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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/01065
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun.
Uniform Title: Venice gondolier sun
Added title page title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun,
Venice Gondolier Sun
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers. -- Venice (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Sarasota County (Fla.)
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
General Note: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
notis - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
issn - 1536-1063
System ID: UF00028295:01095

Full Text




S VENICE olie r75


Gondolier Sun -@g|
LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S NO.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER


A record: 8-story walls


PHOTO PROVIDED
A crane lifts one of the 80-foot-tall walls into place Friday at Venice High School, where the Venice Performing Arts Center is being constructed.


Mega walls go up at Venice High


STAFF REPORT
Some of the "tilt-wall" pan-
els for the Venice Performing
Arts Center, put in place on
Friday, are the largest ever
erected in the state of Florida.
Construction of the pan-
els took about a month to
complete.
Tilt-wall construction
involves assembling cast-in-
place concrete walls on the
ground, then lifting them in
place with a crane. The crane
is so large that it took a crane
to assemble it on-site before it
could lift the walls.
There are 3,320 cubic yards
of concrete in the tilt-wall
panels: 821 cubic yards at
the gym, and 2,499 for the
Performing Arts Center.
The tilt-wall panels are up
to 12 inches thick. Some pan-
els weigh over 100 tons, with


COURTESY GRAPHIC
An artist's concept of how the new Venice High School performing arts
center will appear when it opens in 2014.


16 lifting points on the largest
panels, requiring 18,000
pounds of crane rigging.
The crane used to erect the
center has a 300-ton capacity.


In all, there are 114 panels
in the center and 79 panels in
the gym.
The tilt-wall panels have
thin brick inlays installed to


give the look of a brick build-
ing at a lower cost. There are
90,000 thin bricks inlayed in
the gym panels alone.
Construction began with a
larger concrete slab to build
the walls on, followed by a
protective wax layer upon
which the bricks are laid.
Concrete is then poured on
top.
Once the walls are in place,
they're sprayed with hot water
to melt the wax.
Safety is the number one
priority when the panels are
lifted into place. Specific
training is required for each
worker who will be present
during the raising of the tilt
walls. No less than four state
and county safety officials
were on scene Friday.
The gymnasium and a new

WALLS 16


Lee


found


guilty

By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
STAFF WRITER
John Allen Lee sat stone-
faced in a Sarasota courtroom
Friday afternoon as two guilty
verdicts against him were
read for the murders of Venice
residents Traci Nabergall, 39,
and Jason Salter, 46.
Nabergall's adopted son,
Christian Grover, 25, cried
uncontrollably into a tissue as
Salter's mother held her fists
up to her face in victory and
sobbed.
It took jurors at the Sarasota
County Courthouse an hour
and a half to find Lee, 49,
guilty of two counts of first-
degree murder in the 2011
slaying in South Venice. Some
male and female jurors also
teared up and grabbed tissues
as they looked at the second
row filled with the victims'
families who were holding
hands, gasping and crying
softly.
Across the courtroom, Lee's
mother showed emotion for the
first time, weeping.
During closing state-
ments Friday, prosecutor
Karen Fraivillig told jurors
it was Lee who barged into
Salter's home in a jealous
GUILTY 110


Meth lab


stopped

By GREG GILES
NEws EDITOR
Deputies arrested three men
Friday afternoon in the act of
cooking methamphetamine
in a shed behind
a home in a
Nokomis residen-
tial neighborhood.
The Sheriff's
Office's tactical
unit was already
conducting
surveillance on
the suspected BROWN
drug house at
210 Sago Lane in
Nokomis in the
morning, when a
deputy witnessed
a 21-year-old
female leave the
residence and fail
to stop at a stop LANGFORD
sign at the corner
of Sago Lane and
U.S. 41. She was
pulled over.
Apparently she
had no driver's
license. The owner
of the home being
surveilled then LINT
showed up with a
friend another known drug
suspect to drive her home
and was "actively attempting

METH 115


Good morning,
Gondolier Sun
subscriber
Ernest Gifford


FRONT SECTION
LEGALS ........................................ 10A
LET 'EM HAVE IT...................... 8A
LOTTERY .................................... 2A
OBITUARIES..............................4A


OPINION ..................................... 8A
POLICE BEAT.............................. 14A
SPORTS................................ 12-13A
WEATHER................................ 2A


OUR TOWN SECTION
CROSSWORD ............................. 7B
JUNECASAGRANDE ................ 8B
RELIGION ............................... 6B
SOUTH TRAIL.........................4B
VENUE..................................... 3B


IN THIS EDITION
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2A SUN NEWSPAPERS


MARCH 23, 2013 WEEKEND EDITION


SUN FILE PHOTO

Motorists must

share road


with cyclists

By MONTY ANDREWS
GUEST WRITER
In our continuing effort to understand
Florida vehicle laws, the Florida Driver
Handbook provides the following informa-
tion pertaining to "Sharing the Road." This
can assist all drivers to better understand the
rules we need to know and observe.
"Expect to find a bicyclist on all types of
roads (except interstate highways), at all
intersections and roundabouts, in all types
of weather, and at all times of the day and
night. Bicyclists may ride out in the travel
lane of their lane for their own safety due to
narrow roads, or to avoid obstacles or pave-
ment hazards, or to prepare for a left turn.
"On roads without shoulders, or with cars
parked along the right side, often the safest
place for a bicyclist to ride is the center of
the lane. A bicyclist may use the full lane
even while traveling substantially below the
speed of traffic if the lane is too narrow for a
car to safely pass a bicycle within the lane.
"Most travel lanes in Florida range from
10-foot to 12-foot wide, and guidance indi-
cates that a 14-foot lane is a width that allows
safe sharing with most motor vehicles."
You can see Florida law grants consider-
able privileges to bicyclists.
"Why?" you ask."They are just bicyclists."
Well, in the eyes of the state of Florida, as
a motorist you must respect the right-of-way
for bicyclists.
They are entitled to the same rights and
privileges as you, a motorist. But don't feel
picked on; cyclists must follow many of the
same laws as motorists. We just have to do a
better job of enforcing those laws.
Ride safe, ride smart.


Libraries to


debut new


website
FROM SARASOTA COUNTY

The Sarasota County Library System will debut its
redesigned website on March 26.
The redesigned site includes new contents and fea-
tures and provides quick and easy access to information.
On March 26, the current address, www.sclibs.net,
will point to the new site www.scgov.net/library.
The library website has the same features as the old
site, including an events calendar; online meeting-
room request system; downloadable e-books, e-au-
diobooks and e-videos; databases providing full-text
newspaper and magazine articles; interactive help;
and SUNCAT, the library catalog.
A tour of the site is available by visiting www.sclibs.net
and clicking "watch a quick tutorial on the new site."
The library website averages 21,000 unique visitors
a month and provides regular updates on library
news, programs and services.
For more information, call 941-861-5000 (TTY: 711
or 800-955-8771), or visit the current library's website
www.sclibs.net.


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Payoff for March 19
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3 5-digit winners..............$83,102.01
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:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


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:4A SUN NEWSPAPERS

I OBITUARIES

NORMAN WILSON
Norman "Bart" Wilson
passed away Tuesday,
March 12, 2013, at Quality
Health
Nursing
Home in
i Fernandina
Beach, Fla.
He had been
a resident
there, along
with his wife,
1 Betty Lou (Alvis)
Wilson for the
past 14 months.
Bart was born
Jan. 23, 1928, in Tonica,
Ill., to Roscoe Adolph
and Clara Hazel (Brady)
Wilson. He was the third of
four children, with Donna
Mae (Elverne Barton), Dale
Ervin (DorothyWithrow)
and Ann Jillon "Jill" (Roger
"Gabby" Puetz). His
parents and siblings are
deceased.
Bart married Shirley
May Divine in 1946 in
Tonica, and they had two
children: Bruce (Laurie)
Wilson of Washington, Ill.,
and Christy (Steve) Shay of
Putnam, Conn.; and one
grandson, Wes Sekula of
Somerville, Mass.
Bart and Betty were
married July 10, 1970, in
Springfield, Ill., and had a
wonderful marriage; she
survives. He had a step-
son, Keith (Molly) Rodgers
of Rockwood, Tenn., and
two step-grandchildren,
Megan (Judd) Wilder
of Brunswick, Ga., and
Christian (Deanna)
Rodgers of Toronto,
Ontario. He was also the
proud step-grandfather
of five grandsons and one
granddaughter.
Bart joined the U.S.
Navy and served his
country on board the USS
Albany, a heavy cruiser. He
was later recalled to the
Navy and served during
the Korean War on board
the USS Kidd, a destroyer.
Bart was employed as
a tool-and-die maker in
O'Fallon, Ill., and then by
the Caterpillar Tractor Co.
in Joliet and Peoria, Ill.,
for almost 20 years. He
then worked as a sales rep
for Norman Engineering
in Peoria until his retire-
ment in 1985.
He and Betty resided
in Venice, Fla., from then
until relocating to
Fernandina Beach last
year. While in Venice, Bart
was a volunteer at Venice
Hospital, and he and Betty
were active golfers and
members of the Jacaranda
West and Myakka Pines
country clubs.
Bart was an active
member of the Peoria
Masonic Lodge as well
as being a member of
Shriners International
and the Jesters, which
was quite appropriate,
as he always had a joke
readily at hand.
Services: Following
a memorial service in
Tonica, Ill1., at a date to
be announced, he will be
buried with his parents at
Fairview Cemetery.


MARCH 23, 2013 WEEKEND EDITION


County to pull deputies from city schools


By GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

The Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office will
withdraw its school re-
source officers, or SROs,
from schools within city
limits beginning this
July.
It's anticipated that city
police departments will
pick up the slack.
Sheriff Tom Knight
confirmed the move this
week in a fax to Sarasota
County School District
Superintendent Lori
White, saying he already
discussed the plan with
city managers and police
chiefs.
"They recognize the
value of this shift and
readily assume the
responsibility," Knight
said.
The main reason for
the move, Knight said, is
to avoid confusion in the
chain of command on
campus.
"If something
happens on the
school campus, the
primary responding
agency is Venice (Police
Department)," Knight
said. "From a pure
unity-of-command and
decision-making (stand-
point), we don't want


Words of Comfort
It is good for us that we sometimes
experience adversity and sorrow,
for they often make our hearts
understand that we
are only strangers
and sojourners here
for a time.
Anonymous

The experience you have here on
earth is only a small fraction of
time, compared to the infinite time
you will spend in heaven. Be
comforted knowing what adversity
you have, is but a wisp of time to
the j ii j '.,iiyou in heaven.
Michael Dunn-Rankin


green uniforms running
around blue uniforms,
saying 'Who's in com-
mand and
control?'"
"We are,
of course,
there to
assist in
any capac-
ity at their
KNIGHT request."
"From a
tactical response stand-
point, it is the preferred
situation, since it will
ensure a continuity of
command in the event
of an incident," Knight
said.
The North Port Police
Department assumed
full control of its SROs
a few years ago, for the
same reason, Knight
said.
Under former police
chief Jim Hanks, Venice
requested it share the
responsibility.
"It was the right deci-
sion back then," Knight
said.
The impact on Venice
will be minimal. Venice
High is the only school
within city limits that
will lose its deputy. The
schools within the city
of Sarasota will lose five
SROs.
All remaining SROs in


Words of Comfort
When we recall the past, we
usually find that it is the
.imnplet things- not the gr.a.I
occasions- that in retrospect
give off the greatest glow of
happiness.
Bob Hope A


May the memory of (
your loved ones who
have journeyed
through your life
bring you comfort and
happiness.


- Michael Dunn-Rankin


For more
Words of Comfort, go to www.wordsofcomfort.net

OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries are accepted from funeral homes and crematories only.
There is no charge for publishing an abbreviated death notice once.
Full obituaries, notices of services and repeat death notices will be
subject to charges based on their length. Obituaries should be emailed
to smcintosh@venicegondolier.com and must include a phone number.
There is an additional charge for faxed or hand-delivered obituaries,
and for photos. The Venice GondolierSun publishes on Wednesdays and
Saturday. Obituary deadlines are noon for faxes and 2 p.m. for emails
the day before publication. For more information, call 941-207-1011.





Living Trusts Joint..................... $600
(Avoid Probate) Single..... ..............$500
1 Will, Power of Attorney ..........$75
"Ladybird" Deeds
SUpdate HIPAA Requirements
143 East Miami Ave. Venice, FL 34285

488-8551
S .,,I ,,.I ,..h . ........ ... ....h.h. ., ...... .....1 .... I. . ..I f ...... .....
J v ... . .... ... I. ... ,...I .... .. .... .. .s. n I... . ..... .. ... .... I... . A. .1. .. .. .. ... .


the Greater Venice area
- like Pineview School,
Laurel-Nokomis School
and Venice
Middle
School -
within the
county will
retain their
deputies.
Elementary
LAVALLEE schools
are not
currently supplied with
SROs, although nearby
SROs occasionally visit.
Knight said making the
change in July will give a
local police department
plenty of time to train on
campus.
"Venice has a new
school built now," Knight
said. "This is an oppor-
tunity to get to know the
new video and security
camera systems. Give
them an opportunity to
see where the nooks and
crannies are. If anything
does happen, they'll be
much more prepared to
respond. It's just good
policing."
The move was not
born out of budgetary
necessity, Knight said. In
fact, it's likely to tax his
budget.
Currently, the Sheriff's
Office splits the cost
of SRO salaries and


benefits 50/50 with
the school district. It's
a good deal for the
schools. The Sheriff's
Office will have to
"absorb" $300,000 in
salaries, Knight said.
Last December's
shooting at Connecticut's
Sandy Hook Elementary
School reminded Knight
it was time to take
action.
"Did it bring it back
to light for me? Yes. It's
something I've been
thinking about doing for
some time. It's the right
thing to do."
"It's about tactics and
safety at our schools,"
Knight said.
The city of Venice,
meanwhile, is gearing up
to plan for the change.
"The implications
of this change are
obvious," wrote City
Manager Ed Lavallee to
Venice Police Chief Tom
McNulty in an email
this week. Lavallee, who
spent decades oversee-
ing law enforcement
operations in Newport,
R.I. before coming to
Venice, said he plans
on meeting with school
officials and VPD to
discuss options in
preparation for the next
school year.


"If we intend to main-
tain the current level of
police presence in the
school system, we will be
responsible for replacing
the deputy with another
local police officer,"
Lavallee said.
"In light of the recent
acts of violence in
school systems across
the country, this is
not a good time to
reduce the proactive
and reactive benefits
of a professional law
enforcement presence
in our school district,"
Lavallee said.
Sheriff Knight said he
has every confidence in
VPD to assume that role.
"I feel strongly that
the respective agen-
cies are fully capable
of providing all law
enforcement services
within their jurisdic-
tions," Knight said.
"This will enable those
agencies to serve and
protect schools accord-
ing to their individual
policing philosophies,
which are unique to
the municipalities they
serve.
"Of course, we remain
ready and available to
assist when needed."

Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


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:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


Mobile home park rewarded for questioning taxes


By GREG GILES
NEws EDITOR

The owner of Lake
Village Mobile Home
Park will have its prop-
erty taxes reduced by
41 percent while Bay
Indies MHP will see a
reduction of 9 percent
under a ruling made this
week.
Many fixed-income
residents in the coun-
ty's 60 parks received
a surprise last year
when tax bills showed
an increase due to
substantial increases in
mobile home park val-
ues in one instance
by 90 percent.
Those who rent or
lease their spaces can't
appeal their taxes; only
the property owners can,
so it took some time to
convince the owners to
do just that.
Only two mobile
home parks, both
owned by Equity Life
Style Properties, who by
contract passes those
tax increases on to its
tenants, met the deadline
to appeal 25 days after
the mailing of the TRIM
Notice.
"Hiring an attorney ...
that turned the trick,"
said Mike Rafferty, Bay
Indies resident, follow-
ing Tuesday's decision
by the Value Adjustment
Board granting a
decrease.
Lake Village, with 391


spaces, and Bay Indies,
with 1,309 spaces, each
had their taxable values
lowered by $7.8 mil-
lion and $3.7 million,
respectively when
the board ruled in favor
of a special magistrate's
findings.
Lake Village's tax-
able value was reduced
from $19.17 million
to $11.35 million; Bay
Indies' was reduced
from $42.15 million to
$38.45 million.
Magistrate Rick Rape
found park sales data
used in the Lake Village
appraisal part of a
76-park nationwide
acquisition was based
on an allocation amount,
and not the actual sales
price.
He found the use
of rental apartment
projects to determine
capitalization rates
("converting income to
value") in the appraisal
process wasn't well
suited for the analysis of
income from a mobile
home park.
Bay Indies also had
a substantial number
of vacancies and
concession income
that wasn't taken into
consideration.
Jeffrey Mandler, rep-
resenting ELS, present-
ed new data compiled
from RealtyRates.com
on current and histori-
cal capitalization rates
that include mobile


home and RV parks,
which Rape used in
coming up with a final
appraisal.
Rape said in his written
findings "neither party
did a good job in sup-
porting their expense
estimates" and the "gross
income estimated by the
property appraiser did
not properly account
for bad debt and con-
cessions at the subject
park."
Nevertheless, Rape
said, the income
capitalization ap-
proach used by both
parties in the appeal
"properly reflected the
decision-making model
employed by market
participants in develop-
ing pricing decisions
for large mobile home
parks."
Income data for mo-
bile home parks is hard
to come by, and could
have made the appraisal
process much easier.
The property appraiser
asks for it, but it's rarely
provided due to the
confidential nature of the
information.
So the appraiser
came up with his own
data. In the end, both
parties agreed to raise
the capitalization rate
from 7 percent used by
the Sarasota County
Appraiser's Office to
approximately 9 percent.
It's a key ingredient in
the formula used to


lower the property ap-
praisal value.
What that means
for next year is still
uncertain.
Rafferty said Bay
Indies' attorney was
prepared to appeal the
park's appraised value
back in 2010 but the
county appraiser backed
off a 10-percent increase
at that time.
"This tax process on
commercial parks is re-
ally unfair," Rafferty said.










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"I asked the
Department of Revenue,
which oversees county
appraisers, if the process
was flawed, and they
said as far as they could
tell, nothing was incon-
sistent. Now I think with
this decision, they should
again take a look at this,
and maybe the Attorney
General as well," Rafferty
said.
The Value Adjustment
Board consists of two
members of the Board of


boat load

morles.


County Commissioners,
one member of the
county school board, and
two citizen members.
The board appoints
special magistrates to
conduct hearings on
petitions filed.
Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com

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SUN NEWSPAPERS 5A




MARCH 23, 2013 WEEKEND EDITION


VHS grad wins


architectural competition


STAFF REPORT
Derek Pirozzi, a 2004
Venice High School
graduate, took top
honors in the 2013 eVolo
International Skyscraper
Competition.
His "Polar Umbrella"
won first place out of
625 projects submitted
by architects from 83
countries, earning Pirozzi
a $5,000 prize.
The project is a buoyant
skyscraper that rebuilds
the arctic ice caps by
reducing the surface's heat


gain and freezing ocean
water, according to the
eVolo magazine website.
In addition, the structure is
equipped with a desalina-
tion plant and solar-pow-
ered research facilities and
eco-tourist attractions.
The magazine estab-
lished the competition in
2006 to recognize out-
standing ideas for vertical
living, according to its
website. Since then, the
publication has received
more than 5,000 projects
that envision the future of
building high.


Pirozzi graduated
from the University of
South Florida School
of Architecture and
Community Design
in 2012. While at
USF, he received the
School of Architecture's
Thesis Award and was
nominated for two
Outstanding Portfolio
Awards; the Eduardo
Garcia Award, the school's
highest design honor; and
several other honors. He
is an intern in the Seattle
office of Olson Kundig
Architects.


COURTESY GRAPHIC


This design for a "Polar Umbrella" won Venice High graduate Derek Pirozzi the top prize in the
2013 eVolo International Skyscraper Competition.


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FROM PAGE 1
administration build-
ing are scheduled to be
completed this summer.
The Venice Performing
Arts Center is expected to
open in late summer or
fall of 2014.
The center is a joint
venture of the school
district and the city. The
city agreed to contrib-
ute $7.5 million of the
$15 million price of the
new facility to upgrade


the school auditorium to
a full-service community
performance hall.
The 1,100-seat,
51,000-square-foot
center will include rooms
for drama, band, chorus
and orchestra, as well
as a piano lab. It will
provide Venice students
with a world-class venue
for performances.
It also will serve as the
new home of the Venice
Symphony Orchestra,
the Venice Concert Band
and the Exsultate! choral
group.
The opening of the


Miracles


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:6Ai SUN NEWSPAPERS





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


Board: Leave hidden 'parks' alone


By GREG GILES
NEws EDITOR
A local board this week
opted not to recommend
a facelift for the city's
hidden "parks."
The Parks and
Recreation Advisory Board
voted unanimously to
drop its discussion of mak-
ing improvements to five
little-known open spaces.
The spaces, sometimes
referred to as pocket
parks, aren't really parks
at all. They were de-
signed as open space
behind residential homes
in John Nolen's 1926
layout of the city.
The issue made it onto
the City Council's radar
two years ago when mem-
ber Bob Daniels requested
a list of all city properties
to possibly identify surplus
property for sale.
They were intrigued
by the newly discovered
open spaces, some
in their unkempt
natural state, others well
groomed. But the Council
opted not to touch them
and left it to the parks
board whether to con-
tinue the discussion.


The parks board on
Monday decided not
to pursue the issue any
further, saying it could
anger some neighbors.
The central issue sur-
rounded the purpose of
the green spaces. Board
members came to believe
the parks were created for
the benefit of the immedi-
ately surrounding neigh-
bors, not as bonafide
parks with amenities.
In January, Board
Member Monty Andrews
warned his peers they
could be opening a can
of worms.
"There's been some
real controversy among
neighbors," Andrews
said. "Some feel they
shouldn't be infringed
upon. Some think
they are there for their
personal use. Most are in
people's backyards."
Council Member
Emilio Carlesimo, who's
the ex-officio member on
the parks board, pushed
for a final decision on the
issue, saying he wanted
an answer should city
council ask about the
hidden parks.
Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


FILE PHOTO


One of five open space "parks" in the original John Nolen city plan.


Venice church administrator charged with theft


By BOB MUDGE
SENIOR WRITER
The former admin-
istrator of Holy Spirit
Orthodox Church has
been accused of embez-
zling more than $50,000
in church funds, accord-
ing to a Sarasota County
Sheriff's report.
Robert S. Kondratick,
67, of the 11700 block of
Tempest Harbor Loop,
Venice, a former ortho-
dox priest and former
high-ranking official in
the Orthodox Church of


America, turned himself
in March 6 after the
issuance of an arrest
warrant for
grand theft,
the report
shows.
He was
released
from the
Sarasota
KONDRATICK County Jail
on $50,000
bond.
The probable-cause
affidavit states church
council members con-
tacted the Sheriff's Office


at the end of January
after discovering funds
had been misused from
June to December 2012.
Church officials fired
Kondratick at that time.
Witnesses told in-
vestigators Kondratick
requested signed blank
checks to pay what
he said were church
expenses, according to
the report. However, the
investigation report-
edly revealed he made
out 14 checks to "Cash"
totaling $25,950, and
14 checks to himself


THE ACCUSATIONS
The investigation reportedly
revealed Robert S. Kondratick
made out 14 checks to "Cash"
totaling $25,950, and 14 checks
to himself totaling $28,000.
totaling $28,000.
A number of the
checks had a memo
noting they were for the
church's Good Samaritan
Fund, for the benefit of
parishioners in need of
financial assistance. But
Kondratick could not
explain or document the


use of the funds, accord-
ing the report. Those
checks totaled about
$18,000.
Church council
members provided
investigators copies
of the checks given to
Kondratick in payment of
his salary and benefits to
establish that the checks
Kondratick wrote to cash
or himself were not for
that purpose.
Kondratick report-
edly was relieved of his
duties as chancellor of
the Orthodox Church of


America in 2006, follow-
ing allegations of finan-
cial misconduct affecting
more than $1 million
in church funds. He
was a priest at Holy
Spirit Orthodox Church
until 2007, when he was
defrocked. He became
the church administrator
at that time.
Criminal charges never
were brought regarding
the 2006 incident.
Kondratick is sched-
uled to be arraigned
April 5.
Email: bmudge@venicegondolier.com


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PUBLISHER
TIM SMOLARICK
PHONE: 941-207-1010
FAX: 941-484-8460
8A
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 23, 2013


OPINION


GONDOLIER SUN EDITOR
RONALD DUPONT JR.
PHONE: 941-207-1218
rdupont@venicegondolier.com


SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR VIEW


Pollution levels won't go lower if funding does, too


After fighting the federal Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
and winning over its abil-
ity to set water quality standards for
state waterways, the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection
would have to establish those criteria
by the end of 2014, under the terms of
a bill quickly making its way through
a state House of Representatives com-
mittee.
The bill, approved Wednesday by
the House State Affairs Committee,
follows Friday's deal between the DEP
and EPA over the maximum levels of
nitrogen and phosphorus in Florida's
coastal streams, estuaries, rivers and
intercoastal waterways.
The DEP will begin holding work-
shops next month with a goal of
having new levels set by September,
according to a report by the News
Service of Florida. A lawsuit by the
Environmental Group EarthJustice
challenging the EPA-DEP deal could
upend either timeline for new


pollutant levels.
A prior settlement of a lawsuit
against the EPA over Florida's failure
to establish minimum pollutant levels
led the EPA to demand Florida set
so-called "numeric criteria." Elected
officials at the state and federal
levels railed against that decision and
convinced the EPA to let Florida have
another chance to get it right.
Officials are talking a good game so
far.
"We can't go back to where we
were in this state 125 years ago, we
can't do it," said Rep. Ben Albritton,
R-Wauchula. "But we can certainly
take this time right now to draw a
line in the sand, make sure that we
stand up as a state, we can handle our
own issues, we can deal with our own
challenges, and make the future the
best we can."
Not only can't we go back 125 years,
we can't even afford to continue doing
what is allowed right now by a DEP
that looks the other way while the


state's water bodies, including the
Peace River and Charlotte Harbor, are
being polluted by tainted stormwater,
leaching septic tanks and run-off from
agricultural operations.
For example, the DEP has a nearly
decade-old agreement with Charlotte
County that requires the county to in-
stall sewer lines in an area around the
Manchester Waterway in exchange for
the county being allowed to remove a
broken lock installed to prevent run-
off from entering Charlotte Harbor.
The Charlotte County Commission
has repeatedly nixed sewer proposals
to comply with the agreement and is
currently moving slowly ahead with
a small-scale pilot project that would
serve about 2,000 properties in the
East and West Spring Lake Area. A
prior proposal would have extended
sewer to some 18,000 properties in
Port Charlotte west of U.S. 41 and
south of State Road 776.
Even if the Legislature were to
approve marginally higher minimum


levels, budget cutting at the state's six
regional water management districts
and raids on funding for conservation,
preservation and aquifer recharge
lands would limit its ability to make
noticeable headway in the fight
against waterway degradation.
Two purchases totaling $2.7 million
trumpeted by Gov. Rick Scott and
the Cabinet on Wednesday represent
only a fraction of the property needed
to ensure suitable buffering around
waterways. In Scott's 2013-14 budget,
only $25 million is allocated for land
acquisition versus an average of about
$300 million a year for the Florida
Forever program over a 20-year
period, according to a Fort Myers
New-Press report.
In two of the four years since 2009,
the state budget included no funding
for Florida Forever.
This doesn't strike us as a governor
and legislators committed to water
quality. Maybe they will surprise us.
More likely, they'll disappoint.


Time flies, but never


when it would help me


I can use my cellphone to
send a text instantly to anyone
in the world who has similar
technology. I can use an app
to see a current weather map.
I can log onto a hospital's
website and learn how long I'll
have to wait to see a doctor in
the emergency room.
So why does it supposedly
take 10 days for e-mail spam-
mers with technology at
least as advanced as mine to
remove my name from their
mailing lists (during which
time, they inform me, I may -
lucky me continue to receive
communications from them)?
Most of these emails also
inform me that the reason I'm
being spammed (my word,
obviously; they call it advertis-
ing) is because of my "relation-
ship" with the sender, which is
analogous to the relationship
between a dog and a fire
hydrant (I'm the hydrant).
I've never even heard of
these spammers, let alone
asked them to contact me. I
just happened to end up on an
email list that just happened to
end up in their hands, and they
just happen to think I need a
few dozen emails a day about
where to buy printer ink or how
to refinance my mortgage.
But I don't. I don't even need
one. So I avail myself of the
"Unsubscribe" option, only to
be told that we could remain
pen pals for an additional 10
days. I guess they're letting me
down easy. How thoughtful.
Mind you, some companies
respond to unsubscribing with


a notice that we are through
- they will never darken my
Inbox again. I like them, even
though I still don't have any
use for their goods or services.
I just wish I knew how to put
them in touch with the ones
that need 10 days to find my
name and delete it so we could
at least meet in the middle at
five days, max. Because the
emails from them do continue
to come in.
A bigger question in my
mind, at least is why it takes
three days for my bank to pay a
bill electronically when I can go
on the payee's website and pay
it immediately. The bank knows
much better than either of us
how much money I do or don't
have, and it's not shy about let-
ting me know when my balance
slips below a designated level.
I pay almost all my bills online
and get by day to day almost
entirely on my debit card, so my
account balance is always up to
date. If I make a miscalculation,
the bank will ding me for fees.
What's the problem?
And there's this: I tried to pay
my homeowners association
dues a mere three days early
last year, and my bank informed
me it would be glad to handle
the transaction for a $14.95
fee. My HOA was processing the
dues through a different local
bank and the notice said I could
pay at any branch for free.
Guess what I did.
I understand that even today
there are things that need a
time to occur. If you're making
a baby, you don't want to see
your little darling a minute
early, and that's not changing.
But if I can email a Chinese
restaurant, order one of
everything on the menu and
pick it up in 20 minutes, my
bank shouldn't need three days'
notice to get my water bill paid.
And I'd like to see some big
deposits hitting my account
real fast. I'm not expecting any,
but I'd really like some.
Email: bmudge@venicegondolier.com


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To be the superior quality, low-cost provider of information and adver-
tising in the local communities we serve. We will continuously improve:
the value of information provided to our customers; the value and results
for our advertisers; the quality of life in our communities; the return on
our stockholders'investment ... while providing a fair, challenging and
rewarding workplace for productive employees.


LETTERS WELCOME
Letters to the editor are welcome on virtually any subject. They must be
signed and give the writer's address and telephone number for verifica-
tion. Letters of more than 250 words may be edited for length. We do not
publish letters that condemn or praise business service. We do not publish
poetry, open letters or letters to third parties. Letters from the same
person will not be published more than once a month. Send or bring your
letter to the Venice Gondolier Sun, 200 E. Venice Ave., Venice FL 34285. You
can also fax signed letters to 941-484-8460 or email them to rdupont@
venicegondolier.com. For more information, call 941-207-1000.


IF YOU WERE THE POPE FOR ONE DAY, WHAT ONE THING WOULD YOU CHANGE? CALL US AT


941-207-1111.
Missing my hour. I want
my hour back! It was only five
months ago we had to put the
clocks back and now we have
to put them ahead and lose
an hour. The days are getting
longer all by themselves, just
as Mother Nature intended.
Nobody likes it. It serves no
useful purpose. Instead of talk-
ing about it, let's do something
about it. I want my hour back!
Great job. I think you folks
ought to do an article on the
value and the details that
Dorian and all the folks at the
Venice Community Center
put into putting on beautiful
performances month after
month, year after year. We've
been ticket holders for three
years, and we just love it! We
think you guys should do a
human interest article on how
good a job they're doing.
Back taxes. Here's what
would happen if the federal
government would collect its
back taxes on just the federal
employees. Example: $303,000
in unpaid taxes in 2011 from the
White House aides and $3.5 bil-
lion of unpaid taxes of federal
employees of 2011. If those taxes
were paid, the sequester would
not impact the tours of the
White House. So, let's remember
that if the federal employees
would pay their back taxes, the
sequester could be eliminated
partially from the back taxes
payment. Unfortunately, the
federal government would
rather create discomfort in the
American people than collect
back taxes or eliminate the
fraud and the waste.
Arena. As one member of the
Venice Circus Arts Foundation,
all of us would like to thank
everybody who has helped us
along the way in our endeavor
to restore the Circus Arena to its
original state. We had the promise
of the previous council to give us
five years to make every effort to
restore this property. Now, this
new council has taken this away
and has given us 60 days, along


Let 'em


Have It
with a building inspector to come
up with new ideas. Where was
the building inspector for the
past 22 years? Why the rush now?
We'd like to continue what we
have been doing. They already
have people coming in and giving
them prices on all the steel in
the building. Is that fair? Do you
know that many of the council
members have never been by the
arena? Talk about not knowing
what it's like. There will be a sign
soon that tells us what is to be
built on that property. They are
just waiting in the wings.
Money back. The people in
the county need to read that
landscaping contract of the 51
trees on U.S. 41 and find out the
person that was paid and the
decision to plant them. Kind
of waiting on my tax refund on
them the reimbursement that
the government owes me.
Traffic jams. In Venice, we
have grown in population from
3,000 in the 1960s to 21,000
today. Another 10,000 people
increases the influx of winter
visitors enjoying our sunny
weather, beaches and quaint
city friendliness and bicycle
trails. The Circus Arena that
can hold 4,500 people for each


major event year around would
add approximately 2,000 more
autos on our short Business
41 on the island of Venice. The
exhaust is not a healthy thing
for retirees. Venice experiences
excessive traffic gridlock with
the first major classic car show
at the Venice airport area. We've
lived here for years and love the
circus, and watched an increased
population, with the hospital,
school traffic most of the year,
and soon the new Performing
Arts Center at the high school,
all converging on Business 41.
We also have a large community
center on the island. A circus
museum would be most fitting,
but anything larger would
only complicate traffic for our
permanent residents.
DIY. To the caller who was
curious about church and
state: I wonder when the last
time was when you picked
up a Bible and read a little
something on your own. Why
don't you sit in your bedroom
and count the wallpaper and
leave people alone?
Money walks. Let's save the
Circus Arena. We have marches
and drives for everything
else, let's have a march for the
Circus Arena. All the citizens
can participate and walk for a
mile or half a mile or a block.
You can get sponsors and the
money can go to buy a new
roof. Let's save the arena!
The Let 'em Have It line
allows readers to sound off on
issues of local interest. Opinions
expressed here are solely those of
the callers. Personal attacks on
private individuals; attacks on or
commercials for specific busi-
nesses; local candidate endorse-
ments or attacks during election
season; or opinions or comments
otherwise unfit for publication
will not be printed. If you would
like to participate, call the line
at 941-207-1111. Call no more
than once a week. Please keep
your comments brief The line
is available all hours. Caller
identification is not required.





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


Women struggled early for their First Amendment rights


As we celebrate Women's
History month, we should
pay homage to a resolute
group of women who
deserve recognition during
Sunshine Week, another
March event. Sunshine
Week calls attention to
journalists who coura-
geously brought to light
information that govern-
mental and other authori-
ties prefer to keep hidden.
Their notable ranks
include women who have
insisted for nearly two
centuries on their right to
cover the nation's capital in
spite of prejudice against
their gender.
Three decades before


the CivilWar, Anne Royall,
an impoverished widow,
started her own newspaper,
Paul Pry, inWashington.
As the name implied,
she had no hesitancy in
exposing abuses of power
such as unauthorized use
of government horses and
carriages by public officials.
Ridiculed as unwomanly
and argumentative, Royall
eked out a meager living as
aWashington journalist for
nearly a quarter-century,
ending her career in 1854
with a prayer that "the
Union of these States may
be eternal." She had only
54 cents when she died at
the age of 85.
Her successors also
encountered hostility
on grounds they had no
place in the man's world
of political reporting. In
1850, Jane G. Swisshelm,
the first woman journalist
to insist on sitting beside
men in the Capitol press
galleries, had to give up
her seat because she dared


publish unseemly details
of the private life of Daniel
Webster, one of the most
famous senators of his day.
Women did not actually
find a place in the press
galleries until the suffrage
campaign that culminated
in women getting the vote
in 1920, but even then they
were not always welcome.
Although women re-
placed men in Washington
journalism duringWorld
War II, when it ended,
editors resumed hiring
practices that relegated
many women journalists to
social reporting.
Relatively few women had
access to news that told the
public about the activities
of its officials. In the 1950s,
however, Maxine Cheshire,
a social reporter for The
Washington Post, investi-
gated Mamie Eisenhower's
acceptance of gifts from
foreign governments.
Cheshire was among
10 Washington women
journalists profiled in a


1972 Cosmopolitan article
headlined "The Witches
ofWashington," which
pictured its subjects as com-
petitive and unfeminine in
their pursuit of news.
Women were refused
membership in the presti-
gious National Press Club
until 1971, and were allowed
to cover speeches of officials
there only by sitting in a hot,
crowded balcony while men
reporters took notes and
dined in comfort below.
When federal equal
employment legislation
took effect in the 1960s and
1970s, women journalists
got new opportunities to
cover the same assign-
ments as men. But they still
encountered barriers, in-
cluding sexual harassment.
Eileen Shanahan, an
economics writer for The
NewYorkTimes from 1966
to 1977, described flagrant
examples of harassment
on Capitol Hill in an oral
history interview. She cited
an instance in which a


senator directed her to his
"hideaway" office to get
an important economics
report and "actually tore a
button off my blouse trying
to get at me."
She fought him off but
remembered to pick up the
report as she left.
Today, women are esti-
mated to represent about
half of the Washington
press corps and have
proved themselves capable
of carrying on the highest
traditions of journalism. For
example, Dana Priest of the
Washington Post is a two-
time Pulitzer Prize winner.
Along with Anne Hull,
she exposed the degraded
living conditions for
wounded soldiers at Walter
Reed Medical Center,
which led to the resignation
of top officials and im-
provements in health care
for veterans.
She previously
uncovered secret overseas
prisons that the Central
Intelligence Agency


used for interrogation of
suspected terrorists.
Priest is motivated to
bring an abuse to light
as a way of ensuring that
democracy continues. In
a television interview on
secret prisons, Priest said,
"We tried to figure out a
way to get as [much] infor-
mation to the public as we
could without damaging
national security."
Women have fought
hard and responsibly for
the opportunity to report
significant news from
Washington.
Maurine Beasley is
professor emerita at the
Philip Merrill College of
Journalism, University of
Maryland College Park. She
is the author of"Women
of the Washington Press:
Politics, Prejudice, and
Persistence" (Northwestern
University Press, 2012).
This article is produced
in partnership with
OpenTheGovernment.org
for Sunshine Week.


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10A SUN NEWSPAPERS



GUILTY

FROM PAGE 1

rage on Jan. 24, 2011,
after calling and texting
Nabergall, his estranged
girlfriend, 53 times. Lee
stabbed Salter 14 times,
including once in the
heart and in the neck,
and stabbed Nabergall
at least five times,
slashing her throat
with such force the
knife sliced through her
trachea.
Fraivillig showed
jurors bloody photos
of the victims, which
some family and friends
saw for the first time.
Salter's sister left the
room.
"After he killed them,
Mr. Lee washed off
their blood, opened the
refrigerator and then he
fled, leaving behind only
his bloody footprints,"
Fraivillig said. "He threw
the knife in the drain
pipe and went to his
friend Rhonda Porter's
house (in Englewood).
He knew she was an
alcoholic and an old
friend. He thought
she would forget what
happened because she
drinks a lot.
"But he slipped up. He
told her he slaughtered
two people. Then he
clarified, and said, 'I


MARCH 23, 2013 WEEKEND EDITION


killed him (Salter).' They
buried his clothes in her
yard. Then he tried to
pin the murder on her
by putting his bloody
shoes under her (car)
seat to leave behind
evidence just in case
she didn't listen to him.
Then he had her help
him bury the sneakers
too."
Lee's attorney, Carolyn
Schlemmer, said it
wasn't Lee who killed
Nabergall, but Salter. She
said Lee didn't have any
of Nabergall's blood on
him.
"He loved her,"
Schlemmer said. "He was
trying to protect her, but
when he walked in she
was already dead. Mr.
Lee admits he killed Mr.
Salter in self-defense.
Why didn't he go to the
police? Because he is a
14-time felon. Who was
going to believe him?
He was trying to get Mr.
Salter to stop giving her
drugs."
Schlemmer said Porter,
who is an admitted
33-year alcoholic and
suffers from memory
lapses and blackouts,
played a larger role in
the murder. She said
Porter lied during her
testimony, but her client
wasn't allowed to lie.
"Let's leave poor
pathetic Ms. Porter out
of this," Fraivillig said,


following Schlemmer's
statement. "She was
blacked out when Lee
called to tell her he was
coming over on the
night of the murder. She
was able to remember
he smelled of a strong
odor of blood and death
... She could remember
Lee told her he threw
the weapon in the drain
pipe and where the
clothing was buried.
She could remember
what Mr. Lee said
about slaughtering two
people."
Fraivillig said both
victims had the exact
same type of deep cuts
to their neck cuts
that were made with
the same knife, ac-
cording to the county
medical examiner. She
said the 14 superficial
cuts Salter sustained
to his arms, hands and
face were all defensive
wounds from being
attacked.
"Mr. Lee said that Mr.
Salter kept coming at
him, yet Mr. Lee had
absolutely no cuts on his
body," she said.
Twelfth Circuit
Judge Peter Dubensky
told jurors to return
Wednesday for the pen-
alty phase of the trial.
Jurors will be asked to
recommend whether Lee
should get life in prison
without the possibility of


Spring is in full bloom at W lf 'dSOr

of Venice
I ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE


Join us tor a






Open House




Enjoy a fun-filled afternoon with entertainment, refreshments
and tours of our beautiful community. Bring a friend or
make new ones at this yearly event!


For inore information. cal: (941) 408-2600

S liic,,c I. B(. 1 l Urncr t
= ki Bu SlcnJ l, ind .Chl ILc The

d C ie picmirr rrir..iI, nmlM, ir ii ior
il ,' ^ith n reqLiieJ i".L -i-l,. s of Venice ,
%SSISTEDLIVING & MEMOR.L'

1600 Center Rd Venice, FL 34292 A LegenJd Senior Living ResJdic
,Winds&orSLcom A LFc 1114 A MIssion fo Serve. A Passion foi C


1e.
rue.


parole or be sentenced
to death. During the
penalty phase, victims'
family members will
read statements about
how Lee has impacted
their lives.
Dubensky ultimately
will rule on the sentenc-
ing, which could take up
to two months.
Lee's stepbrother,
Rob Weaver, who dated
Nabergall for 10 years,
said Lee got what he
deserved.
"He killed two
people and then went
to the refrigerator to
get a beer," Weaver
said. "After seeing a
photograph of Rhonda
Porter's nightstand
with the same brand
of beer John drinks,
I'm convinced it was
his. He killed them and
then drank that bloody
beer on his way over to
Rhonda's house. It just
shows you the kind of
person he is."
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY
ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

Christian Grover hugs Assis-
tant State Attorney Karen
Fraivillig on Friday, minutes
after hearing John Lee was
found guilty of slaying Traci
Nabergall and her friend Jason
Salter in 2011.


NOTICE OF FINALAGENCYACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final
Agency Action is approval of the
application for an Environmental
Resource Permit to service residential
activities on 93.0 acres known as
Grand Palm Phase lB. The project is
located in Sarasota County, Section(s)
19, Township 39 South, Range 20
East. The permit applicant is Resource
Conservation of Sarasota, LLC whose
address is 5800 Lakewood Ranch
Boulevard, Sarasota, Florida 34240.
The Permit No. is 44024192.004.

The file(s) pertaining to the project
referred to above is available for
inspection Monday through Friday
except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District, 6750
Fruitville Road, Sarasota, Florida
34240.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interest
are affected by the District's action
regarding this matter may request an
administrative hearing in accordance
with Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Status (ES.), and Chapter 28-
106, Florida Administrative Code
(FA.C.), of the Uniform Rules of
Procedure. A request for hearing must
(1) explain how the substantial
interest of each person requesting the
hearing will be affected the by the
District's action, or proposed action;
(2) state all material facts disputed by
each person requesting the hearing or
state that there are no disputed facts;
and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter
28-106, FA.C. A request for hearing
must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the
District's Brooksville address 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-
6899 within 21 days of publication of
this notice (or within 14 days for an
Environmental Resource Permit with
Proprietary Authorization for the use of
Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure
to file a request for hearing within this
time period shall constitute a waiver of
any right such person may have to
request a hearing under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, FS.

Because the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate final
agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the District's final action
may be different from the position
taken by it in this notice of agency
action. Persons whose substantial
interest will be affected by any such
final decision of the District in this
natter have the right to petition to
become a party to the proceeding, in
accordance with the requirements set
forth above.

Mediation pursuant to Section
120.573, ES., to settle an
administrative dispute regarding the
District's action in this matter is not
available prior to the filing of a request
for hearing.
469172


LEGAL NOTICES


FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE NOTICE TO NOTICE TO NOTICE TO OTHER NOTICES
S12NM OF AUCTION CREDITORS CREDITORS CREDITORS I 38
19 20 20 20


Notice Under Fictitious
Name Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of Crisis Care
International located at 1435
E. Venice Ave. #104-265,
located in the County of Sara-
sota, in the City of Venice, FL
34292, intends to register the
said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Venice, Florida, this
19th day of March, 2013.
Transforming Leadership
Publish: March 23, 2013

Notice Under Fictitious
Name Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of Reins Inspir-
ing Change located at 3644
Delor Ave. located in the
County of Sarasota, in the City
of North Port, FL 34285,
intends to register the said
name with the Division of Cor-
porations of the Florida Depart-
ment of State, Tallahassee,
Florida.
Dated at North Port, Florida,
this 19th day of March, 2013.
Delores Tricarico
Publish: March 23, 2013

I NOTICE I
OF AUCTION



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
JOHNSON'S TOWING OF VENICE
gives
Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these
vehicles on April 10, 2013, 9:00 am
at 604 TAMIAMI TRL N. Nokomis, FL
34275-2137 pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. JOHNSON'S TOWING
OF VENICE reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or all bids.
2010 CHEVROLET
1GCSKSE36AZ285138
GENERAL MOTORS CORP


1GKEK63R7YR175421
Publish: March 23, 2013

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
JOHNSON'S TOWING OF VENICE
gives
Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and
intent to sell these
vehicles on April 17, 2013, 9:00 am
at 604 TAMIAMI TRL N. Nokomis, FL
34275-2137 pursuant to subsection
713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. JOHNSON'S TOWING
OF VENICE reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or all bids.
2000 FORD
1FAFP53U6YG141410
1996 LEXUS
JT8BF12GOT0159238
Publish: March 23, 2013


Notice of Public Auction
Notice is hereby given that the contents
of the rental units listed herein will be
offered for sale at public auction per the
Florida Self Storage Act. (Statutes/Sec-
tions 83.901 83.809)
The property list contained herein will be
sold to satisfy liens imposed by EXTRA
SPACE STORAGE on April 10, 2013 at
3:30 PM, or thereafter the sale will occur
on premises, at Extra Space Storage,
located at 1266 US HWY 41 BYPASS,
VENICE, FLORIDA 34285
The personal goods stored therein by the
following may include, but are not limited
to general household, furniture, boxes,
clothing, and appliances.
1.Unit #1304, 1302, Nancy Doss Cun-
ningham
2.Unit #1195, Nicole Marie Healy
3.Unit# 2002, Mary Schlenger
4.Unit #116, Edward M. Fuqua
EXTRA SPACE STORAGE reserves the
right to reject all bids. Purchases must
be made at the time of sale by "Cash"
only. All contents are sold
"as is". Contents of the unit must be
removed immediately, or the storage unit
containing the items must be rented by
the purchaser. Sale is subject to cancel-
lation at any time.
Publish: March 16, 23, 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEATRICE BALDWIN,
Deceased.
File No.
2013-CP-000629-NC
Division:Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of BEATRICE BALD-
WIN, deceased, whose date of
death was September 19,
2012, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Sarasota County
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is P.O. Box
3079, Sarasota, FL 34230.
The names and addresses of
the personal representatives
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is March 16,
2013
Personal Representative:
RICHARD C. BALDWIN
3274 Marilyn St
Schenectady, NY 12303
GEORGE N. BALDWIN, III
62 Voorheesville, NY 12186
ROBERT J. BALDWIN
3234 Tarleton Dr.


Beavercreek, OH 45434
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
CHARLES F. WHEELER, ESQ.
BECHTOLD & CORBRIDGE,
P.A.
240 Nokomis Avenue South
Suite 200
Venice, FL 34285
Telephone: (941) 488-7751
Florida Bar No.116573
PUBLISH: March 16, 23,
2013
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SARA-
SOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DIANA L. HANSFORD,
Deceased,
File No. 2013-CP-930-SC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DIANA L. HANSFORD, deceased, whose
date of death was February 2 2013, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Sarasota
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 4000 South Tamia-
mi Trail, Venice, FL 34293. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is March 16, 2013
Personal Representatives:
Denise L. Bontrager
1929 Yucca Lane


North Port, FL 34286
Attorneys for Personal
Representatives
W. KEVIN RUSSELL, Esq.
W. KEVIN RUSSELL, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 398462
14295 South Tamiami Trail
North Port, FL 34287
Telephone: (941)-429-1871
E-Mail: kevin@wkevinrussell.com
PUBLISH: March 16, 23, 2013


TO PLACE YOUR LEGAL
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
FOR CONSIDERATION OF
TEXT AMENDMENT PETITION 13-1AM
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-07
NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Venice,
Florida will hold a public hearing beginning at 9:00 a.m. or short-
ly thereafter, on April 9, 2013, in Council Chambers, City Hall, 401
West Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida, to consider and act upon the
adoption of the following proposed City Ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF VENICE, FLORIDA, AMENDING
CHAPTER 86, LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, ARTICLE V, USE REG-
ULATIONS, DIVISION 3, RESIDENTIAL ZONING DISTRICTS, SEC-
TION 86-81(k), RSF RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE FAMILY DISTRICT; LIMI-
TATIONS ON SIGNS; CHAPTER 122, ZONING, ARTICLE V, SUP-
PLEMENTARY ZONING DISTRICT REGULATIONS, DIVISION 4,
SIGNS, SUBDIVISION II, IN PERMIT, SECTION 122-582, EXEMP-
TIONS; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT WITH OTHER ORDINANCES;
PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
Purpose of Ordinance: the city code currently prohibits non-com-
mercial religious or first amendment type signs in the RSF and
PUD zoning districts and the federal courts have found similar sign
restrictions in other cities and counties to be unconstitutional;
therefore that revision of the land development code is required to
comply with federal law and permit limited non-commercial signs
in the RSF and PUD zoning districts which can be used for religious
or other first amendment purposes; and the city desires to elimi-
nate any inconsistencies for signs identifying home occupations
by amending its code to prohibit home occupation signs in the RSF
district.
A complete draft of the proposed Ordinance is on file in the Office
of the City Clerk for inspection by the public between the hours of
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be responsi-
ble for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evidence at
this meeting upon which any appeal is to be based.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. Written
comment filed with the City Clerk of the City of Venice, will be
heard and considered.
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the City
Clerk's office at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.
/s/
Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk
Publish: March 23, 2013


..ftr

F1





:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


Sarasota kicks off film festival in Venice


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
Film fans celebrated
the kickoff of the 15th
annual Sarasota Film
Festival Wednesday at
Venice Art Center.
"We create this
festival for the commu-
nity, and Venice is part
of our community,"
Festival Director Tom
Hall said in his opening
remarks.
There are 222 films
at this year's festival,


which opens April 5 with
"Blackfish" and a gala
party at the Van Wezel
Performing Arts Hall.
Film ticket is $25. Party
ticket is $75 and a VIP
pass is $125. "Blackfish"
is a 90-minute docu-
mentary about "the
consequences of whale
captivity."
"I'm the only one who
has seen all the films,"
Hall said.
While the kick-off
was in Venice, films and
special events will be


HEMINGWAY HONORED
Mariel Hemingway will be honored with the festival's Impact Award,
co-presented by UN Women.


in Sarasota. Tickets for
most individual films
are $12.50 per person.
A young screenwriters
event is free and will
feature staged readings
of original screenplays by
students from Phoenix
Academy and Sarasota
County Technical
Institute.


