<%BANNER%>
Venice gondolier sun.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/01005
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun.
Uniform Title: Venice gondolier sun
Added title page title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun,
Venice Gondolier Sun
Publication Date: 05-26-2012
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers. -- Venice (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Sarasota County (Fla.)
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
General Note: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
notis - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
issn - 1536-1063
System ID: UF00028295:01005

Full Text




. VENICE 75a"




Iondolier un
LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S NO.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER


SNOOK HAVEN CLOSES Page 7A CUP ACTION Page 10A CHAMBER WINNERS Page 13A



Getting an early start County works out mowing mess


SUN PHOTO BY JUSTIN FENNELL


By CAROL SAKOWITZ
STAFF WRITER

The embattled Sarasota County
Procurement Department took
more heat from the county com-
mission this week but got narrow
approval Wednesday for a plan to
handle the mowing of major thor-
oughfares in the unincorporated
parts of the county.
Ever since former employee
Rodney Jones was arrested on
corruption charges in March 2011,
the purchasing department has
come under increased scrutiny.
At issue is the termination of a
contract with Bloomings Turf and
Landscape Management Inc.,
which was hired in January to


provide roadside mowing services
for county north, central and
south zones for a year at almost
$1.9 million annually. The scope of
work was a departure from previ-
ous contracts in that it included
removing Brazilian pepper trees;
landscaping; arborist services;
fertilizer and herbicide applica-
tion; planting; mulching; and hand
pruning.
Although there were questions
about the costs other bids
were almost twice as much the
commission approved the contract
earlier this year.
But Bloomings, which already
handled 75 percent of the county's
3,500 acres under a former con-
tract, could not meet the increased


work and was fined $6,700 for
nonperformance. On May 1,
Bloomings wrote the county
seeking early termination of the
contract. On May 7, Bloomings
stopped all work.
During Wednesday's meeting,
Commissioner Nora Patterson
said, "The whole thing's been a
mess."
Commissioners Christine
Robinson, Carolyn Mason and
Patterson voted to authorize
County Procurement Official
Mark Thiele to solicit quotes and
approve contracts for up to six
months, not to exceed a total
of $1,058,000. Commissioners

MOWING 112


20 years


later, city


fire fees


doubled

By GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

When Venice City Council
directed staff to review its
permit fee structure last year
it learned the city hadn't
increased any of its fire inspec-
tion fees in two decades.
Council directed staff to
update the fees, but when
the draft fees came back in
October for review, council
found they were too high.
Council then issued another
directive: Raise the fees to at
least cover costs, but keep
them lower than surrounding
communities.
Six months later, on Tuesday,
council adopted a new fee
structure, which goes into
effect immediately.
"It did meet one of the
goals," said Mayor John Holic,
"stay a little bit south of the
average (surrounding) fee."
The fees, based on a series of
nine plan reviews and inspec-
tions, will go up from a total of
$322.50 to $725.
They're still lower than the
city of North Port at $840,
Sarasota County at $1,060 and
the city of Longboat Key at
$1,625.
The city of Venice will now
require a new-tenant safety

DOUBLED112


Precinct changes are many


I
-.Q1

FJ


4*


-


COURTESY GRAPHIC
New election precinct boundaries will be
the topic of discussion at a series of town
hall meetings in June. Venice lost two
polling places under the new plan.


S-.


V~Fl
N .
~hIE2


town hall meetings, according
to Sarasota County election
officials.
Within the city of Venice,
the number of precincts will
be reduced from 11 to nine.
But boundary changes mean


SBso0a County
t sor of Eectr ns

Kahy) Dent


all but three precincts will be
affected.
Bottom line: Most voters
will still go to their old polling
place to cast their ballot, but
others will have to travel to a
new location.


Those unaffected by the
redrawn and renumbered
voting precincts are:
Bird BayVillages (old pre-
cinct 130, new precinct 513)

PRECINCT 112


0,

O
0o


\




By GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

Voting precinct boundary
changes announced earlier
this week are significant
enough to warrant a series of


Legion treats veterans to a picnic


PHOTO COURTESY OF DON BLAIR
This contingent from American Legion Post 159 took a picnic lunch to veterans
at the Bay Pines veterans facility May 20.


By DON BLAIR
SPECIAL TO THE GONDOLIER SUN

Sunday, May 20, at around
10 a.m., 42 of us from Ameri-
can Legion Post 159 boarded
a chartered bus to head for
the hospital in Bay Pines, a bit
west of Pinellas and just east
of Madeira Beach. It only took
a little more than an hour to
get there.


The storage sections of the
bus were nicely loaded with
chests full of sloppy Joes, hot
dogs, baked beans, potato
salad and case after case of
cold drinks, not to mention
all kinds of cookies from our
Post's ladies auxiliary.
It was the ladies who put the
whole picnic idea together, a
proposal supported enthusi-
astically by the entire Legion


Post. Previously, there had
been occasional visits by
the ladies, several cars at a
time, to bring goodies to the
veterans, but this was the
first full bus effort. When all
was said and done, it was a
wonderful, worthwhile effort
carried out with a smooth
efficiency and accompanied

VETERANS 112


Good morning,
Gondolier Sun
subscriber
NORMA HARTWICK


N OITCEST NORF


OTR UO WN SECTION


LEGALS .......................................... 6A OPINION ........................................8A
LET'EM HAVE IT.......................... 8A POLICE BEAT .............................. 4A
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR........... 9A SPORTS........................................ 10A
LOTTERY........................................ 2A WEATHER...................................... 2A
OBITUARIES................................ 4A


CROSSWORD......................... 6B
FINEWHINES.............................7B
RELIGION .................................8B
TRAVEL.....................................4B
VENU E...................................... 3B


N I THIS EDITION


CLASSIFIED
COMICS
TV BOOK
USA WEEKEND


COUPONS


DEATHS


Applebee's .............................. 2A Martin Kapustka
Fantastic Sam's......................... 9A Nancy Nickel
Twin Palms Chiropractic........ 7A Alta Payne
Venice CarWash....................... 9B


7 05252 1 0075 0


WD SAI AN A R YW I E SRSUN.COlORHMEDEIVERYCAL941 1300l S I I S11


faor
SLTT100
Mail-in Rebate(Debit Card)
ON PURCHASE OF FOUR
CHEVROLET SELECT TIRES


*GOODYEAHHANDKUOOKPIRELLI
Bill Buck Chevrolet
lostmarked by 6/30/12 Rebates and details also-
~___ ____ ___ I


Si J I .

-. r --- ce

41i -r


30-DAY
MATCH C
BUY SELECT TIRES
A BETTER PRICE
THE PURCHASE, W
DIFFERENCE."
*DUNLOPFIRESTONE
*HANKOOK*MICHELIN
Bill Buck (


'PRICE
)N TIRES
AND IF YOU FIND
WITHINN 30 DAYS OF
E'LL REFUND THE

* GENERAL*GOODYEAR
N*PIRELLI UNIROYAL
Chevrolet


I IIWII I I IWII WWII I W-110- I IWII III I I Ila &Wl I IWII


~5E


i
c *


I


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


- - - -


i %rrv,E







ALMANAC


2A SUN NEWSPAPERS


MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


SUN FILE PHOTO

Other bicycle-friendly

communities

By MONTY ANDREWS
GUEST WRITER
On my recent trip to Nebraska to attend
the graduation of my grandson, I was able
to spend some time checking out bicycling
conditions of two of the state's largest cities,
Omaha and Lincoln. Both have recently
attained the bronze level of Bicycle Friendly
Community.
I was once told that when you enter a city
that has a BFC designation you can sense it.
In my case, when I visited Lincoln I imme-
diately noticed the number of bicycle racks
strategically located throughout the city.
Signs also were placed along the city rights
of way giving notice to all drivers to share the
road, and reminding motorists of a bicyclist's
rights.
I didn't quite have the same feeling in
Omaha. Probably because of its size, the
city seemed less accommodating, although
I noticed cyclists were not shy about taking
control of the roads and exhibiting their
rights.
Another prominent feature I noticed was
the use of "sharrow" markings. Sharrows, or
shared bike lanes, have markings stenciled
on streets. These were accompanied by signs
along the streets stating "Bicycles May Use
Full Lane."
By coincidence, an editorial printed in


ABC 7 WEATHER


' k < J^ l"~;.rlK~i;lrTK^

1H 1 11 72 2'71 I 71


Temperature
I : erda03
Normal
Record
Rainfall
Yesterday
Month
Year


Hin h L:oa
87 69
93 58
(2008) (1931)
0.57"
Actual Average
1.42" 1.54"
7.04" 13.03"


m ,f l


Sunrise/set
T,:,n.rl-l : ;uri;,61
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonrise
Moonset


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
i(Srji.:.1 3anl Chnrl.:.ne c.:unlleS)
SE winds at 5 to 10 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet, light chop.
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
NE winds at 7 to 14 knots.
Seas 1 to 3 feet, light chop.
S1 I [o,]:I In]


I-I ER.TERIJ .T4r JDRI.41 TIME
DATE HIGH HIGH LOW L
: I RM. A.M. RM. A
6:37 a.m. SAT26 3:28 5:41 11:47 9
SUN 27 4:33 6:23 11
MON 28 5:54 7:02 12:47 1;
TUE 29 7:31 7:40 2:16 1
11:25 a.m. WED 30 9:10 8:16 3:32 2
12:40 a.m. *STRONGTIDE
a- A.M. p-RP.M.


the local newspaper contained a
couple of items of interest. First,
it was pointed out that a new law
had recently been passed requir-
ing motorists to keep a 3-foot
minimum distance when passing
cyclists and pedestrians. Florida
has had this law for more than a
year, although I'm not sure how
many motorists know this.
Second, the editorial acknowl-
edged the sometimes-strained
relations between motorists and
cyclists. It challenged the city to
create a plan so that all motorists
and cyclists can get to where they
are going efficiently and safely.
For the city of Venice, complet-
ing the BFC application and being
awarded that coveted designation
will go a long way toward address-
ing these same challenges.
Ride safe, ride smart.


HOLIDAY CLOSINGS
Venice City Hall will be
closed on Monday, May 28,
in observance of Memorial
Day. Garbage, recycling and
yard waste will be collected as
usual.
Most Sarasota County
government offices, libraries,
recreation centers and transit
services will be closed Monday,
May 28, to observe the national
Memorial Day holiday.
However, Payne ParkTennis
Center will be open from
7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and the
Arlington Park Recreation
Center will be open from noon
to 5 p.m.
Sarasota County Area Transit


May 24N...... 209
May 24D...... 593
May 23N...... 245
May 23D...... 586
May 22N...... 984
May 22D...... 140
May 21N...... 673
May 21D...... 203

D-Day; N-Night


May 24N......2617
May 24D......7204
May 23N......2454
May 23D......1362
May 22N......0518
May 22D......5813
May 21N......4989
May 21D......4870

D-Day; N-Night


May 22........................... 3-20-32-35
MegaBall................................... 19
May 18........................... 2-16-23-33
MegaBall................................... 15
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for May 22
0 4-of-4 + MB ..................................$-
4 4-of-4..................................$1,684.50
22 3-of-4 + MB .............................$671
737 3-of-4 ................................... $59.50
1,166 2-of-4 + MB ..........................$26


May 23........................4-7-26-53-59
Powerball ................................. 32


May 24.................. 1-3-16-20-32
May 23................ 18-21-26-30-31
May 22.................. 6-9-10-18-20
May 21 .................. 4-6-10-13-24
May 20.................... 4-6-7-11-23
Payoff for May 24
0 5-digit w inners.......................... $-
266 4-digit winners....................$555
8,483 3-digit winners .............. $23.50
2-digit winners .................Quick Pick ticket


May 23.................... 5-6-9-23-30-41
May 19................ 5-10-14-17-28-33
Payoff for May 23
1 6-digit winner...................... $4 million
51 5-digit winners..................$2,805.50
2,369 4-digit winners ..................$49.50
43,402 3-digit winners .....................$5
2-digit winners with Xtra................free ticket
Drawings occur Wednesdays, Saturdays
Estimated jackpot: $2 million


May 19......................8-13-35-46-51
Pow erball ............................. .... 30


Drawings occur Wednesdays and Saturdays
Estimated jackpot: $128 million ($83.7 million cash value)


will not operate on Memorial
Day.
The collection of solid waste,
yard waste and recyclables
remains on the regular pickup
schedule.
The landfill at 4000 Knights
Trail Road in Nokomis will be
open 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; however,
the administrative office will be
closed. Also closed are Sarasota
County's chemical collection
centers at 8750 Bee Ridge
Road, Sarasota, and at 250
South Jackson Road, Venice.
The chemical collection center
at 4010 Knights Trail Road,
Nokomis, will be open.
For more information about
the county's Memorial Day
schedule, call 941-861-5000.


CORRECTION
In the May 23 story on
a dispute over opening the
Marker IV dock in Venice, Mayor
John Holic was incorrectly
quoted as saying a county
commissioner previously met
face-to-face with him and
Marker IV's owner to settle the
dispute. In fact, Holic said he
met with a "county representa-
tive,"which was a staffer. The
GondolierSun regrets the error.
The article also said the
mayor would attempt to meet
with County Commissioner
Christine Robinson to work
out a resolution, but that
won't happen, Holic later said,
indicating a new round of
preliminary discussions will
remain at the staff level.


50% OFF ay et

Purchase any entree at regular price and
receive 50% off your second entree.


F RE ESeminars



Glaucoma & Cataracts
Lunch and learn how the latest glaucoma
treatment options can eliminate the expense
of drops and how cataract surgery with
advanced lenses may reduce your
dependence on glasses.

* Friday, June 8th
Noon North Port
Joshua W. Kim, M.D.
Glaucoma, Cataract &
Lens Replacement Surgeon

Restore Your Healthy Vision
Learn about risk factors, prevention and the
latest advances in treatment options to manage
diabetic eye and macular degeneration.

* Wednesday, June 13th
12:30 PM Englewood

* Thursday, June 14th
Noon North Port
M. Brandon Parrott, M.D., Ph.D.
Vitreo-Retinal Surgeon

RSVP: 941-925-2020
CENTERFORSIGHT.NET/SEMINARS

CENTER FOR SIGHT
SARASOTA I VENICE I BRADENTON
SEE, HEAR AND LOOK YOUR BEST"
406 N. Indiana Ave., Englewood ~ 14844 S. Tamiami Tr., North Port
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE PAYMENT CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR
PAYMENT FORANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED ASA RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO
THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT


^^^^^^Florida Lottery^
I www^^^ flalottery ^^^com I^


I ABC]r 7l ALMANC


I POWERBALL6


L &,0 .11
wr fr *
-tdrtle _.r icsfl




:WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


L~jj


Ii,'r


"Id


Eri700UVEHICLES I
AN A T S -SUNDAY MONDAY
ANRAlPRIlCE 0OSE -ELL! ""
11AM-5PM 9AM-5PM


THIS WEEKEND ONLY


FOR Q60

A APR MONTHS! W

ON ALL NEW CIVIC, ACCORD, CROSSTOUR,
ODYSSEY, PILOT AND RIDGELINES


*?k'.i^H!MI.M


1l v II 1 .1
LO ':: l1,0 '', ,: I *'t II F fI , -,
^, I E "" L'E":";"
1 ^. y 'j^ ***11'""v


ORR 1799 oS9F9.
BUY LEASE PER
F O R F O RR


2007 FORD TAURUS SEL $3
STK#H12915A, LOCAL TRADE, EXTRA CLEAN........................................ ..............
2001 HONDA CRV $6988
STK#H12757B, AUTO, ICE COLD AIR ............................................................................
1999 LEXUS RX 300 $7988
STK#H12874B, LEATHER. LOADED..........................................................
2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING LIMITED $79
STK#H121051A, SEDAN, LOADED, LOW MILES..................... .......................
2005 NISSAN SENTRA $7988
STK#H121005B, AUTO, ICE COLD AIR ...........................................................................
2000 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE $7988
STK#H12961A, LOW MILES, EXTRA CLEAN .................................. .....................
2001 CHEVY TAHOE LT $8988
STK#H12986A, LOCAL TRADE, GREAT CONDITION................... ..............

2004 HONDA ACCORD EXL V6 $11 98
STK#H121003A, LEATHER, LOADED WITH OPTIONS........................ ..............
2007 JEEP COMPASS SPORT $11QQ
STK H12982B, 4WD, AUTO, LOW MILES.................................................................... I
2005 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE $11 988
STK#H121076A, 4WD, LOCAL TRADE, LOW MILES .. .......................
2006 BMW 530i $1 3988
STK#H12852A, SEDAN, LOADED ....................................... .........................
2011 CHEVY MALIBU LS $1988QQ
STK#H12877A, LIKE NEW, ONLY 19K MILES..... ....................................... ,
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY LE $15,988
STK#H121040A, ALL POWER, ONLY 19K MILES ..................................................
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE $16 988
STK#H121004A, LIMITED, LEATHER, LOW MILES....................................................
2009 CHEVY SILVERADO LT $18,988
STK#H121029A, LOW MILES, ALL THE OPTIONS ..................................................
O D' IT 2 YEARS FREE
(lc 9 MAINTENANCE+
2010 HONDA FIT $1 988 2010 HONDA INSIGHT EX $1798
STK# H12890A, AUTO, LOW MILES ................................ 15 ,9 8 8 STK H12858A, 44 MPG, LOADED...............................
2009 HONDA CIVIC LX s$1 9000 2009 HONDA CRV LX $17988
STK H12936A, AUTO, AIR, ALL POWER........................ STK 929A,4WD,PRISTINE......................................
2008 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID 2007 HONDA CRV LX $18,988
STK P0174, 42 MPG, 28K MILES .................................ST 86A, LEATHER, SUNROOF,32KMILES.........
2008 HONDA ACCORD LX-P $i Q 2008 HONDA ACCORD EX-L $ oAQ
STKBP0179, ALL POWER, 25K MILES............................ 1. ,9 8 8 STKBH121033A, NAVIGATION, LOADED....................... V.$ 0 U
2010 HONDA FIT SPORT $16988 2010 HONDA ODYSSEY EX-L $ ,
STKBH12811A, AUTO, LOADED...................................... 16 ,9 8 STKP0O178, LOADED, LOW MILES .............................. 2 6 19
2010 HONDA CIVIC LX $i6. 988 2011 HONDA PILOT EX $27,988
STK H1292 A, AUTO, 18K MILES................................. STK H12826A, LIKE NEW, 15K MILES ...........................
S SHOWROOM HOURS:
TODAY Uam-6pm
SUNDAY 1 lam-5pm
S 1 00501 2 PARTS/SERVICE/BODY
0 5 M41 BY-PASS Mon.-Fri.7:3am-5.:3Opm
Saturda85 S.41 BY-PASS 7:3ampm
only Do not compare to models before 2008 Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle +See dealer for details All offers with approved credit


-7


UNDER $10,000 SPECIALS


1998 HONDA ACCORD COUPE V-6
AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF .................................................
1999 HONDA ACCORD LX
AUTO, ALL POWER,ONLY 45K MILES .......................................
2005 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
V-6,LOADED ........................................ .......................
2003 HONDA CIVIC LX
AUTO, A/C, ONLY 44K MILES..................................
2004 TOYOTA SIENNA LE
7 PASS, DUAL A/C ..................................... ................
2003 BMW 325i CONV
Di AP A D .i AP .rI C .T. ..r ,. .r..L.


I BLAL U ON BLALIC LLAIlRK, IT UUPOWN rUN ...............................................................
MiAAERSECIAL


2011 CHEVY IMPALA LS
LIKE NEW,ONLY 4K MILES................................
2009 KIA SPORTAGE LTD
NAVI,LEATHER,SUNROOF ................................
2012 HONDA FIT
ONLY 3K,SAVE THOUSANDS .............................
2011 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ
I FATIUOFD OIIOMDn.FI rNASEFH


2009 VW GTI
AUTOA/C,FAST AND FUN..................
2009 LINCOLN MKZ
LEATHER,SUNROOF,ONLY 32K MILES.


$5990
$6990
.$7990
$8990
$9990
$QQQn


.14,990
.16,990
$16,990
.. 17,990
$18,990
518,990


-iBfi^-ifi A1 rA i* HI


2007 TOYOTA YARIS S................. $10,990
2007 TOYOTA COROLLA LE .......... S11,990
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA LE.......... S14,990
2006 TOYOTA AVALON XLS ........16,990
2006 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER LTD $16,990
2010 TOYOTA RAV4........ ..................$17,990


2011 TOYOTA CAMRY LE.............. $18990
2008 TOYOTA SIENNA LE ............ $18990
2010 TOYOTA PRIUS III NAVIGATION $20,990
2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA D-CAB ...... 21.990
2010 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER V-6 22,990
2010 TOYOTA VENZA ...............$22,990


Ends 5/28/12 All prices & leases excludes tax, tag, registration and title and include dealer fees. tLeases based on 39 month 12K Miles year, $3999 down. Prices/
Discounts net of all Factory Rebates/Incentives & Factory Value Package discounts. *tDouble your trade on new cars only provided by Cramer Toyota offers cannot be
combined.**O%APR on select models in lieu of rebates, terms may vary. All pictures for illustrative purposes only. +See dealer for detas All offers with approved credit.


N:


NEW 2012 TOYOTA

PRIUSONE


BUYI 9'.0
FOR 1,
VIN#8596


Toyota Carnry was named an Excellent Valueff
I -IntelliChoice I


......................................
......................................
......................................


......................................


........................................................
........................................................


LLc i i BZ i% iLV ..................................................................................


.....................................................................


SUN NEWSPAPERS 3A


!;f





:4A SUN NEWSPAPERS

I OBITUARIES
Martin J. Kapustka
Martin J. Kapustka,
age 74, of Itasca, Ill., and
Venice, passed away
Thursday, May 24, 2012.
He was the beloved
husband of 50 years to
Geraldine (nee Kurek);
loving father of Ronald J.
(Michele), Lee J. (Patri-
cia), Laura A. (Richard)
Bartuce and Cheryl A.;
dear grandfather of
Andrew J., Adam N.,
Alexander J. and Alan P.
Kapustka and Allison,
Nicholas and Zachary
Bartuce; and fond uncle,
cousin and friend to
many.
Services: Visitation is
Monday, May 28, from 3
to 8 p.m. at Kolbus-John
V. May Funeral Home,
6857W. Higgins Ave., Chi-
cago, Ill. Lying-in-state is
at St. Philip the Apostle
Church, 1233 Holtz
Ave., Addison, Ill., from
9:30 a.m. until the time of
Mass, 10 a.m. Interment
will be in St. Adalbert
Cemetery, Niles, Ill. For
info, call 773-774-3232 or
visit www.kolbusmayfh.
com.

Nancy Nickel
Nancy Nickel, 63,
of Venice, formerly of
Dayton, Ohio, passed
peacefully in her sleep
Wednesday, May 23, 2012.
She is survived by
mother, Virginia Nickel;
brothers, Tim and William;
sisters, Jane Annie
Kelly and SandyWilds;
daughters, Toni Kolker


MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


and Debra Brunett; and
two grandchildren.
Nancy did not wish
to have a
funeral, and
no memo-
rial services
will be held.
rj Instead, we
hope that
Nancy's
many
friends and family mem-
bers will remember her for
her kindness and the love
she had for them. We hope
that everyone who knew
her will cherish the time
she was able to share with
them, keep her in their
hearts always and never
forget what a wonderful
daughter, mother and
friend she genuinely was.
Nancy so easily offered
her love to us all and had
so much more yet to give.
That love, her love, will
continue to fill our hearts
today and always.

Alta C. W. Payne
Alta Caroline Webster
Payne, 90, of Venice, Fla.,
died Sunday, May 20,
2012.
Mrs. Payne was the
daughter of Julian Webster
and May Hartsock
Webster. She was born in
Fort Valley, Ga., on June
7, 1921, and moved with
her parents to Florida in
1922. She was a graduate
of Agnes Scott College in
Decatur, Ga., and taught
mathematics until her
retirement from Venice
High School in 1983. She
was a member of Venice


Presbyterian Church,
where she was an elder
and former church
treasurer.
Alta is survived by her
daughter, Pamela Joelson,
and her husband, Ray;
and two grandsons,
Dean Joelson, his wife,
Kameron, and their
children, Sierra and
Alyssa, and Ryan Joelson,
his wife, Heather, and
their children, Ava and
William. Preceding her in
death were her husband,
William C. Payne, and her
son, William C. Payne Jr.
Her family deeply
appreciates the loving
care she received from
Aston Gardens and
Tidewell Hospice.
Services: Services will
be private. Ewing Funeral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.

OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes and crematories
only. There is no charge for
publishing an abbreviated death
notice once. Full obituaries,
notices of services and repeat
death notices will be subject to
charges based on their length.
Obituaries should be emailed
to Ikennedy@venicegondolier.
com and must include a phone
number. There is an additional
charge for faxed or hand-
delivered obituaries, and for
photos. The Venice GondolierSun
publishes on Wednesdays and
Saturday. Obituary deadlines
are noon for faxes and 2 p.m. for
emails the day before publica-
tion. For more information, call
941-207-1110.


Family friend charged



with sexual assault


A South Venice man
was arrested this week
after he allegedly had
sex with the
disabled
daughter of
a longtime
Ch, f family
S friend.
S According
to a Sara-
OTERO sota County
Sheriff's
Office report:
The family friend was
helping a woman install
a television. She left the
house for 45 minutes,
leaving the friend and
her 20-year-old autistic
daughter, who functions
at a third-grade level, in
the house together.
When she returned
they chatted briefly
and he left. That's when
she noticed the victim
appeared disheveled.
A Child Protection
Center interview was
conducted. The victim
identified the friend
as having touched her
inappropriately. She said
she told him to stop but
he would not.
William Anthony
Otero, 57, 300 block
Wesleyan Drive, Ven-
ice, was arrested and
charged with sexual
assault on a disabled
person. Bond was set at
$7,500.


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol,jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction. Guilt is determined by
the courtsystem.


