ering revising the list
of parks even further,
as it includes at least
one private park, and
perhaps should include
some of the city's size-
able green spaces, she
said.
Council agreed to
move forward with
the recommendation,
which was to give staff
time to properly vet
the issue.
Dogs and other pets
would still be off limits
at parks on the Gulf,
and in parks that have
youth-oriented activi-
ties, like the Wellfield
Sports Complex and
Chuck Reiter Park, and


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parks where there aren't
any sidewalks or trails,
like Mundy Park and
East Gate Park.
There was even
discussion on whether
to allow pets in the
south end of Maxine
Barritt Park, but not on
the north end, with its
heavily used covered
recreational area.
City council members
immediately spotted a
few issues with the idea,
like whether it's a good
idea to include private
parks in the new regula-
tions, and whether it's
a good idea for Higel
Marine Park and Marina
Park and Boat Ramp.
Council Member Jim
Bennett questioned
whether those marine
parks were too small
to accommodate pet


4. ah,


activities. Parks board
members said it was
necessary for transient
boaters who need to
walk their pets.
Mayor John Holic
agreed there was a need
to allow boat owners to
take their dogs on board
"so they are not breaking
the law."
"We could make that
dog loading only," he
said, drawing laughter
from council members.
The matter will come
back before city council
for consideration at its
next meeting. If council
likes the idea, it will
likely come back again
as a proposed city law
with two public hear-
ings, giving the public
plenty of time to weigh
in on the issue.
Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


OPEN HOUSE


*tra Ag .3
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Raffle Prizes
Gift Baskets
Wine &
Hors d'oeuvres
(while they last)


Brickyard Salon, LLC.
(formerly known as "The Hair Spot")


530 US 41 Bypass S. Ste 14A
Venice In the Brickyard Plaza
941-497-7604


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SUN NEWSPAPERS 3A





:4A SUN NEWSPAPERS


OBITUARIES

Betty Bluhm
Boese

Betty Boese, 92, of
Venice, Fla., died on
Sunday, Aug.18, 2013.
Betty was born
.on Jan. 21,
.:f:~ 1921, at Lying-
In Hospital in
Chicago, Ill.,
to Maurice L. and Clara
Miller Bluhm. Betty grew
up on the shores of Lake
Michigan in Winnetka,
Ill., where she graduated
from New Trier Township
High School. She graduat-
ed from Wellesley College
in 1942 with a degree in
psychology.
Following gradua-
tion, Betty returned to
Winnetka, where she
worked briefly as a teller
at Northern Trust Bank,
before returning to the
Boston area to train as a
WAVE officer in the U.S.
Navy. While stationed
at Miami Fla. NAS Lt.
(jg.), Bluhm met Lt. (jg.)
Harold Boese, a naviga-
tion instructor from Linn
Grove, Iowa.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


They were married in
Miami on Sept. 15, 1944.
Upon leaving the
Navy in 1945, Betty and
Boesey lived for five years
in Aurora, Ill., before
settling back on the Lake
Michigan shore in Lake
Bluff, Ill., where they
raised their family and
lived for 38 years before
retiring to Venice, Fla.
With her children,
Tom, Tim and Beth, all of
school age, Betty worked
for 16 years as a teacher
and then director of
the preschool at the 1st
Presbyterian Church of
Lake Forest, Ill. When
Boesey retired in 1980,
Betty joined him in
30-plus wonderful years
of retirement, caring for
their beautiful homes, en-
joying her love of garden-
ing, traveling extensively,
playing countless tables
of contract bridge, and
building on her reputa-
tion as the most gracious
and consummate of
hostesses.
Betty was an honorary
life member of both the


Lake Bluff and Venice
Garden Clubs. She was
active in Lake Bluff and
Venice chapters of PEO,
a national philanthropic
sorority, the Lake Bluff
Women's Club and the
College Club of Venice.
Betty was for many
years co-director of the
Beginners Choir at the
Union Church of Lake
Bluff and a member
of Venice Presbyterian
Church where, while
in her late 80s, she and
a friend organized a
program to send care
packages to the troops in
Afghanistan.
Betty was an exemplar
of a life of service to her
family, friends, church,
and community. She
was a tireless worker
and, more often, well-
organized leader as
schoolroom mother, den
mother, Girl Scout cookie
chairman, church rum-
mage sale coordinator
and in myriad other good
works.
Betty was preceded in
death by her parents, her


husband, and her sister,
Barbara Bluhm.
Survivors include sons,
Tom and wife Katie, Tim
and wife Sue, daughter
Beth Gehring and hus-
band Jack; grandchildren,
Caroline, Greg, Meredith,
and Drew Boese, Amy and
Jeff Gehring; sister-in-law
Lois Ann Warner and
husband Frank; nephew
Mike Warner; and wife
Barb, and several cousins.
Services: A memorial
service in Venice and a
private burial service
at Sarasota National
Cemetery are being
planned.
Contributions:
Memorial gifts may be
made to the Venice Area
Garden Club Scholarship
Fund, PO. Box 1685,
Venice, FL 34284 or
Venice Presbyterian
Church, 825 The Rialto,
Venice, FL 34285.

Ernest William
Cutler

Ernest William "Bill"
Cutler passed away on


Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013,
two weeks after his 92nd
birthday.
In his 92
years, Bill
brought a
great deal
of joy to his
family and
friends and
led a full
life.
He was
-... known for
';;.:. his big smile,
mischievous
twinkle in
his eye, warm gener-
ous heart and positive
outlook.
Bill loved life and was
always willing to help
anyone, expecting noth-
ing in return.
He was married to
Noreen Iredell Cutler
for 55 years until her
death in 2005. During
their time together, they
raised four children,
moved frequently across
the United States and
traveled the world during
their retirement years.
Life with Bill was always


an adventure.
AWorld War II veteran
who served in China and
India, Bill was a member
of the Hump Pilots
Association and earned
the Distinguished Flying
Cross and Air Medal
for his service during
World War II. Bill made
frequent visits to China
after the war where he
was honored by the
Chinese people for the
support of the U.S.
military to our Chinese
allies during this period.
Over numerous trips, he
took all of his grandchil-
dren along with family
and friends.
He is survived by his
four children, 10 grand-
children and 4 great-
grandchildren, as well as
by loyal and kind friends.
He will be missed by
those who knew him,
but his spirit will live on
through our memories.
Arrangements by
National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte.

DEATHS|5


I~i I





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and make a right onto Miami Avenue.

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w Arev


LEGAL NOTICES
FIC ~ N TIE


FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE OF ACTION
12 C 16


Notice Under Fictitious
Name Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of ClaimPal
located at 1001 Avenida del
Circo, located in the County of
Sarasota, in the City of Venice
FL 34285, intends to register
the said name with the Division
of Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Venice, Florida, this
23rd day of August, 2013.
Choice Plus, LLC
Publish: August 28, 2013

NOTICE OF ACTION



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF:
One 2008 Chevrolet VIN #
3GNDA13D88S540646
Case Number: 2013-CA-4186-NC
JUDGE: DIVISION "C"

NOTICE OF ACTION PURSUANT TO
FLORIDA STATUE 49.08
TO: OMELIO NAPOLES-MARQUEZ AND
ALL KNOWN AND UNKNOWN NATURAL
PERSONS; ALL PARTIES HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE,
OR INTEREST IN PROPERTY DESCRIBED
HEREIN; AND/OR OTHERWISE ANY ENTI-
TY OUTLINED BY SECTION 49.021,
FLORIDA STATUTES, WHO CLAIM AN


INTEREST IN THE ABOVE REFERENCED
PROPERTY, UNKNOWN ADDRESSES)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a for-
feiture action has been filed in the Circuit
Court within Sarasota County, Florida, in
the matter of In Re: Forefelture of: ONE
2008 CHEVROLET VIN #
3GNDA13D88S540646, against the
above-described ONE 2008 CHEVROLET
VIN # 3GNDA13D88S540646 by the
Sarasota County Sheriff's Office pur-
suant to the Florida Contraband Forefel-
ture Act in the above-entitled case. You
are required to file your written defensed
with the Clerk of the Court, 2000 Main
Street, Sarasota, FL 34237, and to
serve a copy of those defenses on or
before the 20th day of SEPTEMBER,
2013, on Patrick Dugan, Esquire,
Esquire, Post Office Box 4115, Saraso-
ta, Florida 34230-4115. Failure to file
your defenses will result in a default
being entered against you.
WITNESSED by hand and the Seal of the
Court on this 12TH day of AUGUST,
2013
KAREN RUSHING
Clerk of the Circuit Court
K GOODSPEED
Deputy Clerk
Publish: AUGUST 21, 28, 2013


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
JOHNSON'S TOWING OF VENICE
gives
Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these


S NOTICE
OF AUCTION
19

vehicles on September 18, 2013,
9:00 am at 604 TAMIAMI TRL N.
Nokomis, FL 34275-2137 pursuant
to subsection 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. JOHNSON'S TOWING
OF VENICE reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or all bids.
2007 FORD
1FAHP34N37W226682
1982 MAGIC TILT TRAILERS
220661
1983 MPER
ALSHHO91M83F
1995 TOYOTA
JT2EL56EOS7026114
2002 KIA
KNDUP131X26335757
Publish: AUGUST 28, 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SARA-
SOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
DELORES R. SORENSEN,
Deceased,
File No. 2013-CP-3103-SC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DELORES R. SORENSEN, deceased,
whose date of death was July 9th,
2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Sarasota County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 4000
South Tamiami Trail, Venice, FL
34293. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set


NOTICE TO NOTICE OF SALE OTHER NOTICES
CREDITORS I 30 1 38
20


forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHINON OR BEFORE THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is August 21, 2013
Personal Representatives:
Pamela J. Knouff
5233 Hansard Ave.
North Port, FL 34291
Attorneys for Personal
Representatives
W. KEVIN RUSSELL, Esq.
W. KEVIN RUSSELL, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 398462
14295 South Tamlaml Trail
North Port, FL 34287
Telephone: (941)429-1871
E-Mail: kevin@wkevinrussell.com
PUBUSH: August 21, 28, 2013


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
OF PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will sell, to satisfy lien of the
owner, at public sale by competitive bid-
ding on September 11, 2013 at 4:30pm
at the Extra Space Storage facility locat-
ed at: 225 N Tamiaml Trail Nokomis, FL
34275,
The personal goods stored therein by the
following may included, but are not limit-
ed to general household, furniture,
boxes, clothes and appliances.
Dianna Crane #933 HHG
Walter Crosby #1012 HHG
Joseph Hernandez#232HHG
Purchases must be made with cash and
paid at the time of sale. All goods are
sold as is and must by removed at the
time of purchase. Extra Space Storage
reserves the right to bid. Sale is subject
to adjournment.
Publish: August 28,
September 4, 2013

OTHER NOTICES




Notice of Suspension
To: James H. Deleo
Case No: 2013002025
A Notice of Suspension to suspend your
license and eligibility for licensure has
been filed against you. You have the
right to request a hearing pursuant to
Section 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statues, by mailing a request for same
to the Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, Division of
Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Talla-
hasse, FLorida 32345-3168. If a request
for hearing is not received by 21 days


from the date of the last publication, the
right to hearing in this matter will be
waived and the Department will dispose
of this cause in accordance with law.
Publish: August 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013


TO PLACE YOUR LEGAL
NOTICE, CALL STACY
(941)-207-1011
SMCINTOSH@SUN-
HERALD.COM
(at the Venice Office)
fax (941)-485-3036


Notice of Suspension
To: Elizabeth A. LaCombe
Case No: 201303258
A Notice of Suspension to suspend your
license and eligibility for licensure has
been filed against you. You have the
right to request a hearing pursuant to
Section 120.569 and 120.57, Florida
Statues, by mailing a request for same
to the Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, Division of
Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Talla-
hasse, FLorida 32345-3168. If a request
for hearing is not received by 21 days
from the date of the last publication, the
right to hearing in this matter will be
waived and the Department will dispose
of this cause in accordance with law.
Publish: August 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013


ci~7, -.


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Sales Service Storage


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Theme: "Settin' Sail for Sun Fiesta 2013"
Date: October 19, 2013
Time: 8 am check in, 9 am race
Where: Downtown, West Venice Ave.
Fee to enter: $50. 00 per team
Prizes: Trophies & Gift Certificate

Rules: Each team to provide their own bed.
1 rider, 4 pushers and 2 reliefpushers per team.
No mechanical propulsion.

Registration Deadline: October 10, 2013
EVERYONE WELCOME
For More information call Nancy Jordan (941) 468-5146

Complete & submit with entry fee to:
Sun Fiesta, c/o Nancy Jordan
641 Silk Oak Drive, Venice, FL 34293



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Address:

Email: Phone #:
4tS S






^o-e





:WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


DEATHS
FROM PAGE 4

Margaret Brands
Martin
Margaret Brands
Martin, 94, of Nokomis,
Fla., formerly of Princeton
Commons, Brick and Bay
Head, N.J., passed away
Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013,
at her home.
Margaret was born in
Jersey City, N.J., and had
resided in Elizabeth, be-
fore moving to Bay Head.
She wintered in Nokomis,
Fla., until moving there
full time in 1990.
She maintained a
summer residence in
Princeton Commons,
Brick, N.J.
Margaret, along with
her late husband, was a
former member of the
Elmora Country Club,
Elizabeth, N.J., and the
Mission Valley Country
Club, Venice, Fla.
Margaret was preceded
in death by her husband,
Lester C. Martin, whom
she had married in 1941,
in April of 1993; her
parents Charles and Jewel
Cahill Brands Sr.; and her
brothers Charles Brands
Jr., Arthur Brands, and
Kenneth Brands and her
sister Gwendolyn B. Serbe.
She is survived by her
many nieces and neph-
ews and their children.
Services: Relatives and
friends are invited to call
from 8:15 a.m. to 9 a.m.
onWednesday, Aug. 28,
2013, at the O'Brien
Funeral Home, 2028
Hwy 35 at New Bedford
Rd., Wall followed by a


Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. at St. Mark's
RC Church, 215 Crescent
Parkway, Sea Girt, NJ
08750. Burial will be in
St. Catharine's Cemetery,
Sea Girt.
Contributions: In lieu of
flowers the family requests
donations to the Macular
Degeneration Foundation,
PO. Box 531313,
Henderson, NV 89053.
For further informa-
tion or to forward
condolences to the
family please visit www.
ObrienFuneralHome.com.

Stanley C.
Parzych, Jr.
Stanley C. Parzych, Jr., 74,
ofVenice, Fla. (previously
ofEasthampton, Mass.),
passed away
peacefully
with family
by his side
on Friday,
-Aug. 23,
2013, in
Venice, Fla.,
after a series
of sudden health issues.
Stan was born on
March 4, 1939, to Stanley
and Mary (Kwiecienski)
Parzych. He was raised in
Easthampton, Mass.
In 1965, he married
Annmarie Archambault
of Springfield, Mass.,
and together they raised
their four children in
Easthampton, Mass.
He retired from Standex
International in 1999. Stan
and his wife then moved
to Venice, Fla., where he
enjoyed retirement in the
sunshine, playing golf,
beautifying his home and
woodworking. As foretold
by their wedding song,


Moon River, they were two
drifters who set off to see
the world.
Stan leaves his wife,
Annmarie, a brother,
Edward Parzych of
W Hartford, Conn., and
is preceded in death
by hist parents; and his
brother, Donald (Lefty).
He leaves three sons
and one daughter;
Michael and his wife,
Karyn, Matthew and his
fiance, Erin Lee; Maria
Sokol and her husband,
John, as well as Marco
and his wife, Courtney.
Stan's children blessed
him with 11 beautiful
grandchildren, who all
brought him great joy.
He will be remembered
as a gentle man, loving
husband, dedicated
father and wonderful
grandfather who gladly
helped family and friends
with all home projects.
Services: A Memorial
Mass was held at the
Epiphany Cathedral in
Venice, Fla.
Contributions:
Memorial contributions
may be made to Tidewell
Hospice of Sarasota, 5955
Rand Blvd., Sarasota, FL
34238.

Lowell Selders
Lowell Selders died
of dementia peacefully

Aug. 21,
2013,
with his
daughter
and son-in-
law by his
side under
hospice
care.
He was born in


Tecumseh, Mich., on
May 2, 1932. Lowell
Selders and his father
John Selders farmed not
only their land on (M-52)
Tecumseh, but all over
the Tecumseh area.
As a young boy and
wanting to start a family,
Lowell took his farming
equipment and started
digging basements and
laying pipes. He kept
expanding his business.
He got married to Marilyn
Crow of Adrian in 1952.
On their honeymoon,
they ventured to Sarasota,
Fla., meeting families who
were successful contrac-
tors. Lowell and wife soon
learned commuting and
working in both Michigan
and Florida was for them.
They purchased their first
home in Florida in 1953.
Kids soon came but
never stopped them from
commuting and becom-
ing entrepreneurs. When
Lowell wasn't expanding
his own businesses, his
greatest joy was helping
others either achieve their
dreams personally or
helping many young kids
start their own business.
Lowell was full of
practical jokes as well
as hugs and encourage-
ment when life would
get you down. He retired
in 1984 after 40 years
in the excavating and
asphalt business. He
stepped into all types of
other businesses to keep
himself busy: rentals, car
washes, gas stations, real
estate, and woodwork-
ing, just to name a few of
his talents until 2012.
Lowell lost the love of
his life, his wife Marilyn,


of 61 years in March of
2013.
He is survived by his
children, Terry L. Selders
(Renee) of Franklin,
N.C., Timothy L. Selders
(Kathy) of Temple City,
Calif., and Pamela J. Cook
(Les) ofVenice, Fla.; sis-
ters, Betty Johns of Mich.,
Bo Cramer of Mich.,
Marilyn Pashel of Mich.;
brothers, John Selders of
Fla. and Vernon Selders
of Ariz.; and grandchil-
dren, Jeremy Selders of
N. C., and Cali Selders of
Calif.. He was preceded
in death by his brother,
Wayne Selders, and
his parents, John and


SUN NEWSPAPERS 5A

Mildred Selders.
Services: Visitation will
be from 1:30-2 p.m. on
Friday, Aug. 30th, 2013, at
the Venice Church of the
Nazarene to be followed
by a funeral service.
Burial will be at Venice
Memorial Gardens.
Contributions:
Memorial donations to
Tidewell Hospice, 5955
Rand Blvd., Sarasota, FL
34238 or Manna Ministry,
Venice Church of the
Nazarene, 1535 East
Venice Avenue, Venice,
FL 34292.
Farley Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.


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Direct Phone Numbers: Wed. & Weekend Rate SUBSCRIBE TODAY! CUSTOMER
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Editor: Ron Dupont Jr. Periodicals Postage paid at Venice, SingleCopy POSTMASTER: Send addresschangestoVenice Gondolier Sun, 8 5 p.m.
President:Derek Dunn-Rankin Flrida and additional making centers. Wed. 75 Circulation Department, 200 E. Venice Ave, Venice FL 34285. Wed. 6a.m. 5p.m.
_________ President: DerekDunn-Rann_ Weekendorida and additional mailing centers. 7% Tax Included Foreign rates upon request Sat. 6 a.m. 11 a.m.









6A
WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 28, 2013


BUSINESS MATTERS


CONTACT US
RONALD DUPONT JR.
EDITOR
941-207-1218
rdupont@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


New Publix in North Venice is opening


By ROGER BUTTON
BUSINEWS COLUMNIST

Following years of
planning and nine
months construction, the
Publix anchor store of
the newVenezia shop-
ping center is opening in
North Venice tomorrow,
Thursday, Aug. 29.
Former shoppers at
the torn-down Publix on
U.S. 41 will not only be
surprised at the internal
size of this new store but
also will be welcomed by
faces of associates who
have joined a new team
at this location.
A grand opening takes
place at 8 a.m. tomorrow,
Thursday, Aug. 29 at this
new, state-of-the-art
Publix Supermarket.
It will be the 1,073rd
company store in the
group at 2438 Laurel
Road at the junction with
Pinebrook Road.
"We are very excited
to be in this area and as


a result, we have added
50 jobs to Venice, around
20 new associates to
this store," said Brian
West, the Media and
Community Relations
manager. "By coordinat-
ing existing associates
with new hires, we
perpetuate the Publix
culture of ensuring our
customers are the most
important thing to us."
For local residents, the
new in-store pharmacy
with the convenience of
a drive-thru lane will be
advantageous. The phar-
macist in charge, Sara
Reisdorf, starts with a
staff of three that will in-
crease as volume grows.
Although not a clinic,
they will offer vaccines
without appointments
for flu, pneumonia and
shingles shots.
Entering the store,
customers will see what
is becoming popular in
new store design the
circular barrel design


customer service desk.
To the right will be a
colorful floral display
and immediately in front
will be a flexible display
counter for promotional
items.
The layout of the floral,
bakery, deli, produce,
seafood and meat
departments around
the store perimeter offer
instant identification. An
entirely new addition for
Publix being debuted at
this store is the Bamboo
store package with
special pendant lighting,
d6cor and unique layout.
It's a pendant design of
their signature "Apron"
kiosk where an associate
demonstrates how to
prepare and cook meals
in 15 minutes, then lets
customers sample the
items. Recipe cards and
all the ingredients are
on an adjoining display
rack.
There are nine
check-out lines, and


approximately 105
Publix associates will
be employed at the
45,000-square-foot store.
It will open daily from
7 a.m. with the pharmacy
opening from 9 a.m.
Monday to Saturdays
and from 11 a.m. on
Sunday.
Publix is privately
owned and operated
by its 160,000 employ-
ees, with 2012 sales of
$27.5 billion. Currently,
Publix has 1,072 stores in
Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Alabama and
Tennessee.


-- r
... a.u
-r1


PHOTOS BY ROGER BUTTON
For cooking demonstrations,
Aimee Riedel, the district
meal specialist for"Apron,"
prepares the new style
Bamboo store package kiosk,
which has special pendant
lighting, d4cor and a unique
layout.


Chef Rolf upgrading Saltwater Cafe, inside and out


In a $500,000 project,
the Saltwater Caf6, 1071
Tamiami Trail North
in Nokomis, has just
completed an internal
refurbishment and is
fully operational, con-
firmed Chef RolfZahnd,
the owner. External work
continues and should be
completed in six weeks.
Internally, the whole
kitchen has been upgrad-
ed with state-of-the-art
equipment, new doors
and new paint. Duct
work and air condition-
ing have been upgraded.
In the dining room, the
wooden floor has been
redone, the interior has
been repainted and there
are new bathrooms.
The outside stucco
is being replaced,
awnings are being
replaced, new signage
is being fitted and the


landscaping is being
upgraded. It is open
daily from 11:30 a.m.; call
941-488-3775.

Ramada Operator
Bids for Springs
One of the two ap-
plicants seeking the
franchise to manage
Warm Mineral Springs
in North Port is A-Z
Hospitality of Sarasota.
They launched and
operate the new Ramada
Venice Resort Hotel,
450 U.S. 41 Bypass North
across from T.J. Maxx.

Lobster
Extravaganza
Labor Day weekend,
Thursday, Aug. 29,
through Monday,
Sept. 2, the Crow's Nest
Restaurant, Tavern and
Marina on the Venice
Inlet at the South Jetty
is featuring lobster pots
at the Crow's Nest, a tra-
ditional end-of-summer
weekend event. Seafood
is their specialty, and live
Maine lobsters will be
the featured dish, along
with littleneck clams, red
potatoes and farm-fresh


corn on the cob.
From their 1,200
award-winning cellar
wine selections, they
feature a "Lobster Wine
Flight" of California
Chardonnays all
weekend. Weekend
Tavern entertainment
will include Darrell
Lawhorne, Jimmy Bones
and the sax-piano duo of
"Straight Up" on Sunday,
all starting at 8:30 p.m.
Call 941-484-9551.

All About
Restaurants
Buying and selling
liquidated restaurant
equipment is the new
business opened by
Steven Smith and his
son, Steven Smith Jr.
Called Restaurant
Restore, the busi-
ness is located at 3449
Technology Drive in the
Vista Commerce Center
near PGT Industries.
Additionally, the
business offers com-
plete in-house design,
AutoCAD drawing, health
department paperwork,
licenses and bid sheet
preparations and equip-
ment packages utilizing


surplus or pre-owned
equipment for new
restaurant start-ups.
Within their restaurant
and showroom, they
have monthly open-to-
the-public auctions of
surplus factory scratch-
and-dents or used
equipment.
A native of Sarasota,
Smith spent 25 years
as a corporate chef
after attending culinary
school. He was executive
chef at Charlie's Crab on
St. Armands and subse-
quently opened restau-
rants for TGIFridays,
Bennigans and others.
He owned and operated
Caribbean Pie Company
in Sarasota until selling it
to attend drafting school,
later moving to Venice
to open this location.
The business is open
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; call
941-400-6118.

End of Summer
More than 50 shops
along the downtown
avenues, West Venice,
Tampa, Miami and
Nokomis, are celebrat-
ing the end of summer


with sales for the End of
Summer Sidewalk Sale.
It will be held on Friday
and Saturday, Sept. 6
and 7, from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. For details, call
941-484-6722.

Country Fest
Fans can enjoy the
Country Fest on Monday,
Sept. 2, Labor Day, at
Snook Haven, when
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
they will be entertained
by Evan Steele & Johnny
Country, Back Roads,
Critter Ridge, Kim Betts
& Gamble Creek Band
and the Grayson Rogers
Band. Admission is $10.

Gymnastics
Correction
The telephone of
Christina Brown's new
gym studio, Gator Tens
for Life at 2097 South
Tamiami Trail, near
Franks Theaters in the
Galleria Plaza in South
Venice, is 941-882-3032.
During construction and
upgrading of the shop-
ping center, large signs
indicate the entrances to
the businesses.