"Five thousand stu-
dents in 30 area schools
from pre-school to high
school will participate,
at no cost to the stu-
dents," festival educa-
tion director Allison
Koehler said. "There
are 13 educational
programs."
Mariel Hemingway


will be honored with the
festival's Impact Award,
copresented by UN
Women. Also coming for
the festival are Griffin
Dunn, who will be hon-
ored for his performance
in "The Discoverers,"
two-time Oscar winning
director Barbara Kopple
and World Cinema
Award winner Suzanne
Clement.
All those films plus
many special events
will pack the festival,
which concludes


April 13 with filmmaker
awards and the film,
"Frances Ha," directed
by Noah Baumbach.
Tickets for the film are
$25 with VIP tickets for
$125.
Volunteers are the life-
blood of the festival and
are still being sought. To
distribute posters, help
at staff events and help
with the festival, visit
SarasotaFilmFestival.
com/volunteer.

Email: kcol@venicegondolier.com


COUNTY CALENDAR
Community Alliance Nominating and
Membership Committee March
27, 2p.m., Room 201, Health and
Human Services, 2200 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-2561
Community Alliance Sarasota
Partnership for Children Joint
Meeting with PYD Council March
25,3 p.m., Conference Room 220,
Blue Awning Building, Sarasota County
School Board, The Landings, 1950
Landings Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-
861-1410
Coordinated Assistance Network
(CAN) Work Group of COAD March
27, 4 p.m., Room 201, Health and
Human Services, 2200 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-2561
Developmental Disabilities Strike
Team March 28, 9 a.m., Room
2063, Health and Human Services,
2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-2558
Early Learning Coalition Budget
and Finance March 29, 8 a.m.,
Conference Room, Cavanaugh &
Company LLP, 2381 Fruitville Road,
Sarasota. Call 941-954-4830

ADVISORY BOARD VACANCIES
Visit www.scgov.netladvisoryboards or
contact the Sarasota County Call Center at
861-5000 for latest vacancies and information
about Sarasota County Advisory Boards.


Family Safety Alliance March 28, 3
p.m., Large. Conference Room, United
Way of Manatee County Building,
McClure Center, 4215 Concept Court,
Lakewood Ranch. Call 941-861-2882
Historic Preservation Board March
26, 4:30 p.m., Think Tank, third floor,
Administration Center, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-6883
LIBRARIES AND AARP OFFER
FREE TAX RETURN ASSISTANCE
Sarasota County libraries and the
American Association of Retired
Persons (AARP) are partnering to offer
free assistance with the preparation of
2011 tax returns through April 17.
AARP Tax-Aide volunteers are
available to assist with filing federal
returns at the following libraries:
* Fruitville Library, 100 Coburn Road,
Sarasota: Monday-Thursday,
10 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
* Jacaranda Library, 4143 Woodmere
Park Blvd., Venice: Monday and
Wednesday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
* Selby Library, 1331 First St.,
Sarasota: Monday-Thursday,
2-6 p.m.
AARP Tax-Aide, which would usually
be offered at Gulf Gate Library
during tax season, has relocated
to the Chelsea Center at 2506 Gulf
Gate Drive, east of St. Thomas
More Church, and will be offered on
Wednesday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and
Friday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.


SARASOTA COUNTY'S HEALTH
RANKING IS AMONG TOP FIVE IN
THE STATE
Sarasota County ranked within the top
five counties in the state in the 2013
County Health Rankings report just
released by The Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation and the University of
Wisconsin. This is the fourth in a series
of annual reports that uses traditional,
established data, much of which was
obtained from the Florida Department
of Health (DOH) and is available to the
people of Florida at www.floridacharts.
com.
"In Sarasota County, there are areas of
progress and continuing opportunity,"
said Community Health Improvement
Partnership (CHIP) Director Kari
Ellingstad. "We continue to rank among
the top five of Florida's 67 counties
overall, which reflects the priority that
our community has placed on healthy
environments and healthy lifestyles.
Placing continued emphasis on the
quality of its parks and recreation
facilities, -and in helping to improve
access to quality health care, including
preventive screenings for diabetes and
breast cancer, helps to improve the
health of our community."
For more information on community
partnerships to promote healthy living,
visit www.chip4health.org.
For information about the county
health rankings, visit www.
countyhealthrankings.org.


Sarasota County prohibits discrimination in all services, programs or activities on the basis of race, color, national orgin, age, disability,
sex, marital status, familial status, religion, or genetic information. Persons with disabilities who require assistance or alternative means for
communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.), or who wish to file a complaint, should contact: Sarasota County
ADA/ CMI Rights Coordinator, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota, Florida 34236, Phone: 941-861-5000, TTY: 7-1-1 or 1-800-955-8771. Email:
adacoordinator@scgov.net. Persons needing assistance are asked to provide notice as soon as practicable in advance of the event to allow
time to accommodate their request.


THEVENICE


Symphony


Cathleen Pavelka, Mezzo Soprano
Friday, April 5 8PM

Saturday, April 6 4PM & 8PM

Mezzo Soprano Cathleen Pavelka is an
international vocalist and Manhattan School of
Music graduate. She will perform works by
Rossini, Saint-Saens, and arias from Bizet's
Carmen. The orchestra will perform Cesar
Franck's Symphony in D Minor.

Concert Preview! April 3 1pm

Join us an for entertaining and informative session as Conductor Ken
Bowermeister previews the music selected for this concert, discussing
the relevance and history of the composers and their work.
Concert Previews are free and open to everyone!
Venice Public Library 300 Nokomis Ave S. on Venice Island


WALT



SO
Stm


Spring POPS! Concert

"Dance" Theme
Friday, April 26 8PM

Saturday, April 27 4PM & 8PM

Hold onto your seat for a journey through time
and enjoy dance music from the 1890's
through the 1950's! This energizing
performance is our season finale...so call for
tickets today!


AUTO ACCIDENT

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Concert Venue: Church of the Nazarene, 1535 E. Venice Ave.
^ www.thevenicesymphony.org
Ticket Line: (941)207-8822
Phone: (941)488-1010


SUN NEWSPAPERS 11A


Eric barbera, UU b ODDi-Jo uonner, UU uan b uscn, u I
VFVj*tmfaf!=VV rv









WEEKEND EDITION SPORTS
MARCH 23, 2013


CONTACT US
ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR
941-207-1107
rsmith@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


Local sailor eyes 2016 Olympics


By ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR

What started as a
hobby at the Venice Youth
Boating Association
(VYBA) has turned into
the best decision Fred
Strammer ever made.
Strammer, a Nokomis
resident, was recently
named to the 2013 U.S.
Sailing Team Sperry Top-
Sider, the country's national
team comprised of the top
sailors in the nation.
Strammer's parents
enrolled him in a learn-
to-sail program at the
VYBA at age 9, and he's
been hooked ever since.
The 24-year-old won
a plethora of champion-
ships growing up before
continuing his career at
Brown University, where
he was the captain of the
sailing team his junior
and senior years.
He met Zach Brown
in the spring of 2011
while Strammer was
finishing his college
career. Brown, three
years Strammer's elder,
was coaching following
a distinguished sailing
career at Yale. The two
decided to team up
shortly thereafter.
Strammer and Brown
earned their places on the
national team by taking
the gold medal in the 49er
at January's International
Sailing Federation (ISAF)
World Cup in Miami.
The 49er is one of
the fastest boats in the
Olympics, a 16-foot mono-
hull that requires both
sailors' trapezing in order


PHOTO PROVIDED BY
WALTER COOPER/
US SAILING
Fred Strammer grew up
honing his craft in Venice. Now
he's a 2016 Olympic hopeful.
to hold the boat down.
"In many ways, its like
trying to stand on a bar
of soap in the shower,"
Strammer said. "The boat
either wants to sail full
speed or capsize."
Even the most accom-
plished sailors struggle
with the event, and
developing chemistry is
paramount to success.
"It takes many teams
over two years to learn
how to sail the boat
comfortably even if they
are champions in other
classes," Strammer said.
If January's gold medal
is any indication, he and
Brown have gotten past
that stage.
The pair is currently
training in Palma de
Mallorca in the Spanish
Balearic Islands for their
second World Cup event
of the year: the 2013 ISAF
Sailing World Cup Palma.
They'll compete in five
other events in Europe


PHOTO PROVIDED BY MICK ANDERSON
Zach Brown, left, and Fred Strammer, right, won the gold medal in the ISAF Sailing World Cup in Miami in January.


this year, with their
long-term goal being
to qualify for the 2016
Summer Olympics in Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil.
The team may be the
top 49er squad in the
country right now, but
they'll have to continue
performing at a high
level in the years leading
up to 2016 in order to
punch their tickets to
Rio. In the meantime, the
recognition that comes
with being named to
the 2013 Top-Sider team
comes with a few perks,
including the ability to
raise the funds necessary


to travel to such exotic
destinations.
"Qualifying helps us
with fundraising, our
branding, and some
other resources the team
offers," Strammer said.
No one would blame
someone in Strammer's
position for getting side-
tracked by his beautiful
surroundings, but he said
the team's trips to Europe
are strictly business.
"The boat park, the
waters we sail, and the
roadways from one
event to the next are the
most we see during our
travels," Strammer said.


"Besides, we are on a
tight budget and detours
aren't on the ledger!
"We spend maybe
half of our time sailing
and working out. There
is never enough time in
the day to get it all done.
Training in Europe is
hugely beneficial to us
because the bulk of the
competitors come to train
and race at these events."
By his own admission,
Strammer admits he's not
the most talented sailor.
"I think there are many
different ways to the top,
yet every champion in any
sport has the same key


attributes: persistence,
hard-working, talent,
resources, mental strength
and the ability to perform
in critical moments.
"The sport of sailing is
no different. Every time
I hit the water, I have to
perform."
And if all goes accord-
ing to plan, his travels will
eventually take him to
Brazil in 2016.
"Qualifying for the U.S.
Sailing Team this year was
a huge achievement for
us," Strammer said. "But
we still have a long way to
go before meddling in Rio."
Email: rsmith@VeniceGondolier.com


HIGH SCHOOL VARSITY BASEBALL


Indians go undefeated in district, down Pirates


5-2


By ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR

The Venice Indians
(11-1, 10-0) completed
their undefeated district
slate with a 5-2 win over
Port Charlotte (5-8, 4-5)
Thursday night in Venice.
Four Indians starter
Brandon Elmy, Tyler
Shambora, Tyson Albert
and Cooper Hammond -
combined for 12 strikeouts
while holding the Pirates
to three hits on the night.
Elmy was particularly
impressive, tossing four
innings of one-hit ball and
striking out eight Pirates in
his first start since dislo-
cating a rib in February.
Venice Head Coach
Craig Faulkner said, "I
like what our pitchers are
doing. Elmy has come on
strong here to comple-
ment Sham, Albert and
Hammond."
The Indians broke a
scoreless tie in the bot-
tom of the third inning
on catcher Mike Rivera's
solo home run off Pirates
starter Donovan Petry,
who surrendered two
runs and walked four in
his 2.2 innings.
"I was looking for a
first-pitch fastball," Rivera
said. "He threw me inside.
I turned my hips and I
got it."
Faulkner said the
4-bagger set the tone for
the rest of the game.
"That's a big home run
to get us up 1-0 and take
the wind out of their sails,"
he said. "We don't give up
a lot of runs, so we've just
got to score a few."
Consecutive walks put
a pair of Indians on and
Nick Longhi's 2-out double
gave Venice a 2-0 lead.
Ryan Miller drove in
the game-winning run in
the fourth on a perfectly
laid bunt single down the


third base line.
The Pirates answered in
the top of the fifth when
Taylor Severson roped
a 2-run double down
the right field line off
Shambora.
The Indians' lead bal-
looned back to three in
the bottom of the inning
on Tyler Atwell's sacrifice
fly to deep left field and
a wild pitch that allowed
Rivera to score from third.
Pirates Head Coach
Bryan Beisner said, "We
made a nice comeback
there, got it to 3-2, and
then we gave away a
couple runs. Once you do
that, you're in trouble."
The Pirates allowed as
many walks (six) as they
did hits.
"We've got to throw
more strikes," he said.
"We gave away a few runs
tonight."
The Indians will be the
No. 1 seed in the District
11 playoffs after going
10-0 in district play. The
accomplishment is one
Faulkner hopes will lead
to bigger and better
triumphs.
"It was a huge goal and
it's not an easy goal to
accomplish. We haven't
done that very often. We
set the tone for the dis-
trict, and now we move
on to playing some really
tough teams."


The Indians interact with their third-grade reading buddies
prior to Thursday's game.


With the prestigious
National High School
Invitational tournament
beginning Wednesday in
Cary, N.C., the Indians
will play four games in as
many days against some
of the country's toughest
competition.
Despite his team's
10-game winning streak,
Faulkner pointed out a
couple areas in which the
Indians can get better.
"One thing we need
to improve on is our
baserunning," he said.
"We're a fast team and
we're not taking advantage
of it. We're not moving up
on balls in the dirt nearly
enough. Misplayed balls
in the outfield, we need to
be taking the next base."
Faulkner also said his
hitters need to change
the way they approach


their at-bats.
"I think some of our
players are not as sharp
as they want to be at the
plate," he said. "They're
jumping at balls instead
of staying on balance."
The Indians will play
Christian Brothers
(Tenn.) in the opening
game of the tournament
Wednesday at 11 a.m.

Indians give back
to community
Prior to Thursday's
game, the Indians inter-
acted with their third-
grade reading buddies
from Venice Elementary.
Venice players spend time
with individual students,
interacting with them and
helping them improve
their reading skills.
Email: rsmith@VeniceGondolier.com


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SUN PHOTOS
BY JUSTIN
FENNELL
Drake Burns,
9, throws
out the first
pitch before
Thursday's
game. Burns
is one of the
third-graders
involved in
the reading
mentors
program
the Indians
volunteer their
time for.


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GTEN Riverview @ Venice, 3:30
(@ Hecksher Park)
Friday BTEN Braden River@ Venice, 4
BASE Venice v. TBD (@ Cary, N.C.) (@Laurel Nokomis School)





:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TENNIS



Indians sweep Out-of-Door Academy


STAFF REPORT

The Venice High boys
tennis team improved its
record to 7-2 with a 7-0 win
over Out-of-Door Academy
Thursday afternoon at
Laurel Nokomis School.

* SINGLES
No. 1: Brian Felman
(V) defeated Luke Horan
(ODA) 6-1, 7-6 (7-5)
No. 2: Thomas
Whittaker (V) defeated
Ethan Eckart (ODA) 7-6
(7-4), 6-1
No. 3: Erick Gasca (V)


defeated Jordy Moran
(ODA) 6-1, 6-0
No. 4: Charlie Bond (V)
defeated Vaughn Garcia
(ODA) 6-4, 6-2
No. 5: Cristian
Hitchcock (V) defeated
Janum Trivedi (ODA) 6-7
(5-7), 6-4, 10-7

* DOUBLES
No. 1: Felman/Gasca
(V) defeated Eckart/J.
Moran (ODA) 8-0
No. 2: Fong/
Krishnaswamy (V)
defeated L. Horan/Garcia
(ODA) 8-4


SUN PHOTOS BY JUSTIN FENNELL
At left: Venice No. 1 Brian Felman earned a hard-fought 6-1, 7-6
(7-5) victory over Out-of-Door's Luke Horan.



At right: Venice's Thomas Whittaker defeated Out-of-Door's
Ethan Eckart 7-6 (7-4), 6-1 in the No. 2 match-up.


444', ~


* ~ 4 ~ ~, I


Date Night sends Indians to N.C.


By ROB SMITH
SPORTS EDITOR

Date Night isn't just
a couples activity any-
more; it's how the Venice
Indians funded their
trip to Cary, N.C., for the
National High School
Invitational.
The Indians, with the
help of 52 local businesses
that donated $50 gift cards
to their establishments,
raised $14,000 conducting
a season-long raffle.
For $20, members
of the community
purchased tickets and
became eligible for $2,600
in gift cards.
Venice Head Coach
Craig Faulkner said his
team's trip to North
Carolina wouldn't have


been possible without
Venice residents and
businesses stepping up.
"The community
is always behind us,"
Faulkner said. "We ap-
preciate their support. It's
a great prize to win, and
the community stepped
up and supported that
and bought raffle tickets.
"The things we do
help that. This Saturday
we're going to Habitat for
Humanity in the morning
and in the afternoon we're
doing Challenger Baseball at
Chuck Reiter. We're trying to
give back, and these young
men pour themselves back
into the community as well.
It's a win-win for both of us."
Securing so many
businesses under a single
fundraising event seems


like a monumental task,
but Faulkner said the will-
ingness of the business
community to participate
made the process much
easier than anticipated.
"They're great," he said.
"Even in difficult times,
through the past few
years, businesses have still
supported us with adver-
tising. It was just a matter
of getting to 52 restaurants
and asking them, and they
all stepped up. It's really a
nice thing."
Faulkner also had a mes-
sage for Nick Pepper, who
won the Date Night raffle
during Thursday's game.
"I hope he enjoys those
restaurants," Faulkner
said. "I hope he takes me
with him."
Email: rsmith@VeniceGondolier.com


SPORTS BRIEFS

Venice Vikings
registration dates
and coaching
information
The Venice Vikings
will be holding registra-
tion dates for returning
players and cheerleaders
on Wednesday, March 20,
and Wednesday, March 27,
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
The first nonreturning
player registration will be
Saturday, April 20, from
9 a.m. to noon.
The Vikings are now
accepting coaching
applications/statements
of intent from anyone
interested in volunteer-
ing for the football and
cheerleading teams.
The applications were
due by Feb. 28 and
were available online


at LeagueLineup.com/
VeniceVikings, or send
a statement of intent to
P.O. Box 1702 Venice, FL
34284-1702.

Manta Pride Run
is March 23
The Lemon Bay
Touchdown Club is plan-
ning its second Manta
Pride Run for 7:30 a.m. on
March 23 at Lemon Bay
High, 2201 Placida Road,
Englewood.
There will be a 5K
Spirit Run/Walk over a
wooded trail. There will
also be an 8K Gridiron
Course run that will
include an all-terrain
obstacle course with
football drills.
The day of the race the
fees will be $25 and $35.


All proceeds benefit the
Lemon Bay HS football
program.
Registration forms are
available at lbtdclub.com.
Register online at action.
com.
Packet pickup and
race-day registration will
be at Lemon Bay High
School between 6 a.m.
and 7 a.m. the day of
the race. Awards will
be given to the overall
female and male winners.
Recognition will also be
given to the top three
finishers in various age
categories. There will
be ample parking. The
course is scenic, safe and
well-marked, and has
drink stations.
For more information,
email Stacie Sparks at
sjssparks4@gmail.com.


Ed Howard Lincoln

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SUN NEWSPAPERS 13A





MARCH 23, 2013 WEEKEND EDITION


Home burglarized four times; suspects arrested


The Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office arrested
two men for burglary
yesterday after they
were caught on camera
outside a Venice home.
Deputies responded to
an alarm and recovered
images from home secu-
rity cameras of a suspect
and a rental vehicle with
a tag number. Detectives
determined the vehicle
had been rented by Kevin
Hunter.
Kevin Hunter, 39, and
Jason Adams, 37, both
of Valrico,
were taken
into custody
with assis-
tance from
Hillsborough
County
deputies
HUNTER and charged
with bur-
glary after
confessing
to the
crime.
Both
men have
criminal
ADAMS histories in
ADAMS Hillsborough
County. Hunter was
arrested on charges
of burglary in 1997 in
Sarasota County. Both
are being held without
bond.
This home had been
broken into at least four
times since September
of 2012. In December
of 2012, the Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office
released video and


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction. Guilt is determined by the
courtsystem.


images of suspects
burglarizing the home.
Hunter and Adams are
believed to be connected
with that case. Additional
burglary charges are
pending.

Pellet gun
brandished
AVenice man was
arrested for showing a
gun to another man over
a love interest.
According to a Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office
report:
The two men ran into
each other at a conve-
nience story on Colonia
Lane in Nokomis.
The victim said
Zackary Michael Beyer-
Radford, 20, was a former
lover of his
girlfriend,
which had
caused
some
tension.
When
he ran into
BEYER-RADFORD Beyer at
the store,
Beyer allegedly pulled up
his waistband, reveal-
ing the tip of a black
semi-automatic pistol,
and pointed his finger at
the victim simulating a
firearm, then threatened
to kill him.


Deputies traced Beyer
to a local motel where
they found a black semi-
automatic pellet gun.
They then had the victim
drive by to positively
identify the suspect.
Beyer, of the 5200
block Citadel Ave., in
Venice, was charged with
aggravated assault. Bond
was set at $1,500.

Big bail for pill
sale
Yet another arrest was
made this week involving
a person selling drugs
to undercover agents. A
high bond of $100,000
was set.
According to a Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office
report:
Nicole Leigh Stout, 29,
was arrested Wednesday
on a warrant served for
two under-
cover sales,
made in
January and
February.
On Jan. 30
Stout sold a
detective an
STOUT unspecified
number
of morphine pills in
exchange for $60 in
prerecorded currency. On
Feb. 7, she sold the detec-
tive three dilaudid pills


(narcotic pain reliever) in
exchange for $90.
Stout, 300 block
Briarwood Road, Venice,
was charged with the sale
of a controlled substance
(morphine, dilaudid).

Venice Police
Department
arrests
Daniel Ray Kent, 52,
1500 block Kilpatrick
Road, Nokomis. Charge:
driving while license
suspended. Bond: $500.

Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office
arrests
Kristina Lee Reilly, 27,
300 block Cowry Road,
Venice. Charge: proba-
tion violation (original
charge: child neglect),
possession of narcotic
equipment. Bond: none.
Somvert At, 30, 4300
block Mercury Road,
Venice. Charge: proba-
tion violation (original
charge: violation of
injunction for protection
against domestic vio-
lence). Bond: none.
Andrea Lynn Givens,
24, 700 block Locarno
Drive, Venice. Charge:
Charlotte County warrant
(possession of a controlled
substance and drug para-
phernalia). Bond: none
Licia Jean
Santisteban-Good, 33,
500 block Neponsit Drive,
Venice. Charge: petit
larceny. Bond: $1,500.


Erik Michael Walker,
32, 400 block Argus Road,
Venice. Charge: pos-
session of a controlled
substance (methamphet-
amine), driving while
license suspended or
revoked (habitual of-
fender). Bond: $3,000.
Frankie Lee Tate, 52,
9000 block Tamiami Trail,
Venice. Charge: fraud un-
der $20,000, grand theft,


fraud (obtaining goods
with invalid vehicle title).
Bond: $21,500.
Travis Carter Costello,
39, 5300 block Kenisco
Road, Venice. Charge: pro-
bation violations (driving
while license suspended
or revoked). Bond: none.
Ryan Thomas Schell,
29, 500 block Burke
Road, Charge: resisting
an officer. Bond: $500.


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:14A SUN NEWSPAPERS





:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


PHOTO PROVIDED

Home Depot helps

expand butterfly habitat
Home Depot and Lemon Bay Conservancy volunteers stop for a break during their project day
at Wildflower Preserve. Pictured, standing, are Ken Frisbie, Sue Murphy, Linda Kirchoff, Ruth
Wilson, Maura Quails, Bob Cooper, Tom Managhan, Colleen Horan and Jennifer Taylor. Seated
are Eva Furner, Sharron Kusiar, Sondra Buchner, Bob Fowler, and Bob Hildebrand is in front.


METH
FROM PAGE 1

to figure out what was
going on," according to
the deputy in a probable
cause affidavit.
The deputy said he
was familiar with both
men from a Sheriff
intelligence bulletin that
explained possible drug
manufacturing was oc-
curring at the Sago Lane
home.
The brush with law
enforcement didn't dis-
suade the suspects' effort
to cook meth that day.
When they returned to
the Sago Lane house at
the end of a dirt road a
quarter mile away, depu-
ties overheard the men
saying all they needed
was lye to proceed. They
left in the vehicle and


returned a couple of
times, finally arriving
with two white males
who carried several bags
to the back porch.
Deputies, meanwhile,
were 30 feet away behind
a neighboring home.
They witnessed
resident Jerome Brown,
56, Randall Langford,
49, from Sarasota, and
Walter "Ricky" Lint, 46,
from Nokomis, bringing
chemicals used to cook
meth in and out of the
shed.
When deputies deter-
mined the suspects were
starting the production
process, they took the
men into custody.
One suspect was
caught after he exited
the shed. Brown locked
the shed door immedi-
ately and began throwing
items out the window on
the opposite side of the


shed. He came out after
deputies ordered him to
comply.
The Sarasota County
Fire Department was
called to clear the scene
of any immediate danger
and one neighboring
home was temporarily
evacuated.
Another HAZMAT
team that specializes in
cleaning up meth labs
disposed of the remain-
ing chemicals.
Brown, Langford
and Lint were charged
with manufacturing of
methamphetamine and
unlawful possession of
listed chemicals.
Brown was also
charged with tampering
with evidence, and pos-
session of a firearm by a
convicted felon for a rifle
found in his shed.

Email: qqggiles@venicegondolier.com


www. ParkinsonPlace.org


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:16Ai SUN NEWSPAPERS





:WEEKEND EDITION
'MARCH 23, 2013

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
941-207-1000
kcool@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR TOWN


SOUTH TRAIL 4B


RELIGION 6B


Sara Peterson named Florida





Big Sister of the Year


By AUDREY BLACKWELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

Helping students to
forge a better path in
life comes naturally for
Sara Peterson mentor,
coach, teacher.
She has spent a lifetime
helping young people as a
special needs educator in
the Northeast. But it was
her most recent volunteer
work that brought its own
reward:
She was named Florida
Big Sister of the Year on
March 2 at Universal
Studios in Orlando.
She will go on to com-
pete at the national level,
which will be decided in
June in Denver. She will
visit Florida Gov. Rick
Scott in April, and other
special appearances are
planned.
Peterson has mentored
Cassie Machanska, a
sophomore at Venice
High School, through Big
Brothers Big Sisters of the
Sun Coast for nearly a
decade, making a positive
impact on Cassie's life.
"The wisdom Sara gives
me helps me in life,"
Cassie said. "When I'm
dealing with big prob-
lems, she's always been
there. For the past nine
years, she's been my best
friend."
For Peterson, the
relationship between her
and Cassie has meant just
about everything.
Janet Smith, lead
mentor manager, said:
"As a new mentor man-
ager seven years ago, Sara
trained me well about
what being a Big Sister
is when she said to me


one day, 'I don't know
who gets more out of the
match, Cassie or me.' Sara
and Cassie truly have a
match in which both the
Big and the Little benefit
greatly."
Gina Taylor, BBBS
vice president of
Communications, said:
"Big Brothers Big Sisters
of the Sun Coast provides
children facing adversity
with caring mentors who
help provide individual
guidance and support.
That is what we do. Sara
Peterson is one of those
caring mentors who has
been providing guidance
and support to Cassie for
the past nine years. Sara
is an amazing person who
gives unselfishly of her
time and talents and is so
deserving of this honor.
"It is because of men-
tors like Sara, the youth in
our programs grow into
successful young men
and women who give
back to their community."

Match mate
The relationship
between mentor and
mentee is not always
down a street paved
in gold. According to
Peterson, when she and
Cassie started out, it was
rough going for a while.
"She was in first grade
and a handful," Peterson
said. "I thought: 'Good
Lord, this kid is going
to drive me crazy.' She
didn't like me, either.
Main reason was she had
another Big Sister before
me, an older lady who
died. The first thing she
said to me, looking me in


PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
Sara Peterson, left, of Venice, was named Big Sister of the Year, Florida, to her Little Cassie Machanska, right, Saturday,
March 2. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Florida "let the good times roll" at Universal Orlando's Mardi Gras in honor of their recent Big
of the Year awards. The Bigs who attended were recognized as extraordinary mentors going above and beyond to make a
noticeable difference in a child's life. The organization announced Smith LeVeille, of Tallahassee, as Florida Big Brother of the Year.
Universal Orlando Resort hosted the Bigs and their Littles for a day of fun in both theme parks. The group capped off the night
throwing beads from this year's amazing floats during the Mardi Gras parade.


the eye, was, 'Are you go-
ing to die?' I said 'no,' and
in a couple of months, we
warmed up to each other
and got really close."
Initially, the pair met
at school as part of the
BBBS school-based
mentoring program.
"At first, she wouldn't
even try to do her work-
sheets," Peterson
said. "She'd crumple them
and throw them away;
and she wouldn't sit still. I
remember thinking there
ought to be a way I could
do something. I began
working on her behavior,


PHOTO COURTESY OF VENICE AREA MOBILE MEALS


Sara Peterson, front, Trinity Hall resident at Village On The Isle, was named Big Sister of the Year
for the Big Brother Big Sister of the Sun Coast Feb. 12. She won at the state level March 3 and
is being considered for the entire country. Tom Kelly, VOTI C.E.O., back left, Gina Taylor, BBBS
communications director, and Janet Smith, BBBS lead mentor manager, congratulate Peterson.


and we made goals
together, like listening
to the teacher. I thought
about what my children
enjoyed, which was me
sitting down and reading
with them, and we did
that.
"Today, she is 16, and
when I ask what she
wants to do, she'll say she
wants to go to the library
or a bookstore. She's
an avid reader and just
loves books. That got her
to settle down... such a
simple thing."
In the second year,
the duo added the BBBS
community-based
program and spent more
time together both in
and out of school. Then,
when Sara's husband,
Clifford, got ill he died
four years ago she and
Cassie only met out of
school.
"She recently got her
driver's license and has
set a goal of becoming
a nurse," Peterson said
of Cassie. "I think she
would like to help people.
We volunteer at Venice
Presbyterian Church's
Buddy Break program
where we help with
special needs children,
and we deliver meals
for Venice Area Mobile
Meals."
Joy Mahler, BBBS presi-
dent and C.E.O., said: "I
think Sara is typical to
many of our volunteers -
they meet the child where
they're at and introduce
them to many new
opportunities. Sara is a


PHOTO COURTESY OF BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS
Cassie Machanska, left, cuddles with Sara Peterson, her Big
Sister, at the Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast's recent
holiday party.


teacher and a mentor and
developed the relation-
ship into a friendship that
will last a lifetime."
Mahler has observed
the two together.
"I was with Sara and
Cassie at Disney World,
and believe me, it was all
about Cassie for Sara. She
was selfless in many ways
with a desire to coach and
mentor, and they enjoyed
being around each other.
As a mentor, Sara was
able to immerse Cassie
in a whole new world of
experiences that you and
I take for granted."

Special education
Peterson's background
reflects the caring,
coaching, teaching and
mentoring that brought
her the award. She is a
mother of three two
sons, one of whom died
two years ago, and a


daughter, and she has
three grandchildren.
Clifford was a Ph.D. and
president of a commu-
nity college; she earned
a master's degree in early
childhood education at
Wright State University,
Ohio, and taught there for
a while. After they moved
to Fitchburg, Mass., she
helped set up a program
for children with develop-
mental delays. She taught
part-time at Fitchburg
State College.
"It's nationwide now,
but Massachusetts was
the first state in the
United States to take
these kids into the public
school," she said.
She and her husband
retired and moved to St.
Petersburg Beach, and
in 2002 they moved to
Venice. A friend suggested
she volunteer with BBBS,

SISTER 12


Riding the South Trail to Annie's Books


Those who love the idea
of buying books but not
keeping them can take
delight in the buy-back
program at Annie's Books


& Gifts, 1522 South U.S. 41
Bypass, Venice.
Anne Sink, owner, sells
new and used books at a
discount and then offers
to buy them back for store
credit on your next book
purchase.
"New books are sold at
a 10 percent discount on
hardbacks and a
20 percent discount on
paperbacks," Sink said.
"If customers return
their book after reading
and want to buy another
similar book, we'll give
them half off their original


purchase price on it."
So if a used book costs
$3, the customer gets
$1.50 off the next used
book purchase; if a new
book cost $22, the return
in-store credit on a new
book purchase is $11.
This policy, plus Sink's
expanded line of gifts and
sundry items, has kept her
little shop at the corner of
Center Road and South
U.S. 41 Bypass flourishing
for the past 18 years.
Robert and Teresa
McNeil, ofVenice, are
regulars at the store.


"It's a very nice shop,"
Robert McNeil said. "It is
well-organized and is easy
to get into and out of, and
the deal is fair with half
back on your return for
your next purchase. It's a
nice way to merchandize."
Linda Ledford, who
moved to Venice from
Atlanta 10 years ago, said,
"This is my favorite store.
They have the books I like
to read, both used and
new."
Annie's Books has about

BLACKWELL 14


SUN PHOTO BY AUDREY BLACKWELL


Anne Sink owns Annie's Books & Gifts.


VENUE 3B







2B SUN NEWSPAPERS FF


'Clybourne Park' is pure America


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Leave it to an
Australia-born director
to reveal all the only-
in-America nuances of
"Clybourne Park" by
Bruce Norris.
Michael Donald
Edwards has been
an ardent student of
America since he was a
young man in his native
Australia and dreamed
of coming here. In true
American fashion, he
climbed the ladder of
success in both opera
and theater in the
United States while ad-
vancing to his present
position as producing
artistic director of the
Asolo Rep.
Doing double duty,
Edwards takes on
the job of directing
"Clybourne Park,"
which covers one of the
most unsettled times in
the history of America.
The work was inspired



SISTER
FROM PAGE 1

knowing her background.
She applied, and the rest
is history.
"My father was a
college professor, and my
mother was a high school
teacher," Peterson said.
"My folks were givers, and
I think I have a back-
ground of giving people."

Just one more
child
Looking toward the
future for Cassie, Peterson
said she will miss her
when she graduates high
school and moves on in


as much by historical
events of the time as by
"A Raisin in the Sun."
While prejudice was
not born in America, in
the 1960s when whites
left the city in record
numbers, bigotry
blossomed and neigh-
borhoods in Detroit,
Cleveland and Los
Angeles literally went
up in flames.
"Clybourne Park" is a
Chicago neighborhood.
The year is 1959. Russ
(Douglas Jones) and
his wife Bev (Annabel
Armour) have sold their
house and are moving.
Their reason to move
has nothing to do with
white flight, yet they
have to deal with their
neighbor Karl (David
Breitbarth).
"Karl is upset that
Russ and Bev have sold
their house to a black
couple, the Youngers.
Karl is so upset that
he monopolizes the
conversation even


life, but she is mentally
preparing for that time.
"Every year I tell Cassie
I'm getting older, and
I say, 'Maybe you want
someone younger,' and
she says 'no,'" Peterson
said.
"I will be 83 in May, and
I sometimes think my life


though Russ and Bev
are being visited by
their pastor Jim (Jesse
Dornan), and his wife
Betsy (Sarah Brown),
who is deaf. Also
present are Bev's black
housekeeper Francine
(Tyla Abercrombie) and
her husband, Albert
(Christopher Wynn).
"It seems as though
Bev is clueless as to
Karl's bigoted com-
ments. Bev offers
Francine a silver chaf-
ing dish, yet is unable
to understand that such
an item is of little inter-
est to Francine."
Jones and Breitbarth
are in their element and
make this production.
As experienced char-
acter actors who can
wring the most from
their characters, they
also raise the bar for
guest actors (Armour
and Abercrombie)
and third-year Asolo
Conservatory students
(Dornan, Brown, Wynn


will be over before too
long. I remember think-
ing when we started, that
maybe I could help one
more child. I thought:
'Why not see if I can help
one more child.'"
And she did.

Email:abladwell@venicegondolier.com


and Jacob Cooper
(Kenneth).
In Act 2, the house
is the same although it
seems to have been re-
modeled, and the time
is 50 years later. A white
couple plans to buy the
house, tear it down and
replace it with one that
the black neighbors do
not consider appropri-
ate for their historical
neighborhood.
As they talk, we
learn more about the
real reason Russ and
Bev moved. This time,
Jones portrays a handy-
man named Dan who
finds a trunk in the
backyard and foists it
into the middle of the
deteriorating conversa-
tion. The first act seems
almost a kinder and
gentler time, by com-
parison to the escalat-
ing racial, bordering on
vile, comments in the
second act.
"Like we don't all
know ..." Steve says.


I COMMUNITY BRIEFS


Pet microchip
event
Suncoast Humane
Society will hold a low-
cost microchip and vac-
cination clinic Saturday,
March 23, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,


PHOTO BY BARBARA BANKS COURTESY OF ASOLO REP
Douglas Jones, left, as Dan and Davidi Breitbarth as Steve in
the Asolo Rep production of "Clybourne Park."


Just in case some-
one doesn't know, the
second act takes the
offensive, literally.
The remaining char-
acters include relatives
of some characters in
the first act. A bitter-
sweet ending provides
closure to the play
although not to the
ongoing transformation
of Clybourne Park.


at the Venice Thrift Store,
656 South Tamiami Trail
in the Rialto Shopping
Center. No appointment
needed.
Vaccinations range
from $10 to $14.
Heartworm tests are


"Clybourne Park"
continues in repertory
through May 2 in the
Mertz Theatre within
the FSU Center for
the Performing Arts,
5555 North Tamiami
Trail, Sarasota. Tickets
range from $20-$72. For
reservations, call 941-
351-8000 or visit:
AsoloRep.org.
Email: kcol@venicegondolier.com


$15, and your pet can
be microchipped for
$25. All proceeds benefit
the animals at Suncoast
Humane Society. Call
Suncoast Humane
Society at 941-474-7884
or visit: Humane.org.

BRIEFS 14


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Cal enceM intretat(41 44-72 orinorato


)NY SPONSOR SILVER PLATTER SPONSOR


VENICL RrGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
SILVER GOBLET SPON
TIHBINE
WELDD


Gondolier Son


BankofAmenca
Caldwell Trust Co
Jim WendyCo
Crest Cadilbc
Robert J Desk
Farr Law Firm
Flonda PowerG LI


EDMUND &ELIZABETH CAMPBELL
FOUNDATION


GULF "OASSI
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LVER DOLLAR SPONSORS
Key Agency
pany MorganStanley
Pinkerton WValth
Management Group
Wells Fargo Advisors
Robinson, Hanks Young
it and Roberts CPA


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DR. SCOTT WALKER
Optometrist
Eye Examinations Contact Lenses
Fashion Eyewear Diseases of the Eye
(Over 30 Years In Venice)

The Pattison Building
S "The Eye Doctor 262 West Miami Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285
on the Island" 485-2468


I


BREAK MARCH 23, 2013









VENUE


SUN NEWSPAPERS


3B
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 23, 2013


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


*RELIGION

* SUNDAY
Fellowship Sun Srvs, FC
Worship Srv @9 &10:30am @ LBHS
2201 Placida Rd. Come hear Pastor
Garry & Fellowship Band in both srvs.
475-7447
Free Gospel Concert, Free
Gospel Choir Concert 7pm, Venice
Bible Church, 2395 Shamrock Dr.
493-2788 Fundraiser for Greater Holy
Temple Church

* THURSDAY
Living Last Supper,
7 p.m. DaVinci's painting enacted.
Communion open to all. Englewood
United Methodist Church, 700 E.
Dearborn, 473-4133

* FRIDAY
MUSIC SACRA, Good
Friday Sacred Music, Poetry, &
Scripture. 7pm, Venice Presbyterian,
825 The Rialto, Venice, 488-2258

* EVENTS

* SATURDAY
Bake Sale, Bake Sale. All
proceeds to benefit the South
County Food Pantry. @ 9 am @
4821 Egret Rd., Venice 468-5302
Kings Gate Club Fair,
9-3 p.m., 290 Ave. of Kings,
Nokomis, Flea Market, Hot Food,
Crafts, 484-6119, www.kgc.cc, No
pets; service dogs only.
Historic Train Depot,
Free docent lead tours of 1927
Train Depot, 303 E Venice Venice
FI M-W-F 10-3, Sat 10-1 info
941-412-0151


Kids Beach Yoga,
10:30am. Nokomis Beach.
966-5800. Parents and kids, playful
yoga. Bring beach towel. SRQ
permit.
Bay Indies Jazz Band,
Big Band, Oldies, Dixieland, Sat
Mar 23, 1 to 3pm at the Indies
Hall, Bay Indies Blvd & Vincent Ave.
Bill-952-212-3630
Low/Afternoon Tea, 2
PM Afternoon Tea March 23, Venice
Nazarene Church, Call Wilma
492-9191 or, church 488-5007 for
info/tickets $10
Pig Roast Party, 6th
Annual Elks Pulled Pork w/ all
fixins' $15, Dance Music. Cocktails
4:30 Din 6pm. 1021 Discovery Way,
Nok 486-1854
Going North Party, MC2
Square, 03/23/13, 7P-10OP, Country
Club Estates 700 Waterway Venice,
$5, Res Call Betty 941-485-2297
Ballroom Classes, Still
open March 27, 6:30 Advance
7:30 Beginner/Intermediate
Venice Community Ctr. for info call
941-496-9692
Claudio B & Company,
Claudio B & CO. at Lakeside
Lutheran Church. 2401 S. Tamiami
Tr., 7:00pm $10 493-5102

* MONDAY
ZUMBA with Lynn,
Venice Community Center, 326. S.
Nokomis, Venice, 9:00am Monday/
Thursday, 941-493-8630
AARP Free Tax Help,
Low & mid income-any age. Jac.
Lib, 4143 Woodmere Pk Blvd 10-4.
Need 2011 return 2012 income &
deductions 888-227-7669
Hair Cut-a-thon, Relay for
life fundraiser. Jon Marcus Salon


3/25/13 10:00 am-6:00 pm haircut:
$12.00 468-6022
VABI Exhibit, Explore
history of VABI's improvement
projects. Venice Museum &
Archives, 351 Nassau St. S, Venice,
486-2487
Yoga w/Mary Lynn,
Monday 5:30pm, Yoga Relax
Stretch w/MaryLynn,417 S Tamiami
Tr, Venice 34285 941-685-8445
mlszerbin@aol.com
W. Coast Swing Dance,
Beginner lesson 6:30, Int. 7, dance
8-? $8; under 30 $4. No partner
needed. Pineapples, 133 Tamiami
Tr Venice. 539-4908
Suncoast Rehearsal,
Suncoast Chorale Rehearsal.
Monday @ 6:45 pm, 4365 St. Road
776, Venice. Love to sing? Consider
joining us! 888-326-8403
Ven. Harmony Chorus,
at 6:45pm. Ladies singing at
United Church of Christ in Venice
on 620 E. Shamrock Blvd. 480-1480
Join us

* TUESDAY
AARP Free Tax Help,
Low & mid income-any age. Venice
Comm Ctr. 326 S Nokomis Ave 9-1.
Need 2011 return 2012 income &
deductions 888-227-7669
VABI Exhibit, Explore Venice
Area Beautification Inc.'s improve-
ment projects. Venice Museum &
Archives, 351 Nassau St. S, 486-2487
Baby Rhyme & Sign,
3.26/13 10:15-11 Jacaranda Lib 4143
Woodmere Park Blv Venice birth- 2
1/2 861-5000
Ageless Grace, 10:30-
11:30 am, 251 S Tamiami Trail, Venice
Fl, 227-1513
Chair Fitness, Ageless Grace


In order to provide "one-stop shopping" for area
event listings, the Venice Gondolier Sun is consoli-
dating calendar items into a single location. The
Venue calendar includes library, senior, Well-Being
and religion events as well as community events.
We have moved to a reader-submission model for
all of these items.
To get your events printed in the newspaper, they
must be submitted via our website, www.venice-
gondoliersun.com. On the left, click on "Community
Calendar,"then click on "Submit Event"and fill in
the appropriate fields. You must enter the location,
address and phone number in the "Print Edition Text"
box for it to print.


Chair Fitness!, Tues.'s start March
26th; 10:30-11:30AM, 251 S Tamiami
- $9-12 per class. Call 227-1513.
Tai Chi for Health, Tai
Chi, Venice Comm. Ctr., Room G.
10:30-11:30 AM, Tues/Thurs, $6.00/
class. 941-492-2167
Walking Tour, Tour starts
at 10:30am at gazebo; local guide/
author discusses area mansions &
villas. Fee-$10; 941-484-5002
eHelp, Get help with your
online problems 1:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Jacaranda Lib 4143 Woodmere Park


Deadlines: For events to run in Wednesday's paper,
the deadline is 1 p.m. Monday. For events to run in
Saturday's paper, the deadline is 1 p.m. Thursday.
In order to print as many events as possible, we will
print a maximum of four lines per event at no cost. You
may purchase additional space for $10 per day, per
event, per edition. Simply choose"Paid Listing"on the
"Submit Event"page on the website. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.
We will only allow one submission per event, per
day. If your event runs for more than one day, you will
need to submit a separate form for each day. Multiple
submissions of the same event for the same date may
result in all the related events being removed.


Blvd Ven 861-5000
Afternoon Movies, Enjoy
watching free movies. 2:00 p.m.
to 5:00 p.m. Jacaranda Lib, 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd, Ven., 861-5000
Happy Time Band,
Bill Anderson HappyTime Band,
Dixieland, Oldies Tue, Mar 26, 3
to 5pm, Cent. Prk Gazebo, Bill
952-212-3630
Mindfull Meditation,
Mindfullness Meditation, Venice
Holistic Center, 251 S Tamiami Trail,
3-6 PM Every Tues, 323-8033,


All are Welcome
Country Time Singers,
Country Time Singers, free, 5 to 7 pm
Tues. at the Venice Beach Pavilion,
101 The Esplanade, bring a chair.
941-412-3333
Transition Venice, 6pm
300 Nokomis Ave Venice 275-5431
Net Zero Energy House Presentation
Tea Party Meeting, Venice
912 Tea Party Meeting Realtors'
Bldg, 680 Substation Rd. near Burger
King 6:15 PM call Pat 941-412-0193
- FREE


'Evening Under the Stars' celebrates


25 years


FROM STATE COLLEGE OF
FLORIDA FOUNDATION
State College of Florida
Foundation will host
the 25th anniversary of
"Evening Under the Stars"
April 13 on the Venice
campus of SCF, 8000
South Tamiami Trail.
General admission
gates open at 6 p.m. for an
outdoor concert featuring
the Venice Symphony
Pops Orchestra.
The event committee


has been planning since
last year for this event and
expects a large crowd. The
Symphony will perform
a selection of fun, up-
beat, well-known songs,
ranging from The Beatles
to Hollywood to the Big
Apple to Duke Ellington.
There are two tickets
levels: general admission
is $15 in advance, $20 at
the gate; and reserved
general admission is $25,
available by advance sale
only.


PHOTO COURTESY OF STATE COLLEGE
OF FLORIDA FOUNDATION


Mary Lou Bale, left, development director; Steve LaFountain;
Debbie Revels; Nancy Klingbeil; Cathy Kuhlman; Rick Shrader;
Susan Schaefer; Melissa Caldwell and Jeannie Lynch comprise
the planning committee of State College of Florida Foundation's
25th anniversary of Evening Under the Stars April 13.


With a reserved general
admission ticket, ticket
holders can bring and set
up their chairs between
2:30 and 3:30 p.m. only
the day of the event.


All general admissions
are welcome to bring
chairs, blankets and
coolers to enjoy their own
refreshments in an old
Florida setting. No tables


or pets are allowed. Rain
date is April 14.
To purchase tickets, call
the Foundation office for
a ticket purchase site at
941-408-1418, or purchase


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securely online at
ScfFoundation.net.
For more information,
"like" State College of
Florida Foundation on
Facebook.


Susan,. -
-lefore
I'11w


BIOTEK.
Center for eightt IOSi


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Can't Lose Weight?
Reduce Cellulite Venice:
Increase Metabolism 941-485-89oo
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SUMMER 2013 PROMOTIONAL

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP PROGRAMS*
SPECIAL LIMITED-TIME MEMBERSHIP: 5/1/2013 9/30/2013

3 Membership Options k


/ Fam ily Full (Golf/Tennis /Dining) ..................................................$500 +Tax
Family membership includes: singles, spouses, or any children less then
23 years of age living at home. Includes daily green fees and court times.
Five day advance tee time reservations are available. SPECIAL OFFER-
Sign up and pay for a Family Full membership before 4/1/2013 and
receive $50 in club credit!
NOTE: Both Family Full summer membership and Family Tennis summer
membership includes: complete use of all Plantation's private facilities
including complimentary daily use of the driving range with range balls and
golf cart, fitness center with full time Director of Fitness on-site, Junior-
Olympic pool and jacuzzi, bocce courts, Pickle Ball, Hibiscus Room (cards and
games), library, all social events, dining and off campus member trips.

Fam ily Tennis (Tennis/Dining) .................... ............................. $250 + Tax
Family membership includes: singles, spouses, or any children less then
23 years of age living at home. Includes daily court fees.Three day
advance court time reservations are available.

3 Fam ily D ining (Dining at Plantation) ........................................... $100 + Tax
Family membership includes: singles, spouses, or any children less then
23 years of age living at home. Family Dining club membership is limited to
Plantation dining only.