Choking incident
leads to arrest
A Nokomis man went
to the hospital because
of a deep laceration on
the back of his head,
then to jail.
According to a Sara-
sota County Sheriff's
Office report:
A man who was intoxi-
cated got into an argu-
ment with a woman at his
home and put his hands
around her throat. As her
son pulled the man away,
the man fell back and hit
his head on the corner of
a mirror on the wall.
When he returned
home from the hospital,
sheriff's deputies were
waiting.
Cruz Fernando
Serrano, 46, 600 block
Osceola Road, Noko-
mis, was charged with
domestic battery. Bond
was not available.

Venice Police
Department arrests
Christopher Scott
Prest-Neumann, 27,
500 block Indiana Ave.,
Nokomis. Charge:


driving with expired
license for more than six
months. Bond: $120.
Kyle Brian Ray, 26,
200 block North Harbor
Drive, Venice. Charge:
battery. Bond: $750.

Sarasota
County Sheriff's
Office arrests
Megan Marie Pardy,
18, 200 blockWoodland
Drive, Osprey. Charge:
parole violation (original
charge: driving while
license revoked or sus-
pended). Bond: none.
*Valerie Temple, 28, 10
block Shoreland Drive,
Osprey. Charge: driving
while license revoked or
suspended. Bond: $120.
MelanyWilson, 27,
1200 block Barbara
Drive, Venice. Charge:
fraud. Bond: $1,500.
Lori Linn Moser,
37, 5200 Citadel Road,
Venice. Charge: selling
narcotics (oxycodone).
Bond: $5,000.
MichaelWion, 40,
11900 block Granite
Woods Loop, Venice.
Charge: out-of-state fugi-
tive (Ohio). Bond: none.


FinancingAvailable for Qualified Customers
941-488-1810 HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5
941 -488-1 10 SATURDAY 8-3
825 E. Venice Ave. Venice, FL 34285
Best Of Venice 2003-2011
www. mcpcolortile. comn


MEMORIAL


_ DAY


(G"


Monday, May 28th at lOam

Gulf Pines Memorial Park in Eng ewood

Specia Guest Speaker- Lieutenant Genera Rona d Watts; Retired US Army
Marce a Brown Voca ist, Nationa Anthem
Mike Sharp- Branch Music
Lemon Bay ROTC Dril Team
Rotonda Veterans' Honor Guard
Ladies Auxiliary VFW post #10476 and VFW Post #10178 Butterfly Re ease
Boy Scouts Troop #157 Giving F ags to a in attendance
SVFW post #10476 and #10178 Wreath Acceptance by each Branch or Service


LEMON BAY
FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATION SERVICES
A 2 #9oye& a(elorFum-erl Hom.

Englewood
(941) 474-5575
LemonBayFH.com


GULF PINES
MEMORIAL PARK
Englewood
(941) 474-2413
GulfPinesMEcom


11T*UEOl


every life has a story"


I


Direct Phone Numbers:
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000
Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220 Classified 429-3110
Editorial/Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified Fax 866-949-1426 IAdvertising Fax 485-3036
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100
Community Web Site http://www.venicegondolier.com
DayStar Communications 207-7800
Publisher: Tim Smolarick
Editor: Bob Mudge
President: Derek Dunn-Rankin


The
Bureau



Printedonrecy pape,


Home Delivery -----------------------------
Wed. & Weekend Rate SUBSCRIBE TODAY! CUSTOMER
Newspaper designated market. S SERVICE POLICY:
Venice, Laurel, Nokomis, Enclosed is a check for and mail to the address below, attn. Circulation. If you do not receive
VENICE glewood (Sarasota Co.) Name your newspaper by
13 wks. $15.00k 6a.m., please call the
26 wks. $25.00 Address Circulation Dept. at
Gond lier2071300 and
Gle S52 I wkss. $45.00 City State Zip 207 -1300 and
LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S NO.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 52 WkS $45.00 Cinth State -a newspaper will be
EZPAY$3.50/month Phone brought to you.willbe
TVTimesisoptional$.10aWkhobroughttoyou
USPS (221-700) ISSN (1536-1063) Waterlineisoptional$.1aWk Mastercard( ) Visa( ) Expiration Date______
The Venice Gondolier Sun is published every Mail Delivery i,, ,, ,,i.. CUSTOMER
13 wks. $21.84 SERVICE HOURS:
Wednesday and Weekend by The Sun. 26 wks.$41.34 ".." Mon.,Tues.,
200 East Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285. 52 wks. $73.32 - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- Thurs. & Fri.
Periodicals Postagepaid at Venice, Single Copy POSTMASTE Send address changes to Venice Gondolier Sun, 8 5 p.
Florida and additional mailing centers. Wed. 751 Circulation Department, 200 E. Venice Ave., Venice FL 34285. Wed. 6 a.m. 5p.m.
Weekend 75 7% Tax Included- Foreign rates upon request Sat. 6 a.m. 11 a.m.


'(oo Aw"m- -C e


F.


~;"~i~


(Wlfyaf


h




:WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


GRAND OPENING
..m- -M


0S S
A A A A


WAS $8g9


$399


SPRCSO EL
DOULETH DIFEENE!

60MOTHFIANIG
Availble fr all i omor ad te ms& Fstr atrese


#These coupons may not be used with one another. Offers cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Not valid on prior purchases, gift cards, clearance or one-of-a-kind merchandise. Cannot be used toward the purchase of a Stearns & Foster mattress. See store associate for details. Mattress
coupons shown expire 5/28/12. $200 Coupon Code 634710. S100 Coupon Code 634711. $50 Coupon Code 634712. ttValid on all mattress sets with a queen set value of S 299 or more. Must sleep on mattress a minimum of 30 nights. After 30 nights, customer has 90 daysto return mattress.
Customer is responsible for returning the mattress to the store. Limit one trial offer per customer. Offer excludes all adjustable bases, boxsprings and accessories such as pillows, mattress protectors, etc. Stained, or otherwise damaged mattresses will not be accepted. Void in the state of Tennessee.


Want to NO Many Payment F-
? - CREDIT Options Available
Today. NEEDED** For Your Convenience
4. 0-__ME VISA ~I
**If you do not have sufficient availability to use or qualify for the credit sources listed, you will be directed toasfurniture.com
RAC Acceptance, to determine if you qualify for RACs rentto-own program. Some applicants may not qualiy.y espanol.asfurniture.com


Prices are in effect from receipt of ad through 5/28/12 and are subjectto change. American Signature Furniture (ASF) is not responsible fortypographical errors. Assortments vary by location. See store fordetails regarding all warranties. The only promotions valid on Serta iComfort are financing offers
and gift card offers upto S200. All other offers do notapply. See associatefordetails. *Our "Compare at" and "Save" prices reflectthe currentselling price of merchandise of like gradeand quality sold by othersin the ASFtrade area, which is a national trade area thatincludes online retailers.
Asa result, advertised "Compare at" and "Save" prices may or may not necessarily bethe prices at which such merchandise is sold bytraditional retail outlets in the local area. +Advertised higher price is not a retail price comparison or a representation that any sales of this product at this price
have taken place in the local area. Thisprice is merely a representation of what similarcompeting products have been priced at in the recent past undersimilar retail market conditions. The consumershould check competing prices forsimilar products to determine what percentage of savings is present on
products of this type in the current retail market. :With purchase of any premium mattress set $699 or more. Free delivery within normal delivery area. Next day delivery offered on a qualified in-stock mattress set purchase made before 4:00 PM and to be delivered in the stores' daily
scheduled delivery areas.Askassociatesfordeliveryschedule details. Mattresses must bebagged and sealed priorto removal and delivery of newmattresses(bags available in store).ASFshall not be obligatedto remove mattressesthat pose a safety riskto ourassociates. Seestore for details. tAmerican
Signature Brand Limited Lifetime Warranty: A limited lifetime warranty applies to allAmerican Signature Brand furniture for the life of the original purchaser. A written copy of the Limited Lifetime Warranty is available in-store upon request. See store for details regarding any warranties that
may apply to other brands sold in-store. ttGuarantee: If you find a similar item (with the same qualities, features and benefits) with the same services, being offered for less, within 30 days of purchase, ASFwill gladly offeryou a refund of twice the difference between the competitor's price and ours.


Tampa 15020 North Dole Mabry Highway* (813) 769-0700 Jacksonville 9400 Atllntic Boulevard (904) 421-0950
Brandon 161 Brandon Town Center Drive (813) 315-1120 Daytona Beach 1924 W International Speedway Blvd* (386) 944-0240
Pinellas Park 7230 US 19 (727) 456-5420 Altamonte Springs 150S5 Stole Route 434 (407) 571-0529
Sarasota 5455 University Parkway* (941) 552-0830 Orlando 7463 West Colonial Drive (407) 581-0949
Port Charlotte 2150 West Tomiomi Trail (941) 625-0297 Orlando 730 Sand Lake Road (407) 581-5320
Fort Myers 13711 South Tomiomi Trail (239) 425-3699 Sunrise 12801 West Sunrise Boulevard (954) 315-0740
Miami 7775 SW 40th Street (305) 728-2800


SMT TRESSES


SUN NEWSPAPERS 5A






6A SUN NEWSPAPERS MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION








LEGAL NOTICES


INVITATION NOTICE OF ACTION
TO BID I16
14


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Bid proposals are invited for the
Runway 4-22, Taxiway E and
RSA/ROFA Improvements
located at Venice Municipal
Airport. Bids will be received at
the office of Owen-Ames-Kim-
ball Company, 11941 Fairway
Lakes Drive, Ft. Myers, FL
33913 (Phone: 239-561-4141,
Fax: 239-561-1996) NLT 2:00
p.m. on Wednesday May 30,
2012.
The Work may be generally
described as follows:
The reconstruction of the
5000'by 150'Runway 4-22,
relocation of Taxiway E, runway
and taxiway lighting and sig-
nage improvements, electric
vault improvements, security
fence relocation, and modifica-
tion to the existing golf course
to improve Runway Safety Area
and Object Free Areas. The
work wil include approximately
20,500 tons of bituminous
asphalt course and cold in-place
recycling of the asphalt and
base course in addition to grad-
ing and drainage improve-
ments.
Owen Ames Kimball Company
strongly encourages qualified
Disadvantaged Business Enter-
prises (DBE) and Woman and
Minority Owned Business Enter-
prises (W/MBE) to respond to
this solicitation.
Drawings and specifications
may be examined at the offices
of Owen-Ames-Kimball Compa-
ny, Fort Myers and Punta Gorda.
Drawings and specifications are
also available on a CD at the
Owen-Ames-Kimball offices or
may be downloaded from Pro-
Core, our online plan room.
Contact Robin Dailey at the
number above to gain access to
downloading documents from
ProCore.
Bidders may use their standard
form of proposal. Bids must be
in accordance with the plans
and specifications. Owen-Ames-
Kimball Terms and Conditions of
the purchase order will be the
governing document regardless
of any statements to the con-
trary noted in the bidder's form
of proposal.
Bidders must deliver their pro-
posals to the Owen-Ames-Kim-
ball Company via express mail,
regular mail, e-mail, fax or in
person ahead of the stated time
for closing of the bids.
This is a unit price proposal per
the bid schedule attached with
the bid documents. Bidders will
identify those Items that they
are bidding lump sum propos-
als are not acceptable. Owen-
Ames-Kimball Company
reserves the right to reject any
and all bids.
All inquiries regarding this proj-
ect should be directed to Leo
Smith at Owen-Ames-Kimball
Company at the address and
phone numbers listed above.
Publish: May 26, 30, 2012


of the Family Court, Ulster
County, dated and filed with the
Petition and other papers in the
Office of the Clerk of the Fami-
ly Court, Ulster County on June
3, 2012
Published: May 5, 12, 19, 26,
2012


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
AUCTION
Notice is hereby given that the
contents of the rental units list-
ed herein will be offered for sale
at public auction per the Florida
Self Storage Act. (Statues/Sec-
tions 83.801-83,809).
Auction: Saturday, June 16,
2012 at 10:00 am or thereafter
at The Storage Bins
2359 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL 34293
(941) 493-2214
Miscellaneous Household Items
Jeffery N. MacDonald
Unit B36 10 x 10
Steven Stadnicki
Unit G24 10 x 20
Publish: May 26,June 2, 2012



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice of Public Sale: Flagship
Towing & Automotive Center,
LLC gives notice of Foreclosure
of Lien and intent to sell these
vehicles on June 11, 2012,at
10:00am at 106 Corporation
Way Venice, FL 34285, pur-
suant to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. Flagship
Towing & Automotive Center,
LLC reserves the right to
accept or reject any/or all bids.
1991 HONDA
JHMED8351MS025420
Publish: May 26, 2012


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice of Public Sale: Flagship
Towing & Automotive Center,
LLC gives notice of Foreclosure
of Lien and intent to sell these
vehicles on June 8, 2012,at
10:00am at 106 Corporation
Way Venice, FL 34285, pur-
suant to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. Flagship
Towing & Automotive Center,
LLC reserves the right to
accept or reject any/or all bids.
2004 CHEVROLET
1GNCS13X44K107088
2000 HYUNDAI
KMHJF35F5YU037093
Publish: May 26, 2012


FAMILY COURT OF THE STATE
OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF
ULSTER
In the Matter of a Guardianship
Proceeding
File No. 25727
Docket No. G-00229-12
VALAURA QUIMBY and
KEVIN QUIMBY
Petitioners,
against-
SABRINA MARIE CAPERNICK
and PATRICK DANIEL GORDON
Respondents
IN THE NAME OF THE PEOPLE
OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
TO THE ABOVE-NAMED
RESPONDENTS: SABRINA
MARIE CAPERNICK, WHOSE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS
385 TAZEWELL DRIVE, PORT
CHARLOTTE, FLORIDA, 33948
AND TO PATRICK DANIEL GOR-
DON, WHOSE LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS IS 1050 CAPRI
ISLES BLVD. L204, VENICE, FL
34292.
A Petition under Article Six of
the Family Court Act having
been filed with this Court
requesting that Jadelyz Lisa
Gordon, a person under the
age of 21, be committed to
the guardianship of Valuara
Quimby and Kevin Quimby.
YOU AND EACH OF YOU ARE
HEREBY SUMMONED to appear
before this Court at 16 Lucas
Avenue, Kingston, New York,
June 21 at 9:00 o'clock in the
forenoon of that day to answer
the petition and to be dealt
with in accordance with Article
Six of the Family Court Act.
On your failure to appear,as
herein directed a warrant may
be issued for your arrest, all of
your parental rights may be ter-
minated and your failure to
appear shall further constitute
a denial of your interest in the
child who is the subject of of
this proceeding, which denial
may result, without further
notice, in the transfer of com-
mitment of the child's care,
custody or guardianship or in
the child's adoption in this or
any subsequent proceeding in
which such care, custody or
guardianship or adoption may
e at issue.
Dated: Kingston, New York
April 30, 2012
Kathy Lasko,
CLERK OF THE COURT
TO THE ABOVE-NAMED
RESPONDENTS:
The foregoing summons is
served upon you by publication
pursuant to an Order of the
Hon. Anothonv McGintv. Judge


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM T. CORRIGAN
Deceased.
File No. 2012-CP-1731-SC
Division: Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of WILLIAM T. CORRIG-
AN, deceased, whose date of
death was January 3, 2012,
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Sarasota County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is P.O. Box 3079, Sara-
sota, Florida 34230-3079.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is May 26, 2012
Personal Representative:
Dennis J. Tracy
229 Pensacola Road
Venice, FL 34285
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Dennis J. Tracy
Attorney forDennis J. Tracy
Florida Bar No. 0176558
DULMER & TRACY, CHTD
229 Pensacola Road
Venice. Florida 34285


NOTICE TO
I CREDITORS
20


Florida Bar No. 0176558
DULMER & TRACY, CHTD
229 Pensacola Road
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941) 485-7761
Fax: (941) 488-9482
E-mail: dennisjtracy@com-
cast.net
PUBLISH: May 26, June 2,
2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAYMOND M. DUBRULE
Deceased.
File No.
2012-CP-001771-NC
Division: Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of RAYMOND M.
DUBRULE, deceased, whose
date of death was April 26,
2012 is pending in the Circuit
Court for Sarasota County
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is P.O. Box
3079, Sarasota, FL 34230.
The names and addresses of
the personal representatives
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is May 19, 2012
Personal Representative:
BRUNHILDE M.
BECKER
429 Valencia Rd
Venice, FL 34285
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
C. KELLEY
CORBRIDGEESQ.
BECHTOLD & CORBRIDGE,
P.A.
240 Nokomis Avenue South
Suite 200
Venice, FL 34285
Telephone: (941) 488-7751
Florida Bar No.0325066
PUBLISH: May 19, 26,
2012




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY R. ELLIOTT
Deceased.
File No.
2012-CP-001414-NC
Division: Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of HARRY R. ELLIOTT,
deceased, whose date of death
was November 24th, 2011 is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Sarasota County Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is P.O. Box 3079,
Sarasota, FL 34230. The
names and addresses of the
personal representatives and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court


WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIOD SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is May 19, 2012
Personal Representative:
Lauren J. Elliott
c/o 240 S. Nokomis Ave
Ste. 200
Venice, FL 34285
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
C. KELLEY
CORBRIDGE,ESQ.
BECHTOLD & CORBRIDGE,
P.A.
240 Nokomis Avenue South
Suite 200
Venice, FL 34285
Telephone: (941) 488-7751
Florida Bar No.0325066
PUBLISH:Mav 19.26.2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SARA-
SOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 2012-CP-00583-NC
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DONALD K HACKER, JR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of DONALD K HACKER, JR.,
deceased, whose date of death
was December 14, 2011; File
Number 2012-CP-00583-NC, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Sarasota County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is 2000 Main St, Saraso-
ta, FL 34237. The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is: May 26, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Kathleen H. Tsichlis
14 Via Barbera
Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
92688
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Law Offices of
Sardelis and Bowles, L.L.P.
Nicholas P. Sardelis, Chartered
Fla. Bar No.: 337587
2033 Main St., Ste. 502
Sarasota, FL 34237
(941) 366-1200
Publish: May 26, June 2, 2012



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM W. MOORE
Deceased.
File No. 2012-CP-1517-SC
Division: Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of WILLIAM W.
MOORE, deceased, whose
date of death was February
15, 2012, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Sarasota County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is P.O. Box
3079, Sarasota, Florida
34230-3079. The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the Dersonal


set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication
of this notice is May 26, 2012
Personal Representative:
The Northern Trust
Company
1515 Ringling Blvd.
Sarasota, FL 34236
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Dennis J. Tracy
Attorney for The Northern
Trust Company
Florida Bar No. 0176558
DULMER & TRACY, CHTD
229 Pensacola Road
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941) 485-7761
Fax: (941) 488-9482
E-mail: dennisjtracy@com-
cast.net
PUBLISH: May 26, June 2,
2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NORMAN A. NESBITT
Deceased.
File No. 2012-CP-01693-NC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of NORMAN A. NES-
BITT, deceased, whose date of
death was February 16, 2012,
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Sarasota County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Sarasota County Cour-
thouse, P.O. Box 3079, Sara-
sota, FL 34230. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate,
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date offirst publication
of this notice is May 19, 2012


Personal Representative:
Arlene M. Smith
505 Peach St
Venice, FL 34285
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Andrew J. Britton, Esq.
Attorney for Arlene M. Smith
Florida Bar No: 213500
401 Johnson Lane, Ste 102
Venice, FL 34285
Telephone: (941) 408-8008
Fax: (941) 408-0722
E-Mail: brittonlaw@gmail.com
PUBLISH: May 19, 26, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GEORGE R. SANDERSON
Deceased.
File No. 2012-CP-001874-NC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of GEORGE R.
SANDERSON, deceased,
whose date of death was April
15, 2012, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Sarasota County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Sarasota
County Courthouse, P.O. Box
3079, Sarasota, FL 34230.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to
be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate,
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date offirst publication
of this notice is May 26, 2012
Personal Representative:
Susan M. Sanderson
973 Orinoco E.
Venice, Fl 34285
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Andrew J. Britton, Esq.
Attorney for
Susan M. Sanderson
Florida Bar No: 213500
401 Johnson Lane, Ste 102
Venice, FL 34285
Telephone: (941)408-8008
Fax: (941) 408-0722
E-Mail: brittonlaw@gmail.com
PUBLISH: May 26, June 2,
2012


TO PLACE YOUR LEGAL NOTICE,



Call Stacy 941-207-1011 (at the Venice Office)



or e-mail: smcintosh@sun-herald.com



Fax: 941-485-3036 I


NOTICE TO NOTICE TO NOTICE TO
CREDITORS CREDITORS CREDITORS
20 20 20


NOTICE OF ACTION

16 NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
20


Notice of Publication of Overall Goal
Venice Municipal Airport proposes an overall Disadvantaged Busi-
ness Enterprise (DBE) goal of 8.88 percent for planned construc-
tion projects funded through the United States Department of
Transportation (DOT) Financial Assistance Programs for fiscal year
2012 (October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012). A con-
tract goal of 7.26 percent was also established in conjunction with
the planned Runway 4-22, Taxiway E and Runway Safety
Area/Runway Object Free Area construction in accordance with US
DOT Policy 49 CFR Part 26, Participation by Disadvantaged Busi-
ness Enterprises (DBE) in Department of Transportation Financial
Assistance Programs, updated February 2011.
For 30 days following the date of this notice, the rationale and
methodology used to determine the overall and contract goals are
available for inspection during the normal business hours of 8:00
am to 5:00 pm at the Administrative Offices of the Venice Munici-
pal Airport as well as on the City's Website at http://www.venice-
gov.com. For information related to the DBE program,
please contact:
Mr. Chris Rozansky, C.M., Airport Administrator
Venice Municipal Airport
150 Airport Avenue East
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 486-2711
Venice Municipal Airport and the U.S. Department of Transporta-
tion will accept comments regarding the goals up to 45 days from
the date of this notice.
Publish: May 26, 30, 2012


PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER THE ADOPTION OF
CITY OF VENICE ORDINANCE NO. 2012-16
NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of the City of
Venice, Florida will hold a public hearing beginning at 9:00 a.m.
or shortly thereafter, on June 12, 2012, in Council Chambers,
City Hall, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida, to consider
and act upon the adoption of the following proposed City Ordi-
nance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF VENICE, FLORIDA AMENDING
CHAPTER 86, LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, ARTICLE V, USE
REGULATIONS, DIVISION 9, SPECIFIC USE REGULATIONS OF THE
CODE OF ORDINANCES BY ADDING SECTIONS 86-152, 86-153
AND 86-154 ENTITLED THE CITY OF VENICE DOG FRIENDLY DIN-
ING PROGRAM, PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Purpose of Ordinance: to implement the local exemption estab-
lished by Section 509.233, Florida Statutes, to permit public
food service establishments within the city to allow patrons' dogs
within certain designated outdoor portions of their establish-
ments.
A complete draft of the proposed Ordinance is on file in the
Office of the City Clerk for inspection by the public between the
hours of 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be responsi-
ble for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evidence
at this meeting upon which any appeal is to be based.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. Written
comment filed with the City Clerk of the City of Venice, will be
heard and considered.
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the City
Clerk's office at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.
/s/
Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk
Publish: May 26, 2012





WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


Patrons ask about


Snook Haven's future


By CAROL SAKOWITZ
STAFF WRITER

Potential improve-
ments to a recent 3-acre
addition to Snook Haven
Park were on the agenda
Monday for a county
parks and recreation
public meeting at the
Morgan Family Com-
munity Center in North
Port.
While residents got a
taste of what could be in
store for the area around
the Myakka River and its
tributaries, some came
to learn of the status
of the Snook Haven
restaurant.
Snook Haven, a
popular county-owned
facility located on the
Myakka River near the
intersection of East
Venice Avenue and River
Road, has drawn atten-
tion because of problems
with its concessionaire.
About eight to 10 regular
patrons who attended
Monday's meeting
asked county Parks and
Recreation Manager
Carolyn Brown about its
future during a breakout
session.
Sunrise Sunset Con-
cessions of Snook Haven,
owned by St. Petersburg
attorney Kenneth Keefe,
is a year behind in its
rent owing more than
$42,000. According to the
concessionaire's contract
with the county, Sunrise
Sunset is required to pay
the county 12.5 percent
of its monthly sales.


Brown said a let-
ter sent May 7 to the
concessionaire advised
it to quit the location by
June 7 "unless they cure
the default." The keys
were turned over this
week.
"We're closing (the
restaurant) temporarily
to seek a new conces-
sionaire," Brown said.
"I want to emphasize
it was open during the
busy tourist season. The
service was provided; we
achieved that."
However, she said, the
county already plans
to advertise a request
for proposals regarding
the restaurant "hope-
fully, by the end of this
week." Brown said staff
is finalizing the details of
the RFP.
Although there will
be no food or enter-
tainment while the
restaurant is closed, she
said the location's other
amenities boat, canoe
and kayak-launching
facilities, picnicking and
a portable restroom -
will be open.
County staff outlined
potential improvements
to the new addition to
the existing 2.5-acre
Snook Haven Park,
purchased in December
2010, including upgrad-
ing an existing boat
ramp for shallow-draft
boats, repairing an exist-
ing dock and providing
parking and picnic areas.
The public meeting
was the second on the


subject held by county
parks and recreation. The
first was held April 18
at the Jacaranda Public
Library in South Venice.
Sarasota County Com-
missioner Carolyn Mason
said Tuesday she was
impressed with the turn-
out of about 30 citizens
at the Morgan Center.
She said the attendance
was as large as at the
Jacaranda meeting, "and
I was at both."

Email: csakowitz@sun-herald.com


What's Your Alternative?


DR. DAN BUSCH, DR. ERENE ROMANSKI
CHIROPRACTOR
Whether it is thought of as an "alternative"
therapy, a "complementary treatment", or
simply an effective means of promoting and
maintaining health, chiropractic is fast
becoming a staple of people's health care
regimen. According to a nationwide survey,
about 40 percent of people between ages 35
and 64 say they use complementary and
alternative medicine (CAM) for either disease


prevention, the treatment of ailments, or both.
Overall, more than one-third of all adults
surveyed indicated that they utilized some
form of alternative therapy, including
chiropractic. For men and women in their 40s
and 50s, the primary goal is to stave off
disease. The use of chiropractic, meditation,
massage, and yoga was found to increase as
people get older.