Qualified Retirees
Wanted
Experienced and
retired executives are
wanted by Manasota
SCORE to expand and
diversify the organiza-
tion's membership and
business mentoring
resources throughout
Sarasota and Manatee
counties.
The goal is to develop
a diverse group of
applicants for the
SCORE mentor training
program to increase ser-
vices to the area's entire
business community.
Women-owned busi-
nesses have received
many awards, and
SCORE is encouraging
women and minority
applicants to apply for
the mentor training pro-
gram. Contact Charles
Sax at 941-955-1029.
Editor's note: Service
and product information
in this column should not
be taken as an endorse-
ment of the business.
Send your news of a
new business opening, an
expansion, a relocation or
other significant event to
rogerbutton@verizon. net.


Gardens of Venice opens, expects 60-percent capacity soon


By ROGER BUTTON
BUSINEWS COLUMNIST

Retirement centers are
part of the community in
Venice and now there is
another.
An expert with a
wealth of experience
operating such facilities
said he saw there was a
need for a single story
facility in South Venice.
And that's how
Gardens of Venice came
into being.
Built on virgin soil on
what was a few years ago
to have been the U.S.
Postal Services facility
for SouthVenice, the
Gardens of Venice facility
is a purpose-built com-
bined retirement and
assisted living facility
at Jacaranda Boulevard,
said Zia Butt, CEO and
president of North Port
Retirement Centers.
When eventually full,
it will provide comfort-
able, convenient and
homelike services for
people as they are aging.
Further, the facility will
hire 60 people on an
almost $2 million annual
payroll.
"We are starting with
30 people who began


their working schedules
last week," he said.
"Costs ran over budget
to $14 million, including
the land purchase, but
we have, and are adding
more amenities."
The first 3 of 35
residents who made
reservations moved in
on the opening day.
Butt anticipates another
24 people who made
tentative reservations
but wanted to see the
location completed will
take up residence within
four months, taking a
total 60 percent of the
accommodations.
The total bed capac-
ity is for 150 people who
will occupy single bed-
rooms of approximately
490 square feet and suites
750 square feet with a
bedroom, living room and
lanai. Most resident driv-
ers can park vehicles by
their rooms with easy ac-
cess on the circular drive
around the diamond-
shaped building.
Entry and exit to the
location is controlled
by single access secu-
rity controlled gates
planned for installation
next week. Around and
throughout the facility,


there is 24-hour secu-
rity with cameras and a
monitored system. It is
an all-gated community;
no one can leave from
the premises except
through the front gates.
Entering the front
doors leads to a spacious,
well-appointed reception
area with impressive
chandeliers. Decorating
the walls are masterpiece
oil paintings. Doors lead
to the centrally enclosed
tropical style gardens
and a relaxing climate-
controlled inner patio.
Thick, plush carpets
identify the thorough-
fares throughout the
complex. There are four
libraries and four dining
rooms and a special fam-
ily or business private
dinner room. Visiting
families initially may
have the opportunity to
stay there, but eventu-
ally when the complex
is fully operational, they
will take advantage of
discounted rates at select
local hotels.
The all-inclusive priced
program includes three
meals daily with snacks
available. Specialty items
like ice cream can be
requested 24 hours a day.


SUN PHUIU BY NUGLE BU I ION
In the spacious reception area of the Gardens of Venice, a retirement and assisted living center,
are (I-r) Zia Butt, president & CEO; Venissa Driggers, marketing director; Penney Messier, LPN
facility manger; and Kristian Dunda, chief operating officer.


The menu is designed for
nutritional needs. Butt
has found from experi-
ence that as some people
age, they do not eat
appropriate meals.
"The assisted living
is already here, and we
are just waiting for the
license," Butt said.
Activities are a big por-
tion of our business, said
Kristina Dunda, chief


operating officer. A full
time activities director
is arranging art and pet
therapy, outside shop-
ping tours and beach
trips, as well as trips to
local attractions.
Additional facilities
include a doctors visiting
room, an exercise room
designed by a physical
therapist with bicycle, row-
ing and motion machines.


Facility manager is
Penney Messier, LPN,
who will always have
an LPN and RN on
duty 24 hours. Venissa
Driggers is the marketing
director. The chef and
two cooks together with
a full staff began shift
working during the orien-
tation period prior to
residents moving in. For
details, call 941-497-0650.





WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


MUDGE
FROM PAGE 1
It coped with the end
of pilot training at the
Venice Army Air Base fol-
lowingWorldWar II, and
the decision of Ringling
Bros. and Barnum &
Bailey Circus not to
use Venice as its winter
headquarters any longer
in the '90s.
Most notoriously, after
Sept. 11, 2001, Venice
became known as the
place where three of the
terrorist pilots learned to
fly, and community lead-
ers were worried that the


FLASHER
FROM PAGE 1
There he was, located
at the first place they
looked sitting under
a covered picnic table
near the boat ramp at
Marina Park drinking


COUNCIL
FROM PAGE 1
Concerned the city
of Venice is poisoning
its relationship with
Sarasota County, a
number of Holic peers
made the same argument
at Tuesday's council
meeting in Venice.
"We are perceived in
Venice as, quite frankly,
being arrogant and
attacking," Council
Member Kit McKeon
said. "I'm seeing there is
some pushback."
"While I feel there may
be some merit, I feel we
are going about it in the
wrong manner. "
Council Member Bob
Daniels, not one to shy
away from the media
limelight, agreed it may
be time to workshop the
idea, and not only about
recouping expenses, but
the larger discussion


city's reputation would
be forever tarnished by
the horrific events of that
day.
But Venice was no
more responsible for the
actions of the terrorists
than it is for the antics
of the flashers who
have been in the news
recently, and its connec-
tion to 9/11 is now no
more than a footnote in
history.
And this isn't remotely
the first time nudity
and sexual behavior at
Venice's beaches
have made headlines.
Caspersen Beach pe-
riodically gets into the
news, usually for a law

a beer with another
man.
McNulty said they
recognized Moss from
his photo and called in
another officer to make
the arrest.
In recent weeks, there
were several reports
of lewd and lascivious
incidents in which males

about whether the city
wants to have its own fire
and police departments.
"(Let's) take this out
of the public forum and
take this to a workshop
and hammer this out ...
to really lay it out on the
line."
He also backed the
mayor's quest for infor-
mation, and his sense
of urgency in making
something happen.
"We owe it to our
citizens to come up with
those numbers (true
costs to provide services)"
Daniels said. "I'm here to
say, today, I think we have
a crisis on our hands."


SAVE $$$SS$

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Classifieds


enforcement sting op-
eration aimed at sexual
activity on the trails away
from the beach.
Over the last several
years, there have been far
more arrests for indecent
exposure or solicitation
of sex there than at the
beaches themselves. The
flashers just decided to
take to a more public
venue.
Somewhat ironically,
for years the far southern
portion of Caspersen
Beach has been in-
formally considered
clothing-optional. It's
even touted as such on
websites, though the
efforts of the Suncoast

exposed themselves to
females downtown and
at local beaches. Venice
police apprehended
William Waldman a
week earlier for exposing
himself to women on the
beach.
Two other flashing
incidents in the area
of the Venice Avenue

Holic defended his
proposals, but backed
down, at least for the
time being, in deference
to council's comments.
"I'm not frustrated with
council," he said, "I'm
frustrated with the sys-
tem. Other counties have
come up with a solution.
I'm remiss if I don't bring
(this) to your attention.
It's almost impossible to
talk about this subject
without ruffling some-
one's feathers.
"There are two ways to
address the budget. I'm


Naturists group to get
a formal designation to
that effect have failed so
far despite arguments
that it would attract
tourists who share their
interest.
Whatever attraction
it might be to nudists,
no one is going to add
Venice to their list of
vacation or retirement
spots if they think they'd
run a significant risk
of being accosted by a
pantsless man pleasuring
himself.
That risk is back to
minimal now, with all
three suspected flashers
having been arrested and
facing prosecution. The

Bridge and another
incident in the area
of the Hatchett Creek
(north) Bridge occurred.
At another incident
at Kilwin's Ice Cream
store on West Venice
Avenue on Aug. 12, he
was captured by nearby
security video.
A police officer was

tired of cutting expenses.
If not here, where else
are we going to make up
revenue? ... Start think-
ing about where you're
going to raise taxes."
Council Member
Jeanette Gates agreed
a new approach is
needed.
"I don't think anybody
is saying we roll over. We
all said we need to find
another way to go about
this. There is another
way. We're smart enough
to figure this out."
Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


adverse publicity the city
has gotten also carries
the message that this
type of conduct is treated
very seriously, so would-
be flashers are probably
going to give this area a
pass.
With no flashers at
large, publicity will die
down. It didn't even
spread that far to begin
with. Yes, Venice's plight
got a mention in the
New York Post, but don't
expect another one. At
most, these stories merit
an entry in the South
Florida Sun Sentinel's
FloriDUH file, which
is not among the most
researched sources for

able to tie the video to a
name.
McNulty said he and
Mattmuller spend some
time on patrol as part of
their daily routine.
Moss is the third
person to be arrested
for exposing himself in
public over the past few
months. He was charged


SUN NEWSPAPERS 7A
people contemplating a
visit to Venice.
The city's eternal
charms warm weather,
the Gulf and its beaches,
restaurants, cultural
amenities and so much
more will quickly
reassert themselves as
reasons to come here,
and the actions of City
Council will reclaim the
headlines. The identities
of the flashers will be
promptly forgotten, if
they aren't already.
And we will all be back
to enjoying the Venice we
know and love includ-
ing the beaches.
Email: bmudge@venicegondolier.com

with lewd and lascivious
behavior.
McNulty said he didn't
believe Moss was a
copycat flasher.
"I don't believe he had
any inkling the other guy
(Waldman) was doing,"
McNulty said.
Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


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PUBLISHER
TIM SMOLARICK
PHONE: 941-207-1010
FAX: 941-484-8460
8A
WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 28, 2013


OPINION


GONDOLIER SUN EDITOR
RONALD DUPONT JR.
PHONE: 941-207-1218
rdupont@venicegondolier.com


SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR VIEW


County'house' could look shoddy if care is not taken


Sarasota County Commissioner
Christine Robinson waved a
huge red flag last week when she
warned that county spending could be
unsustainable only a couple of years
down the road.
The message was clear: Unless com-
missioners kept spending increases
in check, property owners could be
facing tax hikes in the near future -
something nobody welcomes.
We appreciate the caution. Although
the flag may be more yellow than red,
we do believe prudence is justi-
fied, especially when it comes to an
impending $8 million windfall.
On Tuesday, commissioners are
expected to finalize an earlier vote to
cut the disaster-reserve fund from 90
to 75 days of operating costs. The tax
money sits in reserve to be used to
deal with emergencies like hurricanes.
Ninety days is on the far edge of


accepted practice. In our view, 75 days
in reserve seems sufficient.
But what to do with the extra
$8 million?
There are a number of options. The
county could use it to offset future
deficits. It could divert the money to
delayed road-paving projects or fix
up ball fields. It also could also use a
portion to build new facilities.
The latter has been urged by County
Commissioner Joe Barbetta, a vocal
champion of investment in sports
facilities for economic development.
We welcome Barbetta's position and
have long believed new facilities can
drive increased sports tourism, which
increases tourist and sales taxes while
drawing more visitors and second-
home buyers.
We do wonder, though, whether this
isn't the time to step back and sit out
a couple of plays. The latest proposal


is to build a Super Cross track at the
county's BMX park. The facility, at a
projected cost of roughly $1 million,
could attract more bike racers from
around the country. Another proposal
calls for $25,000 to study the feasibility
of a youth baseball complex at Babe
Ruth fields near Robart's Arena.
It's not a lot of money, especially com-
pared to the tens of millions already
spent to refurbish Ed Smith Stadium
and build the new Benderson Park row-
ing facility. But is it the right time?
County commissioners voted last
week to spend $20,000 for a boat
needed for races at Benderson Park.
More boats will be needed in the
future. How about a private sponsor?
The commission also has pledged
$2.6 million toward the world rowing
championships.
Robinson pointed out that econom-
ic uncertainty reserves which were


well-managed throughout the reces-
sion were now projected to run
out in a couple of years. Projections
showed a $22 million shortfall for the
2016-2017 fiscal year.
Many things can change before
then; past projections proved to be
overly conservative. A steeper rise in
property values and construction of
new homes, hotels and the Benderson
mega-mall near the rowing park -
will help balance the books.
But caution is needed, balance is
needed. Infrastructure maintenance
delayed by the recession is also a form
of economic development. It's not
flashy, but put it off too long and your
home eventually becomes shabby and
unattractive.
After years of cuts to staff and
programs, costs are rising and they
are rising faster than revenues. Careful
please.


Our problems seem


trivial in comparison


Jp-~


I watched a short video of
what appeared to be actual
footage of a bank robbery tak-
ing place in Detroit. The first
images on the screen were of
masked men; there were three,
I think, running from the bank
entrance and all three finding a
way into the escape vehicle.
Immediately, there were
several police cars screeching
to a halt in front of the vehicle
and 10 or 15 feet off to the
side of the getaway car. Police
officers began emerging from
their vehicles with weapons
drawn; my first thought was
that there was going to be
a shoot-out between police
and robbers, causing serious
injury.
The officers, with weapons
drawn, ran right past the
getaway car and straight into
the bank while the getaway car
gently maneuvered through
the police vehicles and once
past, calmly drove off. The
police officers then rushed
outside looking up and down
the street and as if they were
confused.
Innocent bystanders now
began looking at them as if all
hope in humanity exited the
world due to their mishap. This
scene was supposed to have
occurred in Detroit, Michigan.
Being a skeptic of the
Internet and all that comes
with it, I realized there was a
solid chance that what I just
watched was nothing more
than modern age technology
being manipulated by some-
one wanting the world to see
something untrue.
However, the video did
reinforce that while some cities
have rather large problems,
our own little corner of the
world is doing okay.


While our own fair city from
time to time has issues, some
crime and political nonsense,
we are in fact darn lucky to
live and trade in this area.
But I do have a few quick
messages for the Venice City
Council.
Hey, Council! Build a garage,
back them in, bus them or
leave parking as is for those
who wish to visit our shops
and attractions here in Venice.
Either way, we should be proud
that people keep coming back
to see us, time after time. Get
this fixed and move on.
I am hearing hundreds of
thousands of tax dollars will be
spent studying parking issues?
We can't figure this out on our
own really?
Hey, Council! Pay the county,
pay the sheriff and pay the
hometown police department.
Whatever we are doing, it
is working. While there are
always poor decisions being
made by good people, Venice
is not considered the crime
capital of Florida.
Let's quit bickering and keep
it that way. I lived in Tampa
and can tell you all about
crime and the effect it has on
a soul. Do what needs to be
done to keep us safe.
Hey, Council, the beaches
and other attractions are a
vital part of our existence. Let's
make sure we fix the issues
facing our beaches today for
both us and future generations
to enjoy. Pay attention to long-
term solutions, not just quick
fixes as decisions made have
great impact on us all.
Venice is a beautiful city with
beautiful beaches; please let's
keep it that way.
Additionally, while you
did not create the pension
problem, you were elected
as officials to handle these
sorts of issues. Find the best
solution to the problem,
implement it and move on to
the next issue that needs your
attention.
Hey, Council! Our issues
aren't near as bad as Detroit,
Michigan's seem to be. Ours
should be easy to fix.
Tim Smolarick is publisher of
the Gondolier Sun.


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give the writer's address and telephone number for verification. Letters of more
than 250 words may be edited for length. We do not publish letters that condemn
or praise business service. We do not publish poetry, open letters or letters to third
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rdupont@venicegondolier.com. For more information, call 941-207-1000.


SHOULD VENICE KEEP ITS OWN POLICE DEPARTMENT? OR LET THE COUNTY TAKE OVER?
CALL US AT 941-207-1111.


Evacuation plans. It looks
like Venice High School is well
on its way to reality. It's getting
a big wow from the local
newspapers performing
arts, that's a big wow. However,
one thing that's never been
mentioned is the same facil-
ity serving as an evacuation
center. It never seems to be
discussed. Why shouldn't it
serve as a center? It's a natural.
We've got a performing arts
center. Why doesn't it also say
shelter? North Port did it, why
not Venice? The Venice City
Council was led to believe
that the grade school would
become a center. That never
happened. Ninety-five percent
of the students and staff have
to cross the bridges twice a
day. Talk about planning. Only
in Venice.
Politics. In response to one
of your readers in your paper,
I'm glad I'm a Republican
because when you look at the
nation today, the Democrats
sure made a mess of it.
Parking. Just calling to
tell you that I agree with the
parking editorials that you had
in the paper today. It looks like
the best idea I've heard so far.
Parking and walking. I tend
to agree with the editorial
on the parking garage, that it
has to be done. An additional
problem that we have in the
downtown area, especially
during the winter season, is
that too many people still do
not understand the purpose
and the rules of a crosswalk.
Therefore, you end up in
intersections where everybody
is stopped in every direction
even though there are no
pedestrians present. And
people also need to realize
that if a pedestrian is 10 feet
away from the road, you don't
have to stop and wait for them
to get to the crosswalk, for
goodness sakes. It wouldn't
hurt some of these people to
go ahead and let the traffic
go past them once in a while,
either.


Let 'em


Have It
Make garage smaller.
The parking lot should only
contain the three blocks
that the city owns. It should
not include the Pattison
Building parking lot. It they
eliminated the parking on
the business side of Venice
Avenue, it would allow the
bicycles to ride down that
part of the street and not on
the sidewalk, which I think is
dangerous.
Garage on East Tampa.
Regarding the parking garage,
wouldn't a better place be
at East Tampa Avenue down
toward the Intracoastal where
there is a large area of land
that's already vacant. People
could use that parking garage
and walk to downtown. It
wouldn't involve putting a
huge three story garage right in
the downtown section. That's
my opinion.
All for garage. Calling about
the downtown garage. Been
here going on 20 years, and
I think it is the greatest idea
that anyone's come up with
so far. I love back-in parking. I
do back-in parking whenever I
can, but this garage and open-
ing up Venice in a few years
to no cars at all is just a great


idea. I hope the city and the
residents go for it. Fantastic
article!
Yes to garage. I'm in agree-
ment with the parking garage
proposal. I also think we
should do a tasteful parking
garage in front of the post
office on Venice island. It
would be a boost to the Venice
economy and to the tourist
attraction down here. People
can't come to Venice because
there's no place to park! It's a
chief complaint when we have
guests here. Please! Please!
Let's get this done. Let's make
it happen. I've lived in Venice
for 25 years.
Parking garage a good idea.
If there's money for a parking
garage, that's the way to go.
As the parking garage article
pointed out, for those walking
or sitting on a bench, they'll
have a more pleasant environ-
ment to deal with. One of the
council members mentioned
how backing into a parking
space is the same as the first
move made when parallel
parking. I believe there are far
more bad parallel parkers than
good ones. Traffic will be at a
standstill with only one lane
and will be a factor in how
many 911 calls will be made
when our senior population
experiences road rage under
this parking scheme.

The Let'em Have It line al-
lows readers to sound off on is-
sues of local interest. Opinions
expressed here are solely those
of the callers. Personal attacks
on private individuals; attacks
on or commercials for specific
businesses; local candidate
endorsements or attacks during
election season; or opinions or
comments otherwise unfit for
publication will not be printed.
If you would like to participate,
call the line at 941-207-1111.
Call no more than once a week.
Please keep your comments
brief The line is available all
hours. Caller identification is
not required.


THINK WE WILL LEARN TO /NOT SURE WHAT YOU MEAN,
WRITE IN "CURSIVE" THIS I BUT I THINK MY FATHER
YEAR? SPEAKS IN CURSIVE WHEN
HE WATCHES THE NEWS












'Xe" / A1 10




WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


Plenty of turtle hatchlings on area beaches


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD -While
maybe not a record-setting
year, Manasota Key and
other local Gulf beaches,
like the rest of Florida, are
seeing a plentiful sea turtle
nesting season.
"By now in the
turtle season, nesting has
slowed to a trickle, but
nearly every night, hatch-
lings are emerging from
the sand and scrambling
to the Gulf," Wilma Katz
reported. Katz and Zoe
Bass are state primary
permit holders oversee-
ing the Coastal Wildlife
Club's volunteer sea turtle
patrols on Manasota Key.
Sea turtle nesting season
starts May 1 and ends
Oct. 31.
With a few sea turtles
still lumbering onto
beaches and nests hatch-
ing, Katz asked, "For their
safety, it's vital to continue


keeping the beaches dark,
free of holes, and free of
beach furniture and other
obstacles in their path to
the water."
According to the
Coastal Wildlife Club,
as of Aug. 16, sea turtle
patrols identified 2,619
loggerhead sea turtle
nests on Manasota Key.
Last year during the same
time period, 3,031 logger-
heads nested. However,
the wildlife club reports
far more green sea turtles
nesting, 66 compared to
three last year during the
same time period.
On Don Pedro and
Knight islands where
Brenda Bossman is the
primary permit holder, she
reported, "We had a new
nest (Sunday). Up to 283
loggerheads and 17 greens.
"That's a grand total
of 300! That's quite a few
nests for a two-mile stretch
(of beach)," she stated in
an email. "Our hatching


rates are good this year.
We're getting a better suc-
cess rate with the hatching
of nests so far."
On Little Gasparilla
Island, Linda Soderquist
reported 101 loggerhead
nests.
"Hatches are late,"
Soderquist said. "Must be
the huge amount of rain,
cooling down the nests."
Both Bossman and
Soderquist said several
nests sustained preda-
tion from coyotes last
week. Raccoons, arma-
dillos and other wildlife
are known to dig up and
prey on sea turtle eggs.
"Red ant predation has
been bad this year, espe-
cially for nests high up
in the dunes," Bossman
said. "The red ants will
kill hatchlings as they try
to emerge from nests."
From Venice north
to Longboat Key, Mote
Marine Laboratory over-
sees sea turtle nesting. As


of Aug. 24, Mote reported
2,236 loggerhead nests, of
which 892 were on Casey
Key and 316 in Venice.
Mote also reported 30
green sea turtle nests,
compared to six nests in
2012.
The enthusiasm heard
by local sea turtle patrols is
being echoed by the state.
According to the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,
researchers at Florida's
three National Estuarine
Research Reserves in
Naples, Apalachicola in
the Panhandle and Ponte
Vedra Beach on the East
Coast have reported
that this year's sea turtle
nesting season is the
second highest on record
- a total of 861 nests
- in the three reserves.
The FDEP also reported
higher counts of green sea
turtle nests this year in the
reserves.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


Homelessness expert

in Venice Friday


STAFF REPORT
Dr. Robert Marbut, a
renowned homelessness
expert, will host a commu-
nity conversation at Venice
Community Center, 326
S. Nokomis Ave., 2-4 p.m.,
Friday, Aug. 30.
He will speak about
his experiences working
with communities across
the country to help them
combat homelessness.
During a question-and-
answer session, the
public is encouraged to
provide Marbut with their
ideas on how to deal with
the issue of homelessness
in Sarasota County and
the municipalities.
The city of Sarasota
and Sarasota County
contracted with Marbut
to develop a strategic ac-
tion plan to evaluate and
improve the efficiency
and organization of


homeless service provid-
ers throughout Sarasota
County.
The scope of work dur-
ing Marbut's four-month
contract is divided into
phases: conducting
on-site visits of homeless
services in the county; a
needs assessment; gap
analysis (gap between
the inventory vs. actual
needs); strategic fram-
ing (in-person meetings
with stakeholder groups
including homeless
individuals); drafting
a strategic action plan;
comments and best
practices briefings; and
presenting a complete
action plan to the city
and county.
For more information,
contact the Sarasota
County Call Center at
941-861-5000, or visit
SCGov.net.


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SUN NEWSPAPERS 9A








10A
WEDNESDAY SPORTS
AUGUST 28, 2013


CONTACT US
ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR
941-207-1107
rsmith@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL



Richards'serve leads Indians past Pirates


By ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR

Since last Thursday,
Venice Head Volleyball
Coach Brian Wheatley has
begun practice scrim-
mages with his starters
already trailing 12-0. The
idea is for the Indians to
come out ready from the
first point on.
Tuesday, in Venice's
season opener against
Braden River, the Indians
scored the first eight
points of the match,
displaying the sense of
urgency their coach is
hoping to develop.
Venice (1-0) swept
the Pirates 25-11, 25-18,
25-21 thanks in large part
to a dominant serving
performance. The Indians
had 12 team aces, includ-
ing five by sophomore
Hannah Richards.
"A strong serve is your
best defense," Wheatley
said. "There's a reason she
started off serving for us.
She sets the tone."
Richards also had nine
kills. Lauren Mattmuller


A-
Left to right: Hannah Richards, Liz Leone and Gen Beaumier celebrate a point during the Indians'
win over Braden River.

added eight kills and two Venice High state cham- "We'd love to see a
blocks. pionship team and won great crowd come out for
The Indians will play state player of the year the last match here," he
their final match in honors. said.
the Teepee Wednesday Wheatley said there will Venice's next home
evening when they host also be a mystery guest match after Wednesday's
Cardinal Mooney. The server to open the match, will be Sept. 18, when
Cougars are coached by and encouraged the the Indians play Jensen
Kristen Batt, who was community to send the Beach in the new gym.
a member of the 1998 Teepee out in style. Email: RSmith@VeniceGondolier.com


Sophomore Hannah Richards had nine kills and five aces for
Venice.


HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL



Indians take on tough Tigers defense in opener


By ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR

With few errors to
correct from last week's
42-7 preseason thrashing
of Southeast, the Venice
Indians are spending
the days leading up to
Friday's season opener
at Palmetto making sure
they're still in shape.
Lightning prevented
the Indians from practic-
ing most of last week,
and the starters didn't see
much playing time after
Venice built a 35-point
halftime lead against the
Seminoles.
Indians head coach
John Peacock said, "We're
going to condition a
little more on Tuesday
and Wednesday than we
normally do."
Venice will likely need
its regulars for all four
quarters Friday, particu-
larly on offense.
The Tigers, who return
nine starters on defense
from last year's 8-2 team,
limited Riverview to 13
points last week despite
the fact that Palmetto's
offense gained just 38
yards on the night. Rams
running back Karan
Higdon ran for 193 yards,
but it took him 36 carries
to do so.