Join us and watch as we raise our new Golf Pro Shop and
locker rooms this summer. There will be no interruption
of Club activities or services during the renovations.
On-site residency not a requirement.
Offer not available to resigned Plantation Members.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

%0 Featured Events
Birds of Galapagos Islands, On March 26, from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, at the Venice Audubon Center,
4002 Tamiami Trail, Venice Audubon's Barry Rossheim, a Zoology Teacher & Nature photographer, shares about his
recent trip. Free. For info, call 496-8984. Visit www.veniceaudubon.org.
Barry Manilow, Billy Joel & The Beatles, The Killer Bs Barry Manilow, Billy Joel & The Beatles A Tribute
to Their Music. Stars renowned pianist & vocalist Brian Gurl, guest artist Tom Ellison on sax & a fabulous band!
Thurs., Mar. 28, 7pm, Venice Community Center, 326 S. Nokomis Ave. Sec A: $25; Sec B: $20. Call 941-861-1380.
Free/Open to Public Civil War Lecture, Venice Historical Society holds free Civil War lecture,
7pm, Tues., Mar. 26, Village On the Isle (Mark Manor Bldg.), 930 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice. Dr. John Belohlavek,
Professor of History, USF, Tampa: "Causes of Civil War."No reservations needed. Open to public. For more info, call
941-412-0151.


W t That nWr kFs

mot m 441


KILLER BSj

A Tribute to the Music of
Billy Joel, Barry Manilow
& The Beatles
Experience a breathtaking blend of
timeless melodies, driving rhythms
and stunning interpretations.
Thursday, March 28th
Showtime: 7 pm Tickets: $25/$20
Venice Community Center
326 S. Nokomis Ave
Call 861-1380 for tickets and info


111




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^ ELAINEDET'ER
MEMBESHISPDIECTOR

PLATATION GOLF AND
COU* 500B ROjuiCjKjLE BOLSEVARD^^^

VENICEFL 3429

941-497-1479~iiB^


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4B
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 23, 2013


SOUTH TRAIL


CONTACT US
RONALD DUPONT JR.
EDITOR
941-207-1218
rdupont@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


South Venice Garden Club hosts fundraiser


By SUELLYN NORTON
GUEST WRITER

Walkers along the
Venetian Waterway Trail
enjoy the gifts of unsung
heros with every step,
Roller Blade stroke or
push on their bicycle
pedals.
Local garden club
members have provided
butterfly gardens and
even park benches along
the way.
Most assume the work
to be that of members of
the Venice Area Garden
Club, which recently held
its annual home tour to
generate money for such
projects and for college
scholarships for Venice


High School students.
Members of the smaller
South Venice Garden Club
work just as tirelessly to
maintain and improve
the waterway trail but
also to support local food
pantries, cleanup Alligator
Drive and maintain the
grounds of the South
Venice Civic Association
where they hold their
regular meetings.
Today, the Civic
Association will be the site
of the club's annual plant,
rummage and bake sale
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
building is at 720 Alligator
Drive, Venice.
Other projects benefit-
ting from sale proceeds
include plant donations


for new Habitat for
Humanity homeowners.
Those plants are often
the icing on the cake for
those first-time hom-
eowners as well as proof
of their welcome into the
neighborhood.
Garden club members
meet monthly at the Civic
Association building,
participate in field trips
to such places as the
Venice Rookery in South
Venice, Crowley Museum
and Nature Center and
Florida Native Plants
Nursery.
Members include
Master Gardeners, artists,
craftsmen, authors,
environmentalists, land-
scapers, photographers


and naturalists. They
come from all growing
regions in the country,
eager to test their knowl-
edge against the Zone 10
planting location of South
Venice.
Members often present
programs that add to the
variety of educational
offerings to members.
Sharing cuttings and in-
formation leads to strong
friendships as participants
learn about South Florida
gardening.
Currently, the club
is participating with
the South Venice Civic
Association's Siesta
Waterways Project
in coordination with
Sarasota County and other


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SOUTH VENICE GARDEN CLUB


The Garden Club holds a show..
not-for-profit groups
working for cleaner and
environmentally friendly
waterways. The goal is to
clean up area waterways


long ignored and polluted
in order to bring back area
wildlife.
For information call
941-493-0006 or visit


Garden club members work together on various landscaping
projects in the area.


Plant sales are

popular fundraisers

for the garden club.


l a


F ~ w
ii'


Venice Gardens is looking forward to spring


By MARY-ANN CONLY
GUEST WRITER

The final days of winter
had the faithful gathered
at the Venice Gardens
Civic Association sorting
through gathered items
for the annual Rummage
Sale, which continues
today (Saturday,
March 23).
While doing this, we are


chatting about our winter
and what we are looking
forward to this coming
spring and summer. It's
a great time to catch up
with those we haven't
seen for a while and wish
those well who are getting
ready to head north again
next month.
I have had a great
winter this year with all
the happenings at VGCA,


especially the Meatloaf
Dinner, with nearly 100
people attending. Who
would have thought
meatloaf would attract so
many? However, we also
had our own Janis and
Frank Cowan to provide
the musical entertain-
ment, which put the icing
on the cake.
The other dinners and
dancing were equally well


attended and successful.
Much fun for all.
Spring and summer are
just around the corner
with the pool opening
and another new project
for us all to get behind.
The new project is called
"Shoeboxes for Seniors."
A group of us have
discovered that there are
seniors who have fallen
through the cracks of


society and are exist-
ing with little and no
one to care about their
needs. It is hoped that a
forthcoming article with
more information will
spark those who want to
volunteer just a little
- to help with informa-
tion, funds, finding large
sneaker or shoeboxes.
You don't need to be
a member of Venice


Gardens to help with this
project. We have had a
donation from a couple
who are originally from
Vermont and are headed
for Alaska.
Come see us at the
Rummage Sale, 406
Shamrock Blvd.

Mary-Anne Conly writes
about Venice Gardens for
the South Trail pages.


BLACKWELL
FROM PAGE 1

20,000 used books and audio
books in good condition lining
the shelves, all in alphabetical
order and sold at 60 percent off
their original retail price. She
may accept your used books for
a percentage of the retail price
in credit, depending on condi-
tion and overstock.
Another customer, Grace
Esposito, sent Sink a card earlier
this month that she shared with
her staff. In it, Esposito compli-
mented the store's attentiveness



BRIEFS
FROM PAGE 2

Syracuse University
luncheon
Syracuse University alumni
friends will meet at noon,
Sunday, April 7, for a luncheon
at The Francis Venue East,
Sarasota.
Tony Souza, chairman of the
Downtown Sarasota Alliance,
will speak about "Downtown
Sarasota: Transitioning from
Good to Great." A short busi-
ness meeting of the alumni
club will follow.


to "customer satisfaction," a
pleasant aroma in the store, a
"vast and splendid" inventory,
"expedient telephone book
reserves" and speedy services
on special orders.
Several shelves in the front of
the store carry specialty items,
include one section for Florida
books books by Florida
authors and books about
Florida candles, handmade
jewelry (including reasonably
priced Pandora-like bracelets),
card games, puzzles, holiday
ornaments, gifts and cards, and
locally made skin care products.
The store offers free gift-wrap-
ping for store purchases and

The ticket price of $26
must be prepaid by April 1 by
mailing a check to Syracuse
University Alumni Club of
Suncoast Florida, P.O. Box
1822, Venice 34285, with your
menu selection. For more
information, call 941-373-5335
or visit: SuncoastSU.org.

Venice Concert Band
Venice Concert Band, direct-
ed by Bill Millner, will perform
7 p.m. March 25 and April 29 at
the Venice Community Center,
326 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice.
Tickets are $5 single ticket
price or $30 for the 6-concert
season. Call 941-480-1704.


ships for shipping fees only.
Sink was born in Oklahoma,
but only spent three days there.
"My dad was an engineer
with DuPont in Wilmington,
S.C., and I lived there for most
of my life," Sink said. "I married
Ralph 26 years ago. He owns an
RV merchandizing business in
Englewood."
If you're interested in buying
or trading in used books, or
buying a new one such as the
current "Killing Lincoln," "50
Shades of Grey" (a hot seller)
or Jodi Picoult's newest release,
"The Storyteller," you may want
to stop in Annie's Books & Gifts.
Store hours are 10 a.m. to


SCF holds concert
State College of Florida
Foundation will host the 25th an-
niversary of "Evening Under the
Stars" April 13, 6 p.m., at itsVenice
campus, 8000 South Tamiami
Trail.
General admission is $15 in
advance, $20 at the gate; reserved
general admission is $25, advance
sale only. Reserved general
admission allows you to set up
chairs between 2:30 p.m. and
3:30 p.m. only. All attendees can
bring chairs, blankets and coolers.
No tables or pets allowed.
To buy tickets, call for a loca-
tion at the SCF Foundation office,
941-408-1418, or buy online at:


5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, and
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; they
are closed on Sunday.
A trip through the store just
might surprise you.

Audrey Blackwell writes about
the people, places and businesses
along the Venice South Trail.

Email: ablackwell@venicegondolier.com


SUN PHOTO BY
AUDREY BLACKWELL

Denee MacDonald has worked at
Annie's Books & Gifts for eight years.

ScfFoundation.net.

Exsultate! to perform
Next in the 2012-13 concert
series "Exsultate! Sings" will
be "Poetry" on April 14.
The April concert features
new pieces by David Brunner,
specially commissioned with
grant funds for Exsultate! to
add to his "A Timbered Choir:
The Sabbath Poems, 1979-
1997" and pair it with Randall
Thompson's "Frostiana" for a
grand season finale.
Tickets are $17, students
pay $5. Group discount rates
are available. Plans are also
under way for Brunner to hold


a master class open to the
public on Saturday, April 13.
Visit: Exsultate.org.

'Harvey' hops onstage
The Players Theatre, 838
North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota,
happily welcomes "Harvey,"
written by Mary Chase, to the
stage March 28-April 7.
The classic stage hit features
the story of Elwood P Dowd,
who makes friends with a 6-foot
invisible rabbit named Harvey.
Evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.;
matinees are at 2 p.m. Tickets
are $25 for adults and $12 for
students. Call 941-365-2494 or
visit: ThePlayers.org.


- ~iI


.4 I


'"F,
-*_ -'.





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


Greene and team shine in 'Our Town' at Venice Theatre


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Daniel Greene is
everything playwright
Thornton Wilder could
ask for in Venice Theatre's
production of Wilder's
"Our Town."
With a gentle Grover's
Corner accent and
demeanor, Greene leads
us through the little town
of Grover's Corners, N.H.
Occasionally serving as
the minister, he makes
us comfortable, sets the
stage and then, perhaps,
makes some people
uncomfortable, for that
could be the intention of
the playwright.
In Act One, on an early
morning in 1901, we meet
the town's people: Dr. and
Mrs. Gibb (Greg Courter
and Kristi Hibschman);
Mr. and Mrs. Webb (Steve


Horowitz and Laurie
Colton), young George
Gibbs (Zachery Evanicki);
his sister Rebecca (Grace
Wickerson); George's
friend Emily Webb
(Kenzie Balliet) and her
brother Wally (Morgan
Guin); milkman Howie
Newsome (Travis Rose);
Joe Crowell, who delivers
the paper; and Constable
Warren (Bill Atz), among
others.
The stage manager
brings out long-winded
professor Willard, who
was portrayed Wednesday
night by director Murray
Chase as a last-minute
replacement for Den Nee
who was injured and
unable to perform. By the
time we had learned the
location of the churches
and religious affilia-
tions, the stage manager
managed to whisk the


good professor away and
we could get down to the
business of recognizing
- despite the historical
time difference people
not too different from
people we may know
today.
This is but one reason
the play is being pro-
duced somewhere in the
United States virtually
everyday and especially
this year, which is 75
years since its New Jersey
opening in 1938.
Part of the charm of the
production is the panto-
miming of everyday chores
and other actions by the
characters as they are
introduced. Women mix
and knead biscuits, chop
things, remove plates and
glasses from cupboards,
put things in the oven,
receive the milk from the
milkman and so on.


We see a friendship
blossom between Emily
and George, learn about
the town drunk and choir
master, Simon Stimson
(Neil Levine) and learn
that Mr. Webb is the edi-
tor of the local paper but
Mrs. Soames (Maureen
Young) also is interested
in stories.
In Act Two, we move
ahead three years to the
courtship and marriage
of Emily and George and
other changes within the
community. Because of
the device of having a
stage manager on stage,
we get to backtrack
briefly and eavesdrop
on a soda fountain date
when Emily and George
realize their bond.
In Act three, the stage
manager takes us up on
the hill where the town
folk are buried. Some


people we have met are
already there and others,
sadly, are on their way.
The drama escalates as
we learn that Emily has
died but is able to return
briefly to an earlier day,
with unforeseen (by her)
consequences.
She was told to pick
an unimportant day.
Perhaps no day is ever
unimportant.
Whether there is a
lesson here is up to the
individual but there were
few dry eyes Tuesday
evening as the stage
manager gently wrapped
the proceedings.
Donna Buckalter
created a stunning
wraparound scene for
the production, which is
presented in the round.
Stephanie Gift's costumes
were spot on; lighting by
Christopher A. D. Parrish


and sound by Dorian
Boyd added additional
touches. Candace Artim
is the production stage
manager.
Also in the cast are
Alexzandra Clemens as
Woman in the balcony,
Mare Klein as Lady in the
box, and Timothy Polk
as Si Cromwell and Sam
Craig.
"Our Town" continues
through March 30 as a
Stage II production in
the Yvonne T. Pinkerton
Theatre, at Venice
Theatre, 140 Tampa Ave.
Tickets are $13-$15 for
students and $25-28 for
adults. The box office is
open from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. weekdays, 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
and one hour before all
shows. Call 941-488-1115
or visit:VeniceStage.com.
Email: kcol@venicegondolier.com


Carnival initiates fleetwide review


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Reeling from an engine
fire aboard the Triumph
that stranded passengers
in the Gulf of Mexico
and mechanical failings
on three other ships in
recent weeks, Carnival
is beginning a fleetwide
review of its ships and
operations.
A statement from
the company's head-
quarters in Miami
specifically addressed
the line's Caribbean-
based Triumph and
Mediterranean-based
Sunshine.
After the fire aboard
the Triumph, disen-
chanted passengers
were left sleeping on
decks and dealing with
toilet backups and other
problems as the ship
was slowly towed back
to port. Adding insult to
injury, a tow rope broke
and delayed the already
lengthy process.
Passengers were given
refunds and transfers
back to their original
port plus discounts on
future cruises. Then three
additional ships had
mechanical problems,
and the line seemed
jinxed at best. Passengers
swarmed travel agents
to see about canceling
cruises.
Triumph needed the
most work because of
the fire and ensuing
problems. There was no
choice but to remove it
from service, but the line
has now extended the
time out for that ship
and for the Sunshine.
Both will remain in
drydock for "product en-
hancements" in addition
to the needed repairs.
"The cruise line is
making significant
investments to enhance
the level of operating
redundancies and the


scope of hotel services
that can run on emer-
gency power, and further
improve each ship's fire
prevention, detection
and suppression sys-
tems," according to the
statement.
Guests affected by
cruises canceled between
now and the Triumph's
June 3 return to service
will "receive a full refund,
reimbursement for
nonrefundable transpor-
tation costs and a
25 percent discount on
a future four- to five-day
cruise."
A similar deal is being
offered to passengers af-
fected by cancellation of
European cruises aboard
the Sunshine, which will
return to service
May 5 after a $155 mil-
lion renovation.
"We sincerely regret
canceling these cruises
and disrupting our
guests' vacation plans,"
said Gerry Cahill,
Carnival Cruise Lines'
president and CEO in the
statement. "We are fully
committed to applying
the recommendations
stemming from our fleet-
wide review and to make
whatever investments are
needed despite the dif-
ficult decision to impact
people's vacations."
Elation experienced
a malfunction of its
steering gear and had to
be towed back to port.
Legend limped back
to Tampa at a reduced
speed from a seven-day
Caribbean cruise after
canceling two port calls
because of the problem.
Dream passengers
and crew were stranded
in St. Maarten because
of a generator failure.
Most were flown home
and offered refunds and
discounts on a future
cruise.
With four of 23
Carnival ships out of


service and thousands
of unhappy passengers,
only time will tell if this
latest move will help
stem what is more than
a proverbial "hole
in a dike."
"I would like to provide
continued assurances
that all of our vessels
have fully effective safety
systems, equipment and
training in place," Cahill
added. "Additionally,
our ships receive regular
inspections from the
United States Coast
Guard and other regula-
tory authorities.
"The changes we
are implementing are
focused primarily on
improvements to better
support continued power
and hotel services should
unexpected issues arise.
In addition, we are ap-
plying new learning and
making enhancements in
the area of fire suppres-
sion and extinguishing.
"Going forward, the
review will focus on the


balance of our fleet.
While this process will
take time, it is our high-
est priority and has the
full support and resourc-
es of Carnival Cruise
Lines and Carnival
Corporation."
Carnival Triumph op-
erates year-round four-
and five-day Mexico
cruises from Galveston,
Texas. Carnival Sunshine
is scheduled to operate
a series of nine- and
12-day Mediterranean
cruises May 5 to Oct. 20
either round-trip from
Barcelona or sailing
between Barcelona and
Venice.
The ship will sail on
a 16-day trans-Atlantic
crossing from Barcelona
to New Orleans
Nov. 1-17, positioning the
vessel for a special 6-day
Caribbean cruise depart-
ing Nov. 18 followed by
the launch of year-round
seven-day Caribbean ser-
vice from New Orleans
Nov. 24.


SUN FILE PHOTO BY KIM COOL


The signature Carnival stack aboard Carnival's Inspiration clears
the Tampa Bay Sunshine Skyway bridge on a cruise a few years


Guests on impacted
voyages should consult
their travel professional


or call 800-327-6482 for
assistance.
Email: kcol@venicegondolier.com


CROSS
FROM PAGE 7






AT 0 E




SUDOKU
FROM CLASSIFIED
3986741

7 1 4 8 2 5 6
8 2 3 9 4 1 7
9 5 1 7 6 8 4
6 4 7 2 5 3 9
1 7 J23 9 6 5

4 3 6 5 8 7 2


* Softest Carpet Made
* Features Magic Fresh
* Captures Household Odori
* Lifetime Stain Warranty


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FRESH FLOORS

SALES EVENT


THURSDAY IS FREE APPRAISAl DAY
If You Are Interested In Selling Your Unused Or Unwanted Gold Jewelry,
Diamonds, Watches Or Objects D'Art, Sell It To Us.
We Offer A Free Consultation Service To Help You Determine Which Items
Are Of Value. Perhaps Several Hundreds Of Dollars.

DIGNIFIED PRIVATE CONSULTATION
LOCAL PEOPLE YOU CAN TRUST
HIGHEST PRICES PAID IMMEDIATELY


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We also provide written appraisals for insurance at reasonable prices. 4


347 W. VENICE AVE ,
Island of Venice

69 488-2720
469037r


PHOTO COURTESY OF NATIONAL LEAGUE OF AMERICAN PEN WOMEN

American Pen Women give art awards
The National League of American Pen Women held its annual awards luncheon March 6
at Laurel Oak Country Club, Sarasota, to recognize extraordinary seniors from Sarasota
County and Manatee County high schools excelling in art, letters and music. Pictured are
judges and students involved in the Arts category: Judges: Louise Hamel, left, Kathleen
McDonald; and Elle Friedberg, Third Place,"Catlin," Pen & Ink/Watercolor, Pine View High
School; Sarah Ruiz del Vizo, Merit Award,"Warped,"' Pen & Ink, Pine View High School;
Torrie Stroop, First Place,"Words From Beneath,"'Mixed Media, Sarasota High School; Chris-
tina Chiodi, Second Place,"Milan Cathedral;'," Intaglio Print, Riverview High School, Judge:
Barbara Turner-Grace.


SANE9
10 to 25%-


SUN NEWSPAPERS 5B


3 z^^ '" YBAe^









6B ELIG N
WEEKEND EDITION R E1
MARCH 23, 2013


CONTACT US
941-207-1110
Ikennedy@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


DAVID MILLER

Considering our

religious baggage

"Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great
cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that
hinders and the sin that so easily entangles, and let us
run with perseverance the race marked out for us. Let
us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our
faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross,
scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of
the throne of God. Consider him who endured such
opposition from sinful men, so that you will not grow
weary and lose heart." (Hebrews 12:1-3)

Let's face it religion is a part of life.
Religion is the service and worship of God or the
supernatural. Christianity is a religion, and anyone
who claims to follow Jesus is a Christian.
Now, within Christianity, there are different groups
or denominations, such as Presbyterian, Baptist,
Methodist, Catholic and the like. All of these groups
or denominations have different styles, different
emphases and different ways of understanding what it
means to be a follower of Jesus, but all of these groups
fall under the umbrella of the Christian religion.
Understanding that religion is a part of life, we must
also understand that each and every single one of us
has religious baggage.
If you are reading these words and you don't
consider yourself a Christian, chances are religious
baggage has something to do with it. If you are
reading these words and you are very happy with
your church, chances are still very good that you have
religious baggage.
Religious baggage is perspectives and practices con-
cerning God that we have picked up throughout our
life experience from a church. How we view worship
is influenced by our religious baggage. Celebrating
communion is influenced by religious baggage.
How we understand God is influenced by religious
baggage. And our feelings about church are influ-
enced by religious baggage.
Since we all have religious baggage, what are we to
do? We have to identify our baggage and deal with it.
Religious baggage is neither good nor bad, right or
wrong, it simply is, and its "isness" is influencing our
relationship with God.
We are called to "throw off anything that hinders" us
from running the race that God has marked out for us.
How do we throw off anything that hinders us? We "fix
our eyes on Jesus."
How do we fix our eyes on Jesus? We constantly ask
ourselves a simple question: "Is this about Jesus, or is
this about me?"
Worship style is about me, not Jesus. Loving my
neighbor is about Jesus and not about me. Not
celebrating communion at someone else's church is
about me, not Jesus. Practicing forgiveness is about
Jesus and not about me.
Religion is needed, but the challenge is to avoid
making religion our god. Christianity helps us to wor-
ship, connect, learn and grow, but it doesn't save us or
forgive us or grant us eternal life.
Christianity is simply the vehicle of the good news
of Jesus; it isn't the good news of Jesus.

The Rev. David Miller is pastor of First Christian
Church in Venice.


Fisherman's Net Church
Non-denominational, Spirit-filled
941-223-1180
Sunday 10 AM Service
1101 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice Island
www.fishermansnetchurch.com
PRINCE OF PEACE (WELS)
EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Worship Service: 10:00am
Pastor Paul J Werner
2222 Englewood Road,
Englewood
S 474-0776
Swww.princeofpeacefl.com

Venice-
Nokomis
United Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship:
10 AM
Children's Puppet Church:
10:15 AM
Adult Sunday School
11:15 AM
Youth Fellowship Monday
5:30 PM
208 Palm Avenue, Nokomis
Phone 488-4137
(West of US 41,4 blks. South of
Albee RdJMatthew Currie Ford)
www.vnumc.net
vnumc(daystar.net a
Senior Pastor, Glenda J. Brayman


CALVARY
BIBLE CHURCH
1936 East Venice Ave.,
Venice, FL Ph. 485-7070
SSound Bible Teaching
AWANA Clubs/Children's Church
Hymns of the faith
"Christ centered & bible based."
Friendly people
www.cbcvenice.com
A warm welcome awaits you and your family
Sunday services- 9:30,10:30 & 6:00


You're Invited
CHRIST UNITED
I METHODIST
CHURCH
Jerry Van Dyken, Pastor
Larry Potts, Associate Pastor
Sunday Traditional
Worship Services
8:00 and 10:45 am
Contemporary Service 9:15 am
Sunday School 9:15 am
and 10:30 am
Nursery Provided for
All Services
Parking shuttle provided
493-7504
1475 Center Road, Venice
www.cumc.info


Local church makes Last



Supper come alive


From BILL SCHMIDT
For the nineteenth year,
Christ United Methodist Church
will be presenting a Service of
Remembrance of Jesus' Last
Supper with his disciples.
It is a live re-enactment com-
plete with costumes as Jesus and
his disciples gather in the Upper
Room for their Passover feast. In
1995, this was the original cre-
ation of Peggy Miller, wife of the
senior pastor, who chose to use
three narrators in place of speak-
ing parts.
The first narrator describes the
drama as it to unfold as
well as the scenes where Jesus is
speaking directly to his disciples.
The second and third narrators
are used to present the spoken
words of either the disciples as
they interact with Christ or the
words of Jesus as he explains the
coming betrayal by Judas, denial
by Peter, his death, and finally his
resurrection.
The front of the church sanctu-
ary is transformed to represent a
scene very much like Da Vinci's
Painting of the Last Supper. Tables
are spread across the chancel and
draped with table cloths. Wooden
bowls of cheese, fruit, and nuts are
set to be shared by the disciples
during the evening.
The center of the table is
reserved for Judas, Jesus, John and
Peter for the roles they are about
to play. During the drama, Jesus


SUN PHOTO BY LOU KENNEDY


Rehearsal of the re-enactment of the Last Supper at Christ United Methodist Church
included Jesus washing the feet of one of his disciples. The Maundy Thursday service
will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday March 28. During the drama, the sanctuary will be
transformed to represent a scene much like Da Vinci's painting of the Last Supper.
Rodney Pocevic, left, Pete Ditmer and Bob Coleman watch as Jesus, played by Pastor
Bob Haley, washes the feet of Brian Usher.


breaks the bread and shares cup
with his disciples as the narrator
repeats the words Jesus spoke to
them.
Then the congregation is invit-
ed to four tables of 12 seats each,
which are set up in the center
area of the Sanctuary where each
attendee may partake of the ele-
ments of the Last Supper. During
each seating, Jesus continues to


Worship with us: Sat. 5 pm Sun. 8:30 & 11 am
Counseling Appointments 926-2959 467817
e, caring and doing Unitarian Universalist
Congregation of Venice
Worship Service and Youth Religious Education
Sunday O.30 a.m.
Rev Mike Young, Interim Minister



TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE
Bible Fellowship 9 am
Se7ar Worship in the Word 10:15 am
111, A-'iBilkeChurSh

700 Center Rd, Venice (Garden Elementary)
(941) 525-6196


AANewLife
COMMUNITY CENTER
home of 6qeto ..tfe Asemblf o'f god


www.nlaog.org
941.493.0775


5800 Tamiami Trail South, Venice 34293
Sunday Worship: 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
Wednesday Family Night: 7:00 p.m.
Drop by and discover our warm family environment,
exciting worship and a message that makes a difference!
Healing School: 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery: Thursdays 6:00 p.m.


speak to the disciples how they
will assume responsibility for
continued teaching and healing
among his followers.
Between each seating, the choir
will present a selection of hymns and
anthems until all have been served.
The service is at 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 28 at Christ
United Methodist Church, 1475
Center Road.


Venice Mayor John Holic issued a proclamation declaring
March 19 through March 23, 2013, be set aside for the 4th
Annual Bible Reading Marathon in the city. The mayor
began reading Genesis at 8:05 p.m. on March 19. The
last word of Revelation will take place around noon on
Saturday, March 23.


St Mark's Episcopal Church"
Office: 941-488-7714
508 Riviera Street, Venice (2 blocks west of Venice Regional Medical Center)
Saturday 5:00 p.m. Holy Communion
Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
9:30 a.m. Holy Communion (with nursery)
11:15 a.m. Holy Communion
(Breakfast served 1st Sunday of each month 9:00-11:00)
Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Holy Communion & Healing Service
The Rev James H Puryear, Rector


VENICE BIBLE
CHURCH
S. -Benefit concert for
,.. WWW.OneMakeover.org
5 Sunday, March 24th 7 pm

Bible Study 9:00 & 10:40
Worship 9:00 & 10:40am
CHILDREN YOUTH SMALL GRouPS
493-2788
www.VeniceBibleChurch.com
9395 W. Shamrock Dr. (9 blocks west of US 41)

t LAKESIDE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2401 S. Tamiami Trail (Across from So. Cty. Admin. Bldg.)
493-5102
web: www.lakesidelutheran.net
email: LLC@lakesidelutheran.net
Worship 8:00 a.m. or 10:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship 9:15 a.m.
Children's Church 9:15 a.m.
Nursery 9:15 & 10:30 am
ChitinM ag &a ly eingConsigOffire49


PHOTO COURTESY OF LIFT CHURCH


Easter event

gives hope to

Venice families

Venice Rising is a day for families in the community to
join in an Easter celebration of the resurrection and a
gigantic egg hunt at Blalock Park that includes $10,000
worth of prizes and gift certificates provided by Venice
businesses. It's an Easter Sunday extravaganza sponsored
by Lift Church at 10 a.m. March 31.


Mayor launches


Bible Reading


Marathon


0





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


ACROSS
1 Saroyan's "My
Name is _"
5 Tear to pieces
10 Newspaper
section, for short
14 Gaze fiercely
19 Utah's Illy
20 Field of action
21 go bragh!"
22 Black tea
23 "The Plough and
the Stars"
dramatist
25 Baseball's Hall of
Fame Orator
27 Ruddy
28 "Typee" sequel
30 Whirled, as water
31 Window's ache?
32 French actor
Delon
33 "...long both
shall live?"
34 Coax
37 Former Cannes
coin
38 Was present
42 Mio
43 Bedknobs and
Broomsticks
actress
45 Ginger drink
46 Ghastly pale
47 The Censor of old
Rome
48 Polite end-of-page
direction
49 Tiff
51 Large wine cask
52 Pulitzer Prize
playwright
57 Napoleon's victory
city
58 Citizen Kane's
sled
60 Horse's goad
61 "America", for one
63 Sky dog, Major or
Minor
64 Orifice
65 Fright
66 Coins of 54 Down
68 River to the
Ubangi
69 Sam, of "The Right
Stuff"
71 Mozart's"
Kleine
Nachtmusik"
72 Mia Farow's mom
76 Lion's name
78 Touches ground
80 Chi-Louisville
vector
81 Wee
82 The Great
Commoner
83 Daughter of
Cadmus
84 Becket actor
89 Enlightened
Buddhist


0 for the Irish!


90 Supported, as
stockings
92 Make merry
93 "...yet a _to all":
Pope
94 Be informed
95 Nursery heavies
96 St. Louis bridge
builder
97 No-see-um, for one
100 B'way's 1968 rock
show
101 Avaricious
104 Director of 100
Across
107 Prolific Irish
woman author
111 Coeurd'__, Idaho
112 Steely
113 Islands, in the
Baltic
114 The little brown
church locale
115 Noted Sing Sing
warden
116 Follow orders
117 Hotsy-_
118 Fashion mag
DOWN
1 Balaam's mount
2 Ship hazard


Edited by Linda and Charles Preston


3 "I1 know named
Sal"
4 Popular board
game
5 "Les Plaideurs"
dramatist
6 Turkish decree
7 Foot, in anatomy
8 French article
9 Covert
remunerations
10 Jubilate
11 Hunter in the sky
12 Cratchit boy
13 Yoko
14 Blimp sponsor
15 Baseball's Baldy
16 Joke day, for
short
17 Croupier's tool
18 Made do, with out
24 Pope's fanon
26 Remainder, in
Rouen
29 Gershwin's "The
Love"
32 Result of a burning
desire?
33 South African
playwright Fugard
34 Ulster, for one
35 Supreme Assyrian
god


36 Terence Cardinal
Cooke's successor
37 Wined and dined
38 Piedmont wine city
39 "Odd Man Out"
actor
40 Omit a vowel
41 Blue jeans material
43 River of Toledo
44 "Turandot" is one
47 Early Picasso art
style
50 Too-too
52 Start of a
counting-out rhyme
53 Cosmetician
Lauder
54 Province of S.
Poland
55 Local deity
56 Delicately-
patterned grillwork
59 Stuffed
62 California wine
valley
64 More confident
65 Alan Ladd classic
66 Stiff curtain
material
67 Tropical vine
69 Pitchman's decoy
70 Coup _:
overthrow


CROSS13
73 Fall flower
74 Exploited
75 Western Indians
77 Sgt. Snorkel's dog
79 Orators'
stock-in-trade
82 Put up peaches
85 Sappho's Muse
86 Fabric
87 Garr of Mr. Mom
88 Stuff oneself
89 Egyptian dry
measure
91 Soul mate
93 Take off
95 Midwest terminal
96 Alaska's First
Governor
97 Cit. of Rome
98 Vincent Lopez
theme song
99 Merganser
102 Rotary telephone
feature
103 Holler
105 Pi follower
106 Chitchat
108 Undeliverable mail
initials
109 Slave Turner
110 Born, in France


I BLOOD BANK SCHEDULE


Suncoast
Communities Blood
Bank staff will be in
the local area Monday,
March 25, 8 a.m.-noon,
at Terra Cove, 1060
Laurel Ave., Venice;
Monday, March 25,
1:30-4:30 p.m., at Encore
Royal Coachman, 1070
Laurel Road, Nokomis;
Thursday, March 28,

SOLUTION TO MAR. 16
CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD


5:30-8:30 p.m., at 111
Pavonia Road, Nokomis;
and Friday, March 29,
11 a.m.-5 p.m., at
RaceTrac, 410 South
Tamiami Trail, Nokomis.
For more dates and
times, call 941-735-4223
or visit:SCBB.org.

From Suncoast
Communities Blood Bank

SOLUTION TO TODAY'S
CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD


I THE BIG RED BUS SCHEDULE


Florida's Blood Centers
needs all types of blood
donations.
Donating blood takes
about an hour. Every
donor receives a mini-
physical and a screening
with each donation.
All mobile donors will
receive a thank you gift.
Donations are taken
at 4155 South Tamiami
Trail, Venice Village
Shoppes, between Ross
and Publix, Venice, or on
The Big Red Bus, which
will be in Venice Monday,


SFL.ORIDA'S
BLOOD CENTERS

March 25, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
at South County Family
YMCA, 701 Center Road;
Friday, March 29,
7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., at
Venice Regional Medical
Center, 540 The Rialto.
Call 941-492-9202. For
more dates and times,
visit:FBCDonor.org.

From Florida's Blood
Centers


LOOKING FOR


SOMETHING?


Tabatha will love to love you Saturday's Sudoku, horoscopes, movie
listings and Dear Abby are in the real
Tabatha is a laid-back 3-year-old spayed female kitty that has estate classified section along with a
been at EARS for two years. She's affectionate and gets along well es e lan ng a
with other cats and loves humans. Call Deva at Englewood Animal bonus crossword puzzle and a host of
Rescue Sanctuary, 145W. Dearborn St., Englewood, at 941-681- other features. The Sudoku solution still
3877 or go toEARS41ife.com. The second and the last Saturday of
every month EARS features Pampered Pets low-cost dog grooming a appears in 0 ur Town.
and bathing.


alIaiboaintrave
ruise, Hotel & Air Travel Packages


March Open House Madness
3/26 Royal Caribbean International
3/27 Regent Seven Seas Cruises
3/28 Avalon Waterways/Globus
SPresentations by cruise line
representatives highlighting
new ships, itineraries and
more at All Aboard Travel
Win a cruise Door Prizes
Special offers
Call to RSVP or for more details!
Book a Celebrity Cruise by Monday,
4/15/13 and choose from 1,2 or 3!
1. Free Beverage Package
2. Free Gratuities
3. Onboard Credit
Call to book or for more details.
17 Day Roman Renaissance
Enjoy 1 nt in Rome plus sail to
Florence/Pisa (Livorno), Provence
(Toulon), Barcelona & Tenerife.
fr.S799


GARAGE DOOR
IM \( I R.\IIN I)

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Mini Vacation
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April 14th, April 28th
& May 12th
Includes 4 days/3 nights
Receive $75 Free Play
and 3 meals at Isle of
Capri Casino Resort
$219 ppdo
1-800-284-1015
(941) 473-1481
Escorted Motorcoach
Groups Welcome!
Local Pick Ups
On The Road
Again Tours


since 1995


NEW ENGLAND FALL COLORS
TI'-m1r! J']e 10 DAYS>,,, $899
1 hotel stay at world famous Killington
Resort, Day trips to 5 states including
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HU-II'|IJ1!J 6 DAYS f". $1,099
NewYears Eve Celebration, Parade
seats, sightseeing & more. Add tours of
California coast or Vegas. Add cruises to
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GREENLAND & ICELAND
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Cruise London, Ireland, Northern
Ireland, Scotland, Iceland, Greenland,
Newfoundland to USA. Add Paris Tour
ALPINE OKTOBERFEST
tIIllM 15 5DAYS ft $2,298
Other Trips with 1 Hotel Stay including
Breakfast and Dinner Daily are also
Switzerland, Ireland, Italy and more!
ALASKA & CANADA
I9 DAYS m $1,299
Seattle, Juneau, Ketchikan, Skagway.
Add a Canadian Rockies Tour OR do a
Gulf Cruise and add Denali Park.
BRANSON HOLIDAY SHOWS
l:lim[llnj]l 9 DAYS om $999
Enjoy 7 TOP Branson shows. Scenic
Ozark Mountains and Little Rock.
Breakfast Daily! Air Option Available! S-


IE



Quiet 1/2 HP Motor, 1 wireless keypad.
2 Intellicode Transmitters. 5 Year Motor Warranty.

$299oO

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Impact Garage Doors, Hurricane Shutters, Entry Doors, Screen Doors,
Gates, Openers, Impact Windows, Front Entry & Interior Doors
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1* RAILROAD TIESl
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S 12/1820.00 ;
LAWN FERT. 10-2-8 vv
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A ST.AUG. W & F
1 820.00 v
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A 850 N. Indiana v
(Hwy. 776)
Al Enalewood, FL v
A4<<4< <<<<< 44444444


SAi7VSiS www.4SeasonsAC.com
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Florida Powr Light
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ystems Only


MARCH 2013


Advancements in Shoulder Replacements

Wednesday, March 27, 6:00 7:00 p.m.
John Paul Vidolin, M.D., Board Certified in Orthopedic Surgery
Venice Regional Medical Center's Auditoriums (A-C)
Light refreshments served
RSVP to 1-855-876-2362


DR VIDOLIN


How to Manage Stress Before It Manages You


p P'ARKINSON
RESEARCH
FOUNDATION


540 The Rialto
Venice, FL 34285
941-485-7711


Thursday, March 28, 10:00 11:30 a.m.
Chris Cortman, Psy.D., Licensed Psychologist
Venice HealthPark, Lion's Club Room
1201 Jacaranda Boulevard, Venice, FL 34292
Call 941-483-7422 for more information
Reservation not required


A VENICE REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER


I The best healthcare under the sun.


VI 4*


I


FE I UPCL![!iOMNll


SUN NEWSPAPERS 7B


Where Quality Products And
Customer Service Are Still #1"
0 I I





MARCH 23, 2013 WEEKEND EDITION


An open-and-closed


case


JUNE CASAGRANDE

A reader named Roy
sent me an e-mail
recently. He had a
question not for
himself but for a friend.
And, heaven help me, I
really believe it was for
a friend.
Here's what Roy
wrote: "Dear June, I
have a friend who is
bothered by the differ-
ence between the use
of 'open' and 'opened'
when a person has left
the room.
"My friend wants to


know the answer but
is reluctant to write to
you for fear of making a
grammatical error.
"An example ... 'When
I left the room, the
door was left open.' Or
should it be, 'When I left
the room, the door was
left opened'? The reason
for the conundrum in
my friend's mind is that
you can't leave the room
with the door 'close.'"
Well, Roy, your friend
was right to cower in
terror at my ogre-like
powers of withering
linguistic judgment.
As someone who never
makes mistakes, and as
someone who accepts
only professionally ed-
ited, error-free emails,
I probably would have
ended up chasing him
through the streets
trying to stab him with a
red pen.
But seriously, folks.


The unfortunate thing
here, aside from the
image of me as a slob-
bering monster with
fangs and an overbite, is
that someone thinks his
errors would stand out.
On the contrary,
the feeling of being
singularly and shame-
fully inadequate in the
grammar department is
more like an epidemic.
It seems everyone I
talk to has an irrational
fear that they somehow
missed a lesson every-
one else got and that
they must, at all costs,
conceal their ignorance
from the grammar-
enlightened masses.
The truth is, if you
feel you're all alone in
this realm, that's your
guarantee that you're
not alone.
Let's consider our
anonymous friend's
question: Because you


can refer to "a closed
door," you can also use
the term "an opened
door." So far, so good.
But can we extend that
to the forms without the
"d" ending?
Setting aside the form
of "close" that rhymes
with "dose" and means
"nearby" (which is
essentially a different
word), it's true you can't
really have a "close
door." So does that
mean you can't have an
"open door"? No. In fact,
both open and opened
can modify the noun
"door," even though
their corresponding
antonyms may not work
the same way.
"Closed" and
"opened" are derived
from verbs, to close
and to open. Yet they
function as adjectives
in "a closed door" and
"an opened door."


That's simply one of the
options English offers
- our language lets
you use past participles
of verbs as adjectives:
an eaten breakfast, a
painted fence, a written
work, a walked dog, a
known fact.
We call these adjective
uses "attributive," and
we employ them every
day without having to
think about it.
But the verb "open"
doesn't just have its
past participle form
"opened" to work as an
adjective. It also has a
full-fledged adjective
form, which is identical
to the verb: "open."
The verb "close," on
the other hand, doesn't
offer the same option.
Technically, it can
function without a "d"
as an adjective. But this
form is so unidiom-
atic that it's completely


impractical. No one
uses the term "close
door" to mean "closed
door."
And if, like me, you
think that "an open
door" sounds better
than "a opened door,"
that has nothing to do
with the mechanics of
these term. It's probably
because the form "open
door" is more popular.
In language, that's
valid.
So to anyone who
hesitates to ask such an
interesting and insight-
ful question, all I can
say is that my door
is always open, and
dictionaries are easy to
open, too.

June Casagrande is
author of "It Was the
Best of Sentences, It Was
the Worst of Sentences."
She can be reached at
JuneTCN@aol.com.


(


*


nwe, f 7tf


: ..
Holy Thursday, March 27, 2013
NNo Morning Ma I e, i *I
MorningPrayer-Lituri: ot the Hour, ,-iin AI M-ih1.p)
7 PM-Mass of, the Lord', Supper
Adoration Blessed Sacrament attci .\la; uLilhl ffhP.lI
a i

Good Friday of Lord's Passion, NMarch:28, 2013:
No morning NlaI-e;'
Morning Prayer-Lituhirg of the HOiurs 'il AM CIKii 'l i
Noon-Stations of the Cross
3PM-Liturgical Service & Comnniunion 2,.

Holy Saturday, March 29, 2013
No morning MIase.
Morning Prayer-Litutgilcal of tll Hoiure i. n i ,;1 i 11
Noon-Stations of the Cros-.
12 Noon-Blessing of Food

Holy Saturday Night, The Easter Vigil, March 30, 2013
8:15 PNI (no 4:00 Mlass)

Easter Sunday, The Resurrection of the Lord, March 31, 2013l
Nli Cs ni ili' f Su riI.I M T, Nl ~ i& 11 il AM : 12 3il PM
Overflow Masses: 9:15, 11:15 Am i RP ih CLiotci I

350 Tampa Ave., Venice
(941) 484-3505


la.ind'. Thtii sdal. i pi
Eaister Sunda ,, i adii['ionil XIII and I -1145
Eastei Su.id.i1 i o ileinpOI'rIr'. 1 1 5
G- ood Friklai, Ser.ice I i Ipmin
L! CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
S D 14A Y llll .,.n, \llllt t, IM1- I 3lJ,.t. -4
'n41-493-'5"14
11,',1_, UIllh'I ll,"

SUNDAY, MARCH 31ST


s First Baptist Church
Executive Drive


First Baptist Church
Venice
Jacaranda Lakefront
Campus at
Executive Drive
www.fbvenice.org
941-485-1314


EASTER JOY
Worship at

SLakeside Lutheran Church
8 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Traditional
9:15 A.M. Contemporary
Easter Breakfast 7-10 AM
Easter Egg Hunt After 10:30 Service
2401 S. Tamiami Trail, S. Venice
493-5102
(Across From the South County Administration Building) j









Palm Sunday, Mar 4th 10:30 a.m.
Maundy Thursday March 28th
Holy Week at 6:00 p.m.
Easter Concert Sunday,
March 31st 10:30 a.m.
"This Is Love!" By Church Choir & Directed
by Norma Sue White.
Reformed Community Church
6tO Banyan Drive, Venice Florida. 34-29
* *N 9 493-3Q^ O-2'


Celebrate

Easter
Maundy Thursday 7pm
Good Friday 7pm
Easter Sunday 10am
Rev David M. Werley

OUR SAVIOR
LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ELCA)

2705 Tamiami Tr. N., Nokomis
941-966-4442




















Holy Week & Easter Schedule
i ':] :":' am' H. Ril- ~I




SnacofrthePaMss o wlimSndAy)


E- A .S T ER dCLERAION











Mcniial Galen r o,'ih Plm
Holy Wednesday, Mar Schedu 27le
Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday, March 2


6 00 p Fot shng HI Eu:I-ran l Rie ist
Holy Wednesday, March 27

6 00 pm Foot Sevshing and HOIj Eucharist
S 00 am Stations of the Cross
12 00 pm veneration of the Cross & Eucharist
r./reser.,ed Sacrament
Holy Saturday, March 30
7 00 pm The Great .vigil of Easter
Ser.'ice of Light Ser.'ice of Lessons
Renewal of Baptismal Vows
HOlI Eucharist ,.ith administration of Easter Communion
Sunday of the Resurrection: Easter Day, March 31
7 00 am HoIl Eucharist Rite 1 in -Il Saints
Memorial Garden
10 00 an HolI Eucharist Rite 2
Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd
1115 Center Rd. Venice, Fl *497-7286

St. Mark's Episcopal Church
508 Riviera Street Venice 488.7714
(2 blocks behind Venice Regional Medical center)


Palm Sunday March 24
Liturgy of the Ptalms
8:00, 9:30 & 11:15 am
Also celebrated March 23 at 5pm
Good Friday March 29
12 2 pm
Holy Communion followed by
Stations of the Cross
Service begins at Noon


Maundy Thursday March 28
7:30 pm Holy Communion
Congregational Foot Washing

Holy Saturday March 30
7:30 pm The Great Vigil of Easter
.... i I


Easter Sunday March 31
Holy Communion & Music
8:00, 9:30 & 11:15 am
Nursery 9 to 10:45 am
The Rev James H. Puryear, Rector The Rev Judith S. Roberts, Interim Assoc Rector
wwwstmarksvenice.org


:8B SUN NEWSPAPERS


41M





:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 23, 2013


FROM TIDEWELL HOSPICE

With more than
100,000 military veter-
ans living in Sarasota,
Manatee, Charlotte and
DeSoto counties, giving
aging heroes the best
possible care is a timely
topic.
Elder law attorney
Mark Mazzeo and
Tidewell Hospice
will present national
speaker Deborah L.
Grassman in a program
about veterans seeking
peace at the end of life.


Grassman's infor-
mative and inspiring
presentation will be
held April 4,
8:30 a.m.-noon, at
Gulf Coast Community
Foundation,
Community Room,
601 South Tamiami
Trail, Venice. The free
program is open to
the public. A book
signing follows the
presentation.
Grassman is the
author of "Peace at Last,
Stories of Hope and
Healing for Veterans


and their Families" and
an adviser for the Bay
Pines VA Medical Center
hospice program in
Pinellas County.
A pioneer in develop-
ing protocols for recog-
nizing and responding
effectively to military
veterans' concerns,
Grassman talks about
issues specific to
combat veterans who
are seeking peace at
the end of their lives.
RSVP to Lisa Wright,
941-914-5041, or email
lawright@tidewell.org.


Scholarships for adult


learners available


STAFF REPORT

Business and
Professional Women of
Englewood and Venice
is accepting applica-
tions through April 30
for $1,000 scholarships
for female adult learn-
ers for the 2013-14
academic year.
Applicants should be
from the Englewood/
Venice area, residing in
either Sarasota County
or Charlotte County.
Adult learners are
those women pursuing


advanced education or
retraining in college or
vocational school. The
BPWEV scholarship ap-
plications, instructions
and contact information
are accessible online
atbpwev.org.
BPWEV is engaged in
the national program
"Joining Forces for
Women Veterans and
Military Spouses."
The program provides
resources and online
connections to veterans
and military wives to as-
sist in their successfully
obtaining meaningful


employment and a
career of their inter-
est. One goal is to help
these women complete
advanced education or
training, and BPWEV
encourages women
veterans and military
spouses to apply.
BPWEV is a nonprofit
501 (c)3 organization.
Individuals wishing to
make a donation to the
2013 Scholarship Fund
may mail a check to
BPWEV, P.O. Box 611,
Englewood FL 34295-
0611 or give online at
bpwev.org.


SAVE LIVES& GIVE BLOODED
*..
*


p


4r~* ~


w:.

4-


...


You are invited to attend
our Gospel Meeting
March 24th, 25th, 26th
at the Lemon Bay Church of Christ
7000 Regina Drive
Englewood, Florida


The times and topics of services are:
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Bible Class -
How to be a Better Student of the Bible
Sunday 10:30 a.m. Worship -
How to be a Better Servant
Sunday 6:00 p.m. -
How to make Jesus your everything
Monday 7:00 p.m. -
How to have a Better Nation
Tuesday 7:00 p.m. -
Why you should be Faithful to God


se vi e.I
!IiZ


Directions: Go East on 776 approximately 1 miles, turn right onto
Regina, church building is on the left
Directions from P.C.: 776 to Roberta, turnleft onto Regina, go approx 800'
to the church building on the left.
Contact phone number 941-400-8528



r Grace United Methodist Church
400 E Field Ave., Venice 488-1374


EASTER SUNDAY SERVICES March 31st
Traditional 8 am & 11 am
Contemporary 9:30 am

Nursery Available for
ALL EASTER SUNDAY SERVICES

Pastor Jim Mitchell


-.5-


' / ejoice

Services

Thursday Evening 7 PM
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Morning Worship 10:30 AM
Evening Service 6 PM


CELEBRATE EASTER AT

VENICE BIBLE
CHURCH

GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
March 29th 8:00 p.m.
Adult-orientred Service of

SUNRISE SERVICE
Sunday, March 31s' 7:00 a.m.
Maxine Barritt Park
I ,i II e :e r i liii l : I :it -i i- j t" r,I S :_ k "
SUNDAY MORNING
CELEBRATION SERVICES
March 31s ~- 9:00 & 10:40 a.m.


-9


l -/ Victor Baptist Church
1 -APTI{T C /C 241 BurneyRd.Osprey, FL
BAPTIST CHURCHk(./ 941-966-4716
Lifting up the cross!