HOR:M NIAY&F 'ID7I. 0:I *TUSDY&TUISAY9:0-:0






TWIN PALMS
CHIROPRACTIC
y- I808 Venice Ave. East
412-3800
www.twinpalmschiro.com
Erene Romanski, DC Eric Barbera,DC Bobbi-Jo Donner,DC Dan Busch, DC
FREE Wellness Workshops Weds. 5-6pm Open to the Public!





*THE PATIENTAND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HASA RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CHANCE L
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS
SPERFORMEDASA RESULT OF ANDWITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FORTH FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT Lic# 14016


It's a really big deal!



Memorial Day


Savings Event

Take up to an EXTRA 30% to 50% OFF
our everyday discount prices throughout the store!
Aak Wi M M


LIF


30% off
Tees, tanks, shorts
& crop pants


oa.


30% off
Ladies swimwear


30% off
Summer handbags


SIf'

30% off 30% off
Fashion earrings Tees, shorts
& activewear


30% off
Summer acrylics


30% off
Men's swimwear


50% off
Sheets


Sale valid on select items. Entire stocks not included unless spec field. Styles & colors vary by store. Prices valid through 5/28/12






r ----------------------------
Through Monday S(r 0 II
EXTRA Savings Off Our I
Everyday Discount Prices I
One time use per transaction. Cannot be combined LO
S2f O with other coupon offers on this item. Excludes Red Dot O
Clearance, Panache Gift Cards, Fabulous Finds, BOGO C)
a merchandise and online purchases. Not valid on previously
purchased merchandise. May be used with Stein Mart 0
MasterCard' Rewards Certificates. Coupon must be O C
2 surrendered at time of sale. Valid through 5/28/2012 in On
SAny 1 Sale Item atng stores. Reproductons will not beaccepted.
Anry 1 Sale Item pcNot for use by Stein Mart associates. r.-
r-------------------------------------------
Through Monday Sn I
EXTRA Savings Off Our l
Everyday Discount Prices .cD I
On t~m , t ,,,t, C nt ba bnhnr d


I0/ with other coupon offers on this Item. Excludes Red Dot O
/O Clearance, Panache Gift Cards, Fabulous Finds, BOGO O
merchandise and online purchases. Not valid on previously -
SI purchased merchandise. May be used with Stein Mart O
MasterCard. Rewards Certificates. Coupon must be i
surrendered at time of sale. Valid through 5/28/2012 In
I Any 1 Sale Ite participatingstores. Reprductionswill not beaccepted.
I Any 1 Sale Item p Not for use by Stein Mart associates. oIi
--
L --------------------------
r ------------- --------------------------


I Through Monday
I EXTRA Savings Off Our
I Everyday Discount Prices


o40ff
I All Red Dot Clearance
I All Red Dot Clearance


cy
LI
Vald on Red Dot Clearance items. Cannot be combined O
with other coupon offers on these Items. Not valid on
previously purchased merchandise. Excludes online
purchases. May be used with Sten Mart MasterCard
Rewards certificates. Coupon must be surrendered at ^
time of sale. Vald through 5/28/2012 n participating Cj
stores. Reprductions will not be accepted.
Shoes 25% Off. rN


L-----------------------------
Take an exira 10' oil your entire purchase
S. hen you use your Slein Mar I MaslerCard
a.t ww ,, 1 5/25 Ihrough 5/28/2012.

Fo ornaes ti at tr ii w wsen atco rcl -8-tinmat nieofe a ay


SUN PHOTO BY BOB MUDGE


'Arresting' development


Venice Police Chief Tom McNulty poses for a "mugshot" on his way to "jail" Wednesday. He was one of dozens of community
leaders "arrested" as part of a fundraiser for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. He said he had already collected about $1,600
of the $3,200 bail set for
him.


SUN NEWSPAPERS 7A


ne ime use per e


I


A A A J





PUBLISHER
TIM SMOLARICK
PHONE: 941-207-1010
FAX: 941-484-8460
8A
WEEKEND EDITION
MAY 26, 2012


OPINION


GONDOLIER SUN EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: 941-207-1101
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR VIEW



A moment to remember, honor sacrifice


On April 19, Army Sgt. JaBraun S.
Knox arrived home in Auburn,
Ind., after a 7,000-mile-long trip
from Afghanistan.
The visit was a surprise to his young
wife, Courtney, his infant son, Braylon,
and most likely everyone else who
knew Knox from his days as kicker and
quarterback of the local high school
football team. Knox joined the Army
in January 2009, after finishing high
school. By summer he was fighting in
Iraq. Last October, he left with his unit
for Afghanistan.
Knox had 15 days at home with his
baby son before returning to the war.
On May 18, he was killed when his
unit was attacked by indirect fire in a
place named Asadabad, which is the
capital of Kunar province.
"He liked to kid around and joke
around but, on the same token, he
could be serious when it was time to
be serious and be competitive and
work hard in practice and games,"


his old football coach later told a Fort
Wayne, Ind., TV station.
Knox was 23 years old.
Also killed in the Asadabad attack
that day was Sgt. Michael Knapp, 28,
of Overland Park, Kan. Knapp joined
the Army 2003, served in Kosovo,
was deployed twice to Iraq and then
Afghanistan. When he died, he was days
away from a two-week leave to visit his
wife and 9-month-old baby girl.
"Mike was a soldier through and
through, and you just couldn't ask for
a guy that's more loyal to our country
and to my daughter, and then to my
granddaughter," his father-in-law later
told a Kansas City TV station.
Knox and Knapp were two of five
casualties whose names were made
public by the Department of Defense
May 21. Also killed were U.S. Army
Spc. Samuel T. Watts, 20, ofWheaton,
Ill., who succumbed to wounds in-
flicted by a roadside bomb in Zharay,
Afghanistan, on April 25. Two other


soldiers were reported killed by an
improvised explosive device in Tarin
Kowt, Afghanistan, on May 20. They
were Army Capt. Jesse A. Ozbat, 28, of
Prince Geroge, Va., and 2nd Lt. Tobias
C. Alexander of Lawton, Okla.
Since 2001, at least 1,851 members
of the U.S. military have died in the
war in Afghanistan, according to The
Associated Press, 1,539 as a result of
hostile fire. Some 4,477 died in the
Iraq War from 2003 to 2011.
It was back after the Civil War that
Decoration Day began informally as a
day of remembrance for those who had
given their lives in battle. In 1868, Maj.
Gen. John A. Logan declared May 30
as the official day to decorate graves of
both Union and Confederate soldiers
in Arlington National Cemetery.
After World War I, Memorial Day was
extended to honor all who had fought
and died in our nation's wars.
Monday we pay tribute to those who
sacrificed their lives fighting in the


American Revolution, the War of 1812,
the Civil War and Spanish-American
War and World War I. The 291,000-plus
killed in combat inWorld War II, and the
405,000 Americans who died during that
war. The 36,516 service men and women
who died during the Korean War and
the 58,209 in Vietnam. The eight killed
in Iran in 1980, 266 in Beirut from 1982
to 1984, and 19 in Grenada in 1983. The
258 members of the American military
who lost their lives in the first Gulf War.
Especially, though, we take a mo-
ment to think of the men and women
who will put on a uniform this morn-
ing on our behalf. Some will never
again spend time with their spouses
and babies, moms and dads, sisters
and brothers, friends and former
coaches, like JaBraun Knox, Michael
Knapp, Samuel Watts, Jesse Ozbat and
Tobias Alexander.
For them and for the others, our
prayers, our thanks and our wishes for
peace.


Our Plantation Community
Foundation bylaws specify that
we may make gifts and grants
for community, civic, cultural,
educational, scientific, environ-
mental, recreational or fitness ac-
tivities; social and health services;
and youth and elder programs.
This week I'd like to describe the
work of a cross-section of our
2012 grantees, making the point
that, through our grant giving,
we work toward improving the
quality of life in South County in
a wide variety of ways.
For many families a child's
disability is a lifelong, loving
concern that may also introduce
stress for both parents and
siblings. In-home respite care,
provided through the Family
Network on Disabilities of
Manatee/Sarasota Inc. gives
families a pause from the ex-
traordinary demands of ongoing
care and supports the caregivers
by offering them a special time
out with their spouse, or the op-
portunity to attend to the needs
of other family members.
Respite care needs for those
with autism have tripled in
the last year and 70 percent of
respite services that the founda-
tion supports are for those with
autism. Our grant for in-home
respite care for families in Venice
will provide about four hours per
month for each family over the
next year. A total of 20 families
in South County are requesting
in-home respite care, with an
additional 14 on the waiting list.
The mission of Historic
Spanish Point is "to connect
people of today with 5,000 years
of human history in southwest
coastal Florida by collecting,
preserving and interpreting
objects and traditions significant
to our region's past."
During the November/
December holiday season,
Spanish Point has a series of
events collectively called Heritage
Holiday. Among other things,
volunteer actors dress in period
costumes and visitors can ask
them questions about the lives
of their characters during that
period. Our grant will be used to
upgrade and replace the period
clothing.
St. Francis Animal Rescue of
Venice Inc. is a no-kill shelter,
and its mission is to rescue
abandoned, unwanted cats and
kittens in our community and to
provide them with shelter, food,
medical care and companion-
ship for their entire lives or until
responsible homes can be found


through adoption. Supporting
local spay/neuter programs
and educating the public about
responsible pet ownership are
also important aspects of its
mission. Our grant will be used to
purchase much-needed medical
supplies.
LiteracyVolunteers of South
County provides free, indi-
vidualized tutoring for adults
in reading skills and English as
a second language, as well as
group classes in English language
conversation and U.S. citizen-
ship preparation. This important
program is supported by more
than 100 volunteer tutors and
classroom instructors. Plantation
Community Foundation has ap-
proved a grant for the purchase of
critically needed curriculum and
training materials upon which
both program participants and
volunteers depend.
Suncoast Chorale Inc. has been
performing for 34 years. There are
currently 60 members ranging in
age from 19 to 92. New members
pay half the cost of their uniforms
and all members pay a member-
ship fee. The chorale performs
three concerts per year with each
concert performed twice, once at
aVenice church and once at an
Englewood church. The chorale
also performs three special con-
certs per year, including this year,
for example, Brahms' "Requiem"
with a 35-piece orchestra and
singers from communities
throughout the region. Our grant
will be used for sheet music and
performance portfolios.
Venice Area Pregnancy Care
Center Inc. celebrated its 27th
anniversary this year and is run
exclusively by volunteers. The
agency strives to assist needy
clients by supplying infant car
seats, diapers, clothing, layette
items and sometimes baby food.
Diapers are offered monthly; car
seats, clothing, etc., are offered
as needed. Clients are referred by
other agencies, churches or by
word of mouth. No questions are
asked concerning marital status
or religion. Our grant will be
used to purchase infant car seats
needed before a newborn baby
may travel home with mom.
These are just a half dozen ex-
amples of the investments we've
made in our 41 2012 grantees to
try to "Make a Difference" here in
this community that we all love.
To learn more about our founda-
tion and to keep up with founda-
tion news, go to www.plantation
gcc.com and click on "Plantation
Community Foundation" at the
bottom right of the homepage.
If you are interested in join-
ing us, or would like to be
notified of our events, drop us
a line at Plantation Community
Foundation, 500 Rockley Blvd.,
Venice FL 34293, or pcf500@
verizon.net. We'd love to hear
from you.

Lee Williams is president
ofPlantation Community
Foundation.


ALL IN FAVOR OF SAYING
"THANK YOU FOR YOUR SACRIFICE"
ON MEMORIAL DAY, PLEASE
RAISE YOUR HANb.


Go6Ctib SvAJ


SHOULD THE COUNTY PUT A NEW CONCESSIONAIRE IN AT SNOOK HAVEN? CALL US AT
941-207-1111.


More info. Just how many
handicapped people will
be served by these baseball
fields? I think we need a good
article on it in the paper. And
what is the cost of building
these fields? Is it going to cost
$100,000 per child or adult to
play ball? I mean, I'd like to
know what the cost is. Not ev-
erybody has to do everything.
I had a handicapped young
man. I think we bend over
backward for handicapped
people to enable them to be
able to do things they want to
do. There again, children who
don't have handicaps can't do
some of these things because
of money and restrictions. So,
let's take the emotion out of
this and have some fiscal re-
sponsibility. Let's get the facts.
How much is it going to cost?
Let's get more information
before decisions are made.
Editor's Note: Challenger has
said it will bear the entire cost
of building and maintaining
a complex for its athletes.
Local sports organizations
offer scholarships to try to let
all children play regardless of
finances.
Tick, tock. Do contractors
working on 1-75 ever finish a
project or do they just keep
working on it?
More room. The Nokomis
Community Park has tons and
tons of room. Pine Royal Road
- there's a huge vacant lot
there. There's plenty of room to
have their Challenger fields.
Your turn. I thought the job
of the schools was to teach
reading writing' and arithmetic.
Parents, it's your job to see that
your kids are drug free. So you
kiss them.
Fencing. Regarding the
Pinebrook Park potential ball
field site: Five of us were walk-
ing up the cart path at Capri
Isles Golf Course looking across
at the little pond adjacent to


Let 'em


Have It
the soccer fields and witnessed
a Florida panther walking
along the chain-link fence and
disappearing back into the very
jungle that we're talking about.
I would only hope that if this
ball field develops that there's
fencing along the outside of
it that would eliminate the
potential of any inroads by
one of our endangered species
here in Florida. I'm sure that
they eat some things and that
they're patrolling the jungle for
that reason. Caution on the safe
side? I don't care about the ball
fields one way or the other, but
think about the protective side
of it.
Remove it. I, and everyone I
know, am vehemently opposed
to the roundabout. I was in-
volved in an accident there last
week and there on the ground
were small parts of cars, metal
and rubber, on the sides of the
roundabout, obviously from
many accidents. Please remove
it and put the traffic lights
back. If you're determined to
keep it, make it one lane.
Off lines. Hundreds and


hundreds of trees still have
power lines running through
the middle of them. We're
intelligent enough to know
that winds can topple power
poles that are not near trees.
But now you have two things
to deal with, and it takes a lot
of time and money to clean
up the mess that part of which
could have been prevented.
Mitigate the potential damage.
Now is the time to do it. Don't
allow the public to plant trees
next to power poles and lines
just to hide them from view.
Let's be proactive.
Right spot. I read in the
papers about the Challenger
complex and the dispute with
the neighbors. It's unbeliev-
able how shortsighted people
can be. What an ideal place to
have it a complete sports
facility. The promoters of the
facility have done a great job of
conceding to the homeowners'
concerns and it still doesn't
seem to be enough. These
young athletes need a place to
be. So what if you hear voices
or see lights? If the lights are
bright, pull the blinds. Go over
and have a hotdog and sit and
watch the smiles on the faces
of these kids. Just remember,
they're human also.

The Let'em Have It line
allows readers to sound off on
issues of local interest. Opinions
expressed here are solely those of
the callers. Personal attacks on
private individuals; attacks on or
commercials for specific busi-
nesses; local candidate endorse-
ments or attacks during election
season; or opinions or comments
otherwise unfit for publication
will not be printed. Ifyou would
like to participate, call the line
at 941-207-1111. Call no more
than once a week. Please keep
your comments brief The line
is available all hours. Caller
identification is not required.


Making South


County better


`









Airport a valuable city and regional asset


BRETT
STEPHENS
GUEST COLUMNIST

In his recent opinion
piece "Airport is older but
not more important," Ted
Koszarski proffers the
same tired, misinformed
conjecture that reminds
us some still don't
comprehend the value of
municipal airports and
why they exist.
Among other things,
General Aviation airports
provide emergency
medical services, aerial
firefighting, law enforce-
ment and border control,
agricultural functions,
flight training, time-sen-
sitive air cargo services,
business travel, humani-
tarian aid, scheduled
services and more. Recall
the recent letter from
the Gondolier Sun reader
thanking the city and the
airport for having the
helicopter that put out a
nearby brush fire, saving
his home from disaster.


For more than 20 years,
Venice Aviation Society
Inc., a nonprofit, commu-
nity-based organization,
has remained true to the
mission of "Supporting
a safe, modern, sustain-
able, community-friendly
airport." We campaign for
safety, sustainability and
compatibility through
transparency and fact-
based responses to the
issues.
Granted, a restaurant
or golf course doesn't
need an airport to exist.
But most recognize that
without this particular
airport, the beachscape
from Caspersen Beach
all the way up to Airport
Avenue would resemble
the north end of the
island: more condos,
more homes, fewer parks
and less public beach.
Mr. Koszarski seems
to suggest that airport-
based tourism isn't a
valued component of
our local economy. Main
Street merchants, hote-
liers, restaurateurs and
many others would likely


disagree, adding that
Venice Municipal Airport
is an important contribu-
tor to our local economy.
Just ask the city's
Economic Development
Board.
Suggesting that the
city "doesn't receive one
penny in revenue from
the airport" is purely
false. Annually, the airport
writes a check to the city
for administrative servic-
es, last year to the tune of
$194,000. According to tax
records, airport tenants
paid $106,000 in property
taxes in 2010.
Plus, the city derives
revenues indirectly
from the airport in the
form of retail sales, sales
taxes and wages to local
employees. According
to a Venice Airport
Business Association
study, the airport busi-
ness payroll remains
conservatively in excess
of $3.8 million, with
closer to 100 employees
rather than his claim of
30. A Florida Department
of Transportation study


concurred that the airport
is a substantial compo-
nent of our economy.
Mr. Kozarski conve-
niently overlooks the
fact that airports only
get funding from airline
ticket sales and aviation
fuel taxes, not your
income tax dollars. Our
airport is self-sufficient
by design.
The "bad apples" anal-
ogy, suggesting the actions
of a few are compromising
everyone's quality of life, is
disingenuous hyperbole.
At the peak of operations,
a Part 150 noise study
said there wasn't a noise
problem. Nonetheless,
the airport pursued a
voluntary "Fly Friendly"
noise abatement program,
developed in partnership
withVASI, implementing
several effective measures,
including raising the
traffic pattern altitude,
changing pattern routes
and providing notices
to pilots in the Airport
Facility Directory.
While Mr. Koszarski
astutely recognizes that


airplanes make noise
(along with garbage
trucks, chainsaws, leaf
blowers, lawn mowers,
boats and your neighbor's
stereo), there's actually a
whole lot less of it than
there was 10 years ago.
Get to know people
who fly; you'll find them
just as hospitable as
everyone else in Venice:
decorated veterans,
professionals, volunteers,
retirees, parents, grand-
parents, business owners,
community leaders,
missionaries, students,
friends and neighbors -
clearly not Mr. Koszarski's
stereotypical "cowboys"
given to "excesses."
"Keep it small," or
"Don't grow the airport."
We've never quite under-
stood those comments
either, given the airport is
hemmed in by the Gulf,
Intracoastal Waterway
and residential areas. If
anything, the airport is
smaller. Parcels of land
were sold off (sometimes
at a pittance), substantially
diminishing the inventory


of leasable real estate.
There is still a lot of
work ahead and, thank-
fully, there is the vision
and energy in our city
to get the job done. The
Airport Layout Plan now
provides a path forward
that includes rehabilitat-
ing runway 04-22, shifting
arrivals and departures
out of residential areas
and the means to remove
24 homes from the
Runway Protection Zone.
VASI holds meetings
open to the public, at
which guest speakers
and community leaders
discuss important avia-
tion issues. At our website
you'll find the FAAs 2012
General Aviation Airports
Study, along with the
unabridged version of
this article. The facts are
out there.

Brett Stephens is the
president ofVASI, a
Venice resident, a pilot
and tenant of the Venice
Municipal Airport. The
VASI website is www.
VeniceAviationSociety.corn.


I LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


It was a flashback,
all right
Editor:
In reference to
"Flashback" in Let'em
Have It: In the years
since I retired to Venice
I've had occasion to see
several doctors. I've had
outpatient services at a
number of our outstand-
ing testing and rehab
facilities. I've been a
patient at Venice Regional
Medical Center and I've
had prescriptions filled
at more than one area
pharmacy. In every case,
I had to produce not only
my proof of insurance but
my driver license as proof
of identity.


Silly me! I never once
realized that I was the vic-
tim of "southern white"
discrimination or that the
"greedy elephant party"
was just trying to hold me
down and make me part
of the slave class.
I bought a house and
showed my driver license
at closing. I established
utility services same
thing. If I want to cash
a check in a store I visit
three times a week (you
could say they know me),
I'm required to show my
driver license each
and every time. Again,
never once did I suspect
that as a middle class,
white, senior citizen, I
was being victimized by


countywide, systematic
discrimination.
Had I ever had the
faintest idea that Venice/
Sarasota County was such
a bigoted place to live, I
assure you I would have
located elsewhere! But my
hat is off to the Gondolier
Sun's Let'em Have It line.
You are obviously not the
least bit discriminating,
even against venomous,
foolish rhetoric. It was a
flashback for sure to
junior high in the 1950s
deep south.
Thankfully, in this state
I also show my driver
license to vote. What
makes me wonder is this:
If someone is registered
to vote and gets called for


jury duty, how can he or
she request to be excused
because he or she is not
a citizen? Maybe the
Gondolier Sun could
check into that. Seems
that even a driver license
isn't a reliable ID.
Keep a sharp eye out
next time you're at the
polls. You never know
when you'll see Mickey
Mouse, Pancho Villa or
the entire Dallas Cowboys
cheerleading squad.
Barbara M. Vaughn
Venice

Not what, but where
Editor:
We have lived in Venice


for more than 18 years.
We built in Venice not
only for the location, but
for the beautiful nature
park and walking trail
behind our home.
We wake up in the
mornings to the sound
of songbirds, and in the
evenings we listen to
the bobwhites and other
sounds of nature. During
the day we walk the
trail and see even more
wildlife. School children
have taken field trips to
this nature park and have
enjoyed the many experi-
ences that are becoming
harder to find as the
community development
thrives.
Again the Challenger


baseball organization is
renewing its efforts to
build a sports complex
with lights, concession
stands and parking
facilities. Once this land
is cleared, the vegetation
will never be the same.
The beautiful nature park
that local residents have
enjoyed for more than 30
years will be gone.
To be clear, the cur-
rent acreage in question
is being used by local
residents on a daily basis,
and the concept of the
proposed ball park is not
being challenged, but the
location is.
Ted and Sandy Caiazza
Venice


REFACE OR REPLACE

And You Get ALL These 6 Offers


ALL CABINETS 50% OFF
when you reface or replace


FREE KITCHENSINK *. _.
with purchase of granite or quartz countertops

FREE "u mnor
FREE INSTALLATION

on cabinets only reface or replace


FREE CABINET
0 FREE HARDWARE
In stock ony, with purchase of cabinets reface or replace

OL FREE OLLOUTS

Lmit 4, with purchase of cabinets reface or replace.


PLUS AN EXTRA 10% OFF for one week only

~ -* U I~ >J T w M r sr M 1 T.i


CALL ANYTIME

7 DAYS A WEEK

(941)341-0143
EXT. 526


1%Y A%-i


Even without this special you'd save hundreds,
even thousands by ordering from
Kirkplan Kitchens
because there's no middlemen to deal with.


Kirkplan Kitchens will build your kitchen or
refacing system that precisely fits
your taste, needs or budget
at 50% less than our usual low list prices.


And, if you order now, you can take advantage
of our free design, delivery & installation offer.


*NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS. ANY OF THE 6 OFFERS WITH
PURCHASE OF ANY KIRKPLAN KITCHENS REFACING OR CABINET SYSTEM.


0


WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


SUN NEWSPAPERS 9A


I PLUS


I


m










WEEKEND EDITION SPORTS
MAY 26, 2012


CONTACT US
PERRY D. PENTZ
SPORTS EDITOR
941-207-1107
ppentz@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


VENICE LITTLE LEAGUE CITY CUP




Babe's, Sertoma force one more game


By PERRY D. PENTZ
SPORTS EDITOR

Rain shortened both
championship games
in Venice Little League
City Cup action Friday
night, forcing two
winner-take-all games
Saturday.
In the Majors Divi-
sion, Babe's Plumbing
scored three runs in
the bottom of the fifth
inning to rally for a 7-4
win over Roberts Insur-
ance at Chuck Reiter
Complex.
In the Minors Division,
Sertoma scored four runs
in the third and two in
the fifth inning to defeat
Economy Pool.
Both winner-take-all
games are scheduled for
10 a.m.
The seven Majors
Division will compete
in the County Cup at
Central Sarasota County
Little League at Twin
Lakes Park in Sarasota.
Opening ceremonies are
scheduled for Tuesday
at 6 p.m. Teams will be
announced, then a home
run derby will take place
for 12-year-olds only.
An "Around the Horn"
competition will feature
one four-man group per
team, and there will be a
fastest runner competi-
tion for all Major Divi-
sion players.
Games will begin
Wednesday. Tentatively,
the 24 teams from Sara-
sota, Venice and North
Port Little Leagues will
be divided into six pools
of four teams each.
In earlier Minors City
Cup action, Economy
Pool defeated Sertoma
8-5 in the winner's
bracket final Wednes-
day to advance to the
championship, while
Faulkner Inc. stayed alive
in the loser's bracket
with a 10-4 victory over
Harn R/O. On Thursday,
Sertoma advanced to the
championship game with
a 8-5 win over Faulkner
Inc.


SPORTS SHORTS

HIGH SCHOOL
BASEBALL
VHS STATE CHAMPION
CELEBRATION SET FOR MAY 29:
Venice High School and the Venice
community will celebrate the
Indians capturing the Class 7A state
championship on May 29.
The Venice Fire Department and
Police Department will escort the
team along with coaches in a parade
beginning at the high school, then
north on Tamiami Trail ending
downtown at the Venice Gazebo,
at 7 p.m.
Honoring Venice for its second
state baseball title will be Venice
Mayor John Holic.
Everyone is encouraged to line
the processional route to celebrate
the Indians'second state title in
baseball.
Commemorative T-shirts will be
available for purchase.