As sharp as the Indians
offense looked against
Southeast, they're taking
a big step up in competi-
tion Friday.
"Palmetto's got a big,
fast, athletic defensive
line," Peacock said. "Their
secondary looks pretty
sharp and their lineback-
ers can play. They're
gonna be a good football
team."
Quarterback Dom
Marino was 10-for-10
for 197 yards and two
touchdowns in his
Venice debut, and will
look to build on that
performance with his
uncle Palmetto head
coach Dave Marino -
across the field. It will be
the third uncle-nephew
matchup between the
two, dating back to the
younger Marino's time at
Riverview.
"It's always fun," Dom
said Friday. "He won't
take it easy on me and
I won't take it easy on
him."
Peacock said senior
running back Terry Polk
might be better than he
was in 2012, when he ran
for more than 1,800 yards.
"Polk looked very
sharp," he said. "He
looked a little faster than
he was last year, and


he was making sharper
cuts."
The Venice defense,
meanwhile, will be
focused on bottling up
Tigers running back Josh
Hicks, a Rutgers commit.
The senior ran for 86
yards on nine carries (in-
cluding a 45-yard score)
against Venice in the
teams' 2012 preseason
matchup.
Palmetto doesn't have
much of a passing attack,
as the Tigers lost their
top four receivers to
graduation. They didn't
earn a first down against
Riverview until the third
quarter.
"If we stop the run,
we're gonna be in good
shape," Peacock said. "If
we give (Hicks) any space,
he's got a chance to take it
to the house every time."
The Indians will
receive a stiffer test than
Southeast provided, but
Venice's defense matches
up favorably here and the
Indians' success contain-
ing Southeast's Courtney
Allen makes it hard to
believe Hicks will find
much running room.

Prediction: Venice
27, Palmetto 7
Email: RSmith@VeniceGondolier.com


Above: Offensive guard Jesse
Tinkler opens a hole for
running back Brandon Davis.


SUN PHOTOS BY ROB SMITH
At left: Wide receiver Langston
Provitt catches a pass as
Venice works on its two-
minute drill during practice
Monday.


Vikings win three of four against Hornets


STAFF REPORT Jr. Pee Wee: Venice
Vikings Knights 42,
Mitey Mite: Venice Cypress Hornets 14
Vikings Kings 25,
Cvoress Hornets 6


- Ir - -- - -.
Martin Ramos, Damon
Wilson, Dalton Carter
and Carson Smith all
scored on runs behind
the blocking of Alijah
Fissel, Tyler Kisgen,
Dylan Robertson, Hogan
Hays, Jonathan Simmons
and Noah Foster.
The defense, led by
Eric Beck, Kisgen, Ramos,
Williams and Berg,
forced two turnovers.
Kade Slaton, Carson
Smith, Larry Shannon
and Jeremiah Pachota
contributed to the strong
defensive effort.
Next week the Kings
are home again against
the Fort Myers Firecats at
11 a.m.


Pee Wee: Cypress
Hornets 13, Venice
Vikings Lancers 0
The Venice Lancers
held their own against
the Cypress Hornets in
the Peewee division. The
Hornets scored on two
break-away plays, but
the Lancers' defense held
them on the other drives.
The final score was 13-0.

Jr. Midgets:
Venice Vikings
Crusaders 8,
Cypress Hornets 0
Cypress was poised to
strike first after a 60-yard
run took the visitors to


the 1-yard line. A goal-line
stand led by a sack from
Jake Meyers and a deflect-
ed pass in the endzone by
Noah Constantino turned
the ball back over to the
Crusaders.
Venice finally got on the
board with 5:18 left in the
fourth quarter on a 12-yard
scamper byXavier Cruz.
Trent Tarala kicked the extra
point to put Venice up 8-0.
The ensuing onside kick
led to a 15-yard penalty
which gave Cypress the
ball at Venice's 35. After a
212-hour lightning delay,
the Crusaders line an-
chored by Noah Lay, Scott
Schenke, Derrick Kipp
and Taner Nicol stuffed
the visitors with no gain
and ran out the clock.

Midgets:
postponed
due to weather.


COURTESY PHOTO


Crusaders running back Xavier Cruz blocks for quarterback Noah Lay.





:WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


Some readers turn to
the Sports pages for the
heroics of the young
- and there's so much
greatness and achieve-
ment to celebrate there!
But sports enthusiasts
who are also able to
celebrate the gutsy hero-
ics of the elderly will take
heart from today's golf
tales.
Let's start with Dave,
75. He tells me as we get
started that I'll have to
drive the golf cart be-
cause if he drives, his left
leg is exposed to more
sun than is good for it.
"You've heard how I
had cancer of the jaw
and they rebuilt it from
my tibia, right?" he asks.
"Sure. Seems like it's
working out well..."
"Oh, yeah, it's great.
Especially since they
were able to implant new
teeth in the jawbone. But
see here on my left leg,
down on the outside of
the calf? See that shiny
patch of skin?"
It's about ten inches
long, three inches wide.
"It's very delicate
skin," Dave says. "I'm
supposed to protect it
from too much sunburn.
That's why I'm asking
you to drive. Of course
I'd be happy to drive
otherwise."
"Of course," I say, and
shake my head in amaze-
ment and process this
story about the trials of
a senior golf warrior and
the wonders of modern
live-forever technology.
"You know what that
skin is made of?" Dave
asks.
"No."
"It's babies' foreskins."
"What?"
"That's right. Foreskins
of baby boys. They col-
lect them in hospitals.
Make very good skin
transplants. ..."
Then, without skip-
ping a beat: "I'd say
you've got about a
seven iron left from here,
Mark."
I Googled the sub-
ject later, and Dave
wasn't pulling my leg.
Babies foreskins are a
great source for skin
transplants.
Think you've had as
much geriatric joy as you
can take? Tony, 86, is a
tough old World War II
vet who's still out there
"breaking his age"; in his
case, he's got to hit 85 or
better.
Tony is a working-class


guy, a John Wayne-style
man's man, a genuine
hero who landed on
Normandy Beach two
weeks after D-Day,
fought his way toward
Germany in the Battle
of The Bulge, then built
and blew up bridges in
Germany, Austria and
Northern Italy in an
engineering brigade.
The day before I play
with Tony, he volunteers
to re-grip my clubs.
In his workshop, I see
his powerful back and
shoulders sweating
profusely. He's got the
club shaft in a vise on
his work table and he's
slicing the old grip with
a razor knife. This is a
man of 86 years with
all kinds of medical
problems, but he's still
got tremendous physical
power, concentration


and determination.
The next morning
on the first tee, I see he
doesn't take much of
a backswing but puts
the ball 150 yards down
the middle. "Down the
middle Tony ... that's
what we call him," his
buddy volunteers.
So here we are: he can't
get anywhere near a full
backswing, his eyes tear
up with macular degen-
eration so that "floaters"
sometimes make his
ball look like an egg, he's
wearing Depends under
his shorts since, as he
told me last night, he
had bad prostate surgery
20 years before and
we're starting out on
a round of golf on a
95-degree Florida day.
Ready for the senior
heroics? The knockout
punch?


On the fourth hole,
Tony goes into a bath-
room and emerges with
the front of his shorts
dampened by urine.
"P-pad opened up," he
explains.
Thinking he may be
too embarrassed to
continue, I ask, "Do you
carry an extra in your
bag?" In the car?"
"No, I'm fine," Tony
says. "It'll dry out."
And guess what? On
the next hole, a 180-yard
par three, he hits 150 up
the middle and then
chips in from 30 yards
out for a birdie two!
I guess once you've
survived so many bigger
battles, there's nothing
much to be ashamed
of nothing, really, to
hide.
"Great birdie, Tony!"
Email: MarkPoetryl@Gmail.com


SPORTS BRIEFS GOLF SCORES


Golf's old magic:



The heroics of the elderly


Real Local News in
The REAL Local Newspaper.


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Meet-and-greet
with VHS football
coach
VHS head football
coach John Peacock
will hold a meet-and-
greet with Indians fans
at the Venice Daiquiri
Deck Thursday evening
at 6 p.m. Peacock will
appear on "Talking
Venice Indians Football"
with host Rich "Spitz"
Spedaliere live every
Thursday at the Daiquiri
Deck from 6-7 p.m. There
will be specials for ap-
petizers and raffle prizes.

Football season
tickets, all-sports
passes for sale
Venice High School
football reserved seat
season tickets and adult
all-sports passes are for
sale at the Boone Law
Firm, 941-488-6716, 1001
Avenida del Circo, Venice.
Football season tickets are
$36, individual all-sports
passes are $60 and family


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* Monday, August 26
Lake Venice Golf Club
Monday Group, Quota Points
1: Butch Urhahn, Dom Spigarelli, Tony
Moreira & Rich Nicholas (-1)
Individuals: Tony Moreira (+4), Bob Joyce
(+3), Ron Longley (+3), Butch Urhahn (+2),
Neal Clauser (+1)

* Tuesday, August 27
Jacaranda West Country Club
18-Hole Ladies, Guys & Dolls (2 BB of 4)
1: Joann Myers, Mary Ellen Snell, Ethel
Molezzi, Kyle Skog (-17)
Jills,Three Clubs&a Putter
1: Evelyn Kent (40)
2: Myriam Murphy(45)
3:JaneWinn, Bru Murawski &Virginia Skra-
bak (50)


all-sports passes are $150.

VHS boys soccer
meeting Aug. 28
There will be an informa-
tional meeting for any stu-
dent athlete interested in
trying out for the VHS boys
soccer team. The meeting
will be held Wednesday,
Aug. 28, after school at
2:45 p.m. in Building 3,
Room 132, of the new gym.
For more information, visit
VeniceHighSchoolSoccer.
com.


SUN NEWSPAPERS 11A


Tr.S





WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


By ROGER BUTTON
BUSINEWS COLUMNIST
The designers at Tervis
in North Venice wasted
no time in introducing
their latest product the
Goblet.
A wine glass within a
tumbler would to some
seem impossible but not for
the new product develop-
ment team, a relatively new
addition to the company's
staff that was set up less
than two years ago.
They have the respon-
sibility to come up with
new ideas and the execu-
tion of those items.
"For the laid-back
consumer, the Tervis
goblet delivers a portable
drinking solution, great
for wine, sangria and
margaritas because it
is fun drinkware for
outdoor entertaining,
poolside parties, tailgat-
ing and more," said Kim
Livengood, the director of
Public Relations & Events.
Available in a 16-ounce
size, the goblet is pro-
moted for entertaining


PHOTO PROVIDED BY TERVIS
Making its debut this week is the goblet from Tervis, the latest
novel design of their iconic tumbler.


fun. Standing almost 8
inches tall, the inner stem
is shaped as a goblet for a
touch of class and a dash
of whimsy. It is available
in nine designs with a
price tag of $20.
This week, it was intro-
duced on Tervis.com and
in the company stores. It
will be available at select
stores, including Bealls


and Bed, Bath & Beyond.
Initially, the goblet
shape is being manufac-
tured in the original, clear-
view plastic. According to
Livengood, there are plans
for additional designs as
well as colors.
"Expect to see more
exciting new products
from Tervis in the future,"
she said.


See the unexpected


- a goblet in a glass


PROVIDED BY CHARLOTTE
COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office's Marine
Patrol Unit cited three
men recently for having
possession of more than
the legal limit of sharks
on board their boat.
The Marine Patrol Unit
was patrolling the area
of the Placida boat ramp
near the Boca Grande
Causeway recently when
they encountered Dale L.
Money, 72, and James D.
Money, 33, both of the 600
block of Chamber Street
in Port Charlotte, and
Victor T. Glynn Jr., 33, of
Oklahoma. The three men
were loading their boat
onto a trailer.
The deputies asked


and 30 inches long. The
limit in Florida for coastal
sharks is one shark per
person on the boat.
Each man was issued
a notice to appear in
court for violation of
being over the bag limit.
Three of the sharks were
seized and destroyed.


RICHARD'S'

[mq :1i t


The Charlotte County Sheriff's Office cited three men for
reportedly having more than the legal limit of sharks near
the Boca Grande Causeway.


tl.< CtOe( Wow'


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A NICvr I ncn- I OnvuwnvvWm
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Since 1971


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er R jU Breakfast Lunch Dinner
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North Port

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HAPPY HOUR
11:30AM 6:30PM
Well 4:00PM TO 6:30PM
Live Music
Monday
Dual-Sax-Ron/Jazz Jam
Tuesday
Debra Opie/Jazz Jam
Wednesday
Valerie/Karaoke
Thursday
Kim Jenkins
Friday
Valerie & Neal/Live Music
Saturday
Lisa Ridings Band
Villa Venezia Plaza
p 1740E. Venice Ave.
Venice, FL 34292
941.484.1889


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11am-6pm & 9pm-Close
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16oz PBR Cans.................... ........ $2.00 Fried Pickles........................ ....... $5.00
More specials: www.cedarreef.com
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or
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Check out the Wave Grill and Splash Bar


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8/29 ................. Dave Smash
8/30 .............. Country Night
With Gator Creek
8/31 .....................Emma Tree
9/6............................. Gemini
9/7.............................Gemini


9/13 ................. Dave Smash


Tuesday Night


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5:30 8pm


9/19 ... Last Chance Crew Party
With 107.9WSRZ


0
RAMADA
The Ramada Venice
in the Ramada Venice 941-308-7700
425 US 41 Bypass North, Venice, FL, 34285


them if they had caught
anything that they had
kept. The men said they
had not but gave depu-
ties permission to check
their coolers and live
well. When the deputies
checked the cooler, they
found six small black tip
sharks, all between 20


Three cited for illegal

shark possession


"' WAREHOUSE
INC
Caroet Tile Hardwood Vinyl Caroet Cleaninq


:12A SUN NEWSPAPERS




:WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


welcome to your new

Publix.


Come
North


discover
Venice. >


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brand-new


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iates who


are happy to answer questions, offer cooking
tips, and take your groceries right to your car.


thursday, august 29 at 8 a.m.


You can sample delicious foods and
the first 500 customers receive
grocery tote bag.


- if you're one of
a FREE reusable


Publix at
Plaza Venezia
2438 Laurel Rd. East
North Venice, FL 34275
store hours:
Monday-Saturday: 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Sunday: 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
grand opening hours:
8 a.m. to 10 p.m. on August 29
pharmacy hours:
Monday-Friday: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Store: 941.484.8426
Pharmacy: 941.488.2459
publix.com


W E S HO PP IS A PLEASURE@


SUN NEWSPAPERS 13A




WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


0. T "Retailer of the Year -
State of Florida"

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550 S. SeaboardAve.
Just North of
Venice Nissan
on U.S. 41 Bypass
941-485-3211
Weekdays 9-6
Sat. 9-6 Sun. 11-6


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4027 N.Washington
(US 301)
1 Mile South of University
on US 301
941-351-8600
Mon.-Sat 9-9
Sun. 11-6


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1100West Cortez Rd.
Corner of 41 & Cortez
Next to Office Depot
941-749-6069
Mon. Sat.9-9
Sun. 11-6


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Across from the
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941-479-7900
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:14A SUN NEWSPAPERS





:WEDNESDAY
"AUGUST 28, 2013

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
941-207-1000
kcool@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR TOWN


ODA

LAW GROUP, P.A
WE HELP PEOPLE GET BACK ON THEIR FEET


1694 S Tamiami Tr
Venice


SOUTH TRAIL 4B


AROUND TOWN 8B


St. Francis offers refuge for cats, and more


By JAN CHAPMAN
SPECIAL TO THE GONDOLIER SUN

Every day, 9,000
animals are killed in
shelters simply because
they don't have homes.
The volunteers at St.
Francis Animal Rescue of
Venice (SFAR) have been
working hard to reduce
these numbers.
Behind its doors, SFAR
is a home of friend-
ship and tender-loving
care for kittens and
older cats who seek a
forever home. And it is a
place of protection and
tranquility and a forever
home for those who are
unadoptable.
St. Francis Animal
Rescue of Venice would
not be what it is today
without the commitment
and dedication of its vol-
unteers. They help more
than 1,000 cats each year
in Sarasota County.
In 1992, Judy Lane,
Grace Joyce and Angie
De Gregorio began meet-
ing at the North Jetty in
Nokomis to feed a group
of about 30 cats. They
decided to band together
to do something to help
those homeless felines.
At that time, Lane was a
paralegal at a large law
firm in Sarasota, but she
soon realized that St.
Francis needed her.
Since her retirement,
she has committed her
time to helping the cats.
Rarely has a day gone by
that she is not volunteer-
ing at St. Francis Animal
Rescue. She works for
the cats, doing the jobs
that few enjoy doing and
diligently watching over
the permanent residents
- ensuring they are
healthy and have the


best possible quality of
life.
Through private
donations and fundrais-
ing events, the founding
ladies gathered resources
to spay and neuter cats
in local colonies and to
purchase the building
known as St. Francis
Animal Rescue. Lane
was instrumental in that
effort. Their mission
remains the same today:
to help find homes for
unwanted cats and kit-
tens, and provide refuge
to cats in need.
In 1993, they pur-
chased and opened the
shelter located at 1925
South Tamiami Trail in
Venice, which housed the
thrift store and adop-
tion center. Since that
time, the thrift store has
moved into a separate
location, opening up
needed space for the cats
in the shelter.
Through the dedica-
tion of Lane and many
other volunteers, the
shelter has become more
highly respected and
has assisted with the
spaying and neutering of
more than 6,000 cats and
kittens throughout our
community.

Answering the call
Over the years many
people have come and
gone, but one constant
remains: Judy Lane's
dedication to helping the
cats. To say that she loves
cats is an understate-
ment; it is her calling.
She can coax the most
unruly cat into a cage for
a trip to the vet. Many
days she eats her lunch
sitting with the cats. She
has been known to take


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. FRANCIS ANIMAL RESCUE
Some of St. Francis Animal Rescue's outstanding volunteers: Jill
Clark, left, volunteer; Connie Thomas, volunteer; co-founder
Judy Lane; Gail Carson, board president; and Bertie Erickson,
board vice president.


SUN PHOTO BY AUDREY BLACKWELL
Jan Chapman, an independent contractor at St. Francis Animal
Rescue, holds a female feline named Babe in the kitten room.


Hmmm. How can I get those fish out of that screen? This guy
likes to watch television all day long, especially when he can
watch his favorite snack food.


TA-


SUN Hl-IIU BY AUUKIY BLA;KVVELL
Kittens get to hang out in their own private room and remain
cageless if they choose. There are cages available if they need
to be in one for their well-being.


home a few that no one
would want.
Lane knows many
people in the community
who work with animals
and they all appreciate
and honor her. She is
a credit to Venice and
Sarasota County, and no
award is big enough to
give her credit for the


love and care she has
devoted to thousands of
cats during her 20-year
tenure.
Every day, the staff and
volunteers at St. Francis
work hard to carry on
Lane's mission, striving
to keep cats and kittens

CATS 15


SUN PHOTO BY AUDREY BLACKWELL
Really sick cats, like this one, need to be caged in the infirmary.
This one was diagnosed with feline infectious peritonitis and
also has problems with her teeth. Erin Tallotson, vet tech, keeps
a close eye on her, and neighboring veterinarians, such as Gary
Berkowitz, help out in emergencies.


SUN PHOTO BY AUDREY BLACKVVELL
This kitten finds comfort in a blanketed, open-ended crate.
Besides sheltering cats that end up homeless, St. Francis Animal
Rescue also tries to reduce the population of wild cats through
its trap/neuter/release program.


This gal found a comfy spot on top of the cages in an open adult
cat room.


Famous clown centerpiece of


veteran's doll collection


By TOM CHANG
STAFF WRITER

When Clare Mitchell
passed in May, she left
her husband Walter
Mitchell her cherished
clown doll collection,
among them a life-sized
Emmett Kelly Sr.
Kelly was a famous
clown, who performed
for Ringling Brothers
and Barnum & Bailey


Circus under the name
"Weary Willie," based
on the hobos of the
Great Depression. Kelly
joined the troupe shortly
after the United States'
entry into World War II.
Willie became a staple
at the circus, and often
was found wandering
into other performers'
acts, according to www.
ringling.com.
Kelly's son, Emmett


Kelly Jr., followed in his
father's footsteps, adopting
his own version of Willie in
1960, according to www.
emmettkellyjr.com.
While Kelly was charm-
ing circus audiences with
his antics, Mitchell was
off in the South Pacific
fighting in the war. He
said he operated a crane,
usually loading bodies
onto boats.
Mitchell enlisted in


the U.S. Army in 1942,
where he served until he
suffered a severe injury
in 1945, when sniper fire
sent him plunging 50 feet
to the concrete below.
He broke his back in four
places and was paralyzed
for nine months. He
remained in the hospital
for two years, long after
the war had ended. Walter Mitchell inherited his wife Clare Mitchell's clown doll
collection after her death in May, among them a life-size
DOLL 15 Emmett Kelly Sr.


VENUE 3B


492-6000





:2B SUN NEWSPAPERS






WELL- BEING
SBrought To You By....


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


the TO S
th .Make afternoons FUN!
>Gymnastics > Homework Help
> Dance > Free Snacks
.""n > Sports > Plus more!

40 ,,, Venice YMCA 941-492-9622
4 .,, www.VeniceYMCA.org


Venice Regional hospital has a NICHE for seniors


Did you know that over
80 percent of patients at
Venice Regional Medical
Center this year were 65
or older? That's pretty
remarkable, considering
that the average age of
hospital patients in the
state of Florida is 54.
For a hospital, car-
ing for senior patients
presents some special
challenges. Think about
it. If you're lucky enough
to be a golden-ager,
you're probably also
unlucky enough to have
vision problems, or
hearing loss, or some
degree of memory loss
... or maybe all of these
woes.
Maybe you need a
cane or a walker or a
wheelchair. Maybe you
have a chronic disease,
like diabetes or emphy-
sema. Maybe you don't
sleep well. Maybe you
don't eat as well as you
should. Maybe you get
depressed easily.
Hey, nobody said
getting old is easy. Well,
if you go to a hospital
for whatever reason,
the hospital has to take
all of these possibilities
into account ... and
then do something
about them.
The acronym NICHE
stands for a national
organization with the
improbable name,
Nurses Improving Care
for Health-System
Elders. Okay, they need
work on their acronyms,
but they serve a very
worthwhile service: to
see to it that hospitals
throughout the country


HOSPITAL
TALES
DEAN LAUX, GUEST COLUMNIST

operate their facilities
in a senior-friendly
manner.
They set standards for
nurse training and the
hospital's environment
and procedures to assure
that the needs of geri-
atric patients are being
served. If a hospital
meets their standards,
it is designated as such.
And with all those senior
patients, Venice Regional
meets the standards very
well.
Says Cathy Carr,
chief nurse executive at
Venice Regional, "Many
hospitals have a NICHE-
designated department
within their hospital.
We have a NICHE-
designated hospital."
It's not easy to obtain
a NICHE designa-
tion. Says Carr: "Every
policy and procedure
has to be examined. For
example, we can't have
our floors too shiny. An
elderly patient sees a
shiny floor and thinks
it's slippery. That can
cause a fall because the
floor isn't slippery. And
light reflected off of a
shiny floor can make it
difficult for some elderly
patients to see where
they're going."
Beds need to be
equipped with weight-
change alarms, to alert
the nursing staff if a
weak or disoriented
patient who shouldn't


be out of bed suddenly
decides to try. Video
monitors may be needed
to keep track of patient
movements, to avoid
their getting into trouble
or rescue them if they
do.
But being senior-
friendly goes way beyond
a hospital's facilities.
Especially important is
training the nursing staff
to be aware of elders'
unique needs. Venice
Regional has 20 nurses
who have been specially
trained to be Geriatric
Resource Nurses, helping
other staff deal with the
proper care of elders.
"They can have a
whole set of problems,"
says Wendy Arcano,
clinical educator at
Venice Regional. "For
example, elders may
have age-related changes
in their skin, so skin
care is important. Their
nutritional needs and
their ability to metabo-
lize will show changes,
some normal for age and
some abnormal. Their
appetites may decline.
So they have to have
the right combination
of fats, proteins and
carbohydrates in their
hospital diet."
Falls are a special
problem.
"Our goal is prevention
of falls," says Arcano.
Besides the bed alarms
and video monitors,
many other steps must
be taken to prevent falls.
"The nurses have to
make frequent rounds to
check up on them. They
have a high fall risk if


they've had surgery, or
have an IV or are already
using a cane or walker,
if they have a history of
falling, or they're not
alert, or have an im-
paired gait. We assess
each senior patient for
all of these risk factors at
least twice a day," says
Arcano.
Some elders develop
urinary incontinence
and need bladder
training. They're often
weak and need to have
early ambulation (walk-
ing), because they're
prone to decondition-
ing ("Deconditioning
brought on by inactiv-
ity or bed rest affects
important body systems
and results in reduced
functional capacity."
Source: PubMed at
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
pubmed/8178204). They
can have sleep disorders
and need to develop
techniques to promote
sleep.
"A major problem,"
says Arcano, "is depres-
sion. As you age, people
around you neighbors
and friends die, and
you may become lonely.
So the nurses are trained
to look for signs of
depression. They have to
help their senior patients
to socialize. They have to
help them realize what
they still have and what
they can do."
Okay, it's not easy be-
ing a senior, and it's not a
piece of cake to take care
of a senior, either. So it's
nice to know that if you
have to go to a hospital,
it has a NICHE for you.