Auburn Road
Presbyterian Church (PCA)
4' N IAuburn Rd 485-3551
\\\\\\ 1arpCa Or0
Holy %eek sen' ice schedule:
Tir..Idal. arch 24. ":311 p.in.- MAiUNDY
THURSDAY SERVICE. coinincinor.alin_, the Last
Supper ol' C(rit illh His disciple. \\c "ill be
celcl)'raiiIl IdlltICord'I SuIp)er duirinl, oiir lime
(Note that the TIME of the Maundy Thurs.
service changed to 7:30)


Easter Sunday, 31arch 31. "' .11
SERVICE Iolloned > bI
Service 9:30 am RESUiRL'ECT


NRISE

kIlA


at Ca2& d uri rshi .
a~ter SundiyWo i er

g9 8 Pale Nokonf
S Phone -8-41
Glenda J. Bray Senior Pastor -j
(WestofUS41,4 .SouthofAlbee-
Rd.I/Matth urrie Ford) 4
www. c.net. '-
vnumcm star.net


Church of the Holy Spirit

Maudy Thursday 7pm
Good Friday Noon & 7pm
SONrise Service at Nokomis Beach 6:30am
(Bring a chair or blanket)
JOIN US FOR EASTER BREAKFAST 8:30am
Easter Service 1 Oam


': 126 S. Tamiami Trail Osprey Fl
(Just north of Walmart)
941-966-1924



iMkNewLife
COMMUNITY CENTER
home of 7?ew o1e Assemblf of C0od
Resurrection Sunrise Service: 7:00 a.m.
Join us and Venice Bible Church
at Maxine Barritt Park/Large Pavilion
(south of Sharky's restaurant)
Resurrection Sunday Worship
with the Ditchfield Family Singers
at New Life:
8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
5800 Tamiami Trail South, Venice 34293
: www.newlifevenice.org 941.493.0775



i jmmanuel
'l r. -LUTHERAN CHURCH
the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in Venice
790 South Tamiami Trail ("on the Island")
941/488-4942
Christ is Risen! Celebrate Easter with us. All are welcome
(Childcare p'ov'ided during Sunday w.-orship)
Maundy Thursday Lord's Supper 7:00 pm
Good Friday Liturgy 7:00 pm
Vigil of Easter (Saturday) 5:00 pm
Easter Sunday Festival Holy Communion
with Organ. Brass, and multiple choirs
8:30 am & 11:00 am
www emmanuel-elca org


Difficult decisions for


veterans discussed


-~-THE VOICES OF SARASOTA
A Large, Dynamic Chorus.

Songs of hope and inclusion,
celebrating humanity and
embracing equality.

Monday, March 25 at 7:30pm

St. Andrew United Church of Christ
6908 Beneva Rd., Sarasota 34238
www.uccstandrew.org
Free-will offering
S922-7595 or 484-1755


SUN NEWSPAPERS 9B








10B
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 23, 2013


PHOTO ALBUM


CONTACT US
941-207-1102
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


PHOTO COURTESY OF
AMERICAN LEGION
American Legion NO-VEL
Post 159 Color Guard
members Bob Oen,
front left, Jim Tucci, Cliff
White and Wayne Hill;
Post Commander Jim
Hutchinson; Honor Guard
members Norm Cote, John
Farrow, Butch Gorman
and Steve Chamzcak;
Bugler Phil Groebe; and
John Sliman, back left, Al
Angelasti, Commander
Norm MacLellan, Lance
Rose and Steve Doty
participated in the recent
dedication of the Berlin
Airlift Memorial at Patriots
Park.


Belinda Aubuchon's son, Mack Kitchel, and his dog, Bella,
visited Belinda's mother, Ann Johnson, 88, at HarborChase,
Venice.



I,^s^.^ A


PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE KUROPATWA


Billy Bob, left, Shayna Forgetta and Tanya Scotece attended the funeral for Shayna's Lhasa/
Westie mix dog, Gizmoe, held at Venice Memorial Gardens when it opened its pet cemetery
Feb. 16.


PHOTO COURTESY OF NORMA DAYTON PHOTO COURTESY OF BOB VEDDER


Asye Somersan, left, stands with Sheila Farrell,
president of Venice Area Democratic Club. Somersan
gave a presentation on the economy at the February
meeting.


A new flower basket decorates the lamp
pole in front of Coldwell Banker in down-
town Venice. The basket is sponsored by
Lueanne Wood, as is the turtle art.


Venice's Only Not-For-Profit, Faith Based
Continuing Care Retirement Community Offering:


0o
0 ",,


F



VILL

ONTI
EVE RYDAY


PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMES SAGER


Nan Winans, left, Leslie Yard, Sandy McIntyre, Nancy Pike, Janita Wisch, Esther Bird, Carolyn
Conte, Betty Black and Claudia Daniels, board members of Literacy Volunteers of South Sarasota
County, at the organization's annual fundraiser March 12 at Jacaranda Trace's banquet room. Out
of a colorful array of dazzling teacup auction prizes, won by many, one stood out: "I'm donating
my winnings to the Literacy Volunteers of South Sarasota County," said Leslie Yard, the organiza-
tion's tutor coordinator and lucky recipient of the 50/50 drawing. For more information about
LVSSC, call Leslie, 941-488-8994 or visit LiteracyChangesLives.org.


* Independent Living
* Assisted Living
* Skilled Nursing Care
* Outpatient Rehab


GGE

ISLE
, NEW DAY


F (941) 486-5484
920 Tamiami Trail South
Venice, FL 34285


COURTESY PHOTO


Betty Watson, front left, Judy Young, Louise Balboni, Louise Atkisson, Jean Marie Burton, Jeanne
Richgels (instructor), Nancy McKee, Sandy Krubl, Marion Cerny, and Jim Young, back left, Phil
Balboni, Dick Engle, John Burton, Tom McKee, Tom Krubl and Bill Cerny, all participants of the
dance classes at Country Club Estates.


PHOTO COURTESY OF
ED MARINAK
Right: John Bagdovitz,
kneeling left, Rudy Saveli;
and Jack McNally, standing
left, Jim Martin, Frank Viola
(Grand Knight), Chuck Hartley
(Deputy Grand Knight), Eric
Schneider and Ken Conray,
along with Ed Marinak
(activity chair, not pictured)
prepared breakfast for about
125 Immokalee tomato farm
workers who stayed at the
Knights of Columbus, Council
No. 7052, recently. The farm
workers were marching from
Immokalee to Lakeland to
bring awareness to their
desire for better wages.


PHOTO COURTESY OF SANDRA BROOKSHIRE
Debbie Grossman, left, Olivia Thomas, SPARCC executive
director, and Linda Berliner, right, speaker. Berliner is a court
services volunteer for Safe Place and Rape Crisis Center. A
25-year-veteran in the field, she goes to court to help clients
that need restraining orders, etc. The SPARCC auxiliary monthly
membership coffee was held at Debbie Grossman's home on
Casey Key, Nokomis, March 6. The next free membership coffee
will be April 3,10 a.m. at the Moose Lodge, 111 Auburn Road,
Venice.


PHOTO COURTESY OF BOB VEDDER
Russ Johnson, left, a volunteer for Venice Area Beautification
Inc., watches as Mike Pell, of the city of Venice, places one of 23
new flowering baskets in the city. This basket is in front of Ann
Thompson's law office. She is one sponsor of the new baskets.


SHARE YOUR PHOTOS
To share your photo with us, email a JPG at least 4 by 6
inches with a list of who or what is in the photograph to
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com, or mail photos to:
Venice Gondolier Sun, Attn: Photo Album, 200 E. Venice Ave.,
Venice FL 34285.


PHOTO COURTESY OF ED MARINAK
Immokalee tomato farm workers ate breakfast after spending
the night at the Knights of Columbus facility. Several K of C
members prepared the breakfast.


VADC
VENICE AREA
DEMOCRATIC CLUB

























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The Sun / Sunday, March 24, 2013


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Sunday, March 24, 2013 / The Sun www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 5


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Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com The Sun / Sunday, March 24, 2013


THE PHANTOM


BY LEE FALK


DOONESBURY "FLASHBACK"


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Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


The Sun / Sunday, March 24, 2013











2 13 annual qi 3 toi


A special section of the Sun family of newspapers Serving readers along the Southwest Florida coast


fwBOU TT


IE TREATIO







@BEG aD ]a] O am


23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
Josh Olive
941-206-1010
WaterLineWeekly@gmail.com

EDITOR
Lee Anderson
941-206-1010
WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com

DESIGN/LAYOUT
Josh Olive
Tommy Von Voigt


REGULAR
CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Lee Anderson
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Capt. Ed Kopp
Robert Lugiewicz
David H. Martin
Vincent Molnar
Capt. Mike Myers
Terry Myers
Dave Nielsen
Cam Parson
Tommy Von Voigt
Capt. Cayle Wills
Shawn Zelek


MARKETING
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Leslee Peth
941-206-1262
Ipeth@sun-herald.com

DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Chris Beckett
941-206-1264
cbeckett@sun-herald.com

BOATERS' BARGAINS
941-429-3110







Some of WaterLine's subject matter
consists of the writers'opinions. We
do our best to be accurate in mat-
ters of fact in this publication, but
matters of opinion are left to each
individual author.


Anyone who's been fishing in Southwest
Florida more than once or twice quickly realizes
that there is a lot to learn about being an angler
here. There are so many different species to
target and so much water where you can fish.
Then when you start adding in variables for
example, time of year, water temperature,
weather conditions, tide height and direction
- the sheer number of possibilities you might
encounter in any given day on the water can
easily become overwhelming. And I didn't even
mention all the laws and regulations that you
have to deal with.
If that's the boat you're in right now, I have
good news it does eventually get a little
easier and start to make some sense. But I'd be
lying if I told you that you'll know it all someday.
The cold, hard truth is that no one does, and no
one can. I myself choose to look at this as a good
thing. I like learning, and being a Southwest
Florida angler means I can spend my whole life
fishing here and never run out of things to learn.


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


What can you catch when you go fishing in
Southwest Florida? The question isn't hard to
answer, but it does take a little time. The Gulf
of Mexico, its associated estuaries and the rivers
that feed them are home to literally thousands of
species offish, not to mention a stunning array of
invertebrate marine life. Here are some of the fish
you may find nibbling on the end of your line.
INSHORE SPECIES
These are mainly fish of the shallows and
backwaters, though being fish they may choose to
swim out into the Gulf. Inshore fishing encom-
passes the entire estuary system, from the river
mouths to the beaches and all 270 square miles of
Charlotte Harbor.
TARPON are perhaps Southwest Florida's best
known and most sought-after gamefish. Growing
to massive sizes 250 pounds or more is
possible, though 80 to 120 pounds is more typical
- these schooling fish are tough customers.
Aerial acrobatics displays are a trademark of this
species'fight. The majority of the tarpon in our
area are seasonal visitors, arriving in late spring to


Before you can run, you have to be able to
walk. This publication is designed to ensure that
you're walking on solid ground as you climb the
local fishing learning curve. If you're just getting
started, the articles here will get you off on the
right foot. For those of you who already have
some angling experience in the area, this will
serve as a reference, reminding you of some
things you already know and helping you put
together some pieces so the puzzle makes more
sense. If you've been fishing here for the last 20
years, you can probably still pick up a thing or
two by reading through this guide.
In assembling this year's annual guide to
fishing, I was continually reminded by how
amazing our waters truly are and how lucky we
are to live within easy distance of their shores.
If you live to fish, there are precious few places
that would make better homes. Each of us
who loves and enjoys Charlotte Harbor and the
surrounding waterways has a responsibility to
do what he can to ensure that the quality of the


spawn in the deep Gulf and sticking around until
winter cold fronts drive them south. There is also
a resident population that winter in the rivers,
where the tannic acid tints them a beautiful
golden color. Boca Grande Pass is the epicenter
of local tarpon action, though these fish can be
found throughout the backwaters and along the
beaches during the warm months. Dozens of area
guides specialize in silver kings, and dozens more
show up from out of town to cash in when the fish
are thick. The best baits will depend on where you
find the fish. Tarpon in the Pass on an outgoing
tide may be focused on swimming crabs and
ignore any other bait. The same fish might eagerly
take a whole dead mullet under the U.S. 41 bridge
over the Peace River a couple months later. Big
artificial baits and jumbo flies, tied just for tarpon,
also catch more than a few fish. The Boca Grande
tarpon jig is also popular, though a debate is still
ongoing about whether the jig is designed to snag
fish. Small juveniles, which live in backwaters,
creeks and canals, are often targeted with light
fly tackle and are just as athletic as their parents.
Tarpon are almost exclusively a catch-and-release
species, sought just for the thrill of catching one.
They're considered inedible here, though commer-
cially fished in the Caribbean and Africa's Atlantic
coast. Killing a tarpon or possessing it for longer


habitat and the fishing remain high, so those
who come after us will have the same opportu-
nity to fall in love with this incredible and unique
environment.
The basic information here is not intended
to stand alone it's meant to be an comple-
ment to our weekly magazine. Every Thursday,
WaterLine covers not just fishing but the
other forms of outdoor recreation that make
Southwest Florida a paradise for those who just
can't stay inside. If you're not already getting
WaterLine every week, call 941-206-1000 and
ask for it. If you want to learn more about local
fishing, boating, paddlesports, birdwatching,
diving, wildlife and shooting, WaterLine is your
best resource.


than it takes to remove the hook is legal only with
a $51.50 permit issued by the state (at printing
time, it appeared the state might do away with
the permit this year, making tarpon possession
illegal at any time).
SNOOK are another top local gamefish, but are
just as popular on the table as they are on a line. A
tropical species, snook do poorly when the water
gets cold. A disastrous string of freezes in early 2010
killed large numbers of these fish, which is why the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
closed the season until at least Sept. 1, 2013, on
Florida's west coast. During winter, many snook go
up the rivers or seek refuge in deeper canals. Most
anglers think of this fish as a shallow-water species,
but snook are plentiful on some of the reefs and
fish havens out in the Gulf. Diving is a good way to
locate these populations. Inshore, snook tend to
hang around structure mangrove roots, dock
pilings, bridge abutments and even seawalls will
often hold a snook or two. Often, if you can see one,
it can see you and will refuse any bait. Although
this can be frustrating, remember that it's illegal to
snag a snook. When they don't have lockjaw, snook
are known to eat crabs, shrimp and fish up to about
half their own length. Live bait usually outfishes
artificial in the backcountry, where chumming
with freshly killed whitebait is a popular method.




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.ausa..u..uamm.u. uimuumum~.u~uuui


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3tock,


I INGMAN


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 3


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 4


During the summer, when most local snook
move out to the beaches for their annual spawn,
soft plastic baits catch a lot of fish just a few
feet from shore. Snook from 18 to 27 inches are
common. Snook 28 to 33 inches the legal
slot when season is open are often hard to
find. These fish can grow to nearly 50 pounds,
though 5 to 10 average. When and if snook
become legal to harvest, they are considered by
many to be a top choice for dinner. Be sure to
remove the skin; it will impart a soapy taste to
the cooked meat.
Not too many years ago, REDFISH were
a commercially fished species here, and the
population was in trouble. Strict regulations -
a fairly narrow slot limit and a one-fish bag -
led to a strong recovery, though numbers have
dropped a little the past couple years. Reds are
the target of several Southwest Florida tourna-
ments. Almost all of the fish caught inshore are
immature juveniles from 2 to 10 pounds, though
an occasional school of adult fish (aka bull reds)


will move in from the open Gulf during
autumn months. These big fish mingle
with the near-adults inshore, then move
back out to sea, taking the larger fish
with them and leaving mostly younger
juveniles (aka rat reds), which is why
decent keeper fish are often hard to
find in winter. Unlike in many places
along the Atlantic coast, surf fishing is
not a popular way to target these fish
here the bulls usually travel too far
off our beaches to reach by casting. Bull
reds can attain weights of 50 pounds or
larger, but it's rare to catch a fish over
20 pounds or so in our area. Redfish on
the flats and under the mangrove roots feed
best on incoming tides. As the water floods into
very shallow areas, the fish move in, some-
times in large schools. As the fish grub around
on the bottom for mollusks, crustaceans and
worms, their tails will sometimes stick out of
the water. These warm-weather"tailing" redfish
are stalked by many flats fishermen, who
enjoy targeting a preselected fish. During cool
weather, these fish move far up
into mangrove creeks and canals.
Because reds grow fast a fish
that's under the slot in early spring
may be over it by the time fall's
first real cold front arrives they
are often voracious feeders. To take
in enough calories, redfish are not
above scavenging. A dead shrimp or
piece of cutbait fished on the bottom
is usually eagerly taken by any red
that finds it. Scented soft plastic
baits are also popular. When reds are
feeding on baitfish,
hard or soft plastics will
draw strikes. Although
they have underslung
mouths, redfish will
hit a topwater plug hard when
they're in the right mood. As
you might expect of a fish with
a commercial market, redfish
are good eating. Bigger fish are
coarse-fleshed, but bigger fish
are also illegal to harvest. Black-
ened redfish is tasty enough


that it nearly destroyed Florida's stocks.
SPOTTED SEATROUT are the third species
in the so-called "Charlotte Harbor slam"
- catching a snook, redfish and seatrout
all in one day. Of these species, the trout is
likely to put up the least tussle. Although
not renowned for their great
fighting ability, trout do have
one important trait that makes
them an important fish to local
anglers: They often bite well
when it's cold and most other
species aren't thinking about
food. Trout, also called specks,
run smaller than many popular
gamefish; 1 or 2 pounds is
average, and anything over
5 pounds (a "gator"trout) is
worth bragging about. These
fish don't like fresh water,
and often move out of the
river mouths during the rainy
season. They also dislike --


Seatrout


warm weather, and
will often retire to deep areas near grassflats
or over hard bottom when the water heats
up on summer days. When the water is in the
comfortable mid-60s to high 70s, trout are
found mostly over grass. Water 3 or 4 feet
deep often holds good numbers offish, and
deeper potholes on very shallow flats may be
packed with trout. Drifting with live shrimp
fished under a popping cork is the standard


method of hunting trout. Smaller artificial
baits also work well; tandem Love's Lures
are especially popular. Trout caught in warm
weather often have soft, mushy flesh. In cool
weather, they have better texture. It's impor-
tant to get trout on ice as soon as possible
if you want them
for the table. A
couple related
fish, SAND
and SILVER
SEATROUT,
are also caught
here, mostly in
winter. They tend
j to prefer deeper
water than specks.
Another winter
target is the
prison-striped
SHEEPSHEAD.
These fish migrate
inshore during
winter and are
Sheepshead not put off by our
coldest weather. In
spring, they move
offshore to spawn and then remain there.
They can be caught offshore year-round, but
because of their feeding method they are an
incidental catch on the reefs. Sheepies are
crushers they use teeth that look eerily
human to smash the shells of crabs, clams and
snails to get at the soft innards. A sheepshead
will often grab a hard-shelled creature, crunch
it and spit it right out, then pick though the
crushed shell for edible meat. That means
when you try to set the hook on a sheepie,
you're often just pulling the bait away from
it. Becoming a successful sheepshead angler
is a skill that takes time to learn, and hooking
one is much easier when you're fishing right
under your feet which is where they are
in winter, haunting piers, pilings, seawalls
and rocky shorelines. Most inshore fish are
smallish males, often around a pound or less.
Big females are more common on the reefs
and can run up to 8 pounds or more. Because
of their shellfish diet, sheepshead fillets are
delicious and highly desirable.




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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 5


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 6


During the spring and fall runs, SPANISH
MACKEREL become one of the area's most-
wanted fish. Water temps in the mid-70s
usually trigger the migration of these
scissor-mouthed eating machines. One reason
for their popularity: When they're chopping


up a school of bait, they'll hit anything shiny
and moving fast through the water. While it
lasts, the action can be incredible. To speed
up the dehooking process, many anglers use
single-hook spoons or jigs and mash down the
barbs. This is important, because unhooking
a mackerel with multiple hooks in its mouth
is good way to have a run-in with its teeth.
Helpful hint: They're really, really sharp. If the
water gets too warm, these fish will move
entirely to our north for the summer, then
come back when fall starts putting a little nip
in the air. Spanish also love shrimp and will
sometimes take trout anglers' baits. To reliably
catch macks, a short wire leader is a good idea.
This may reduce your strikes, but it should
eliminate cutoffs. Alternatively, use a long-
shanked hook. Fish in the 1- to 3-pound range
are common, with larger fish often showing
up ahead of the main run. Spanish are oily
and taste a bit fishy. Still, they're well-liked by
most people who like fish. The flavor can be
much improved by cutting out the red meat
before cooking. Broiling and smoking are good
ways to prepare mackerel.
POMPANO also have spring and fall runs
along our coast, traveling in loose schools. A
few fish stick around all winter and summer,
but May and October normally see the heaviest
concentrations. Pomps rarely eat other fish,


preferring to dine on crustaceans.
This is one of the few fish you're more Pe
likely to catch on the beach than in
the backcountry, although pompano
travel up the estuaries as far as the
river mouths. An unusual method of
finding these fish is called skipping. -
Basically, you drive your boat over
a flat in about 4 feet of water and -
watch for jumping pompano in
your wake, then go back and fish j
that area, hoping other fish in the
school haven't been spooked. Live
shrimp, crabs and sand fleas are
good baits for these fish, but jigs are just as
popular and perhaps more effective.
iW


Traditional pompano jigs have
a heavy round head and a short yellow or
white skirt. Silly jigs also catch plenty offish,
especially in hot pink or yellow. Pomps are not
big fish; 1 to 3 pounds is average. Exceptional
fish may reach 8 pounds. Don't expect them
to give up easily, though their fight is
surprisingly big for their size. Pompano are
highly prized as eating fish.
A close relative of the pompano, PERMIT
are often mistaken for their smaller cousins
when young. They're not easy to tell apart
when they're small, especially if you don't
have one of each to compare. Permit are more
rounded in profile; pompano are usually less
silvery and more yellow. If you look at the dorsal
and anal fins, on a permit the start of both fins


nit






.:..... . .-.......

are roughly aligned; on a pompano, the anal
fin starts well behind the dorsal. Unlike pomps, just
permit get big. Although juvenile permit are ana
often found in pompano schools, adults are
usually found solo or in aggregations over reefs
or wrecks. In the Keys, big permit are sight-fished
on the flats; in Southwest Florida, not so much.
But they eat the same baits hand-picked
shrimp or silver dollar-size blue crabs are the top
choices. Fish from 10 to 20 pounds are reason- .
ably numerous, and they can grow larger than
40 pounds. Permit are fine table fish, but most
anglers release the big ones to fight another day.
COBIA are often caught in this area but
hard to target. During spring and fall, there
are plenty of these fish around, but they don't
form schools like they do along the northern
Gulf coast. Instead, cobes are seen as single-
tons from the river mouths to the offshore
reefs. With so much water for these
fish to be sior


scat-
tered around, it can be difficult
to locate one. Markers and other fish-holding
structures will draw in cobia, as will an
anchored boat. They also are often seen trav-


eling with manatees and big stingrays.
Live pinfish and eel-imitating lures are
among the top baits, though cobia will
eat almost anything. Small fish are rare;
most will weigh 15 to 30 pounds, and
fish up to 60-plus pounds can be caught
if you're lucky. Cobia are notorious for
tearing up equipment when landed
green, so fight the fish until it's tired
before you try to boat it.
The oddly named TRIPLETAIL is not
much of a sport fish, but it's got delicate,
snow-white meat that makes it a choice
fish for the cooler. Tripletail really have
I one tail, but the lobes of their dorsal and
l fins overlap the tail fin, creating the illu-


n of three tails (if you squint just right, and


you're drunk). Tripletail hunters
look for these fish around
|Cobia surface structure. Some good
examples: Marker pilings, crab
trap floats, a chunk of flotsam
out in the Gulf. Don't give up;
you may stop at 50 or more
trap floats before you spot a
tripletail. In cold weather, they
sometimes seem to vanish.
These fish tend to be seen near
the surface and are usually
sighted before casting. If the fish
sinks out of sight, cast anyway it probably
didn't go far. Toss a small shrimp or whitebait
with as little terminal tackle as possible, and


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 7


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 8


The past couple years have seen a huge
upswing in the number of FLOUNDER local
anglers are catching. Since they lie right on
the bottom, flounder are picky about where
they live. Sandy bottom near rocky areas is
ideal habitat; fish can also be found in the surf
or on mixed grass and sand bottom. Despite
their sluggish appearance, flounder can move
quite quickly to attack a bait. The best method
is to bounce or drag a shrimp or soft plastic
slowly across the bottom in good habitat. The
flounder around the nearshore reefs are often
bigger than the ones caught inshore. That's
because offshore you're more likely to run into
southern flounder, which can grow as large as
20 pounds (though one bigger than 5 pounds
is worth partying over). Inshore, Gulf flounder
are the more common fish, and they don't get
as large maybe 2 pounds. Flounder are
a commercial fishing standard and are very
good, but fish under 15 inches or so barely
have enough meat to be worth filleting.
BLACK DRUM are closely related to redfish
but don't have much of their sporty cousins'
vigor. A black drum fight is usually a minute
or two of hard pulling (no running) followed
by the fish surrendering to fate. Even more


inclined to scavenging
than reds, they will readily take day-old
dead shrimp or crabs off the bottom. Though
they're hardly sporting, black drum can be
entertaining, especially the bigger fish of 30
pounds or more (they can top 100). A good
way to hook into one of the big boys is to soak
half a blue crab on the bottom next to a bridge
piling. A photo of you holding it up will be
very impressive for the folks back home, who
don't know that it only fought for 90 seconds.
Juvenile drum up to about 5 pounds are fine
food fish; bigger ones get coarse and often
have muscle parasites.


BLUEFISH are rarely numerous enough to
target, but schools of smaller fish (aka chop-
pers) are often found around schools of bait in
spring and fall. These blues sometimes cruise


Sup and down the beaches, but there's little
incentive to surf fish for them as they do
in the Atlantic. Why? A 20-inch bluefish is a
pretty big one here; over there that's practi-
cally bait size. Oddly, a few big ones have
been taken out of Punta Gorda canals lately.
Fish for these guys like you would mackerel
throw a shiny artificial and reel it in fast.
As with macks, a bit of wire will increase your
landing ratio. Some people find the taste
of bluefish objectionable. Trimming off the
dark red meat and soaking the fillets in milk
overnight will help.
WHITING are a tasty little fish targeted by
two kinds of people: Those who want to have a
big fish fry,
and those
who want to
use them for
tarpon, cobia .
or snook bait.
Technically
called Gulf
kingfish,
whiting are
not much
sport but H
sure can fill
a cooler. Big
schools of
these fish
run the surf
all summer
and in winter can be found all through the
estuaries into the river mouths. A small jig
works very well, especially if tipped with a
chunk of shrimp. To catch a bunch, a castnet or
beach seine works even better. Most whiting
are small under a pound. Though bony, they
are delicious beer-battered and deep-fried.
The Rodney Dangerfield of saltwater sport
fishing, JACK CREVALLE get no respect. This
is mostly due to the fact that they're basically
inedible and were thought of for years as
trash fish. In today's catch-and-release world,
however, jacks need to be recognized for what
they are pound for pound, one of the
hardest-fighting and most spirited gamefish
in the world. Jacks are merciless predators,
slashing through baitfish schools and leaving


handfuls of dead and dying fish
in their wake. When they're in a
Whiting feeding frenzy, any bait is likely to
draw a strike; at other times, try
fishing a popper or other surface
lure, or a live bait under a float.
/ A small jack of 2 to 5 pounds will
fight like a trophy snook, and if you
hook one in the 20-pound range
you'll wonder why your tarpon isn't
jumping. They can grow to more
-than 50 pounds, and heaven help
IF you if you hook one that big. The
-:: smaller but very similar HORSE-
EYE JACK is also a common catch;
horse-eyes have a less blunt snout
and reach about 30 pounds but are
rare larger than 5 pounds.
The reason LADYFISH are looked down on
is that they're small. Related to tarpon and
bonefish
- two
of the
world's top
sport fish
- they
have as
much fight
as their
famous
cousins but
in a smaller
package. L
Another S Ladyfish
name for


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 9


this fish is ten-pounder, because that's what
you'll swear you've got on the other end
of the line. A hooked ladyfish often takes
to the air in a series of leaps that put most
other"gamefish"to shame. To get the most
out of these fish, scale your tackle down.
Don't use your redfish rig to catch ladies
- use an ultralight outfit. Little plastic
baits or spoons work great, as do small live
shrimp. Ladyfish are no good to eat but do "
make exceptional cutbait for redfish, snook,
tarpon and sharks (for big fish, just use the .
ladyfish whole).
Saltwater CATFISH are the least-wanted Z.
fish in Southwest Florida. They're seemingly 0
inescapable for many anglers, who weave a
tapes-
tries of
curses in
the air as
they reel in
catfish after
catfish. But
it doesn't
have to be
that way.
Catfish hunt
for edible
material
mainly
by scent.
No smell,
no catfish
(most of the
time). Try
artificial
Gafftopsail catfish if the cats
J are all up
in your
business. Southwest Florida actually has two
saltwater catfish species: HARD HEADS and
GAFFTOPSAILS. Gafftops are easily recog-
nized by their long fin extensions. Sometimes
gafftops will take an artificial lure fished near
a baitfish school. Because they are predator/
scavengers, gafftops are actually edible and
taste pretty good. Hardheads taste like boat
ramp muck. Most catfish caught are a pound or
so, but gafftops can get to about 8 pounds and
put up a decent fight on light tackle. Catfish
slime on your line will keep other fish from
biting, and catfish spines are
venomous and can put you in a
world of hurt. To be safe, just
cut the line close to the hook.
REEF FISH
Reef fish live in the Gulf, but
not everywhere generally,
you'll find them only near
structure. Hard limestone
bottom, springs, ledges,
wrecked boats or planes,
coral-encrusted rubble and
artificial reefs will all hold
these fish. Most reef fish stay
near the bottom; some, like
amberjack and barracuda,
prefer to live in the open water above the
reef itself. To legally take most reef fish, you
must use a non-offset circle hook and have a
dehooking tool available (see the regulations
on page 24-25 for more info).


Several species of grouper are among the
most popular fish in our area. GAG and RED
GROUPER are the most frequently caught.
BLACK GROUPER and SCAMP also can be
found. Other species are present but are either
small, rare or found only in very deep water.
All grouper are reef fish as adults. Juvenile
grouper up to a foot or so live in the protec-
tion of the estuaries before moving out to the


Red grouper


reefs as they grow larger. Gags generally live
in shallower water that the other species, so it
doesn't take as long a run into the Gulf to catch
them. In the cooler months, grouper move
closer to shore. Keeper-size gag can be caught
in water as shallow as 15 feet during winter,
and reds can be found in 40 feet instead of 80.
Black grouper and scamp are usually caught
by accident while fishing for gag or reds; both
prefer deeper water. All grouper will readily
take live or cut bait, usually fished with a
heavy sinker or jighead to get the bait to the
bottom quickly. Gag will also take big plugs
trolled over hard bottom areas; this works
best in winter when the fish are in shallower
water. Heavy tackle is normally used, because
if you don't get the fish off the bottom quickly,
it's likely to dive into a hidey-hole and cut you
off. If you get hung, keep pulling the fish
often wedge themselves in by flaring their gill
covers, and constant pressure will sometimes
pull them out. Once you've got the grouper
coming to the surface, you can settle in for the
fight. For some real fun, you can chum gags
to the surface and catch them on your snook
tackle. Grouper on the reefs average 3 to 5
pounds, though they can get much bigger.
Gags can get to 70-plus pounds, and black
grouper can push 100 pounds. Grouper are the
quintessential Florida table fish, very popular
in restaurants despite rampant fraud involving
serving a wide variety of fish as"Florida
grouper" because of the name recognition.
GOLIATH GROUPER are a protected species,
so no harvest is allowed. Unlike other grouper


species, Goliaths
can be found inshore in very large sizes. This is
because they mature at a much larger size than
other groupers the 150-pound fish living
under local bridges are still babies. Adult fish,
which can weigh 700 pounds or more, move
out into the Gulf. Some live in water less than
50 feet deep; others move into the crushing
depths where it's always night. Goliaths
sometimes will eat a hooked grouper or
snapper on some reefs, drawing the ire of
anglers. If this happens, pick up and move.
These giants were once harvested by spear-
fishermen for the seafood industry. Because
they are unafraid of divers, this practice
nearly wiped them out. They are now
fully protected by law, a situation which
fisheries managers are currently looking
at modifying. Regardless of whether
harvest someday becomes legal, Goliaths
are popular catch-and-release subjects for
those who want to catch a truly huge fish.
Specifically targeting Goliath grouper for
catch-and-release is OK in state waters but
illegal in federal waters (9 miles offshore
on this coast). If you're not sure if your fish is a
Goliath, look at the tail among our groupers,
only Goliaths have paddle-shaped tail fins.
The various snapper species are almost
as esteemed for the table as grouper.
MANGROVE SNAPPER (sometimes called
gray snapper) are the most commonly caught
species off Southwest Florida. These fish are
very plentiful inshore as juveniles, and can
be seen around almost any structure. Mangs


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 10


up to about 15 inches can be caught inshore;
as they mature, they move into the deeper
waters of the Gulf. Reefs, wrecks and rockpiles
in water from 10 to 200 feet often


Mangrove snapper


host swarms of
mangrove snapper. Other snapper species
also grow up inshore, but are rarely seen as
they are more secretive than juvenile mangs.
LANE, MUTTON and YELLOWTAIL SNAPPER
are more common in the Keys
than off our coast, but all these
species are out there. For anglers Great
willing to run out far enough, RED
SNAPPER can be found starting
in about 100 feet. As with most
other bright red fish, red snapper
are really creatures of deep water,
so deeper water will hold more and
larger fish. To get the fish feeding,
a chum block is always a good idea.
Snapper are smart and will often
refuse a baited hook, but chum
works on them a bit like alcohol
does on us: Their inhibitions are
lowered and they're easier to fool. Chum will
also bring them nearer to the surface, where
you can use lighter tackle because there's
less concern about getting snagged on the
bottom. Snapper will eat fish but seem to
prefer crustaceans. Sometimes it's hard to get
a shrimp past all the bait stealers; in those
cases, try a small crab. Mangroves are common
to about 3 pounds, and fish of over 10 pounds
can be caught. Yellowtail are smaller at 1 to
2 pounds. Big yellowtail, called flags, start at


about 3 pounds, and 6 pounds is a monster.
Lane snapper are even smaller, mostly under a
pound. Mutton snapper average bigger; 5 to 10
pounds is a good fish and 20 is
possible. Most red snapper off
our coast are about the size of
a mutton, though fish to 40
pounds are possible it'll
just take you all day to get
out to water deep enough. In
addition to these species, the
rare CUBERA SNAPPER can
also be found in our waters.
This giant up to 100
p ounds is a specialist,
feeding mostly on
crabs and spiny lobster.
You've got to really
want one of these fish
to use a whole lobster as bait.
GREATER AMBERJACK are punishing
fish to catch. Typically large and endowed
with great strength and endurance, fishing
for AJs is a test of stamina. Amberjack


live over reefs and wrecks starting at about
50 feet deep, with larger fish in deeper water.
The biggest fish, over 100 pounds, are rarely
seen in our area they prefer deeper water
than is out of easy reach on the Gulf coast.
Still, the 20- to 40-pound fish common off our
coast will put up a major fight. Many anglers
find that one AJ is about all they really want
to catch. These fish also come in smaller
versions: LESSER AMBERJACK, BANDED
RUDDERFISH and ALMACO JACKS are very


similar fish, but in a 5- to 10-pound package.
Amberjack will readily take large live baits, or
a dead bait that's been butterflied (with the
fillets cut free at the sides but left attached
at the head end). Vertical or butterfly jigs will
also take AJs, or you can try big well-built
topwater poppers. Commercial fishermen
pursue amberjack, which are a delightful if
underrated table fish.
Several species of porgies (pronounced
with a hard "g") call this area home. GRASS,
KNOBBED, RED and JOLTHEAD PORGIES
can be found on shallow and deep reefs off our
coast. Sheepshead are technically porgies as
well. As with many other reef species, juvenile
porgies live inshore, either on the grassflats or
p /


in the shelter of mangrove
roots. Most bottom fishermen welcome
porgies these fish are just as good to eat
as snapper though few target them. The
problem is getting to the big ones, which
prefer deeper water. Jolthead porgies up to
3 or 4 pounds are fairly abundant in waters
50 feet deep or less, and this species is the
most desirable. Porgies are not fish-eaters
and bite best on shrimp or squid. As with
other reef fish, you need to get them off the
bottom quickly or risk them diving for cover
and fouling the line.
Like porgies, white or KEY WEST GRUNTS
are seldom the goal but rarely unwelcome.
Grits and grunts, a Florida Cracker favorite,
makes good use of this fish's excellent flaky
white meat. As with porgies, grunts are not
fish-eaters and are usually caught on shrimp
or squid. Most white grunts will be a pound
or so, though big ones can top 10 pounds.
MARGATES are another grunt species you


might catch; they're good but not quite as
good as a white grunt. Other grunts are also
found here BLUE-STRIPED GRUNTS,
PIGFISH, SAILOR'S CHOICE but these
fish are mostly too small for consumption.
They do, however, make excellent bait for
any number of predatory species.
BLACK SEA BASS are not a common
catch here, though they're plentiful in the
Tampa Bay area. Sometimes you'll hook
one while fishing for other bottom fish, and
they're incidentally caught by those seeking
tripletail around crab traps (if you fish deep
they rarely rise to the surface). They're
not big fans of cutbait but will take shrimp


eagerly. Most fish weigh less than 2 pounds,
but they are outstanding on the table and
worth the trouble of cleaning.
GRAY TRIGGERFISH are also incidental reef
catches. With thick, leathery skin protecting all
the goodness inside, triggers are a challenge
to anyone trying to clean them. If you can
find someone to show you the technique, it's
worth learning the snowy meat is deli-
cious. Triggerfish eat crabs, sea urchins and





1.4 lD a:n5nME. ,l-'n S-'.n sA,

other reef invertebrates, and will readily take invertebrates, crushing their
shrimp or squid. Their feeding style is similar ized teeth in their bizarrely
to a sheepshead's crush, spit and Shrimp is usually the best ba


own right. Over the reefs, barracuda are strong
fighters. On the flats of the Keys, they also are
notorious for incredible jumps. Unfortunately,
'cudas are rarely caught inshore in Southwest
Florida. Enticing a barracuda to
strike can be a challenge. Move-
ment and flash are the triggers. Try
ripping a spoon or a brightly colored
tube lure rapidly across the water.
Using the front half of a freshly
'cuda-snipped snapper works, but
be aware this is illegal in federal
waters (reef fish can't be used as
bait in these areas). Wire leader is a
requirement if you want to consis-
tently land these toothy torpedoes.
LION FISH are an invasive exotic
species in the warm Atlantic and
have become very common in some
areas, particularly the Bahamas
and Bermuda. In the past couple


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 11


years, lionfish have been found in the Gulf
(though not yet in Charlotte Harbor). These
Pacific natives have no predators in our area
and insatiable appetites potentially a very
bad combination. They rarely take a baited
hook but have no fear of divers and are easily
speared. If you see one, do what you can to
kill it. The spines are highly venomous, but the
meat is very good.
PELAGIC SPECIES
These fish live in open water often very
deep open water. Deepwater species are not
often caught near the coast here. Unlike in
South Florida where blue water is a mile or
two offshore, you have to get out past 100
miles to find truly deep water off Southwest
Florida.
KING MACKEREL are a migratory species
of open waters. In the spring, kingfish fanatics
await the Spanish mackerel run, because they
know the kings will be just a few weeks behind


them. As with their smaller relatives, king
mackerel are fast-swimming fish eaters with
teeth designed to scissor a bait neatly in two.
Their method of attack is often to chomp off
the back half of a smaller fish, then turn and
gobble the front half as it starts to sink. That's
why many kingfish anglers use a stinger rig,
which features a second hook near the bait's
tail to nab a short-striking king. These fish are
known for making line-sizzling runs, and you'll
need a reel with a quality drag. Schools of
smaller kingfish sometimes will follow baitfish
pods well up the Harbor, but that's fairly rare
occurrence. Most fish stay a mile or two off the
beaches, but the bigger ones often run closer
to shore. Anglers on the Venice Municipal Pier
catch good-sized kings regularly when the fish
are running. Trolling a lure or rigged dead bait
is a good way to hook a kingfish, or drift a live
blue runner or mullet. As with other toothy
fish, wire leaders are more or less mandatory.
Use diving birds to locate the fish for the most
success. Schooling kingfish range from 5 to 20
pounds; big fish of up to 80 pounds are more
solitary and sometimes patrol the edges of a
school of smaller fish.
CERO MACKEREL are an uncommon fish
on the Gulf coast. They look much like Spanish
macks but are usually found alone rather than
in schools. Cero prey on small fish and squid.
You might catch one by accident while fishing
near bait schools. Cero average about 20 inches
but can grow to 4 feet.
WAHOO are also in the mackerel family,
but are more of an open-ocean species. They
are not common catches off our coast because
the water is too shallow for
their liking a run of 80 or
100 miles is required to get to
their preferred depths. When
baitfish are schooling thickly
in the Gulf, sometimes a few
wahoo will crash the party in
water as shallow as 30 feet.
Catching one can be tough. The
same methods that catch king-
fish will catch wahoo, but you
need a lot more luck because
there are fewer of them out
there. Nearshore wahoo are


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 12


-- _-
.-








usually on the smaller side 30 pounds or
less. Big ones in the ocean depths can reach
about 150 pounds.
DOLPHIN (or mahi, to avoid confusion
with Flipper) are another fish of open, deep
waters. Very young juveniles, called peanuts,
can be found in water as shallow as 30 feet
during the warm summer months. Small
dolphin form thick schools, which become
looser as the fish mature. Mahi from 5
to 10 pounds are called chicken dolphin.
Eventually, once they reach 20 pounds or
so, dolphin give up schooling altogether
and travel alone or in pairs. The fish may
reach nearly 80 pounds. Maximum size is
attained quickly these fish grow fast and
die young, with 4 years being a very long
life. Dolphin are drawn to almost any sort of
floating object weed lines, tree trunks,
even your boat if you drift long enough. If
dolphin are present under flotsam, the golden
flash from their metallic sides should be
easy to spot. Any small fish or shrimp will be


eagerly taken by schoolies. Once you
ahoo hook one, the school will usually stay
S with the hooked fish, enabling you
to catch a double- or triple-header if
you've got people to man the rods. Big
fish are usually caught by trolling or
drifting. A good table fish. The electric
golden-green color of a freshly boated
dolphin fades rapidly to plain silvery
gray once the fish is dead. Many of the
smaller dolphin caught off our coast
are actually POMPANO DOLPHIN,
a closely related but dwarf species
that grows to only about 5 pounds. Pompano
dolphin have a more rounded ventral profile;
it's more or less straight on a common dolphin.


BONITO more accurately, little tunny -
are a hard-fighting small tuna that will readily
take a hook. During spring and fall, these fish
follow schools of bait up and down our coast
in water as shallow as 20 feet. Often, these
fish are not given the respect other tunas are.
This is because most anglers use tackle
too heavy for bonito to really shine. On
uin scaled-down equipment, their sporting
qualities become more apparent.
Bonito are a good fly fishing species.
Live or dead fish, or a fast-moving jig
or spoon, will entice bonito to the
hook. Although edible, their flesh
is darker and fishier than many of
their larger relatives. These qualities
make them a popular baitfish for
shark anglers, and seekers of big
blue-water game often rig tunny
for trolling. Average fish are 3 to 8
pounds, and they can reach nearly 30.


Our other small tuna, the BLACKFIN TUNA, is
more highly regarded. Blackfin tuna are usually
found in deep water but may come farther
inshore during bait runs, sometimes even into
the Harbor itself. Still, a blackfin in water under
50 feet is a rarity. As with other tunas, they
have a strong tendency to school. When the fish
are crashing bait, they will often hit just about
anything in the water. Otherwise, trolling a squid
imitation is a good method of locating blackfin.
Just as spirited as their legendary bigger rela-
tives, blackfin tuna put up a strong fight on light
tackle. Heavy equipment will overpower them
quickly. A much better table fish than bonito,
blackfin are excellent grilled, pan-seared or as
sashimi. Most fish will be under 15 pounds, with
a maximum of about 40 pounds. Other tunas -
YELLOWFIN, BIGEYE and BLUEFIN do live
in the Gulf but rarely come within 100 miles of
the Southwest Florida coast.
SAILFISH are occasional summer visitors to
our area. As with other deep-


water fish, pods of bait are the reason
ma they come near shore. Sails are infrequent
catches in water less than 100 feet deep
but are sometimes taken by those seeking
kingfish with big live baits. It's not
unheard of to catch one on the inside of
Boca Grande Pass, which is technically in
Charlotte Harbor. Unfortunately, if you do
catch one in the Harbor, no one will ever
believe you (get it on video!). Most Gulf
sailfish are in the 30- to 60-pound range,
though fish over 100 pounds are possible.
These fish can be eaten, but they're not
very good best to release them. Bigger
billfishes swordfish and blue and white marlin
are even more rare in shallow water. If you go
out into the open Gulf, billfish are available year-
round in water deeper than 500 feet.
SHARKS & RAYS
Sharks are misunderstood predators which
generate both fear and fascination. These
ancient fish have skeletons of cartilage instead
of bone. Due to intensive overfishing, mostly
for their fins, shark populations are in trouble
around the world. Because of this pressure,
there are strict limits on recreational sharkers:
All but a handful of species have a 54-inch
minimum limit (exclusions: blacktip, blacknose,
Atlantic sharpnose and bonnethead), and an
angler can keep only one shark per day. Sharks
excrete urea through their skin, and urea
contamination can quickly ruin the meat if the
shark is poorly handled. If your shark is destined
for the grill, gut the fish and get the meat on ice
as rapidly as possible. Contrary to popular belief,
shark guts thrown overboard will
not scare away other sharks. Sharks'
sailfish razor teeth will cut monofilament
instantly, so use wire leader. A shark's
jaws are made of dense, bone-like
cartilage. Because of this, circle hooks
can be hard to remove from the bony
jaw. However, many anglers tend to
gut-hook sharks if they use J-hooks.
File off the barb of a circle hook to
the fish in the jaw but which can be
removed without causing additional
harm. When you're releasing a shark,


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if the hook won't come out easily cut the wire Blacknose
as short as possible. Many anglers tend to use shark
giant baits and hooks for sharks, but you'll catch
more fish on smaller baits (no bigger than half
a pound) and smaller hooks (6/0 to 10/0). By
the way,"sand sharks" do not exist it's a lazy
angler's term for any shark caught on the
beach. .. ... '1


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 13

M___ Atlantic sharpnose Nurse shark


Bull shark


BULL SHARKS are a fairly common species in
Southwest Florida. Unlike other sharks, bulls
will often swim into pure fresh water areas
and can be caught far up the rivers. All sharks
are opportunistic feeders, but bull sharks are
among the least selective. Because of this,
their meat is bit gamey. Whole or cut mullet
or stingray make good bull shark bait. Juvenile
fish to about 40 inches are frequently caught
inshore; bigger fish are usually found in the
Gulf but can and do show up in the shallows.
Common to 6 or 7 feet, and big females can
grow to 10 feet and 500 pounds.
BLACKTIP and SPINNER SHARKS are often
confused. Both are excellent gamefish, putting
up a strong fish and often leaping clear of the
water. Both usually prey on smaller baitfish
like sardines and herring. And both are very


good eating fish. You need to know two
differences: First, only a spinner shark has
black tips on all the fins, including the anal
fin. Second, while blacktip sharks have no
minimum size, spinners must be 54 inches
to keep. Blacktips average 4 or 5 feet and
40 to 50 pounds; spinners average about 6
feet and 100 pounds.
BLACKNOSE SHARKS are small,
averaging about 30 inches and growing to
4 feet and about 40 pounds. They often gather
in schools, and these schools are often found
associated with pods of baitfish in water less
than 30 feet deep. The underside of the snout is
grayish or dusky, making it easy to distinguish
from other inshore sharks. Blacknose sharks are
an excellent target for light-tackle anglers.
ATLANTIC SHARPNOSE SHARKS are
another small schooling species. They rarely
grow larger than 3 feet and can be found in
loose schools of two to 50, mostly in the estu-
aries and the surf zone. Usually, but not always,
these fish have small whitish spots sprinkled
on the upper body. As with other small sharks,
they eat mainly small baitfish. Anglers seeking
large sharks sometimes have their baits stolen
bite by bite by blacknose or sharpnose sharks.
LEMON SHARKS are protected from harvest,
because they school in winter on nearshore

I Lemon shark o


reefs and ledges, making them vulnerable to
commercial fishing. They aren't the rarest shark
in Southwest Florida, but their numbers are
fewer than they should be. Lemon sharks are
often seen in shallow water on the
grassflats, where they pursue their
favored prey, mullet. These sharks
commonly attain 8 feet or longer
and can grow to 400 pounds.
NURSE SHARKS are rarely
sought by anglers because of
their sluggish fight a bit like
a waterlogged tree trunk. They
will scavenge, but their main
diet is crabs and lobster. Any fish
that mostly eats crustaceans is
going to be an excellent table
fish, and nurse sharks are no
exception. Crabs and lobster are
most common on reefs; therefore, so are nurse
sharks. These are big fish, averaging 7 to 9 feet
and 150 to 220 pounds.