SENIOR SOFTBALL
Wednesday Night
Senior Softball League
STANDINGS (as of May 23)
DeFina's Restaurant..................... 6-0
Style Line ....................................4-1
Builders Specialties.................. 4-2
Critter Ridge Landscaping........... 4-2
Sears ....................................... 3-2
W GACA Trainers...........................3-3
Absolute Lawn & Landscape....... 2-3
Tiberii Dentistry ...................... 2-4
Rugs As Art ............................. 2-4
Manasota Hardware.................... 2-5
Peluso Air....................................0-6
May 16 Results
Critter Ridge Landscaping 21, WGACA
Trainers 12
Absolute Lawn & Landscape 27, Mana-
sota Hardware 15
Sears 19, Style Line 8
Tiberii Dentistry 22, Peluso Air 7
Builders Specialties 26, Rugs As Art 17


Brian Raynor of Roberts Insurance pitches against Babe's
Pluming in the winner's bracket game Wednesday at Chuck
Reiter Complex. Roberts Insurance notched a 3-2 win to advance
into Friday's championship.


SUN PHOTOS BY PERRY D. PENTZ
Roberts Insurance's Justin Hanley hits one of his two home runs against Babe's Plumbing in the
Majors City Cup semifinal Wednesday at Chuck Reiter Complex. Roberts Insurance used three
home runs to notch a 3-2 victory to advance into Friday's championship game.


MAJORS
DIVISION
CHAMPIONSHIP
Babe's Plumbing 7,
Roberts Insurance 4
With the score tied
at 4-4, Babe's Plumb-
ing grabbed the lead in
the bottom of the fifth
inning. Andrew Thomas
led off with a double in
the right-center field
gap. Kyle Starck ripped
a double over the right
fielder's head to score
Thomas with the go-
ahead run.
After a strikeout, Mitch
Donofrio slugged his
14th home run of the
season over the center
field fence for two RBI to
give Babe's a 7-4 lead.
Umpires then called
the teams off the field
because of lightning.


Rain followed 10 minutes
later, and the umpires
called the games final.
Rules state games have
to finish at least four
innings to be complete in
the case of bad weather.
Roberts Insurance
entered the game after
a 3-2 win over Babe's in
the winner's bracket final
Thursday night.
In the top of the first
inning, Jaivon Heiligh
reached on an error.
After a strikeout, Heiligh
tagged and advanced to
third on a fly out. The
throw to third base sailed
over the third baseman's
head and Heiligh scored.
Babe's came back to tie
it with a run in the bot-
tom of the inning. With
two outs, Frankie Buncik
lined a home run over
the center field fence.
In the top of the


- r, .-..

Babe's Plumbing's Alex Partridge hits his first-ever home run
off the top of the fence in left field against Roberts Insurance
in the semifinals of the Majors City Cup Wednesday at Chuck
Reiter Complex.

-.- ,- -' ,-
- ..----;- r ~ ^- -1


Babe's Plumbing's Christian Gardner lines a RBI double into
right-center field against Roberts Insurance in the winner's
bracket of the Majors City Cup Wednesday at Chuck Reiter
Complex.


second inning, Roberts
took a 2-1 lead. With one
out, Brandon Raynor
reached on an error
and went to third base
on a double by Thomas
Wildermuth. Raynor
scored on a sacrifice fly
to center field by Heiligh.
Babe's grabbed a 4-2
lead in the third inning
by scoring three runs.
Austin Rice reached on
an error with one out.
Thomas hit an infield
single, then a sacrifice
bunt by Starck moved the
runners to second and
third base. Buncik lined
a double past the center
fielder to score Rice and
Thomas. The final run
scored on a dropped fly
ball in center field.
Roberts tied it at 4-4
with two runs in the
fourth. Brandon Raynor
led off with a walk. After
a strikeout, Heiligh
doubled over the right
fielder's head to score
Raynor. Heiligh went to
third on an errant throw.
After another strikeout,
Justin Hanley's single
scored Heiligh with the
tying run.

MINORS DIVISION
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sertoma 8,
Economy Pool 5
Sertoma scored two
runs in the top of the first
inning before Economy
Pool went ahead with
four runs in the bottom
of the inning.
In the third inning,
Sertoma took the lead
for good with four runs.
Economy Pool got a run
back in the third but
Sertoma added to its
total with two runs in the
fifth inning.
Economy Pool had
its first batter at bat in
the bottom of the sixth
inning when the game
was called and ruled
complete.

WINNER'S
BRACKET
Roberts Insurance 3,
Babe's Plumbing 2
Roberts Insurance
slugged three solo
home runs for all of its
runs to notch a 3-2 win
over Babe's Plumbing
Wednesday at Chuck
Reiter Complex.
Roberts Insurance
scored a run in the
bottom of the first inning


against top-seeded
Babe's Plumbing on
a home run by Justin
Hanley over the center
field fence. It was his
eighth home run of the
season.
With two outs in the
top of the second inning,
Babe's Plumbing tied it
on a home run by Alex
Partridge that hit the top
of the fence in left field
and then the netting
behind it.
It was Partridge's first-
ever home run.
Roberts Insurance, the
second seed, regained
the lead with a run in
the bottom of the third
inning as Hanley slugged
his ninth home run
of the season over the
center field fence.
The lead didn't last
long as Babe's Plumb-
ing, last year's City Cup
champion, added a tying
run. Mitch Donofrio led
off with a double to left-
center field. Christian
Gardner knocked him in
with a double to right-
center field.
A sacrifice bunt by Ian
Fennessy moved Gardner
to third but Roberts


Insurance pitcher Nick
Goguen got out of the
jam with two consecutive
strikeouts.
Roberts Insurance
came right back and
took the lead for good as
Brian Raynor pounded
his third home run of
the season over the right
field fence to give his
team a 3-2 lead.
Babe's got a runner
on first with an infield
single by Gardner but he
advanced no farther.
Brian Raynor started
on the mound for
Roberts Insurance, while
pitching for Babe's were
Gardner, Partridge and
Donofrio.

LOSER'S
BRACKET
Babe's Plumbing 10,
Venice-Nokomis
Rotary 6
Babe's Plumbing
pounded out 10 hits,
including two home
runs, to grab a 10-6 win
over Venice-Nokomis
Rotary in the loser's


LITTLE 11


Venice-Nokomis Rotary pitcher Jakob Zito throws a ball to first
after fielding a ground ball against Babe's Plumbing in the
loser's bracket final of the Majors City Cup Thursday at Chuck
Reiter Complex. VNR dropped a 10-6 decision to get eliminated.


SUN PHOTO BY PERRY D. PENTZ

Bet payoff is shear pleasure
Venice baseball player Grant Banko gets his first haircut
since the beginning of March from Ashley Vondermuehll
of James Griffith Salon in Venice Wednesday. Banko told
assistant coach Brenden Curcio he would get a haircut if
the Indians won the state title. Venice held up its end of
the bargain, winning the championship Sunday with a 4-2
victory over Brandon in Port St. Lucie.





:WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


LITTLE
FROM PAGE 10

bracket of the Majors
City Cup Thursday at
Chuck Reiter Complex.
The win advanced
Babe's into the champi-
onship game Friday.
Babe's got off to a
quick start, scoring in the
first inning. Kyle Starck
singled, Frankie Buncik
doubled and then Mitch
Donofrio pounded his
13th home run of the
season over the right-
center field fence.
Venice-Nokomis
Rotary got two runs
back in the bottom of
the third inning. With
one out, Jacob Cock-
rill singled and Mac
Guscette walked. After
a ground out, Chase
Doyle doubled to score
Cockrill. Austin Wagner
followed with a single to
score Guscette.
Babe's added two runs
in the second inning.
With one out, Austin Rice
reached on a bunt single.
Toby Anderson then
cracked his second home
run of the season over
the right field fence to
give Babe's a 5-2 cushion.
In the third inning,
Babe's added a run for
a 6-2 lead. Donofrio
reached on an infield


SUN PHOTOS BY PERRY D. PENTZ
Jacob Faulkner of Faulkner Inc. throws a pitch against Harn
R/O in a loser's bracket game in the Minors City Cup Wednesday
at Chuck Reiter Complex. Faulkner Inc. remained alive in the
double-elimination tournament with a 10-4 victory.


single. A fielder's choice
by Christian Gardner
produced a force out at
second base. Gardner
stole second base and
scored on a single
over third base by Ian
Fennessy.
VNR, which had 11
hits, scored two runs
in the bottom of the
third inning. With one
out, Jakob Zito ripped
his third home run of
the season over the
left-center field fence.
Sam Smith followed
with a double down the
first base line and Alex


-


Sertoma's Jack Curcio fouls off a pitch against Faulkner Inc.
in the loser's bracket final of the Minors City Cup Thursday at
Chuck Reiter Complex.


Cade Preece of Harn R/O
pitches against Faulkner Inc.
in the loser's bracket of the
Minors City Cup Wednesday at
Chuck Reiter Complex.
Merchant walked. After
a force out at second
base and a walk to Owen
Kuschel, Steven Barosh
singled over third base to
score Smith.
In the fourth inning,
VNR pulled within a run
at 6-5 on a one-out home
run by Guscette his
third of the season -
over the left field fence.
Babe's scored three
runs in the top of the
fifth inning on an RBI
ground out by Gardner,
a double by Tyler Helms
and an error.
The final run for
Babe's scored in the sixth
inning on a RBI single by
Donofrio.
For Babe's, Donofrio
was 3-for-3 with four RBI


while Kuschel had two
doubles and Wagner hit
two singles for VNR.

Venice-Nokomis
Rotary 16,
Lawyers 11
Venice-Nokomis
Rotary scored seven runs
over its last two innings
to rally for a 16-11
victory over the Lawyers
Wednesday at Chuck
Reiter Complex.
In the seesaw game
19 of the 27 runs were
scored in the first three
innings.
The Lawyers opened
with two in the top of
the first but VNR took
a 3-2 lead with three
runs in the bottom of
the inning. Each team
scored four runs in the
second inning as VNR
maintained its one-run
lead, 7-6.
The Lawyers went
ahead 10-7 with four
runs in the top of the
third inning before VNR
closed within a run with
two runs in the bottom
of the third inning.
The Lawyers didn't
score in its half of the
fourth inning, opening
the door for Venice-
Nokomis Rotary, which
scored four runs to grab
a 13-10 advantage.
In the fifth inning, the
Lawyers got a run back
but VNR went ahead by
five runs with three runs
in the bottom of the third
inning.
For VNR, Tommy
Deans had two hits,
including a two-run
home run, while Jakob
Zito added a solo shot.
Jacob Cockrill went
4-for-4 with three RBI.
Mac Guscette had a
single, double and triple.
Chason Rockymore had
three singles while Sean
Smith picked up two hits.
Steven Barosh chipped in
a double.
For the Lawyers, A.J.
Allport had two doubles
and a single while Logan
Masella added a double


and two singles. Luke
Apostolu had a double
and Orion Kerkering


SUN NEWSPAPERS 11A

slugged a triple.

Email: ppentz@venicegondolier.com


Can't find it anywhere?
Don't give up check
the Classifieds!

SUNUPS
SU N^--^NEWSPAPERS
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice







Cosmetics Implants
General Dentistry Facial Esthetics


S SEMINAR: June 28, 2012
Learn more about the newest techniques in general dentistry,
smile makeovers and implants. Call to reserve 914-9344


m
Cosmetic &
Restorative Dentistry


Implant Surgery &
Restorative Dentistry


3951 Swift Road
Sarasota Florida 34231
941.914.9344
www.SarasotaDentist.com


World Class
Dentistry and
Facial EstheticsTM




Use your smart phone to scan
here to visit our website


"We take the deals the other guys won't!



2012Mazda2


20 2Mazda3

0 DOWN & O0 FIRST PAYMENT





PER

MO*
36 mo. lease with
10k miles per
year. Sign & Drive!!





7048 Tamiami Tr., Sarasota, FL
1/4 Mile South of Stickney Point Rd. on Business 41

941-924-6700
*All Prices plus tax, tag, dealer fee., with approved credit.

., S I* s s


$1 6 80 cash due at signing
2012 LINCOLN MKZ a month 0 cash due at signing
-for 24 months Security deposit waived.
/ Red Carpet Lease* Excludes tax, title and license fees.

INCLUDES $ 1000 LINCOLN EXCHANGE BONUS'


2012 LINCOLN MKX 3 a month $2849 cash due at signing
for 36 months Security deposit waived.
/ Red Carpet Lease" Excludes tax, title and license fees.

INCLUDES $ 1000 LINCOLN EXCHANGE BONUS'

4 YEARS/50,OOO MILES OF COMPLIMENTARY MAINTENANCE ON EVERY NEW LINCOLN:


Ed Howard 7110 S. TmimiTrail
Sarasota, Florida, 34231
Lincoln 941-921-4402


LINCOLN
To find out where Lincoln is going, visit LINCOLN.COM
*Not ll buyers will qualifyfor bncoln AFS Red Carpet Lease Poyments may vary, dealers determine prices Residency restrictions apply First month's payment up to $425 paid by noln (PGM #50091) Cash due signing
is ofter 2,875 cash bok (PGM #50089) +$1,000 Lincoln Exchonge Bonus Trde-In Assistonce Cosh (PGM #32943) Exchnge Bonus Cosh requires rade-in of 1995 or newervehicle orterminotelease 30 dayspriorto or
90 days ofter new retail delivery Not available with lease renewal, owner loyalty or other conquest offers Take new retail deliveryfrom dealer stock by 7/2/2012 See dealer for qualfications and complete details
Maintenance plan coverage includes a maximum of 8 regularly scheduled services.
Exchange Bonus only available on 2011 Lincoln MKX, Lincoln MKS, Lincoln Navigator, 2012 Lincoln MKX, Lincoln MKS, Lincoln MKT, Lincoln MKZ and Lincoln Navigator. Not available on Lincoln MKZ
Hybrid. Requires trade-in of 1995 or newer FLM or competitive vehicle, or lease terminated 30 days prior to or 90 days after vehicle delivery.
II


I







MOW IN Jon Thaxton dissented. Street, Venice Avenue who have done mowing removal for 2,400 acres will not be allow
M W IDavid Cash, Opera- and Center Road. He in the county previously will be advertised. to bid on the new
tions and Maintenance said it is possible the will be called and asked The county will go proposal, "but in the
FROM PAGE 1 director, said mowing county will use four or to bid on a short-term back to four north and future (Bloomings'
services will begin as more vendors until a new basis. Concurrently, a south urban and rural Ray Rodrigues) will be
Joe Barbetta, a strong soon as possible on main contract can be bid and "simpler" offering of zones, and may have one allowed to bid again."
critic of the Bloomings roads such as U.S. 41, approved, mowing, edging, weed vendor per zone.
contract approval, and River Road, Dearborn Thiele said vendors eradication and litter Thiele said Bloomings Email: csakowitz@sun-herald.com


DOUBLED
FROM PAGE 1

inspection fee, which is
actually a combination
of fees charged by the
building department
covering building,
electric and plumbing
reviews when occupancy
changes, and a fire
inspection fee.
It's needed to ensure
the safety of the



PRECINCT
FROM PAGE 1

Bay Indies (old
precinct 88, new precinct
515)
Country Club Estates
(old precinct 45, new
precinct 521)
On the island, old
precincts 21 and 89,
separated by West Venice
Avenue, are combined
into new precinct 511.
Voting will be the Venice
Community Center, site
of old precinct 89.
Precinct 36 (Gulf
Shores and Golden
Beach) and precinct
63 (surrounding the
municipal airport) are
combined into new
precinct 519, with voting
at Emmanuel Lutheran
Church.
Former precincts


VETERANS
FROM PAGE 1

by constant thumbs-ups
and thank-yous from the
veterans, dozens of them
going through the "chow
line" in their wheelchairs,
followed by dozens more
ambulatory patients,
staffers and volunteers.
Our Post chef, Terry
Duffey, directed the food
effort, as always. It was
well-done and obviously
very well-received. It
was a wonderful sight
to see the ladies walking
alongside the veterans
in wheelchairs, holding
their plates when neces-
sary and helping them
choose what their food
preferences were. More
than one hot dog? Not a
problem.
It looked like most of
the veterans headed for
patio tables with umbrel-
las to hold back a very
warm Sunday sun while
others headed into the
air-conditioned regular
dining hall, which must
have a capacity in the
hundreds. The estimate
was that we served
around 200 people,
perhaps a bit more than
that.
I can tell you that in


NNo

K matter
N what

you

,- have

?'(j to
sell...





JiWt ^d


Place your ad

today! CallH
941-206-12001


buildings, according
to Building and Code
Enforcement Director
Vincent LaPorta.
Currently, when a
business tenant changes
occupancy, there is no
inspection unless a
renovation is involved,
triggering a permit and
inspection.
"There's a lot of
changes that can happen
over the years to make a
building unsafe," LaPorta
previously said.

64 (Pinebrook) and
62 (east of Capri Isles
Boulevard) are redrawn
with Pinebrook Road
being the dividing line.
It creates new precincts
517 and 305, but voting
for both will take place
at the polling location
historically used the
Church of the Nazarene.
The former Waterford
election district (150)
is redrawn with the
northwestern-most
portion moving into
precinct 305. Most
residents will remain in
new precinct 301, with
voting at the Waterford
Sports Club.
The redrawn precinct
now encompasses
sparsely populated prop-
erty to the east between
Laurel Road and Border
Road.
Former North Venice
precinct 61 is split by

the warm glow surround-
ing our bus trip home it
was easily decided that
our Post would be doing
these Sunday picnics a
lot more often. We had
done a very nice thing
for men and women who
have given so much and
it only made the ride
home more memorable.
About the VA hospital
at Bay Pines, consider
these numbers: 5,700
employees backed by
2,000 volunteers serv-
ing an area with an
estimated half a million
veterans, and well more
than 90,000 patient visits
every year, offering every
conceivable surgical
procedure, psychiatric
treatment and dentistry,
and just under 400 beds.
I estimated the main
hospital must have been
about 17 stories high but


Charter Review Board June 6, 7 p.m.,
Commission Chamber, Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-5279 LIVE TV and webcast
Developmental Disabilities Strike Team
May 31, 8:30 a.m., Suncoast Center
for Independent Living, 3281 17th St.,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-2558
ValueAdjustmentBoard-June 4,10 an,
Commission Chamber, First Floor,
Administration Center, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-5279
APPLICATION CLOSING: June 1, 2012
Advisory Board: Building Code Board
of Adjustments and Appeals
Vacancies: Two (2)
Information: Planning and Development
Services, Cheryl Swenney, 941-861-6637,
cswenney@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Citizens Advisory
Committee for Public Transportation
Vacancies: Three (3)
Information: Kathy Beard, SCAT
Administration, 941-861-1003, kbeard@
scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Citizen Tax Oversight
Committee
Vacancies: One (1)
Information: Office of Financial Planning,
Anna Madden, 941-861-5035,
amadden@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Coastal Advisory
Committee (CAC)
Vacancies: Two (2)
Information: Natural Resources, Luana
Guio, 941-861-0673, Iguio@scgov.net


ADVISORYBOARD VACANCIES
Visit www.scgov.net/advisoryboards or
contact the Sarasota County Call Center at
861-5000 for latest vacancies and information
about Sarasota County Advisory Boards.


He's seen do-it-
yourselfers install ceiling
fans with extension
cords, knock holes
into fire walls for cable
television or telephone
lines, remove bathrooms
and install sinks without
drains connected to the
sewer system.
"This will protect the
new tenants," he said.
New periodic com-
mercial and multifamily
residential life safety
inspection fees vary

Laurel Road, with the
northern half becoming
precinct 435. Polling will
remain at the Venetian
Golf & River Club.
Overall, the number
of voting precincts in
Sarasota County was
reduced from 156 to
98, with the number of
voting locations trimmed
from 127 to 85.
County officials said
the increased number of
early voters and mail-in
votes warranted the
reduction in precincts.
"This will reduce the
amount of equipment,
training and personnel
required to conduct a
countywide election,
resulting in saving of
taxpayer dollars," said
Supervisor of Elections
Kathy Dent.
The Board of County
Commissioners approved
the recommended

it was a very large, very
well-maintained campus
with many other build-
ings offering many sorts
of therapies and medical
procedures. We were told
that the whole facility
composes the third-
largest VA medical facility
in Florida.
When all our willing
hands put the wraps
on the picnic at about
2 p.m., we took a short
bus ride over to Ameri-
can Legion Post 273 in
Madeira Beach, with the


according to build-
ing square footage,
from a low of $30 for
a 5,000-square-foot
building, to $100 for a
20,000-square-foot facil-
ity, topping out at $650
for a facility with more
than 500,000 square feet.
Council also directed
staff to change the
way it charges for
re-inspections.
Currently, the city
charges double the fee for
re-inspections. Council

boundary changes
Tuesday.
County officials have
planned a series of town
hall meetings two
in South County to
answer any questions.
The kickoff meeting
is Tuesday, June 12, at
the Robert L. Anderson
Administration Center
in South Venice. A North
Port meeting will be held
June 20 at the Morgan
Family Community
Center. Both begin at
5:30 p.m. Three addi-
tional meetings will take
place in Sarasota.
New precinct maps
will be available for
viewing on the Sarasota
County Supervisor of
Elections website at
www.SarasotaVotes.com
shortly, according to a
county press release.

Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com

largest Legion member-
ship in the U.S. at right
around 4,200. We spent
several hours sitting
comfortably on one of its
decks with a magnificent
view of the water -
Boca Ciega Bay, in this
instance.
The picnic was a job
well done only no one
involved in it would tell
you it was a job. It was a
great pleasure a feel-
good Sunday none of us
will ever forget.
We will do it again.


1ULCH
P Cypress and Red C 9

Ar 1'M RIJ Open7Days per bag
Lawn& Garden Center M :3 30
M. i. i't:. "ii. .!.


APPLICATION CLOSING: June 4,2012
Advisory Board: Englewood
Community Redevelopment Area
Advisory Board
Vacancies: Three (3)
Information: Englewood CRA, Jodi
Morris, 941-473-9795, jmorris@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Health Facilities
Authority and Industrial Development
Revenue Bond Citizens Advisory
Committee
Vacancies: Two (2)
Information: Office of Financial Planning,
Richard Gleitsman, 941-232-6112,
rgleitsman@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: June 1, 2012
Advisory Board: Historical Commission
Vacancies: Five (5)
Information: Sarasota County History
Center, Jodi Pracht, 941-861-6882,
jpracht@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Historic
Preservation Board
Vacancies: One (1)
Information: Sarasota County History
Center, Lorrie Muldowney, 941-861-6883,
Imuldown@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Integrated Pest
Management
Vacancies: Four (4)
Information: Health and Human
Services, Eric Schreiber, 941-861-9723,
eschreib@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Keep Sarasota County
Beautiful Advisory Board (KSCBAB)
Vacancies: One (1)
Information: Environmental Services,
Lawrence Alexander 861-6731,
lalexand@scgov.net


APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Library Advisory Board
Vacancies: Four (4)
Information: Community Services, Cynthia
Stroth, 941-861-5481, cstroth@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Neighborhood
Initiative Grant Advisory Committee
Vacancies: One (1): District Three
Representative
Information: Neighborhood Services, Vicide
French, 941-650-1292, vfrench@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Sarasota Tree
Advisory Council
Vacancies: Two (2)
Information: Natural Resources, Mary Ann
Palmer, 941-861-0672, mapalme@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Water and Sewer
Advisory Committee
Vacancies: Five (5)
Information: Environmental Services, Deb
Banks, 941-861-0660, dbanks@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Waterways
Advisory Council
Vacancies: Four (4)
Information: Public Works, Paul Semenec,
941-232-5541, psemenec@scgov.net
APPLICATION CLOSING: Until Filled
Advisory Board: Well Driller's
Advisory Board
Vacancies: Two (2)
Information: Environmental Health,
Lisa Messenger 861-6671,
Lisa_Messenger@doh.state.fl.us


Member Kit McKeon said
re-inspection fees can
punish a building owner,
not the contractor or
installer who may have
made the mistake.
Members were also
concerned with a second
inspection being done by
a different inspector, who
may catch something the
first inspector missed.
"If it were the same
inspector doing the
(follow-up) inspection,
that may be easier to


1799,!
Smirnoff
Vodka
Selected Varieties,
1.75 L


swallow," said Council
Member Dave Sher-
man, "but they are often
different" people. The
second inspector catches
something else, and the
property "owner gets
whacked again."
Council felt it was
more reasonable to
double the fee upon a
third re-inspection, and
directed staff to make the
necessary changes.

Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


1099 I
Skol
Vodka
Or Gin,
1.75 L


49.99, 24.99'
Grey Goose Russian
Vodka Standard
Selected Varieties, Vodka
1.75 L 1.75 L




18.99r 33.99 ,
Bacardi A.. Ron Zacapa
Light Rum Centenario
Or Gold Rum
or Oakheart Spiced, 750 ml
1.75 L




20.990 15.99 '
Captain DonQ Q .
Morgan Rum
Spiced Rum Selected Varieties, e'
Original or Silver, 1.75 L
1.75 L



37.99w 48.99
Crown Blanton's
Royal Single
1.75 L Barrel
Bourbon
750 ml




17.99 1 37.99 A
Evan Glenfiddich
Williams 15 Year
Bourbon Scotch
1.75 L 750 ml



27.99 19.99
Johnnie Walker Tanqueray
Red Label Gin
1.75 L 750 ml




36.99, 22.99,
PatrOn 1800
Silver Silver Tequila
Tequila OrReposado I
750 ml or Coconut,
750 ml


15.99
Montezuma
Gold Tequila .1
Or White,
1.75 L


2699
Hennessy
VS
Cognac
750 ml


Prices effective Thursday, May 24
through Wednesday, May 30, 2012.
Visit publix.com/store to find the store nearest you.
Liquor items are only available at Publix Liquors.


Publix,
LIQUORS


Individualswithdisabilities who need assistancto prtiipat in anyof these proceedings should contact the county administration at leastthree (3) businessdays before the meeting time and date at -861-344.


:12A SUN NEWSPAPERS


MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION





EDITION MAY 26, 2012


WEEKEND


Carolyn Eagen, ffN
right, execu-
tive director of 1 '
Beacon House,
reacts to the
announce-
ment of her
agency as the
Venice Area
Chamber of
Commerce's Nonprofit Business of the Year Wednesday. With her
is Assistant Director Kevin Chinault.