PHOTO PROVIDED


Venice Regional Medical Center has 20 geriatric resource nurses
who see to it that all hospital staff members are alert to the
special needs of seniors.




i- DR. SCOTT WALKER
Optometrist
Eye Examinations Contact Lenses
Fashion Eyewear Diseases of the Eye
(40o Years In Venice)
The Pattison Building
S"The Eye Doctor 262 West Miami Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285
on the Island" 485-2468


Beachgoers

reminded to

do 'stingray

shuffle'
STAFF REPORT
Stingray season has
begun and is expected to
last through the summer.
Sarasota County lifeguards
remind beach-goers to
avoid injury by doing the
"stingray shuffle" when
entering beach waters. By
shuffling your feet in the
sand, you will scare off
any stingrays that might
be around.
If stingrays are present
at the beach, a purple flag
will be visible from the
lifeguard tower in addi-
tion to signs posted alert-
ing of the danger. Flags
SHUFFLE 13


CROSS
FROM PAGE 6


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We encourage you to take good care of your health. That is why you're
personally invited to our Open House on September 5. See the largest
outpatient, diagnostics and surgery center in Venice and tour each department.
Learn how Venice HealthPark can be a wonderful resource for your healthcare
needs in a facility that's close to home. Drop by for tours, health screenings,
hors d'oeuvres, beer and wine, music and prizes.

Open House
Thursday, September 5, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Free screenings:
* Balance
* Blood pressure
*BMI
* Foot

Plus:
* Light hors d'oeuvres, beer and wine
*Tours of every department at Venice HealthPark
* Raffle prizes
Call 1-855-876-2362 to RSVP. Space is limited.


VENICE REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER


The best healthcare under the sun.
Venice HealthPark 1201 Jacaranda Blvd. Venice, FL 34292 941-497-7800









VENUE


SUN NEWSPAPERS


3B
WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 28, 2013


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* EVENTS

* WEDNESDAY
KMI Exhibit, Explore 37
years of Kentucky Military Institute in
Venice, Venice Museum & Archives,
351 Nassau St. S, Venice, 486-2487
Line Dancing, Line dance
at S. Venice Yacht Club, beg. & adv.,
country & other, 4425 Yacht Club Rd;
10:30-Noon, $4,445-1310
Fun With Watercolors,
Paint-Alongs with Carolyn Merenda,
Wed., 1-4pm, South Venice Civic Ass'n,
720 Alligator Dr. $85/mo.+supplies.
366-2866.
Free Healing Clinic,
4:00-7:00pm, Angel Ministries 2269


I COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Citywide baptism
One Christ One City
is sponsoring its fifth
Beach Head For Christ
citywide worship and
baptism Sunday, Sept. 1,
5:30 p.m., at Brohard
Park just north of
Sharky's On The Pier. It
will be a "Celebration of
Faith" with pastors and
followers from several
denominations in the
area attending. There will
be music, prayers and
baptisms in the Gulf Of
Mexico.

Snook Haven
Country Fest
Snook Haven, 5000 E.
Venice Ave., will host its
first Country Fest Labor
Day, Monday, Sept. 2,


South Tamiami Trail, #3A Venice,
FL 34293, 941 492-4995 "Love
Donation"
Zumba w/MaryLynn,
Tues & Thurs 6:15pm, 417 S Tamiami
Tr 34285,941-685-8445 Zumba Yoga
BodySculpt classes daily
Ballroom Classes,
Starting September 4, 6:30 Advance
7:30 Beginner/Intermediate
Venice Community Ctr. for info call
941-496-9692

* THURSDAY
Gentle Yoga, 9am Venice
Holistic Community Center, 251
Tamiami Tr S, Venice, FL 34285. Mary
Riley 941-539-9149
Healing Circle, 10-11am,


11 a.m.-7 p.m. Five
Florida country bands
will perform, including
Evan Steele and Johnny
Country (11 a.m.-noon),
Back Roads, 12:15-
1:30 p.m.; Critter Ridge,
1:45-3 p.m.; Kim Betts and
Gamble Creek Band, 3:15-
4:45 p.m.; and Grayson
Rogers Band 5-7 p.m.
Located on the
river, Snook Haven offers
barbecue smoked daily
menu items, including
chicken and pulled pork,
as well as shrimp and
fresh and smoked fish.
Call 941-485-7221 or visit
SnookHaven.com.

Boat raffle
Habitat for Humanity
received a very gener-
ous donation of a 1999


Angel Ministries 2269 South Tamiami
Trail, #3A Venice, FL 34293, 941
492-4995 "Love Donation"
Medicare Choices, 10:00-
11:00am 14415 Tamiami Tr North
Port, Retiring soon? New to Medicare
or Florida? Know your Options!
941-223-5592 RSVP
Beginner Tai Chi, all ages
welcome, 10:30-11:30 am, Venice
Comm. Ctr., 326 S. Nokomis Ave,
$6.00,941-492-2167
Girl Scout Info, Venice Girl
Scout Nights: Venice, Taylor Ranch,
Garden Elementary and Laurel
Nokomis School 8/29 at 6:30 pm

* FRIDAY
Mommy & Me Yoga, 9 am



Scout boat with an 18.5
center console and a 115
HP Yamaha motor. It
includes a performance
trailer, Bimini top,
55-gallon fuel tank, dual
battery hook-up, fish
finder and full canvas
cover. It will be raffled off
at the Venice ReStore in
North Port at its grand
opening on Sept. 14, at
noon, for $50 a ticket
(only 200 being sold).
All proceeds go toward
funding a Habitat home.
To buy a ticket, go to
the Habitat office, 280
Alligator Drive, Venice, or
call 941-493-6606, ext. 225.

Hearing
aid contest
Medical Gardens
Hearing Center, 5900


In order to provide"one-stop shopping"for area
event listings, the Venice Gondolier Sun is consoli-
dating calendar items into a single location. The
Venue calendar includes library, senior, Well-Being
and religion events as well as community events.
We have moved to a reader-submission model for
all of these items.
To get your events printed in the newspaper, they
must be submitted via our website, www.venice-
gondoliersun.com. On the left, click on "Community
Calendar,"then click on "Submit Event"and fill in
the appropriate fields. You must enter the location,
address and phone number in the "Print Edition Text"
box for it to print.


Venice Holistic Community Center, 251
Tamiami Tr S, Venice, FL 34285. $10
Lynne 941-237-6318 www.niuyoga.
com.



Pan American Blvd.,
Suite 102, North Port,
34287, will give away a
pair of digital hearing
aid devices, valued at
$6,990. Contest is open
to all hearing-impaired
residents within the
communities of Venice,
Englewood, North Port
and Port Charlotte.
Send an essay in 300
words or less about "How
hearing aids will enhance
my (or my loved one's)
life" between Sept. 2
and Oct. 31, or email it
to contest@hear2help.
com. The top 10 entrants
will be contacted for a
complimentary hearing
evaluation to determine
degree of hearing loss.
For more details, call
941-423-7911 or visit
Hear2Help.com.


Deadlines: For events to run in Wednesday's paper,
the deadline is 1 p.m. Monday. For events to run in
Saturday's paper, the deadline is 1 p.m. Thursday.
In order to print as many events as possible, we will
print a maximum of four lines per event at no cost. You
may purchase additional space for $10 per day, per
event, per edition. Simply choose"Paid Listing"on the
"Submit Event"page on the website. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.
We will only allow one submission per event, per
day. If your event runs for more than one day, you will
need to submit a separate form for each day. Multiple
submissions of the same event for the same date may
result in all the related events being removed.


Gentle Yoga, 10:30 am Venice
Holistic Community Center, 251
Tamiami Tr S, Venice, FL 34285. Mary
Riley 941-539-9149



Farmer's Market
closes for
triath on
On Aug. 31, the Venice
Farmer's Market will be
closed due to the YMCA
Triathlon. Also occur-
ring that day will be the
Miami Avenue Craft Fair
from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Please note that the
Farmer's Market normally
does not close if there is
a craft festival on Miami
Avenue, but due to the
YMCA Triathlon, it is. The
Venice Farmer's Market
will also be closed on
Oct. 19 for Sun Fiesta.

Sun Fiesta
dates set
Women's Sertoma
Club of Venice will hold


Duplicate Bridge, Senior
Friendship Center, 12:50 4:00 pm,
941-493-3065, Partner needed,
$2-Members, $4 non-members.



the annual Sun Fiesta
Oct. 18-20 in downtown
Venice. Times are Friday,
Oct. 18, 5-10 p.m.;
Saturday, Oct. 19,
9 a.m.-10 p.m.; and
Sunday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.
There will be a parade,
bed races, live entertain-
ment, food vendors,
a beer and wine tent,
Miss Sun Fiesta pageant,
Sun Fiesta Idol contest,
arts and crafts vendors,
raffle/auction, and Sun
Fiesta T-shirts for sale.
Admission and park-
ing are free. Children's
activities include bounce
house, crafts, games and
contests. Further, the Boy
Scouts will hold a break-
fast Sunday, 9-11 a.m.
All proceeds go to local
charities. Visit SunFiesta.
net.


Chiropractic care gets on your nerves:


That's the point


Erene Romanski, D.C., chiropractor with Twin Palms, lists what
people can do to improve their well-being during a meeting of
Newcomers of Venice Alumni.


SHUFFLE
FROM PAGE 2

currently are up and will
be flown as needed.
Stingrays by nature are
not aggressive; how-
ever, the problem arises
when bathers unknow-
ingly step on them. This
happens close to the
shoreline where stingrays
tend to burrow in the
sand, usually during the


summer months when
they are searching for
food or mating.
Stingrays are capable
of inflicting a laceration
or a penetrating type
of wound. The injury is
serious and can be very
painful. Anyone who
has suffered a stingray
wound must take imme-
diate and effective action
in its treatment.
If stung by a stingray:
Seek a lifeguard or
go directly to the nearest


By AUDREY BLACKWELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
It's all about getting on
your nerves. Chiropractic
treatment, that is.
Many will say it's a
way to crack bones and
release joints, and while
that usually happens
in the course of a chi-
ropractic adjustment,
the road to well-being
follows the nerves.
"What I do as a chiro-
practor is apply pres-
sure on a nerve," Erene
Romanski, D.C., told
members of Newcomers
of Venice Alumni re-
cently. She spoke to the
group at their Aug. 21
luncheon meeting held
at Plantation Golf &
Country Club.
Romanski told the
people what they could
do for their own well-
being. She listed some
common actions people
can take to feel better:
engage in good nutrition
and hydration, exercise,
adequate sleep and
rest, and keep a positive

medical facility for treat-
ment or someplace where
you can get hot water.
Soaking the wound
in hot water should be
the first step taken in
treating this injury. Soak
the injured area in water
as hot as one can stand,
which will help to relieve
the pain
For more information,
contact Sarasota County
Lifeguard Operations
at 941-861-5000 or visit
ScGov.net.


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mental attitude.
"Add ensuring a proper
nerve supply to the list,"
she said. "Everything
happens from the head.
The brain communicates
through nerves with the
body. When there's a
breakdown in the system,
there's a problem. What
we deal with in chiro-
practic is the problem."
According to
Romanski, two things our
bodies need are stability
and mobility.
"Our bodies want to
move in a way that is
stable," she said. She gave
an example of a 3-year-old
boy who had been vomit-
ing up to 18 times a day.
The parents took him to
several doctors, but test-
ing didn't reveal the cause.
The parents worried he
would have projectile
vomiting at night.
Romanski suggested


they bring him to her for
treatment. They did.
They took him back
the next week and told
her he had only vomited
three times and eventu-
ally, with continued
treatment, the vomiting
subsided. The mother
wondered why no one
had ever told her about
chiropractic before.
"The body can heal
itself," Romanski said. "I
looked for a segment of
the spinal column I felt
was out of alignment and
put pressure on the nerve.
That's all I do as a chiro-
practor, apply pressure."
Another story
Romanski shared
was about one of her
daughters (she has five
children). When her third
daughter was about to
be born, she was face
down in the birth canal
and needed to be turned.


It was a difficult process
and time was of the
essence, and the midwife
said she would have to
help bring the baby out.
She pulled the baby out,
but after the baby arrived
it did not cry and her
face was pale.
"I thought something
may be out of alignment
from pulling her out and
did a little adjustment
on her spine," Romanski
said. "Color came into
her face and she cried.
All was well. I took her to
a pediatric neurologist
who said she was healthy.
Now, she is studying to
be a chiropractor."
Romanski said her
story and the other fam-
ily's story give a powerful
testimony about chiro-
practic care.
For more information
about chiropractic, visit
TwinPalmsChiro.com.


/ / I 1


BREATHING ROOM
DR. DAN BUSCH, DR. ERENE ROMANSKI
CHIROPRACTOR


It is interesting to note that a recent study
indicates that a loss of height among seniors is
strongly associated with shortness of breath
and reduced lung capacity. The study grew out
of observations by many health professionals
who noted that some of their older patients
experienced shortness of breath, which they
suspected was linked to loss of height. When
an ensuing study confirmed these suspicions,
few were surprised that the findings supported
anecdotal evidence. In essence, many older


people simply run out of breathing room.
From the chiropractor's point of view, this
problem may be helped with increased
attention to correcting posture and treating
spinal misalignment, both of which can
compromise height and breathing capacity.
P.S. If you find yourself hunched over, a visit
to the chiropractor may help restore your
posture.


1 WEDNES IY9 I ,:0 -6: 30


Erene Romanski, DC


TWIN PALMS
CHIROPRACTIC
808 Venice Ave. East 412-3800
www.twinpalmschiro. com
JEWEL CHIROPRACTIC
579 S Indiana Ave. #C 474-4944
Bobbi-Jo Donner, DC


Dan Busch, uD I


- - - -E - - -



*THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHTTO REFUSETO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, ORTREATMENTTHAT IS
PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF ANDWITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDINGTOTHE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
MM14015 DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, ORTREATMENT Lic# 14016


MO NMM M [wmMMM









SOUTH TRAIL


4B
WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 28, 2013


CONTACT US
RONALD DUPONT JR.
EDITOR
941-207-1218
rdupont@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


Teacher raises mulled as union, district meet


By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER

Potential raises and
leave time were among
the items representa-
tives from the Sarasota
County School Board and
the Sarasota Classified
Teachers Association
discussed recently as
they continued working
their way toward a new
labor deal for the dis-
trict's teachers.
The SC/TA has pro-
posed that all instruc-
tional salary schedules
be increased by 3.69 per-
cent for the new 2013-14
school year. The union
represents about 2,800
teachers and 2,200 other
district employees.
The increase would
be retroactive to July 1,


meaning teachers would
be reimbursed the differ-
ence between their old
and new salaries since
that time, according to
the proposal.
A raise would come a
year after the school dis-
trict and SC/TA agreed to
a bonus of 2.2 percent of
employee salaries for the
2012-13 school year. It
averaged between $1,100
and $1,400 for teachers.
The district's starting
salary for a teacher with
a bachelor's degree and
less than three years of
teaching experience is
$38,997.
"I think that's a reason-
able first offer," said SC/
TA executive director
Barry Durbin.
Art Hardy, an attorney
representing the school


district, said he was not
surprised by the initial
offer. He then told the
SC/TA members on hand
that the school district
is spending $12 million
more than it is receiving
in revenue this year. The
raises would cost the
district approximately
$2.58 million, and would
have to be classified as
raises instead of bonuses,
since they'd be funded at
least in part by the state.
Hardy said he
expects the state to
send $6.3 million to the
district this year.
"I think it's going to
be hard for the board to
come up with an addi-
tional $2.58 million, but
I do understand where
you're coming from,"
Hardy said. "I appreciate


what others are doing
around the state, but
they're still striving to
get to the salaries of
Sarasota."
Officials discussed
sick/bereavement
leave and which family
members it would apply
to. Currently, teachers
are entitled to four days
of sick leave as of the
first day of employment
of each school year
and is credited with an
additional day at the
end of each month of
employment.
According to school
district documents, sick
leave covers the teacher
or illness or death of
a member of his or
her immediate family,
including spouses, par-
ents, children, brothers,


sisters, grandparents,
parent in-laws or other
close relatives or mem-
bers of his or her own
household.
During the meeting,
both sides briefly went
back and forth on what
other "close relatives"
means.
"Teachers can use their
sick leave on account
of personal sickness,
accidents or disability,"
Hardy said. "I think
what we were trying to
say in our language is
that we know in-laws
like brothers-in-law or
sisters-in-law are another
close relative."
Durbin said that
should actually be writ-
ten into the final docu-
ment, and Hardy agreed.
North Port High School


principal David Jones,
who was in attendance at
this week's meeting, said
he's been surprised at
how smooth and amica-
ble the negotiations have
been up to this point.
"There hasn't been any
tension at all," said Jones,
who declined further
comment on specifics of
the meeting.
Hardy said the raises
and leave would be dis-
cussed by the Sarasota
County School Board
in an executive session
prior to their next meet-
ing, which is scheduled
for Sept. 3. According
to the Sarasota District
Schools website, another
negotiating session is
planned on Wednesday
in Sarasota.
Email: slockwood@sun-herald.com


'Green Map' outlines county's sustainable resources


PROVIDED BY The interactive "Green
SARASOTA COUNTY GOVERNMENT Map" will serve as a


Sarasota County has
released an interac-
tive mapping tool that
provides residents and
visitors with information
on sustainable commu-
nity resources includ-
ing ways to find local
produce, locate green
hotels or check out the
solar installations in their
neighborhood.


community tool that will
continue to grow and
change as residents use
and add to it. According
to the county, there are
currently more than
4,000 existing sites on the
Green Map, including
1,906 on solar energy,
822 on Florida-friendly
landscaping, 137 on
green buildings and 130
on green businesses.


Other aspects include
alternative health re-
sources, organic and local
food, park and recreation
areas and libraries.
"The new Sarasota
County Green Map en-
courages you to engage
with the green places in
our community in brand
new ways," said Aubrey
Phillips, administrative
manager with Sarasota
County Extension.
"Visitors can suggest


new sites, share com-
ments and photos, and
describe how places have
impacted them, bringing
to light the connections
between neighbors and
neighborhoods."
The map is a collab-
orative effort between
Sarasota County, the
University of Florida/
IFAS Extension and
SCOPE (Sarasota
County Openly Plans
for Excellence). Laurel


Corrao, GIS analyst
at SCOPE, said in a
statement the effort is
particularly important to
local community engage-
ment efforts around
sustainability.
"I can't wait to see all
the new ways Sarasota
County residents share
and get excited about
'green-centric' data on
the new Green Map,"
Corrao said.
The Sarasota County


Green Map is part of the
award-winning global
Green Map System,
which supports lo-
cally led Green Map
projects in encouraging
environmental aware-
ness and sustainability
consciousness. Today,
there are more than 400
Green Map projects in 51
countries to help people
locate sustainable urban
and rural places and
institutions.


Kids create art, memories at NPAC camp


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SUN PHOTOS BY LOUISE HALL
The North Port Art Center held an Art Camp for kids over the summer. Here, creating pages for
their NPAC Art Camp memory books are Mia Fuentes, 7, Megan Loewe, 12, Ruthie Martinez, 7,
and Romeo Casale, 8, in Judy Lee's art class.


Ali Gupta, Natalie File and Zach Duriso create original designs on CDs that will be formed similar
to artist Dale Chihuly's multi-shaped colored glass artwork, in NPAC youth director Clare Harvey's
Art Camp class.


North Port Art Center Summer Art Camp student Ansley Ryan, 7, instructor Judy Lee and volunteer
Samantha Bronson admire Ali Gupta's Art Camp book that Ali had created in Lee's morning class.


I1L


Maria Rutkowski, 9, and her brother Robert, 6, are assisted by North Port Art Center volunteer
Linda Young during the last week of"Fun"-tastic Summer Art Camp while working on their indi-
vidual NPAC Art Camp memory books.


At right: Victoria Arnold, 7,
and Alexandra Low, 6, look at
CDs that had been heated to
resemble glasswork by artist
Dale Chihuly. North Port Art
Camp students colored designs
on clear CDs with markers
before the discs were heated.


-

t.. -



Tessa Valeska, 9, Ivy Prophett, 10, and Madison Bailey, 8, create memory books about the many
art projects that each student had worked on during the eight weeks of the Art Center's "Fun"-
tastic Summer Art Camp.







CONTACT US
941-207-1102
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


CLASS ACTS


5B
WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 28, 2013


'Pepped up'and raring to go


By AUDREY BLACKWELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

"Yeaaa" students yelled
out.
They were responding
to the question, "Where
is the sixth grade?"
asked by teachers at
Venice Middle School's
pep rally Wednesday,
Aug. 21.
A similar response
came from students in
the seventh- and eighth-
grade groups sitting in
bleachers in the school's
gym.
The rally followed
a presentation of the
colors by the VMS Young
Marines Color Guard, led
by Major Mike Dubrule,
commander, and a
reciting of the Pledge of
Allegiance.
The rally was headed
up by Principal Karin
Schmidt, teachers and
staff. They wanted to
do something to give
students, teachers and
staff members a positive
spark as school began.
It was the result of a
well-conceived plan.
"At the finish of the


school year last year, a
group of teachers and
staff came together from
Venice Middle School
and Oak Park South and
decided they would work
to give our school a new
tomorrow," Michelle
Miller, teacher, wrote in
an email.
The planning group,
called TNT (Totally New
Tomorrow), adopted
the tag line "Igniting
Change." It wanted to
flip a "positive switch to
the overall atmosphere
of the school for teach-
ers, students, staff and
parents," Miller wrote.
The group met often
and brainstormed ideas
for motivating teach-
ers and students, and
for instilling positive
behaviors.
"The idea was to
change the school
from the inside out, to
eventually spill out into
the community with a
message thatVMS/OPS
is back, better than ever,"
Miller wrote.
The first week of
school started with
teacher scavenger hunts,


Karin Schmidt, principal of Venice Middle School/Oak Park
South, participates in the "Igniting Change" pep rally Aug. 21.


Venice Middle School Young Marines Color Guard present the
colors.


team building and a
sense of renewed energy.
Then came the pep rally.
"We want every stu-
dent to know they have
a place here and that
they belong at Venice
Middle School," Schmidt
said.
Many more similar
activities will be held


throughout the school
year.
Email:ablackwell@venicegondolier.com

SUN PHOTOS BY
AUDREY BLACKWELL
At right: Andrew Swiss, left, and
lan Miller, sixth-graders, honor
the U.S. flag during the Pledge
of Allegiance.


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

"Burt and Me," a
frothy little love story
featuring music by Burt
Bacharach, offers a
pleasant opening to the
season at the Broadway
Palm Dinner Theatre.
Better than the chance
to listen to Bachrach
is the chance to see
another performance
by Rendell DeBose
(Jerry Landes), just off a
fabulous performance as
the donkey in Broadway
Palm's stellar production
of "Shrek the Musical."
Until he is snatched up
by Broadway, DeBose
is one of the must-see
performers along the
Cultural Coast.
He can change his
entire look in seconds,
morphing from one
character type to
another, seemingly as
easily as he changes
his delivery of lyrics.
He does it in scene
two which features the
songs, "Wishin' and
Hopin'" and "The Look
of Love." But what he


really does best is give
his all to each song,
each word, each note.
DeBose doesn't just
sing and dance but he
acts, and this in a show
that is light on story
and more of a musical
review. There is nothing
intrinsically wrong with
what anyone else does in
this production; it is just
that DeBose goes the
extra five miles to make
it all so much better.
See the show if you
love Bachrach music
and consider DeBose the
show's bonus factor. He
was wonderful in Shrek
and he is superb in "Burt
and Me."
Broadway Palm
veteran Chuck Caruso
also delivers some extra
silly bits, which add to
the fun. So do some
really bad wigs that he
uses to change from
a guy named George
Madson to a priest
(Father Dejoseph) and
then a bartender. Sheira
Feurstein is delightful
as the over-the-top New
York piano teacher in
the first scene before


PHOTO COURTESY OF BROADWVVAY PALM DINNER THEATRE
A scene from the Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre production of"Burt and Me"which will run
through Oct. 5 in Fort Myers.


she changes into Sally,
who is pursued by Jerry
Landes.
Taylor Hale does a fine
job in the ensemble as
a male singer/dancer.
Also in the cast are
Kate Marshall as Lacey
Turner, John Ramsey as
Joe Madson and Sami
Dohert as Female Swing/
Ensemble performer.
Marshall was Princess
Fiona in "Shrek" and


Ramsey was one of that
show's Three Little Pigs.
"Burt and Me" contin-
ues through Oct. 5 at the
Broadway Palm Dinner
Theatre, 1380 Colonial
Ave., Fort Myers. As a
season opener special,
the theater is offering all
tickets at $45 for dinner
and show. Those who
purchase four or more
tickets prior to Sept. 8,
will receive a house


appetizer and a cocktail
in a souvenir glass.
Call the box office
at 239-278-4422, stop
by the theater or visit
BroadwayPalm.com.
Email: kool@venicegondolier.com


ACADEMIC NEWS

Dakota Egglefield,
of Nokomis, was one
of 18 college students
who received a merit
scholarship award in
August from the
Florida Swimming Pool
Association. FSPA pro-
vided more than $18,000
in scholarships for the
2013-2014 academic
year to dependents of its
members and employees
to help offset the cost
of a college education.
Egglefield is studying
psychology at Clemson
University.