Our most commonly caught shark, the
BONNETHEAD or SHOVELNOSE, is often
confused with a juvenile hammerhead.
Bonnetheads have a much more rounded
snout profile, though. Most bonnetheads are


less than 4 feet long and weigh less than 15
pounds. These little guys specialize in eating
shrimp and crabs, though they will take what
they can get. As with other crustacean feeders,
the meat is excellent.
Two larger members of the hammerhead
clan also show up in our area: SCALLOPED
and GREAT HAMMERHEADS. Both are much
bigger than bonnetheads. Scalloped hammer-
heads average 6 to 8 feet and can grow to 14
feet and 400 pounds. Great hammerheads are
huge, averaging over 10 feet and reaching
20 feet and 1,000 pounds. Hammerheads eat
squid, mackerel and other pelagic creatures,
but they like stingrays when they can get
them. Great hammerheads also are known
to attack hooked or just-released tarpon.
Hammerheads are uncommon and getting
rarer with each passing year, which is why the


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state passed a law in 2011 prohibiting
their harvest. The largest hammerheads
to visit our coast are females, and they .
usually arrive gravid, ready to give birth.
SANDBAR SHARKS live in shallow
water elsewhere but in our area are a
fairly rare offshore species, usually found
near the bottom at 60 feet or deeper.
They prey on pelagic and deepwater
reef fish. 6 feet and 100 pounds is about
average, though they can grow to more
than 200 pounds.
Two species of mako sharks patrol the open
Gulf: SHORTFIN and LONGFIN MAKOS. These
species are difficult to tell apart, but longfin
makos are rarer and harvest is prohibited.


shallow as 6 inches. If you step on one
Tiger shark while wading, it will arch its tail up and
w drive a venomous barb into your leg. To
S lessen the pain, apply hot water (don't
scald yourself, though). To avoid the sting,
don't walk while wading in ray habitat -
shuffle your feet instead. The ATLANTIC
STINGRAY, with a maximum disc width
of about 14 inches, is smaller and more
common than the SOUTHERN STINGRAY,
which can grow to 6 feet across, which in
reaching 20 feet and 3,000 pounds though turn in smaller and more common than the
12 feet and 600 pounds in closer to average. ROUGHTAIL STINGRAY at a maximum of 10
SMALLTOOTH SAWFISH are not likely to ...
be mistaken for anything else. Once common Southern stingray
all along the Gulf coast, sawfish were wiped
out in most areas and now are found regu-
larly only in Southwest Florida and the Keys. 'L


r Spotted eagle ray


Shortfin makos are the fastest shark in the
sea, capable of swimming at 20 mph. This,
combined with their tendency to leap when
hooked, makes them a world-class sport fish.
Mako prey on tuna, swordfish and other pelagic
species, and are themselves similar in taste and
texture to swordfish. Their prey lives in deep
water, and so do the sharks; don't expect to
see these fish in water less than 200 feet deep.
Makos are big fish, averaging 8 feet and 150
pounds but reaching nearly 1,500 pounds.
TIGER SHARKS are very rare off the South-
west Florida, except during April and May
when they follow sea turtles, their favored
prey, coming to our beaches to lay their eggs.
Even then, tigers are never common, which is
why they can't be legally harvested. Besides
sea turtles, tiger sharks will eat sea birds, fish,
other sharks and all sorts of trash. Tiger sharks
spend a lot of time near the water's surface.
These are truly massive fish, capable of


Sawfish grow to huge sizes fish larger than
15 feet were once relatively common, and
their distinctive saw-toothed bills can still
be seen in some of our older bait shops and
waterfront restaurants. Nowadays these fish
are fully protected. As an endangered species,
specifically fishing for them is unlawful, and
they must be released unharmed if acciden-
tally hooked. They'll eat almost anything they
find on the bottom. Few giants exist today,
but juvenile sawflsh are seen and sometimes
caught in muddy or sandy shallows.
Stingrays lie on the bottom in water as


feet across. All three species feed on bottom-
dwelling mollusks, worms and crustaceans, and
all will readily take a hook baited with dead
shrimp or cutbait. Stingrays use their broad
bodies to suction down to the bottom, and
reeling one in can be difficult. The wings are
edible, each yielding a top and bottom fillet.
There are several species of rays that
swim in open water. COWNOSE RAYS,
sometimes incorrectly called bay
rays, are often seen in dense schools,
sometimes numbering in the thou-
sands. These fish love to eat shrimp and
will take a hook. They are strong and
can be a lot of fun on light tackle, but
are not often targeted. Unlike stingrays,
cownose rays are active swimmers and
rarely lie on the bottom. But they do N
have a short venomous barb, and should
be handled carefully.
SPOTTED EAGLE RAYS are not a
common species. They almost never
take a hook, but can be seen sometimes


leaping clear of the water, which is impressive
for a fish 6 feet wide. They're not legal to keep.
MANTA RAYS, which also leap, get much
larger than other rays up to 15 feet across.
Mantas used to be a common sight along the
coast but have grown rare in recent decades,
and also are not legal to harvest.


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 14


V -o


. .







ODDITIES
There are lots of unusual,
unique and just plain strange fish
that call the Southwest Florida
coast home. Here are just a few.

SEA ROBINS are sometimes
caught by anglers fishing shrimp
on hard bottom or on deeper
grassflats. Almost all are juve-
niles under 8 inches; bigger fish
live in deep water. Inedible.
The GULF TOADFISH is
sometimes caught on shrimp or
pieces of shrimp fished around
pilings, usually by anglers trying
to catch sheepshead or pinfish.
This fish has a big, scary-looking
mouth full of sharp teeth but is
otherwise harmless. They can
be eaten, but there's not really
enough meat to bother with.
LIZARDFISH are common Sout
on sandy bottoms and will take
a hook baited with shrimp or
cutbait. Usually under a foot long, lizardfish
should be handled carefully their numerous
teeth are sharp like tiny needles. Inedible.
SOUTHERN PUFFERS often steal baits meant
for other fish. These common fish love shrimp
and will sometimes take lures or flies that look
like shrimp. They are also aggressive and will
attack baits out of sheer meanness. Be careful
dehooking them; their buck teeth can easily cut
through bone. Puffers are usually 10 inches or
less but can get twice that size. The flesh is prized
in some cultures but the internal organs are
toxic, so it's best to not to eat these fish.
PORCUPINEFISH and COWFISH don't
often take a hook, but are sometimes seen
dead on the shore. These fish are highly
susceptible to red tide, which sometimes kills
them by the thousands. Both species are some-
times dried and sold as beachfront souvenirs.
ATLANTIC SPADEFISH are sometimes
mistaken for sheepshead because they have
a similar pattern. Unlike sheepies, though,
spadefish have little food value and are usually
caught by accident. Spadefish form schools of
several hundred fish. They will sometimes take a


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shrimp, but their main diet is tiny invertebrates,
sponges, jellyfish tentacles and plankton.
Spadefish usually are less than a pound, but fish
to 5 pounds are sometimes seen.
The GUITARFISH looks like a cross between
a ray and a shark. These odd fish are some-
times caught by anglers in the surf, usually on
shrimp. They get to about 3 feet long and have
no sport or food value.
MORAY EELS are sometimes caught by
reef fishermen using cutbait for grouper or
snapper. Morays have slimy skins, sharp teeth
and snappish personalities, so if you hook one
it's best to just cut the line as close to the hook
as you can.
AMERICAN EELS were once abundant in
local estuaries and river mouths but are now
quite uncommon. They will occasionally take
a bait fished on the bottom. Although edible,
they should be released due to their rarity.

FRESHWATER SPECIES
The rivers that feed Charlotte Harbor are
also full offish. In addition to the rivers, there
are many miles of freshwater canals and thou-


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 15


sands of small ponds (though only a few larger
lakes) in our area. All of these places are home
to numerous gamefish.

LARGEMOUTH BASS, the largest members
of the sunfish family, were once Florida's claim
to fishing fame. Long before saltwater angling
was a popular pastime, Florida-strain bass (we
have our own subspecies, which grows bigger
and faster than northern bass) were drawing
anglers from around the country and around
the world. Although the descendents of these
fish have been stocked in waters all over the
globe, Florida bass fishing is still first-rate.



















Central Florida boasts
a number of large lakes where fast boats are
the norm. In our part of the state, most bass
fishing is a bit more relaxed, because we don't
have big lakes like that. Still, even ponds of
less than an acre can hold bass of surprisingly
large size. More than one angler fishing a
neighborhood water feature has caught a fish
of over 10 pounds, and you could be next. An
average catch is more like 1 or 2 pounds. Bass
feed on a huge variety of aquatic life cray-
fish, frogs, small water snakes, fish and even
ducklings are part of their diets. Plastic worms
are a favorite bait, and in our tannin-stained
waters dark colors work best (purple is a killer).
Spinnerbaits and topwater plugs are also
favorite lures. For livebaiters, golden shiners
are the standard. Small sunfish also are good
bait (to stay legal, you have to catch your own
on hook and line), as are crayfish. Although
bass are edible, their flesh often has a muddy
flavor. If you want to eat freshwater fish, the
next species is a better bet.
BLACK CRAPPIE, known locally as speckled
perch or just specks, are probably the best-
eating freshwater fish in our area. The mild
white flesh has earned them the name sac au
lait (sack of milk) in Louisiana. Unlike most
other sunfish, crappie prefer cooler water,
which is why the peak fishing season is the
middle of winter. When it's warmer, they can
still be caught it's a matter of finding the
deepest spots, where the water is coolest.
Specks are dedicated predators of smaller fish
and rarely take other baits, though they can be
caught on minnow-imitating lures. The basic
method is to tie on a jighead or feather jig and


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 16


put a minnow on the hook. This is
often fished on a long cane pole, and
sometimes crappie anglers will have
dozens of rods bristling out all around
the boat. Big ones (they can get
larger than 2 pounds) sometimes take
crankbaits meant for bass. Crappie
are narrow-bodied fish and difficult
to fillet without leaving behind a
lot of meat, so most fish are scaled,
beheaded, gutted and defined (in
that order), then battered or dusted
with flour and fried whole. Eating
around the bones is a pain, but that's the best
way to minimize waste.
There are several smaller members of the
sunfish family in our waters BLUEGILL,
REDEARS (SHELLCRACKER), SPOTTED
SUNFISH and WARMOUTH. Most of thesefish
are hand-size or smaller, but they make up for
small size with their willingness to bite. They
will take most small baits, including waxworms,
grass shrimp, chunks of nightcrawler and
minnows. Bluegills are the most common,
and the most aggressive feeders. Bluegills are
also the most likely to be caught on artificial
lures; they readily attack small spinnerbaits,
flyrod poppers and even miniature versions of
popular hardbaits. Small soft plastic grubs will
take bluegills also, and these "quieter" lures
are also eaten by the other species. Though
less eager to hit an artificial, shellcrackers pull
harder. To tell shellcrackers and bluegills apart,
look for a coppery patch on the forehead (a
feature of adult male bluegill) or a red edge
to the flap on the gill cover (on most, but not
all, shellcrackers). Spotted sunfish are smaller
and have distinctive coloration, very different
from their cousins. Warmouth are even easier
to identify, with their much larger mouths and
stocky bodies. There are no rock bass in Florida;
warmouth take their place. All of these fish are
usually prepared using the method described
for crappie.
PICKEREL, a miniature version of the
northern pike, are popular sportfish that are
strangely uncommon in this area. Despite
being plentiful both to our north and south,
pickerel are a rare catch here. In areas where
they live, they are often caught by bass anglers


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 17


using small lures in or near vegetation. Pick-
erel are ambush predators, hiding in tangles of
plants and darting out to grab small fish swim-
ming by. They're good to eat but very bony, so
they're usually released.
GAR and BOWFIN are members of an
ancient group of fishes, which explains their
primitive appearance. These fish can survive
in stagnant, polluted waters that would be
fatal to most other species. Aggressive preda-
tors of smaller fish, gar are the bane of many
bass fishermen because they grab their shiners
and kill them. Gar are hard to hook because of
their bony mouths, but they are still frequently
caught. Although many anglers call their
catches alligator gar, that is a species of the
Mississippi River drainage and there are none
here. We have FLORIDA GAR (stocky with a
relatively short snout; grows to about 30 inches)
and LONG NOSE GAR (more slender with a long
snout; can reach nearly 6 feet). Bowfin, also
called mudfish, have more catholic diets and
often take lures meant for bass. Despite being
looked down on by many, bowfin are tenacious
fighters and much more entertaining on the line
than a bass of the same size.


In many parts of the country, freshwater
catfish are a favorite angling target. We're
spoiled for choice here and catfish are often
overlooked, but these bewhiskered fish are
plentiful and tasty. WHITE and CHANNEL
CATFISH are both silvery or grayish and are
common in the freshwater sections of the
Peace, Myakka and Caloosahatchee rivers.


YELLOW and BROWN BULL-
HEADS are a bit smaller and Blue ti
darker in coloration. All catfish
bite best at night or on overcast
days. Baits that smell strongly are
used to draw catfish, which hunt
by scent. Sometimes anglers use
baits that are rotten or putrid.
In most cases, baits that are
fresher will work better. Good
choices include chicken livers,
smelly cheeses, dead shrimp and
prepared blood baits.
EXOTIC FRESHWATER FISH
Our warm waters are an inviting
habitat for a number of nonna-
tive fish, most of which were
introduced by accident (fish farm
ponds being flooded and spilling
over into other waters) or through
state-sanctioned programs.
Some are also the descendents
of aquarium fish released by
thoughtless owners.
Various African and South
American cichlids have made themselves
at home in southern Florida. In Southwest
Florida, the most common of these is the
BLUE TILAPIA. If you see the bottom of a
freshwater pond or canal pockmarked by
pits 2 to 3 feet wide, tilapia are the probable
cause those are their nests. Although
sunfish also nest this way, tilapia nests are
usually spaced closely together. Tilapia eat
a lot of plant material (in fact, they were
intentionally released as vegetation control)
but will also take meaty foods at least some-
times. They can be caught on breadballs and
worms, and sometimes will hit an artificial
lure or small dark fly. These fish are delicious,
and fisheries managers would like you to kill
every one you catch. In fact, practicing catch-
and-release with this and most other exotic
species is technically illegal.
MAYAN CICH LIDS, a brightly colored and
aggressive species, did poorly in the 2010
freezes and are just now rebuilding their popu-
lations locally. It's only a matter of time before
this is again a common fish here. Mayans will hit


almost any small lure and also like worms and
small fish. They are much stronger fighters than
native panfish of similar size. Many cichlids -
OSCARS, BLACK ACARA, JAGUAR GUAPOTE,
MIDAS CICHLIDS, SPOTTED TILAPIA and a
whole host of other species are common in
the canals of Naples and throughout the Ever-
glades. All are cold-sensitive, and our regular
winter chill is probably sufficient
to keep these fish from becoming p.
established here. *
Some anglers who have heard
of the incredible PEACOCK BASS
fishery in Florida will be disap-
pointed to learn that there are
none in this area. Before the
state stocked these fish to control Grass c
other exotic species, they care-
fully evaluated the potential for
them to spread beyond the Miami-Dade canal
systems. Peacocks die in water colder than
62 degrees, so these amazing gamefish can't
survive here year-round. It's worth the trip
south to target them. Heck, back when you


had to go to Venezuela for peacocks, it was
still worth the trip.
GRASS CARP are the largest fish you're likely
to find in freshwater canals. These fish, which
are triploid (sterile), are stocked intentionally in
public waters to reduce vegetation overgrowth.
There's no point in keeping them, since they
taste terrible, and it's illegal anyway.
-- a-1,11m r


That's a lot of information, but there's a
lot more to be said about each of these fish
species. To learn more about the fishes of
Southwest Florida, read WaterLine every week.
If WaterLine doesn't come in your newspaper,
call 941-206-1000 to subscribe.


Serving the Area Boater since 2003

We're ready-We're willing-We're Abel.


rHO-IDA
Mno4x7 InaG


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Abel's Marine
7341 Sawyer Circle, Port Charlotte, FL 33981
941-698-4006


_R I N E E





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IDa e nmf ln n l I l l ll


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 18


Your very first day on Charlotte Harbor


By Capt. Ralph Allen

As you prepare for your first-ever Charlotte
Harbor fishing trip, you're about to discover
that Southwest Florida is truly a fisherman's
paradise. Boasting a year-round fishery which
spans more than 200 square miles of water, this
huge, rich estuary is home to literally hundreds
of species offish, including such popular and
sporty species as snook, redfish, tarpon, cobia,
sharks, snappers and more. Here are a few hints
to help you get started on your adventure.
Charlotte Harbor is huge in size, but most of
it is not very deep. Newcomers often comment
that their biggest shock when comparing
Charlotte Harbor to their home waters "up
north" is how shallow it is here and how
easy it is to go aground, even in relatively
small boats. Sandbars that are miles in length
lie just beneath the surface on both sides of
the Harbor, and it's possible to wade out for
hundreds of yards from the shoreline in many
places. Navigation is further complicated by
the fact that the water level changes with the
tides, sometimes as much as 2 or 3 feet up or
down in just a few hours. To minimize your
shallow-water troubles, do these two things
before you head out: First, spend some serious
time scrutinizing a chart, either on paper or
online, to get an idea of the lay of the land.
Second, invest in a good pair of polarized
sunglasses. Polarized sunglasses do an amazing
job of reducing glare, and with a pair perched
on the bridge of your nose you'll often be able
to spot the subtle changes in water color that
signal the location of shallower water.
There are hundreds of species of fish that
live in Charlotte Harbor, of which nearly 100


are regularly encountered by anglers. These
fish come in a variety of shapes, sizes and
colors. Some are good to eat and some are not
so good. Some have teeth, fins or stingers that
can inflict damage to a careless fisherman.
Most are subject to harvest regulations, which
can include both minimum and maximum size
limits, bag limits, closed seasons and special
tackle requirements. Learning to identify all
these fish and obey the myriad regulations can
at first appear to be an overwhelming task,
especially considering that most of us moved
here from areas where there are nowhere near
as many species of fish but it can be done.
You can make it easy on yourself by prac-
ticing catch-and-release fishing there are
very few regulations to worry about, since
most of the rules apply only to the harvest of
fish. Get a fishing license at a tackle shop or at
one of the county tag offices, and you can hit
the water without worrying about too much
else. While you're getting your fishing license,
ask for a copy of the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commision's fishing regulations
booklet; if a printed copy is not available, visit
http://bit.ly/xMjJVD to view the rules online.
Fish identification can be a challenge for a
newcomer, so it may be a good idea to buy a
fish ID guide at the tackle shop while you're
buying the license. You might not want to
carry a fish book with you on your boat, so
bookmark http://bit.ly/wU9pLb for a fairly
comprehensive fish identification guide that
you can access from your cell phone while
you've got the fish in front of you. (Of course,
most of that information is also in the guide
you're holding right now.) Finally, buy a fish
dehooking tool and learn to use it, preferably


without removing the fish from the water. This
minimizes the damage done to the fish and to
the angler during the unhooking process.
So, you've bought some tackle, picked up
some bait, spent time looking at a chart,
and you're ready to go on that first fishing
trip. Now what? Charlotte Harbor offers so
many places to fish that you could spend a
lifetime trying to hit every possible spot.
Making matters more complicated, factors
such as tides, weather, and time of year can
make certain spots or techniques more or
less productive a location that produces
redfish on a falling tide may not hold any on
an incoming tide, and that location might only
have appreciable numbers of fish from August
to December. Your best bet is to make your first
trip or two on Charlotte Harbor with someone
who's already familiar with the Harbor. This
can be accomplished by hiring the services of
a fishing guide, or by finding a buddy who's
fished here before and offering him a ride.
If your very first trip is going to be solo, then
there are a few tried-and-true things you can do
to have a chance at success. One would be to get
out on the flats in 2 to 4 feet of water and drift
with a shrimp suspended beneath a float in
areas where seagrass is visible on the bottom.
If you do you'll almost certainly catch some fish,
though I won't guarantee what kind. Be careful
to do this only if your boat's draft is shallow
enough that you won't damage the grass,
which is vital habitat for many species. Another
option is to anchor and fish alongside one of
the artificial reefs in the Harbor. The largest
and most popular inshore reef is the"Bridge
Reef" located approximately a mile-and-a-half
southwest of the mouth of Alligator Creek,


BASIC ANGLING ETHICS
When they're having fun, sometimes fishermen
forget the basics. Our fish and our waters are a
shared resource, so be good to them we are th-
stewards, after all. Don't take fish out of season or
over the limit. Take your trash home and keep it
out of the water. Respect your fellow boaters and
anglers. Obey manatee and no-wake zones. IfyoL
get hung up on a mangrove or someone's dock,
retrieve your gear if at all possible. Do your part, c r,
fishing can be fun for everyone.

near the northeast corner of the main body of
Charlotte Harbor. This reef almost always holds
at least a few fish, but success requires that you
drop your anchor outside the reef boundaries
so it doesn't hang on the concrete rubble which
comprises the reef. You should also be prepared
to tie on new rigs to replace those that you'll
lose to snags in the reef.
Even anglers who have fished here for years
are still constantly learning new things Char-
lotte Harbor is just that kind of place. Don't be
afraid to ask questions, and read WaterLine every
Thursday for more helpful articles to help you
become a successful Southwest Florida angler.
Capt. Ralph Alien runs the King Fisher Fleet
of sightseeing tour boats, deep sea fishing
charter boats and back bay guide boats located
at Fishermen's Village Marina in Punta Gordti
He is an award-winning outdoor writer and
photographer and is a past president of the
Florida Outdoor Writers Association He can f
reached by phone at 941-639-2628 or by cimont
at Captain@KingFisherFleet.com for boating o0
fishing information or with questions you t iioit
to see answered in WaterLine.


dft441





,1 E vlt iusuuunmu, .,, ,,,. 2013 Annual I


Do I need a license to fishbP


The short answer: Probably, unless
you're under 16 years old or a Florida
resident over 65 years old (you'll have
to prove it, so keep proof of age and
address with you, or you can get a
no-cost fishing certificate from your
county tax collector's office).
But there's a long list of exceptions
from the license requirement.
You don't need a license to fish if:
You are a Florida resident certified as
totally and permanently disabled and
you possess a Florida Resident Disabled
Person Hunting and Fishing Certificate.
You are a resident who is a member of
the Armed Forces of the United States,
you are not stationed in this state, and
you are home on leave for 30 days or less,
upon submission of orders.
You are a resident who is fishing with
live or natural bait, using poles or lines
that are not equipped with a fishing-
line-retrieval mechanism, and you are
fishing for noncommercial purposes in
your home county. However, you must
have a valid fishing license to fish by any
method in a fish management area. This
does not apply to any form of netting,
nor to shellfish, lobster, crabs or shrimp.
You have been accepted as a client for
developmental disabilities services by
the Department of Children and Family
Services. The department must furnish
proof to such clients.
You are fishing during an FWC-estab-
lished free fishing day.
The following exemptions apply to
only freshwater anglers:
You fish in your county of residence
on your homestead or the homestead of
your spouse or minor child, or if you are a
minor child fishing on the homestead of
your parent.


You are fishing in a fish pond of 20
acres or less which is located entirely
within the private property of its
owner. A fish pond is a man-made pond
constructed for the primary purpose of
fishing, entirely within the property lines
of the owner and with no surface water
connection to public waters.
You are fishing in a fish pond of
20 acres or more, whose owner has
purchased a fish pond license at a fee of
$3 per surface acre.
You possess a Resident Freshwater
Commercial Fishing License.
The following exemptions apply only
to saltwater anglers:
You fish from a for-hire vessel (guide,
charter, party boat) that has a valid
vessel license.
You fish from a vessel, the operator of
which has a valid vessel license issued in
the name of the operator of the vessel.
You fish for recreational purposes from
a pier with a valid pier saltwater fishing
license.
You have a valid saltwater products
license.
You fish for mullet in fresh water
and you have a valid Florida freshwater
fishing license.
You are a resident who is saltwater
fishing from land or a structure fixed to
land who has been determined eligible
for the food stamp, temporary cash
assistance, or Medicaid Program by the
Department of Children and Family
Services. Proof of identification and a
benefit issuance or program identifica-
tion card issued by DCFS or the Agency for
Health Care Administration must be on
your person when fishing.
Until August 2009, Florida residents
saltwater fishing from shore or any land-
based structure didn't need a license. Now


you do, but the license is free. However,
note that since you need a license, you
will need a lobster or snook permit if you
want to harvest those species in season.
The shore fishing license covers wade
fishing, but only if you don't take a boat
to your wading location. That means if
you take the ferry to Palm Island and then
fish from the beach, you need a regular
saltwater license. If you already have
a regular saltwater fishing license, you
don't need a shore license, too you're
already covered. The free shore license is
for residents only nonresidents must
purchase a regular license even if fishing
only from shore.
For more information on fishing
licenses, visit www.MyFWC.com/license.


Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 19

LICENSE FEES
Recreational licenses and permits for residents and nonresidents are
available at county tax collectors'offices. In addition, you can buy them
from subagents, such as sporting goods stores or other retailers that sell
hunting or fishing equipment; on the Internet and by phone. All license,
permit and issuance fees are subject to change by the legislature. State
law guarantees all money from sale of fishing licenses goes to the FWC
to help fulfill its mission of"managing fish and wildlife resources for their
long-term well-being and the benefit of people":'
Resident Saltwater OR Freshwater Fishing ............. $17/year, $79/5 years
Resident Saltwater/Freshwater Fishing Combo................. $32.50/year
Resident Saltwater Shoreline License .............................................. Free
Lifetime Saltwater (includes Snook and Lobster permits)
OR Freshwater Fishing License
4 years or younger ........................... ................................. $126.50
5-12 years ........................................ ........... ................... $226.50
13 years or older ............................. ................................. $301.50
Nonresident 3-Day Freshwater OR Saltwater Fishing ..................$.....$17
Nonresident 7-Day Freshwater OR Saltwater Fishing ..........................$30
Nonresident Annual Freshwater OR Saltwater Fishing ........................$47


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rs






OSPREY


\ ALBEE ROAD BRIDGE:
Snook love bridges, andthis
structure spans deep water
*, It's a staging area forsnook
duringothesummeranda
rockjetties thatflank Venice
Inlet on the north and ,
south are well-known fish
towatchthesunset). Creek




RobeitsttmCreek





SHEEPIESBONITHEFROCKS: V
There's a mitigation reefa l VENICE
half-mile off Venice Beach
- basically, a bunch of
boulders in a line across
the bottom. It drawsfish
including some massive .
sheepshead all year long.

BIG FISH FROM SHORE:The SOUTH
Venice Municipal Pier is one of the
few piers on Flonda's west coast VENI
that extends into the actual Gulf of Alligator
Mexico. It'sa great place to target Creek
sharks and king mackerel when Creek
they're running. Awaming Some of
the locals can be abrasive.9


Between Caspersen and
Manasota beaches, there
is no road access. This de-
serted stretch is sometimes
used illegally as a nude
beach, so maybe don't
hrinatho kidc haratnfich


i L ASUKAS ISUKt
Much of Lemon Bay is
with seagrass. Althou
are fish and othercre
virtually anywhere
grass, forthe bestfish
for mixed bottom (gr
candvrnrchallviar


HI


The boys at Fishin' Frank's, Jeff
Kincaid at Capt. Ted's Tackle,
Capt. Mike Myers and several
knowledgeable anglers contrib-
uted to this man. Thanks. nvs!


Lessthan six
feet of water(as
measured at mean
lowerlowwater)


This is a n
DO NO
NAVIGATE
If you igni
you do so a


Sixtotwelve
feetofwater(as
measured at mean
lowerlowwater)


.A.-A.. .H .....T. II





*VV111P ).E
"74

.................... .... .,..





SARASOTA COUNTY ;0
SBlackburn Pt Boat Launch* 800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
SDallas White Park* 5900 Greenwood Ave, North Port Am
SHigel Park* 1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice
SIndian Mound Park. 210 Winson Ave, Englewood
-Loreto Bay Access. 800 Loreto Court, Nokomis
Manasota Beach Park. 8570 Manasota KeyRdCa
SMarine Boat Ramp Park*301 E.Venice Ave, Venice
-Marina Park- 7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
-Nokomis Beach Park.*901 CaseyKeyRd
Snook Park *5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice
DESOTO COUNTY ,
Brownville Park-*1885 NE Brownville St 4 f/
SDeep Creek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St B
Desoto Park. 2195 NW American Legion Dr
SLiverpool Park. 9211 Liverpool Rd
SNocatee .3701 SW County Road 760
Lettuce Lake* 8801 SW Reese St SALTORFREHnPortharlotteand
it II II ~~~North Port, can.~~te~tsdoUS
CHARLOTTE COUNTY 41 are generally salt water those n the
.Ainger Creek Park. 2011 Placida Rd, Englewood north side a
Butterford WaterwayPark*-13555
Marathon Blvd, Port Charlotte
Darst Park *537 DarstAve, Punta Gorda on PORT CHARLOTTE
El Jobean Boat Ramp* 4224
El Jobean Rd, Port Charlotte
Harbour Heights Park. 27420
ForkedVoyageur Dr, Punta Gorda
Creek Hathaway Park. 35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda
Placida Park. 6499 Gasparilla Rd, Placida
SPort Charlotte Beach* 4500 Harbor Blvd, Port Charlotte TOO SHALLOW: The
EENER: *SouthGulfCove Park*-10150 Amicola St, Port Charlotte a hansnu kso t Al Ora
carpeted Spring Lake Park.3520 Lakeview Blvd, Port Charlotte but navigation is aCreek
agh there
1htheres problem for most boats.
lu 1 Caution is advised.
hing look 'I
grass with ELJOBEAN
ENGLEWOODLIVETHELEGEND:TheElJobeanbridge P.E
and trestle (part of the old Charlotte Harbor Alligator R IV
OHPOM PAN0: The Ainger ( .,
OH POMPANO: The Ainge& Northern railroad line) isa world-famousBay
Sd Pier on Beach Road is one big snook hole.Theresa reason for that.
Creek of the bestplacesetocatchs Point
Cap, nomoacnohartm.ohoteovrouraanssorsando.R
also hook pompano on any ofI
the barriersisland beaches.a14-F0TtOLE:hTo
find this summerwsharkara l0- H WINTERaHAVEN:jDur-
th spon potrePgoaN S "ingItheNG oefhoolep sPUNTA
SUMERSNOK Iateeprng snook move into the
thaneirineau pb hrkn canals of PuntaaGorda

PG ROVE CITY
DON'TGETRUN OVER: This narrow strip of THE THREE AMIGOS: You'll CONSTANT.FLOW:tThis
wate iscaledTkiNTleFLOWfisingissood vl
notice that snook, redfish and creek is heavily over-
but wakeboarders and Jet Ski enthusiasts seatrout often appear together grwnandmaynotbe
zipthroughfrequently.Watchoutforthemon this map.Thats because areas navigabl ,butitisdeep
because they may not be watching out rrOu with mangroves and seagrass are and fed by a Sping-
$(p ideal habitat for all three species.
Stump Pass,40/4 That doesn't mean they'llbe in Whorehou....
Q10, O 110 the exact same locations, though. ,hr o
B k ee4Snook usually prefer thick cover to Point
out over grass or sand. Redfish o
IT USE IT FOR SHOALWATERS: w n Stump cangoeritherway, dependingRon Thiatelliephoto
ION PURPOSES. adma edeprta anbrsadtruh
ore this warning,20-FOOTHOLE west of Alligator
at your own peril. o r o
; ~ Charlotte Harborha
P O N D FIS H IN G:aSomeNof:the pon ds m ta
SUMMERSNOOK In te sprng, sook are flooded with salt watercarring baby II
ati( ffmake theirway out to the Gulf for their '
, a 11 summer spawning season.When the fishes during very hightides. If you can
first coldfrontscome througthey make get to them, there are some incredible
/ w t i ,f r t c l r n s c m h o g t e a efi s h i n g o p p o rt u n it i e s t o b e f o u n d .
~~theirway back to the canals and rivers. 0
The passes and the nearby beaches are 0 1)
greatsnooklocationsallsummerlong., -
LACI MIDDLE HOLEBlack n


\My IIDH
\ aiiE ffUaTMna


y /iz ELwv W-z 21)11


w wvvqw r -,.v ww v




MIDDLE HOLE
Wi gokurd
Boggess 1000 /- Creeke,
~HARD BOTTOM: Cape

( = ~~and it can be found in c hOUsel, ZMLRA
Haznumerous i ots around LOf'l
ay o 4 large area of rocky, shelly Pirate
bottomePotempano really .
ZEMEL ROAD



numeoupotaound LOWER HOLELight Tackle
v, HTTHhDO HTheb...
a numeoubtdokon Back Bay FishnTime To Go Fishing!
the baksideof Gasarill
BulliBay Crossb





troutplus popno adcobia W,.,, h
AN E u orsokaDev edfish whentheyre rnnin.Yoilal
fDKey%

BayouDanger
0 Reef U
FISHING ON FOOT: The Burnt Light Tackle
2: HTTN.OCS-heStore bar offers excel lent wade
nueosba ok fishing for snook, redfish and Back Bay Fishing
Trh tebcsd faprlatrout, pu omaoand cwith'
Point Islad ar a faorit halwhen they're running.You can wt
stake outthe boat and hop
overboard, orfind one of the

The

FISHTHE d a
Sr e bo l igisandyshoal
TwoKLIA oPine is a great
e tPuntaC Gtaoearlydin
KEE Itheseason.

MondongoPatricio I
C ayoI addoIsland 0 g i~p AZ, [Laist hloy Pa h & p[ftgi
Costa 1 u@IFI

J 0 -Fishing the
Pa rt 5r Charlotte Harbor
Cabbage Island BlackIndian
Key UseppaySEEASEACOW: Field Aquatic Preserve
Island PINELAND Forlasomendreason
plshrhodltan(manateesarev k sie& Peace River
often found be-
dhftweenkthesetwow
small islands.

REDFISH ON THE


REDFISH HOLE:Thissmall VETERANS BOULEVARDoil
shallowwateraround Blackkey has a deep area around


thepsoutherneo that MATLACHA:Anotherfamoussnookspot
often holdsgood edfish entered isthe Matlacha Bridge (billed asthe RIVERTARPON: Whenand Cove keys is perfect for


fishingestbridgeiingtheworldwhich might
br idge holds a few fish, but Its nowhere a fantastic but little-used
O~rnear as snooky as itused to be hbaitisthethai hhaf tofa

LE? Potholesarjust sandy areas on aY,
and the fish know it.










canbeafootacrossorasbigasyour CAPE
ig te eges f te gass f yu fid a1 0CO RAL
-00


PantherBLittl











S~lPPISUMPORPANOROAD
KeyiniP i
REDFISH HOLE:RThisismallIslandiETERAnSlBOULwteBi
o/ key has a deep area around 0 i
the southern eiQ that 1i h0 MATLACHA: Anothernfamous snook spot-
(." 11 often holds good redfish, is the NMatlacha Bridge (billed as "the
Key_ fishingest bridge in the world,"which mightR







arefullytonthehsiwvrmkings are uprive
Keyt oUv Ahave been true atoone time).The newafantasti.JbEtl
Althouherin P UNDE Hbridge holdsEaIfewfish, butSit'snowhereAI
notgenelsnlyyonsiitv.edotorlenbaitisUthe tail halfofl"iUNTA
davgblntslasitousednote. hardhead catfish Fish it on
Q, the bottom or under a float.
'Foster 0R'.... ....URASS
ILE? Potholes are just sandy areas on B y
er soften a bitcdeeper than the sur- 10
can be a foot across or as big as your CAPE' ..
ng the edges ofthe grass. Ifyou find a 10 \
shallow tide, it may hold lots offish. D- C. X0 4 ORAL 1-l, ,_
p vMason a ti!

Pass ,R epkerns 70a i


Cate Point
SKIPPING POMPANO: One way r. ', -" )oc
to find out ifa flat holds pompano S rdPO"
is to run across it (don't mow the t A 0
grass!) and watch behind you. IONA
Passing boats sometimes cause C...
TRPEAI:Tipeal iepompano to leap out ofthe water, k S I
objects. A great way to target Ocice youkfindtaliey spt, o ucatc ne.Isla nd
fish is to run the crab trapciceb kan trtoach n.
carefully and throw a small Buk,4Z1
allis on the lightest leader zT A E eig I\
-a-- toIeo---+6i_ S A E _-g 'b N












Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester in
state waters; included in aggregate bag of 20
reef fish in federal waters
Season: none
Notes: 9

AMBERJACK, GREATER






Size limit: 30" min.
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed June 1-July 31; subject to
additional closure in federal waters if quota is
met
Notes: 1,3,4,5,9

AMBERJACK, LESSER
BANDED RUDDERFISH


Size limit: Slot 14"to 22"
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 5 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 1,4,5,9

BLACK
DRUM





Size limit: Slot 14"to 24"
(may possess one over 24")
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 7,8

BLACK
SEA BASS J._


Size limit:
10"min.
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9
..............................


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 1,5

BONEFISH A


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited
Season:none
Notes: May be possessed temporarily at the
site of capture for photos, measuring and
weighing. 1,5

COBIA(


Size limit: 33"min.
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester or 6 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season: none
Notes: 1


CRAB, BLUE
Size limit: none,
Daily bag -
limit: 10

whole
Season: Closed -
Sept. 20-Oct. 4 .
in state waters beyond 3 niile. 0
Closed to trapping July 10-19 in
odd years for trap cleanup. Traps not allowed in
federal waters.
Notes: 5 trap maximum. 10

CRAB, STONE
Size limit: 2.75"
min. from
nonmoving e
claw tip to 1 toO.
base of firstrap maximum. Possession of whole
joint -
Daily bag ,
limit: 1 gal-
Ion per harvester
or 2 gallons per vessel, whichever is less
Season: Closed May 16 to Oct. 14
Notes: 5 trap maximum. Possession of whole
crab illegal; harvest claws only. 10

DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)


S.'- ..-. -,- --


Size limit: none in Gulf
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester or 60 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season: none
Notes: 5

FLOUNDER


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: Harvest by gig or spear is allowed. 2,8

GROUPER, BLACK


Size limit: 22"min. (24"min. Monroe County)
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within ag-
gregate bag of 4 grouper (1 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County). Aggregate bag
1 for gag and black grouper in Monroe County.
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9,11

GROUPER, GAG


Size limit: 22"min. (24"min. Monroe County)
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within ag-
gregate bag of 4 grouper (1 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County). Aggregate bag
1 for gag and black grouper in Monroe County.
Season: Open July 1 Dec. 3 in state waters;
open July 1 until quota met in federal waters
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9
..............................


State and federal saltwater fishing /


vanilotinno fni CunuthiAuiot linuirio


I oulIuIlUIo lu. UNuuImhootO Ilu. Iua


Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9,11

GROUPER, OTHER
(CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND AND TIGER)


GROUPER, NASSAU


SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)


center of fork. Highly Migratory Species
permit required to harvest in federal waters.
All harvested fish must be reported to NOAA
within 24 hours; call 800-894-5528.

MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb 1-Aug. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever is less; Sept.
1-Jan.31: Aggregate 50 per harvester or per vessel
Season: none
Notes: Harvest or possession of striped mullet
prohibited in Punta Gorda between 6 p.m. and 6
a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See http://bit.ly/urExej.

OYSTERS .
Size limit:
3"min. shell
Daily bag limit:
60 pounds or 2 5-gal- s
Ion buckets whole in -ishell
per harvester or per v e /
Season: Closed July
1-Sept. 30
Notes: Go to www.Florida
Aquaculture.com for allowable harvesting areas.

PERMIT



-.' 7


Size limit: / Size limit: \ '
none I n
Daily bag limit: Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
5 gallons heads on per harvester or per vessel 10 snapper per harvester
Season: none Season: none
Notes: 5 Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, CUBERA SNAPPER, VERMILION (BEELINER)


A- ^Size limit:
10"min.
to 3 mi:ay inv ;; p ;;'e 2 over Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester; not
per ve;;eiI included in aggregate bag of 10 snapper per
:iud~ed, in ,qqreate tq of harvester; included in aggregate bag of 20 reef
eier if under 3'11 fish in federal waters
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9


Size limit: 1 -, 12
3'1. per harve(er or p
Daily bag limit: Inr,
1:1 appearr per harrv
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9


Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited.
Season: n/a
Notes: n/a


Size limit: Slot 18"to 27"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester or 8 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season: none
Notes: Gigging, spearing or snatching pro-
hibited. Illegal to harvest or possess in federal
water. Transport limit 6 per person. 2,5,7

SEA TROUT, SPOTTED





Size limit: Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one
over 20")
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,5,7

SHARKS, ALL
SPECIES

'--

Size limit:
54" min., except Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose,
blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and smooth
dogfish (only exceptions to 54"min. in federal
waters are Atlantic sharpnose and bonnethead)
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less; in
federal waters, 1 per vessel
Season: none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. Highly Migratory Species permit required
to harvest in federal waters. 1,5,7

SHEEPSHEAD







Size limit: 12"min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,5,7
..............................


.," Size limit: 20" min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester
within aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9,11

GROUPER, SCAMP


Size limit: 16" min. (20" min. Monroe County
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester
within aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9,11

GROUPER,
SNOWY


Size limit: none"
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester
within aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: none
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

GROUPER, SPECKLED HIND
GROUPER, WARSAW


Size limit: rinone
Daily bag limit: 1 per ve;;el thin aggregate tbag
of 4 grouper (aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: none
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9


GROUPER, YELLOWFIN
GROUPER, YELLOWMOUTH


Size limit: n a m
Daily bag limit: Zero harvetr prohibited Size limit: 2' n, r,
Season: n a Daily bag limit: 4 per harve(ter [ihinr
Notes: Legal to target for catch and release in aggregate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester
state waters but not in federal waters within aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)


Size limit: none I
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester
within aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9,11

HOGFISH /


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 1,4,5,9
..............................


MACKEREL, KING
Size limit:
.. Slot 11 "to 20"(may possess one over 20")
_. -" Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season: none
Size limit: 24 numn. Notes: No more than two fish over 20" per
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester vessel. Hook and line gear only; spearing legal
Season: none only in federal waters. Rules differ in Special
SiNotes: Bag limit reduced to 1 per harvester Permit Zone south of Cape Sable (Florida Bay/
? in some state waters when federal waters are Keys); see http://bit.ly/rA94BJ. 1,5,7
closed to harvest. See www.MyFWC.com/Fishing ..............................
for current regulations. 1,5 POMPANO,
****************************** FLORIDA


MACKEREL, SPANISH



-- "

Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: Transfer of Spanish mackerel to other
vessels at sea prohibited. 1,5


Size limit:
11"minimum
Daily bag limit: 6 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: May harvest with cast net or seine. 1,5,7
.... ... ... .... ... ... ...


.............................. POMPANO,
MARLIN, BLUE AFRICAN
MARLIN, WHITE
SAILFISH A L ....


-^ .--_ ^- "


Size limit: 24 mm.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester or per vessel
Season:none
Notes: Spear fishing prohibited. 1,5,7
..............................


7,


Size limit: Blue marlin 99" min.; white marlin
66"min.; sailfish 63"
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 1 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: Measured from tip of lower jaw to


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 4,5,9


Enuuua uimoweEiMe aumilmiomuuoiim
savaatA~gRvHa Romeo HAmmnm% all


SNAPPER, OTHER
(BLACKFIN, DOG, MAHOGANY,
QUEEN, SILK AND YELLOWTAIL)



- ." -'- ,. :


Size limit: 12 nun.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNOOK,
ALL SPECIES A,


-~


Size limit: Slot 28"to 33"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed until at least Sept. 1. Go to
www.MyFWC.com/Fishing for latest regulations.
Notes: $10 snook permit required to harvest
when license is required, including free resident
shore fishing license. State regulations apply in
federal waters. 2,5,6,7,8

SPINY LOBSTER
Size limit: 3" carapace min.; must be
measured in while still in water
Daily bag limit: 6 per harvester during
regular season. Special limits apply during
sport season; contact regional FWC office for
current sport season regulations.
Season: Closed April 1-Aug. 5, except sport
season last consecutive Wed. and Thur. in July.
Notes: Recreation trapping prohibited.
$5 Spiny Lobster permit required to
harvest when license is required,
including free resident shore
iihing lieri e For full rule- I ee
hirrr ,r t n',v I -' 10 ( .


TRIPLETAIL


Size limit:
- 15 nmn. ,
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. 2,5,7,8

WAHOO




Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
7 Season: none
Notes:1,5 4 ,

LIONFISH 4 1" ;




Size limit: rn:ne
Daily bag
limit: none
Season:none
Notes: This invasive species is native to the
South Pacific and is spreading through the
Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Kill all
specimens on sight. Fins have venomous spines.

UNREGULATED SPECIES
The following species do not have established
bag limits, so the daily bag limit is two fish or 100
pounds per harvester, whichever is greater: Atlantic
croaker, barracuda, blackfln tuna, bonito
(little tunny), cero mackerel, gafftopsail
catfish, grunts (all species), hardhead
catfish, jack crevalle, ladyfish, palometa,
pigfish, pinfish, porgies (exc. sheepshead),
sand bream mojarraa), sand seatrout, silver
seatrout, spadefish and whiting.


Size limit: 10"
min. in state waters; 12"min. in federal waters
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester within
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, ,./
LANE .


=-~~


Size limit: 8" min.
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester in
state waters; not included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester in Gulf; included in
aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in federal waters
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER,
MUTTON A~t',,


Size limit:
16 nun.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, 1,
RED


Notes: $51.50 tarpon tag required to harvest
or possess. FWC may eliminate the tag this
year, making tarpon a catch-and-release-only
species. For special seasonal Boca Grande Pass
rules, see http://bit.ly/uYwhLS. 6,8

TRIGGERFISH, GRAY


Size limit: 14"(12"in federal waters)
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester per day;
included in aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in
federal waters.
Season: Closed June-July in state waters;
matching closure proposed for federal waters
Notes: 1,4,5


State waters extend from the shore 9 miles out into the Gulf of Mexico. Federal waters extend from 9 miles out to 200 miles. These regulations were correct as of March 20, 2013 and are subject to change at any time by the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission and/or the National Marine Fisheries Service. Visit www.MyFWC.com and www.nmfs.noaa.gov for current regulations. This list does not contain every fisheries rule with which an angler must comply. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.


NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is the straight
line distance from the most forward part of the head
with the mouth closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is the
straight line distance from the most forward part
of the head with the mouth closed to the farthest
tip of the tail with the tail compressed or squeezed
together while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of for-hire
vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must use
non-stainless steel circle hooks when using natural
baits, and must possess dehooking device and
venting tools and use when appropriate.
5. Must remain in whole condition (head and tail
intact) until landed ashore.
6. Harvest by spearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple or treble hooks in conjunction
with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand perch, fish
designated as reef fish are illegal to use as bait in
federal waters or aboard a vessel with a federal
reef fish permit.
10. No harvest of egg-bearing females.
11. In federal waters, 2014 closed season expected
to apply only to waters more than 20 fathoms.


PROHIBITED SPECIES
SThe following species are closed to all harvest and if
Size limit: 1,. nrun captured must be immediately released unharmed:
Daily bag limit: 2 per harve;ter rwihinr Goliath grouper, Nassau grouper, Atlantic
aggregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester H angel shark, basking shark, bigeye sand tiger
Season: Open June 1-July 15 in state waters shark, bigeye sixgill shark, bigeye thresher
(proposed); federal waters open June 1 (closure ........-"*. .......... shark, bignose shark, Caribbean reef shark,
not yet determined) TARPON Caribbean sharpnose shark, dusky shark,
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9 Galapagos shark, great hammerhead, lemon
....'..'........................ ..... shark, longfin mako shark, narrowtooth shark,
..APP.ERS... c MASTER ^- night shark, sand tiger shark, sandbar shark,
)SNAPERK, S.CHUULMAS)IER ', .. scalloped hammerhead, sevengill shark, silky
S shark,sixgill shark, smalltail shark, smooth
.hammerhead, spiny dogfish, tiger shark,
Size limit: norne whale shark, white shark, manta ray, spotted
: ..' Daily bag limit: 2 fish possession limit eagle ray, longbill spearfish, spearfish (all
Season:none species), sturgeon, Florida queen conch.


)





t4 *K aa(,. nnuEgnfil-n-' .,sam
0,,1%&vqIlt r~ Umatuuu~filquin~nn U iU fliEUn~.UU iEi


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 26


Note: Sometimes saltwater species may be
found in fresh water in Florida. To harvest
these species, you must have a regular or shore
saltwater license (except mullet; see below). You
do not need a freshwater license to specifically
target saltwater species in a freshwater environ-
ment, but ifyou do not have a freshwater
license then any freshwater species must be
immediately released unharmed. (Ifyou plan
on doing this, just get a combo license and save
yourself the headache.)

BLACK BASS


Size limit: South Florida (south of S.R.
80): 14" maximum; one fish larger than
14" may be harvested daily. Central
Florida (north of S.R. 80): 14"minimum.
Lake Okeechobee (see http://bit.ly/
Akzt7G for definition): 18"minimum. Lake
Weohyakapka (Walk-in-Water): Slot 15"
to 24"; may possess one over 24". Lake
Trafford: Slot 18"to 22".
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester (Lake
Weohyakapka: 3 per harvester)
Notes: Bag is aggregate for all species of black
bass, but only largemouth black bass are found
in Southwest Florida. Special limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1,3

PANFISH
(INCLUDES BLUEGILL, REDEAR SUNFISH
[SHELLCRACKER], FLIER, LONGER SUN-
FISH, MUD SUNFISH, SHADOW BASS,
SPOTTED SUNFISH STUMPKNOCKERR],
WARMOUTH AND REDBREAST SUNFISH)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 50 per harvester
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1,4

CRAPPIE (SPECKLED PERCH)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 25 per harvester
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1

SUNSHINE BASS


Daily bag limit: Aggregate 24 per harvester
Notes: This regulation also covers striped and
white bass, which are not found in Southwest
Florida. Sunshine bass, a striped/white bass
hybrid, are stocked by the state in waters
around Florida. Special bag and size limits
may apply in Fish Management Areas; see
below. 1


CHANNEL CAT FISH **********************.
^ GR ASS CARP


: p -' *''ES *-^ *


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 2
.BROWNBULLHEAD
YELLOW BULLHEAD
YELLOW BULL HEAD


WALKING CATFISH


introduced by state biologists to control other
ninnn-ifiiio -fifko( 1 1


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero; harvest or possession
prohibited without a permit
Notes: These fish are introduced to areas
where vegetation overgrowth is a problem.
Grass carp released in Florida are triploid,
incapable of spawning.
......................


CLOWN KNIFEFISH


BULLSEYE SNAKEHEAD




Notes: There may be multiple species in
Florida. Can be confused with native bowfin.
Snakehead has long anal fin (on the belly) at
least one fourth of the fish's overall length.


ALLIGATOR GAR FISH MANAGEMENT AREA
SPECIAL REGULATIONS


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: 2
......................
FLORIDA GAR
LONGNOSEGAR


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Be careful if preparing for consump-
tion; the roe is toxic. 2
......................
BOWFIN




Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Can be confused with nonnative
snakehead. Look under chin for large flaplike
scale and check for a short anal fin; this will
positively identify a bowfin. 2
......................
CHAIN PICKEREL
REDFIN PICKEREL






Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 4
''.......i. .'E' .. ...
AMERICAN EEL


Size limit ",,
Daily bag limit ii
Notes 2 :


MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb 1-Aug. 31: Aggregate
50 per harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever
is less; Sept. 1-Jan. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or per vessel
Notes: Harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda between
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29.
See http://bit.ly/z9J6v3. May not be
harvested by spear fishing in fresh water.
Any resident fishing for mullet in fresh
water who has a valid Florida freshwater
fishing license does not need a saltwater
license. 2

BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
Size limit: 17"maximum (may possess
one over 17")
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Notes: Nonnative species intentionally


4-


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero; harvest or possession
prohibited without a research permit
Notes: Despite popular belief, alligator gar do
not occur in Southwest Florida. These giant fish
are restricted to the Panhandle in this state.

NONPROTECTED EXOTICS
These fish are unwelcome invaders in Florida's
waters. These fish have no bag or size limits
and are all popular food fish in their native
countries. Other than peacock bass and grass
carp, exotic fish may not be returned to the
water nor may they be used as live bait, and
should be consumed or disposed of properly.