Lisa, left, and Seth Von Marschall celebrate the naming of Appli-
ance Specialists LLC as the Young Professionals Business of the
Year Wednesday by the Venice Area Chamber of Commerce.


John Hinshaw, center, and daughter Ali Hinshaw react to the
announcement Wednesday that their company, H&H Signs Inc.,
is the Venice Area Chamber of Commerce's Small Business of the
Year.


Marianne and Seth Hill share
a moment after learning their
business, Hill & Hill Plumbing
Co., had won the Venice Area
Chamber of Commerce's
Medium Business of the Year
award Wednesday.


CITY NOTES
COMPILED BY
NEWS EDITOR GREG GILES

Snook Haven
closed
The Snook Haven
Restaurant located in
Snook Haven Park, 5000
E. Venice Ave., Venice, has
closed for the summer.
Sarasota County Parks
and Recreation officials
expect the restaurant to
reopen in the fall with
new management.
The park will remain
open. It is a popular
local and tourist destina-
tion that features canoe
and kayak access to the
Myakka River. Originally
opened in the 1940s as a
fishing camp, the prop-
erty was purchased by the
county in 2006 in order
to protect and maintain
its cultural, historical and
environmental assets.
Sarasota County Parks
and Recreation and the
county Procurement
Office expect to have a
request for proposal seek-
ing a new concessions
vendor issued by the end
of the month.

Happer steps
down from
planning board
Marshall Happer, a
former mayoral candidate
who was appointed by
former mayor Ed Martin
to the planning commis-
sion, recently resigned.
Happer represented the
slow-growth point of view
in city politics in recent
years.
His replacement is
Helen Kirchner Moore,
who will serve the
remainder of Happer's
term, until Jan. 31, 2013.
Moore is a Realtor
with Michael Saunders
and Co. She also serves
on the Municipal Code
Enforcement Board, and
Architectural Review
Board, and is a former
member of the city's
Police Pension Board
and the Venice Housing
Authority.


Rich Bun


Under


Rod Thomas, co-owner of
Bentley's Boutique Hotel,
expresses his apprecia-
tion for the Large Busi-
ness of the Year award
From the Venice Area
Chamber of Commerce
Wednesday.

RU


onpane's


NEW r-'-"1)h,f in Venice '-
Cooked to order Cheese Steak
Soups Salads Subs Fresh Made


$OF n11s


WEDNESDAY
1 2 Pound
SPrla Dinn i
S5.99


812


We Deliver
To Your Local
. Business


FRIDAY
Haddock Dinnel
S6.99


E Venice Avenue 485-0505
Summer Hours
Monday-Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-4 G


SUN NEWSPAPERS 13A


SUN PHOTOS
BY BOB MUDGE
Honored at the Venice Area
Chamber of Commerce's
annual Business of the Year
awards luncheon Wednesday
were Seth, left, and Marianne
Hill of Hill & Hill Plumbing
Co., Medium Business; Adam
Simard and Rod Thomas,
Bentley's Boutique Hotel,
Large Business; Carolyn Eagen,
Beacon House, Nonprofit; Lisa
and Seth Von Marschall, Appli-
ance Specialists LLC, Young
Professionals; and Ali and John
Hinshaw, H&H Signs Inc., Small
Business.


13*/




MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


NO INTEREST UNTIL JUNE 2013! homasfle
NEXT DAY DELIVERYAVAILABL Cherry Corner Curio for
NEXT DAY DELIVERY AVAILABLE!* Cssornio.,
a S5..9valueu!


Danish Style Leather Recliners


ADDA DESIGNERS TOUCH with this Montana Olive merlot wood accents
Living Room with unbelievable seating comfort. This is a great addition for
any room! Includes sofa, loveseat, matching merlot cocktail and 2 end
tables. Sleeper with innerspring mattress available.
$399 sofa. 5 pc package $899.
Irr - -.- .


ADD STYLEAND COMFORT with this beautiful showood accented living
room. Dress up any home with this unbelievable value! In stock for next day
delivery. 5-pc package includes sofa, loveseat, matching cocktail table and 2
end tables. $399 sofa. 5 pc package $999.


Special Purchase
NASA TECHNOLOGY memory foam mattress. Why pay
$2,000 $4,000?


Queen Bed

$399


Whi\ paN more?


CASUAL DINING SET features natural diamond slate accents on the
dining take and chairs. At the unbelievable price of just
$299 for the table and 4 matching chairs. 5ps set $299
| -E BIf |" 1L I


STYLE, COMFORT AND UNQUESTIONABLEVALUE is the word
here. This beautiful Sofa and Love seat group is upholstered in 100%
Micro Fiber for years of long lasting durability and comfort. In stock
and ready go. Also available in Beige. $599
Sofa and Love seat $59
I - I I ImalW = IM


THIS BEAUTIFUL HAND RUBBED CHERRY
BEDROOM offers style and unquestionable value, you
get the dresser, mirror, queen head board, footboard
and matching rails for 599 and get the
matching night stand FREE!


DUAL RECLINING LEATHER SOFA. Style, comfort & value
at its best! This dual reclining sofa in bonded leather from
Simmons will offer years of comfort & durability to any
home with unquestionable value! Matching loveseat &
recliner also specially priced. $499


S1 r r j r r rl



This is a deal you do not see all the time.
This Special Purchase offers you a Sofa
and Love Seat in the 2 tone look that is
so popular for just $499 for both pieces!


Sofa and Love seat just


Serta


Queen Size Set
d% ouA dA


0;S


Serta


Ei


PORT CHARLOTTE
1241 El Jobean Rd.
(776 across
from Sam's)
S941-764-8700
Mon.-Sat. 9-9
Sun. 11-6.


VENICE SARASOTA BRADENTON
550 S. SeaboardAve. 4027N.Washington 1100West Cortez Rd.
Just North of (US301) Cornerof 41 &Cortez
Venice Nissan 1 Mile South of University o ice eo
on U.S. 41 Bypass on US301 Next to Ofce Depot
941-485-3211 941-351-8600 941-749-6069
Weekdays 9-6 Mon.-Sat.9-9 Mon. Sat.9-9
Sat. 9-6 Sun. 11-6 Sun. 11-6 Sun. 11-6


ELLENTON
5814 18th St East
Across from the
Ellenton Outlet Mall
941-479-7900
Mon. Sat.9-9
Sun. 11-6


E


*WITH
APPROVED
CREDIT


L'I'am


/


:14A SUN NEWSPAPERS


M


$4991m |





.WEEKEND EDITION
"MAY 26, 2012

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
941-207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR TOWN


CROSSWORD 6B


SUN PHOTOS BY KIM COOL
American flags mark the graves of veterans buried at Venice Memorial Gardens.


One of the volunteers who placed flags at Venice memorial Gardens for last year's Memorial Day
weekend wore as many flags as he placed at graves.


Venice honors Memorial


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Memorial Day weekend had
an early start in Venice.
Friday, hundreds of flags
were to be placed on veterans'
graves atVenice Memorial
Gardens.
The tribute is an annual
project at the local cemetery
where some 30 volunteers
show up bright and early to
place hundreds of flags. Many
of the volunteers are veterans
or family members and most
dress for the occasion, either
in their military uniforms or, in
some cases, colorful red, white
and blue outfits. In addition to
decorating the graves of those
who once served this country,
many more flags are placed
along the edge of the road that
winds through the cemetery.
Once the flags were placed,
members of the American
Legion were to hold a cer-
emony that included the
playing of "Taps," prayers
and speeches by Mayor John
Holic, County Commissioner
Jon Thaxton and Col. Norman
MacLellan, U.S. Army (ret.).
The Venice Middle School
Chorus was set to sing and
the school's Young Marines
were scheduled to participate,
cemetery spokesman June
Parker said.
A flag retirement ceremony
with caisson and a wreath-
laying ceremony were to
round out the event, which
also included members of the
Vietnam Brotherhood and
VFW, North Port 8203. After
the program, there was a


picnic and the release of many
balloons inscribed with the
names of veterans.
Flags will remain all week-
end. Visitors are welcome to
stop by to pay their respects.

Saturday events
Today, at 9:30 a.m., members
of the Venice Corvettes Club
will cruise in a caravan to the
Armed Forces History Museum
in North Largo.
From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
there will be guided tours of
the Train Depot on Seaboard
Avenue off East Venice Avenue.
Call 941-412-0151 or 496-9474.
From 4 to 8 p.m. today,
enjoy the Venice Brew Bash, an
import and craft beer festival,
on West Miami Avenue. Sample
80 beers. Admission is $35.

Sunday events
Sunday, car-racing fans will
tune in to watch the annual
Indianapolis 500 race, which
has been a Memorial Day
fixture since 1911. In recent
years the race has been held
on Sunday in case of rain.
Also on Sunday, there will be
a concert at the Church of the
Palms, 3223 Bee Ridge Road,
Sarasota, featuring the Jaco-
bites Pipe and Drum Band and
Key Chorale. Tickets are $20 at
the door.

Monday events
At 10 a.m. in Venice the
annual Memorial Day cer-
emony will take place at the
west end of Venice Avenue in


Veterans Park. The Venice High
School Band will perform a
selection of patriotic music
and members of area veterans
organizations will speak.
At 10 a.m. in Sarasota, there
will be parade along Main
Street from Osprey Avenue
to J.D. Hamel Park on Gulf
Stream Avenue where there
will be a ceremony beginning
at 10:45 a.m. featuring high
school marching bands, ROTC
units, veterans groups, scouts,
elected officials and others.
At 3 p.m. a national moment


of remembrance takes place.
From 5 to 7 p.m. there will
be a Memorial Day concert
in Phillippi Estate Park, 5500
South Tamiami Trail, Sarasota.
Bring lawn chairs or blankets
and coolers, if desired. Admis-
sion is $5 per person for those
13 and older. There will be food
and drink vendors in the park.

Flag etiquette
On the morning of Memo-
rial Day, the flag is raised to
the top of the staff and then


lowered in a solemn manner
to half-staff, where it remains
until noon when it is raised to
the top of the flag pole for the
remainder of the day.
According to various web-
sites, the raising of the flag
at noon is akin to raising the
memory of the dead by the
living "who resolve not to let
their sacrifice be in vain, but
to rise up in their stead and
continue the fight for liberty
and justice for all."


Email: kcool@venicegondolier.com


A bucket of flags to be placed at the graves of veterans at Venice Memorial Gardens.
A bucket of flags to be placed at the graves of veterans at Venice Memorial Gardens.


*39 Month lease, no security deposit required. 10,000 Miles/Year. $2,995 due at signing.
Payment plus tax, tag, and $499.95 dealer fee. With approved credit, through Ally.


VENUE 3B


TRAVEL 4B


/ -P I lME IA 1 I 'g







2B SUN NEWSPAPERS COFFEE


BREAK


MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


It's a hit when the slipper fits at Broadway Palm


By AUDREY BLACKWELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

The Broadway Palm
Theatre becomes a
magical kingdom in
which love conquers all
during its production of
"Cinderella."
The show, which began
May 17 and runs through
June 23, continues to
delight little girls. On the
second night of the run,
several moms and daugh-
ters attended the play,
and many of those little
girls wore long, flowing
princess dresses to match
the storybook tale.
Musical Director Loren
Strickland's orchestra sets
the stage for the magic
as the easily recognizable
Rodgers and Hammer-
stein music wells at the
onset of the play.
Adrienne Griffiths
makes a pretty princess
as Cinderella. Her bright
blue eyes sparkle as she
sings about being happi-
est after her wicked step-
mother and stepsisters
go to bed and she has the
house she must maintain
all to herself.
Her pretty blond tresses
get fuller as she trans-
forms into the beautiful,
mysterious princess


who attends the prince's
ball. Credit the work of
costume designer John P.
White.
The audience cheers
when the ploys of the
wicked relatives fall apart,
but the trio gets a lot of
laughs because of their
obvious jealousies.
"Why would a guy
want a girl like her, who's
really lovely, instead of a
sturdy girl like me?" one


stepsister sings.
For those unaware of
the enchanting fairy tale,
the story was adapted for
the stage by Tim Briggs
from the book written by
Oscar Hammerstein and
set to music by Richard
Rodgers in 1965.
Cinderella lives with
her wicked stepfamily
and is more beautiful
then they, but they are
invited to a party the king


(Paul Crane) and queen
(Jennie Hollander) put
on for the prince (Adam
Clough). The queen
wants her son to meet a
nice lady and settle down.
Cinderella was not
invited but longs to
go and tells her fairy
godmother (Regina
Harbour) of her desire
and she makes it all come
true. There is one rule
that cannot be broken:


PHOTO COURTESY OF BROADWAY PALM THEATRE
Adrienne Griffiths plays Cinderella and Adam Clough plays the prince in the Broadway Palm
Theatre's production of Rodgers & Hammerstein's "Cinderella."


Cinderella must return
home at the stroke of
midnight.
The prince dances with
all the ladies at the ball,
but isn't happy with any
of them, until he dances
with Cinderella. She had
been transformed into
a beautiful princess and
was unknown to her
wicked family members.
When the clock strikes
midnight and she flees,
she drops one of her glass
slippers, which the prince
uses to find her, his one
true love.
The characters adeptly
portray the charm of this
classic fairy tale, and at


the end the prince and
Cinderella wed and all
is well in the magical
kingdom.
Show times for this
happily-ever-after tale are
Wednesday through Sun-
day evenings with some
matinees. Tickets are on
sale at a family friendly
price ranging from $18 to
$39 with group discounts
for parties of 20 or more.
To reserve a ticket, call
239-278-4422, at www.
broadwaypalm.com or
go to the box office at
1380 Colonial Blvd., Fort
Myers.

Email: ablackwell@venicegondolier.com


__ SAVE $2.00 Instantly

minoIIIJW* 5mnffYodki

S, t'S llubjr.nr 0082000-200506




5 82000 99282 5 *11 2 p
25 99
a I~~


Triangle Inn to hold fundraiser


STAFF REPORT

The Triangle Inn Asso-
ciation will hold a fund-
raising dinner at 5:30 p.m.
Thursday at Venice Yacht


Club, 1330 Tarpon Center
Drive, Venice.
The event will celebrate
and raise funds to sup-
port historic Venice.
Entertainment will


be a play titled "Two
Gentlemen of Venice,"
written by Ron Myroup
and presented byVenice
Theatre.
RSVP by May 28


with a donation of $50
per person by a check
payable to The Triangle
Inn Association, 351 S.
Nassau St., Venice FL
34285.


9,99 24,99
Pinnacle Grants
Vodka Scotch

Wolfschmidt .Hendrick's
Vodka G1in,


PHOTO COURTESY OF CASEY CAHILL


Venice couple gets

more than the green
Jim and Cindy Bock, of Venice, win the drawing for a
weekend stay at World of Golf Village in St. Augustine
during the fifth annual Sharon Monk charity golf tour-
nament and Kentucky Derby dinner May 15. The event,
titled Run for the Roses Go for the Green, honors past
Women's Resource Center of Sarasota County president
Sharon Monk and raises money for the organization. The
event closes out WRCSC's fundraising season.


WHAT'S ON STAGE


"Loveland Follies":
May 31-June 3, 7 p.m.,
with an additional 2 p.m.
matinee show June 3,
Venice Theatre, 140 W
Tampa Ave., Venice.
Loveland Center and
Venice Theatre will hold
the 17th annual Loveland


Follies as a MainStage
production. Tickets for
"Ladies and Gentlemen:
The Beatles!" are $15,
available at the box office
at 941-488-1115 or online
at www.venicestage.com.

STAGE 13


"On the Island ofVenice"
339 W.Venice Ave.,
Venice, FL 34285 ,fl
941-488-4892
-


SUN PHOTO BY AUDREY BLACKWELL


Locals net Special

Olympics tennis win
Kristin Meyn took first place in the Special Olympics
Womens Doubles Tennis championship May 19 with her
tennis partner, Sharon Wirth. They played in the Wide
World of Sports event at Disney World.







PerishbleFood DailySpecials!
Itm e Receive Savings Up To


10%. OFF


70-- -
70Ro!


ericmi



NAOT
...^


.s



s O ES 2 (941) 488-4999
S (219 W Venice-Ave.
www.dicksshoes.com Downtown-Venice


899
Canadian
Club
Bacardi
Rum


32,99
Jack Daniel's
Black
175Lor
Jim Beam
Black Label
175 L


Unbelievableiprices!! Reay,toDrinkCocktails forSummer!i


Dewar's White Label 1.75L...........27.99
Crown Royal 750m....................... 19.99
Svedka Vodka 1.75L ..................... 16.99
Platinum 7x Vodka 1.75L ............ 15.99
Coconut Jack Rum 1.75 ............ 13.99
Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum 1.75L....... 19.99
Sauza Gold or


Chi Chi's Cocktails............7.994 14.99
Bacardi Ready to Drink 1.75L....... 10,99
18 Ultimate
Margartta RID 1.75L...................... 13.99
Captain Morgan Long
Island Tea 1.75 L............................ 15.99
Mallbu Cocktals 1.75L.................. 12.99


SlverTequlla 1.75L.............. ...........19.99 Jose Cuervo Authentlcs 1.75..... 14,99



5.99 w'""s
Barefoot


Yellow Tal' Schmitt
Wines Sohne SH-


Puberty ,
Creek

i


Suffer Home
.,1 .,,, I,


P ^r ^"0 "' 012
Alcohoic beverages no1 available a1 allWalgreens ocatlons To find a location near
3S3*


74&se


SAft







CONTACT US
941-207-1102
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


VENUE


3B
WEEKEND EDITION
MAY 26, 2012


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


SToday
Native Plant Walk, 9 am
May 26th walk trails of Sleeping
Turtles South, 2800 N. River Road,
Venice.474-1492
Triangle Inn Dinner,
Fund raiser features dinner/play; $50
tickets avail now; event is May 31,
5:30pm; Venice Yacht Club; 486-2487
Venice Depot Tours, Free
Docent-led Tours of Historic Train
Depot, Sat 10 am to 1 pm through
October 31st. 303 E. Venice Ave.
412-0151.

* Sunday
Jubilee Cookout, Jubilee


Celebration Free Cookout@ noon @
the church property located corner of
Parade & Rot. W. Blvd. 475-7447

SMonday
Gentle Yoga on Capri,
5:30 6:30pm, 101 Capri Isles Blvd,
941-539-9149, $10.00

STuesday
Peer Advisor, 9-3 by
appointment Mon, Tue, Wed
Confidential referral session
485-9724 Women's Resource Center
703 Center Rd $5
Bonanza Bingo Games,
6-8pm Tues Ven-Nok Elks $1 Bingo,


486-1854. Dinner/Sandwiches
5-7pm
W. Coast Swing Dance,
Beginner WCS lesson 7-8, dance
8-10, $8 for both. No partner
needed. Pineapples, 133 S. Tamiami
Tr., Venice. 539-4908

SWednesday
Fun With Watercolor,
1-4pm ea. Wed. at So. Venice Civic
Assoc., 720 Alligator Dr., Venice.
$82/mo + supplies. Call Carolyn
366-2866.
Gentle Yoga on Capri,
5:30 6:30PM, 101 Capri Isles Blvd,
941-539-9149, $10.00


To get your events printed in the newspaper,
they must be submitted via our website, www.
venicegondoliersun.com. On the left, click on
"Community Calendar,"then click on "Submit Event."
Deadlines: For events running in Wednesday's
paper, the deadline is 1 p.m. Monday. For events
running in Saturday's paper, the deadline is 1 p.m.
Thursday.
If you do not have the ability to enter your events
via our website, we can type them in on your behalf
at the rate of $5 per event; this fee does not guar-
antee your event will make the printed version. Call
941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make
a payment or to have us enter your event for you.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event
at no cost to the event submitter. You may purchase
additional space for $10 per day, per event, per
edition. Simply choose Paid Listing on the Submit


Event page on the website. All paid listings will run in
the location designated for the event type.
We will only allow one submission per event, per
day. If your event runs for more than one day, you will
need to complete a separate submission form for each
day. Multiple submissions of the same event for the
same date may result in all the related events being
removed.
The Venice Gondolier Sun has changed the format
for Venue in an effort to provide readers information
about the most events we can.
We reserve the right to exclude any submitted
listing that does not meet our specifications or
that requires excessive editing. There is no express
or implied guarantee that any free listing will be
included in any event calendar or run in any specific
location. This is on a first-come, first-served basis.


MainStreet hosts downtown Brew Bash


FROM VENICE MAINSTREET

Today, from 4 p.m. to
8 p.m., downtown Venice
will be transformed
into an import and craft
beer festival sponsored
in part by Gold Coast
Distributing, Import Craft
Specialty Group.
Designed to promote
the appreciation of


craft and import beers,
attendees will sample
more than 80 brews,
15 of which have never
been sampled before in
the area, while enjoying
great music and more.
This event is the perfect
opportunity for beer
aficionados, beer lovers
or just the casual beer
drinker.


The festival will partner
with Venice MainStreet
Inc. Since 1988, Venice
MainStreet has operated
as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit
organization dedicated
to enhancing the quality
of life in our community
by preserving, protecting
and promoting, historic
downtown Venice.
It works in historic


preservation, beautifi-
cation and economic
restructuring. Its com-
munity vitality efforts can
be seen in the numerous
activities presented
throughout the year to
residents and visitors
alike.
"We are excited to
partner with Gold Coast
Distributing on the


Venice Brew Bash," said
Mindy Pieper, MainStreet
executive director. "We
are looking forward
to helping beer lovers
across Southwest Florida
get their Memorial Day
weekend off to a sudsy
start."
For just $25 advance
purchase and $35 at
the door, you'll get an


armband, glass and a
relaxing afternoon of beer
tasting. You must be 21
or older to participate in
the event. Attendees will
be required to show valid
photo I.D at the door; no
charge for minors with
paying adults.
For more information,
go to www.venicebrew
bash.com.


InStride benefits


from real estate sale


STAFF REPORT

A portion of the
proceeds of a recent
real estate transaction
through Generous
Property will be donated
to several local charitable
organizations. The first
of the donations was
recently presented to
InStride Equine Therapy.
Located in Nokomis,
InStride helps clients
with disabilities through
hippotherapy.
The term is derived
from the Greek word


STAGE
FROM PAGE 2

"Piano Recital Series":
June 6 begins the series
at 1 p.m. at Venice
Presbyterian Church, 111
E. Firenze Ave., Venice.
June will be an inspi-
rational month of free
piano recitals celebrating


"hippos," which means
horse.
"Specially trained
physical, occupational
and speech therapists use
this medical treatment for
clients who have move-
ment dysfunction," said
Mike Bigner of InStride.
"By partnering with
horses, we challenge
individuals with special
needs to reach their full-
est potential."
Donna Blem, executive
director at InStride said,

INSTRIDE14

the addition of a new
K. Kawai grand piano. A
dessert reception will fol-
low each recital. Featured
pianists are: June 6: Dick
Hyman, The Best of
Jazz and Swing; June 13:
Andrew Galuska, VPC
director of music, The
Colorful Life and Music
of French composer Erik
Satie; June 20: Sharon
Elery Rogers and Carolyn


Tanaka named Rotary Teacher of the

By ROGER BUTTON
SPECIAL TO THE GONDOLIER SUN

"The future of our community and
nation depends in great part on the
success of our school system," said
Rotarian Dr. JimWoods in announc-
ing Danielle Tanaka as the 2012
Rotary Teacher of the Year May 17.
Applications were invited from six
local schools, and a committee of
Rotarians selected the winner.

TEACHER 16

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROGER BUTTON


Year


Jane Goodwin, left, Sarasota County .' I ,
School Board member; Dr. Danielle Fisher
Tanaka, Venice Nokomis Rotary Club Teacher of the Year 2012; Rotarian Dr. Jim Woods; Jack Turgeon, principal of Venice High
School; and Doug Laudenslager, Rotary Club president.


Stephens, VPC assistant
pianists, great classi-
cal works and works of
faith; and June 27: Chris
Romig, VPC senior pastor
atVPC, classics, jazz and
hymn arrangements.
"Studio Showcase":
June 1, 7 p.m., The Play-
ers Theatre, 838 North
Tamiami Trail, Sarasota,
will hold a year-end
studio showcase. Studio


olympic pools
where great pools begin
NEW POOLS RESURFACING PAVERS
POOL SERVICE REPAIRS REMODELING HEATERS
Pebble Tec & Quartz Finishes
121 Triple Diamond Blvd. #13, North Venice, FL 34275 941-485-0062 www.olympicpools.us



4 1PIN EBR OK
CARE & REHABILITATION CENTER
Caring is the Kry in Life


students as they appear
live on stage will per-
form songs, dances and
scenes. Tickets are $8.
Call 941-365-2494.
"Jericho" plays
through June 9, 5 p.m.


and 8 p.m., at Florida
Studio Theatre's Keating
Theatre, 1241 N. Palm
Ave., Sarasota. Call for
tickets and seating avail-
ability at 941-366-9000.
"Fanny Brice,


America's Funny Girl,"
plays through June 17 at
Asolo Rep Theatre, 5555
North Tamiami Trail,
Sarasota. Call for tickets
and seating availability at
941-351-8000.


HAVE YOUR LOCAL

DAILY NEWSPAPER

AT YOUR FINGERTIPS!

The Sun Newspaper is launching
a NEW Website that allows
Subscribers to read all the latest
stories on your computer,
tablet and smart phone!


/ 5 Star rating by the
State of Florida Agency for
Healthcare Administration.


* i~u I %,ai Ikc
S( 1 IISIIl l ,1' "'Il.- ,1'\ l l'lll"
( ,,ll-l'llllll l.a11- 211n3-2n1 I


Services include:
* Physical, Speech, & Occupational Therapies...plus outpatient
rehabilitation & an outdoor Therapy Garden!
* Respiratory and Restorative Services
* Overnight Observation for Same Day Surgery
* 24 Hour Nursing Care
* Respite Care
* Payor sources available: Private, Medicare, Medicaid, Hospice,
Commercial Insurance, Managed Care


941-488-6733
1240 Pinebrook Road, Venice, FL 34285


VENIC EA


HOW TO GET YOUR EVENTS LISTED


N.-,









4B TRAVEL
WEEKEND EDITION TRA
MAY 26, 2012


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
941-207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


SUN PHOTOS BY KIM COOL


The Disney Dream and its new sister ship the Fantasy make
regular calls at Disney's private island, Castaway Cay in the
Bahamas.