DOLL
FROM PAGE 1

The last of three
surviving brothers from
the war, Mitchell carries
pictures from both the
Pacific and the European
campaigns. Walter
acquired the European
pictures from Clare,
whose previous husband
also served during the
war.
The Mitchells moved
to Englewood in the



CATS
FROM PAGE 1

in their homes.
St. Francis provides
a food bank to assist
people feeding colonies
of feral cats and for those
who have fallen on hard
times and need help
feeding their own cats.
St. Francis has volunteers
who can assist with
behavioral issues, so-
licit donations for pets in
need of medical care and
offer spay and neuter
vouchers for those who
cannot afford to spay or


1970s, afterWalter retired
from the construction
industry. They remained
here for more than
40 years, with Walter
making a living flipping
homes. He also enjoyed
fishing and traveling in
his recreational vehicle,
until declining health
forced him to give up his
hobbies.
Walter, 91, said he
inherited 23 clowns upon
Clare's death in May.
"My wife got the
Emmett Kelly (Sr.) from
her sister, and she had it

neuter cats and kittens
found in our community.
Donations are gladly
accepted for both assis-
tance for the cats in our
shelter and community
as well as items to be


for a long time," he said.
"The collection is beauti-
ful, and the clowns vary
in size."
He said he plans to
keep two and sell the
rest.
"There is demand for
circus memorabilia," said
Larry Kellogg, a regional
publicist for Ringling
Brothers and Barnum &
Bailey Circus for more
than 30 years, who's
been collecting circus
memorabilia for ore than
50 years. "Clown dolls
don't usually fall within

sold at the thrift store to
benefit the cats.
For more information
about the shelter and
the services offered, call
941-492-6200 or visit
StFrancisARFL.org.


the category."
Kellogg writes for
www.worthpoint.com,
an antiques, arts and
collectibles blog that
specializes in pricing. He
said clown dolls often are
coveted by clown or doll
enthusiasts.
"The highest Emmett
Kelly (Sr.) doll I've seen
sold was ... valued at
$70," he said.
Mitchell said if he were
to go to auction, he can
make a lot of money
from the Kelly doll.
Email: tchang@sun-herald.com

Jan Chapman is an
independent contractor
with St. Francis Animal
Rescue.
Audrey Blackwell,
assistant features editor,
coni, i'it'ed to this story.


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


I LOS ANGELES TIMES CROSSWORD


ACROSS
1 Stockpile
6 A.L. West player
11 Place to see reeds
14 Like some trains
and anesthetics
15 "Gigi" star Leslie
16 Pollution-policing
org.
17 Put down
toddlers?
19 It's in many poems
20 Wirehair of
whodunits
21 Start of a morning
diner order
22 Hunt illegally
24 Petty of "A
League of Their
Own"
26 Sediment
28 Put down formal
education?
33 Handle the helm
35 They're not from
around here,
briefly
36 Ship of Greek
myth
37 Rand who
created Dagny
Taggart
38 Went by
42 The Matterhom,
e.g.
43 Plumbing
concern
45 GI entertainers
46 British
48 Put down
thoroughfares?
52 Hook's sidekick
53 Caesarean
rebuke
54 "Me too!"
57 Pay, as expenses
59 Russian
assembly
63 Fuss
64 Put down a rock
genre?
67 Spruce cousin
68 Soothing
application
69 Cockamamie
70 Comics cry
71 Ancestral
diagrams
72 Dumas
swordsman
DOWN
1 "The West Wing"
Emmy winner


By Pancho Harrison CROSS I 2


2 Homer's hangout
3 IRApart:Abbr.
4 Big name in
frozen desserts
5 Crafty
6 Thorny shrub
7 "Elephant Boy"
actor
8 Rare sights in
nurseries
9 Lobster eggs
10 How many
writers work
11 Greek salad
topper
12 Larger-than-life
131950s Rambler
maker
18 Virologist who
worked with
Epstein
23 Worker protection
agcy.
25 Storybook baddie
27 To be, to Brutus
28 Wrangler material
29 Station
30 47-Downs have
to talk their way
out of them
31 Look at
lecherously
32 Cuts off
33 H.S. sobriety
crusaders


34 Spare, in Soho
39 Moon over
Marseille
40 Put together
41 Waist
management
44 Cuban cabbage?
47 Loan recipient,
often
49 In the center of
50 Popular pieces
51 Rock follower?
54 Sound partner


55 Drooling comics
dog
56 Idiot
58 Water-draining
aid
60 Canyonlands
National Park
locale
61 Hand, to Jorge
62 Pub server's
trayful
65 Tuner's asset
66 "Mamma !"


I GOREN BRIDGE

ANSWERS TO WEEKLY BRIDGE QUIZ


Q 1 Both vulnerable, as South you
hold:

4 A 6 ~ J 10 7 4 0 8 3 6 KJ 9 5 4

The bidding has proceeded:
WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH
30 Dbl Pass ?
What do you bid now?

A As our astrologer would say, "This
hand is on the cusp!" Pessimists
would be content with three hearts to
protect against North having a
minimum double and only three
hearts. We however, are prepared to
take our chances and the heart game;
the secondary fit in clubs adds so
much potential to the holding.

Q 2 Both vulnerable, as South you
hold:

4 7 4 2 9 5 0 A 8 3 6 K QJ 10 6 3


The bidding has proceeded:
NORTH EAST SOUTH
16 Pass 24
26 Pass ?
What do you bid now?


WEST
Pass


A Again, you have to choose
between a slight underbid and an
overbid. This time we are with the
pessimists and would bid only three
clubs it is unlikely you will miss
game if partner cannot bid again. For
those viewing life through rose-
colored glasses, a game-forcing rebid
of three diamonds is the only
alternative.

Q 3 As South, vulnerable, you hold:

S8 5 4 QJ 95 0 K 6 5 A72

The bidding has proceeded:
WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH
16 DhI Pass ?
What do you bid now?

A Similar problem. Your 4-3-3-3
pattern is not a serious flaw and your
queen of hearts should be upgraded.
Therefore, we opt for a slightly pushy
invitational jump to three hearts over
the quieter two hearts.


Q 4 As South, vulnerable, you hold:

SA 9 6 5 AK 7 6 0 K 7 6 5 2

Partner opens the bidding with one
spade. What do you respond'?

A If you have a forcing spade raise
in your arsenal, be it raise to three
spades or two no trump, by all means
make it. If not, you must make a
temporizing bid of two hearts now,
planning to jump to game in spades at
your next turn.

Q 5 Neither vulnerable, as South
you hold:

SJ6 ZJ93 0 98652aA73

Partner opens the bidding with one
heart. What do you respond?

A If your methods include the
forcing notrump response. take that
action and correct to hearts as
cheaply as possible over partner's
rebid with a dead minimum, do all
you can to slow down the auction. If
not, raise to two hearts with three
trumps, an ace and a ruffing value, a
pass would be too timid.

Q 6 East-West vulnerable, as South
you hold:

4743 AJ843 0 KJ86J3

In third seat, what action do you take
after two passes?

A We know it is fashionable to
make light opening bids in third
chair, but what value can there
possibly be in opening one heart?
The bid is neither pre-emptive nor
are you sure you want a heart lead.
Pass.

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tribune Content Agency, LLC,
2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX
75038. E-mail responses may be sent to
gorenbridge@aol.com.)


Toy train show coming to Venice Sept. 7


By TIM EVERT offer as a way to intro-
SPECIAL TO THE GONDOLIER SU duce children and young
families to the hobby of
A large gathering of model trains.
toy train enthusiasts will For more information,
gather in Venice Sept. 7 call 941-475-5278.
for the annual Toy Train Most adult train enthu-
Show and Swap meet, siasts became interested
hosted by the Southern in the hobby as children.
Division of the Train One such "grown-up" is
Collectors Association. Peter Campisi.
Operating train As a child, Campisi, of
displays, train drag races Venice, was interested
and how-to clinics for in toy trains. But it took
train repair and scenery a long time to develop
construction will be what became a lifelong
featured. dream of building his
The event will be held very own miniature
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. railroad empire.
at the Ramada Inn, 425 Like many boys grow-
North U.S. 41 Bypass. ing up in the 1940s and
Regular admission 1950s, Campisi received
is $5. Children 12 and a Lionel Train set for
under are free, and there Christmas in 1947, a
is a free admission offer train set he still owns.
to any adult who also He thoroughly enjoyed
brings along one child 12 his toy freight train set,
and under. The Southern which was headed up by
Division is making the a diecast iron No. 1666


LOOKING FOR


SOMETHING?

Wednesday's Sudoku is in the classified

section along with Dear Abby,

horoscopes, movie listings, a bonus

crossword puzzle and a host of other

features. The Sudoku solution still

appears in OurTown.


BRIDGE QUIZ
Look for the weekly
bridge quiz in
Saturday's real estate
classified section of the
Venice Gondolier Sun.
The answers appear in
Wednesday's Our Town.


steam locomotive.
As time went on, his
dream got placed on
the back burner while
school, work and family
took over his life. But
Campisi never forgot his
dream.
After building several
small train layouts in the
1950s at Christmastime,
his dream was rekindled
some 40 years later
when he visited a hobby
store in the mid-1990s.
He noticed the O scale
trains were much more
accurately detailed and
correctly sized than was
his old Lionel set.
Campisi lived in the
Columbia, Md., area at
the time. Fortunately,
two different manufac-
turers of the detailed O
scale trains were located
near there.
In his travels, Campisi
met Jerry Williams,
founder of Williams
Electric Trains now
owned by Bachmann, a
model railroad giant -
and Mike Wolf of MTH
Electric Trains. Peter's
interest peaked even
more, and he bought
some of these train
models, starting with the
Pennsylvania Railroad's
GG-1 electric locomotive
and the famous Berkshire
steam locomotive.
But the building of a
model railroad still had
to wait.
He moved to Venice in
2002 and began building
the foundation in 2004
for his miniature train
empire in a 15-by-25 foot
dedicated room in his
home. The long planning
process included length
and type of track, bench-
work (the underframe of
the layout), model struc-
tures to be assembled
and detailed, and scenery
with many trees.
Great lengths of
colored electrical wiring
(usually the hardest part)
and a control panel were


PHOTOS COURTESY OF PETER CAMPISI


A coaling tower is part of this toy train landscape.


A Big Boy locomotive is pictured near a backdrop of mountains in this landscape design.
A Big Boy locomotive is pictured near a backdrop of mountains in this landscape design.


completed by 2010.
Then he started the
more fun part of building
the layout scenery
construction. In 2011,
Campisi and his wife
JoAnn, a nature printer,
set apart every Thursday
as "art day." The project
gathered steam and now


is nearly completed.
Most interesting with
model railroading is
that a layout is never
truly finished, according
to Campisi. There are
always more details to
add, minor changes and
tweaks here and there,
and new ideas to try.


Campisi plans to keep
adding to his layout and
said, "This truly stunning
model train layout will
give me many more years
of artistic expression to
enjoy."
Tim Evert is a toy train
enthusiast who is helping
to coordinate the show.


SI*OUR LOCAL,
NOT-FOR-PROFIT
HOSPICE
SINCE 1980
prelenfi

1TSAWOw E LLIFE
Learn how Bea and Irv are living and loving
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To learn about Tidewell's programs and services, call
855-843-3935 anytime.
Serving Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte and DeSoto counties.


SOLUTION TO TODAY'S
CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD


6B SUN NEWSPAPERS




:WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28, 2013


Spanish Point improves


access


for those with disabilities


Publix.
LIQUORS


FROM HISTORIC SPANISH POINT
Historic Spanish Point
has upgraded its 30-acre
site for greater access for
individuals with disabilities.
John Mason, interim
director of the site said,
"We are pleased that with
these upgrades all visitors
may experience the his-
tory of the site and enjoy
its beauty regardless of
their disabilities."
With grant funds
received from an anony-
mous family foundation,
Historic Spanish Point
was able to leverage funds
from an exceptional
grant from the Institute
for Museum and Library
Science to acquire and
implement an assistive lis-
tening system for visitors
with hearing impairments.
Historic Spanish Point is
now the only museum in
Sarasota County to offer
this system to its visitors.


White Cottage is one of the historic buildings at Historic Spanish Point.


The Bernard and Mildred
Doyle Charitable Trust's
generous grant to Historic
Spanish Point is permitting
the museum to renovate its
historic Cock's Footbridge
and install ADA-compliant
handrails on the bridge to
ensure that all visitors can


access and traverse the
bridge comfortably.
Historic Spanish Point
has received a grant from
the William G. and Marie
Selby Foundation to assist
with the repaving of the
30-acre property's roads
and pathways. This grant
has been augmented by


a generous gift from Jim
and Kay Lauritsen, of
Osprey, along with support
from other friends and
members.
This project will greatly
increase the accessibility of
Historic Spanish Point to
all visitors, and especially
those with mobility issues.


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through Wednesday, September 4, 2013.
Liquor items are only available at Publix Liquors.
Visit publix.com/store to find the store nearest you.
Must be 21 years of age or older to purchase
alcoholic beverages. Quantity limits per customer apply.
D akeand/acksonvlle4CThursday 50450196


VJ Day


remembered


PHOTO COURTESY OF FRANK PATTI
Members of the Venice Tin Can Sailors who served
on U.S. Navy destroyers in World War II attended
the VJ Day (Victory in Japan that ended the war)
celebration at Sarasota Bay Front Park near the
sailor and nurse statue Aug. 14.


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Jewish Congregation

of Venice

Celebrate the High Holidays
With Us
Rabbi Daniel Krimsky and Cantor Marci Vitkus lead
our High Holiday worship using the new Reform Prayer
Book and featuring choral
and instrumental music
with both traditional and
modern melodies. Call for
information, about High
Holiday services, as well
as our weekly Shabbat
services, and a variety of "
social, cultural and educational activities throughout the
year. Our Religious School enrolls children in grades K-8
and offers Bar/Bat Mitzvah preparation. We welcome Jews
of diverse backgrounds, interfaith families, and anyone
interested in Judaism to all our worship services, classes,
activities and programs.
Jew '-' Congregation of Venice
600 N. Auburn Road, Venice, FL 34292
941-484-2022 ~ jcvenice2@gmail.com
ww.jewishcongregationofvenice.org
Minutes from 1-75 and US 41 v


Fiendship is Crucial to Longevi

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EVE RYDAN's 1 DAY Choose a Community That Feels Like Family

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Call Carol TODAY for more information at (941) 486-5484
920 Tamiami Trail South, Venice FL 34285


SUN NEWSPAPERS 7B


bUNIP rnulu DY liI O UUL








8B
WEDNESDAY
AUGUST 28, 2013


AROUND TOWN


CONTACT US
FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST
franvalencic@comcast.net
SUN NEWSPAPERS


SUN PHOTOS BY FRAN VALENCIC
Jack Turgeon, principal of Venice High School, and his wife
Katrina love celebrating the beautiful new Venice High School.
Jack talked about the school construction at the Rotary Futures
Comedy Night.


Debi Hammet (left) and Kim Kindell, director of the Rotary
Futures Program at Venice High School, look forward to another
year helping students find college scholarships. Debi served on
the Comedy Night committee.


Pam and Mayor John Holic offered their "Learn to Barbecue"
classes as a silent auction item for the Rotary Futures
Comedy Night.





A, R


LLLI
ILL
TLLj
ftl-L


Susan Hanks (left) and Dee Dee Jepsen review last minute
details of the Rotary Futures Comedy Night. Both women serve
on the board. Dee Dee chaired the Comedy Night fundraiser at
the Venice Yacht Club.


Scott, Kim and Julie Pinkerton enjoy the Rotary Futures Comedy
Night. Julie works at the Rotary Futures Program helping
students match up with scholarships. Kim is a Venice High
School alumni.


Stacy and Brent Pinkerton celebrate Stacy's birthday at the
Rotary Futures Comedy Night at the Venice Yacht Club.


Allison and Doug Laudenslager support the Rotary Futures Bob and Sue Vedder enjoyed bidding on several silent auction
program. items at the Rotary Futures Comedy Night.


Comedy Night raises funds


for Rotary Futures


FRAN VALENCIC
"Our Rotary Futu
Program is now in t
Venice High School
Administration Buil
right in front next to
office," Director Kin
Kindell announced
the Comedy Night.
"I have a swipe ca
and it's like opening
door to The Ritz Car
she added. "I don't e
have to turn the ligh
on. They go on whei
enter the room."
For 11 years, the
resource center has


housed in a portable
classroom. Now they are
front and center with
easier access for the stu-
dents. In 2013, students
received about $2.4 mil-
lion in scholarships to
follow their dreams. The
Center has a database of
750-plus scholarships.
Venice High Principal
Jack Turgeon told the
audience at the school
res college night, "Is 10
he times better than any
other in the county."
ding, "Academics always
ithe come first at Venice
n High," he added. He
at talked about the con-
struction. "We've gone
rd from 57 buildings to 3."
the He promised a com-
rlton," munity open house at
yven Venice High, "as soon as
its the dust settles."
n I The evening included
TimWilkins comedy
and a delicious Venice
been Yacht Club dinner. Chair


of the event Dee Dee
Jepsen kept the program
moving along. Sheriff
Tom Knight, aVenice
High alumni, doubled his
ride-along contribution
for the silent auction as
the bidding was so fierce.
Bob Vedder, who initi-
ated the Rotary Futures
Program, thanked a long
list of volunteers.
Bravo to everyone
involved with this terrific
annual fundraising event.

Two of our best
The special people
of this week are Karen
and Jim Woods, who are
celebrating their golden
wedding anniversary on
Aug. 31. Karen volunteers
for the Rotary Futures
Program and serves
on the board. She also
served on the event com-
mittee for the Comedy
Night.


Jim serves with the
Venice Nokomis Rotary
Club. This year he
chaired the Teacher
of the Year Award. He
always greets people at
the gate at the Rotary Art
Show. Jim also served on
the Venice City Council.
Together, they are a
happy duo. They enjoy
their walks around town,
traveling and enjoying all
the good things Venice
brings. Karen and Jim
look like high school
sweethearts. It's a plea-
sure to see two people
so in love after 50 years.
Warmest congratulations
and Happy Anniversary.
Jim and Karen Woods
are two people who make
Venice a great place to live.
Fran Valencic is the
Venice Gondolier Sun's
social columnist and
welcomes your ideas
and tips. Email her at
FranValencic@comcast. net.


Sherrey Welsh (left) and Elizabeth Skinner look forward to
fundraising events at the Venice Yacht Club.


Mark Pritchett (left), Gina Taylor, Caitlin and David Joyner share
stories about the work they do with VHS students. David gave
the invocation at the Rotary Futures Comedy Night.
-


Tim Wilkins (left) provided the entertainment for the Rotary
Futures Comedy Night. Jim Woods and Jeff Boone always
provide a little comedy of their own.


Rotary Futures volunteers (from left) Polly Skinner, Mollie
Johnson and Karen Woods help whenever needed.


Venice's Best Full-Service Retirement Community
Independent & Assisted Li ing nilh the Securi) ol On-Sile Heallhcare Ser ices
l(9-1 ) -408-2050 3600 \ illiiun Penn \\a, Venice, Florida


Please Be Our Guest!

Luncheon

& Tour

Sept. 12th

At 11:30 am
RSVP (941) 408-2050


Jacaranda Traic Reflident


Dci




Your Weekly Guide to Entertainment, Travel and Arts in Southwest Florida


Read Let's Go! online at
www.yoursun.com


N1o


ROOOPEN HOUSE SPECIAL
Bring this ad and receive 6 MONTHS FREE
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Your guide for the

57th Annual Pioneer Days


Arcadia Englewood *Fort Myers North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Sarasota *Venice


2400 Kings Hwy
Port Charlotte, FL 980 Featuring Top Music & Entertainment
941-629-9191 Talents From all over the USA
WWW.vIsanl net


PASTA NIGHT $9.95
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY p us reg me,
Doors Open for Dinner 3:30pm


CM ZEi SSC VNICM66N


Comedy Hypnotist
Rich Guzzi
August 28th September 1st


Tuesday September 17th
I Dwight Icenhower
Elvis Tribute
SDinner Show


He Played Joey on the
TV Show Full House
Dave Coulier
October 16th -19th


Restaurant & Comedy Zone





E' /CI/'.' August 28-September 3, 2013


GO OUT AND ABOUT


MWednesday

DJ SCUBE STEVE, 8 p.m.- close. Cornhole
contest 8 p.m. close. Rattler's Old West Saloon,
111 W. Oak St.,Arcadia.
LIVE MUSIC WITH DANE, 5 p.m.- 7 p.m.
$5 Philly cheesesteak sandwiches. Englewood
VFW, 550 N. McCall Rd., Englewood.
941-474-7516.
FORBIDDEN FRUIT FARMERS, (live
music), 7 p.m. Englewoods on Dearborn, 362 W.
Dearborn St., Englewood. 941-475-7501.
MOMENTS 2 REMEMBER, (live music),
6 p.m. -10 p.m. Englewood Moose 1933,
55 W. Dearborn St., Englewood. 941-473-2670.


Summer Specials
Monday AII-L ,.. a-r.Eal I'Di--D I':1 : : alal IEulllr
$7.99* Tuesday : Ta.:.:.: l11 IT ., I.,:.i-,, Wednesday
Lobster Night : I. Friday .illi'.1 .Iar, al Fi 'I-, Fr,
$10.95 Salurday 1i'l n- i i:t i r ii i _
Burnt Store Marina
3200 Matecumbe Key Rd., Punta Gorda
941-639-3650

NEXXLEVEL, 6:30 p.m. No cover. Come dance
to the music of Motown and more. Beyond The Sea
Restaurant and Supper Club, 3555 S. Access Rd.,
Englewood. Call 941-474-1400 for reservations.
JAZZ JAM, 6:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Cactus Jack
Southwest Grill, 3448 Marinatown Lane, North
Fort Myers. 239-652-5787.
BELLY DANCING, 6:45 p.m. Greek Grill
and Gallery, 14828 Tamiami Trail, North Port.
941-423-6400.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Spankey's Bowling Alley, 299 S. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-240-2675.
KARAOKE, with Mark McKinley. 7 p.m. -
10 p.m. North Port Family Restaurant, 14525
Tamiami Trail, North Port. 941-426-9885.
KARAOKE, with DJ Rockin' Ray, 8 p.m. Porky's
Roadhouse, 4300 Kings Highway, Port Charlotte.
941-629-2114.
KARAOKE, with DJ John. 9 p.m.- midnight.
Applebee's, 19010 Murdock Cir., Port Charlotte.
941-766-0666.
KARAOKE, with Billy G., 6 p.m. 10:30 p.m.
F. 0. E. Eagles #3296, 23111 Harborview Rd., Port
Charlotte. 941-629-1645.
KITT MORAN, (jazz), 6 p.m.-9 p.m. J.D's
Bistro Grille, 1951 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte.
941-255-0994.
BIG DOGS LIVE TRIVIA CHALLENGE,
7 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Free to play. Top three teams
share $100 in gift certificates. Chubby'z Tavern,
4109 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte. 941-613-
0002.
TRIVIA WITH MIKE, 7 p.m.- 9 p.m. Happy
hour all night. Beef'0' Brady's, 1105 Taylor Rd.,
Punta Gorda. 941-505-2333.
TRIVIA NIGHT, 8 p.m The Celtic Ray, 145 E.
Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. 941-916-9115.
KARAOKE, 6:30 p.m.- close. Allegro Bistro,
1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8 a.m. and 7:45 p.m. Certified yoga
instructor with 35 years of experience. Venice
Beach Pavilion.

SThursday

KARAOKE WITH MIZ EDNA, 8 p.m. -
close. Rattler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St.,
Arcadia. 863-494-6803.
LIVE BLUES NIGHT, (blues), 7 p.m.
Englewoods on Dearborn, 362 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-475-7501.
PAST PRESIDENTS DINNER WITH
JUST DU-ET, (live music), 6 p.m. 9 p.m.
Englewood Eagles #3885,250 Old Englewood Rd.,
Englewood. 941-474-9802.
KATE KEYS,(live music), 6:30p.m. no cover.
Beyond The Sea Restaurant and Supper Club,
3555 S. Access Rd., Englewood. Call
941-474-1400 for reservations.
BINGO, 7:15 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Play
for $1. Proceeds to benefit children's charities.
Rotonda Elks, 303 Rotonda Blvd. East, Rotonda.
941-697-2710.
nooo


TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, registration
5 p.m., play from 6 p.m.- 11 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Rd., Englewood. 941-473-ZONE.
LEMON BAY BARBERSHOP CHO-
RUS, 6:30 p.m. Rehearsal open to the public.
Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-429-0215.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, 6:15 p.m.
Englewood Moose 1933, 55 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-473-2670.
JIM MORRIS, (live music), 6 p.m.- 9 p.m.
Nav-A-Gator, 9700 SW Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy.
941-627-3474. Cover charge: canned goods and
nonperishable food items.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami Trail,
North Port. 941-426-1155.
KARAOKE, 8 p.m.- 11 p.m. Buffalo Wild
Wings. 4301 Aiden Lane, North Port. 941-429-
9722.
KARAOKE BY DJ DON AND JO, 6 p.m.
It's pasta night at the Sons of Italy, $7.50 for
members, and $8.50 for guests. Sons of Italy,
3725 Easy St., Port Charlotte. Call for reserva-
tions, 941-764-9003.
KARAOKE, 6 p.m.- 9 p.m. With DJ Don.
The Portside Tavern, 3636 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte. 941-629-3055.


Thurs. Blues Mike Quick Band
7pr
Fri. Democracy Reggae Band 7p
Sat. Betty Fox Blues Band 7pro

HANDBAG HAPPY HOUR, 5 p.m. -
8 p.m. to benefit The Animal Welfare League
of Charlotte County. Live and silent auction, as
well as door prizes and light hors d'oevures to be
served. D'Vines Wine and Gift Emporium, 701 JC
Center Ct., Port Charlotte. 941-627-9463.
GUITAR ARMY, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Gilchrist
Park, Punta Gorda.
NEXXLEVEL, (live music), 5 p.m. 9 p.m.
Tiki Bar, next to the Four Points by Sheraton in
Punta Gorda.
BOURBONAUTS, (live music), 9 p.m. The
Celtic Ray, 145 E, Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.
941-916-9115.
CLASSIC GOLD ENTERTAINMENT,
('50s/Elvis Music), 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Allegro Bis-
tro, 1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8 a.m. and 7:45 p.m. Certified yoga
instructor with 35 years of experience. Venice
Beach Pavilion.