BLUE TILAPIA


POTEDTLAPA......................
SPOTTED TILAPIA


............OSCAR..
OSCAR ,jWfjgjjM


MAYAN CICHLID


JAGUAR GUAPOTE


S........... .. ...
MIDAS(CICHLID


W H-




BROWN HO PLO


SUCKERMOUTH CATFISH


For FMAs not listed, see www.MyFWC.com/Rules
AndRegs/Freshwater_FishRules_regions.htm.
Lakes Tohopekaliga (West Lake
Tohopekaliga), Cypress, Hatchineha, and
Kissimmee), Polk and Osceola counties: Open
to fishing. No bag limit for channel catfish. Minnow
lift nets, fish traps and trotlines may be used.
Manatee Lake, Manatee County: Open to
fishing. Trotlines may be used from sunset until 9
a.m., Sunday through Thursday. Outboard motors
more than 20 hp may not be used. No bag limit
for channel catfish.
Webb Lake, Charlotte County: Open to
fishing during posted hours. Gasoline motors
may not be used on boats. Panfish bag limit: 20.
Channel catfish bag limit: 6. Bluegill and redear
sunfish less than 8 inches in total length must
be released immediately. Black bass must be
released immediately. Vehicles may be used only
on designated roads.
Marl Pits 1 and 3, Charlotte County: Open to
fishing. Panfish bag limit: 20. Bluegill and redear
sunfish less than 8 inches in total length must be
released immediately. Channel catfish bag limit:
6. Black bass must be released immediately.
Marl Pit 2, Charlotte County: Open to fishing.
Bluegill and redear sunfish less than 10 inches
must be released immediately. Bluegill and
redear sunfish combined bag limit: 10. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Black bass must be released
immediately.
Tenoroc Fish Management Area, Polk
County: Fishing is allowed only by FWC permit.
All anglers must check in and out at the Tenoroc
Fish Management Area headquarters and deposit
their valid fishing license with the custodian unless
otherwise instructed. Days and hours of operation
and quotas shall be as designated by the FWC
and posted at area headquarters (currently
Friday through Monday only). Quotas will be
established for each lake, and fishing is permitted
in designated lakes only. Lakes may be closed
to public access for management purposes or if
access to the lake exposes the public to danger,
by posting notice at the Tenoroc check station
office. Quotas for open lakes may be temporarily
increased to accommodate anglers during times
when other lakes are closed due to management
construction projects, road repair, unsafe access
or special recreational events. All dogs must be
leashed, except as authorized by FWC. Unless
otherwise specified, Tenoroc FMA harvest
restrictions are: Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie
less than 10 inches in total length must be released
immediately. Sunshine bass bag limit: 6. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Black bass must be released
immediately. Fish may not be filleted, nor their
head ortail fins removed, until the angler has
checked out at the area headquarters. Cast nets
and minnow seines are prohibited. No person shall
have any gun under his/ her control while under
the influence of alcohol or drugs. Public access
is prohibited in areas posted as"Restricted"for
protection of threatened or endangered species,
or environmentally sensitive areas. Motor vehicles
may be operated only on named roads, designated
parking areas, and fishing ramps as designated in
the area use brochure. Vehicles may not obstruct
designated roads, boat ramps, gates or fire lanes.
Swimming and float tubes are prohibited.
Regulations for Tenoroc lakes are as follows:
Gasoline motors may not be used on boats on
Lakes A, Butterfly, C, F, Fish Hook, G, Half-Moon,
Horseshoe, Hydrilla, Legs Lost, Lake East, Lost Lake
West, Tern, 2, 3, and 4 (primitive launch only on
Butterfly, F, Fish Hook, G, Half-Moon, Lost Lake
East, Lost Lake West, and Tern). Lakes B and 5:
Boats are restricted to idle speed-no wake. Black
bass 15 inches in total length or longer must be
released immediately. Black bass bag limit: 2.
Picnic Lake: Gasoline motors may not be used
on boats. Black bass bag limit: 2. Black bass 15
inches in total length or longer must be released
immediately. Pine (formerly East and West
Pasture Lakes) and Derby Lakes: Boats may


4!4 -^


NOTES
1. Game fish. May only be taken with pole and
line or rod and reel. There is no limit on the
number of rods an angler may use. May not be
filleted, nor their head or tail fin removed, until
you are done fishing for the day. Unlawful to
sell, offer for sale or transport out of the state
unless specifically permitted by the FWC, except
that licensed anglers may transport two days'
bag limit of legally harvested fish.
2. Nongame fish. May be taken by:
Pole and line or rod and reel.There is no limit
on the number of rods an angler may use.
Bush hook, setline ortrotline baited with cut bait
or other substance; but not including live game fish
or any part of any game fish. Bush hooks, setlines
and trotlines must be clearly and legibly marked
with the harvester's name and address.
At night by bow and arrow or gig.
During daylight hours by manually operated
spears, gigs, snatch hooks, crossbow or bow
and arrow from a boat or from shore except in
Dade County canals south of the C-4 and east
of the L-31N and L-31W canals inclusively.
By the use of cast nets.
3. Illegal to use as bait whole or in part.
4. May be used as bait only for rod and reel or
pole and line angling.

not be used. Other than anglers described above,
no one 16 years or older shall fish on Pine or Derby
lakes unless accompanied by a child under 16
years of age. Panfish bag limit: 20. Anglers may
keep no more than 5 bluegill and redear sunfish 8
inches or longer in total length per day. Cemetery
Lake: Boats may not be used. Anglers may keep
no more than 5 bluegill and redear sunfish 8 inches
or longer in total length per day. Lake Crago:
Largemouth bass, crappie and sunshine bass: state-
wide size and bag limits apply. Wire traps may be
used for nongame fish. Trotlines may be used from
sunset until 9 a.m. No bag limit for channel catfish.
Boats are restricted to idle speed-no wake.
Lake Istokpoga, Highlands County: Open to
fishing. No bag limit for channel catfish. Black
bass 15 inches or more in total length and less
than 24 inches must be released immediately.
Black bass bag limit: 3. Only 1 black bass may be
24 inches or greater in total length. Nongame
fish may be taken by cast nets, dip nets, seines,
trotlines, set lines, bush hooks and wire traps.
Refer to the Florida Commercial Freshwater
Fisheries brochure PDF.
Mosaic Fish Management Area, Polk and
Hardee counties: Open to fishing. Fishing is
allowed only by daily permit issued by the FWC.
All anglers must check in and out at the Mosaic
creel station, the designated entry point, unless
otherwise instructed. Days and hours of operation
and quotas shall be as designated by the FWC
and posted at the Mosaic creel station (typically
Mosaic is open Friday through Monday). Fishing is
permitted in designated lakes only. All other lakes
and restricted areas, so posted, are closed to public
fishing. Any lake may be temporarily closed to
public access for management purposes, or in the
event that access to the lake exposes the public to
danger, by posting notice at the creel station.
Unless otherwise specified, Mosaic FMA
harvest restrictions are: Black bass must be
released immediately. Sunshine bass bag limit: 6.
Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie lessthan 10 inches in
total length must be released immediately. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Fish may not be filleted, nor
their heads ortail fins removed, until the angler has
checked out at the Mosaic creel station. Disposal of
fish remains within Mosaic property is prohibited.
Taking offish and wildlife with guns is prohibited.
Motor vehicles may be operated only on designated
roads, parking areas and boat ramps. Vehicles may
not obstruct designated roads, boat ramps, gates or
fire lanes. Swimming and float tubes are prohibited.
Rough fish may be removed from designated lakes
by cast nets and minnow seines by permission of
the landowner. Outboard motors more than 10 hp
may not be used.
Regulations for individual Mosaic FMA lakes
are as follows: Haul Road Pit: Black bass 15
inches in total length or longer must be released
immediately. Black bass bag limit: 2. Long Pond
(LP2 West): No boats permitted.
Hardee County Park, Hardee County: Open
to fishing. All anglers shall enter at the Park main
entrance, the designated entry point, unless
otherwise instructed. Angling from a boat is
allowed by entry pass issued by Hardee County.
Angling from shore does not require an entry
pass unless otherwise posted at the Park main
entrance. Days and hours of operation and quotas
for freshwater fishing are posted at the Park main
entrance. Fishing is permitted in designated lakes
only. Any lake may be closed to public access by
Hardee County for management purposes, or in
the event that access to the lake exposesthe public
to danger, by posting notice at the Park main
entrance. Black bass must be released immediately.
Sunshine bass bag limit: 6. Panfish bag limit: 20.
Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie lessthan 10 inches
in total length must be released immediately.
Channel catfish bag limit: 6. Fish may not be
filleted, northeir head or tail fin removed, until the
angler has left the Park. Disposal offish remains
within Hardee County Park is prohibited. Taking
offish and wildlife with guns is prohibited. Motor
vehicles may be operated only on designated
roads, parking areas, and boat ramps. Vehicles may
not obstruct designated roads, boat ramps and fire
lanes. Swimming and float tubes are prohibited.






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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 27


By Robert Lugiewicz


I don't know how many knots there are in
the fishing world. There must be hundreds -
maybe thousands. Of those, there are a few
dozen in common use: Trilene, clinch, Palomar,
nail, surgeon's, blood, Sebile, slim beauty,
etc. All these knots have a purpose, and each
can certainly be used by local fishermen. But
memorizing a bunch of knots is a pain, and if
you don't tie them regularly your fingers will
forget them. Do you really want to carry a
book or a set of cards with you every time you
go out on the water? I sure don't I'd rather
spend my time fishing.
What if I told there was one knot you could
use for almost all your fishing needs? That's
why the uni-knot was invented. In its most
basic form, it's one of the best knots for tying
on a hook. When you're fishing a lure and
trying to get the most action out of it, with
just a minor modification it can be used as
a loop knot. And there's also the double uni,
which is a great way to connect two lines -
for example, when you're tying a leader to
your main line.
The uni-knot was first publicized in the
1980s by Vic Dunaway, a well-read Florida
Sportsman editor who died just last year. Prior
to the that, the knot was called the Duncan
loop and was tied primarily by fly fishermen.
Dunaway was probably the first to use it to tie
two lines together.
The knot we all learned to tie as kids is the
clinch knot: Put the line through the hook eye,
spin it around seven times, and then stick the
tag end through the loop and snug it up. It's
not a bad knot for light freshwater fishing, but


it's not a good knot either. If you try using it
for heavier tackle, it will often pull through.
When your line comes back with just a curly
little pigtail on the end instead of a hook,
that's what happened. Mono or fluorocarbon
heavier than 20-pound test holds a clinch knot
poorly, and it tends to slip with braided line
of any strength. This slippage can be tough to
diagnose in braid because it's too limp to hold
a pigtail shape, so you may think the line just
broke. Betcha it didn't.
The uni-knot is a strong knot, and its
strength comes from the friction of the wraps.
When you're tying the knot, a fair amount
of lubrication is required (that means spit).
Plentiful moisture will allow the knot to snug
down tightly without putting undue stress on
the line (that means use plenty of spit). Since
braided line has less friction than mono or
fluoro, it takes more wraps of braid than mono
to create a knot of the same strength. There
are stronger knots out there the uni tests
at about 80 percent of line strength but
it's really fast to tie and if you don't crank your
drag down, you should be fine. The uni-knot
also has great resistance to snapping when
pulled with a quick jerk, something that causes
a lot of knots to fail.
To use the uni-knot as a loop for fishing
artificial, tie it as you normally would, being
sure to cinch it down well. Then grab the knot
by the wraps closest to the lure eye and slide
it up the line to form a loop. You can use pliers
for this if you must, but be careful not to nick
the line. When a fish hits, the pull will snug the
knot back down. No worries: You can open and
close the loop as many times as needed without
affecting the strength of the knot at all.


When you're using the uni-knot as a
line-to-line connector, it's called a double
uni-knot. It's tied exactly the same way as
when you're tying it to a hook eye, except
you tie it to a loop of line instead. When
you're connecting lines of similar diameter,
you don't need to do anything special. But if
you're tying a line to another twice as thick,
you need to double the end of the thinner line
first. In fact, it's always a good idea to double
braid any time you're tying a knot in it.
If there's a major difference in line
diameters say, 60-pound mono to
20-pound braid the knot will still
probably slip even if you double the braid.
But at that point, you need to evaluate why
you're using such heavy leader. If you really
need to do that, use a swivel as a connector,
or tie a tapered leader (as an example,
20-pound braid tied to 30-pound mono tied
to 60-pound mono).
The uni-knot can also be used as for
selling a hook. A lot of anglers, especially
old-timers, like to use snells for fishing dead
bait. It's fairly easy to tie the uni-knot as a
snell just tie it like a double uni, using the
shank of the hook as the second line.
There's really no other knot that has the
versatility of the uni-knot, and for that reason
alone every angler should know how to tie
it. If the instructions here don't do it for you,
stop by the shop and I'll be happy to show
you how. It's really pretty simple, and when
you need to remember only one knot for
connecting your leader, your hooks and your
lures, that's definitely not a bad thing.
Robert Lugiewicz is the manager of Fishin'
Frank's Bait& Tackle, located at 4425-D


HOW TO TIE THE
UNI-KNOT& DOUBLE UNI
1. Thread the leader through the hook eye and pull
about 8 inches through. Fold this tag end parallel to
the leader.
2. With your left thumb and forefinger, pinch the two
lines together about an inch above the hook eye.
3. Now bend the tag end back toward the hook,
forming a loop. Be sure the tag end is on the side of
the line closest to you.
4 .Open your thumb and forefinger just enough to
accept the tag end. You should now be pinching
three pieces of line, and you should have a loop with
two lines parallel on one side.
5. Feed the tag end through the loop and wrap it
around the parallel lines six times.
6. Release the loop and pull the tag end just until
the wraps start to collapse on themselves.
7. Slide your pinching fingers down to the hook eye,
moisten the wraps well with saliva, and pull the
knot mostly but not fully tight.
8. Now moisten the parallel lines, then pull the
standing part of the line until the knot is tight. Trim
the tag end you're done.
TO TIE A DOUBLE UNI
1. Start with the two lines parallel, one tag end
pointing left and the other right. Overlap the lines
by about 8 inches and pinch them together. Follow
step 2 thru 7 above, starting with the heavier line.
2. Follw steps 2 thru 7 with the lighter line. Don't
forget to double the lighter line if necessary.
3. Moisten the parallel lines and pull both standing
lines. The knots will slide together and tighten.


Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call
941-625-3888 for more information about
the shop or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at www.FishinFranks.com.


WaterLine photos by Josh Olive
Robert Lugiewicz demonstrates how to tie a double uni knot
using two brightly colored ropes. Start with the lines parallel.





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Natural baits are any live or dead animals,
or any parts of them, used to catch fish. You
can catch many types of bait yourself; others
are usually purchased. The following list is
extensive but does not cover every possible bait
you can use.

SALTWATER BAITFISH
Almost any small fish can also be used for
bait, as long as they aren't juvenile gamefish or
other regulated species. To keep your baitfish
alive, get them into the livewell as quickly as
possible. A bait flopping around on a hot deck
won't last long. Don't take any more baitfish
than you need. Remember, the fish you want
to catch rely on these baitfish as a food source,
and if they don't feed well they won't reproduce
well. There's a lot of bait out there, but there
are also lots of guys with cast nets.
BALLYHOO: These look a bit like needlefish,
but only the lower jaw is elongated. Most
commonly used as a rigged trolling bait for
pelagic gamefish, ballyhoo can also be cast-
netted inshore and used as bait for other species.
BLUE RUNNERS: A small member of the jack
family, these fish are a good bait for king mack-
erel, cobia, amberjack and other open-water
fish. Usually used live, blue runners are durable
on the hook and are ideally suited to drifting
or kite fishing. Also used for grouper. Chum and
catch them on a sabiki.
BONITA: Used as cutbait for sharks. Size your
baits to the fish you want to catch. Catch them off
the beach during spring and fall or buy frozen.
CATFISH: Although most anglers curse
catfish, they can be an outstanding bait for
sharks. Tarpon also like them, especially when
they're in the rivers. Small catfish (less than 10
inches) are cobia candy.
CIGAR MINNOWS: AKA round scad, these are
another small jack species. Tarpon like them, as
do most open-water gamefish. Catch them on a
sabiki, or on small bare gold hooks.
GLASS MINNOWS: Bay anchovies, also called
glass minnows, are an important forage fish
but are tough to use as bait because they're
small and delicate. They make great chum,
ground or cut into pieces. Must be netted.
EELS: Infrequently used, but small eels are a
well-known cobia favorite.


GRUNTS: Hand-size grunts are excellent
grouper or amberjack bait on the reefs. Smaller
ones, including pigfish, are great for trout, reds
and snook inshore. A 3-inch pigfish under a
float is a hot ticket for big trout.
KILLIFISH and SAILFIN MOLLIES: Rarely
used in this area, but very popular for flounder
and redfish in many other parts of the South-
east. Killies can be caught on tiny hooks baited
with shrimp bits; mollies can't. Both are easier
to seine or dip-net.
LADYFISH: One of our most underrated
species, ladyfish not only are great fighters on
light gear but also are fantastic bait. Use cut or
whole for sharks, tarpon and monster snook,
or cut into smaller chunks for redfish. Take only
what you need for the day they get mushy if
frozen and thawed.
MENHADEN: A very important bait in
the Atlantic, menhaden also are found on
the Gulf coast but in fewer numbers. Strict
plankton feeders, menhaden are rarely caught
on a sabiki cast-netting is the way to go.
Most menhaden host a parasitic crustacean
(Cymothoapregustator) in their mouths, which
comes crawling out after the fish dies.
MULLET: Three mullet species are found in
Southwest Florida. The striped or black mullet
is the largest species, common to about three
pounds, and is the only one usually eaten
(smoked or fried). White mullet are the midsize
fish, usually about a foot long. Fantail mullet are
usually less than 8 inches long and are used only
as bait. All three mullet species can be found
in shallow fresh, brackish or salt water, usually
over muddy or grassy bottom which they root
through to find tiny invertebrates and algae.
Live or cut mullet are a top bait choice for most
fish-eating species, and are oily enough to make
very good shark bait. Because of their diet, they
are difficult to catch on hook and line. A big,
fast-sinking cast net works much better.
NEEDLEFISH: These toothsome critters are
not often used as bait but can be outstanding
for big snook. When a big snook ignores every
other bait, a live needlefish will sometimes
entice a strike. Both the upper and lower jaws of
a needlefish are long and pointed. Catch with a
small baited hook skimmed across the surface.
PINFISH: These small porgies are very


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 28


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common on shallow grassflats and around
dock pilings. They won't usually be found with
predatory fish everything likes to eat them.
Tough and durable, pinfish are easily caught on
a sabiki with bits of squid on the hooks. You can
also chum them up on the grassflats and cast
net them. Pins are super bait for redfish, snook,
tarpon, cobia and all reef fish.
SAND TROUT: Small sand trout are good bait
for snook. Big sand trout are good bait for big
snook, and also for cobia. Sometimes, they're the
only bait that matters. Catch on chunks of shrimp.
SPANISH SARDINES: These fish are similar to
whitebait but are less deep-bodied and usually
larger, to about 16 inches. They are edible and
are in fact one of the several species canned
commercially as sardines. Often bought frozen,
or catch your own with a cast net or sabiki. If
you get frozen sardines, you should brine them
before use to toughen them. No, you can't use
canned sardines as bait they fall apart.
SQUIRRELFISH: Sand perch, known locally
as squirrelfish, are irresistible to big grouper.
Sometimes you may find them at the bait shop,
but usually you'll have to catch your own. Cut
shrimp or squid, fished over sandy bottom on
a small hook, will catch sand perch. This same
method will catch many less desirable species,
so if you don't start bringing up sand perch in a
few minutes try another spot.
STINGRAYS: A live bait for seriously big fish,
stingrays are a favorite food of hammerhead
and bull sharks. Goliath grouper are also known
to enjoy a ray snack. If you aren't ready to hook
a 500-pound fish, don't use a ray for bait.
WHITEBAIT: Whitebait is a generic term that
includes threadfin herring and scaled sardines
(aka greenbacks or pilchards), among other
small chrome-sided schooling fish. These fish
are too delicate for most bait shops to keep
alive, so generally you'll have to catch your own
with a cast net or sabiki rig. Keep them in an
oxygenated baitwell and don't overcrowd them
- it's better to have 20 live baits than 60 that


are all dead. Threadfins get to about 10 inches
and scaled sardines to about 6 inches. Both are
top inshore baits, live or cut.
WHITING: See sand trout.

OTHER SALTWATER BAITS
SHRIMP: There are dozens of shrimp species
that live in the area, but for bait purposes we
divide them into two categories: Shrimp and
grass shrimp. Grass shrimp are small (under 2
inches) and are rarely used for bait, except by
panfishermen. Shrimp, on the other hand, are
hands-down the most popular bait in Florida.
They can be used live, dead or frozen and
thawed, either whole or cut into chunks. Very
few fish will turn down shrimp, but they also
draw lots of bait thieves. You can dip-net your
own (their eyes glow at night in a flashlight
beam), but they're a lot easier to buy.
BLUE CRABS: Very common in the estuaries,
these crabs are good bait for many fish. Small
ones (silver dollar size) can be used live for
permit, cobia and tarpon; bigger ones can be
cut to use for redfish or black drum. Also a good
bait to target big snapper on the reefs. If a crab
has an egg mass under its tail, let it go. Catch in
traps or with a dip-net.
PASS CRABS: These crabs (technically,
they're iridescent swimming crabs, Portunus
gibbesii) look a bit like small blue crabs but
have longer claws with a pink tint. They're
called pass crabs because the passes are where
they're often seen, swimming on the surface
on strong summer outgoing tides. Tarpon love
them. Usually dip-netted.
FIDDLER CRABS: Easy to see on sandy or
muddy shores but hard to catch because they
scramble into their burrows when you get close.
The top bait for big sheepshead, fiddlers can
also be used for porgies, snapper and hogfish
on the reefs. Only males have a big claw;
remove it before using the crab as bait.
MUD CRABS: These small dark-colored
crabs are found among rocks and oyster shells,


usually over muddy bottoms. There are actually
several species. Be careful not to collect juvenile
stone crabs, which are illegal to possess. Used
mostly for sheepshead.
SAND FLEAS: More properly called mole
crabs, these little guys aren't fleas at all. They're
fantastic bait for sheepshead, black drum and
pompano. Dig your own along the surf zone of
Gulf beaches or buy frozen ones.
OYSTERS: Although they are a pain to
collect, oysters can be harvested from pilings,
bridge abutments and oyster bars. They make
a good (if a bit delicate) bait for sheepshead,
redfish and black drum. You can also scrape
them and barnacles off the pilings with a hoe to
make instant sheepshead chum.
SQUID: Rarely caught here, squid are none-
theless very popular bait. Whole squid or big cut
chunks make excellent red grouper bait. Smaller
pieces catch porgies and grunts. Squid is a very
tough bait and difficult to steal from the hook,
so it's an excellent choice for tipping a sabiki rig.
MARINE WORMS: Few people bother to
collect these here, but any marine worms you
find are great bait for redfish and sheepshead.
Be careful many can bite painfully. You can
also use earthworms as a substitute (but don't
tell anyone that's a secret).

FRESHWATER BAITS
CATERPILLARS: Many caterpillars are good
panfish bait. Collect your own cutworms, or
buy waxworms at the bait shop. As with true
worms, sometimes more effective cut in half.
CATFISH BAITS: A wide variety of smelly
things are used as catfish bait: Cut fish left in the
sun, rancid chicken livers, stinky cheeses, various
blood dough concoctions, etc. There are lots of
others, both commercially available and home-
made, but the thing they share is the ability to
make you retch. Baits that are strong-smelling
but not actually rotten usually work best.
CLAMS: Freshwater clams (round ones with
yellow-brown shells) can be pried apart and the


soft part used to catch sunfish, or put several
on a hook for catfish. They're an introduced
species, so don't worry about using too many.
Don't use mussels (oval with dark shells), which
are in decline.
CRAYFISH: These look like a miniature
lobster. Bass love them (actually, so do redfish,
but that's another secret). Collect your own
in traps or by dip-netting in weedy areas.
Sometimes you can find them crawling on land
at night after heavy rains.
CRICKETS: Cheap to buy at the pet shop,
crickets are good bait for sunfish and cichlids.
Grasshoppers are good too, but you'll have to
catch your own.
EXOTIC FISH: A number of exotics, including
tilapia and jewel cichlids, are very common and
can be easily netted. Regardless, under Florida
law, these fish cannot be legally used as live
bait all you can do is dispose of them. Using
goldfish and other aquarium fish as live bait
is also against the law. It is permissible to use
them as cut bait, but if you have live specimens
on the water you are begging for a citation. The
only exceptions: Platies and fathead minnows.
GOLDEN SHINERS: A standard for big


1 1


MATCH THE HATCH
When fish are used to eating a certain food, it makes
sense to use that as bait. For example, sheepshead
at El Jobean aren't eating sand fleas, because there
are no sand fleas there for them to eat. Instead,
they're eating small crabs and oysters. Using sand
fleas as bait here is not a good plan. But at the Boca
Grande phosphate docks, just a couple hundred feet
from the beach, sand fleas are a fine choice. Another
example: In winter, most of the whitebait disappears.
Many anglers, having gotten used to using whitebait
during the long summer, will go to great lengths to
locate a few. But even if they find some, whitebait is
not nearly as effective in winter. Why? Because the
fish have switched over to shrimp, crabs and other
foods that are more abundant in the cooler months.


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THE EXPERTS' FAVORITES
No matter what your lot in this life may be, it's
hard to imagine anyone has it worse than a shrimp.
From the moment shrimp hatches, it's on the menu.
But their bad luck can work to your advantage.
"Everything from tiny pinfish to 200-pound tarpon
will happily eat a shrimp,"says Robert Lugiewicz of
Fishin' Frank's Bait & Tackle. "Plus, they're easy to get
and readily available. If there aren't any live shrimp,
frozen ones will work almost as well.":'
Charter captains Josh Greer and Mike Myers agree.
"I use shrimp all the time,"says Mike. "They catch
everything:'
"It's almost the perfect bait;,adds Josh. "Every
gamefish in Charlotte Harbor eats shrimp at some
point or another.":'
So if every fish loves shrimp, why is it only
almost perfect? Well, in summer, a lot offish have
something else in mind when they're feeling peckish.
"My favorite natural bait changes with the
season,"says Capt. Ralph Allen of King Fisher Fleet.
"Shrimp do the job from about Thanksgiving to
Easter, then I switch to whitebait for the warmer
months. This mimics the availability of natural prey
in the estuaries."
Fishing guide Cayle Wills echoes Ralph. "My
favorite natural bait is going to depend on the season
and the type of fishing I'm doing. To narrow it down,
in the late spring, summer and early fall I prefer
whitebait. The rest of the year I prefer shrimp:'
Whitebait have almost as tough a life as shrimp.
It seems they exist mostly to be food for hungry
mouths. But not everyone follows the use-bait-
anything-eats philosophy. Asked about his favorite
bait, Jeff Kincaid of Capt. Ted's Tackle goes in an
entirely other direction.
"I like using ladyfish/'he says. "Hey big bait,
big fish!"


largemouth bass, shiners are easily chummed
with bread pieces and caught on bread balls on
tiny hooks, or you can buy them. It takes a lot
of oxygen to keep these baits alive, and once
they're dead they're only good for catfish cutbait.
GRASS SHRIMP: A good bait for sunfish,
grass shrimp are easy to dip-net along weedy
shorelines. Use a light wire hook. You can use
big ones (1.5 inches is a big one) singly, or put
several on a hook to make a bigger mouthful.
MINNOWS: This covers almost any small
nongame species, including mollies, mosquito-
fish, killifish and a bunch more. Bass and crappie


CATCHING METHODS
SABIKI: A sabiki is just several small hooks spaced 8
to 24 inches apart. The hooks can be plain or dressed
with a small skirt. You can also use small chunks of
bait. Most commercially made sabikis have three to
six hooks. To use, tie a sinker to the end and cast out
or drop straight down and jig.
CAST NET: The gold standard in bait collection, a cast
net makes it possible (sometimes even easy) to col-
lect a day's worth of bait in a few minutes. Learning
to throw a net well is an art, and not one that can be
learned quickly. In fresh water, cast nets must have a
mesh under one inch.
SEINE: A seine is basically a wall of mesh with floats
on top and sinkers on the bottom. Smaller seines
require two people to operate; big ones can be used
by one person in conjunction with a set pole. In salt
water, seines must be less than 500 square feet with
mesh no larger than two inches; in fresh water, a seine
must be not more than 20 feet long, not more than 4
feet high, and have a mesh no larger than one inch.
DIP-NET: Any net with a handle may be regarded as
a dip-net. Sometimes a regular landing net will work,
such as for larger blue crabs, but in most instance
the mesh is too large and will allow your bait to slip
through. Specialized dip-nets with extendable handles
are used for shrimping from bridges and piers. To be
legal, your net's perimeter must be less than 96 inches.
TRAPS: Trapping gamefish is prohibited, so bait
traps must be small. In salt water, traps must not
exceed 2 feet in any dimension, with a throat
or entrance not exceeding 3 inches in height by
3/4-inch in width. In fresh water, traps must be no
more than 24 inches long, 12 inches in diameter,
and have a maximum 1-inch funnel entrance. Any
unregulated species may be taken in traps.


love to eat them all. Seine or dip-net them.
SUNFISH: As long as you catch them yourself
on hook and line, bluegill and other sunfish are
legal to use as bait. A 4-inch live bluegill is an
excellent big-bass bait.
WORMS: Big ones (nightcrawlers) are a
good choice for bass and catfish. Small ones
wigglerss) are readily taken by sunfish and
cichlids. You can dig your own wigglers, if you
can find a good spot for it, but you'll have to
buy nightcrawlers because they don't live in
Florida. Sometimes cutting one in half or into
pieces can draw more strikes.









I


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 30
i-I


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

Having the right tools is important for any
project. Whether you're at work or at play, you'll
be much more efficient and effective when you
have what you need to get the job done.
Fishing is no different. But with so many
options available in rods and reels, it's easy to
get bogged down in the details when you're
selecting your gear. Let's simplify the situation.
You can take part in the majority of our local
fishing opportunities using one rod and reel
outfit: A 7-foot medium rod (rated somewhere
between 12- and 20-pound line) and a 4000
size spinning reel, spooled with 12-pound
monofilament or 20-pound braid. This general-
purpose combo can be used to catch redfish on
the flats, snook around docks, flounder in the
surf, mackerel in the passes, snapper on the
reefs and bass in the canals. I suggest a 7-foot
rod as a compromise: A longer rod would be
better on the open flats, and a shorter rod
would be better when you're fishing straight
down or among the trees. Rod action is
personal preference, but a softer rod is usually
better if you use live bait and a stiffer rod will
help you put more action into artificial lures. If
you do a little of both, split the difference.
There are some things that your new all-
purpose outfit is ill-suited for, and those things
can be summed up in two words: Big fish. To go
after tarpon, seriously big snook, cobia and king
mackerel, you need something heavier. A dual-
drag spinning reel in a 5000 or 6000 size (that
would be the 8000 or 12000, if you're buying
Shimano) paired with a 7-foot heavy rod rated
for line between 30 and 50 pounds is just about
right. Line up with 30-pound mono or 50-pound
braid. The dual-drag reel makes this rig ideal
for trolling and for using big live baits, popular
methods for taking our bigger gamefish. In
addition to the species listed above, this is also
a good outfit for taking on sharks up to about


WaterLine photo
by Josh Olive
This angler's 3000
size reel and
medium weight
rod will handle
the majority of the
Harbor's fish.


-__ ~.--.- ---~----~-----.-.~-


5 feet, big snapper and smaller grouper and
amberjack on the reefs, and the huge redfish
that school just offshore in fall. You probably
won't be casting artificial lures with this rod
too often casting with heavy gear can be
exhausting after just a few throws. You will,
however, probably be doing some trolling,
which works best with a rod that has a softer tip.
So far you have two outfits: Medium and
heavy. But there are yet bigger fish swimming in
our waters, so your next rig is the extra-heavy.
With this, you can take on big grouper (including
Goliath grouper up to a couple hundred pounds),
bruiser amberjack, and all but the largest sharks.
A conventional reel with a star or lever drag in a
4/0 or 6/0 size and a 6-foot rod rated for 50- to
80-pound line is about what you'll want. Braided
line is not really appropriate on conventional
reels (see sidebar). Many rods in this class have


roller guides, which add significant cost. They're
nice but hardly necessary.
With the three rigs we've looked at, you can
catch 99 percent of what's out there. But sport
fishing is about having fun, so I'll suggest one
final outfit. As we all know, not every fish is a big
one. To make the most out of hooking smaller
fish ladyfish, sea trout, rat redfish, and even
panfish in salt or fresh water an ultralight
rod and reel is just the ticket. I use a 1000 size
spinning reel on a 6-foot rod rated for 2 to 8
pound line. To maximize line capacity on a small
reel, braid in 4- to 8-pound test is the way to
go. Most ultralight rods are 5 or 5.5 feet, but a
longer rod will cast a lot farther and is worth
looking for. As you gain angling experience, you
may even use your ultralight to take on larger
fish, especially on the flats or in the surf where
there are few snags and it's OK to let the fish run.


BRAIDED LINE OR
MONOFILAMENT?
Braided line has taken the tackle world by storm, and
there's a reason: For most purposes, it's better. It has
virtually no memory, so it's less prone to tangling. It's
more abrasion-resistant, which makes it harder for a
shell or toothy fish to cut through it (unless it's under
tension). In the same pound test, it's a lot thinner, so
more fits on your spool. Because it's thinner, it has
less air resistance, which means you can cast farther.
It does have a few drawbacks, though: It's more vis-
ible, it has no stretch at all, it makes a bit more noise
in the water, and it costs more to spool up. To hide
the visibility, you'll need a longer leader (I suggest
no less than 30 inches). A longer leader will also
allow for just a bit of stretch, which acts as a shock
absorber. As for the cost, braid has a much longer
useful life span than mono, so in the long run it's
pretty much a wash.You can also use mono backing
to reduce the cost of spooling up. The big problem
with braid applies mostly to conventional reels be-
cause of their horizontally oriented spool: When you
put pressure on the line, the strand tends to dig into
the line under it on the spool. This can cause binding
and result in lost fish. There are thing that you can do
to counteract this, but with conventional reels, mono
is usually a better choice. Sometimes you'll see line
digging in on a spinning reel, which usually means
you have your drag set way too tight.


WHICH BRAND?
Brand preference mostly comes down to the Chevy-
vs-Ford debate: Mine's better because it's better. In
reality, manufacturers can't survive long unless they
put out a quality product. Therefore, it's a good idea
to stick with gear from well-known brands. It's also
a good idea to buy your gear from one of the locally
owned and operated tackle shops, because they know
better than to sell you junk. If you tell the shop staff
what you're looking for and what your budget is,
they'll make sure you get the most bang for your buck.

From this point, you can expand your tackle
into more specialized realms. There are any
number of rods and reels for specific purposes,
which is why there are so many choices avail-
able at a well-stocked tackle shop. But with a
carefully chosen arsenal of multipurpose rods
and reels, you can catch almost anything that
swims without spending a fortune on gear.





e, =e.vl i ...u nmuau .. ....u.u....,. 2013 Annual Guii



How to maintain your reels


By Capt. Cayle Wills
One question that we get asked a lot in
Fishin' Frank's Bait & Tackle is,"How do I clean or
maintain my reels?"Out on the water I also get
asked how often I oil my reels. Well, I try to make
it a habit to take two of my 12 spinning reels
home for maintenance every month, so my spin-
ning reels get cleaned, oiled and greased three
times a year. My conventional reels get oiled
and greased once a season or as needed. My
baitcasting reels get cleaned every three months.
Now, my reels are out there a lot more than
yours probably are. Mine sometimes get bounced
out of the rod holders, and sometimes they get
thrown across the boat when they're in the way
when we're fighting a big fish. Sometimes I'm
just lazy and don't feel like putting them away
when I get off the water. So my reels need atten-
tion more often than an average angler's.
For your average fisherman, spinning and
baitcasting reels that are used often should
get maintained at least twice a year and
conventional reels once a year or as needed.
Some parts should get oiled after every fresh-
water rinse down you give them, just to keep
them running smoothly.
How you take care of your reels after you
fish with them will dictate both how long they
last and how often you have to maintain them.
If you're fishing in salt water, you should rinse
your rods and reels down after you're finished
fishing. Almost everyone has an adjustable
nozzle on their garden hose. Use the mist
setting on your reels. Avoid using high pressure
on the reel, because all you're going to accom-
plish is blasting those salt deposits further
down into the reel where they start to damage
bearings. Then your reel becomes hard to crank
or starts making funny noises or worse,
your anti-reverse bearing breaks and your reel
turns in both directions. Another old habit
people have is dunking their reels in a bucket
of fresh water. Please stop doing this. There
are few things worse you can do to your reels


than dunking them completely in water, even
if it is fresh water. After you rinse the reels,
set the nozzle to a higher pressure setting and
clean the scales, salt and slime off your rod.
Unless you know what you're doing, I don't
recommend taking your reel all the way apart.
Believe it or not, you can maintain almost
every bearing in your reel without completely
disassembling it. If you're confident this is
a task you can handle, I suggest laying the
parts out in order on a paper towel to help you
getting them back together properly.
Proper lubrication is what will keep your reel
going for the long haul. You'll need a bottle of
quality reel oil and a small tub of reel grease.
Oil and grease come in a huge number of
formulations, so stick with products designed
for fishing equipment.
Most of you use spinning reels, so let's look
at basic maintenance procedures for those.
First, remove your handle and the side plate
from the other side of the reel body. See those
silver rings in there? Those are bearings. Hit
these with a couple drops of reel oil. Don't
forget to oil your handle those are the first
things to start freezing up.
Next, remove your drag cap and spool from
the reel. The first thing to look at is the bottom
of the drag cap. If there is a rubber membrane
or other type of obvious seal, make sure it gets
a light coat of reel grease. Turn your spool over
and look at the bottom of the spool. You're
looking for your clicker. It's probably going
to be a simple piece of stamped sheetmetal
with a spring. If you have a high-end Quantum
reel, the underneath of the spool looks like
a strange contraption dreamed up on the
Starship Enterprise. That's the clicker. If it's a
simple clicker, a drop of oil is sufficient, if it's
not then it gets a light coat of grease.
I don't recommend taking your drag washers
apart. Drag washers are usually pre-oiled or
pre-greased, and not using the same kind of
oil or grease or worse, oiling a grease drag
or greasing an oil drag is likely to cause


that drag to fail. If you must maintain your
drag washers, contact the manufacturer and
getting the recommended oil or grease from
them or take your reel to a local repair shop.
Next, insert the handle and turn your reel
until the main shaft, where the spool mounts,
is all the way up. Put one drop of oil onto the
main shaft and let it run down into the rotor.
This will lubricate your anti-reverse bearing
and the main shaft bearing under the anti-
reverse bearing. Over-oiling this can cause
your anti-reverse bearing to fail. If you do take
your reel completely apart, never use grease
on your anti-reverse bearing. The bearing will
stick and the anti-reverse will probably fail.
Depending on the reel, you may have a
bearing near the top of the main shaft that
supports the spool. Make sure this gets a few
drops of oil also. Then inspect the hole in the
spool that this bearing sits in and make sure
it's clean. A drop of oil here won't hurt either.
Now we're down to the simple things. All
the parts of your reel that move or rotate
should get a few drops of oil. The hinges on the
bail should get a drop or two. If your reel has
an anti-reverse switch, oil it and flip it a few
times. These rarely get used and are very prone
to becoming locked in place.
One piece I do suggest you take apart on
your reel is your line roller. That's the little
wheel that guides line onto your reel. That
little wheel is important to guiding the fishing
line onto your reel properly, and if it's not
working it can cause wind knots. It's also one
of the first things that freeze up on spinning
reels. The reason I suggest taking the roller
apart is because the bearing is inside that
wheel, and all the oiling in the world isn't
going to find its way into that bearing. Salt
water will, oil won't that's the rule.
Normally the line roller is very simple and
comes apart with a Phillips screwdriver. Lay
the parts out in the order in which they were
removed. Clean out any salt and put a few drops
of oil on the bearing. Assemble the line roller the


de to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 31


RUST: PUBLIC ENEMY #1
Any time you expose metal to water, you risk
corrosion. Add salt to the water and make the
metal iron-based, and you virtually ensure there
will someday be rust. Once corrosion begins, it's an
irreversible process. Fortunately, there's Inox. This
little bit of magic in a can can stop rust before it ever
starts. Before you ever take your gear on the water,
give it a light coating. Do it again every second or
third trip. Inox is a rust preventive and a lubricant,
and it excels where WD-40 falls flat.

way you took it apart, putting a drop of oil on the
threads of the screw before you install it.
Baitcasters and most conventional reels are
pretty intricate devices and shouldn't be taken
completely apart and they don't have to
be for routine maintenance. Most baitcasting
reels have an easily removable side plate and
spool, and this will usually let you get to all
the pieces you need to grease and oil. Most
conventional have oil ports in them to let you
lubricate the parts that need it.
Baitcast reels are a little easier to perform
routine maintenance on. Simply remove the
side cap and pull out the spool. Look inside both
side caps and on the ends of the spool. Chances
are you will see bearings and/or gears. Bearings
get a drop or two of oil; gears get a little grease.
The one gear that you shouldn't grease is the
worm gear on the front of the body that moves
your line guide from side to side as you reel.
Some guides move when you cast, some don't.
If it does, putting grease here can shorten your
casting distance. Just make sure the gear is
clean, and a light coat of oil is sufficient.
Conventional reels are even easier. Chances
are they have ports for easy oiling. You will prob-
ably need an oiling device with a metal nozzle
that will allow you to depress the bearing in the
middle of the oil port, but you can easily find oil
bottles with those types of nozzles. A few drops
in these ports is all you need.
Capt. Cayle Wills owns and operates
Bad Fish Charters on Charlotte Harbor. You can
contact him at 941-916-4538 or Capt.Cayle@
ReelBadFish.com. You can also visit him online
at www.ReelBadFish.com or www.facebook.
com/BadFishCharters.


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
Catching fish is hard enough when you're
trying to tempt them with something they
can eat. Why would you want to handicap
yourself by using a lure made of metal or
plastic? In many circumstances, it's actually
easier to get fish to bite on artificial lures. It's
often more work, because a lure depends on
the angler for its fish-appealing action, but
it's often possible even likely, under some
circumstances for a lure fisherman to catch
more than a bait fisherman.
Manufacturers of artificial lures put a
great deal of though into how to make their
products catch fish (and fishermen). Many
years of innovation have brought us to where
we are today. There are literally thousands of
options for anglers who want to use artificial
lures, but most can be sorted into one of the
following categories:
SPOONS: These lures are made from shiny
metal that flashes erratically as the spoon is
pulled through the water. The legend goes that
an angler lunching on his boat accidentally
dropped a spoon overboard and saw a fish
attack it as it fell. The earliest spoons were
made from silverware, much to some house-
wife's chagrin, but now spoons are made in
a huge variety of sizes and shapes. The most
popular here are eighth- to half-ounce models
in gold with some sort of weedguard. Spoons
can be worked by simply casting them out and
reeling them in, or you can impart bouncing
or jigging motion. No matter how you use a
spoon, they are prone to spinning, so it's good
idea to use a quality ball bearing swivel so your
line doesn't get twisted.
JIGS: A jig is nothing more than a hook
weighted at the eye with a piece of metal,
usually lead. Jigs can be dressed with nylon,


feather, bucktail or plastic skirts (an undressed
jig is called a jighead). For fishing in shallow
water, a jig may be as light as 1/64 ounce, or
can be 16 ounces or more for deepwater use.
Most jigs weigh between an eighth-ounce
and 4 ounces, but for inshore use you'll rarely
use one heavier than half an ounce. Jigs are
usually most effective when bounced across the
bottom. A special type of jig called a silly jig is
meant to be worked erratically in midwater;
silly jigs are often paired with very small
teaser flies. Other heavy lures made of metal
(butterfly jigs, diamond jigs, etc.) are also
called jigs, but most are designed to be worked
vertically rather than cast outward like the jigs
most of us are familiar with. A jig can be used in
combination with a spoonlike blade to make a
spinnerbait, popular for both largemouth bass
in fresh water and redfish in the salt.
SOFT PLASTICS: These lures are made in
sizes from an inch long up to enormous, and
in shapes resembling fish, worms, lizards,
shrimp, crayfish, frogs and anything else a
fish might eat. The main thing they have in
common is that the plastic is meant to move
in a lifelike way in the water. Many have curly
or paddle-shaped tails that are designed
to swim when retrieved. Often, soft plastic
lures are impregnated with scent of some
sort, either to attract fish or to convince
them to hold onto the bait longer after they
strike. These baits are usually sold unrigged;
depending on the action desired, soft plastic
lures can be rigged on bare hooks, weighted
hooks or jigs (either dressed or plain).
SWIMBAITS: Technically a type of soft
plastic lure, swimbaits are shaped like small
fish and are usually sold with a weight and
hook already embedded into the lure. Swim-
baits are easy to use just cast it out and reel
it in and come in sizes from 2 inches to the
size of an adult mullet.


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TOPWATER PLUGS: These lures are prob-
ably the most exciting to catch fish with. Even
the most jaded old salts get a thrill when a
gamefish blows up on a topwater. There are
a number of different types. Walk-the-dog
lures are torpedo-shaped and are meant to
be worked with rhythmic rodtip twitches,
which cause the lure to dart back and forth
in a zigzag pattern across the water. Poppers
have concave fronts to make splashes and
noise when the lure is tugged sharply. Prop
baits have small propellers at the front
and back of the lures (sometimes just the
back) that churn as the lure is retrieved.
All topwater plugs work best in low-light
conditions early morning, late evening or
overcast days and in water less than 6 feet
deep. Otherwise, fish are wary about coming
to the surface to hit a bait. Fish often miss
topwater baits when they strike. Don't jerk
the lure away; just keep working it until you
feel the weight of the fish. This is easier said
than done it takes nerves of steel to keep
walking the dog when a 15-pound snook
attacks three or four times in a row.
JERKBAITS: Most anglers are familiar with
jerkbaits (think of the original Rapala Minnow).
These lures have short plastic lips, which cause
them to dive under the water's surface. They're
usually worked by jerking the lure under,
reeling it for a few seconds and then allowing
it to float back up. Varying the amount of time
between jerks and the speed of the retrieve
can make a huge difference in the interest fish
show these lures; you may need to experi-
ment to discover what action works best for a
given set of conditions. As with topwater lures,
jerkbaits are usually most effective in low light.
Sometimes, soft plastic lures are also called
jerkbaits.
CRANKBAITS: Many crankbaits are also
lipped, but the lip of a crankbait is longer


THE TROUBLE
WITH TREBLES
Many lures feature treble hooks, which are both
a blessing and a curse: They are very effective at
hooking fish that hit a lure, but they also can easily
end up in your clothing or your skin. Trebles also
often do quite a bit of damage to a fish, especially
if a lure has more than one set of hooks. It's very
common to have fish hooked in the eye, gills or
other areas along with the mouth. To make it easier
to remove a treble hook from someplace it doesn't
belong, it's a good idea to use a pair of pliers to
mash down the barbs, or file them off.

because the lure is intended to be worked
underwater most or all of the time. There are
also lipless crankbaits (like the Rat-L-Trap)
that rely on the shape of the lure to cause it to
dive. All crankbaits are designed to vibrate on
the retrieve and often work best when simply
cast out and reeled back in. Much of Charlotte
Harbor is too shallow for many deep-diving
crankbaits that are popular up north.
TROLLING PLUG: A specialized type of
crankbait meant to be towed behind a moving
boat. Of course, you can troll with most lures,
but these baits are designed specifically to be
used at trolling speeds and to dive to a certain
depth range. Trolling plugs are usually big and
usually expensive, but they're also a fantastic
way to target big fish in relatively deep water
without having to use natural baits.
TWITCHBAITS: Usually made of hard plastic,
twitchbaits are weighted to be neutrally
buoyant or sink slowly. Unlike most other lures,
a twitchbait has virtually no action except what
the angler imparts with twitches of the rodtip.
Because of this, it can take some time to learn
how to catch fish with these lures. Once you get
the hang of it, though, there are few hard baits
that are more effective.


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 32


Artificial lures and how


to catch fish using them






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FAVORITE LURES
With so many choices available on store shelves, choosing artificial lures can be tough.
To help you stock your tackle box, we posed this question to our WaterLine writers: If you
could have only three lures to use in Charlotte Harbor, what would they be and why?
CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
1. Gold Johnson Sprite: At times almost everything in Charlotte Harbor will hit it,
trout to tarpon, and it's a good prospecting lure.
2. Gulp! Shrimp on a jighead: It's about as close to natural bait as you can get.
3.1/16-ounce Beetle Spin: I love to catch bass and panfish on ultralight gear and this
is my go-to lure. I usually fish it with a 2-inch curly tail grub.
CAPT. JOSH GREER
1. Rapala Skitter Walk: This is a good search bait you can cover a lot of water very
quickly and find fish.
2. Gulp! Shrimp: Specifically, the 3-inch version in New Penny rigged on a jighead. I
can catch any saltwater predator with it.
3. Rapala Twitchin'Shad: This lure imitates whitebait very well. I like to use it for
actually catching fish that I've found with the Skitter Walk.
JEFF KINCAID
Spoons, jigs and Sebile Stick Shads all cast really well, allowing you to reach
fish that are farther away without spooking them, and all three have a proven track
record as fish catchers.
ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
1. Zara Spook Jr: The diversity of this lure is fantastic it's great both inshore and
offshore. It's not too big for small fish or too small for big ones. Topwater strikes are also
amazing. It does take a little effort to learn to work correctly, though.
2. Weedless gold spoon: This is three lures in one you can jig it off the bottom,
reel it at a moderate pace in midwater, or burn it across the surface. Be sure to use a ball
bearing swivel or line twist will get you.
3. Soft plastic shrimp: Everything eats shrimp, so it's fairly easy to fool fish with a fake
one. Like other soft plastics, you can rig this on a jighead or weedless on a worm hook. It
also works well under a float.
CAPT. MIKE MYERS
1. Silver spoon: Everything eats a silver spoon. They're easy to use and they're almost
indestructible.
2. White bucktail jig: Just like the spoon, easy to use and everything eats it.
3. DOA CAL shad on a quarter-ounce jighead: Again, everything eats it and it's easy
to use. It's not indestructible, but it's my favorite by far.
JOSH OLIVE
1. Zara Spook Jr: I used to use topwaters a lot for bass, and I've rediscovered a love of
these lures. The Spook Jr walks really well fast or slow. When you pick a color, remember
that the fish really only sees the bottom. The white/red head is a good standard.
2. MirrOlure Lil John: It doesn't look like much, but this bait is deadly on redfish, trout
and flounder. I usually rig iton a jighead, but redfish are fond of the erratic action on an
unweighted hook.
3. Silly jig with a stinger fly: This is just a great all-around fish catcher. Work it fast
for ladyfish, mackerel, jacks and bluefish, or bounce it on the bottom for flounder,
pompano and trout.
CAPT. CAYLE WILLS
A gold weedless spoon, a Bone/Silver Zara Spook Jr. and a black-and-gold
Rat-L-Trap. Those three lures combined have caught just about every species of fish in
this Harbor, and my confidence in all of them is high.