Travel Q&A:



Hidden



cruise fees


By ANN TATKO-PETERSON
CONTRA COSTA TIMES

Q. I read with inter-
est your column about
hidden hotel fees. Hotels
aren't the only sneaky
ones. I'd always read that
cruises were all-inclusive
- not so. Can you print
some of the big hidden
fees with cruises to warn
potential passengers?
A. Most cruise lines are
more upfront about their
fees, and you receive an
itemized bill before leav-
ing the ship so you can
dispute charges.
For example, many
cruise lines have au-
tomatic gratuities for
services provided by
cabin stewards, wait staff,
etc. However, passengers
also have the option to
change the amount of
those gratuities at the
pursers' desk.
The other most
common expenses not
included in the all-inclu-
sive cruise price include:
Excursions: Ships
provide tours and


port of call, but these will
cost you, anywhere from
$50 to several hundred
dollars.
Specialty dining: The
main dining rooms and
buffets are free, as is
room service. However,
you will be charged
extra for eating in special
restaurants such as
steakhouses, or eateries
such as Ben & Jerry's ice
cream parlor.
Beverages: Most
ships charge not only
for alcohol, but also for
bottled water and soda.
Special flat-fee beverage
packages are usually
available for the latter.
Cut costs for alcohol
by taking advantage of
nightly drink specials or
happy hours.
Onboard amenities:
Extra fees are charged for
some onboard activities,
spa treatments, salon
services, Internet usage
and laundry. As noted
above, day care often is
an added expense, too.
Use of the pools and
entertainment shows
usually are free.


Guests aboard the Carnival Inspiration enjoy the pool area.


Go beyond the beaches in Mexico


By ELAINE GRIFFIN
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL

If you're looking for a personal
encounter with thousands of
your closest American friends,
you could do worse than travel-
ing to Mexican hot spots such
as Cancun or Cozumel. But you
would be cheating yourself of
the chance to experience Mexico
itself.
You can do so safely, and with
little more effort than you'd ex-
pend reaching a trendy Mexican
resort. In addition to the easily
accessed ruins, museums and
markets in and around Mexico
City itself, there's a host of cultur-
ally and ecologically rich destina-
tions to the south.
Here are a few that I've par-
ticularly loved in visits to nine
central and southern Mexican
states during parts of three recent
summers.

Merida, Yucatan
Just a half-day drive from
Cancun, Merida is a vibrant city
of nearly 1 million that is the
political and cultural capital of
the Mexican state of Yucatan. One
of the safest cities in Mexico, it's
also an ideal home base for some
great day trips.
But before venturing out of
town, attention must be paid to
Merida itself. History here truly
runs deep: Merida's striking pastel
mansions are built on the ruins
of a Maya city. Its central zocalo,
or main square, recalls southern
Europe and makes for great
people watching.
The Ballet Folklorico de
Yucatan offers open-air evening
performances at the University
of Yucatan. Mexico City's Ballet
Folklorico is more elaborate, but
it's also more expensive; tickets in
Merida are only $5. It's a steal.
The vibrantly presented story
that the ballet unfolds is steeped
in Mexican history, reflected in
dances and elaborate costumes
revealing Spanish, French, Cuban,
indigenous and Mexican influ-
ences. Men wave Cuban hats.
Women wear elegant dresses
that recall Mexico's brief French
interlude. Mayan costuming
hearkens back to a more distant
and mysterious past.
You can take a piece of Merida
home with you by visiting La Casa
de las Artesanias, a state-run shop
displaying the work of regional
artists, many of whom produce
traditional folk art; jewelry, cloth-
ing, spices and soaps incorporate
indigenous materials.
Just 75 miles southeast of
Merida lie the spectacular ruins
of Chichen Itza, a once-powerful
Maya city included among the
second Seven Wonders of the
World. For a modest fee, English-
speaking guides can explain the
significance of intricate stone
carvings, the purpose of the vari-
ous temples and pyramids and
the rules of the game once played
on the ball court.
Minutes away by car, the Cave
of Balankanche offers a descent
into another world literally,
for the Maya, who viewed the
caves as a sacred middle ground
between the earth and the spirit
world.
Today's visitors won't see
ancient religious ceremonies,


The Mayan pyramid at Cabo is a few hours' drive from the Yucatan Peninsula.


but they'll be treated to beautiful
limestone formations on the walls
and see pre-Columbian artifacts
that remain. It's a moving but
physically demanding experience
because of the heat and humidity
inside the cave.
All that exercise sets the table
for a late lunch at the nearby
Hacienda Chichen Resort (www.
haciendachichen.com), a spa
hotel with an outdoor terrace
looking upon a lovely garden.
The specialty of this region is
sopa de limon, a soup made with
chicken, lime and tortilla chips.
It's delicious.
One can take an easier, fam-
ily friendly day trip by visiting a
restored henequen plantation. A
fiber extracted from agave and
used to make products such as
rope and sacks, henequen played
an important role in Merida's
economy in the late 19th and
early 20th centuries.
You'll learn this and more
through a tour of Hacienda Sotuta
de Peon, a restored plantation
about one hour from Merida;
English-speaking guides are
available and the hacienda will
provide transportation from your
hotel for an additional charge
(www.haciendatour.com/index.
php).
After completing the tour,
which includes a demonstration
of how rope was once made, only
a short ride on a mule-drawn cart
stands between you and a refresh-
ing swim in one of the region's
many cenotes: natural sinkholes
filled with crystal-clear water. A
chlorinated dip will never again
carry the same appeal.
After a swim, lunch awaits at
the hacienda's open-air restau-
rant, along with a gift shop featur-
ing unique henequen products.
The quiet beachfront town of
Celestun, 60 miles from Merida
on the Gulf of Mexico and light
years removed from Cancun's
chain hotels, provides a respite
from educational sightseeing.
In open-air restaurants like La
Boya, tables and plastic chairs
rest upon the sand, the beer is
cheaper than the Coca-Cola and
tables don't get turned.
The Gulf here is shallow and
warm ideal for swimming.
Boats for hire along the shore-
line will take you to a wildlife


A guide who said he was of Mayan
descent describes an ancient ball game
in which the Mayans lobbed a ball
through the round target on the stone
wall shown.

preserve area featuring flamingos,
mangroves and freshwater pools
offering a picturesque setting in
which to swim some more.

Oaxaca: Cultural mecca
A half a day's drive from Mexico
City, Oaxaca is a cultural and
shopping mecca featuring artists
from all over Mexico. A centrally
located hotel I recommend
Hostal de la Noria (www.
hostaldelanoria.com) provides
ready access to Oaxaca's galleries,
restaurants and vibrant street life.
But before exercising your
credit card, stretch your mind
with a trip to the Museo de las
Culturas, a museum with an
impressive collection of pre-
Columbian art displayed within
a beautifully restored colonial
monastery. You can take a guided
tour of the extensive surrounding
gardens, home to a wide variety
of native plants.
Another must-see museum is
the Museo Textil de Oaxaca (www.
museotextildeoaxaca.org.mx),
which features intricate handi-
work from around the world.
The museum gift shop sells
some of the most beautiful
craftwork I've seen in Mexico,
from embroidered belts and bags
to necklaces made of yarn. The
museum supports modern artists
and traditional craftspeople from

MEXICO 16


Venice Audubon offers Palm Island event


FROM PALM ISLAND RESORT

Join members of the
Venice Audubon Club at
the Palm Island Resort
Audubon Getaway June 1
and 2.
The package includes
a Friday-and-Saturday-


INSTRIDE
FROM PAGE 3

"Children and adults with
various diagnoses, such
as cerebral palsy, Down
syndrome, developmental
delay and many others,
b.riiifil fiu Ilnmiqid,'
Im 1"..1 ,ln "


night stay with a guided
bird and beach walk
Saturday morning;
Saturday afternoon bird-
ing and photography
workshops; Saturday
evening dinner with
speaker and silent
auction; self-guided

Specific riding skills are
not taught at InStride.
Hippotherapy lays a
foundation to improve
mobility, function and
sensory processing.
"We at Generous
Property know that
donations like this can
make a real difference in
lh r li\ ., ,- 1f p .,,lr , I k% ill
,lld' dlh .,l r ." s,||dI(.| ; .dl||i>


adventures on Sunday
using Audubon Florida
tips to nearby birding
sites, and luxury accom-
modations to fit any
size group in condos or
full-size houses.
Optional activities in-
clude kayaking, shelling

Joyce Sacco.
If you would like to
help InStride Equine
Therapy, go to www.
InStrideTherapy.org to
find a way to make a dif-
ference in the lives of one
of its clients.
Visit www.Generous
Property.com for more
illI Iii Ill Pi b ,l lI l ( i h I -
mi-'\ Pinpniv. 1


on the beach, tennis and
boat and bicycle tours.
Saturday activities and
Saturday dinners also
are available for separate


CROSS
FROM PAGE 6
AIMIAIRM DIEISMGII HE FITIOIN
FlliAMIE BIUIINITMECIH 0 RIBIBI I
F EPT P ECHO N BTIIR
OPTED RETTEC HOPK R MA


CHINE SEC AC ES SKEET
HANDEL HE L IOS N EI SSE
D I H IOIIII I I I

IRI H SIT E I
DARE O U MIGA IEASE S E S
OIEIII MISA IRI IS I IE IIA K I I
cllllcl l L E Glsl
N T E H*DE I I~llISEGIII
I E T T U B AIOR IIEDI IOLI
T s 0 N S T E MIIATIUBI
A E N J IIIION I ITE I
N C 0 S T E 0 SEINI


purchase. The Audubon
Weekend Package is
designed and discounted
especially for Audubon
Florida guests


SUDOKU
FROM CLASSIFIED


Call the resort for
details at 800-824-5124.
For resort information,
visit www.PalmIsland.
com.



BILOXI
June 11th &june 24&h
includes 4 days/3 nights
Receive $75 Free Play
and 3 meals at Isle Of
Capri Resort $219 ppdo
1-800-284-1015
(941) 473-1481
Escorted Motorcoach
GroupsWelcomel Local Pik Ups
On The Road
Again Tourts
..9 Sh Isin..9 .




:WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


ce


CONSIGNMENTS THRIFT STORES ANTIQUE SHOPS


493-0529
Shop *Donate Volunteer

.uritre-Aplincs- Accessores -Bok


Summer Hours May Sept
Tuesday Friday 9AM-5PM
Saturday 9AM-3PM
habitatvenicerestore.org


1400 Ogden Road
Venice, FL 34285
Free pickup of tax
deductible donations


J4i.


Who says

going

FIRST CLASS

has to be

expensive?

(It's not if you
know where to shop!)




Quality Used & New Furniture
Since 1978
941-408-8402
2317 S. Tamiami Trl Venice, FL 34293
Across from Bill Buck Chevrolet!
Mon-Sat 9am-5pm Sunday 10am-4pm
=Imo |3 w


WHO SAYS

GOING FIRST

CLASS HAS

TO BE

EXPENSIVE?

IT'S NOT IF

YOU KNOW

WHERE TO

SHOP!!
New and used quality Florida style furniture
and accessories. We buy, and consign from
the whole house to just one piece. We carry
chairs, tables, lamps, sofas, wall hangings
from the practical to the whimsical, wall
paintings as well as a wide variety of
mattresses and foundations including
"totally green" sets.
Pick up of your furniture is available
as well as delivery. We have two stores
available for your shopping pleasure. First
Class Consignments and The Green Banana
next door.
First Class Consignments has been
in the Venice area since 1976 providing
style, selection, price and service. New and
exciting furniture arrives daily-you never
know what you will find from day to day.
When you want to furnish your
condo or home, come check out our styles
and prices. Whether it is for one room or the
entire house- We can stage and furnish your
home completely.
We have opened additional consignment
stores in the area: The Beach House at
1843 S. Tamiami Trail South Venice and
our newest addition Consignment
Warehouse located in the former Manasota
Flooring Building at 2247 S. Tamiami Trail
South Venice
Come visit us at any or all of our locations.









...


IPl


I No w Lcai ons I I


203 ESTMIAM941-488-3219
203 WEST MIAMIAVE. 941-488-3219


170 JAMES STREET 941-485-3366


Hospital Volunteers of Venice!
The Elephant's
Trunk Thrift Store
Monday-Friday... I Oam-4pm
Saturday... I Oam-2pm
Voted # Thrift Store
WEEK DAY SPECIAL
MONDAY- Shoes and hand bags 50% off.
TUESDAY- All books 50% off.
WEDNESDAY- Framed Art work 50% off.
THURSDAY- Tapes, CDs, DVDs, Records 50% off.
FRIDAY- All Clothing 50% off.
SATURDAY- Manager's Special!

S501% OFF,
Any Non-Sale Item Over $10
I Limit I Coupon Per Person/Per Day
I Not Valid w/Any Other Offer.
_ Good Through 6-30-12
PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE
595 Tamiami Trail S., On the Island-Next to Publix
941-483-3056


,A t/u t/,,f
| 7//' ,/////

e
J" 4 C^7awi/c}


Voted the Best #1 I Consigner
Consignment 2 and reseller of:
Store 2010 r Chico's Ann Taylor
& 2011! 411 Tommy Bahama Coach
Talbots Dooney & Bourke
Every day of the year is a 50% OFF
Sales Event! Please ask for details.


FI 1'-F VENICE
2 L,::',: ti::r- ,s:: Vs- ,i,: I.,.IVi r:i


ii T


I


SUN NEWSPAPERS 5B


I
i


121fii


~R7


-p7p





MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


International


ACROSS
1 To love,
Spanish style
5 Plaines
8 Cut
12 Harrow rival
16 Beau
17 Batter's ploy
18 Narcissus' love
19 Cubist
designer?
21 Elected
22 Major ending
23 Hew, as a yew
24 Redolence
25 Pekingese
lunacy?
28 Form of
trapshooting
29 "Messiah"
composer
30 Sol
31 Oder feeder
32 In the wrong
role
34 Christian's
creations
36 Tepid
40 Coagulate
41 Auctioneer's
word
43 Psych. neurosis
46 Stage award
47 de vie
48 Dodecanese
dazzler?
52 Author Haley
53 Pennon
55 "Coal Miner's
Daughter" Lynn
56 Jeans cloth
58 Raipur raiments
59 Flo Jo or Rono
60 Pres. title
62 Understand
63 Lapsang
Souchong
65 Schuss
66 Burgundy buddy
70 Asian range
72 Heron's cousin
76 Shuttle phase
77 Various
80 Green's target
81 Raggedy
Galway rigging?
83 Zeta follower
84 "Tubby the _
85 Scrap
86 Bangor neighbor
87 Time my
side
88 Pipe part
89 "It's -up"
91 Small African
dog
94 Wild rye
97 Erse
99 Bone docs.
104 Endure


I SENIOR BRIEFS
Senior Friendship Centers
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice
941-584-0075

Classes
Classes, programs and
activities for people 50
and older are offered on
an ongoing basis. Class
fees are $3 and help
cover center operational
costs. Balance movement
class is $4 per class. Call
Tom Harlow at 941-
556-3259 if this presents
a hardship. Open week-
days 8:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Dining, noon, for 60
and older; suggested
donation is $3.50. Lunch
reservations required
24 hours in advance.
Call 941-584-0090 or
941-584-0067.

MONDAY
Memoir writing group,
9:15 a.m. Share a five-
minute story or just
come and listen.
Associated Medicare
Patients counselors,
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Small
Appliance Repair Shop.
No appointment needed.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Music with the Upbeat
Gang, 1 p.m.
Duplicate bridge,
12:50-4 p.m.; partner
required; $3 donation


TEACHER

FROM PAGE 3

"We are here to honor
one of our very best, who
you will meet up close and
personal in a few minutes.
We are very proud of her,"
saidWoods.
Her career in teaching
spans 20 years, 12 of which
have been in Sarasota
County. Tanaka holds a
master's in public admin-
istration, and in 2002 she
became the founding direc-
tor of the Rotary Futures
Program, moving to Venice
High School in 2005.
Jack Turgeon, principal
of Venice High School,
said, "Danielle Tanaka has
a passion for teaching and
her communication with
the students is fantastic.
Leading the literacy team
this year, she started a book


Edited by Linda and Charles Preston


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All rights reserved CROSS 14


105 Dimitri's dangerous
game?
108 Cartoon Mister
109 Publishing name of
fame
110 Borodin's prince
111 Separate
112 Deride
113 Avian appendages
114 Oenophile's
attribute
115 Nero's nephew
116 "Carmina Burana"
composer
117 Black birds
118 "Quiet!" noises
119 Ruby and Sandra
DOWN
1 Omega's partner
2 Montmartre morn
3 Revise
4 Cash in
5 Brinker's bravery?
6 Beg
7 Big bargains


8 House-lizard
9 Yearns
10 Restauranteur
Toots
11 Brewer's need
12 Classroom
equipment
13 Bosporus beauties?
14 Woodwinds
15 Pont du Gard site
16 Famous Marechal
17 Bonnet buzzer
20 "Kiss Me
26 Golfer gaffes
27 "Op. _" (footnote)
31 Colloquial failures
33 Blind parts
34 Half a small
antelope
35 Fireplace
36 Blue dye
37 Baker, Charlie
38 Nothing, in Nantes
39 Tijuana tie?
41 Equestrian
command
42 Across, poetically


requested
Cards, 1 p.m.
Spanish, 2 p.m.

TUESDAY
Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Video fitness 2,
8:45 a.m.
Yogarobics, 9 a.m.,
low-impact aerobics and
yoga
Woodcarving, 9 a.m.
Quilting, 9:30 a.m.
Basket weaving, 10 a.m.
Ballroom dance lesson,
10 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Craft room, noon
Single-deck progres-
sive pinochle, 12:30 p.m.
Tin Pan Alley Dance
Band, 1-3 p.m.
Cards, 1 p.m.
Caregiver Support
Group, in conjunction
with the Alzheimer's
Association, 2-3 p.m.
Low-impact introduc-
tion to Tappercise, 3 p.m.
High-impact introduc-
tion to Tappercise, 4 p.m.

WEDNESDAY
Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Small Appliance Repair
Shop, 9 a.m.-noon
Senior-friendly aero-
bics, 9 a.m.
Take Off Pounds


drive inviting everyone
to bring in any old books.
Soon there were 1,000 and
we had a storage problem.
"She set up a library
where students pick up the
free books, and soon we
watched students select-
ing their favorite authors
and reading has become
popular again."
Jane Goodwin, Sarasota
County School Board
member, congratulated
the winner. Denise Fisher,
Tanaka's mother, attended
the event.
Woods presented Tanaka
with a plaque as the 22nd
annualVenice-Nokomis
Rotary Club Teacher of the
Year 2012, for unselfish
investment in the youth of
our community. There were
other gifts as well.
"Here is a check for
$1,000, a bouquet of flowers
and your teacher of the year
celebration cake," he said.


44 Himalayan
snowman
45 Fast planes, for
short
48 Canter or shamble
49 Hotel accoms.
50 Sir Francis
51 Posed
54 Poetically before
57 Laughter
59 Angry Valletta
native?
61 Commuter group
63 Jog
64 Feed-grain unit
66 Le dernier
67 Air: Comb. form
68 Golda
69 Textile tinters
70 Nimitz' svc.
71 Canonized 'Mother"
73 Overcome easily
74 North Sea feeder
75 Bears or Penguins
77 Bay State cape
78 Paulo
79 Rose : wine


Sensibly, 9:30 a.m.
Watercolor art,
9:30 a.m.
Euchre, 10 a.m.
Associated Medicare
Patients counselors,
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Small
Appliance Repair Shop.
No appointment needed.
Line dancing,
10:30 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Friendly bridge,
12:30 p.m.
Joe Rivers & Friends
performs, 1 p.m.
Crafts, 2 p.m.

THURSDAY
Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders,
Medicare assistance,
9 a.m.-noon
Woodcarving, 9 a.m.
Yogarobics, 9 a.m.
Hand and foot game,
9 a.m.
Senior-friendly aero-
bics, 9 a.m.
Watercolor class,
10 a.m. to noon
Line dancing, 10 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Music by Dick Rivers,
1 p.m.
Cards, 1 p.m.
Mind Your Mind,
1 p.m. Heighten memory,
reasoning, creative
thinking and more.


MEXICO

FROM PAGE 4

the region. Fashionable
textiles and home goods
are also sold at Ethnico
(http:/ /etnicooaxaca.
blogspot.com), across
from the Museo de las
Culturas.
You can take a break
and grab a bite at the
nearby Benito Juarez
market, which show-
cases a wide variety of
foods, including the
fried grasshoppers that
are a Oaxacan delicacy.
Then polish off this tasty
snack with a visit to La
Soledad, a nearby choc-
olate shop. Oaxacans
take their chocolate
seriously, and La
Soledad offers frequent
demonstrations involv-
ing chocolate used in


82 CPA's concern
87 bother the
flowers": The
Mikado
90 Use a driver
91 Close, in Koln
92 Delon namesakes
93 Manhattan or
Martinique
94 T.V.A.
constructions
95 Bahamian island
96 Severity
97 Contemporary of
H. Wells
98 Beasts of burden
100 Home on the
plains
101 Public storehouse
102 Others, in Oviedo
103 Firms up
105 "...one for the
106 Bruins' coll.
107 Copenhagen
change


Self-assessment ques-
tionnaires are provided
to track progress.

FRIDAY
Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Video fitness 3,
8:45 a.m.
Yoga, 9 a.m.
Friendly bridge, 9 a.m.
Balance movement,
9:30 a.m. Call Tom Har-
low at 941-556-3259.
Hula, 10:30 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Duplicate bridge,
12:50-4 p.m.; partner
required; $3 donation
requested
Music by the Upbeat
Gang, 1 p.m.
SAppointments are
available for a free
30-minute attorney
consultation with
Marcella Mika, a local
attorney who volunteers
her time to assist seniors.
Call 941-584-0075 for an
appointment.

Senior Friendship
Centers Inc., established
in 1973, is a not-for-profit
organization dedicated to
helping older adults live
with dignity and indepen-
dence in Sarasota, DeSoto,
Charlotte, Lee and Collier
counties. Funded in
part by state and federal

drinks, candy and mole.
It will also custom-make
chocolate, giving choco-
holics a shot at that
perfect blend of flavors
and ingredients they've
always dreamed of.
Just save room for
dinner.
Oaxaca is packed with
restaurants; two with
great food and great
views of the zocalo are
El Asador Vasco and
La Casa de la Abuela.
El Asador Vasco offers
Oaxacan favorites as
well as Basque special-
ties. La Casa de la
Abuela makes outstand-
ing mole dishes.
Save time for the
short 45-minute trek
to Teotitlan delValle,
where a community of
Zapotec weavers make
and display their wares.
Take special care to
see the work of La


I BLOOD BANK SCHEDULE


Suncoast Communi-
ties Blood Bank staff
will be in the area
Saturday, May 26,
10 a.m.-noon, Pit Stop,
1841 South Tamiami
Trail, Venice; Saturday,
May 26, 1:30-4 p.m.,
Pit Stop-Venice Island,
913 South Tamiami
Trail, Venice; Sunday,
May 27, Emmanuel
Lutheran Church,


8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 800
Tamiami Trail, Venice;
and Wednesday, May 30,
8:30-11:30 a.m., Sarasota
County School Board-
Transportation, 351 Old
Venice Road, Osprey. Call
941-735-4223 or go to
www.scbb.org for more
dates and times.

From Suncoast Communities
Blood Bank


SOLUTION TO MAY 19 SOLUTION TO TODAY'S
CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD


ITHE BIG RED BUS SCHEDULE
Florida's Blood Centers
needs all types of blood FLORIDA'S
donations. W BLOOD CENTERS
Donating blood takes
about an hour. Every Our Lady of Lourdes
donor receives a mini- Parish, 1301 Center
physical and a screening Road; Sunday, May 27,
with each donation. 9 a.m.-1 p.m., New Life
All mobile donors will Assembly of God, 5800
receive a thank you gift. South Tamiami Trail; and
Donations are taken Tuesday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.,
at 4155 South Tamiami Leslie's Pool Supplies, 619
Trail, Venice Village South U.S. 41 Bypass.
Shoppes, between Ross Call 941-492-9202 or go
and Publix, Venice, or on to www.fbcdonor.org for
The Big Red Bus, which more dates and times.
will be in Venice Sunday,
May 27, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., -From Florida's Blood Centers



LOOKING FOR


SOMETHING?

Saturday's Sudoku, horoscopes, movie

listings and Dear Abby are in the real

estate classified section along with a

bonus crossword puzzle and a host of

other features. The Sudoku solution still

appears in Our Town.


agencies, and support
from private foundations
and individual c(1on,1 it
tions, Senior Friendship
Centers serves more
than 10,000 older adults
annually.

Senior activities
at other locations
Epiphany Cathedral Parish Hall
340 Sarasota St., Venice
941-484-3505
The following free
activities are held
Wednesday:
9 a.m., exercise
9:30 a.m., knitting and
crocheting
9:30 a.m., quilting
11 a.m., rosary
construction
noon, bridge

Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 8118
832 E. Venice Ave., Venice

Vida Nueva, a women's
cooperative of single
and widowed women
weavers dedicated to
preserving traditional
weaving practices.
Oaxaca also is close to
San Bartolo Coyotepec,
home to Dona Rosa's
barro negro pottery
workshop. This all-black
pottery takes on a
distinct sheen because
it is polished before it
is fired. You can watch
a potter transform
clay into art and walk
away with a beautiful
souvenir.
There's a bonus in
store for those making
the trip to Oaxaca at
the end of July: activi-
ties associated with the
Guelaguetza, a cultural
celebration featuring
dancers from all over the
state of Oaxaca, who pa-
rade through the streets


941-484-8118
Seniors With or With-
out Partners sponsors
card playing on Mondays
from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m.
All are welcome. Call
Irene at 941-497-5438.

Our Lady of Lourdes Church
1301 Center Road, Venice
941-497-2931
Senior singles cards and
games from 1 to 4 p.m.
Thursday. Call Elizabeth
Bonfiglio, 941-492-5528.