* Friday

SADDLE TRAMP, (live music) 8 p.m.
Rattler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St.,
Arcadia. 863-494-6803.
RAPS-O-DEE, (live music), 6 p.m. -10 p.m.
Englewood Moose 1933,55 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-473-2670.
JIMMY JAY, (live music) 6 p.m.-9 p.m.
La Stanza Restaurant, 285 W. Dearborn St, Engle-
wood. 941-475-1355.
SUN DOWN, (live music), 6:30 p.m. Ricaltini's
Bar and Grill, 1997 Kentucky Ave., Englewood.
941-828-1591.
SEAMUS MCCARTHY, (live music),
6:30 p.m.- 9:30 p.m. Stump Pass Grill and Tiki Bar,
260 Maryland Ave., Englewood. 941-697-0859.
MEMORIES, (live music), 6:30 p.m. A talented
trio playing all your favorites. No cover. Beyond The
Sea Restaurant and Supper Club, 3555 S. Access Rd.,
Englewood. Call 941-474-1400 for reservations.
COUNTRY EXPRESS BAND, (live music),
6:30 p.m.- 10:30 p.m. Englewood Eagles #3885,250
Old Englewood Rd., Englewood. 941-474-9802.
DEMOCRACY, (reggae), 7 p.m. Englewoods
on Dearborn, 362 W. Dearborn St., Englewood.
941-475-7501.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Armadillo's, 622 N. Indiana Ave., Englewood.
941-474-2356.


KARAOKE, 9 p.m. The New Faull Inn,
2670 Placida Rd., Englewood. 941-697-8050.
BINGO, 5:45 p.m. warm-up with games to
follow, pks start at $20. Proceeds go to children's
charities. Englewood Elks, 401 N. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-474-1404.
TRIVIA NIGHT, (live music), 8 p.m. Open
late for dining and enjoyment. Nav-A-Gator, 9700
SW Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy. 941-627-3474.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 12:30 p.m. -
4 p.m. Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami
Trail, North Port. 941-426-1155.
KARAOKE, 7 p.m. -10 p.m. The Olde World
Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami Trail, North Port.
941-426-1155.
KARAOKE, with Mark McKinley. 7 p.m. -
10 p.m. North Port Family Restaurant, 14525
Tamiami Trail, North Port. 941-426-9885.
BINGO, 11 a.m. All proceeds benefit the
Charlotte County Homeless Coalition. Port Char-
lotte Elks Lodge #2153, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd.,
Port Charlotte. 941-627-4313 ext. 115.
BINGO, 5:30 p.m. Port Charlotte VFW Post
5690, 23204 Freedom Ave., Port Charlotte.
941-467-4447.
ONLY CALIFORNIA WINE TASTING,
7 p.m. 9 p.m. Juke Joint Johnny and his band
with live music at 8 p.m. D'Vines Wine and Gift
Emporium, 701 JC Center Ct., Port Charlotte.
941-627-9463.
PAUL COTTRELL, (live music), on the pa-
tio from 5 p.m. 8 p.m. The Portside Tavern, 3636
Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte. 941-629-3055.
KARAOKE WITH THE CONNECTION,
8 p.m.- midnight. Nemos in Bowland, 3192 Har-
bor Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-625-4794.
DAVE MOORE, (live music), 7 p.m. -
11 p.m. Wyvern Rooftop, 1010 E. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda. 941-639-7700.


(UM4PPASS


'i Fri. Aug 30W
1 6:30-9:30
Seamus McCarthy Band
Sat. Aug 31 5:00-8:00
I Tommy D
941-697-0859 '' ...... "


SWEET CHARIOTS featuring Rock a Billy,
(live music), 10 p.m, The Celtic Ray, 145 E. Marion
Ave., Punta Gorda. 941-916-9115.
NEXXLEVEL, (live music), 9 p.m.- 1 a.m.
Harpoon Harry's, 1200 W. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda.
ZOMBIE UNIVERSITY, (live music),
6 p.m. -10 p.m. Tiki Bar, next to the Four Points by
Sheraton in Punta Gorda.
BEANS AND SEEDS, (Trop-rock), 5 p.m.-
9 p.m. Fishermen's Village Center Stage, 1200 W.
Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda.
KARAOKE WITH DJ JOHN, 9 p.m.-
midnight. Applebees Venice, 4329 Tamiami Trail,
Venice. 941-497-7740.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH PA-
VILION, 8 a.m. Certified yoga instructor with
35 years of experience. Venice Beach
Pavilion.

SSaturday

SADDLE TRAMP, (live music) 8 p.m. Rat-
tler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St., Arcadia.
863-494-6803.
WALLY RUTAN, (live music), 6:30 p.m.
Ricaltini's Bar and Grill, 1997 Kentucky Ave.,
Englewood. 941-828-1591.
VOICES CARRY, (live music), 6 p.m. -
10 p.m. Englewood Moose 1933, 55 W. Dearborn
St., Englewood. 941-473-2670.
TOMMY D., (live music), 5 p.m.- 8 p.m.
Stump Pass Grill and Tiki Bar, 260 Maryland Ave.,
Englewood. 941-697-0859.
PATTY FOX BAND, (live music), 7 p.m.
Englewoods on Dearborn, 362 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-475-7501.
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION
NIGHT, beach party, 7 p.m. close. Claire
Litke plays at 8 p.m. D'Vines Wine and Gift
Emporium, 701 JC Center Ct., Port Charlotte.
941-627-9463.


BEANS AND SEEDS, (trop-rock),
6:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Gasparilla Marina Wa-
terside Grill, 15001 Gasparilla Rd., Placida.
800-541-4441.
NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY WALK,
9 a.m. Join the Mangrove Chapter of the Native
Plant Society for a fun and informational slow
stroll on trails of Anger Creek Joseph Parcel,
1049 Morningside Dr., Englewood. Meet at the
gate and drive inside the gate as the roadside
is private property. Everyone is welcome. Wear
shoes that can get wet, a sun hat, sun screen and
bring insect repellant and drinking water. For
more information call 941-474-8316.
JIMMY JAY, (live music) 6 p.m.- 9 p.m.
La Stanza Restaurant, 285 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-475-1355.
ALL YOU CAN EAT BREAKFAST,
8 a.m.- 10 a.m. $5. Englewood VFW, 550 N. Mc-
Call Rd., Englewood. 941-474-7516.
THREE OF A KIND, (live music), 6:30 p.m.
-10:30 p.m. Englewood Eagles #3885,250 Old
Englewood Rd., Englewood. 941-474-9802.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 5 p.m. to
close. Spankey's Bowling Alley, 299 S. Indiana
Ave., Englewood. 941-240-2675.
BINGO, 1 p.m. VFW, 550 N. McCall Rd.,
Englewood. 941-474-7516.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, registration
5 p.m., play from 6 p.m. -11 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Rd., Englewood. 941-473-ZONE.
NAME THE GAME, 8 p.m. Open late for
dining and enjoyment. Nav-A-Gator, 9700 SW
Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy. 941-627-3474.
KARAOKE, 7 p.m. 10p.m. North Port Fam-
ily Restaurant, 14525 Tamiami Trail, North Port.
941-426-9885.
NORTH PORT FARMERS/CRAFT
MARKET, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. 14942 Tamiami Trail,
North Port. 941-240-6100.
KITT MORAN, (jazz), 7 p.m.-10 p.m. J.D.'s
Bistro Grille, 1951 Tamiami Trail, Port Char-
lotte. 941-255-0994.
KARAOKE, Port Charlotte VFW Post 5690,
23204 Freedom Ave., Port Charlotte. 941-467-
4447.
BETH MARSHALL, (live music), 5 p.m.-
8 p.m. Pop's Port 0 Call, 4230 El Jobean Rd., Port
Charlotte. 941-391-6751.
KARAOKE WITH THE CONNECTION,
8 p.m.-midnight. Nemos in Bowland, 3192 Harbor
Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-625-4794.


FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, noon-
4:30 p.m. Dean's North of the Border, 23064 Har-
borview Dr., Port Charlotte. 941-240-2675.
KARAOKE WITH DJ DON, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Portside Tavern, 3636 Tamiami Trail, Port Char-
lotte. 941-629-3055 or www.theportside.com.
GAS HOUSE GORILLAS, (live music),
9 p.m. Porky's Roadhouse, 4300 Kings Highway,
Port Charlotte. 941-629-2114.
PUNTA GORDA FARMERS MARKET,
8 a.m.- 1 p.m. Taylor Street and W. Olympia
Avenue, Punta Gorda.
THE CRASHERS, (live music), 7 p.m.-
11 p.m. Tiki Bar, next to the Four Points by Shera-
ton in Punta Gorda.
NEXXLEVEL, (live music), 9 p.m.- 1 a.m.
Harpoon Harry's, 1200 W. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda.
OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET, 8:30 a.m.-
1 p.m. Head to the Punta Gorda Historic Train
Depot Antique and Collectibles Mall to relax, get
some shade and enjoy the outdoor flea market.
The Freight Dock is located at 1009 Taylor Rd.,
and Carmalita Street, Punta Gorda. For more
information call 941-639-6774.
FLURGIN, (live music), featuring Celtic rock
and more. 7 p.m. The Celtic Ray, 145 E, Marion
Ave., Punta Gorda. 941-916-9115.
OUT AND ABOUT 14


Let's Go!





August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


Some things to look for


We've made, and will be making some
subtle changes to the features in Let's Go!
First, you may have noticed the last few
weeks we have been doing "Dining Out With..."
in the dining section. Instead of just picking
two random restaurants and writing about
what to expect when you go, we decided to
spice it up a bit We are still featuring one
restaurant of our choice, but now we are also
leaving it up to you as well. We chose to inter-
view members of the community, business
owners, CEOs, county commissioners etc., basi-
cally people who probably eat out quite often,
and ask what their favorite restaurant is. Not
only do you get to know some members of the
community a little better, but the restaurants
featured are personally recommended by



ets Go! Featuredior


We transplanted people who grew up in
the snowy north have a lot to learn about
gardening here in Zone 10.
Petunias and tomatoes are best planted
in the fall and some favorite plants from up
north should become houseplants here just as
we might have grown Oyster plant as a house
plant up north.
To learn such things and so much more,
head to the demonstration gardens at Sham-
rock Park Nature Center, 3900 Shamrock Drive,
Venice, Monday morning from 9 a.m. to
11 a.m. Master gardeners will be there to give


them, so you know they are worth a try. We
feel this new feature adds an entertaining
read to a publication that is all about enter-
tainment
Speaking of entertaining reads, he's brought
you"Upbeat" every week featuring fun music
facts and trivia. He has also brought you
"Mozzie's Awesome Adventure"in Let's Go!
Pets, a six-week series about his dog Mozzie's
adventure to obedience school. Now, Tom
Lovasko will be writing a weekly movie review
column for our readers. We have struggled in
the past with developing a movie section that
will be useful and entertaining for our readers,
and we think a local opinion will be a fun and
informative read for those of you trying to
decide which movie to watch at the theater


this weekend. Tom's movie column will start
next week in the movie section of Let's Go! He
will write a review of what he thought of a
movie of his choice and we will rate it either
"Let's Go!/Not Go."
We also want to give the readers a chance
to share their opinions. If you attend movies
regularly and have an opinion on whether
or not the movie you just saw was worth
the ticket price, send us an email to letsgo@
sun-herald.com stating if you would recom-
mend the movie to other readers. The ratings
will only be listed for movies that are still
in theaters. If no rating is listed we haven't
received any feedback on that particular show.
Again, the movie review column will begin
nextweek. Have a greatweek!


Transplanting and more for transplants'


tours of seven plots: wildlife, cacti, sea-sonals
(relating to salt tolerance for those living close
to the beach), edibles, ground covers, shrubs,
perennials, ornamental grasses and butterfly
gardens. Forget what you thought you knew
and pay attention to these experts who
studied long and hard for several years to learn
what they will share with you for free.
There is more to Florida gardening than
just avoiding planting ficus trees and bamboo
in the ground. For more information, call
941-486-2706.
If gardening isn't your thing, how about


acting? New classes are starting are Venice
Theatre, The Players of Sarasota, Florida Studio
Theatre and others. Check with your favorite
theater. Most offer classes in singing, dancing,
acting, playwriting and more. Or, see about
volunteering at any of the area theaters. They
all need a variety of helpers to succeed. If
you can sew dresses, tailor men's suits, create
marvelous hats, build sets, apply makeup,
usher, paint scenery and drops, operate light
and sound equipment or serve on the stage
crew, there likely is a job available.
Break a leg!


Your weekly guide to
entertainment, travel and
arts in Southwest Florida

Let's Go! on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/SunCoast
LetsGo

President
David Dunn-Rankin

Publisher
Carol Moore
941-681-3031
cymoore@sun-herald.com

Editor
Casey Ortlieb
941-681-3006
cortlieb@sun-herald.com

Let's Go!
letsgo@sun-herald.com
120 W. Dearborn St.
Englewood, FL 34223
www.sunnewspapers.net

Please submit information
at least two weeks before the
event. To send items for the
calendar, please include the
time, location, cost of tickets
and where to get them, and
a telephone number to call


Saturday, September 21, 2013
Port Charlotte Beach Complex, 4500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte
Cocktails at 6 PM & Dinner at 7 PM
Purchase a $10 wristband and enjoy the open bar 6-10 PM
Get a taste of New England with our 13th Anniversary specials for only $75, Twin
Lobsters (each 1/4 Ib.), or Steak & Lobster, with all the fixings! Other entries include
One 1 Ib. Maine Lobster for $60, And for $50 Steamer Pot, Sirloin steak, Chicken


With Phil sn, Auctioneer Extrordinaire
Music by Jeff Collins "The Golden Hippo" Proceeds Benefit Charlotte
Dancing, Raffles, Auctions and "Mystery Gift" County Historical Center programs.
Trip to Key West Live Auction Item

C Tickets must be purchased before September 18, 2013
Make your reservation today: 941-629-7278 -
Visa/MC accepted by phone. Tickets will not be available at the door.

SUNJ W Mosaic
SUN-* NEWSPAPERS 'LRO T


I


I ................................................................


Let's Go!





E11 N/C/'' August 28-September 3, 2013


G O OUT AND ABOUT/MOVIES


OUT AND ABOUT
from page 2

* Saturday

JASON AND THE PUNKNECKS,
(hillbilly punk rock), 10 p.m. The Celtic Ray, 145 E.
Marion Ave., PLntoi Gordo 941-916-9115.
MICHAEL HIRST, (live music), 5 p.m.
9 p.m. Fishermen's Village Center Stage, 1200 W.
Retta Esplanade, Plunto Gordo.
TRIO DE JANERIO, (live music), 7 p.m.
11 p.m. Wyvern Rooftop, 1010 E. Retta Esplanade,
Punto Gordo 941-639-7700.
BANDANA, (live music), 6 p.m. 10 p.m.
Ramada Inn "Wave Grill, 425 Highway 41 Bypass,
Venice. 941-308-7700.
VENICE FARMERS MARKET,8 a.m.
noon. Centennial Park, Downlown Venice. Local
produce, plants, flowers, crafts, jewelry, soaps,
imported oils, seafood, pastries and more.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH PA-
VILION, 8 a.m. Certfied yoga instructor with
35 years of experience. Venice Beoch
Pa\ 'lion

i Sunday

BLUE PLATE DINNER, 4 p.m. 6 p .m.
$6. Karaoke from 4 p.m.- 7 p.m. VFW, 550 N.
McCall Rd., Englet ood. 941-474-7516.
BREAKFAST AT ENGLEWOOD
ELKS, 8 a.m. noon. 56.50 all you can eat.
Englewood Elks, 401 N. Indiana Ave., Engle-
wood. 941-474-1404.
"ENGLEWOOD'S BEST SUNDAY
BRUNCH;' 10 30 a.m. 3 p.m. One free
Mimosa, Sally Dog or Bloody Mary with brunch.
Beyond the Sea Restaurant and Supper Club,
3555 S. Access Rd., Engleit ood. 941-474-1400.


TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, registration
5 p.m., play from 6 p.m. 11 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Road, Engleit ~ ood. 941-473-ZONE.
TRU KOUNTRY BAND, country) 1 p.m.-
4 p.m. The Shell Factory, 2787 N. Tamiami Trail,
Fort A I) ers 239-677-9734.
BEANS AND SEEDS, (live music 5 p.m.-
8 p.m. Pinchers Crab Shack, 6890 Estero Blvd.,
Fort A 1) ers Beoch. 239-463-2909.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 12 30 p.m.
4 p.m. Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami Trail,
North Port. 941-426-1155.
BIG SUNDAY BREAKFAST,9a.m. 11 a.m.
All-you-can-eat breakfast for 56. Amvets Post 312,
7050 Chancellor Blvd., North Port. 941-276-1300.
THE CRASHERS, (live music), 2p.m.-
6 p.m. Porky's Roadhouse, 4300 Kings Highway,
Port ihorlotte. 941-629-2114.
CHEEZE AND KRACKERS, (live music ,
and hog roast, noon. Pop's Port 0 Call, 4230 El
Jobean Rd., Port Chorlotte. 941-391-6751.
SUNSET BLUES BAND, (blues), 1 p.m.
5 p.m. Tilly's Tap Highway 17, 3149 Duncan Rd.,
Punito Gordo. 941-505-0798.
OPEN MIC NIGHT, 8 p.m. The Celtic Ray,
145 E. Marion Ave., Puntco Gordo 941-916-9115.
CLIVE, (live music), Dean's South of the
Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, PunLto Gordlo.
941-575-6100.
FARMERS MARKET, 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.
History Park, 501 Shreve St., PLunto Gorido. Shop
for vegetables, meals, plants, gifts and more.
Most Sundays you will be treated with live music
by Dave Heveron. Don't forget about Miss Starr's
garden tours when the market closes at 1 p.m.
Even with our hot Florida weather, Ihe gardens
flourish. If you attended the tour in the past, you'll
be surprised at what now awaits in the garden.
A 55 suggested donation gets you a plant to
take home. History Park, 501 Shreve St., PunLto
Gordlo. 941-380-6814.


EDDIE MONEY LIVE, (live music, 9 p.m.
Tikets are currently on sale. Tikets are S40 and can
be purchased at www.ickelmaster.com. Must be 21
years of age or older. Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and
CasinoTampa, 5223 Onent Rd., Toompo.
813-627-7625.

SMonday

LABOR DAY CELEBRATION WITH
QUIET FIRE, (live music), Englewood Eagles #3885,
250 Old Englewood Rd., Englet blood.
941-474-9802.
TRIVIA, 6 p.m. -10 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Rd. Engleit ioo. 941-473-ZONE.
LIVE MUSIC, Slump Pass Gnll andTiki Bar, 260
Maryland Ave., Engleit .oo. 941-697-0859.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE,6 p.m.- close.
Banditos, 5665 S. McCall Rd., Engleit iood.
941240-2675.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, noon-
4 30 p.m. Armadillo's Billiard & Brew, 622 N. Indi-
ana Ave., Englei ood. 941-474-2356.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m. close.
Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamlami Trail, North
Port.941-426-1155.
JOYFUL RINGERS, 4 p.m.- 6 p.m. The Joyful
Ringers Handbell Choir invites prospective bell ring
ers to join them in their 2012-13 season. North Port
High School Music Suie, 6400 W. Pnce Blvd., North
Port. 941-423-0706.
NORTH PORT CHORALE REHEARS-
AL, 6 30 p.m.- 9 p.m. A community chorus that
residents are invited to join. North Port High School
Music Suie, 6400 W. Pnce Blvd., North Port. 941-
961-9557.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, Port
Charlotte VFW Post 5690, 23204 Freedom Ave., Port
Chorlotte 941-467-4447.


WES LOPPER, (live music), Dean's South of
the Border, 130 Tamlami Trail, PLunto Gordo.
941-575-6100.
DUAL-SAX RON ANDTHE HOR-
NETS, (jazz), 5 30 p.m.-8 30 p.m. Allegro Bistro,
1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8a.m. and 7 p.m. Certfied yoga
instructor. Venice Beoch Poi lion
LABOR DAY BASH WITH BANDANA,
(live music), 2 p.m.- 5 p.m. American Legion Post
159, 17770 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-485-4748.

*Tuesday

FREE LINE DANCE, 7 p.m.- 9p.m. Rattler's
Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St., 4rcodio
FREETEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m. -close.
Nikki's Place, 1599 South McCall Rd., Engleit iood.
941-234-2675.
OPEN MIC NIGHT, 6 p.m. Lake View
Restaurant, 5605 S. McCall Road, Port Chorlotte.
941-697-9200.
FREETEXAS HOLD'EM POKER,7 p.m.
Porky's Roadhouse, 4300 Kings Highway, Port
Chorlotte. 941-629-2114.
BINGO, 11 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Char-
lotte County Homeless Coalition. Port Charlotte
Elks Lodge #2153, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd., Port
Chorlotte 941-627-4313 ext. 115.
FREETEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Dean's North of the Border, 23063 Harborview
Blvd., Port Clorlotte. 941-743-6100.
TORCHED, (live music), Dean's South of the Bor-
der, 130TamiamiTrail, Punto Gordo. 941-575-6100.
JAZZ IZZ IT, (jazz), 6 p.m.- 9 p.m. The Allegro
Bistro, 1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH PAVIL-
ION, 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Certified yoga inslc tor.


Closed Circuit | Runtime: 1 hr. 36
min. I Rated R for language and brief
violence.
A terrorist attack in London results in the capture
of suspect Farroukh Erdogan (Denis Moschitto). The
attorney general appoints Claudia Simmons-Howe
(Rebecca Hall) as special advocate on Erdogan's
legal team. On the eve of the trial, Erdogan's
lawyer dies, and a new defense attorney, Martin
Rose (Eric Bana), steps in. Martin and Claudia are
former lovers, a fact which must remain hidden. As
Martin assembles his case, he uncovers a sinister
conspiracy, placing him and Claudia in danger.
Getaway I Runtime: Not specified.
| Rated PG-13 for intense action,
violence and mayhem throughout,
some rude gestures and language.
Though he used to race cars for a living, Brent
Magna (Ethan Hawke) is now pitted against the
clock in the most important race of his life; an
unseen criminal (Jon Voight) has kidnapped Brent's
wife, and to get her back, he must follow the man's
instructions to the letter. Brent commandeers
the ultimate muscle car a custom Ford Shelby
GT500 Super Snake and, with a tech-savvy
young passenger (Selena Gomez), sets out on a
high-speed chase to rescue his beloved.
One Direction: This is us I Runtime:
1 hr. 35 min. I Rated PG for mild
language.
"One Direction: This is us"is a captivating and
intimate all-access look at life on the road for the
global music phenomenon. Weaved with stunning


live concert footage, this inspiring feature film tells
the remarkable story of Niall, Zayn, Liam, Harry
and Louis'meteoric rise to fame, from their humble
hometown beginnings and competing on the
X-Factor, to conquering the world and performing
at London's famed 02 Arena. Hear it from the boys
themselves and see through their own eyes what
it's really like to be One Direction.

OTHER MOVIES PLAYING
THIS WEEK
The Mortal Instruments: City of
Bones I Runtime: 2 hr. 10 min. I
Rated PG-13 for intense sequences
of fantasy violence and action, and
some suggestive content.
Set in contemporary NewYork City, a seemingly
ordinary teenager, Clary Fray (Lily Collins), discovers
she is the descendant of a line of Shadowhunters,
a secret cadre of young half-angel warriors locked
in an ancient battle to protect our world from
demons. After the disappearance of her mother
(Lena Headey), Clary must join forces with a
group of Shadowhunters, who introduce her to a
dangerous alternate NewYork called Downworld,
filled with demons, warlocks, vampires, were-
wolves and other deadly creatures. Based on the
worldwide best-selling book series.
The Worlds End I Runtime: 1 hr.
49 min. I Rated R for pervasive
language and sexual references.
Gary King (Simon Pegg) is an immature 40-year-
old who's dying to take another stab at an epic
pub-crawl that he last attempted 20 years earlier.
He drags his reluctant buddies back to their home-


town and sets out for a night of heavy drinking. As
they make their way toward their ultimate destina-
tion the fabled World's End pub Gary and his
friends attempt to reconcile the past and present.
However, the real struggle is for the future when
their journey turns into a battle for mankind.
You're Next I Runtime: 1 hr. 34
min.I Rated NR for language, strong
bloody violence and some
sexuality/nudity.
One of the smartest and most terrifying films in
years, "You're Next"reinvents the genre by putting
a fresh twist on home-invasion horror. When a
gang of masked, ax-wielding murderers descends
upon the Davison family reunion, the hapless
victims seem trapped ... until an unlikely guest of
the family proves to be the most talented killer of
all.
Jobs I Runtime: 2 hr. 5 min. I Rated
PG-13 for some drug content and
brief strong language.
Directed by Joshua Michael Stern, written by
Matthew Whiteley, shot by Oscar-winning cinema-
tographer Russell Carpenter and produced by Mark
Hulme,"Jobs" details the major moments and
defining characters that influenced Steve Jobs on a
daily basis from 1971 through 2001."Jobs" plunges
into the depths of his character, creating an intense
dialogue-driven story that is as much a sweeping
epic as it is an immensely personal portrait of Steve


Jobs'life.
Kick Ass 2 Runtime: 1 hr. 47 min.
| Rated R for strong violence, perva-
sive language, crude and sexual
content and brief nudity.
Dave (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), aka Kick-Ass,
and Mindy (Chloe Grace Moretz), aka Hit Girl, are
trying to live as normal teenagers and briefly form
a crimefighting team. After Mindy is busted and
forced to retire as Hit Girl, Dave joins a group of
amateur superheroes led by Col. Stars and Stripes
(Jim Carrey), a reformed mobster. Just as Dave
and company start to make a real difference on
the streets, the villain formerly known as Red Mist
(Chnstopher Mintz-Plasse) rears his head yet again.
Lee Daniels' The Butler I Runtime:
2 hr. 12 min. I Rated PG-13 for
thematic elements, sexual mate-
rial, language, disturbing images,
smoking and some violence.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler"tells the story of a
White House butler who served eight American
presidents over three decades. The film traces the
dramatic changes that swept American society
during this time, from the civil rights movement
to Vietnam and beyond, and how those changes
affected this man's life and family. Forest Whitaker
stars as the butler with Robin Williams as Dwight
Eisenhower, John Cusack as Richard Nixon, Alan
Rickman as Ronald Reagan, James Marsden as John


Let's Go!