...,,....wn.. ......,. .. 2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 34



How to choose and hire a fishing guide


By Robert Lugiewicz

Southwest Florida is home base for hundreds
of fishing guides. Some of them are profes-
sionals in every sense of the word; others are
not. When you go on a trip with a guide, you
have expectations of a good time on the water
in exchange for your hard-earned dollars. If
you do your homework and ask around a little,
that's exactly what you should get.
The first thing to remember about a charter
guide is that you're paying him to work for you.
As with any other service, you shouldn't just go
with the first guy you find in the phone book.
Call several and chat a bit. Get a recommenda-
tion from a friend, or from one of the local
tackle shops. Visit the guide's website, but
view it skeptically anyone can put together
a flashy website with photos stolen from who
knows where.
Once you are comfortable you've found
someone who will do a good job and whose
personality will mesh well with yours, tell him
exactly what your expectations are being
up-front from the start will prevent misun-
derstandings. Be reasonable about what you
expect. Wanting to catch tarpon in August or big
trout in January is reasonable; wanting to catch
tarpon in January or big trout in August is not.
Every fisherman has a favorite fish. So does
every captain. Most are versatile and capable
of catching whatever is swimming out there,
but there are definitely some who are better at
targeting certain fish than others. If you want
to fish specifically for sharks, it makes sense to
hire a guide who has a reputation for catching
sharks. Also, a guide's boat will make a differ-
ence in what you target. If he runs a 16-foot
skiff, don't expect to go out on the Gulf and
catch amberjack.
If you want to catch fish and have fun,
almost any captain can do that. If you want
to learn, though, be sure your guide under-
stands that ahead of time. Some will even
offer teaching services on your boat. Don't be


shy about chatting it up and asking questions
while you fish. Most guides are very willing to
tell you about the Harbor and all it has to offer.
By the time you get on board, your guide
should already have loaded the boat with ice
and bait. If you have to take the time to go
catch bait, your allotted time should start after
that chore is done. Be sure to mention it -
again, merely to avoid misunderstandings.
While you're on the water, listen to your
guide. You're paying him for his ability and
experience, so it will serve you well to take
advantage of it. If you fished Turtle Bay last


year and caught the heck out of big redfish,
but your guide says the big redfish are at
Pirate Harbor, you're probably best off going to
Pirate Harbor. If you insist, he'll probably take
you to Turtle Bay but if the bite is lousy, it's
not fair to blame him.
Some captains don't make a single cast for
themselves while they have clients on the
boat. Others will wet a line, especially if they
know they've got experienced anglers. Don't
be afraid to say something if you feel your
guide is paying more attention to his own
fishing than to you. Some less-professional


guides treat customers more like fishing
buddies. If that's what you want, no problem.
If it's not, speak up. Remember, you're paying
him to work for you.
Even the best charter captains have bad
days fishing. If you have a really blah day,
many guides will deduct part of their fee or
offer you a discount on a future trip. Don't
expect to pay nothing for your trip, especially
if the bad fishing wasn't something the guide
could have controlled. After all, it costs him
money for the fuel, the wear on his boat, bait
and all his other expenses. If the weather
changes dramatically the day before your
charter, call him and ask how he wants to
proceed. He may ask you to reschedule, or he
may say he can find the fish you want.
As your trip winds down, decide whether
you'll be tipping your captain. Everyone knows
to leave a tip for a waiter. What a lot of people
don't realize is that most charter guides also
expect to get a tip for a job well done. How
much? If your guide goes above and beyond or
stretches your trip by a half-hour to keep you
on a hot bite, a $50 tip is much appreciated. If
he goes way above and beyond, $100 isn't out
of line. If there's a mate aboard, mates usually
work solely for tips.
After your day on the water, be sure to give
a report to the tackle shops that you talked
to before you hired your guide. They'll want
to know how your experience was good,
bad or indifferent. Reports from a captain's
customers are a big part of the recommenda-
tions a shop makes, so you'll be doing your
part to ensure others have a good time on the
water. Charter captains live and die by good
word of mouth, so if you had a great time be
sure to let others know.
Robert is a crustacean relocation specialist
at Fishin' Franks, located at 4425-D Tamiami
Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call 941-625-3888 for
more information about the shop or for local
fishing info. You can also visit them online at
www.FishinFranks.com.


Serving Charlotte Harbor and the Peace & Myakka Rivers


Trust the local experts.
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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 35


hen is high tide?


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


Southwest Florida tides are mysterious things.
They come in and go out in odd patterns, with as
many as five a day or as few as one. Low tide may
occur an hour after high tide and be recorded at
the same height, then the water may flood in
and get 18 inches higher in a few hours.
It may seem like multiple personality disorder,
but our strange tides are really just the result of
the shape of the Gulf of Mexico. See, on the open
Atlantic coast, you have one high tide and one
low tide in a 24-hour period. These are called
diurnal tides. In other places, there are two high
and two low tides. These are semidiurnal tides.
So far, so good.
But along the Gulf coast, we have what
are called mixed tides sometimes diurnal,
sometimes semidiurnal. The mechanics of it are
very complex, so let's leave it at this: The sea
bounces off the coastal contours of the Gulf like
water sloshing about in an irregularly shaped
bin. Determining what it will do can be done by
mathematical equation but not by observing the
previous day's tides.
Fortunately, there's a solution:. Tide charts do
all that pesky math for you, so at a glance you
can find out how much water will be under your
hull when you're crossing the Cape Haze bar.
(That's mostly true; I'll explain in just a moment.)


But a tide chart is no good unless you can read it.
If you're still in the dark, no worries.
Here's how it works: Tide heights are expressed
in feet above or below mean lower low water,
which is a technical term for sea level. Abbrevi-
ated MLLW, these are the depths shown on a
navigational chart. On the charts in WaterLine
every week, these are expressed in both text
and graph form. The graph (the part that looks a
bit like a very unhealthy heart rate readout) is a
bit easier for the uninitiated to grasp. Wherever
the line goes up, the tide is rising. Where it goes
down, the tide is falling. It's easy to see the rela-
tive height of each day's tides. In this format, it's
easy to see when the tide will be rising or falling
quickly the steeper the slope, the faster the
tide (again, mostly true; I really will explain in
just a sec here).
Below the graphs, you'll find the same
information in a text-only format. This is how
tide charts are usually presented on giveaway
cards, because you can fit the information into
a smaller space. If you look at the numbers and
compare them to the ones on the graph, you'll
see they're the same.
Tide charts are only accurate for the listed
location. Inshore, the closer you are to the Gulf
the sooner a low or high tide will happen. For
example, the times listed for Punta Gorda are
correct only for the exact spot where the tide
station is (I believe it's the U.S. 41 bridges). If


you're at Ponce de Leon Park, a couple miles
closer to the Gulf, low and high tides will occur
a few minutes sooner than the time shown. It
takes time for water to flow.
Now, about that explaining: There are a couple
variables that can affect tide height, sometimes
hugely. Tide predictions are available years in
advance. They're based on moon phase and
season, and there's no way they can account
for local weather conditions. In the winter, we
have naturally lower low tides. We also have a
prevailing north or northwest wind that tends to
push water out of the Harbor. No tide chart takes
this wind into consideration, which is why some-
times a tide that's predicted to be, say, 0.36 can
actually be -0.24. The harder and longer the wind
blows, the more this effect will be magnified.
In summer, strong southerly or westerly winds
can have the opposite effect, driving water
levels up. We saw that twice in 2012, with high
tides driven by major storms nearly spilling over
seawalls all around the area. High rainfall and
the river flooding that follows can also cause
tides to be higher than predicted.
Be absolutely clear on this tide height is
a prediction ONLY. You as a responsible boater
must factor in conditions at your location. That
weakness aside, tide charts are a fantastic tool
for anyone who uses the water, which is why we
devote the time and effort to producing them
every single week.


HOWTIDES
AFFECT FISHING
On the shallow flats of Charlotte
Harbor, tide is everything. You'll learn
that real quick when you park your boat
in 3 feet of water, only to discover a
few hours later that your hull is resting
on the sand. The fish have the same
problem as your boat they can't go
where there's no water. As a rising tide
floods a flat, fish that have been waiting
in deeper water outside the bar will
move onto the flat to feed on the small
creatures living in the seagrass beds. The
higher the water gets, the farther into
the mangroves the fish can get. On an
outgoing tide, predators tend to gather
in areas where the water is naturally
funneled for example, creek mouths
and channel outlets. There they ambush
baitfish, shrimp and crabs carried on the
outflowing current.
If you're used to river fishing, you
know that letting your bait move with
the water's flow is the best way to draw
strikes. It's what the fish expect to see.
It works the same way here a bait or
lure that moves more naturally with the
current is more likely to get eaten. Pay
attention to structure such as pilings,
mangrove roots or anything else a
hungry fish might use as an ambush
point, and let your bait drift as close to
that as possible.
Strong outgoing tides are generally
the best time to fish. The powerful water
flow will bring lots of food with it, which
gets the fish in an eating mood. On the
other hand, tides that barely move or
the slack periods as the tide turns can be
very slow for anglers. In summer, when
the upper Harbor is fresh with rainwater
and poor in oxygen, strong incoming
tides bring salty, well-oxygenated water
in from the Gulf. Many fish will ride that
wave into the Harbor, then ride it right
back out again.


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 36


The right way to fight a fish


By Jeff Kincaid

The conventional wisdom for fighting a
fish has always been pump up, reel down
- that is, pump the rod upwards to put
pressure on the fish and bring it toward you,
then reel in the slack as you're lowering the
rod. Unfortunately, a lot of fishermen have
forgotten this basic rule and try just reeling
like madmen. This technique is ineffective
and will bring you plenty of trouble.
One of the biggest things I've been
hearing lately is people using spinning
tackle complaining about line twist. The
worst thing you can do with spinning gear
is to reel against the drag. When you're
reeling, the rotor is turning in one direc-
tion. As drag is feeding line out, the spool
is turning the opposite direction. By reeling
against the drag, you're putting a lot of
twist into the line quickly. In case you don't
know, line twist is bad. Very bad.
Don't overtighten your drag. A reel is not
a winch. The rule for your drag settings is
a third of the strength your weakest link.
If your reel is rated for 8 to 15 pound line,
the rod is rated for 10- to 20-pound line
and you're using 30-pound PowerPro, the
maximum drag setting you would use is
normally 5 pounds one third of the reel's
rated strength. Although your reel may be
capable of applying more drag, using your
drag system at its full capacity all the time
is like towing a big boat with a small vehicle
- it will work, but not well, plus you'll
shorten the lifespan of your gear.
Now that you've got the basics, let's
take a look at what to do from the
moment the fish takes your bait to the
moment the fish is boated.

HOOKING THE FISH
How much pressure does it take to drive
a hook into a fish's lip? If the hook is sharp
and the line is tight, not much. A half-


pound of pressure should do it. The last
thing you should do is give it the over-the-
shoulder Bill Dance move. This will probably
just pull the bait out of the fish's mouth
- or launch the fish out of the water and
maybe right over the boat. When you're
fishing an artificial, most of the time the
fish will hit the lure and turn away. A golf-
er's putt stroke is all the motion you need.
If you're using a circle hook, simply letting
the line come tight does the job. A gentle
hookset will often allow you to lead the fish
out of his cover before he notices anything
is wrong. A hard hookset, though, will alert
the fish immediately that he's been hooked,
and he'll turn right into the mangrove roots
or dock pilings and wrap your line.

FIGHTING THE FISH
If there are obstructions that the fish can
tangle your line in, lift the rod up high. It's
not an effective way to put pressure on your
fish, but at least your line won't get caught.
If the fish heads toward heavy cover, drop
your rodtip and pull in the opposite direc-
tion from the way the fish is running. This
will turn the fish's head away from the
direction he's heading and get him back out
into the open. If the fish gets to cover or
wraps your line around a piling, flip the bail
open. The fish is fighting mostly because
of the pressure he feels from your line. If
the pressure is off, you can move to a more
favorable location and then draw the fish
out of his hiding spot.
If the fish is out in the open and running,
let him run. Don't hold the rod vertically;
this is called high-sticking and is a great
way to break your rod. Instead, lower the
rodtip and point it in the direction the fish is
going. Don't be afraid to let the fish run -
that's why you have so much line on your
spool. If you hook a bigger fish than you
expected say, a nice cobia while you're
trout fishing you may have to chase the


fish. Then again, you may not. If you've got
at least 150 yards of line on the spool, the
fish will likely tire before reaching the end
of the line.
If you feel the need to apply additional
drag during a tough fight, don't touch the
drag knob that's a great way to break
your line. Instead, apply manual pressure to
the spool with the palm of your hand or your
finger. That way, you can put on a little more
pressure when needed and quickly remove it.
When the run slows and the fish starts
to turn, now you have the advantage. The
fish is still moving, but he's not taking more
line out. Put pressure on the fish start
reeling him in. Pump the rod, reel the slack.
Pump the rod, reel the slack. The fish will
probably make a second, third and even
fourth run. Let him. Don't try to boat the
fish until he's good and tired.
If you've cranked the drag down (even
though I told you not to), when the fish gets
close to the boat loosen it back up. When
the fish sees the boat, he may spook, and
when he spooks, that's when he's likely to
break your line. Many fish are lost right at
boatside this way.

LANDING THE FISH
When you have the fish next to the boat
and tired, use your hands, net or BogaGrip
to land him. Grab the fish, not the leader
- this is an excellent way to lose the fish
just before you can take a photo to prove
you caught it. If you'll be releasing the fish,
don't use a towel or dry hands to handle
it. Remove the hook as quickly and gently
as possible, keeping the fish in the water
as much as you can, and release the fish to
fight another day.
Jeff Kincaid is the owner and operator of
Capt. Ted's Tackle in Port Charlotte. Contact
him at www.CaptainTedsTackle.com or
941-627-6800, or stop in at the shop (1189
Tamiami Trail, in front of lngman Marine).


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
With size limits and closed seasons restricting the fish
an angler can keep, it's a simple fact that most of the fish
you catch are going to have to go back in the water. It's
up to you to help them survive to fight another day.
Use tackle heavy enough for the fish you're
targeting. Tackle that's too light means long battles,
and the longer the fight the less likely the fish is
to survive afterward. Ideally, you should be able to
subdue your quarry within 20 minutes.
Use circle hooks if you're using natural bait. Circle
hooks are designed to hook fish in the corner of the
mouth, making the hook more accessible. Mashing the
barb down will make the hook much easier to remove.
If you can easily remove the hook or it's deep in the
fish, cut the leader as close to the hook as possible. This
will cause less damage to the fish than a crude surgical
procedure to remove the hook.
If you use lures with treble hooks, consider filing off or
mashing down the barbs. Multiple hooks cause multiple
wounds to the fish. Also, it's often time-consuming to
remove multiple hooks, and a quicker release is better
for the fish's survival chances.
Some fish can hurt you. Catfish have venomous spines,
snook have sharp gill covers, and several fish sharks,
snapper, mackerel, barracuda and seatrout have sharp
teeth and aren't shy about using them. Always be careful.
Don't gaff a fish you intend to release. Use a net or
your hands to land the fish. If you use a net, be sure it
has soft cloth or rubber mesh. Rough nylon mesh will
scratch off slime.
Wet your hands before handling the fish. Never use a
towel or dry gloves, as this will rub off the fish's protec-
tive slime coat. Deslimed fish often die of skin infections.
Better yet, use a dehooking tool and avoid handling the
fish at all.
Keep the fish in the water as much as possible. The
bigger the fish, the more important this is the
weight of a large fish can crush its internal organs if it's
not buoyed by water. Lifting a big shark or large tarpon
out of the water is likely to do fatal damage.
If your fish is smaller say, less than 20 pounds -
you can remove it from the water briefly. When you're
lifting the fish for a photo, hold it with both hands.


It's OK to use a BogaGrip or other lip-locking tool on
the mouth as long as you support the fish's belly with
your other hand. Don't use pliers; the crushing force
applied can do severe damage to a fish's jaw. If you
plan to release your catch, never handle it by just the
lower jaw. This can cause damage that will kill the fish
slowly. It will swim away just fine, but it won't be able
to eat properly and will starve.
When you release a fish, slide it gently into the water.
Don't literally throw it back the shock of hitting the
water's surface hard can stun or kill the fish. If you're
fishing from a pier, drop it headfirst from as low a height
as you can. If you're fishing from a tall pier or bridge,
lower the fish to the water in a pier net.
If your fish requires resuscitation, hold it underwater
facing into the current (if there's no current, walk with the
fish or idle the boat forward). Don't slosh it back and forth
or side to side. Keep one hand on the lower jaw and the
other under the belly. If it's kicking feebly, hang onto it.
When the fish is ready to go, it'll kick hard and swim off.
Generally, the less time a fish spends in your livewell,
the better. But a livewell makes a good "emergency
room"for very tired or stressed fish. Be sure the water is
well-oxygenated, and close the lid once the fish is inside
- the dark well will calm the fish. After a few minutes,
the fish should be OK to release. Be aware that if your
fish is not legal to harvest, law enforcement officers will
probably take a dim view of your"I was just trying to
revive it" explanation.
No matter how careful you are, some fish will die after
you release them. That's just a reality of fishing. When
catching fish that have a high release mortality rate, an
ethical angler will stop fishing at some point. Trout, for
example, often die for no apparent reason after release.
If you catch 100 trout in a day of fishing, it's not unheard
of to have 25 die, especially if you're consistently
hooking them in the throat or gut. Fish caught from the
bottom in deep water often come aboard with distended
swim bladders. Even when vented, these fish often die.
In these types of circumstances, limit the number of fish
you catch, and when you're reeling in all undersize fish,
maybe it's best to stop fishing or find another spot.
The whole point of catch and release is that the fish
survive. If the fish dies, you might as well have jut kept
it. Do the best you can to keep the fish you release alive
for the future.


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 38


s6w I l


THE BEST
TIME TO FISH
When you prefer to fish
depends partly on your preferred
species and methods.
"My favorite time of the year
to fish is the winter, when redfish
fight like redfish and not limp
overcooked noodles,"says Capt.
Cayle Wills. "Yes, the wind is a
pain and the inconsistent weather
isn't much better, but I love the
really low tides. Most of the time
I'm leaving the flats before most
people can get back there."
"I like the spring,"says Jeff
Kincaid. "The fish seem to eat well
with all the bait around and it's
easy to get them to take lures"
Capt. Josh Greer prefers
autumn."Most of the fish have
already spawned and they're more
concerned with feeding to fatten
up for winter," he says.
Capt. Ralph Allen also likes fall.
"September and October are my
favorites. The fall runs of many fish
are in high gear, the weather can
be great, and there are few people
in town or on the water. If you
want a pod of tarpon to yourself,
this is the time."
"May and October are tradition-
ally both transition months,"says
Robert Lugiewicz. "Big fish show
up and little ones leave in May;
it reverses in October. You can
fish for just about anything from
sheepshead to tarpon it's all
available."
Then there are the guys who
just love to fish."I'll be out there
winter, spring, summer and fall,"
says Capt. Mike Myers. "'l just love
to fish and don't care what time of
year it is. Call it an addiction."


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

People who move to Florida from northerly
latitudes often say they miss the seasons. I don't
know what the heck they're talking about. While
we may not have white Christmases or blazing
fall color, there is no shortage of seasonal
change here in the Sunshine State especially
if you're a fisherman.
As you might expect, January is a bit chilly.
The average high is about 75; the average low
around 50. Water temperature is more stable.
The Gulf is generally in the mid-60s, but the
shallows of the Harbor can fluctuate dramatically
depending on recent weather. It's not uncommon
to have cold fronts drive air temps into the
freezing range, and water on the flats can get
down to the upper 40s. That's lethal for snook,
so they're uncommon on the flats in winter.
Instead, they seek warmer refuge in the Gulf on
nearshore reefs or in the rivers and canals.
January is also dry. Little rain means the rivers
flow weakly and the Harbor becomes saltier.
With near-seawater conditions as far upriver as
the 1-75 bridges and El Jobean, saltwater game-
fish are more willing to travel deep into the river
mouths. Redfish, trout and sheepshead all move
upriver. The cooler it is, the sooner that migra-
tion happens. This past year, a warm winter kept
many of those fish on the flats and in Gasparilla
and Pine Island sounds until late February.
During winter, we typically see a cold front
come through every 10 to 14 days. Some are
mild, dropping the temperature a few degrees;
others are much stronger. The dropping
barometer ahead of the front often puts fish in
a feeding mood and can provide great action.
Once the front passes and the clouds clear, we
get the days the tourism officials pray for -
bluebird skies, high pressure and low humidity.
These days are great for many outdoor activities,
but fishing is generally not among them. Expect
a poor bite for a day or three after a front.
For inshore anglers, the main targets are trout
and sheepshead, which seem more willing to
bite when there's a nip in the air. Flounder don't
mind the cold either. Winter redfish are usually
small, since the larger subadults move offshore





sL, &# i(a wuuurfEufiniU iU mPJ iiUn.U iE


2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 39


in the fall. Pompano may also be biting, but
they're either here or they're not. If you want
to give them a shot, ask at the tackle shop if
anyone's been buying pompano jigs. Black
drum are gathering in the canals and may be
heard thumping at night. With baitfish hard to
come by, shrimp are the standard bait. Winter
is a time of extra low tides, so this is a good
time to scout for new fishing spots and also
a good time to double-check the tide chart so
you don't run aground.
Offshore, you'll find few pelagic fish but the
bottom fishing is good. Gag and red grouper
make a general move inshore during winter,
putting them more in reach of anglers who
don't want to drop a bundle on a big fuel bill.
Unfortunately, gag are closed winter and will
be for the foreseeable future. The good news
is that the Feb.-March seasonal closure on red
grouper is expected to go away by winter 2014.
This is also the time to get bigger amberjacks,
as they also move closer to shore. Snapper
action is usually pretty good but may be
eclipsed by porgies and, on the nearshore reefs,
sheepshead. Sheepies stage up on the reefs
before moving inshore. If the winter's warm,
the reefs may be the place to get'em. Winter
winds often conspire to keep anglers off the
Gulf, especially those in smaller vessels.
Things don't change a whole lot until the
tail end of March. That's usually when we see
the last gasps of winter (call it the thaw, if you
like). If you're a sheepshead specialist, that's
reason to weep. For everyone else, things get
much better. Whitebait, which have been tiny
or nonexistent over winter, begin to show up in
nettable sizes. The rat reds have been eating all
winter and are starting to reach the bottom of
the slot, so you can take one home for dinner.
Unless it gets really hot, the trout bite will stay
good through spring (the big ones might be
harder to find). The snookcicles shake off their
icy crust and begin to show up on the flats
again. The pompano bite is often more consis-
tent (but not always I'd still ask at the bait
shop). Keeper-size mangrove snapper are more
plentiful around the piers, bridges and deep
holes along mangrove shorelines. A handful
of resident tarpon make a showing in the river


mouths, where an even smaller handful of
specialists begin catching them around the
bridges. As the Gulf water temps climb into the
low 70s, cobia start to show up off the beaches
and around the Harbor's artificial reefs.
In the Gulf, the grouper will stay inshore
for a while longer, until the water gets really
warm. With red grouper open April 1, more
boats will be heading offshore to catch them.
The snapper bite is getting better, making for
an even more compelling argument to get
out there. Pods of threadfin herring, scaled
sardines and anchovies will begin appearing
from the south, migrating northward along
the beaches. Hot after them will be Spanish
mackerel and bonito, with kingfish lagging a
bit but not too far behind.
Once the threat of cold fronts is firmly over,
migratory tarpon will show up en masse.
Sometimes they come in small packs of five
to 50; sometimes they all seem to show up
overnight. Resident fish will already be in the
lower Harbor and Pine Island Sound to greet
them as they arrive. Hammerheads and big bull
sharks arrive, following the tarpon. The jumbo
females often come in heavily gravid, ready to
drop a litter of pups to grow up in the estuary.
Spring is a short season in Florida's subtrop-
ical climate and by the middle of May gives
way to a seemingly endless summer. Warm
water holds less oxygen, and the flats heat up
quickly. When fish are driven off the flat itself,
they'll often hang out in deeper water just on
the edges. Look for channels, troughs, creek
mouths and other such features they can be
hotspots for redfish, snook and cobia. Trout are
starting to slow down a bit as the water warms
past their ideal comfort level. Tarpon season
is in full force, with the passes full of rolling
fish getting ready to head offshore for their
spawning chores. Snook are also thinking about
breeding and are slowly migrating toward the
beaches. A few will have already made it to the
surf. The rainy season is just around the corner.
For right now, enjoy the clearest water of the
year now that the winds have settled down.
In the nearshore Gulf, the Spanish and king
mackerel have already begun moving north of
us, but unless the water gets really warm really


fast, there should still be some good pods of fish
out there. Reef fishing is still solid, with fewer
red and gag grouper biting but snapper fishing
reaching a fever pitch. Big amberjack have
moved back out to deep water, but the fun-size
fish of 15 to 20 pounds are usually plentiful.
Permit begin appearing on the wrecks.
June normally kicks off the rainy season. In
recent years, the rains have not been as regular
as they once were. As the runoff begins to flow
down the rivers, the Harbor's waters take on a
strong brown tint. The water's not dirty just
stained with the tannins from the swamps
upriver. Within a few weeks, the visibility in the
Harbor goes from great to lousy. The outflow
of nutrients sometimes kicks off an algae
bloom. Snook are tropical by nature and love
warm water, but they're busy spawning so they
may be less interested in eating. Redfish have
slowed down in the upper Harbor but are still
biting well in Lemon Bay, Gasparilla Sound and
other areas closer to the Gulf. The trout action
has fallen off a cliff. There's a good cobia and
shark bite from the river mouths to the offshore
reefs. Tarpon are mostly concentrated in the
passes and hungry, though a few have started
to move north toward Tampa Bay and points
north. The Spanish mackerel are getting fewer
along the beaches, but if you go a bit farther
offshore there are still kingfish around. The
grouper bite is slow, especially on the near-
shore reefs, but snapper are still going great
guns. Small mahi will probably show up around
weedlines in the open Gulf.
As the heat wears on into July and August,
the king mackerel evaporate. Gulf water
temperatures peak in the upper 80s and can
reach the mid-90s on the upper Harbor's flats.
As river water continues to pour into the
estuary, most fish migrate to the lower Harbor,
leaving the river mouths mostly devoid of
angling targets. Tarpon to the rescue: Having
completed their spawn, the giant masses
begin to spread out along the beaches and
throughout the Harbor.
Not much changes until the first cold fronts
of fall. Both fish and fishermen are eager for
any hint of autumn by now. The rainy season is
about at the end by September. Early-season


fronts energize the fishing action across
the board. Tarpon feed heavily on ladyfish
and glass minnows in preparation for their
journey to the Keys and the Caribbean. Snook
also are hungry, driven to put on fat for
whatever winter may bring. Big bull redfish
- the 15- to 30-pounders show up in the
nearshore Gulf and sometimes in the Harbor.
Trout resume feeding in deeper inshore
holes, though most will be small this time of
year. The big sharks are long gone, but their
offspring are plentiful and eager to take a bait.
The cobia have mostly moved out.
Action in the Gulf is at its low point. The
grouper bite is still modest, the snapper bite
has slowed, and the pelagics are mostly absent.
But that doesn't last long. As the water begins
to cool in October, Spanish macks and kingfish
return from the northern Gulf, along with
huge numbers of baitfish. The massive amount
of food draws gag grouper inshore, followed
shortly by red grouper. Amberjack also move
nearer to shore. As stone crab season gets
under way, so does tripletail season (these fish
are caught mainly around the crab pots).
October and November may have cooler
temperatures, but the inshore bite is red-hot.
Big redfish are everywhere on the flats, feeding
voraciously as they prepare to begin their adult
lives offshore. Snook are eating anything they
can find in their annual pre-winter panic. If
the weather stays warm, the trout will stay
off their feed, but if we get cool early, the
trout action can be fantastic this time of year.
Pompano begin appearing again after being
AWOL all summer. Pods of tarpon are leaving,
but until the first real chill hits, there will be
fish in the upper Harbor feeding. Shark action
is slowing, but there will be small ones in the
Harbor all winter. The flounder bite is starting
to get more consistent.
As the holidays approach, we fall back into
our winter pattern: Great trout fishing, redfish
biting well but getting smaller, tarpon gone,
mackerel gone, gag grouper thick and hungry,
and everyone hoping Santa will bring a good
pompano run. Of course, every year is different,
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By Capt. Josh Greer


If you like catching a lot of fish as easily as
possible, skip this column. Fly fishing isn't about
that. It's more about challenging yourself to
catch fish in a totally different way. Fly casting is
an art. Anyone can pick up a spinning rod, learn
the basics in three minutes and start catching
fish. Learning to cast a fly rod is a skill that
takes time. And the fly is just hair or feathers
on a hook, with no scent or built-in action -
you have to work that fly to make it look like
something a fish wants to eat. No one picks up
a fly rod to catch a whole bunch of fish (which
is not to say that doesn't sometimes happen).
When you go out fly fishing, you probably won't
catch as many fish but the personal sense of
accomplishment and connection you feel to the
fish you hook makes the effort highly rewarding.
If you're used to fishing with other types of
tackle, don't try to apply those lessons here.
In other methods, you're casting the weight of
the lure or bait. In fly casting, you're casting the
weight of the line. That why it's so important to
match the weight of your line and the weight of
your rod. Trying to throw a 12-weight line with
an 8-weight rod is like trying to cast a 6-ounce
jig with a bluegill rod. You have to match your
rod, reel, line and fly.
A lot of thought goes into a fly fisherman's
equipment. For example, you may have a
8-weight rod, so you need an 8-weight line.
Simple, right? But do you need a floating or
sinking line? Which taper do you want (they're


usually classified by species)? Redfish tapers,
for example, are short and fat, made for short
casts with bigger flies. With this line, you don't
need to do as much false casting as you do with
a bonefish taper, which is intended for long
casts with smaller flies and a quiet landing. Line
intended for throwing poppers are different
from lines meant for streamers.
As with any other type of fishing, rods vary
quite a bit as well, even in a given weight class.
Lengths differ a bit, but the bigger difference is
in the action. You can get very slow rods, which
bend throughout the entire length, or fast
rods, that flex mainly at the tip. Slow rods are
generally better for beginners, because they're
much more forgiving of errors in the timing of
your casts. But with a slow rod, it's difficult to
cast as accurately. Faster rods can place a fly on
a fish's nose, but until you get your casting form
down, you're going to have a lot of casts just fall
on their faces.
Fly reels can be very simple devices. They
have no gearing, so you're reeling at a 1:1 ratio.
In many cases, they're nothing more than line
holders, which is fine for most smaller species.
But when you're after bigger game tarpon,
cobia, sailfish, even big bull reds a smooth
and powerful drag system becomes mandatory.
Reels for bigger game are of the large arbor
type, which means you can retrieve more line
with each turn of the handle very important
when a fish has just run off 100 yards of line and
you need to get it back.
As with other fishing gear, the stuff with the


highest price tags is usually the best equipment. There
are manufacturers that build gear with an excellent
reputation that won't cost you a mortgage payment. But
good fly equipment is generally more expensive than
good spinning tackle. TFO makes a really good rod for
about $250. Sage also makes a really good rod; that one
will run you about $800. Figure about $100 for a decent
rod on the low end. Yes, you can buy a rod, reel and line
package for $60, but it's not going to cast worth beans,
and in fly fishing the cast is everything. It's like with
cast nets throwing a bargain-bin cast net is an awful
experience. It can turn you off throwing a net, and cheap
fly rod can turn you off fly fishing.
Fly lines are also expensive. A good line will cost $50
to $100, and that's for about 90 feet of line (the rest is
backing, which fortunately is pretty cheap). The reel is
where you can save yourself some money, though. You
can spend well over $1,000 on a reel, but unless you're
going after those big boys, a $40 reel will do just fine.
Cheap reels are made from a lot of plastic; somewhat
pricier ones from cast aluminum; and high-end models
from machined aluminum. The good news is they don't
usually rust much, provided you rinse it off after use.
Before you think about getting geared up, I would
strongly recommend spending some time with a fly
casting instructor. You should do that first for a couple of
good reasons. First, he'll probably have several different
rods that you can try out. That will be hugely helpful in
deciding which rod you should actually buy. Second, if you
go out with a fly rod and try to cast with no instruction
(or maybe worse, with a buddy telling you how to do it)
you're well on your way toward developing bad habits. It's
much better to have someone with teaching experience
show you right from the start otherwise, you'll have to
unlearn anything you've learned wrong. Your casts don't
have to be textbook-perfect (Lord knows mine aren't), just
good enough to land where you want them to.
Assuming you now know how to cast and now have
a rod, let's go fishing! Not every day is suitable for fly
fishing. You can't cast well on breezy days. That can be
overcome with advanced skills, but I would say anything
more than 10 knots will be tough for a newbie. Keeping
the wind at your back is helpful, but it will make your
backcasts more challenging. You don't have to see the
fish before you cast, although for many fly fishermen
sight casting is the name of the game. In summer, the
tannins and stirred-up silt makes sighting fish tough,
so many fly guys prefer winter fishing. Of course, that's
when it's windy, so ... Hey, I already said it wasn't easy!


TYPES OF FLIES
There are thousands and thousands of different fly
patterns out there, but most of what we use in our salt
water fishing fall into two categories: Baitfish patterns and
crustacean patterns. Streamers and poppers are baitfish
patterns, meant to imitate or give the impression of a
pinfish, whitebait or other small finned critter. Poppers
you work at the surface with short, deliberate strips.
Streamers can be worked in short of long strips using an
even or erratic pattern. Crustacean patterns are meant
to look like crabs or shrimp, so hopping them across the
bottom makes them look more lifelike.

Confidence is the most important thing, so if I were
you I'd focus on casting into schools of ladyfish or Spanish
mackerel, or drifting the flats and blind-casting for
trout. This will put some fish under your belt, give some
experience with fighting fish, and start you on the road
to actually having fun while fly fishing instead of just
feeling frustrated all the time. I still stop all the time to
catch ladies when I see them busting at the surface, and I
don't care who knows about it.
Once you've made your cast, it's up to you to make the fly
come alive. You do not cast a fly out and reel it in. Instead,
you strip it. Basically, you manually tug the line using short
or long jerks, piling up the line at your feet or in a stripping
basket. Each time you tug, the fly jumps forward as far as
you pull it. Sometimes you want to be bold; other times,
subtle. It all depends what the fish want.
Fighting a fish on fly tackle is very different from
fighting one on spinning or conventional gear. The
biggest mistake both new and experienced fly anglers
make is trying to set the hook with the rod. When you're
putting a No. 22 hook into a brook trout, you have to
set the hook with the rod. But setting a No. 2 hook into
a redfish's rubbery lip ain't gonna happen with the rod.
Instead, you use a strip-strike. It's a bit like working a
topwater lure you're already working the bait, just
don't stop until you feel the weight of the fish. When you
try to lift the rod, not only does the hook not get set, you
pull the fly away from the fish.
Fly fishing isn't for everyone. If you're out to fill your
cooler every time, don't bother. If you don't have the
patience to carefully hone a skill set, stick with spinning
gear. But if you're looking for a challenge that will
connect you in a more personal way with your quarry,
you should give it a shot.


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i i,.. IS SirCiSitl l.I V '" 2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 42

There's nothing quite so delicious as


By Capt. Mike Myers
I love going out on the water and catching
my own dinner. Parasitic infections, food
poisoning, and choking on fish bones? Those I
don't like quite as much.
I have a feeling that a lot of you reading this
article like to eat fish. If you are a fisherman
who is not a fan of eating your delicious finned
friends, read on anyway. Most fishermen have
friends or neighbors who beg them for fresh
fillets every time they get home from a fishing
trip even you catch-and-release guys get
asked, I bet. It's a good idea to know how safely
keep, clean and prepare your catch without
making yourself sick (or your neighbors, just in
case you get into that giving mood some day).
The first thing to decide is how you will
keep your catch fresh and safe for consump-
tion. Keeping your fish alive until you're
ready to clean them is always the best bet.
Unfortunately, that's not always an option for
everyone. Keeping your fish on ice is the next
best thing. You should always bring plenty
of ice on every fishing trip, just in case. You
never know when your baitwell pump will
fail and believe me, a dead fish that's been
floating around in your baitwell all day is not
edible. Fish are very perishable, and due to
their strong digestive juices, it doesn't take
long at all for them to start decomposing.
To properly ice your catch, you should line
the bottom of your cooler with at least an inch-
thick layer of ice. Lay your fish over that ice
without overlapping them, then cover them up
with another layer of ice. Repeat this process
until you have filled the cooler with what you
intend to keep for the day. Please, only keep
enough fish for a meal or two the next
few generations of anglers will thank you. If
you ice your catch properly, it can stay good in
your cooler for a couple of days. A big cooler
with lots of ice will keep fish longer than a
12-pack size cooler or one with 5 pounds of
ice in it. I can't tell you how many times I've
gotten home from a trip and, due to assorted


life issues, was unable to clean my fish right
away. I always take great care when icing my
catch, and there is no doubt in my mind that
my fish will be OK until the next day. A rule
of thumb to see if your catch is still fresh is to
look for clean red gills and bright unclouded
eyes, and make sure there is no strong odor. A
fresh fish will have a mild fresh smell to it. If it
makes you go"whoa,"then let it go in the
garbage, that is. Next time, don't waste it.
Now it's time to clean your catch. I'm not
going to go into any details on how to fillet
your fish. There's a different technique to
clean just about every edible fish we have in
Southwest Florida and there are a lot of
them. It's something you really need to show
someone rather than tell them. If you don't
have any friends with filleting skills, YouTube
is a great Internet tool for you to use. There are
videos on there for cleaning everything from
flounder to (my personal favorite) sharks. What
I will tell you is what you will need to get the
job done properly: A sharp fillet knife (use a
6-inch blade for smaller fish and a 9-inch blade
for larger fish; a knife sharpener to keep your
knife sharp; running water to wash off your
fish fillets and to keep your work station clean;
a 5-gallon bucket to hold the carcasses and
scraps; and cling wrap or zipper bags to wrap
or store your fillets for freezing.
You should make it a habit to really check
out each fillet as you're cleaning your fish. Cut
out any deformities, off-color areas, worms
if you don't like them (just so you know, they
won't hurt you just saying) or anything
that just doesn't look right. Fish bones are a
pet peeve of mine. I go through every fillet
thoroughly and cut out every bone I find. There
is nothing worse than biting into a tasty piece


of fish and getting stuck in the mouth by a
bone it can ruin a meal.
If you plan on eating your fish soon after you
have cleaned it but not the same day, it's OK
to store the fillets, covered, in the refrigerator
for up to two days. If you're not going to cook
it that soon, you should get it into the freezer
ASAP. Try to get as much air out of the bag you
are using to freeze your fish in before you place
it in the freezer. This will cut down on freezer
burn, which will make your fish taste stale.
Another good method to avoid freezer burn:
Put the fillets in a freezer bag, fill it with water
and freeze it. Label each bag with the type of
fish that's in it and the date you froze it. About
3 months is as long as you really want to keep
your fish in the freezer, and it should never be
in there more than 6 months.
The best and safest way to thaw frozen fish
is to leave it in the refrigerator overnight. If you
need to thaw it out faster, then place the frozen
fish in cold water until thawed. You never want
to just leave your frozen fish on a counter or in a
sink to thaw this can actually be dangerous.
Again, fish spoils quickly. At room temperatures


it starts to grow bacteria, some of which can be
very harmful to us, in just a matter of minutes.
Cooking your fish will kill off many of these
microbes, but there are a few that heat does
not kill. A microwave oven is also another quick
way to thaw your fish, but I have found that
it can change the flavor of your prized catch. I
don't know about you, but I like my redfish to
taste like redfish, not jack crevalle.
I cannot stress enough the importance of
proper fish handling and preparation. Your health
and well-being, as well as that of your friends and
loved ones, depends on it. Just remember to keep
your catch clean and cool so no one gets sick. And
no, you cannot give bad fish to your neighbors, no
matter how pesky they may be.
Capt. Mike Myers, owner and operator of
Reelshark Charters, is a full-time Charlotte
Harbor guide. Having fished the waters all
along the Southwest Florida coast for more
than 35 years, he has the experience to put
anglers on the fish they want. His specialties
are sharks, tarpon and Goliath grouper. For
more info, visit www.ReelShark.com or call
Capt. Mike at 941-416-8047.


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 43


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 44

Local tackle shops are an


@IW^ng EW! W4miJaffnl


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
There's a lot to know about fishing in
Southwest Florida. There are dozens of
different species offish an angler can target,
each of which has its own preferred habitat
and food source. Many of these fish are migra-
tory and are found in our area only during
certain times of the year. In addition, tides
can make life difficult for inshore fishermen.
Lures and rigs that are popular and work well
in other parts of the country are rarely used
by local anglers, who have learned that fish
here don't respond well to them.
Consistent fishing success in this area
requires a certain level of expertise. One
way to acquire that knowledge is by trial
and error. This method works very well, if
you don't mind taking years to get good at
it. You can jump-start your fishing know-
how by booking trips with a good local
charter captain. This isn't cheap, but if you
go out with a guide and pay attention to his
instruction, you can learn a lot about Florida
angling quickly. The downside to this is
you'll have to go on a lot of trips if you want
to learn it all the fishing changes often,
based on variables such as season, weather,
tides, baitfish availability, recent rainfall,
water visibility and other factors.
What if you can't afford to book dozens of
charter trips, but don't want to spend forever
learning on your own? There's a very good
third option your local bait and tackle
shop. The staff there will usually be anglers
themselves, and they definitely hear a lot of
good information from their customers about
what's going on out on the water. Want to
know where the redfish are biting? Just ask.
What color jigs have the bigger trout been
biting? They'll know. And they also act as
filters of bad information, having heard all


the lies and exaggerations before.
Building a good relationship with your
local shop will pay you back handsomely. As
you become a familiar face, you'll see that
the staff will not only remember you but
also your fishing preferences, your tackle and
what baits you like to use. Being a regular
will also often get you in on scuttlebutt and
"insider info" that's not given out freely.
So how do you get on these guys'good
side? It's very simple: When you need tackle
or bait, buy it from them. Smaller shops don't
have the buying power of a big-box store,
so you might pay a dollar or two more for
your rod, but it's more than worth it. In many
cases, the price differences are negligible.
Even if some things do cost more, the bait
shop staff can actually save you money by
advising you on what tackle and baits will
work best for the type of fishing you plan
to do. What costs less: Spending money on
a dozen lures that don't catch fish before
stumbling across one that does, or buying a
fish-slayer the first time?
Some anglers try to play this both ways:
They go to the bait shop for information
but buy their gear at the big box or from a
website. This is a bad plan for two reasons.
First, the staff at the bait shop aren't idiots. It
won't take them long to realize what you're
doing, and your flow of good info will dry up
fast. Second, if the angling community does
not support the local shops financially, they'll
be forced to close their doors. Same result for
you: No more information.
Fair is fair. You've got to reciprocate.
Anglers and bait shops have a symbiotic rela-
tionship. Each supports the other. Without
fishermen, the bait shops can't survive.
Without the bait shops, anglers will have to
rely on each other for knowledge. But it's
hard to trust information from a bunch of
liars, isn't it?


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 45


SPunta
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Children will experience hands on and up close
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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 46


Whether you're new to the water or an old salt, you have
to agree that anglers use some terminology that takes a
while to pick up. I thought a glossary of some of these words
might be useful to you. Although the following list is far
from complete, it should be enough to get you started.
ARTIFICIAL LURE: Any bait not organic in nature; usually
made of plastic, metal, wood, feathers, hair or some
combination thereof.
BACKCOUNTRY: Inshore areas characterized by narrow,
shallow waterways and heavy mangrove growth. There is
open water in the backcountry, but getting to it is often
difficult. Sometimes used to refer to any inshore waters.
BAG LIMIT: The quantity of a given species that may be
taken by a harvester each day. For the purposes of the bag
limit, a harvester is a person actively engaged in catching
fish. Someone who isn't fishing, has no license or is too
young to hold a rod is not a harvester, which means they
cannot collect any part of a bag limit.
BAIT: Any natural or artificial lure used to entice fish to
bite a hook.
BLIND-CASTING: A method of sportfishing in which an
angler casts a bait to an area he supposes a fish might be,
as opposed to sight-casting.
BLUE WATER: Water so deep it appears royal blue. On
this coast, it takes a run of more than 100 miles to reach
blue water.
BOTTOM FISHING: A fishing style that utilizes natural
baits and heavy sinkers to target reef fish (usually grouper
and/or snapper) in the Gulf.
BRACKISH: Water that is a mixture of salt and fresh.
During the rainy season, the entire Harbor is often
brackish due to heavy river flow. When it's dry in spring,
brackish water may extend far up the rivers. Brackish
water is often murky and/or tinted brown, but not always.
BRAID: Fishing line usually made from synthetic fibers.
Popular braids are characterized by small diameters and
high tensile strength.
BUCK SNOOK: A small snook (16 to 24 inches). Snook are
almost always male at this size and become female when
they get larger.
BULL REDFISH: Generic term for a large redfish. Usually
reserved for fish longer than 30 inches.
BUSTING BAIT: Large fish attacking small fish at the
water's surface.
CANAL: A long and narrow man-made waterway. May be
filled with salt, brackish or fresh water.
CASTNET: A circular net 4 to 30 feet in diameter,
weighted at the edges, designed to be thrown. The netter
grips an attached rope to retrieve the net.
CATCH-AND-RELEASE: To capture fish with no intention
of harvesting them.
CHANNEL: A navigable pathway of deeper water through an
area of shallower water. Some are natural; others man-made.


CHUM: Small pieces of food or liquid (blood, fish oil, etc.)
used as a scent attractant and to get fish started feeding.
CREEK: A narrow natural body of water, usually flowing.
Freshwater creeks may flow for many miles. Tidal creeks
are brackish or salt water and have no natural flow (water
moves only with the tides), and may be as short as 100 feet.
CURRENT: Moving water in any form.
CUTBAIT: Pieces offish used as bait. Usually cut from
whole fish, not fillets.
DEHOOKER: A tool used to remove a hook without
handling the fish.
DRAG: A device that creates friction on a fishing reel to
put pressure on a fish as it pulls line from the spool.
DRIFT FISHING: Fishing from an unanchored boat with
no propulsion system engaged.
DROPOFF: A sudden change of depth.
EAST WALL, WEST WALL: The east and west sides of
Charlotte Harbor. The East Wall extends from roughly Alligator
Creek to Matlacha Pass. The West Wall extends from Cattle
Dock Point to Cape Haze Point Both walls feature extensive
mangroves. The East Wall has a much larger area of flats.
FISHFINDER: An electronic device that uses sonar to
illustrate objects beneath the surface of the water.
FLAT: A large area of shallow water (1 to 6 feet deep),
with a more-or-less-level bottom. Most flats are called by
what covers the bottom (grassflats, mudflats, etc.).
FLUOROCARBON: A plastic material often formed into
thin strands and used for leaders. Fluorocarbon's refractive
index makes it almost invisible in water.
FREE-LINE: To fish a live bait with no weight or float.
FWC: The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission; sets regulations for harvest of game and fish
on Florida lands and waters.
GAFF: A large hook attached to a pole used to land fish.
Gaffing is a safer way to handle toothy fish, but should be
used only for fish that will be harvested.
GATOR TROUT: A large trout. Here, usually any specimen
larger than 5 pounds.
GUIDE: A licensed professional who takes individuals or
small groups on a boat for fishing, tourism or other purposes.
HARD BOTTOM: A section of seafloor that is shelly or
rocky. In the Gulf, hard bottom is often limestone. A ledge
is a dropoff in a hard bottom area.
HARVEST: To kill an animal.
ICW: The Intracoastal Waterway, a system of man-made
and naturally occurring channels that allow a boat to
traverse the coast without being exposed to the open Gulf.
INSHORE: In this area, any salt or brackish water except
the open Gulf of Mexico.
JETTY: A man-made wall that extends out into the water.
Often made of large rocks.
KEEPER: A fish that is legal to harvest.
LANDING NET: A large handheld net with a handle, used
to bring a fish ashore or into a boat.


LEADER: A section of fishing line or wire between the lure
or bait and the main fishing line (also called running line).
Leader may be used for stealth (lower visibility) or to prevent
breakoffdue to abrasion on rough surfaces or sharp teeth.
LIVE BAIT: A natural bait (shrimp, crab, small fish, worm,
etc.) that is still alive when used.
LIVEWELL: A tank aboard a vessel used to keep harvested
fish alive. Usually plumbed with a pump to allow circulation
of fresh water. When used for live bait, referred to as a
baitwell. Some boats have dedicated livewells and baitwells.
MANGROVE: One of several species of trees that form
forests along the undeveloped shores of Charlotte Harbor.
Mangrove roots are vital habitat for hundreds of species,
from snails to Goliath grouper. Also referred to as bushes.
MONOFILAMENT: A strand of nylon used as fishing line.
MOUTH: The end of a river, creek or canal where it flows
into a larger body of water.
OFFSHORE: In this area, anything occurring in the open
Gulf of Mexico.
OYSTER BAR: A colony of oysters, often found in shallow
water and exposed at low tide. Large oyster bars may be
called oyster reefs.
PASS: A connection between inshore waters and the
Gulf of Mexico. Passes are often deep but with associated
sandbars and have strong currents, which are appealing to
fish and make swimming (and sometimes boating) unsafe.
PELAGIC: Animals that live in the open ocean, often near
the surface.
PIER NET: A circular net 3 to 6 feet in diameter, attached to
a rope and used to land hooked fish from a pier or bridge.
POINT: A strip of land that extends into the water.
POLARIZED LENSES: Lenses which affect light waves
to cause an apparent reduction in light reflection and
glare. Used to see fish or bottom contours from above the
water's surface.
POPPING CORK: A fishing float designed to make noise
to attract fish.
POTHOLE: A sandy area on a grassflat. Usually slightly
deeper than the surrounding area. Also called a sandhole.
RAT REDFISH: A redfish less than 18 inches long (too
small to legally keep).
RED TIDE: A bloom (rapid growth) of an alga (Karenia
brevis) that naturally occurs in Florida's salt waters. In
heavy concentrations, the algae produce toxins that can
kill fish and other marine animals. Blooms may make the
water look dark or milky.
REEF: An underwater aggregation of rock or coral. An
artificial reef may be made of rubble, concrete or by
intentionally sinking a vessel.
RUN: A fish swimming while hooked. Also, the large-
scale migration of certain fish species (mackerel, sharks, etc.)
SANDBAR: Often shortened to bar. On the flats, the
shallower areas between troughs. On the Gulf beaches,
the shallower areas created by wave action (usually the


shallowest is closest to shore, with one or two more
farther out). In most cases, bars run parallel to shore.
SAND SPIKE: A long rod holder (often a simple PVC tube)
for beach use.
SCHOOLIE: Many pelagic fish (king mackerel, mahi, etc.)
school as juveniles and are more or less loners when adult.
Schoolies are the young ones.
SEAGRASS: Any of several rooted plants found in shallow
water (0 to about 10 feet in this area). Sometimes seen
uprooted and floating.
SEASON: The time when a fish can be legally harvested.
Seasons are often closed to prevent harvest during spawning.
SHORT: A fish too small to legally keep.
SIGHTCASTING: A method ofsportfishing in which the
angler sees an individual fish (or school offish), then casts
a bait to it.
SIZE LIMIT: The minimum or maximum size of a fish
that may be legally harvested. Depending on species,
measured to the middle of the tail fork or overall with the
tail squeezed.
SLAM: The feat of catching one each of several different
species in a day of fishing. The Charlotte Harbor slam is a
trout, a redfish and a snook. For a Charlotte Harbor grand
slam, add a tarpon.
SLOT LIMIT: A size limit with both a minimum and a
maximum. For example, redfish must be between 18 and
27 inches to be harvested.
SOLUNAR TABLE: A chart showing times when fish are
more likely to feed, based on positions of the sun and moon.
SPILLWAY: A section of a dam that is open to allow water
through, usually during times of high water.
STRUCTURE: Any permanent or semipermanent natural
or man-made object in the water.
TAILING: Fish feeding in such shallow water that when
they lower their heads, their tails stick up out of the water.
Practiced especially by redfish; also by hardhead catfish,
sheepshead, snook and stingrays.
TRASH FISH: A fish not valued for food or sport.
TROLLING: A fishing method that utilizes a bait or lure
towed behind a moving boat. Also, to fish a bait or lure in
a similar way from a pier, a bridge or a seawall.
TROUGH: On the flats, the deeper areas between
sandbars. On the Gulf beaches, the deeper areas created
by wave action (usually one in the surf zone and one to
three more farther out). Troughs run parallel to shore.
VENTING TOOL: A hollow needle used to puncture the
swim bladder of a fish. Intended to release gas that builds
up in some species when pulled to the surface from
depths of 50 feet or more.
WEEDLINE: A floating mass of any marine plant or
macroalgae. Also, a stand of plants rooted in shallow
water and projecting above the surface.
WHITEBAIT: A generic term for small baitfish, usually
scaled sardines.