Safe-driving
school
Safe-driving class for resi-
dents over 50. Choose from
several class locations in
Venice. Make a reservation
for these classes by calling
Fran at 941-485-7846.


in beautiful costumes.
During both the
Guelaguetza and during
Christmas, Oaxaca also
mounts an impressive
light show, projected
against the cathedral
in the zocalo. It pays
homage to the animals
and plants as well as the
artists and people that
make this one of the
many unique regions in
a country as seemingly
familiar as any next-
door neighbor and
as different as any place
you've ever been.

Safety
As the U.S. State
Department points out
(http://travel.state.gov/
travel/cispatw/cis/
cis_970.html), millions
of Americans safely

MEXICO 17


I


6B SUN NEWSPAPERS





WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


FINE WHINES


Not even remotely


By BOB MUDGE
EDITOR

In case you missed it,
the man who did more
than anyone to create the
breed of human known
as the couch potato died
this week.
Eugene J. Polley, the
electronics engineer who
invented the first wire-
less TV remote control,
died Sunday in Downers
Grove, Ill., at 96.
He not only freed us
from the physical burden
of having to get up to
change channels but
cut the umbilical cord
that connected the first
remote controls to their
TV sets, making real
channel surfing possible
and leading directly to
Bruce Springsteen writ-
ing "57 Channels (and
Nothin' On)." (Hey, he
wrote it in 1992; I get 57
cooking channels today.)
Thanks to Polley, TV
viewing went from an
almost entirely passive
activity to one that could
only be more passive
if the channels could
be changed by thought
(which I'm sure several
electronics companies are
working on). He also fed
into or helped create sev-
eral generations of people
who have the attention
span of an espresso-
fueled gnat, frantically
clicking (though, of
course, there is no click)
to find ... something else.
If it sounds like I'm
bashing Polley, I'm not.
I admire inventiveness
and marketing savvy,
and Polley and Zenith,


MEXICO
FROM PAGE 6


his employer, had that in
spades. First sold in 1955,
his "Flash-Matic" cost an
extra $100 when the TV it
controlled cost $500. How
to get people to shell out
the additional C-note?
Not only was the remote
control wireless, it was
shaped like a ray-gun.
Brilliant. What boy of any
age wouldn't want one of
those?
And it's not Polley's
fault that so many people
find it so easy to veg out
in front of the TV. Even
the most basic remote
control has an "Off"
button, and many have
timers. (Might be worth
considering adding a
cattle prod, to actually
motivate someone to get
off the couch, but at some
point personal respon-
sibility has to enter the
picture.)
Certainly plenty of
good came from Pol-
ley's invention. It was a
boon to people who had
trouble getting up to
change channels. It had a
mute button, something
I'd love to have in real life.
Today its descendant lets
you change the channel
and just about everything
else on the TV and a
handful of other devices,
and if you break or lose
it you can replace it for
less than half the cost of
a Flash-Matic. It will even
come with batteries (but
you have to provide the
8-year-old to program it).
I'm way too lazy to look
it up but I'd be more than
willing to bet that his
wireless remote control is
on the family tree of not

beach; Mexican dress
is more modest, and
yours should be, too.
Limit after-dark travel
on isolated rural roads.


just our modern remotes
but everything that oper-
ates wirelessly, from com-
puter mice to cellphones
to game controllers to,
well, everything, it seems.
I find all those things
as handy as the next guy,
and not just because I
like to bore my kids with
stories about life in the
old days, when I had to
walk to school uphill in
the snow (no mean feat in
Florida) and actually get
up to change the channel
on the TV. (Not that it was
a lot of work where I
grew up we only got four
stations, and only one
in bad weather or if the
antenna was acting up.)
My kids live in a wireless
world in which the only
reason to plug something
in is to charge the battery.
They half expect kites to
be wireless.
Still, according to
newspaper articles fol-
lowing his death, Polley
was uncertain about his
legacy.
On the one hand, he
told the Baltimore Sun,
"Maybe I did something
for humanity like the
guy who invented the
flush toilet."
But he also told the
Palm Beach Post, "Every-
thing has to be done
remotely now or forget
it. Nobody wants to get
off their fat and flabby to
control these electronic
devices."
R.I.P., Mr. Holley. You
built a labor-saving
device. It's up to us to
decide what to do with it.

Email: bmudge@venicegondolier.com

Don't linger on the
streets after dark.
In short, travelers
need to exercise com-
mon sense and take


Get over it


Some interesting
language questions have
shown up in my email
inbox recently.
The first is from David
in Glendale, Calif., who
had a question about
this sentence, which
appeared in this column
a few weeks ago: "Little
did I know that I'd be the
one getting the lesson,
or that the lesson would
be this: My knowledge
isn't as vast as I thought
it was."
One letter of that sen-
tence caught David's eye:
"I wonder about capital-
izing 'My,'" he wrote, "and
what rules might apply."
The most important
rule that applies is: Unless
you're a professional
editor, you probably don't
have to worry about this
at all. It's mainly a style
matter, which means that
a capital or a lowercase
letter could be right in
different contexts. But for
inquiring minds, here's
how to make the best
choice.
Associated Press style
says that you should
capitalize the first letter
after a colon only if that
letter begins a complete
sentence. "Here's a fact:
My friend Stephanie
is awesome." But you
should lowercase the first

basic precautions.
Doing so, I've traveled
in Mexico on my own
and also taken high
school students there


letter after a colon if what
follows is not a complete
sentence. "I'll tell you
who's awesome: my
friend Stephanie."
So here's a pop quiz.
In AP style, would you
capitalize the "g" in the
following sentence?
"Here's a thought: G/go
away."
This sentence illustrates
one of the most common
slip-ups by people who
actually know the rule.
They think that because
"go away" doesn't have a
subject it's not a com-
plete sentence. But it is.
Imperative sentences like
"go away" are complete,
they just leave the subject
implied. It's "you." That's
why a capital "g" should
come after that colon in
news style.
Chicago style, used in
books and magazines, has
a different rule. The colon
must introduce at least
two complete sentences
in order for the letter that
follows to be a capital.
"Here's a thought: Go
away. Don't come back."
Otherwise, Chicago says,
no capital: "Here's a
thought: go away."
Another reader had
an interesting question
about where to put an
object pronoun: "I hear
it from other people,
I've seen it written in
newspapers and it always
jangles in my ear. 'Driving
her car, she ran him over.'
Shouldn't this be 'She ran
over him'? Since 'over'
modifies 'ran,' the verb
might be an idiosyncratic
'to run over' and 'him' is
the object. Or what?"
Actually, in analyz-
ing the syntax of that
sentence, you wouldn't

without incident.

Elaine Griffin teaches
English and directs the
Global Studies Program


say that "over" modifies
"ran." They're actually
a team. "Run over" is
a unit called a phrasal
verb, which is usually a
verb-preposition combo
in which the preposition
gives the verb a distinct
meaning. Ask out, shop
around, blow up, catch
up, dress down, cut off
and come forward are
just a few examples.
There's no rule to say
that an object like "him"
can't go right in the
middle of a phrasal verb
like "run over." In fact, the
object can go wherever
anywhere it works.
The word "over" can
also function as a prepo-
sition, "We were flying
over Chicago." The object
of a preposition, in this
case, Chicago, always
comes after the preposi-
tion. So it would be easy
to assume that "run over
him" would follow the
same rule. But it doesn't.
"Over" can even be
an adverb, as in "Don't
bring him over." But here
it's clear that the object
should go before "over."
In this example, "him"
is the object of the verb
"bring." "Over" just tells
us the where.
For the record, "over"
can also be an adjective,
as in "Your worries are
over," which neatly sums
up my position on when
to capitalize after a colon
and where to put an
object relative to the word
"over."

June Casagrande is
the author of "It Was the
Best of Sentences, It Was
the Worst of Sentences."
She can be reached at
JuneTCN@aol.com.

at the University School
of Milwaukee. In
2011, she completed a
Fulbrightfellowship in
Mexico.


visit Mexico each year,
with 150,000 crossing
the border each day for
study, tourism or busi-
ness. Mexico's infamous
drug cartels are par-
ticularly active along the
U.S. border and in many
northern Mexico states;
Oaxaca and Merida
are both well south of
Mexico City.
Obviously, Americans
traveling in Mexico
- and just about
anywhere else can
take steps to avoid
unwanted attention.
Flip-flops and shorts,
for example, are for the


SUMRMEBRHPMAY-OCTOBER
WAKN REDLY-PIAT SALIHD16

Smme Mebe shi $00a onh
"NW Age Defined Membe shis0it 0 Gl.Rsticios
"ALL nitaton ee Wave
" 0Covenint 0nd central ocatd etee Sraot &Veic


Living with Knee Pain?

)## #"$ #' Yo")

+' >:1(gp. =2=AB' @ l4 13W :*<55. 5(WB39:7
o 54<5@1C + 1C#" D$&'" >!; !F/&'" >!; !
=8< la-/ 91:9 +1(!
$.&!P' &"./), -' &/#O.(', +
Location:
Venice Regional Medical Center Auditoriums
540 The Rialto, Venice, FL
RSVP to 1-855-VRMC-DOC.
Light refreshments served. The physician parking lot to the
north of the hospital will be open for parking.


540 The Rialto I Venice, FL 34285
Learn more at VeniceRegional.com


2Q1 VENICE REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
The best healthcare under the sun.


1$ .95 FREE INSTALLATION

II I Yellow Water, Odors,
i 9 Per Month I Removes Chlorine, Rust,

IL Offer Expires 05/31/12 Y1ad Water, PluOdors
I- ....... Bad Taste, Plus Softens!


Free Water Test

i Fl world No Filters
I 40+ Years ToChange Ever I
I. Experience I
I I
I Charlotte/Desoto County Call
941-276-7411 Today I
ISarasota/Manatee County
941-927-8687 www.waterworurificaton.co1 .
Ofe Exie 05_/-3. .1_/1. ..j


I


SUN NEWSPAPERS 7B









8B ELIG N
WEEKEND EDITION RELIGI
MAY 26, 2012


CONTACT US
941-207-1110
Ikennedy@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


I RELIGION BRIEFS
Ice cream and
Torah reading
Men, women and children
welcome at Chabad Jewish
Center, 2169 South Tamiami
Trail, with the reading of the
Ten Commandments from the
Torah, followed by cheesecake,
ice cream and blintzes at
11:30 a.m. Sunday, May 27.
Free of charge. 941-493-2770

Music
Harvest Chapel of Venice,
2370 Seaboard Ave., begins its
2012 Summer Series with a
spiritual revival featuring Leroy
Blankenship, musician, singer,
author and preacher, at 10 a.m.
June 3-6 with presentations at
7 every night. Blankenship has
made several appearances at
the Grand Ole Opry and was
awarded a Lifetime Achieve-
ment Award by the Christian
Country Music Committee.
941-381-1160
*Venice Presbyterian
Church, 111 E. Firenze Ave.,
offers its Summer Piano Recital
Series at 1 p.m. Wednesday,
June 6, 13, 20 and 27, followed
by a dessert reception. Dick
Hyman kicks off the series


June 6 with The Best of Jazz
and Swing. 941-488-2258

CPR, first-aid classes
Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 790 South Tamiami
Trail, offers a CPR and first-aid
course taught by Jim James
from 1 to 4 p.m. Thursday,
June 14, in room 101. Cost is
$25, which includes booklet,
certification and light refresh-
ments. Reservations needed
by calling parish nurse Bev
Granger at 941-488-4942,
ext. 20. Deadline is Monday,
June 11.

Pancakes
Christ United Methodist
Church, 1475 Center Road,
offers pancakes to order, bis-
cuits and gravy, french toast,
bacon and sausage, from 8 to
9:30 a.m., the first Saturday of
every month. Cost: $4; children
under 12, free; over 12, $1.
941-493-7504
Grace United Methodist
Men's Club, 400 E. Field Ave.,
offers all-you-can-eat pancake
breakfasts from 8 to 10 a.m.
the first and third Saturdays
of each month through April.


Sausage, eggs, biscuits and
gravy and more, all for $5 per
person. 941-486-4153
Knights of Columbus,
512 Substation Road, offers a
pancake breakfast from 8 to
11 a.m. the first and third
Sunday. 941-485-1663

Spaghetti supper
Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 800 South Tamiami
Trail, hosts a free spaghetti
supper from 4:30 to 6 p.m. the
last Sunday of every month.
No tickets, coupons or money
needed. All are welcome.
941-488-4942

Discount food offer
Gaballi is a faith-based
for-profit company whose
mission is to sell good quality,
affordable food at a rate of
30 percent to 70 percent less
than national retail prices and
buys from American farmers
and meat producers. Packages
of fruit, vegetables, frozen
meat and prepared conve-
nience meals are offered from
the program through partner
Christ United Methodist
Church, 1475 Center Road,


Piano music celebrated


FROM VENICE
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

An inspirational month of
recitals celebrating the addi-
tion of a new K. Kawai grand
piano will begin at 1 p.m.
everyWednesday throughout
June atVenice Presbyterian
Church.
The series opens June 6 with
Dick Hyman and The Best of
Jazz and Swing. On June 13,
Venice Presbyterian's Music
Director, Andrew Galuska, will
present the colorful life and
music of French composer
Erik Satie. Sharon Elery Rogers
and Carolyn Stephens will
offer the great classical works
and inspiring works of faith
on June 20. And an eclectic
program of classics, jazz and
hymn arrangements closes
the series on June 27 featuring
Chris Romig, senior pastor at
VPC.
There will be a free-will
offering. A dessert reception


the host and distribution site.
The public can order online at
Gaballi.com with the church
user code christunitedmet.


Andrew Galuska is among four
gifted pianists featured in the
Summer Piano Recital Series at
Venice Presbyterian Church during
the month of June.
will follow each recital.
Venice Presbyterian Church
is located at 111 E. Firenze
Ave. Call 941-488-2258.


The church also assists
customers with orders,

RELIGION 19


I RELIGION STUDY AND CLASSES


Calvary Bible Church,
1936 E. Venice Ave., presents
Dr. Paul Maier, author and
professor of ancient history at
Western Michigan University,
addressing the question in his
video series "Jesus: Legend
or Lord?" from 9 to 10 a.m. at
Friday morning Bible study.
941-485-7070
Sunrise Bible Study,
Christian Art Center, 430 E.
Venice Ave., from 6 to 7 a.m.
Monday through Saturday.
941-237-8806
Chabad ofVenice & North
Port, 2169 South Tamiami
Trail, 941-493-2770, offers a
women's weekly book club
based on the book "Bread and
Fire: Jewish Women Find God
in the Everyday," 11 a.m. to
noon Tuesdays for discussions
and the opportunity to meet


SUPPORT GROUPS
Venice Public Library
300 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice
941-861-1347

Lecture series
Friday, 2 p.m., through
July 27
The summer video lecture
series begins with "The Ameri-
can Mind," taught by Professor
Allen Guelzo a broad history
of the ideas, thinkers and
institutions that have mattered
to Americans.


other Jewish women. Pastries
served. Suggested donation:
$5. Walk-ins welcome.
First Baptist Church, 312
W Miami Ave., offers several
classes open to the commu-
nity: Thursdays Ladies Bible
Study, James; Mercy Triumphs,
with Anne Hartokomis;
Wednesday prayer and
Bible study, with Pastor Tom
Hodge; middle school, with
Pastor Nathan Rice; children's
ministries with Bible study and
activities birth to fifth grade.
At 6 p.m., Wednesday Men's
Bible Study with Randy Koach.
Calvary Bible Church,
1936 E. Venice Ave., offers
a free community arts and
crafts class from 10:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. every Friday in
fellowship hall. Call Anne at
941-408-9315.


Film Festival
Thursday, 2 p.m., June
through August
May 31 is the Marx broth-
ers in "Night at the Opera."
"Classic Ladies of Song" is the
theme for June.

Practice your French
Friday, 10-11:30 a.m.
If you have a basic knowl-
edge of the French language
and wish to practice your


The church holds Bible
Study at 6 p.m. Sunday. Call
Pastor Jones at 941-485-7070
for more information.
Prince of Peace Lutheran
Church, 2222 Englewood
Road, Englewood, offers free
classes in knitting, crocheting
or Swedish weaving at 2 p.m.
Wednesday. Practice materi-
als will be provided for intro-
ducing basic concepts. If you
are experienced, come share
your knowledge. 941-475-1231
The Jewish Congregation
of Venice, 600 North Auburn
Road, offers Hebrew language
instruction for adults. Native
Hebrew speaker Chaya Perera
is an experienced teacher of
adults and children at all lev-
els. Classes held once a week,
on Monday or Wednesday.
Average fee: $10 an hour. No


skills, you are invited to attend
weekly meetings of the VPL
French Club. Practice French
conversation during the first
hour followed by reading
from French literature and
current topics. No registration
is required. New members
welcome.

Gardening questions
Thursday, 10 a.m.-noon
Bring gardening questions to
receive help from the Sarasota


grades, no tests. 941-488-8128
JCV also presents "Get More
Out of Being Jewish," with
Rabbi Daniel Krimsky, from
1 to 2 p.m. Thursday. Each
class stands alone to help
in a deeper exploration into
traditional and modern Jewish
texts for enriching your daily
life. No charge. Open to Jews
of all backgrounds, interfaith
families and anyone interested
in Judaism. For more informa-
tion, call 941-484-2022.
Buddhist meditation
classes will be held at 5 p.m.
Wednesday at Unitarian
Universalist Congregation
of Venice, 1971 Pinebrook
Road. Class fee: $10; walk-ins
welcome. Increase your peace
finding happiness inside.
941-373-1600
Mindful meditation,


County Extension Service.

Tot time
Wednesday, 10-10:30 a.m.
Ages 1 month to 3 years.
Play with toys, and then
story time.

After-school activities
After-school computer lab,
Monday, 3:30-4:30 p.m., ages
5-12.
After-school play Mario,


instruction based on Bud-
dhist philosophy, is held from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday
at 251 South Tamiami Trail.
Donations accepted. Call
941-929-4063 or visit www.
meditationvenice.com.
New Life Assembly of God,
5800 South Tamiami Trail,
holds sign language classes
open to the community at
New Life Community Center
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on the first
and third Thursdays of each
month. For more information,
call 941-493-0775.
Unity Church ofVenice, 125
North Jackson Road, offers "A
Course in Miracles," from 6:30
to 8 p.m. Tuesday in Fellowship
Hall. No preparation required.
New participants welcome. Love
offering. Call Donna at 941-468-
5177 or Judy at 941-488-6440.


Tuesday, 3:30-4:30 p.m., ages
5-12.

Preschool Storytime
Tuesday, 10-10:30 a.m., for
ages 3-5

New nonfiction books
"Becoming China's Bitch
and Nine More Catastrophes
We Must Avoid Right Now," by

LIBRARY|19


Venice-
Nokomis
United Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship:
10 AM
Children's Puppet Church:
10:15 AM
Adult Sunday School
11:15 AM
Youth Fellowship Monday
5:30 PM
208 Palm Avenue, Nokomis
Phone 488-4137
(West of US 41,4 blks. South of
Albee RdJMatthew Currie Ford)
www.vnumc.net
vnumc(cdavstar.net
Senior Pastor, Glenda J. Brayman l


You're Invited
CHRIST UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Jerry Van Dyken, Pastor
Larry Potts, Associate Pastor
Sunday Traditional
Worship Services
8:00 and 10:45 am
Contemporary Service 9:15 am
Sunday School 9:15 am
and 10:30 am
Nursery Provided for
All Services
Parking shuttle provided
493-7504
1475 Center Road, Venice
www.cumc.info


St MAk's EOpiscopal Chnwrc
Office: 941488-7714
508 Riviera Street, Venice (2 blocks west of Venice Regional Medical Center)
Saturday 5:00 p.m. Holy Communion (contemporary)
Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
10:00 a.m. Holy Communion (mth nursery)
Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Holy Communion & Healing Service
The Rev James H Puryear, Rector The Rev Earl Beshears, Assoc. Rector
Visit us on the web at: www.stmarksvenice.org 4


SNEW CHURCH STARTING
IN EAST VENICE
Compass Church... Pointing People to Christ. If you
are interested in being part of this exciting project,
contact Pastor Tom Schneider at 941-257-3050
Bible believing-Christ Centered-Presbyterian
www.compasschurchpc.com compasschurchpc@gmail.com


I worship wnn us: Sat. o pm 3un. >:3u am o 11 am
ICounseling Appointments 926-2959 45004 I

\ lnice
I I 'r,-.)yterian
I hluLrch
NEW SUNDAY WORSHIP TIME -10 AM 1
Children's Sunday School--10:15 AM
Loving nursery available
S Wednesday Morning Communion-9 AM
488-2258 111 Firenze Ave. E., Venice
On the Island, 2 bloclks south of
venlcepresbyterlan.org Venice Regonal Medical Centeron UaeRlaflt


TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE
Bible Fellowship 9 am
^So -Worship in the Word 10:15 am
J Bible Church
700 Center Rd, Venice (Garden Elementary)
(941) 525-6196


*j NewLife
COMMUNITY CENTER
home of e2eu, .fte AAseenb/l of Qod


www.nlaog.org
941.493.0775


5800 Tamiami Trail South, Venice 34293
Sunday Worship: 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
Wednesday Family Night: 7:00 p.m.
Drop by and discover our warm family environment,
exciting worship and a message that makes a difference!
Healing School: 1st and 3rd Tuesdays 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery: Thursdays 6:00 p.m.


4 grace

'United ethodist Church
Contemporary Service at 9am Traditional Service 1 lam
LifeWAY Sunday School Classes at 9:30am & 10:15am
o Nursery Available for all services

Pastor Thomas J. Derrough



t LAKESIDE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2401 S. Tamiami Trail (Across from So. Cty. Admin. Bldg.)
493-5102
web: www.lakesidelutheran.net
email: LLC@lakesidelutheran.net
Worship 8:00 a.m. or 10:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship 9:15 a.m.
Children's Church 9:15 a.m.
Nursery 9:15 & 10:30 am
I ...... .. ..... 4,i f


II
.,
..'*" ,:y


r' i .. .. .. .....
l ir
'1-y


VENICE BIBLE
CHURCH
Loving God. Loving People, Making Disciples
There's something
for every member of the family!
SUNDAY
Bible Study 9:00
Worship10:30am
CHILDREN YOUTH SMALL GROUPS
493-2788
www.VeniceBibleChurch.com
9395 W. Shamrock Dr. (2 blocks west of US 41)





WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


Venice Bible readers reach the last word


PHOTO COURTESY
OF KATHY BOLAM
World War II veteran Ted Sivyer
joined volunteers in Venice in a
round-the-clock Bible Reading
Marathon at Patriots Park
recently. They reached the
finish line Saturday, May 19.


By KATHY BOLAM
SPECIAL TO THE GONDOLIER SUN

The third annual Bible-
Reading Marathon began
Tuesday evening (May 15) at
Patriots Park in Venice, with a
message by Pastor Earl Knopf
of South Venice Bible Church.
It ended in the afternoon of
May 19.
Prayers for our country and


church were delivered by the
organizers of the event. Mayor
John Holic presented a proc-
lamation stating the history
of the Bible in the foundation
of our country and the start
of Bible-reading marathons
in 1990 in Washington, D.C.,
which have continued in May
every year since. Other loca-
tions around the country have
joined in.


Prior to the mayor start-
ing to read Genesis, Michael
Bolam blew the Shofar,
which is traditional in some
churches prior to the reading
of God's HolyWord the
Bible.
If you missed participating
this year, plans are already
being made for the fourth
annual Bible Reading Mara-
thon for May 2013.


I SUPPORT GROUPS


Jewish Family and
Children's Service offers a
free weekly caregiver sup-
port group facilitated by a
professional and community
resources for caregivers from 1
to 3 p.m. Friday at St. Mark's
Episcopal Church, 508 Riviera
St. Pre-registration is required.
Contact Pamela Baron at
941-366-2224 or pbaron@
jfcs-cares.org.
GriefShare meets 7 p.m.


Monday at LIFTChurch, 695
Center Road. Call JoAnn Myers
at 941-468-3845 or the church
at 941-497-5683.
Celebrate Recovery
aims at a spiritual commit-
ment to Jesus Christ and
addresses all types of habits,
hurts and hang-ups, meet-
ing from 6 (dinner, $3.95) to
9 p.m. Thursday at New Life
Assembly Community Center,
5800 South Tamiami Trail.


941-493-0775
Encounter (formerly Cel-
ebrate Recovery) helps all with
their hurts, habits and hang-
ups from 6-8:30 p.m. Sunday
(dinner, $3) at First Christian
Church, 1100 Center Road. Call
941-408-8088.
Reformers Unani-
mous International meets
7-9:30 p.m. Friday atVictory
Baptist Church, 241 Burney
Road, Osprey. Call Pastor Arlo


Elam at 941-966-4716 or visit
www.reformu.com.
Grand Group, Grandpar-
ents Raising Grandchildren,
offering encouragement,
mutual support and the
opportunity to share benefi-
cial information for meeting
the needs of grandchildren
being raised by grandpar-
ents, meets Mondays from
10 to 11:30 a.m. at Trin-
ity Presbyterian Church,


4365 State Road 776. For
more information, visit
www.trinitypc.org or call
941-493-0018.
Cancer support groups
meet at 7 p.m. the second and
fourth Tuesdays and 1 p.m.
the second and fourth Fridays
in the chapel at Trinity Presby-
terian Church, 4365 State
Road 776. Facilitators: Joe
and Mary Thompson. Free.
941-493-0018


I WELL-BEING BRIEFS


Educational
programs
The Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation has numerous
educational programs
open to the public.
Offerings include Basic
Course for Caregivers,
Maintain Your Brain
and information about
local caregiver support
groups. It will come to
your community with
the Memory Mobile and
a speakers bureau. Call
941-365-8883.

TOPS
Taking Off Pounds
Sensibly meets 5-7 p.m.
Tuesday at Good Shep-
herd Episcopal Church,
1115 Center Road,
Venice. TOPS weight-loss
organization is open
to men and women in
the Venice-Nokomis
area. Call Barbara at
941-488-2826 or Marie at
941-493-9206.