August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


MOVIES GO


This film publicity image released by Focus Features shows, from left, Martin
Freeman, Paddy Considine, Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, and Eddie Marsan in a scene from
"The World's End."(AP Photo/Focus Features, Laurie Sparham)


F. Kennedy, Liev Schreiber as Lyndon B. Johnson,
and many more.
Paranoia I Runtime: 1 hr. 46 min. |
Rated PG-13 for violence, some sexu-
ality and language.
In this high-stakes thriller, Adam Cassidy (Liam
Hemsworth) is a charming, blue collar guy trying to
get ahead in his entry-level job at Wyatt Telecom.
But after one costly and illegal mistake, Adam
is confronted by ruthless CEO Nicholas Wyatt. He
won't turn Adam in under one condition: Adam
must agree to infiltrate the competition as a
corporate spy. Adam soon finds himself packaged
for success, surrounded by glamorous boardrooms,
expensive cars, and a life he only dreamed of. But
behind the scenes, Wyatt is pulling the strings -
stopping at nothing, even murder, to win a multi-
billion dollar advantage. Realizing he's nothing
more than a pawn in his boss's ruthless game,
Adam's only way out is to go in deeper.
We're the Millers I Runtime: 1 hr.
49 min. I Rated R for crude sexual
content, pervasive language, drug
material and brief graphic nudity.
Small-time pot dealer David (Jason Sudeikis)
learns the hard way that no good deed goes
unpunished; trying to help some teens, he is
jumped by thugs and loses his cash and stash.
Now, David's in big debt to his supplier and to
wipe the slate clean he must go to Mexico to
pick up the guy's latest shipment. To accomplish his
mission, Dave devises a foolproof plan: He packs a
fake family into a huge RV and heads south of the
border for a wild weekend that is sure to end with
a bang.
Elysium I Runtime: 1 hr. 49 min. |
Rated R for strong bloody violence
and language throughout.
In the year 2159, humanity is sharply divided


between two classes of people: The ultrarich live
aboard a luxurious space station called Elysium,
and the rest live a hardscrabble existence in Earth's
ruins. His life hanging in the balance, a man
named Max (Matt Damon) agrees to undertake
a dangerous mission that could bring equality to
the population, but Secretary Delacourt (Jodie
Foster) vows to preserve the pampered lifestyle of
Elysium's citizens, no matter what the cost.
Planes I Runtime: 1 hr. 32 min. |
Rated PG for some mild action and
rude humor.
From above the world of"Cars"comes"Disney's
Planes'an action-packed 3D animated comedy
adventure featuring Dusty (Dane Cook), a plane
with dreams of competing as a high-flying air racer.
But Dusty's not exactly built for racing-and he
happens to be afraid of heights. So he turns to a
seasoned naval aviator who helps Dusty qualify to
take on the defending champ of the race circuit.
Dusty's courage is put to the ultimate test as he
aims to reach heights he never dreamed possible,
giving a spellbound world the inspiration to soar.
The Smurfs 21 Runtime: 1 hr. 45
min. I Rated PG for some rude humor
and action.
In this sequel to Columbia Pictures/Sony Pictures
Animation's hybrid live action/animated family
blockbuster comedy"The Smurfs:'the evil wizard
Gargamel creates a couple of mischievous Smurf-
like creatures called the Naughties that he hopes
will let him harness the all-powerful, magical
Smurf-essence. But when he discovers that only a
real Smurf can give him what he
wants, and only a secret spell that Smurfette knows
can turn the Naughties into real Smurfs, Gargamel
kidnaps Smurfette and brings her to Paris, where
he has been winning the adoration of millions as
the world's greatest sorcerer.
2 Guns I Runtime 1 hr. 49 min. |
Rated R for violence throughout,


language and brief nudity.
For the past year, DEA agent Bobby Trench
(Denzel Washington) and U.S. Navy intelligence
officer Marcus Stigman (Mark Wahlberg) have been
working undercover as members of a narcotics
syndicate. The twist: neither man knows that the
other is an undercover agent. When their attempt
to infiltrate a Mexican drug cartel and recover
millions goes haywire, the men are disavowed by
their superiors. Trench and Stigman must go on the
run lest they wind up in jail or in a grave.
The Conjuring I Runtime 1 hr.
51 min. I Rated R for sequences of
disturbing violence and terror.
Before there was Amityville, there was
Harrisville. Based on a true story,"The Conjuring"
tells the horrifying tale of how world-renowned
paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren
were called upon to help a family terrorized by a
dark presence in a secluded farmhouse. Forced to
confront a powerful demonic entity, the Warrens
find themselves caught in the most terrifying case
of their lives.
Grown Ups 21 Runtime: 1 hr. 41
min. I Rated PG-13 for some male
rear nudity, language and crude and
suggestive content.
The all-star comedy cast from Grown Ups returns
(with some exciting new additions) for more
summertime laughs. Lenny (Adam Sandier) has
relocated his family back to the small town where
he and his friends grew up. This time around, the
grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their
kids on a day notoriously full of surprises: the last
day of school.
Despicable Me 21 Runtime: 1 hr. 38
min. I Rated PG for rude humor and
mild action.
Now that Gru (Steve Carell) has forsaken a life of
crime to raise Margo, Agnes and Edith, he's trying to
figure out how to provide for his new family. As he


struggles with his responsibilities as a father, the
Anti-Villain League an organization dedicated
to fighting evil comes calling. The AVL sends
Gru on a mission to capture the perpetrator of a
spectacular heist, for who would be better than
the world's greatest ex-villain to capture the
individual who seeks to usurp his power.
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters
Runtime: 1 hr. 46 min. I Rated PG for
fantasy action violence, some scary
images and mild language.
Though Percy (Logan Lerman), the half-human
son of Greek god Poseidon, once saved the world,
lately he's been feeling less than heroic. However,
he doesn't have much time to brood the
enchanted borders that protect Camp Half-Blood
are dissolving, and a horde of mythical beasts
threatens the demigods'sanctuary. In order to save
Camp Half-Blood, Percy and his friends embark
on a journey to the Sea of Monsters aka the
Bermuda Triangle to find the magical Golden
Fleece.
Blue Jasmine I Runtime: 1 hr.
38 min. I Rated PG-13 for mature
thematic elements, language, sexual
content. Parents: Common Sense
Media says OK for kids 14+.
After her marriage to a wealthy businessman
(Alec Baldwin) collapses, NewYork socialite Jasmine
(Cate Blanchett) flees to San Francisco and the
modest apartment of her sister, Ginger (Sally
Hawkins). Although she's in a fragile emotional
state and lacks job skills, Jasmine still manages to
voice her disapproval of Ginger's boyfriend, Chili
(Bobby Cannavale). Jasmine begrudgingly takes a
job in a dentist's office, while Ginger begins dating
a man (Louis C.K.) who's a step up from Chili.
Not all movies will be available in your area, and
there are more movies showing at localtheaters than
those listed. Please checkyourlocaltheaterforlistings
andshowtimes. Information provided by Fandango.


f. $ 10.00 MAINE
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Let's Go!







GO DINING OUT


Dining out

with...
By DEBBIE FLESSNER
SUN CORRESPONDENT
When you're Matt Kratzer, and you're one
of the owners of DeSoto Automall, you come
into contact with a lot of people.
Many of those people own restaurants
in and around where you live, and conse-
quently, you end up at those restaurants for
business and for private dining. That is what
made it especially hard for Kratzer to come up
with one particular restaurant that he would
consider to be his "favorite."
"Downtown Punta Gorda has done such
an incredible job with the businesses and
the restaurants," he said."There are different
spots for different times."
But one of the places in Punta Gorda
where Kratzer does spend quite a bit of
time is Trabue, on West Marion Avenue. An
upscale restaurant with a wonderful, neon
blue-tinted bar, it's both a popular after-work
gathering spot and a special occasion destina-
tion.
"The food is great, but it's a very comfort-
able place;' Kratzer said."When you bring
your friends and family here, it's a good
feeling."
Kratzer attributes the ambiance of Trabue
to its executive chef, Keith Meyer.
"I feel fortunate because I've found a place
that I can run the way I want to,"Chef Keith
said. "We try to do everything simple and
upscale, but with a hometown feel."
Each weeknight at Trabue, there is some


Let's Go!


Matt Kratzer
(o-owner at DeSoto Dodge, (hrysler, Ford, Jeep


type of special on the menu. Monday are
unlimited mussels for $20. On Tuesdays, there
is a lobster dinner, with all the sides, for $30.
Wednesday, you can get a bottle of wine and
cheese platter for two for $25, and Thursdays
is the wine tasting event, where you get
three courses paired with three wines for $30.
Chef Keith says that because just he and
his sous chef do all the cooking, they have the
ability to change menu items rapidly.
"The one thing that I change a lot (on the
menu) is the fish;' he said."I usually only keep
one fish at a time, because we buy small and


E'NI/C'.' August 28-September 3, 2013


SUIJ PH-.,T,. B, DEBBIE FLESSIJEP
Trabue regular Matt Kratzer enjoys a cocktail
and conversation with Trabue Chef Keith Meyer.


fresh."
Kratzer said that from the very first time he
came to Trabue, he felt right at home.
"My partnerwas one of the first people
I know to come in here, and I came in the
following week," he said."My favorites (menu
items) are the salmon and the lamb sliders
appetizer, which I don't believe I've ever had
anywhere else."
And both Chef Keith and Kratzer agree -
with all the restaurants and nightlife that
are now in downtown Punta Gorda, it has
definitely turned into the place to be.


"This is a small town, and I do business
here,' Kratzer said. "We're really fortunate
with what's happened here in Punta Gorda.
It's competitive, but we have some great
places, and I enjoy going to the different
ones. It all depends on what you want"
Trabue is located at 258 West Marion Ave.,
in Punta Gorda, and is open from 11:30 a.m.
until 2:30 p.m. for lunch and from 5 p.m. until
close Monday through Saturday. For more
information, or to see a current menu, visit
the Facebook page or the website at www.
TrabueRestaurant.com, or call 941-639-0900.


*. COOK'S
SPORTLAND"'



5000 E. Venice Ave 941-485-7221
www.snookhaven.com

A s t
V isitourweiteo ae ae o ei odi c patstrogot h loue


I Iii ai 1

luill II







s August 31st & September 1st, 2013
Saturday & Sunday 10am-4pm

Free Admission
-"'. ,. Sponsored by

S. VeniiceAkGondolier

Located on Miami Avenue in
historic Downtown Venice.
Take Venice Avenue west over the bridge
and turn left onto Highway 41. Go one block
and make a right onto Miami Avenue.
For more information call 941-484-6722 or 813-962-0388

I^^^^^A 6fi~B~n^^^




August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


TM


HIGH-A AFFILIATE OF THE TAMPA BAY RAYS


ONLY 2 REGULAR SEASON


GAMES LEFT!


/vs


THIRSTY THURSDAY/DOLLAR DEAL DAY
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29T"- 6:30 PM
DON'T MISS OUT ON THE LAST THIRSTY THURSDAY
AND DOLLAR DEAL DAY OF THE SEASON! FANS CAN
ENJOY DRAFTS, SODAS, HOT DOGS, AND ICE CREAM
SANDWICHES FOR ONLY $1!


FAN APPRECIATION DAY
POST-GAME FIREWORKS
FRIDAY, AUGUST 30TH- 6:30 PM


COME OUT FOR THE BIGGEST NIGHT OF THE SEASON!
THE STONE CRABS WILL BE GIVING AWAY STONE
CRABS AND RAYS MEMORABILIA EVERY INNING.
STICK AROUND AFTER THE GAME FOR THE BIGGEST
FIREWORKS SHOW OF THE SEASON!
*ALL DATES, TIMES, AND PROMOTIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.TICKET PRICING ONLY VALID AT BOX OFFICE.


Let's Go!


j


Aitea


B wS E




E' IN/C/' August 28-September 3, 2013


GO DINING OUT


By CHRIS KOURAPIS
% II I' I


Diners who enjoy waterfront dining
are drawn to Leverock's unique location
overlooking Cape Haze Harbor, Palm
Island and the Intracoastal Waterway.
It's rare to discover a restaurant that
accommodates guests arriving by boat or
by car, and it's rarer still to discover one
that offers such an extensive luncheon,
early dining and dinner menu. Leverock's
Restaurant Manager Erik Barber and
Chef Kenneth Young have worked in the
food industry since their college days.
They offer weekly promotions and new
menu items for today's tastes, and they
encourage patrons to join their email list
at: www.leverockspalmisland.com.
"We will in no way infringe upon
customers' privacy," explains Barber.
"We want them to know when fresh fish
shipments arrive, and we believe that
email announcements are a great way to
inform diners about special dishes and
wine tastings"
Wine, according to Barber, enhances
a dining experience. As a former owner
of the Pacific Rim Brewing Company, a
winery based in Seattle, Wash., he is an
accomplished brewmaster, one who is
knowledgeable about all aspects of wine
making. Chef Young, a graduate of New
York's Paul Smith's College culinary arts
program, has years of experience as a
chef, working in prestigious Marriott and
Weston hotels in Colorado and his native


Rhode Island.
Locals enjoy treating guests to
lunches, dinners and spectacular sunsets
at Leverock's. Lunches include inex-
pensive seafood favorites, burgers and
club panini sandwiches with a choice of
fries, homemade chips, slaw or pasta
salad. Sunset specialties are served from
2:30-5:30 p.m. and feature onion crusted
salmon, a Leverock's tradition, baby back
ribs, fish and chips, and pesto shrimp
pasta. Dinner specialties include an array
of appetizers: famous Leverock's clam
chowder, artichoke dip with spinach, and
tuna sashimi. The black and bleu salad
is a mixture of bleu cheese, smoked
bacon, fried onions and mixed greens.
Additional salad offerings include classic
Caesar, fried green tomatoes with shrimp
over arugula with remoulade sauce, and
caprese salad with fresh mozzarella.
Dinner entrees, served with a salad,
include a mixed seafood grill, sesame-
crusted grouper or balsamic salmon.
Meat lovers enjoy pork shops with sauce
bordelaise or filet mignon with rosemary
demi glace. Pastas of mussels and clams
fra diavolo or lobster/shrimp mac and
cheese are popular along with combina-
tions of the above. Favorite desserts
include bread pudding and Key lime pie.
New this year is Leverock's 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday brunch
menu of eggs Benedict, omelets and
gluten-free pancakes. If simply sitting
outside at the Tiki Bar overlooking


the marina pool and
waterfront view seems
appealing, patrons are
treated to half-price
drinks from 3 p.m. to
6 p.m. with musical
entertainment on
weekends. Guests may
select house wines,
local micro brews,
standards and exotic
specialties. Manager
Barber hosts monthly
wine tasting or
formal four-course
wine dinners in a
private dining room.
For reservations call
941-698-6900 or
visit Leverock's
at 7092 Placida
Road, Cape Haze.


S.,


I '.' T 1
"- IA


li' i17


SLII PH -,T,-. B., HPIS V' -IPH-PIS


Chef Kenneth Young and Leverock's Manager Erik Barber
encourage customers to join their email list featuring weekly
specials and wine tastinas.


M.


Right: At the Cape
Haze Leverock's
(Johnny's Bar)
guests may order
exotic cocktail
specialties, select
house wines, and
local micro brews.


~I. IL


(f


At Leverock's outside tiki bar, patrons j
enjoy panoramic waterfront views of a
Cape Haze Harbor.
-E-fee :- :-s. -


LINI\'ERSITY OF


Sarasota Open House
Thursday, October 3
5:30 7:30pm


North Port Open House
Thursday, October 10
5:30 7:00pm


UT"LIH -FLORIAD.
_'.-P --..T t I.-.JA.-TEE

-,


8350 N. Tamiami Trail Sarasota 1 5920 Pan American Blvd. North Port


OCT.

03


OCT.

10


Let's Go!


saiii~~




August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


EVENTS GO


Rich Guzzi to appear


at Visani


Rich Guzzi of"The Rich Guzzi Comedy
Hypnosis Show"is appearing at the Visani
Comedy Zone on August 28. Guzzi is part
standup comic, part hypnotist and part
motivational speaker a cross between Tony
Robbins and Tony Soprano.
His show is on tour in over 20 cities and both
entertains and inspires with a night of hypnotic
comedy. Like nothing you've seen, during one
memorable skit Guzzi instructs 15 hypnotized
audience volunteers to compose and perform a
rap song on stage in Chinese and they do,
with side-splitting results.
Guzzi is a certified clinical hypnotherapist,
and delights in showing others the benefits of
hypnosis. He has helped celebrities in Holly-
wood cure various phobias and he's worked
with professional sports teams to help players
address mental blocks keeping them from
personal excellence.


"I've had people tap me on the shoulder and
say,'When's the show going to start?'and I tell
them,'Look at yourwatch -the show is over!"
he said, referring to those he's hypnotized. Guzzi
enjoys using hypnosis to help people overcome
everything from smoking addictions to Post
Traumatic Stress Disorder in warveterans.
"That's cool;'he said, adding,"I know I'm doing
my part to make the world a better place. It's
not just about me."
His Wednesday through Saturday shows are
for patrons that are 23 and over, 18 and over
can also attend with their parents. On Sunday,
Rich Guzzi will be doing a special teen show.
Young adults ages 13 and up can attend. The
cost of the shows varies. Dinnerwill also be
available for all shows. Please call 941-629-
9191 for reservations and additional informa-
tion or visit ourwebsite Visani.net. Visani is
located at 2400 Kings Highway, Port Charlotte.


Venice Concert Band


Announces 2013-2014


Concert Season


Provided by BILL MILLER
VENICE CONCERT BAND DIRECTOR
The Venice Concert Band, directed by Bill
Millner, will present another outstanding
concert series beginning with its Nov. 11
"Salute To Veterans" Concert at the Venice
Community Center.
Partnering with Exsultate, Venice's
premier choral group, this concert will be
part of the concert band's partnership with
Legacy Of Valor, a campaign created by The
Patterson Foundation to honor veterans
and their families in Southwest Florida.
The band will also partner with the
popular Jacobites Pipe and Drum Band
on Feb. 24, again honoring our veterans.
Veterans and their spouses will be admitted
free to these two concerts.
The Legacy Of Valor Campaign includes a
mosaic of community-driven partnerships
to focus our region to honor veterans and


LABOR DAY
WEEKEND
AT THE CROW'S
NEST:
FE T LUIIN ;i


their families through their time, talent or
treasure.
The Venice Concert Band is proud to be
included in this campaign.
Venice Concert Band dates are as follows:
Nov. 11 -"Salute To Veterans" In part-
nership with Legacy of Valor
Dec. 9 "Christmas Concert"
Jan. 27 -"Winter Concert"
Feb. 24 -"Legacy of Valor Veterans
Concert" In partnership with Legacy of
Valor
March 31 -"Spring Concert"
April 28 -"Season Finale"
All concerts are held at the Venice
Community Center, 326 S.Nokomis Ave.,
and begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are only $5.
Season tickets (six concerts for $30) are also
available. For information call 941-480-
1704. For more information about the
Legacy of Valor campaign, please visit
FreedomPassltOn.org.


MARINA REITA U RANT TAVERN


CUR lAMCOII


L OBITER PO T~


Th 1968 TARPON CENTER DR., VENICE
S RFET OF


yoursun.com


OIG GARDENN
IHOW AND GUIDE

201 3


SATURDAY

September 14th
1 Oam-3pm

at the Charlotte Harbor
Event & Conference Center
75 Taylor Street, Punta Gorda


Exhibitor Space

Is Limited

CALL TODAY!


Port Charlotte:
941-258-9521


Punta Gorda:
941 -205-6402


50446722


I


Let's Go!




E/N/C/V August 28-September 3, 2013 August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


A Section of the Sun


A
<* i"



IhL


Dennis Gonthier and Anthony
Mioduszewski enjoying a night
of shark fishing at the Laishley
Marina Fishing Pier in Punta
Gorda.


SUN PHOTOS BY PETER ARATARI
Kelly, Mackenzie, Gauge, Randy and Olivia
Jackson enjoying an evening ice cream at
the Working Cow Ice Cream shop in Punta
Gorda.


OCJ


Chef Ilia posing at the bar in his
restaurant Ilia's Greek Restau-
rant in Venice.


Brandon, Cayden and Jayson Rakestraw enjoying an afternoon
ice cream at Bob's Twist N'Shake in Venice.


Bruce Prince, "Gypsy" and USMC Corporal
Cody Macdowell back from deployment
at Tattoos by Gypsy in Venice. Gypsy was
Macdowell's art teacher in middle school.


Oscar, Isabella
and David Giraldo
playing at Kenwood
Park in North Port.


Proprietor Nella Valenti and
bartender Jeffrey Twigg
have fun on the job at Allegro
Ristorante Lounge in Venice.


family i t4e eq inrediet...


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G O EVENTS THIS WEEK



Pioneer Days- Englewood


E' N/C/.' August 28-September 3, 2013


By CHRIS KOURAPIS
,%,, (" II I


Englewood's very first Pioneer Days, a
one-day festival honoring families who
struggled to settle the area in the late
1800s-early 1900s was held in 1956.
Newspaper editor, Jo Cortes, wanted an
event that would draw visitors to the tiny
town of Englewood and energize local
shop owners at the end of a slow summer
season. Townspeople pulled together to
create that first exciting festival 57 years
ago, and this year organizers continue the
tradition by promising an extra special
celebration "two weeks of fun with
two days of park festivities." Jean Airey
and co-chairmen Elaine Schweitzer and
Chris Phelps began planning for this
year's events in January. "Pioneer Days is
organized by a motley crew of volunteers
who want Pioneer Days to be fun for all
ages" explained Airey. "We are delighted
that each year more groups are taking


putting on events during the week
as well as joining in the final parade
celebration." On Sept. 1 and 2 West Dear-
born Street will close for two days, and at
Pioneer and Garrett Parks music, vendors,
contests and entertainment will run from
2 p.m. -9 p.m. Sunday and from 9 a.m.-
3 p.m. Monday. EARS (Englewood Animal
Rescue Sanctuary) mascot, Rascal (as
Petey) along with Alfalfa (Adam Ballen-
tyne) and the "Our Gang" 776 Riders will
ride in the parade and later serve at the
beer concession booth. Proceeds will
benefit EARS. A car show will take place
from 3 p.m.- 8 p.m. on Sept. 1 and noon-3
p.m. on Sept. 2. This year's theme "Engle-
wood goes Hollywood- the Hidden
History of Englewood's Past" is a reminder
that Englewood has Hollywood connec-
tions from Mary Pickford and Douglas
Fairbanks to Bobby Vinton, Dan Rowan
and Donna Summer.
On August 13 a mayoral debate was
sponsored by FAME,


Friends for the Advancement of Musical
Education. Voters donated dollars to
the candidate of their choice, and each
dollar counted as a vote with money
donated to charity. The winner with
the most votes will be named Mayor
on Aug. 31, receive a sash, and ride in
the Pioneer Days parade. On Aug. 17
the Little Miss/Mr. Englewood Pageant,
organized by Tammy Birdsong, was held
at the Suncoast Auditorium. Trophies
and awards were donated by Re/Max
Anchor Realty. On Aug. 23 Englewood's
Got Talent was held at Lemon Bay High.
Judges included former winner Clint
Thompson and Theater Director, Dennis
Hall. On Aug. 24 a Chalk Fest for all
age groups, hosted by Englewood Area
Beautification, took place along Dear-
born Street, and a kids Shipwrecked in
Englewood Dance (ages 10-15) was held
at the Sports Complex. On Aug. 26, "The
Case of the Murdered Swede" by Jean
Airey, was performed by Big Brothers/
Big Sisters of the Suncoast at the Green
Street Church.
On Aug. 28 the Little Band of
Writers, a sub group of the Suncoast
lWriters Guild, invites the public to a


free Hollywood theme singalong at
7 p.m. at the historic Green Street
Church, 416 Green St. A Hollywood Hat
Making Workshop will be held from
5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Arts Alliance of
Lemon Bay, 452 W. Dearborn St. Call to
register 941-475-7141.
On Aug. 31 the Cardboard Boat
Race take place at Indian Mound Park
starting at 9 a.m. Registered applicants
compete until the last boat sinks or
crosses the finish line. Spectators should
bring a chair and wear a hat. From 7-
11 p.m. a Shipwreck Dance Goes Holly-
wood will be held at the Elks Lodge,
401 N. Indiana Ave. The Smoked Mullet
Band and a magic show by James
Chartier will entertain "stars." Tickets
cost $15. Call 941-697-5245 for informa-
tion.
Cathy and Roger Redman are spon-
soring a free Fish-A-Thon on Sept. 1 for
youngsters 12 and under in memory of
Redman's son, Michael O'Donnell. The
event begins at 7 a.m. Kids fish on the
Tom Adams Bridge until 10:15 a.m. after
which award winners will be announced.
A free Diaper Derby will start at
2 p.m. on Sept. 1 at the Lemon Bay


Let's Go!