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2013 Annual Guide to Southwest Florida Fishing PAGE 47


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Saturday, March 23, 2013


A Night Among the Stars
January 26, 2013






, .,i ,I.


Page 1




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Thank You Venice for
Voting Us 'Best Tennis Facility"
9 7 Years in a Row! ..




-h,'haerr, n h for gold, orji .
play for fun, we have a gamejor ro
* Eight Har-Tru Courts Fi
Available 7 Day: I,
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JACARANDA WEST
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_Pro Shop: 493-5128
1901 Jacaranda Blvd., Venice Membershzp 493-5010- Ext. 221



Thank You

Venice!


BEST OF VENICE

Estate
Planning Lawyer


Wayne C. Hall
Attorney At Law
Board Certified Wills, Trusts and Estates Lawyer
AV rated by Martindale Hubbell
1314 East Venice Ave.
Suite E
Venice, Florida 34285
941-480-0999


1 Stop Car & Truck Repair
John & Rich Yunker Owners
401 S. US 41 Bypass
Venice, FL 34285
941-485-4061
www.lstopcarrepair.com
In business since 1992, we are a full-service preven-
tive maintenance and auto repair center. Our experts
have the knowledge to service and repair even the
most challenging auto problems on all makes and
models of vehicles. We use the latest technology to
assess the situation and offer you alternatives. We
guarantee all of our work and know you'll be happy
with the outcome.

AAA Travel
Rosenda Calloway
2100 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice, FL 34293
941-493-2100
www.aaa.com/venice
AAA Travel has served the public and AAA Members
since 1938 and has grown from 30 members to over
8 million. We specialize in providing unsurpassed
customer service to AAA members and non-members.
We add value to our tours and cruises that cannot be
found anywhere else.

Absolute Aluminum
Dale Des Jardins, Jr.
1220 Ogden Rd., Venice, FL 34285
941-497-7777
www.absolutealuminum.com
As we are entering our 25th year in business, we
never lost sight of our customer expectations. We con-
tinue to strive each day to provide excellent service,
and everyone in our organization is committed to that.
As we've expanded our product line to provide more
value to our customers, we continue to set ourselves
apart from the competition.

Absolute Window
Dale Des Jardins, Jr.
171 Center Rd., Venice, FL 34285
941-497-7777
www.absolutewindows.net
Absolute Windows is a full service window company
that handles residential, condo and commercial win-
dow and door needs. Our team is second to none when
it comes to experience and expertise. Our customers
feel good in knowing we can handle all of the details
from engineering, permitting, installation and service.


SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD.
. ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .


Page 2





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Always An Occasion Florist Inc.
Philip and Debra Phelan
249 Nokomis Ave., So. Venice, FL 34285
www.alwaysanoccasionflorist.com
Our specialty is exceptional customer service with our floral
offerings for a multitude of occasions. The Phelans established
the shop in 1998 and have purchased five existing flower shops.
Our experienced caring staff are all longtimeVenice residents
who enjoy serving our friends and neighbors. Thank you, Venice!

Artistree Landscape Maintenance & Design
Owner: Joseph Gonzales
1160 Pond Cypress Rd., Sre. B, Venice, FL 34292
941-488-8897
www.artistree.com
Founded in 1990, Artistree is an award-winning specialist
in customer service for landscape maintenance and design
projects of all sizes. No one can match our willingness to accept
responsibility for every service we deliver and for the pride we
take in doing the right thing. It's the Artistree way.

Bandana
Butch & Shannon Gerace
941-497-4287
www.bandanaband.com
Butch Gerace, started his singing career at age 5 in his
hometown of Haverstraw, N.Y Since then, he has performed on
radio, TV and major record labels. Butch is a former member
of the world famous MGM recording group "Sam the Sham &
The Pharaohs" with 2 blockbuster hits "Wooly Bully" & "Lil' Red
Riding Hood." Bandana was formed here in Venice, October
1990.

Beechwood Builders, Inc.
Jeffery Gates
779 Commerce Dr.,Venice, FL 34292
941-484-9053
www.beechwoodbuilders.com
Since 1990, Beechwood Builders, Inc. has been a respected
builder for an extensive list of clients in all areas of construc-
tion, residential, commercial, new and remodel in Southwest
Florida. We are proud of our exceptional reputation and equally
as proud of our longstanding relationships with our clients.

Bicycles International
Heinz Manig
1744 S. TamiamiTrail
941-497-1519
www.bicyclesinternationalfl.com
Bicycles International has been serving Venice since 1986,
with more than 25,000 bikes sold. We know what it takes to
service your needs. We have a factory trained tech and five
employees who have been in the cycling business for more
than a century combined. Come see why we have consistently
been voted Best Bike Shop year after year.


AAA T ,- i I \ ', s TIT BFST
Ri ,ii 0 C i l -i A-.v\Pi FjR
BEST TRAVEL AGENCY
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STOP IN IN CIRCLES

WHEN^ YOU WAT TO UYORSELLHOME


* 9E /4 941-488-6262
SSt www.gaestewart.com
SAllianceGroup email: gaestew@aol.com
S1314 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34285


Page 3





Saturday, March 23, 2013


BICYCLES_
INTERNATIONAL
1744 S. Tamiami Tr. (US 41) Venice, FL
497-1590 (across from Lowe's)



*4


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S V t
Ues IEi~urnehral Hme!m


We're proud to be part
of this community and
appreciate your rn ogilioiu.





FUNERAL HOMES AND CREMATORY


T1 iD
NEMORIAL GAIDENS


265 South Nokomis Avenue
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 488-2291
5900 South Biscayne Drive
North Port, FL 34287
(" 41) 426-2880


Bogey's Sports Bar and Restaurant
Albert & Stacy Myara
652 E. Venice Ave.
941-488-9156
www.bogeys-venice.com
Bogey's Sports Bar and Restaurant is a locally owned estab-
lishment that prides itself on having a strong presence in this
community. The superior food quality and excellent service are
a true reflection of why it's been voted the best Sports Bar in
Venice. Bogey's really is "Where All Good Sports Come To Play."

Boone, Boone, Boone, Koda & Frook, P.A.
Dan Boone
1001 Avenida Del Circo, Venice, FL 34285
941-488-6716
www.boone-law.com
Southern Sarasota County's oldest and largest law firm has
provided local business and individuals with extensive legal
services for more than 55 years. The firm's specialties include
estate planning, probate, real estate, corporate/business,
administrative law and civil litigation.

Bright Cross Animal Clinic
4165 S.TamiamiTrail
941-408-9696
www.brightcross.com
We are a community veterinary center that practices high
quality medicine and surgery. Our goal is always to establish
long-term relationships by exceeding expectations. It is this
constant striving for excellence that has made us Number 1 in
Venice for 9 out of the past 10 years.

Brittons Carpet One
Jonny & Joni Britton
1190 East Venice Ave.
941-485-3336
www.brittonscarpetonevenice.com
Brittons Carpet One has been successfully serving Venice
with your flooring and home decorating needs since 1947.
Brittons has recently introduced a kitchen and bath depart-
ment offering an exquisite selection of cabinets, countertops
and backsplashes. Our on-site kitchen designer will help you
select the right products and plan the space correctly to fit
your lifestyle and dreams.

Burgundy Square Caf6
Owner: Chuck Cyr
227 Miami Ave W., Venice, FL 34285
941-451-8261
www.burgundysquare.com
Voted #1 Breakfast! Fresh, Fresh, Fresh and Delicious that
is how we serve it up! One bite and you will be in love with
our fare. Reasonably priced and cooked the way you want it!
Served up by our friendly staff, it doesn't get better than this!
Come in for a fabulous meal and say hello to us.


Page 4


"M ,
BES O


I wwfalefuerlhm co





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Caf6 Venice
Kay Ann Kropac
116 W. Venice Ave.
941-484-1855
www.cafeveniceontheisland.com
Intimate bistro-style restaurant, featuring an
exquisite menu with a Continental to Polynesian
flair, paired with a fine wine selection. Enjoy the
dining experience of white linen tablecloths inside,
as well as our outside terrace dining, and take
pleasure in the best service in town. Reservations
available!

Ciao Gelato
Daria & RJ Nafziger
317AW. Venice Ave
941-445-5840
Artisan Italian Gelato & Sorbet, Coffee & Pastries. We
took ownership on Dec. 1, 2011 & RJ has been creating
30 flavors daily serving 16 flavors in our display case.
RJ states that "Ever since I had the opportunity of mak-
ing ice cream growing up on a dairy farm in Ohio, it was
my dream to open a Gelateria."

The Cigar Room
Owner: Mr. Z
121 N. Tamiami Trl., Venice
941-485-0837
If you are looking to find an exquisite assortment of fine
cigars, pipes and tobacco products, then look no further.
The Cigar Room is the place! Stop in and see Mr. Z.

Clare Bridge
1200 Avenida Del Circo, Venice
941-485-8885
Clare Bridge Venice specializes in Alzheimer's and
dementia care. We provide a homelike environment in a
secure and caring atmosphere, meaningful activities and
24-hour support for residents who require assistance with
activities of daily living. We strive to continually edu-
cate our staff to ensure our residents always receive
exceptional care.

Classic Creations In Diamonds & Gold
Owners: Chuck & Sylvia Duke
2389 Tamiami Trail S.
941-497-6331
Classic Creations is a full service jewelry store
owned by the Duke family since 1981. Our reputation
is built on customer service and satisfaction, quality
and fair pricing. We have a large selection of men's,
ladies and children's jewelry. We specialize in unique
custom designs and offer expert jewelry and watch
repair. All work is done on our premises. We also pay
top dollar for all your gold, silver and coins.


Thank you Venice!

#17 consecutive years!

#lfhA .M a


$250 OFF u
$250 .....O .


I


Page 5





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Floor Covering Cabinetry Interior Design
All l 1nAror 1 I ^f


. Thank You Venice for your continued Support.
I. 941 -485-3336
1190 E. Venice Avenue BrittonsCarpetOneVenice.com
S Open Mon-Fri 9:00 to 6:00 Sat 9:00 to 4:00






Presenta dtoeceiv


Coast Dermatology
21550 Angela Lane Venice FL 34293
J. Gregory Neily, D.O.
941-493-7400
www.drneily.com
"Since opening in 2002, dermatology has been the per-
fect fit for me. My passion is surgery, and I love the patient
interaction. Iget to know them as people, and each has a
story to tell. I believe that keeping patients as my priority is
what has made our practice so successful."

Cooks SportLand Inc.
Eric & Malcolm Cook
4419 Tamiami Trail S.
941-493-0025
www.cooksportlandvenice.com
Cooks SportLand opened in 1954 with 1,400 square feet
of retail space. We have the area's largest selection of fishing
gear and apparel. Voted Best Bait and Tackle. We also do
rod and reel repairs. A full line of archery equipment, guns,
ammo, camping gear, kayaks, outdoor clothing, moccasins,
Western wear, boots and lots more.

Country Club Estates Cooperative, Inc.
Manager: Marianne Casamassima
700 N. Waterway, Venice, FL 34285
941-488-2111
www.countryclubestatesfl.com
Located on the Intracoastal waterway on Venice Island
sits the beautiful community of Country Club Estates. A
55-plus adult boating community. Country Club Estates
amenities continue to grow, giving the residents a sense
of living a Gulf resort lifestyle.

Crow's Nest
1968 Tarpon Center Dr
941-484-9551
www.crowsnest-venice.com
Since our humble beginning as a hamburger stand over
the marina in 1976, we strove to be the best. Our great
location, quality ingredients and great people committed
to hospitality are the keys to our continuing success.

Davis & Beyer
Dental Health Professionals
Charles Davis, DDS & Brent Beyer, DDS
1218 E. Venice Ave., Venice
941-488-1075
www.venicedentist.com
Our specialty is oral health and producing great smiles.
We offer comprehensive dentistry from prevention to full
mouth rehabilitations. We have been part of this com-
munity for many years. We care deeply about the quality
and value of our services. This is reciprocated by our
wonderful patients, your neighbors.


Page 6





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Decorating Den Interiors
Marsha & Jerry Scott
1945 S.TamiamiTr.,Venice, FL 34293
941-484-3596
marshascott.decoratingden.com
Decorating Den Interiors a complete home decorating ser-
vice, creating special relationships with our clients for 28 years.
We provide the best possible service and attention to detail for
a simple treatment on one window or a complete design for a
whole house, with custom window treatments, furniture, light-
ing, flooring and accessories.

Dick's Shoes
Owner: Kathy Crisman
219 W.Venice Ave.
941-488-4999
www.dicksshoes.com
"I love my shoes that I found at Dick's Shoes," says Jeannie M.,
one of their customers. "I also like the Shoe Club that allows me
to receive FREE shoes." Dicks Shoes has comfort shoes by Naot,
LaPlume and up-to-the-minute styles by Eric Michael and Fly
London. There is always a sale rack full of bargains, and you can
shop every day from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., including Sundays from
noon to 5 p.m.

Eager Beaver CarWash
Wash Depot Holdings, Inc.
1791 S.TamiamiTrail
941-497-6665
www.cleancarfeeling.com
From our menu of full and exterior service wash packages to
an array of professional detailing service, at Eager Beaver Car
Wash we aim to be your clean car destination. Unlike exterior
only, express car washes, we offer solutions for all your clean car
needs (inside and out) to keep you and your car feeling good.

Ear-Resistible Hearing Center
1287 US41 Bypass S
Venice FL 34285
941-257-0530
www.earresistiblehearing.com
At Ear-Resistible Hearing Center, we will treat you like family.
We believe technology and service allow our patients to have a
great experience with hearing aids. Come see us for your free
hearing evaluation and learn about the Ear-Resistible difference!

Eric's Painting & Decorating, Inc.
Eric & Christel Geistert
And sons Eric Jr. and Mike
236 Tamiami Trail S., Venice
941-488-0558
Family owned and operated for more than 40 years. Serving
Sarasota County we are your one stop painting contractor for
all your painting needs. We offer free estimates, quality painting
and integrity with every job we do.


Than You for voting for Us


Page 7


2010 2011 2012




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Custom Window Treatments
Wall Coverings & Carpets
Fine Furniture Residential & Commercial
Free Consultation


OR 27YEARS


1945 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice FL 34293


Thank You For Making Us
Your #1 Choice Again








VENICEl TATIONEDR
-1,4 _A


488-6113


211 W.Venice Ave.
Venice, FL (On the island)


Pfnroul ervMuuiang the Venice Community
Since 1954


Creating Beautiful Rooms Since 1969


VENICE EAST
U0 1


ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP
1 YEAR SPECIAL $
No Initiallon Fee 59 +tax
i.. l l l ii. ,r '.r l i j ...J jl, H .r j ,I I1 1j[ h il'

UP TO 70% OFF
DIN OUR PROSHOP
B '^ ^ l, ... l 7_ I'lanr.^ bi~n-e- ,, lh ,1 at L-',,,:,ir,,:l .-1 I:-
WILSON "KILLER WHALE" $ OO0
WHITE DRIVERS ONLY 07
I" '"'.... I '* ^ 0.IL'. S114.50.:,,..,, ...... :

.l.i, ..:, Odyssey putters original 5225 NOW $ $
I ill A ,, IN STOCK ONLY 89 9
':,z. TRY OUR MODERN DRIVING RANGE
Lowest Rates per
o -, .. . . .


Farley Funeral Homes & Crematory
John & Michelle Williams
265 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice
941-488-2291
farleyfuneralhome.com
Funeral services, cremation, monuments,
aftercare & pre-planning. We have the finest staff
and facilities. We don't out-source important services
such as cremation. Family owned and operated since
1932.
Fidelity National Title of Florida, Inc.
Terri Rose
189 Center Road, Venice, FL 34285
941-493-4600
Our company is a real estate title, closing and
escrow company. We are formerly Chelsea Title
Company and have been active in the community
for more than 25 years. Customer service is of the
utmost importance to us. Over the years, we have
developed many longtime relationships with our
clients, lenders and Realtors. The employees have
been with the company for many years, and we look
forward to many more and meeting new clients,
lenders and Realtors. Thank you to all for your
support, and we look forward to working with all in
the future.


Page 8




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Fifi's of Venice
Owners: Russell & Roberta Pettigrove
219 Venice Ave. W
941-244-2663
223 Miami Ave. W
941-488-4848
Shoe & Purse Boutique
235 Miami Ave. W
941-484-2172
Fifi's Fine Furnishings
654 Tamiami Trl S Rialto Plaza
941-445-5265
We are the only location for all your consignment
resale needs, from fine women's clothing, purses,
shoes and jewelry to our newest store of fine furnish-
ing at the Rialto Plaza! Three consecutive blue ribbon
awards for the clothing stores and the blue ribbon
we just received for the Fine Furnishing store for
2012. It is simply amazing! The store did not even
open until August of 2012. Thanks for all your
support and all of us at Fifi's of Venice four island
locations look forward to fulfilling your special
needs!


f ,A#frn/w / &il2ew S& 3)engm


9 NAILS
? Thank You Venice For Your Votes!
We honor all competitor's coupons in Venice.
In Appreciation Acrylic Nails
*Silk Wraps
S 5..- of*I Pink & White Nails
I ny Service Soak-off Gel Lacquer
n Service *Manicures &
Over $30.00 Pedicures
Expires: 5/1/1 Special Liquid Gel
Airbrush Designs
Waxing

V 1 '


Delicious American and Award-Winning Thai Cuisine
All in a relaxed, sports bar atmosphere.


S112 Best of Venice

I s ,o __L.n_


Page 9




Saturday, March 23, 2013


W omen's Fashions
Cutting Edge from Head to Toe



01 Thank You

Venice!

that are contemporary, trendy,
moderately priced and selected to
flatter customers of all ages!

101 W. Venice Ave. #2
Venice Island
941-485-6900



Coaut Dermatology &

6kin Cancer Center, P.A.


Thank You Venice Tq
For Your
Confidence In Us
To Provide You With
Our Best Care Dossible
Sincerely,
Dr. Gregory Neily
& Amy Murphy


11941-493-74001

21550 Angela Lane
S Venice 34293
Swws. : r,-J i) 11 -i'


J. Gregory Neily, D.O.
Board Certified
Dermatologist
Fellow American I. :,t of
MOH& Surgery
Amy Murphy, P.A.-C, MMS
Certified Physician Assistant
Masters in Medical Science


Freedom Boat Club
Owner: John Giglio
1100 Tamiami Trail South Suite B
Venice, FL 34285
941-451-8756
www.freedomboatclub.com
Freedom Boat Club is the simple alternative to boat
ownership! We believe boating should be an escape
rather than a nuisance. To us, boating is a way for people
to relax with friends and create memories with family.
We want members to enjoy the experience of boating
without the maintenance.

Gae Stewart
1314 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34285
941-488-6262
gaestew@aol.com
A licensed realtor in 1989, Gae Stewart has resided in
Venice since 1970. A Venice Board of Realtors "Realtor of
the Year 2011," Gae maintains her top position because
she cares about you, "her customer." Gae is a dedicated
fulltime agent. Real estate is her profession, "her only
business."

George T. Abernathy, MD, PA
1370 E. Venice Ave., Suite 102
941-412-0026
www.theheartinstituteofvenice.com
Dr. Abernathy is a board-certified, noninvasive
cardiologist specializing in diagnostic cardiovascular
evaluation. This includes echo cardiology, nuclear
stress testing, ultrasound evaluation of carotid, ab-
dominal aorta and arteries and arteries/veins of the
extremities. He accepts Medicare, Medicaid and most
replacement plans. Practicing in Venice 16 years.

Gianni's Pizza
212 S. Tamiami Trail On the Island
941-484-4599
www.giannispizzavenice.com
Thank you Venice for voting us #1 Pizza again this year!
Also, thank you to our amazing staff and loyal customers
who make us what we are today. We are family-owned
and operated and have been serving Venice for 20 years.

Goodwill Industries Bookstore
1752 S. Tamiami Trail
941-441-2906
goodwillindustries.org
Our bookstore has thousands of titles, categorized,
alphabetized; a wonderful children's section; and
knowledgeable staff. We're also a great not-for-profit that
provides jobs and a hand up, not a hand out, to those in
our community with barriers to self-sufficiency.


Page 10





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Green Rehab Services
Chris Greene, OPT
333 Tamiami Trail S., Suite 207, Venice
941-484-2471
www.greenerehabservices.com
"Physical therapy that Works." We are honored to have
been voted Best Physical Therapy in Venice. Our patients
tell us they appreciate thorough evaluations, concise
treatment and genuine concern for their comfort. We
provide treatment for a broad range of musculoskeletal and
neurological, including back, joint and pelvic pain.

Gulf Coast Carpet Cleaning
& Disaster Service
Jim Scott
162 Progress Circle
941-488-0000
www.gcclean.com
Since 1977, Gulf Coast Carpet Cleaning & Disaster
Service has built their business on quality service by having
dedicated, long-term employees who are trained and
knowledgeable in their field to provide their customers
with the best service. We do kitchen and bath remodeling,
we build cabinets at our facility in Venice, we do cleaning of
anything within the home, as well as 24-hour water re-
moval, fire and mold restoration. We are a licensed General
Contractor as well as a Licensed Mold Remediator.

Gulfside Mortgage Services
Tony & Michelle Moore
807 US Hwy 41 Bypass, Ste A, Venice
941-485-42222
www.gulfsidemtg.com
Gulfside Mortgage Services specializes in residential
mortgages. We are celebrating our 10th Anniversary of
being in business. We take pride in giving our clients the
highest level of customer service, competitive rates and
low closing costs. Thank you Venice for voting us the #1
Mortgage Company for 9 years in a row!

HarborChase
Tammy Tolley-Hunt, Executive Director
950 Pinebrook Road, Venice, FL 34285
941-484-8801
www.HarborChase.com
HarborChase has a vision of creating a senior living
community that we ourselves would envision living in.
We provide a beautiful community with private, as-
sisted living apartments and rehabilitation suites with
the comforts of home. We have been awarded "Best of
Venice" for Assisted Living for the past 10 years. It is
wonderful to be recognized this year for Best Nursing
Care and a Finalist in Outpatient Therapy! The acknowl-
edgement that we receive from residents, families and
friends for providing outstanding care is what drives our
passion for senior living.


Y/JJJ MAJT UWJSj j!) VEJIJCjE
FORI Tfjl 1J '1 \N Ai BYJWWJ A


South County's
Largest Selection of
Fishing Tackle,
od & Reel Repair,
Frozen Bait.


in stock

4419 S.TamiamiTr,
S Venice (1 Mi. So. of Jacaranda Blvd.)
40Hours: on. Sat. am-5:3pm; Fri. am-8pm* Closed Sun
Hours: Mon. Sat. 9am-5:30pm; Fri. 9am-8pm* Closed Sun


Page 11




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Speedy Same Day Delivery
Award Winning Service
Fresh Seasonal Flowers
100% Satisfaction Guaranteed
Always Exceeding Your Expectations


* Venice Regional Medical Center
* Englewood Community Hospital
* Village On The Isle
* Bellavita Ashton Gardens
* Manor Care Venetian Gardens
* Jacaranda Trace The Windsor


9


Voted # I
Florist


* Farley Funeral Home
* Ewing Funeral Home
* Mckee Funeral & Cremation Service
* Kays, Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home
* Lemon Bay Funeral Home


The Heights Aluminum Inc.
Cory Lynch
1853 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice, FL 34293
941-492-6064
www.heightsaluminum.com
The Heights Aluminum Inc. would like to extend a
sincere thanks to our past, present and future custom-
ers for making our business your choice for the past 16
years. We look forward to meeting all your aluminum
needs for years to come, including screen enclosures,
pool cages, lanais, pavers, concrete, soffit/fascia and
seamless gutters. Please do not hesitate to call or come
by anytime.
Herman's Meats
Ron Herman
701 Shamrock Blvd.
941-497-4188
We feature the best quality meats and a full service
meat counter. We make our own homemade sausage,
bologna, hot dogs, pies and breads. We are in our 33rd
year of serving Venice.

Find all kinds of area happenings

SWednesdays in the
Venice Gondolier Sun


v 27 Holes
Open to the Public
No Tee limes Necessary
Walk or Ride
Adjacent to The Gulf of Mexico
Best Rates Year Round
\ Annual Memberships Available


Page 12




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Hill and Hill Plumbing Co.
Seth Hill
249 Grove St., S. Venice, FL 34285
941-488-2665
www.hillandhillplumbing.com
Proudly serving the Venice area for more than 60
years, our specialty is being a plumbing contractor,
building contractor and having a 3,000-square-foot
kitchen and bath showroom. Being able to perform all
types of plumbing and remodeling, all under one roof,
is very rare and sets us apart from the competition.
Home & Condo
704 W. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34285
941-484-0670
www.homeandcondo.com
Home and Condo Rentals is family owned and oper-
ated since 1997. We manage more than 500 seasonal
and annual properties. Our specialty is service. Our
strength comes from having specialized areas of re-
sponsibility for each staff person. Our in-house main-
tenance staff means problems are handled swiftly, and
they are on call 24/7. You can reach us at 941-484-0670
or toll free at 800-443-8555. Or visit our website at
www.homeandcondo.com.

$$ SAVE MONEY $$
Shop the Classifieds.

THINKING OF
CHANGING
MANAGEMENT
COMPANIES? WE
HAVE BEEN
irJij_. iind L-JAiL AWARDED THE
n m"" r "r urT


RENTALS & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC.


OPEN DAILY
CLOSED SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Check our web site at www.horseandchaise.com
for continued updates of annual and seasonal rentals.
941-483-3331


the FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT*
SFOR HEALTHY LIVING
FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY





TRY

THE


BEST!

"Best

Health Club "

From our classes
and equipment to
our welcoming, ?
professional staff,
there are so many reasons to join
your Y! Thank you, Venice.






SOUTH COUNTY FAMILY YMCA


Venice YMCA
701 Center Road
941.492.9622
Englewood YMCA
701 Medical Blvd.
941.475.1234


www.SouthCountyFamilyYMCA.org


Page 13


WN





Saturday, March 23, 2013 Page 14





Page 15 Saturday, March 23, 2013




Saturday, March 23, 2013


WHAT DO WE CALL 100
CONSECUTIVE QUARTERS
OF PROFITABILITY?

A GOOD START.

"The best way to ensure the firm's long-term
success is to focus primarily on our clients'
needs." That's how founder Bob James defined
our guiding principle. Our commitment to his idea
has paid off. We just reached our 100th
consecutive quarter of profitability. And we're
already planning for the next 100.
LIFE WELL PLANNED


ThankYou
for voting us
e Best of the Best!


"Contact us to review your
financial plan today."


RAYMOND JAMES
1314 E. Venice Ave, Suite A
Venice, FL 34285
T 941.412.1400
T 800.248.8863
F 941.412.1300
www.raymondjames.com/venice


Honest AC of Venice
Nick & Brooke Masher
795 Commerce Drive, Suite 5
941-496-7566
www.honestacofvenice.com
At Honest AC of Venice, we pride ourselves in be-
ing small enough to provide personalized service but
large enough to respond to your needs quickly. We're
the region's experienced and certified professionals,
and our clients know they can count on us for reliable,
quality work on every job we perform. Honest AC of
Venice provides a range of residential and commercial
services.
Horse and Chaise
Rental and Property Management Inc.
Helene MacDonald
150 N. Nokomis Ave.
941-483-331
www.horseandchaise.com
Our company opened the doors in May of 1995.
We specialize in residential rentals both annual and
seasonal. Our business motto is service to both owners
and tenants, making us the best choice!


U~II \I []0' [ iJ I


dedicated looWl p
thred aly so l invo
dalwl


THANK YOU VENICE
FOR VOTING Us
AM BEST KENNEL


Pet Care


800 E. Lare Rd -Deod L-9-14567


Page 16




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Imperial Blind and Shutter
Scott Campbell and Mike Duffey
1846 Tamiani Trail South, Venice
941-488-6022
www.imperialblind.com
Imperial Blind & Shutter was established in 2003.
We offer custom window coverings to fit any budget.
Imperial Blind & Shutter's main goal is customer sat-
isfaction. Stop in and see why we were voted Best of
Venice.
ISLAND INK
Jesse & Karen Cairns
1229 US 41 Bypass So.
941-375-2791
http://www.islandinkvenice.com/
We refill your empty ink cartridge and sell remanufac-
tured toners. This is true recycling! Our customers are
our friends & neighbors and that's how we treat them.
We want to make sure everyone of our customers gets
good service and a fair and honest deal. Satisfaction
guaranteed!


BURGUNDY

SQUARE CAFE


N .".


PET FRIENDLY
227 W. MIAMI AVE., VENICE ISLAND
941-451-8261


Thank You For Your Support Over The Last 27 Years!


olympic pools

where great pools begin
NEW POOLS RESURFACING PAVERS

POOL SERVICE REPAIRS REMODELING HEATERS
Pebble Tee & Quartz Finishes

121 Triple Diamond Blvd. #13, North Venice, FL 34275 941-485-0062 www.olympicpools.us

VOE ET FVNC #1 POOL BI'D


Page 17




Saturday, March 23, 2013


Venice has so

many treasures in

its own backyard.

Thank you for

recognizing ArtisTree

as one of them.



Artisee
L N SAMaintenance & Design*
DEEPER ROOTS. HIGHER STANDARDS.

-arisre~cm 9A 088887 Esa~ised190 n hepaadseofVeic


Jacaranda Trace
Owner: Roskamp & Patterson Management Company
Address: 3600 William Penn Way, Venice Florida 34293
941-408-2050
www.jacarandatrace.com
Jacaranda Trace wants to thank the readers of the Venice
Gondolier Sun for voting them the 2012 Best of Venice Award
for Senior Retirement Communities and the Inn at Jacaranda
Trace for the 2012 Best Assisted Living facility under 50
residents. Jacaranda Trace offers a rich, active lifestyle for the
independent senior that includes extensive dining, social
activities and entertainment and personal care amenities. To
find out more about Jacaranda Trace and to experience the
lifestyle by taking a tour of their new models, call:
941-408-2050 or visit www.jacarandatrace.com.

Jacaranda West Country Club
1901 Jacaranda Blvd.
941-493-5010
www.jacwestcc.com
Jacaranda West Country Club member-owned and operated
with some of the friendliest people around, who enjoy excellent
golf, tennis and social memberships. Our club has been recog-
nized consistently by community members as the area's "best"
in several categories, including: best tennis facility and best
golf and country club. We offer annual, seasonal and summer
memberships. Our banquet facility is available to the public.


HOME FURNISHINGS, GIFTS & ACCESSORIES



















217 West Venice Avenue Venice, FL 34285 Monday Saturday 10 5:30
P 941-483-1177 www.shopseasidechic.com


Page 18





Saturday, March 23, 2013


James Griffith Salon
Owners: James & Christine Griffith
257 S. Tamiami Trail, Downtown Venice
941-484-2665
www.jamesgriffithsalon.com
So...who cuts your hair? Established in 1988, James
Griffith Salon is an award-winning salon offering a full
line of beauty and wellness services, including French
trained hairdressers, hair color, hair extensions, nail
services, waxing, massage, facials and make-up ser-
vices. Aveda concepts and lifestyle salons.


Jo-Anne Schowska & Nell Taylor
110 Nokomis Ave., Venice, Fl 34285
941-321-8975 or 941-376-9623
www.michaelsaunders.com
Jo-Anne Sckowska & Nell Taylor have sold real estate
in the greater Venice area for 30-plus years and know
the market. Whether buying or selling your home
or condo, we get the job done. Experience counts.
Personalized service. Voted Best Real Estate Team for
2012 again!


FINALIST: MARGARITA, KEY LIME PIE
& LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Enjoy musical entertainment Wed. to Sun.
in. Thurs. 171:30am to 10pm; Fri. & Sat. 11:30am to Midnight
1600 Harbor Drive S., Venice 941-486 -1456
www.sharkysonthepier.com


Thank You Venice for Voting Us
Two Years in a row
Best Medical Healthcare Supplies


50 OFF* $200 OFF
All Lift Chairs A a ny Scooter

We Will NOT Be Undersold!
We Will BEAT Any Competitors Price!

$75 OFF Pedorthist On Staff
4 Wheel li -i
Walkers $300 OFF Any Portable
I Oggen Concentrators,
I 'S
MD 1,


NOW SERVING BEER & WINE
Myakka River boat tours from Snook Haven
TERRY'S RIVER BOAT TOURS
Wed.- Sun. 1 Hour RiverboatTours
11:30AM & 1:30PM $15 / person
Enjoy entertainment everyday.
Open for Lunch & Dinner Daily: 11:30AM 8PM
5000 E. Venice Ave., Venice 941-485-7221
www.snookhaven.com


Page 19





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Fidelity National Title
of Florida, Inc.

Over 25 Years of Experience
Serving the Venice Community


8 R., Venic, 6348





VOTED0 BEST VETERINARY StR-VICE


Dr. Cliff Myburgh, DVM


Dr. Chad Wright, DVM


Dr. Maria Dietrichs-Myburgh, DVM






--



Animal Clinic

Your Community Care -- ,i
Veterinary Center ...




4165 Tamiami Trail S. Venice 408-9696


Kearney Moving & Storage, Inc.
John Kearney
641 N. Tamiami Trl, Nokomis
941-485-3383
www.florida-mover.com
At Kearney Moving, we say "Every Move Matters" because
we believe that every step in planning a move is important.
We listen to our customers' needs, help them plan the
process and then we do the job right... just as we have
been doing for the past 39 years!

Lake Venice Golf Club
Rod Parry
1801 S. Harbor Drive "On The Island Of Venice"
941-488-3948
http://www.lakevenicegolf.com/
Lake Venice Golf Club has a 27 hole facility with lush
over seeded tees, greens & fairways. Adjacent to the Gulf
of Mexico, golfers can walk or ride anytime to experience
the gulf breezes & natural surroundings. Tee times are not
required and we are known for reasonable rates. Call for
seasonal pricing and afternoon specials.

Leonard's Roofing, Inc.
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
www.leonardsroofing.com
Leonard's Roofing is a family-owned and operated roofing
company with more than 30 years of experience. Leonard's
Roofing Inc. is dedicated to providing you with roofing that does
the job. This sounds like a simple company mission; however,
Leonard's Roofing Inc. has gone to great lengths to accomplish
this goal. Reagan Leonard personally guarantees that Leonard's
Roofing Inc. will do its best to take care of your roofing needs.

mi Pueblo Mexican Restaurant
530 US 41 Bypass S.,Venice
941-486-0005
www.miPuebloMexican.com
A local favorite since 1999, mi Pueblo is the place to come for
award winning Margaritas and traditional Mexican food made
with the freshest ingredients. Come and join our family for food,
drinks, music and fun. Experience a taste of Mexico right here on
Florida's West Coast!

Michael Saunders & Company
Michael Saunders
110 Nokomis Ave.
941-485-5421
www.michaelsaunders.com
With more than $2 billion in sales in 2012, MS&C is not only
the largest selling brokerage in Sarasota, Manatee & Charlotte
Counties but also ranks 59th in the nation. Locally owned and
independently operated since its inception nearly 40 years ago,
the company maintains two offices in Venice. The 54 agents who
work in these offices accounted for the largest dollar volume of
properties sold in the Venice MLS.


Page 20





Saturday, March 23, 2013


Montgomery's Carpet Plus ColorTile
Vern Montgomery
825 E. Venice Ave.
941-488-1810
Our motto is 'All You Need to Know About Floors." Family
operated for 30 years in Venice selling installing and main-
taining all flooring products makes us the only full service
floor company in Venice. Carpet, tile, wood, laminate, vinyl
plus Venice's largest area rug department under one roof.

Nice Diggs
Bobby Brown, Cheryl James
1846 S.Tamiami trail, #4
941-445-5421
www.nicediggsfurnishings.com
Nice Diggs is grateful to our patrons of our hometown
owned and operated furniture store. We provide a variety of
furniture and home d6cor for tropical to traditional styles.
Our fifth year has taught us that our policy of "customer
service" and true concern for their needs is the "winner."
Thank you for voting us Best Furniture Store three years in
a row.

Nice Nails
Tammy Nguyen
101 W. Venice Ave. Suite 15
941-488-5909
At Nice Nails, we cater to both ladies and gentleman,
providing full service nail care from problem nails,
short nails and nail biters to beautiful looking nails.
Our staff is well trained and sanitation, ventilation
and cleanliness are high priority. This is our recipe for
success.

Nifty Nic Nacs, Inc.
JeffO'Berry
203 W. Venice Ave.
941-488-8666
www.niftynicnacs.com
Nifty Nic Nacs is the place to laugh out loud with
cutting edge humor gifts, greeting cards and books, pop
culture memorabilia; and retro "Old Florida" products.
Find hilarious and affordable gifts sure to raise eyebrows.
See what makes us the most unique store in Venice, 7 days
a week!

Norma Jeans Bar & Grill
1635 US 41 Bypass/Jacaranda Plaza
941-492-5524
Recently remolded and expanded with full Liquor
Bar. Televisions in every booth plus along the walls.
Come watch your favorite sports team with us. Daily
Specials and Happy Hour. Second location in Englewood
at 1859 Englewood Rd. Lemon Bay Shopping Center.
941-460-8860.


Paraidieso

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* VOTED


Now only...
TWOYEAR
IN A ROW
$59 .9 The Safety Commissio
(a $20 savings when says in 2009 over
you mention this i 15,700 clothes dryer f
ad...reg. $79.95) resulting in 330 injury
Offer expires 4/23/13 and 20 lives lost.
YOUR SAFETY IS PRICELESS!
CALL JEAN TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT
LIC.#2049491 (941) 979-2707 Bonded & Insured


S
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:SOT BA NGIL


1635 US 41 Bypass
941-492-5524
In Jacaranda Plaza


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Saturday, March 23, 2013


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Olympic Pools
121 Triple Diamond Blvd. Unit 13, North Venice
www.olympicpools.us
Olympic Pools has been serving Sarasota County for more
than 27 years under the same ownership. We handle all aspects
of your swimming pool needs from new pool construction to
remodeling, repairs and pool service on your existing pool. Our
goal is to provide a quality product at a fair price for complete
customer satisfaction. We thank you for voting us the #1 pool
builder and hope you use us for all your swimming pool needs.

Paradise Dryer Vent Cleaning
Owners: Jean & Frank Sturchio
941-979-2707
Being voted #1 in the area shows residents that Paradise
Dryer Vent Cleaning provides quality service above and
beyond the competition. Owners Frank & Jean Sturchio built
their business with customer safety in mind. Over 15,000
accidental fires are started in the United States each year due
to clogged dryer vents. Paradise uses firefighters as their well
trained technicians, making sure all customers are in profes-
sional hands, as well as satisfied with the impeccable service.

Pelican Pointe Golf & Country Club
Tom Weaver
499 Derbyshire Dr.
941-496-4653
www.pelicanpointeclub.com
Pelican Pointe Golf & Country Club is more than a great golf
course and club. It is a first class residential community. Our
commitment to creating a lasting impression is why our club has
earned the distinction of being known for its Southern hospital-
ity and for being recognized as one of the finest in the area.

Pit Stop Auto Repair Shop, Inc.
Ron Perry
913 Tamiami Trail S. Venice
941-485-5823
www.pitstopauto.com
It seems like just yesterday that Pit Stop was a dream and a
prayer. It quickly moved from that prayer into a reality. That
reality has turned into three retail locations and a mobile
service that provides for more than 40 families. We have just
finished 16 years in business. ThankYou & May God Bless You.

Professional Pet Sitting
Monica Leighton
941-223-9916
www.propetsitting.net
Professional Pet Sitting has been caring for the pets of
Venice, Osprey, Nokomis and North Port since 2001. We
can offer in your home pet sitting, including pet walk-
ing, mid-day visits and overnight care. We are bonded,
insured and certified through the National Association of
Professional Pet Sitters. Pets love us. Owners trust us!


Thank You Venice!
For Voting Us Your # 1 Barbershop!
SW S S g
nf'mA A A Ff


Established 1961
Celebrating 50 Years of Quality Service
5 Chairs Experienced Barbers
Look Good, Feel Good!
We Appreciate your Business!
Walk-Ins Welcome!
505 Tamiami Trl S. Monday Friday 8 4
Venice Island Saturday 8 -2
(In Publix Shopping Center 94-8-6449
Across from Hospital) 941-485-644
r -


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Saturday, March 23, 2013


Rattan Wicker and Cane
Janice O'Brien
751 US 41 Bypass S., Venice, FL 34285
941-484-3313
www.facebook.com.ratanwickerandcane
Thank you for voting Rattan, Wicker & Cane best
in Venice. Take a stroll around our beautifully de-
signed showroom for fine home and patio furniture.
Specializing in rattan and wicker, we also offer uphol-
stery and unique pieces. Our design consultants are
here to assist you with your next project.

Raymond James-Financial Services
Managers: C. David Sammons: First Vice President,
Investments Sun Coast Complex Manager
Andrea Osbourn: Operations Manager
1314 E Venice Avenue; Suite A; Venice, FL 34285
941-412-1400
www.raymondjames.com/Venice
In the year 1962, a poster of a soup can propelled
the pop art movement. Music lovers embraced the
British invasion and a company called Raymond James
was quietly founded in St. Petersburg, Florida. This
year, 2013, marks the 51st anniversary of Raymond
James and over a half-century of growth and stabil-
ity. And while a lot has changed over the years, what
has never gone out of style is Raymond James founder
Bob James' insistence of putting the client first. It's a
tradition a half-century in the making that is still very
much as relevant today as it was back in 1962 when
an amazing technological breakthrough called the
audio cassette was invented.

Richard's Foodporium
Owner: John Rorer
Address: 17 locations in Florida
941-355-6838
www. richardsfoodporium.com
"In the early 80's, I ran a not-for-profit natural foods
co-op. I quickly realized how much I enjoyed the
industry, the clientele, and knowing that we were help-
ing people live healthier and make positive lifestyle
changes. At Richard's, we call this "right livelihood,"
since we have a career that we can feel good about,
know is doing good for others, and becomes our liveli-
hood. Aside from our unique business model, it's all
about employees who live our core values, build real
relationships with customers, and create a memorable
experience for every customer."



SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD.


Visit www.homeandcondo.com
For Updated List with Photos of Properties.
Annual Seasonal Vacation
P ve do 941-484-0670 or
ps'. 10 800-443-8555
SatVic 704W.VeniceAve.
;;7, on the Island of Venice


Page 23





Saturday, March 23, 2013


* Mid-Day Visits
* Overnight Care


223.9916
a..


* Pet Sitting
* Dog Walking


a
- 6 *~6 -


Your Pets

Deserve

The Best!


. .51. *,,


M


Thanks for Voting Us
The Best Physical Therapy
For 2011 & 2012


Venice Office North Po~rt Ofice
Veie FL. 348 0ot *ort FL32
94I8427 94142639.


The Sand Trap Sports Bar & Grill
Sue & Peter Flynn
4145 S.TamianiTrail
941-455-2300
www.sandtrapbarandgriLcom
Our specialty is authentic Thai cuisine, but we pride ourselves
in serving American as well as Thai courses. I began the "Sand
Trap" with the idea of creating a wonderful neighborhood bar
and grill with good quality food. We opened in February of 2010
and have quickly developed a loyal contingent of regular cus-
tomers. I believe our excellence comes from an excellent kitchen
staffed with experience Thai and American chefs. We also take
pride in our excellent servers and extreme cleanliness.

Seaside Chic
Janice Riordan
217 West Venice Ave., Venice FL 34285
941-483-1177
www.shopseasidechic.com
Seaside Chic is an amazing shop filled with unique selections
of home decor, gifts and accessories from all over the world.
Sure to delight your senses and make your home a special place
to be, wherever home may be! A visit to Downtown Venice is
not complete without stopping in!

Senior Friendship Centers Venice
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice
Adult Day Services: 941-584-0044
Friendship Center: 941-584-0075
Health Clinics: 941-584-0041
Senior Friendship Centers of Venice is proud to celebrate
its 20th anniversary as a nonprofit organization providing
vital services for older adults in our community. Located off
Shamrock Drive on the IntracoastalWaterway inVenice, our
beautiful tree-lined campus features a lively center with a wide
variety of programs and entertainment for persons 50-plus; din-
ing and home delivered meals; adult day services and a Caregiver
Resource Center; supportive and in-home services to help elders
live independently; and health and dental clinics for low income
and uninsured persons 50-plus. Stop by and see what we're all
about! Center hours are 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays.

Sharky's on the Pier
Mike Pachota
1600 Harbor Dr. S., Venice
941-488-1456
www.sharkysonthepier.com
Sharky's on the Pier is a Venice landmark. It not only sits
smack day on the Gulf in the Shark's Tooth Capital of the World,
it also boasts amazing sunsets, gorgeous views and the best
seafood around! You don't want to miss the delicious tropical
frozen drinks, the grouper sandwiches, Tiki Bar or the live
music while sitting or dancing right on the Gulf of Mexico!
Lunch and dinner served 7 days a week. Sharky's, voted Best
of Venice, is now the new owner of Snook Haven Smokehouse
Restaurant on the Myakka River in East Venice.


Page 24





Saturday, March 23, 2013


South County FamilyYMCA -Venice Branch
Manager: Ken Modzelewski, President & CEO
701 Center Road, Venice, FL 34285
941-492-9622
www.SouthCountyFamilyYMCA.org
The Y is about more than getting into shape and working
out. At the Y, being healthy means maintaining a balanced
spirit, mind and body. The Y is a place to work toward
that balance and a place where you belong. Individual,
single-parent and family memberships available. Financial
assistance offered.

Take Care Private Duty Home Health Care
Susanne S. Wise, RN, MBA
600 The Rialto, Venice
941-484-8844
www.TakeCareHomeHealth.com
Take Care Private Duty Home Health Care's mission is to bring
the highest quality of private duty home health care services at
a professional and committed level because everyone deserves
the best in care. Susanne S.Wise, RN, MBA, opened Take Care 16
years ago and continues to focus on customer service and the
quality of our personnel.

Twin Palms Chiropractic Health Center
Dr. Dan Busch
808 Venice Ave. East
941-412-3800
www.twinpalmswellness.com
We have had the pleasure to serve the Venice area for 11 years
and we continue to grow and improve our business in an effort
better serve the needs of this wonderful community. It is the staff
at Twin Palms that people enjoy and want to do business with
and make referrals to.

Venice Car Wash & Detail Center
General Manager. Tim Cerini
700 TamiamiTrl S., Next to Venice Regional Hospital
941-485-7222
www.venicecarwash.com
Your car will thank you for visiting Venice Car Wash and Detail
Center! We offer great service at great prices with great quality.
Come in today to see why we are the little island car wash that's
big on service!

Venice Christian School
Jerry Frimmel Principal
1200 Center Rd.,Venice, FL 34292
www.venicechristianschool.org
Venice Christian School (VCS) is an award-winning ac-
credited independent not-for-profit school with a curriculum
designed to develop the whole child intellectually, spiritually,
socially and physically. Celebrating its 25th year in existence,
VCS offers a high quality college preparatory Christian edu-
cation for grades PreK3 through grade 12 in a friendly but
challenging atmosphere.


4 9j 101 Shamrock Blvd


Page 25




Saturday, March 23, 2013


No Time To Tan?
Get a full days tan in just minutes, regardless of weather!

TINGhank You To
A Our Many
S Customers
$ E 00 For Voting Us
Best Tanning
o* 3Salon 6 Years
In A Row!

BRONZEBEACH
TANNING SALON 941.412.0077
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Venice Day Spa
Heidi Aeppli
509 Tamiami Trail S.
941-488-3674
www.venice-dayspa.com
"One of life's greatest pleasures is to be pampered &
indulged." Be daring, be first, be different. At Venice
Day Spa, we strive to give every client an "experience"
when they walk through our doors. Continually adding
new and unique services to our spa menu, such as our
popular signature champagne pedicure, combined with
our outstanding customer service, sets Venice Day Spa
above the rest.
Venice East Golf Course
Manager: Lila Purcell
107 Venice East Blvd., Venice
941-493-0005
www.veniceastgolfclub.com
Here at Venice East, we have it all! A beautiful 18-
hole golf course Our greens fee rates and membership
charges are the lowest in the area. We have a pro shop
with name brands, and everything is always discounted.
Visit our professional driving range where balls are
still only $4 a basket.


THE CIGAR ROOM


Venice
for Voting us #1


121 Tamiami Tr
Venice
Mr. Z 485-0837


"There is no substitute for Honesty,
Quality & Dependability"
Residential & Commercial Lawn & Ornamental Service
Quarterly, Annual & One Time Pest Services
Fire Ant Flea & Tick Pest & Rodent
Termite Control & Inspections


VOTED BEST FOR J
,,GETTING RID OF THE PESTS!'


, -7,,


Venice

PES CONTROL


125 Corporation Way, Unit G
Venice, FL
493-3030 488-8797


www. venicepestcontrol.corm


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