August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


EVENTS THIS WEEK GO


Goes Hollywood


Woman's Club, 51 N. Maple St. All babies
win small trophies. Families must
register crawling babies by Aug. 31 by
calling 941-474-3520. From 2-9 p.m. on
Sept. 1, a Park Festival/ Car Show will
take place at Pioneer and Garrett Parks.
Also on Sept. 1, a free tour of the
Hermitage Artist Retreat, 6660 Mana-
sota Key Rd., will take place from
1-4 p.m.
On Sept. 2 the festivities take place
from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. at Pioneer & Garrett
Parks on West Dearborn Street. The
highlight of Pioneer Days is always the
parade. Wear your craziest hats and be
eligible to enter the Hat Contest saluting
Hollywood Hatter, Hedda Hopper. The
Kids Fun Run begins at 8 a.m. at the
corner of Dearborn Street and McCall
Road. The Pioneer Days Parade with 58
participants led by Grand Marshal Jean
Berlin begins at 9 a.m. at St. Raphael's
Church (participants assemble at
7 a.m.) and follows Old Englewood
Road, turning onto West Dearborn Street
and proceeding to North McCall Road,
before turning left on North McCall Rd
to Artists Avenue "Clowns Like Us"are
parading as Hollywood stars dressed


as Charlie Chaplin, Marilyn Monroe,
Tarzan, and Dorothy from "The Wizard
of Oz"among others. At 2 p.m. trophies
will be awarded at Pioneer Park for
winners of the Crazy Hollywood Hat
Contest, the Englewood Goes Holly-
wood photo contest, the Englewood's
Got Talent Contest, and the Red Carpet
Float Contest. Photographers whose
winning photos show something around
Englewood that deserves a "red carpet"
salute will be awarded trophies. Parade
awards will be awarded in the following
categories: Red Carpet Star (best use
of theme), Humor (funniest), Youth
(best youth entry-young people partici-
pating/creating), History (Englewood
History), Water Fun (boats, water life),
Good Times (most spirit), Music (most
musical), Patriotic (most patriotic),
Our Environment (green, recycling, eco
assets), Most Original (not necessarily
on theme). Winners will receive original
art work by Cricket Thorne of Cricket's
Old Village Pottery in the Open Studio
located at 380 Olde Englewood Road.
Go to www.EnglewoodPioneerDays.
com for maps, photos, and more Pioneer
Days information.


..... ,P "" . *" .."/......
"***^^**o-'',...


SIIll PH':.T':.S B. CHPIS V l.LIP-PIS


FAME Founder Denise Pivovar introduced candidates for Englewood's Mayor for a Day
Contest at the Debates on Aug. 13 at Englewoods on Dearborn. Candidates run in support
of their favorite charities and FAME (Friends for the Advancement of Musical Education).
*: : *- "** + :>


Premier Doggy Day

and Overnight Campo


k V


Marshall Dillon (John Mead) and Miss Kitty (Joni Hyde) characters from Gunsmoke will
ride on the Englewood Area Cancer Foundation's float along with cast members Lou
Long, Erik Sandness, Erin Halstead, Karen Current, Adele Bourcier, Rob Hipps and Diane
Schmitz.


Cornhole
Volleyball Court
Shaded Picnic Tables
Live Entertainment
New Dance Floor
Misters to Keep You Cool
www.FourPointsPuntaGorda.com


iE .1 Ih, Ih
"FOU R\ 941.637.6770

PO INTS jjian"an""ll L
BY SHER ATO N Punta Gorda, FL


All Day Play
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FACEBOOK.COM/CAMPBOWWOWPORTCHARLOTTE


Let's Go!


ii
FJ, "~t~~ff
~r




E/N/C/V August 28-September 3, 2013


GO AT THE THEATER


A scene from
"Cats" at
Broadway Palm
Dinner Theatre
Oct. 10- Nov.23.


Left: A scene from "Les
Miserables" at Broadway
Palm Dinner Theatre"
Feb. 20-April 12.
Below: A scene from "South
Pacific" at Broadway Palm
Dinner Theatre Dec. 28-
Feb.15.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE
BROADWAY PALM DINNER THEATRE /
John Ramsey as Joe and Kate Marshall as
Lacey, in the Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre
production of Burt and Me, Aug. 22-Oct. 5.
Ask about the season opener special.

By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
Fort Myers'Broadway Palm DinnerTheatre
opened its 21st season Aug. 22 with "Burt and
Me"which will play through Oct. 5. Featuring
the music of Burt Bacharach, this show has
special pricing of $45 per person for show and
buffet dinner.
The season moves into overdrive Oct.10 -
Nov. 23 with the return of"Cats,"with music by
Andrew Lloyd Weber, to the Palm's main stage.
According to the release, audience members
"will be surrounded by theater cats, rock-
and-roll cats, mischievous cats, romantic cats,
magical cats and more."Tickets are $35-$58.
Nov. 28, Broadway Palm opens"Swingin'
Christmas"as its annual holiday offering.
"Swingin" plus through Dec. 25.
"South Pacific"follows Dec. 28-Feb. 15, with
such Broadway favorites as"Some Enchanted
Evening,""YoungerThan Springtime,""Bali Hal"
and"There is Nothing Like a Dame."Tickets
for the holiday show and "South Pacific"are
$35-$58.
Possibly the biggest show of the season,
"Les Miserables,"set in 19th century France, is
on the schedule for Feb. 20-April 12. According


to the release, the"musical tells the story of
broken dreams and unrequited love, passion,
sacrifice and redemption a timeless
testament to the survival of the human spirit."
Tickets for this special production are
$40-$63 per person.
Fast-talking traveling salesman Harold Hill
rolls onto the Palm's main stage April 17 and
plays through May 24. Hill cons the people of
River City, Iowa into buying musical instru-
ments and band uniforms for the town's new
band which he will form even though he
himself is nota musician. For love interest
there is Marian the Librarian. The big song in
the show is"Seventy-Six Trombones."Tickets
are $35-$58.
"Mid-Life the Crisis Musical" pokes fun at
"the trials and tribulations of the middle years."
It plays May 29-June 21.
Closing the mainstage season June 26-
Aug. 9 is another Webber show,"Joseph and
the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat'The story
is about the favorite son of Jacob. When Joseph
is given a wonderous coat of many colors by
his father, all the brothers are so jealous they
conspire to cause theiryoungest brother great
grief by selling him into slavery in Egypt


Joseph's talents help him rise to the position of
the chief advisor to the Pharoah and eventually
a happy reunion with his fatherand brothers.
Tickets are $35-$58.
The Off Broadway Palm season
"You Say Tomato, I Say Shut Up"opens the
season in the Off Broadway Palm Sept 19-
Nov. 2. Following Nov. 7-Dec. 25 is"Away in the
Basement"featuring the ever-popular church
ladies who have starred in several shows in the
Off Broadway Palm, For this show, the ladies
are working on the Sunday School's annual
Christmas program and other holiday prepara-
tions.
"Nana's Naughty Nickersaccording to the
release is a contemporary comedy about law
student Bridget and her sweet grandmother,
Sylvia"whose secret business is the "illegal sale
of handmade lingerie to the mature and
frisky."
"The Dixie Swim Club"returns March 20-
May 11. The story concerns the annual vacation
reunion of five members of a college swim
team, with a focus on four of the weekends
over 33 years.
"Boeing, Boeing"a comedy about a
Frenchman and his"three flight attendant


fiancees" brings the Off Broadway season to
a close July 10-Aug.9. When all three happen
to end up in Paris at the same time, things
get complicated and funny. Tickets for the Off
Broadway Palm DinnerTheatre are $29-$49.
Meals are served in a separate dining room and
the show in the Palm's smaller theater.
The Broadway Palm Concerts
Concerts planned for the Broadway Palm
include the following:
"The Great American Songbook"Jan. 26-27;
"The Duprees," matinee and evening shows
on Feb. 10; Dwight Icenhower's "Tribute to
the King"March 2 and 3; The Drifters, March
16-17;"Back Home Again A Tribute to John
Denver."March 24;"Abba Fab The Premier
Abba Experience,"twilight show on March 30
plus matinee and evening shows on
March 31; and "The Magic of Manilow"
matinee and evening on April 7.
The Broadway Palm DinnerTheatre is at
1380 Colonial Blvd., Fort Myers.
For information, call 239-278-4422 or visit:
BroadwayPalm.com.


Email:kcool@venicegondolier.com


.M PRESENTS


Now October 5


4;'f
Buy 4 tickets and we'll also include
a house appetizer and cocktail in a
souvenir glass! (Valid through 9/8/13)
The romantic musical comedy about high school sweethearts, Joe and
Lacey, who met over their love of basketball and the music of Burt
Bacharach. After separating in college, they crossed paths years later and
Joe plotted an elaborate scheme to try and win her back...the music of
Burt Bacharach and Hal David plays a big part! You'll hear such classics as
The Look ofLove, Always Something There to Remind Me, Raindrops Keep
Falling On My Head, I'll Never Fall in Love Again, Close to You and more.


You Say





Sept 19 Nov 2








Oct 10 Nov 23


IN THE OFF BROADWAY PALM
From the hilarious and touching memoir,
You Say Tomato, I Say Shut Up, by
writers-actors-and real-life-married-couple
Annabelle Gurwitch and Jeff Kahn comes
the stage play you won't want to miss! This
play is sure to bring both laughter and terror
into the hearts of any couple. $29 $49

Andrew Lloyd Webber's CATS is a unique,
spectacular musical with fantastic costumes
and electrifying dancing that has young and
old cheering! You'll be surrounded by
theatre cats, rock and roll cats, mischievous
cats, romantic cats, magical cats and more!
See why cats are unique in every way...just
like us! $35 $58


SBROADWAYPALM

Southwest Florida's Premier Dinner Theatre


1380 Colonial Boulevard, Fort Myers
239-278-4422 www.BroadwayPalm.com


Let's Go!




August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


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HIGH-A AFFILIATE OF THE TAMPA BAY RAYS


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Let's Go!


ONE CRAB





Let's Go!


By KIM COOL
Ii ,11 II 1,,
Venice welcomes crafters from more than
30 states to the Fifth Annual Labor Day
Weekend Craft Festival.
Organized by American Craft Endeavors
and Howard Alan Events, the juried show
will fill Miami Avenue in downtown Venice
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday.
Everything in the show is original and
handmade in America by some 100 arti-
sans, according to a release from Howard
Alan Events. Prices range from $3-$3,000.
Craftsmen and artists exhibiting at the
show will be on site during the show to
talk about their work. Items being shown


range from folk art such as pottery, and
woven baskets to fused wax and glass,
fabric design, handmade cards, leather
work, mosaics, painted and carved wooden
objects to handmade clothing, hair acces-
sories, handbags and designer serving
utensils and stained glass.
There also will be a "green" market
featuring live plants, savory dips, gourmet
sauces and handmade soaps.
According to a release from Howard
Alan Events, proceeds of the show will
support the arts, Venice MainStreet and the
community.
Admission is free. Show hours are 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. For information about this and
other shows, call 561-746-6615 or visit:
ArtFestival.com


E1'1/C '' August 28-September 3, 2013


G O EVENTS THIS WEEK





August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


ROAD TRIPGO


SULi FILE PH-. T-:.
Dinosaur World visitors may pause before
venturing forth beneath two members of
the family Tyrannosaurus Rex..


I g b~~W I -


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Plant City is the dinosaur capital of
Florida, and home to Dinosaur World,
which turned 15 this summer.
That Florida was covered by water
when dinosaurs roamed the land adds
to the story that begins in Sweden
where Swedish entertainment mogul
Christer Svensson sold dinosaurs to
amusement parks in Australia and Asia.
When Svensson decided to retire to
Florida, he purchased the failed Gator
Jungle site at Plant City. He contacted
the manager of a similar dinosaur
venture in Germany and then ordered
up the first creatures for his Plant City
park. Within five years, a second park
opened in Cave City, Ky., and about
five years after that, a third park was
opened in Glen Rose, Texas.
Designed and cast in pieces in
Sweden, the giant creatures are assem-
bled and painted on site in Florida.
They are made of steel, fiberglass and
concrete. At least one of the dinosaurs
is 80 feet long. These days the popula-
tion has grown to about 200.
One especially large creature seems
to straddle the entrance, its feet
protruding through the wall and its
head rising out of the roof.
Within the entrance is the requisite

AS BOTPIVT C4*


ew" Lake Okeechobee Cruise
onday, September 9th, 9am to 6pm


stonbackto FortMyei


DlO9pp Tax


souvenir shop and ticket booth. Most
Florida parks have annual pass deals
that cost about twice a one-day admis-
sion. The difference here is that with
one-day prices of just $14.95 plus tax
for adults, $12.95 plus tax for seniors
(60 plus) and $11.95 plus tax for
children, the annual passes are far less
expensive than even a one-day pass for
children at most parks. Best of all is the
15th anniversary Florida resident deal,
good through Sept. 2 Floridians pay
just $10.95 per person for children 3-12
and adults. All major credit cards are
accepted.
Unheard of at most other parks is
Dinosaur World's acceptance of friendly
dogs on leashes free.
Also different from other parks is the
lack of food concession stands. Dinosaur
World encourages guests to bring picnic
lunches which can be enjoyed within
the park's many picnic areas. When
alive, most dinosaurs were herbivores.
Dinosaur World's replicas are even
better behaved. They won't eat a thing.
Consider the jungle-like setting in
which these silent sentinels dwell. Even
a gentle breeze through the trees can
make it appear that the animals are
moving. Inside the Hall of Dinosaurs
Museum, some dinosaurs really do move
thanks to audioanimatronic technology.
Also in the museum are dinosaur eggs


LADIES'NITE
Male Review 4
Sept. 6th ,a
Intracoastal Waterway Cruise
Sunday, September 8th, 9am to 6pm

' ,' ; ,' ' , , y ;,: , ,+, T ax
D pp Tax


and raptor claws.
Dinosaur World is perfect for the
12-and-under crowd but the park has
repeat customers of all ages. Plan to
spend at least an hour, if not two or
more, wandering through the park.
The creatures are all photogenic. Many
children enjoy climbing on them.
Also on site is a fossil hunt area for
children, a boneyard and new this year
- Dino Gem Excavation.
Take Interstate 4 to Exit 17 (Branch
Forbes Road.) You will see at least
two dinosaurs from the interstate.
One is that most fearsome creature of
all Tyrannosaurus Rex. Travel north
to Harvey Tew Road and turn left. The
parking lot is at 5145 Harvey Tew Road.
There is ample parking and it is free.
For more information, call 813-717-
9865 or visit: DinosaurWorld.com.

Email: kcool@venicegondolier.com


Mini Vacation Get-Away

BILOXI
Sept. 22"d & Oct. 13th
Includes 4 days /3 nights
and 3 meals at
The Golden Nugget Casino
Receive $75 Free Play
$219 ppdo
1-800-284-1015
(941) 473-1481
Escorted Motorcoach Groups Welcome!
Local Pick Ups
On The Road
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Thursday& Sundays Tuesdays& Saturdays

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Let's Go!


A a since 1995




E' /CI/'.' August 28-September 3, 2013


G O LIVE MUSIC


Snook Haven holds


Labor Day country fest


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Country food and country music take
center stage at Snook Haven from 11 a.m. to
7 p.m. Labor Day, Sept. 2.
Concessionaires Mike and Justin Pachota,
the father and son restaurateurs of Sharky's
at the Pier, have spruced up the venerable
old-Florida restaurant and performance site
and created a new menu which includes
a variety of BBQ items created by Venice
Mayor/BBQ chef John Holic. Barbecue items
are smoked daily at the restaurant which
also serves shrimp and fresh and smoked
fish.
There will be food and drink service all
day, indoors and outdoors, plus nearly
continuous entertainment from the Snook
Haven bandstand. Breaks will be just long
enough for instrument switching between
the performing bands.
The headliner is the Grayson Rogers Band,


which will perform from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Evan Steel and Johnny Country kick off
the music from 11 a.m. to noon. Back Roads
takes the stage from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Critter Ridge takes to the stage from
1:45 p.m. to 3 p.m. and will be followed by
Kim Betts and the Gamble Creek band from
3:15 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.
According to a release from Snook Haven,
the bands all come from Florida and will
perform everything from the "big sounds of
Nashville"to the country music that is part
of the music and entertainment heritage of
Snook Haven.
Following the concert, Snook Haven
will be closed for renovations from Sept.
3 to Oct. 3. It will reopen on Oct. 4. Visit:
Snookhaven.com for updates on the renova-
tions.
Snook Haven is on the Myakka River at
5000 E. Venice Ave., off River Road, For
information, call 941-485-7221 or visit their
website.


Get your tickets for Here


Come the Mummies


PROVIDED BY SEMINOLE HARD KOCK
CASINO IMMOKALEE

"Come Alive"with Here Come The
Mummies at Seminole Casino Immokalee
on Saturday, Oct. 12 at 8 p.m. The band's
music has never been more alive, so get
ready to rock like an Egyptian! Tickets are
on sale now.
While there are plenty of funk bands
alive and kicking, there's only one that's
made up entirely of Egyptian mummies,
that being Nashville, Tennessee's Here
Come the Mummies. Careful to keep their
identities under wraps, the band performs
their funk/R&B jams completely wrapped
up while using aliases like Eddie Mummy,
Java, K.W. Tut, Mummy Cass, Spaz, The Pole,
Midnight, Mummy Rah and The Flu.
The mummies rose from their collective
graves in 2002 with their debut album,
Terrifying Funk from Beyond the Grave,


which was followed shortly afterwards by
2003's Everlasting Party. The band returned
in 2008 with Single Entendre, as well as a
live DVD,"Undead Live,"in 2009. The fourth
album, Carnal Carnival, arrived the following
year, kicking off a steady stream of releases
including 2011's"Bed, Bath & Behind,"2012's
"Hits & Mrs."and 2013's"Cryptic."From the
thunderous opening chords of"You Know
The Drill,"to the romantic intonations of
"Never Grow Old,"the Cryptic album is full of
funky hits.
The life-of-the-party band has opened
for P-Funk and Al Green, rocked Super Bowl
Village 2012 and have played massive festi-
vals like Summerfest.
General admission tickets are $30 in
advance and $35 the day of the show. You
must be 21 years of age or older. To purchase
tickets, call 1-800-218-0007 or visit the
cashier at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino
Immokalee, 506 S. 1st St., Immokalee.


:,. ,I I ', I , / .,11 ,. ,t, i , i I ,, /*


Open


to Public

Call us for Tee Times!


Punta Gorda, Port Charlotte, North Port, Englewood & Venice
Myakka Pines Golf Club:
Unspoiled, Olde Florida
Bv, Barbara Mellina r Ci nCorresonnndent


When was the last time you played golf in a truly natural
setting? Do you enjoy hitting your golf ball and strolling down
fairways lined by trees and lakes rather than houses and
pools? Englewood is a quiet, rural area, which is why so many
former Snow Birds choose to live here full time. Myakka Pines
Golf Club is Englewood serenity on steroids! In any round of
golf, while enjoying our lush fairways and excellent greens, you
may see great bald eagles, territorial osprey bright blue
buntings, wise ol' owls, sunbathing alligators, pink spoonbill
cranes and great blue herons.
A member-owned equity club constructed 36 years ago by
dedicated, creative and forward thinking members, Myakka


Pines Golf Club today offers 27 holes of tournament-quality-
conditions, challenging, strategic and fun golf. As a GOLF
CLUB rather than a Country Club, the focus and financial
investment is all toward the golf course. Greens were
reconstructed in 2008 with mini-verde bermuda. Each of the
three nines is different and challenging in its own right. And,
twenty-seven holes provides the flexibility to accommodate
smooth flow on the course by melding tee time and turning
golfers based on which course has the best availability at the
time. Mickie Zada, the Club's General Manager said iWe are
able to ensure excellent rounds of golf time as well as
enjoyable playing experiences.
One of the best golf membership values in the area, Myakka
Pines Golf Club offers an equity membership and a one-year
non-equity golf pass. Private golf carts may be stored and
used at the Club by equity members; one year non-equity golf
passes include golf cart fees. All members receive free driving
range access and handicap system. Extensive practice areas
are available including chipping and putting greens and driving
range. As the Club's PGA golf professional for 25 years, Frank
Perilli maintains a well stocked golf shop offering apparel and
equipment. River Road Grille is open from 6:30 until dark each
day, providing friendly service and offering breakfast and lunch
seven days a week.
For more information visit www.myakkapinesgolfclub.com or
call 941-474-1753 or stop in at 2550 S River Road in
Englewood.


Swww.myakkapinesgolfclub.com
TBylii 941-474-1753
GOLF MEMBERSHIP ON YOUR MIND?
CHECK OUT OUR ONE YEAR GOLF PASS
it INCLUDES golf cart fees
Single: $2,495 + tax

Equity Memberships
are a great value, too!

AUGUST GOLF SPECIAL TWILIGHT
7:15 a.m.-3 p.m. $27.50 after 3 pm: $18.
includes cart (rates are per person plus tax)
Myakka Pines Golf Club 2250 South River Road, Englewood


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PLAYER
... FRIENDLY


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I LET'S G OLOALORE


oOLF COURSE
August 2013
18 holes with cart
all day every day $15 + tax

9 holes with cart
all day every day $10 + tax

Annual Golf Memberships
$250 + tax
*No other discounts with this special offer
TEE TIMES 888-663-2420


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August 28-September 3, 2013 E/N/C/V


LIVE MUSICGO


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By SHIRLEY GEORGE
SUN CORRESPONDENT
From Sarasota to Naples, and venues in
between, audiences are rockin'to Swamp
Donkie band, a high-energy duo. If you like
eclectic music played on acoustic guitar and
fiddle, the duo will keep you entertained
and wanting more. Whether it's classic rock,
country, Celtic or folk, the talented duo's music
and vocals combine originals with a variety of
cover songs.
Guitarist and vocalist, John Whiteleather
lived in Sweden for over 15 years. He toured
Europe with his rockabilly band, The King Rats,
which was formed in Los Angeles in 1989. The
band's recordings and shows were popular in
several countries. After the band slowed down
on making recordings and touring, White-
leather performed as a solo artist. He wrote
and produced songs for European artists who
love songs with an American influence, espe-
cially'50s rock'n'roll, which created a niche for
his music.
"My main gig as a solo artist in Sweden was
playing on an 80-passenger charter boat, The
Slussbruden (translates to Bride of the Locks),
on Lake Runn in the province of Dalarna. The
boat owners were like my family',White-
leather stated.
When Whiteleather came back to the U.S.
and settled in Sarasota, he formed a personal
relationship with Mary Beth Ponder, that
became a professional connection as well
when the duo formed Swamp Donkie band.
Ponderwas a classically trained violinist, but
hadn't touched the instrument for 13 years.
But she is back in full swing, playing and
singing songs she has come to love.


"We enjoyed driving up and down Florida's
west coast searching out venues that would
fit us,"Whiteleather said."Our first gig was
at The Nav-A-Gator Grill in Lake Suzy. We
love performing there; it has that old-Florida
flavor, and just our kind of place."
Several fans told the duo that they loved
the cover songs, but they wanted to hear
some of Whiteleather's country rock originals.
He claims many of his American-themed
originals were written because he missed his
homeland while living abroad. So, the duo
mixes originals with songs by Van Morrison,
Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty,
Waylon Jennings, and others. The duo
performs regularly at Zeke's Bayside Bar and
Grill in Englewood. They have performed at
the Ice House Pub in Punta Gorda, Bridge-
tender Inn and Dockside Bar, Walt's Seafood
Restaurant and Siesta Key Oyster Bar in
Sarasota and McCabe's Irish Pub in Naples.
Whiteleather still travels to Europe once
a year for a few weeks as a solo artist, and
performs with other artists. While he is away,
Ponder keeps busy performing with other
local musicians.
"My dream is to keep writing and recording,
and hope American artists will want to record
my songs as the Europeans did. Our country
is still the best with a lot of good people.
I'm always in search for inspiration through
friends, fishing or traveling. I try to write
simple melodies that depict everyday life
with its joys and sorrows. Mary Beth and I will
continue to keep our music fresh and fun,"
Whiteleather said."Those who come to see us
as strangers will leave as friends."
For bookings, band schedule, and videos, go
to www.swampdonkie.com.


Top of Billboard Chart on DATE

'60s
1961 -"Wooden Heart" by Joe Dowell
1969 "Honky Tonk Women" by the Rolling Stones

'70s
1972 "Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)" by Looking Glass
1979 "My Sharona" by the Knack

'80s
1981 "Endless Love" by Diana Ross & Lionel Richie
1985 "The Power of Love" by Huey Lewis & the News

For The Record
SBoz Scaggs sang with the Steve Miller Band and laterwent on to a successful solo career.
The shortest number one pop song ever was "Stay" by Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs
in 1960, timed at one minute and thirty-seven seconds.
Bertie Higgins, who took the romantic ballad "Key Largo" into the Billboard Top Ten in
1982, was once the drummer for pop singerTommy Roe's backing band.
The mother of Monkee member Michael Nesmith was the inventor of a typewriter
correction fluid known later as Liquid Paper.
Tony Burrows has the distinction of being the lead singer with five different charted
'70s groups: Edison Lighthouse ("Love Grows"), White Plains ("My Baby Loves Lovin"), The
Brotherhood of Man ("United We Stand"), The Pipkins ("Gimme Dat Ding") and First Class
("Beach Baby'".
*Two bands, L.A. Guns and Hollywood Roses, merged to become heavy metal legends
Guns'N Roses.
Singer Bobby Vee once kicked Robert Zimmerman out of his band because he thought
he had no future as a musician. Zimmerman later changed his name to Bob Dylan.
In the early'80s, the Buggles'"Video Killed the Radio Star" became the first video to
appear on MTV.


WLGG~I?~


Last week, this musical trivia question was asked: "You just slip out the back, Jack; make a
new plan, Stan"are from the lyrics of what 1976 Paul Simon hit song?
Answer: "50 Ways to Leave Your Lover." The first reader to get it right was
Carol Finkel of Port Charlotte.
This Week's Question: Name the pop/rock legend who had numerous hit songs in the early
'60s, then joined supergroup The Traveling Wilburys on their 1988 album.

Ifyou thinkyou have the right answer, emailit to upbeat@sun-herald.com no later than
noon this Friday, and we'llpublish your name as the winner with the correct answer in next
week's issue of Let's Go! Please include your name and city.


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E' IN//.' August 28-September 3, 2013


IA


rASI N IS


U OJU FOR NEW MEMBERS!


Play a minimum of 2 hours to qualify then return to the Player's Club
to collect up to $100 in Free Machine Play.


We'll Match Your Wins
Or Losses Up to $100

It's fast, easy, and FREE!
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