TOPS
Taking Off Pounds
Sensibly meets at
10 a.m. Wednesday at
the Senior Friendship
Centers, 2350 Scenic
Drive, Venice. Weigh-ins
prior to the meeting


WELL-BEING SUBMISSIONS
Please submit items for Well-Being to ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
no less than two weeks in advance of your event date or the RSVP date.
Items not submitted two weeks prior may not run. For more information
about the Well-Being section, call 941-207-1102.


are from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Call Cathy at 941-493-
8761. TOPS weight-loss
organization is open to
men and women in the
Venice-Nokomis area.

Overeaters
Anonymous
Overeaters Anonymous
meets at 10 a.m., Mon-
days and Wednesdays,
Venice-Nokomis United
Methodist Church,
208 Palm Ave., Room 6,
Nokomis. Call Lita,
941-484-6448.

Cancer Support
Community
Events are free for
cancer patients and a
caregiver at Jacaranda
Trace, 3600 William Penn
Way. Call 941-921-5539.
Cancer support
group, 10-11:30 a.m.
Monday.
*Yoga for Well-
ness, noon-1:30 p.m.
Thursday.
Qigong exercise,
10-11 a.m. Tuesday.


Screenings
Free blood pressure
and blood sugar tests by
Home Health Services of
Venice, 8:30-10:30 a.m.
the first and third Thurs-
days of the month at
Venice HealthPark, 1201
Jacaranda Blvd., Venice.
Call 941-485-7711.

Caregiver
Support Group
A free weekly caregiver
support group meets
1-3 p.m. Friday at St.
Mark's Episcopal Church,
508 Riviera St. Caregiver
Support offers group
support for loved ones
during the session. Pro-
gram is offered by Jewish
Family & Children's
Service. Registration
required. Call Pamela at
941-366-2224.

Couples
Helping Couples
An anonymous 12-step
program for couples
looking to improve their


relationships, 7:30-9 p.m.
Friday at Emmanuel
Lutheran Church, 790
South Tamiami Trail,
Venice. Twelve-step
experience not necessary.
Couples work on com-
mitment, communica-
tion, conflict resolution
- anything that impedes
a healthy and happy
relationship. Free. Dona-
tions are appreciated. Call
941-475-8535 or 941-
492-9547, or visit www.
recovering-couples.org.

Hurts, habits
and hang-ups
Encounter (formerly
named Celebrate
Recovery) meets every
Sunday, 6-8:30 p.m., at
First Christian Church,
1100 Center Road,
Venice. Dinner is at
6 p.m. ($3), followed by a
motivational speaker, live
music and share groups
including grief support.
Meetings offer a place to
discuss personal issues
and find love and accep-
tance. Call 941-408-8088.

Alcoholics
Anonymous
AA (Sisters in Sobri-
ety) Women: 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Emmanuel


Lutheran Church, 790
South Tamiami Trail,
Venice.
AA (Speaker's group),
8:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 790 South
Tamiami Trail, Venice.
AA meets at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays,
Englewood Community
Hospital, 700 Medical
Blvd. Call 941-426-7655.

Recovering
Couples
Anonymous
Group meets 7:30 p.m.
Friday at Emmanuel
Lutheran Church, 790
South Tamiami Trail,
Venice.

Nar-Anon
Nar-Anon Family
Group, a support group
for families with a family
member with a drug
addiction, meets 7-8 p.m.
Thursday at St. Mark's
Episcopal Church library,
513 S. Nassau St., Venice.
This is for the family,
not the addict. Call Ray,
941-497-6879.
Narc-Anon Group
meets 7 p.m. Tuesday
at Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 790 South
Tamiami Trail, Venice.


Al-Anon

Al-Anon and Alateen
family meetings take
place several times a
week.
Al-Anon Family
Group, Epiphany
Cathedral, Soy Building,
317 Tarpon St., 11 a.m.
Monday
Beginners Meeting,
St. Mark's Episcopal
Church, church office
building, 513 S. Nassau
St., 7 p.m. Monday
Al-Anon Family
Group, Venice Presby-
terian Church, 111 E.
Firenze Ave., 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Al-Anon Family
Group, Church of the
Nazarene, 1535 E. Venice
Ave. (children welcome),
10:30 a.m. Wednesday
Step Study, Grace
United Methodist
Church, 400 E. Field St.,
7 p.m. Wednesday
Steps, The Church of
Christ, 4301 State Road
776, 10 a.m. Thursday
Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 790 South
Tamiami Trail, 7 p.m. and
8 p.m. Thursday; 7 p.m.
Saturday; and 7 p.m.
Sunday
St. Mark's Episcopal

WELL-BEING 113


RELI ION Membership is free. shop at Venice Commu- needed to staff the shop. 776, is collecting dona- feminine hygiene items,
E941-493-7504 nity Church of the Breth- Call 941-355-2029 for tions of the following bug spray, shampoo
ren at which handcrafted more information, items for 1,000-plus and batteries of all sizes.
FROM PAGE 8 Donations needed jewelry, ornaments and The Community needy people in the Drop off donations from
decorative items from Assistance Ministry of community: bar soap, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
answer questions and Our Neighbors' Goods around the world can be Trinity Presbyterian toothpaste and tooth- through Friday. Call
helps with distribution, is a nonprofit fair-trade bought. Volunteers are Church, 4365 State Road brushes, deodorant, 941-492-6384.


LIBRARY
FROM PAGE 8

Peter D. Kiernan (Nash-
ville, Tenn.: Turner,
2012)
"Let's Pretend This
Never Happened (A
Mostly True Memoir),"
by Jenny Lawson (New
York: G.P. Putnam's Sons,
2012)
"Lincoln's Yarns and
Stories: A Complete Col-
lection of the Funny and
Witty Anecdotes That
Made Abraham Lincoln
Famous as America's
Greatest Story Teller," by
Alexander K. McClure
(Bottom of the Hill
Publishing, 2010)
"Midnight in Peking:
How the Murder of a
Young Englishwoman
Haunted the Last Days
of Old China," by Paul
French (New York:
Penguin Books, 2012)
"New in New Orleans
Architecture" by John P.
Klingman (Gretna, La.:
Pelican Pub. Co., 2012)
"Within Arm's Length:
The Extraordinary Life
and Career of a Special
Agent in the United
States Secret Service,"
by Dan Emmett
(Bloomington: iUni-
verse, 2012)


Jacaranda Public Library
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Venice
941-861-5000

e-Help
Tuesday, May 29,
1-3:30 p.m. and
Thursday, May 31,
10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Technology coaches
are standing by to help
you with email, applica-
tions, searching and
other online problems.

Afternoon
at the movies
Tuesday May 29,
2-5 p.m.
Stachel becomes a
pilot in World War I Ger-
many. From a peasant
family, he has hard time
with the nobles in the
program.


Master gardener
help desk
Thursday, May 31,
1:30-3:30 p.m.
Master gardeners help
with lawn and garden
questions.

Video
lecture series
Thursday, May 31,
2-3:00 p.m.
Learn about opera
from its beginnings
and how you can love
it by watching a filmed
lecture of Dr. Robert
Greenberg.

Open-mike poetry
Thursday, May 31,
6-7:30 p.m.
Come to read, come to
listen, come to share the
joys of poetry.


Science Matters
Friday, June 1, 2-4 p.m.
Scientific inventions,
have they been beneficial
or not?

Ask Jack
Friday, June 1,


1:30-2:30 p.m.
Bring computer ques-
tions and trade them for
computer answers.

Sticks & String
Friday June 1, 3-4:45 p.m.
Grab your stick(s) and
knit/crochet with fellow


fiber enthusiasts.

Friday Film Fail
Friday, June 1, 5-7 p.m.,
ages 12-18
Teens, bring your
friends and your attitude
and enjoy making snarky
comments about old films.


Maintaining independence.

Gaining freedom.






$99 move-in special and $5,000

savings on select apartments!

Tour Venetian Gardens to discover the enriching lifestyle
and welcoming community you've earned.
Welcome to Holiday. Welcome Home







GARDENS
An Independent Living Community
S1450 Venice East Blvd., Venice, FL 34292 (Chestnut Creek Subdivision @ Center Rd.)
Please RSVP at 941-496-4000


Venice Car Wash and Detail Center








Senior Wednesday: 20% Off Any Full Service Wash
Please Present this in Person. Next to Venice Hospital
(941) 485.7222 Sign Up online for extra monthly savings,
www.venicecarwash.com


SUN NEWSPAPERS 9B





MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


These Fine Businesses Hav


rving Our Community Since...


^y hta iteor a tinrat
A section U t
of the SUk' EI P 1 Ef
.: .l i H H.. rl R. F:.I F CI Y lu,.1 I r, FL .::':l 206-100(


*l l '7P ('I' Lil ti'lr i i




(941) 639-2757


Charlotte



In sur ance Ance





r 243 N. Brevard Ave. __








www.farr.com





-41101 '.-r.cn SIreTa l P..rt Charlo:te
Arcadia, FL 34266 i
(941) 639-1158 (941)460-9334











IPonger-Kas-GrA dy
FiiiiniRl H IIIo meI I A ( HrAiClTioi ANCrAicP


I'I(1 I .1 9
, .63, 4'14-41-1


FLOOR COVERING


I Ii. *.. (I i .


261 \\t'r MI rii in A. X Punt. (Gimtl.i. 339'5i1
Mon -Fri N .im-6lipm S.Iln tl.I 9'.ini-5p)in
i ii Hiki Fl,,.P omC 'pi41-639-26,111

Q' I l[ T l.lllI T l. Pl nr. (ll o.in l.l
%I t 11" 1 \.I .1 1 %Iiui 11 N. ...11 -1 1111
i 1~~.ii ... ,i. 1''It ,,, PS. -N ot.oun e



941-639-7677


Celebratinlg
y^ ^/Cf 60 years
J INSURANCE
f',s.fir-f 19 ')41-4'4-9511




....y fl ....M.I'. i .I)
automall ,
;0 1 Tini..iini Tr .I Pi, l., G.-':'r'J
639-1155 .. pjimojutlnjl C ron


Sray- s plumbing, inc.
S629-2500 205-2133
423-0250
State Certified License No CFC1426095


SCURRY MOVING
& STOR1lGE, INC.
Atlas Van Lines Agent


1 1 l ..o.r.i.1. o e .11 Rie o. I- 1r.. .

Stan's SEPTIC SERVICE


(941) 639-3976


:rj Venice Ranch
SMobile Home Estates
Park Renovations & New Pool In Progress
2496 Sylvia Lane *Venice FL 34292
Dhnn: IQIA 11I A -RA79 ixv IQA 11 A.RA '91


S A 1( 240 ()Lue.(a ., e
Poirl Chirlille, FL
941P-74-7435
n HI'HL-K tlD)LLOI lo

PanlhierHolloM Denial.com


sI Covering
The Area
-- Since 1971


RICHARD'S


WAREHOUSE


QUALITY TV
SALES & SERVICE. INC.
14212 Tamiami Tr.. North Port. FL 34287
941-426-1773


S oyal raim
"7 1 Memorial Gardens
SCELEBR ATIN(I OC)IR 40TH I E AR
P r KAREN MONNIER, Manager
Ol(ice *41-6>3(*-2381
2 2 I-2:1: ,ne L:,:,I) Rd Punla G.:,rda. FL 331'82
\\\\\\ r,:\alpa)nlmnimnirl.al c.:in



S Stiver's Tire & Auto
850 S. River Rd.
Englewood, FL 34223
941-474-7660




'"- 941-488-0558
has been family owned and operated in Sarasola County
IRle emne, \\.iila.hle


lorida's ONAL
r Oldest CEMATION
and Largest UM
2525 Tn1111ian1 TIil. Linll1 B 624-5212
Poi r ( ballnl r' FL


nielscil

1n:1' V in.glt-i Tr3-il
.[i'il' V il'll:e, FI ';4 2'7 .


0 MORTON'S
AUCG Hardware
r D.If] n Need ft. I" 're Got t!
31:33 Tailaii Tai Tall P:irl (Cl larl.ie, FL I3332*.l41-I 12--3338
I .. I. I .l \\ \. .. k M ..11 -. --l -II %II iIlM i. i l II.... In l l l \iMH II'MA


7MMardis Realty
S' RF/JMIK EXCEL


SO -494) .. S.O. -II. IS--


TO)W\LESCORP
HOMES BUILT WITH PRIDE.
A REPUTATION BUILT ON SERVICE.
(941) 575-1515
0. ' [O 1 .-:or.. :om


SHoward's Pool World, Inc.
Professional Pool People
Maintenance Repairs Equipmenl Healers
941-625-6007 800-215-0226
12419 SW CR 769 Lake Suzy. FL 34269
i no r j E-rooI, orl] :Om LI.: mI P'" i".: : 11:


4516 Tamiami Trail, C
1VA- I r'3C


l)e ndarlUU


Sandi Kettler 941-276-5534
U00 \V I lIr.:.i P,,,Iii. ,:,.r.J


aries ot the Villa
Salon & Spa
ilIl .iI N .i I .l 1 I in t._ii .


Charles T. Anzalone
I I I I II, I I ,,, .. I


. 639-630011
639-6300


Vo, C co Citadel International
S*P 91.-r SE 1lin .
,' 4 ,ap ': C:ral FL :F:L'':
(239) 458-2035
Indoor Gun Range. Sales & Gunsinithing.
'41 (.25 PI-i NRA Firearms Instructor & Range Safety Officer.
......n. -, -, Disabled Veleran US Army


r cOOR & WIND
0o. o


3245 11.11 h..i k" lRd
1. ...l.. I1 .. ... I.I 1 .i I


S-I Il L'5I-l t-
qJl-J4RJ-q951


Preferred Properties, Realtors

941-416-3829


2110 N. Tamiami Tr.
Nokomis
(941) 966-2182
Toll Free: (800) 262-2182
Small RV's: (800) 248-1436


SCOTT WA RRAM L.L.C.
iLU PLUMBING
941-629-4341 --
% 1 1. rli i. r l .. r. .I 1 .1 .1.


FDorsett Signs Inc.
258 S. Grove St.
Venice, FL 34285
(941)-484-4877


Pr Darrel's Pool
Supply Service & Repairs
155 W. Dearborn SI.
Englewood. FL
(9411-474-7665


,: A-! 1IJmu LK
O1f Clli'lolle ('Count,

'....i 625-62'8


i. H I.


C .4-IHHI H~,,, H. I 1 ~l Il, I. .11.. I
i I. ~I..~ H' ~ llI IH, H, H I l


F NEW YORK PIZZERIA RESTAURANT DINE IN TAKE OUI
FULL IL ItJU iL -BLtE F'P ELit EP,'
OPEN 7 DAYS Mon. Fi. 11:00am 10:00pm Sal. & Sun. 3:00pm 10:00prm



Af F

,u FS, w ce fotr tbh Elatl @ Froly
Shoppes of North Port & U.S. 41 & Sumter Blvd.
Specializing in: Mon.-Sat. 9-5
Color Hizhli"htr -I T nc do 041.46.710


S AEABUSCII

VA* instruction
"All Phases of Construction"


P 24611 Hi_,il.mda(I Ro.Id. Punita Gorda.
941-62'-8881
I 1. ( 1( i2'6426 ( ( 1143S52 I ( 13I


AllC 011 0111
Bmldlminu Nrrtli
Fi',II Tlir
(,iiiind il Up"


:10B* SUN NEWSPAPERS


\ lhcllad h,,ll un \t. .- U : ..:-
Im, lid m i. l'l,,mmil. i 1 -





:WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


These Fine Businesses H


Community Since...


7Fan Lady & Lighting
Home Lighting & Ceiling Fans
3579 S. Access Rd. Ste. E
Englewood
941-475-6901
Family Owned & Operated
Phyllis & John Maguire. Patti Cushing



Reailtors \eiiice
II IthL -e Rain osEnd and )Dr .miins HIgin
4343 Tamiami Tr., Venice, FL 34293
941.493.3359


t- -
1111 )DruI Ln En.-elet il. FL
941-474-9371


frThe Venice Auction
Company Inc.
Consider it Sold!
601 Spur St.
941) 485-4964


Quality Health
7 Care Center
A Rehabililaling Nursing Complex
6940 Outreach Way, North Port, FL 34287
(941) 426-8411




2;Rill, rey -,,i Cl i e r -,
_251111 .1ron S vet'. Port (Ci.rlohl FL
19411 2"-('(2 Lic.# A L3915


rAmerican
SRealty '.PruP ip
Gloria Felcyn
700 W. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34285
941-484-8080


-4PRGSSURe
CLEAdERS


625-4655

Jose/i HF. Mazzoni,
tOirie,


FLOORING & DESIGN CENTER
2 Locations to Serve You!
2 JJ El i',- r, R-i Pt Ci:nrl.i:ll. 615 i Cr: :Stl Purlj 3 ,r.13
wwwnappvnomeservices net





3785 lamiaiui had, Poll Chalolle, FL 33952 (Acloss Iom Calolz)
Houls M f 9 00 5 30 Salulday 10 3 (941) 624-0077
WWW.FRIENDLYFLOORS.COM

Auto Air Specialist
941-743-3113
S':--r'!i=, ,n,3ulna n Park
n ....ni L O H.r...r I Pd
.u .. =, -, .


1252 Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte, FL
nAlImAllA-_a


Bird Bay "Realty, Inc.


S We are Condo/Villa Specialists
1-800-464-8497 or 941-485-4804


77 buffalo
^graffix
6 625-2833
18320 Paulson Dr.. Unil A. Porl Charlolle
www.buffalograffix.com


S1Hall's Trucking
P& Bobcat Services
941-485-5717
941-716-3650


S DIRECT MAIL
COPYING
GRAPHICS TYPESETTING
(941) 624-3713 Fai. ,i, -I:
.. En,,mail .:r.:raphi, 3a,- ilar n l_


Formerly located on San Casa moved to:
101 S. Indiana Ave., Englewood
941-475-8132

DOLPHIN CLEANERS
pr Convenieni locations with drive Ihru service







Air Conditioning & Healing
SService Installalions Free Eslimales
Commercial Residential
sr .n.) Zjr OIj jn. ..n jron .ounr,
423-1746
i CCi.c i.C .l O C:.-..O::.: C-c.: i .. n or i n o' 00, .O ..n.r

lArcadia Chevrolet
Serving you for 22 years
201 S. Brevard Ave.
Arcadia, FL 34266
1-800-479-3838
www.ArcadiaChevrolet.com



r Boat l. j/et I mental r
505 Tamiami Trail North
Venice, FL 34285
941-486-8111


r CJames Ciborowski. D.D.S.
94-1 F. Tamiamnii Trail
Port Charlotte, FL 33953
(941) 629-7779

GREAT FLORIDA

Jerry Ray Exler
1214 E. Venice Ave.. Venice. FL 34285
941.483.4270
venice.greatflorida.com


A Silent Sports Outfitters
SNew & Used Kayaks &
Standup Paddle Boards Starting 5199.00!!
2301 Tamiami Trl., Nokomis
(941) 966-5477


-seia
L?^S


STEVE'S
TOWING
www.stevestowing.us
941.769.4187


2 Weller Engineering
janeen Weiler
201 W. Marion Ave., Suite 1360
Punla Gorda, FL 33950
941-505-1700


4, *Free
Check AUTO REPAIN
"Your Full Service Auto Cente
Specializing in Owner Bob Berry
Foreign & 4780 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, FL 33980
Domestic Repairs Call Bob: (941) 764-1388




3782 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte
Summer Hours: Mon- Fri 9-4 Closed Sat. & Sun.
941-255-5550


AV-A-GATOR
Grill & Marina
9700 SW Riverview Cir.
Lake Suzy, FL 34269
www.nav-a -gator.com



V L.AW GROUP P A
1694 Tamiami Tr. S.. Venice. FL 34293
877.216.8489 941.492.6000
- -- | .. . .. .


H'ElIl we're roar uomplet root Store
POOL SUPPLIES EQUIPMENT
SERVICE CHEMICALS
STORE 24630 Sandh Blvd.
Unit302
941-625-1 190 Deep Creek, FL 33983



ROSEBUD'S
SSteak & Seafood House
established 1995
2215 S. Tamiami Tr., Osprey, FL 34233
tnA 'I n- 1 0 [ '7-l


ALLNIED MEDICAL BILLING


ALLMED


! ,,I ,, i I I I...ll l, ll .ll i '*" 2
TEL: (941) 206-5200
FAX: (941) 206-3322


' Horse & Chaise Rental & Property Management, Inc.
Helene MIacDonald
.1 N. :k.:. A N i\-..:- FL i -'.. -941-483-: 33
\ h \ o \I.hoL. isealdc llha e. co ni

GENE GORIVAN
S AUTO SALES
13305 Ta miami Trail Puntma (Gorda
(941) 619-1601
I'11 (.\, I 11 .\ j\ IiI N \ \\ l. \\, ii i I o n I M "


F AUTO TECH
301 U.S. Hwy. 41 By-Pas


VENICE
VENICE. FLORIDA
no


Caluisa Springs

(941) 613-1469


AlTordable housing atll it's best!

Kornman Relief
and Wellness Center
Laura R. Korman DC. DACBN
1 I-. -:l.. RBl: I:- BI .:1 P.-: r I :'.i .:.rr- FL ''
941-629-6700
!-- ,_, !' n .' !' r- I n ,:[ I I !' .- ; ; ,: ,:, !n


Bayshore Marine
SYacht Brokers
23269 Bayshore Rd., Charlolle Haibor
941-627-5777
ba shoremarinefl.com


:JfVedicine WE
Shoppe LIVER
Cmi iiig Bevonil Pi esci iptionis
Phone 941-505-1095 Fax 941-505-1590
t.l [.I-, ; I II,. i .. #-.. .. C


/,iI Ca I IIlll t
(C 'Il~llpl ' / l l hlll ''lI' \ ]II Iil. M h' '
Sicli IcPlice
Theli cPlie Te.nII
941-815-8064
iiiii" li11 "( hl" li,, ll ii,,1l.-I mIt
I,.,I .. I)..,*/ I ,I... II .... ....


lfl1 n HPrf 4 edicaiedioproiodina
TAXI 2, C) o, ,o .
r conie ale, .
The "Ctassy Cab C,,eanrien
941-426-TAXI (8294) kela[! 6
www.northporttaxi.com
A+ Poted '..,.'ith the Better BP.i.iness .Bireoni



r *Tarpon Coast Realty

Ron McGuire
941-223-4781


PRO POWER
AUTO SALES
(941) 627-8822
\Vhidden Industrial Park
'7i lImanict Aie Pnrt Crihrlnhtte Fl Oq8n


All Your Military Memorabilia
) ,Available Here
1231 U.S. 41 By Pass S., Venice
-..l 941-484-7045


.3


SUN NEWSPAPERS IIB





MAY 26, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


3


*ving Our Community Since...


These


941-625-6600


.* Goa/" By imusails

520 King SI.. Punla Gorda. Florida 33950
Bo :.:.. .o o l :.. 1 c :9 :.; "x 9j1 :. B I i
t i*J1 3,'', '', CI-,x .J ',', t -,., ', L',,','



Robarts Funeral Home
16:3 N. Bre\v aIl Av\e.
Arca(cia. FL :342(6(6
863-494-7646


Russell Screen
Repair Service
Englewood, FL
941-473-8951


S GENE GORMAN
FAMILY MOTORS
4380 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte
(941)625-2141
"I'd Gihe 'Em A.aj But hi \\ ile don'tt Let Me"
u% %%.genegorminan.comn



|F L iLr al | i9 Cia
I/r /'/i r ll\u lrl'l I'i.n i. a

941-480-061 941-366-3646





Sue Ellen Fumich 941-276-2894
lU \1\1vv Il r..-.I. P.i G-.-: (.r.J .


TnMuffy ASE CERTIFIED
_MECHANICS
Mon.Fri. 7:30 am -6:00 pm PORT CHARLOTTE
Sat 7:30 am 4:00 pm (941) 764-9815
Sat. 7:30 am 4:00 pm 2572 Tamiami Trail
Sun. 9:00 am -3:00 pm 0 ....-., c, cr .. l -r ei.1



E HARBORCHASE
Celebrating Senior Living!
950 Pinebrook Rd., Venice, FL 34285
941-484-8801




HERON COVE
O)lfi Ic'o 1 S Bi..hit".i. Enk-"-.iudl. FL 34223
TIl 1411'4"3-i145-* Fai\ i)41 4X5-4321


Roger P. Frechette, Sr
DRYER VENT CLEANING
941-661-2020 6 Step Cleaning Process


CARPET CLEANING PLUS
% Deep Steam (leaning 4 Rooms $99.00
Tile & Grout (leaning 40% Off Special
New Van & Mounted Equipment!
941-623-6216





'T, '.'li'., *'/ii i .i, t,' 112 ',,ritl i,'rlil
A941 A 63 -6003 I


AAA Plumbing Inc.
S Drain Cleaning Water Heaters
For all your Plumbing Needs"
j Certified Backflow Tester
629-7177 914-4667
In ur.. L,.iIn '..a y.2 ,..1.77":

Silver Threads Embroider
J & Screen Printing
*3^ ( vYour Hometown Apparel Decorator
Xmi d , rhr. A n,:r ,3 r, ::n,
.... I- ...- -A1 _Ao QnAl k


ACHIEVE FITNESS
2 Port Charlotte Location.
1000)I) Tamiam, Trail
(941) 627-5580
o -13:'.00 Kin H. -
(941) 627-5509
Family Fiendlly Fitness Center For Any Age


r Emerald City
yy Charlotte County's
#1 Gentleman's Club
1225 Tamiami Tr., Porl Charlolle. FL 33953
941.766.1161


TONY E. CACCIOLA
Painting Tile
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
r,,in.:.r w 3 P ir
941-286-1590


23330 Harborvie, Road. Poll Charlolle
www.MikesMattress.com
19411 629-5550


ANCHOR REALTY
ThHomr n Expeil Wllh a Wolld of Exprince I
Punla Gold a I,.l i ,,,,, ... ,, i, l ... ll t Iy. I.1t
Downlown PunlaGolda .i Ih, I. 1.1,,,, :.. it.1 --In i"rI i ii in 1 .--


r 7 Z Det'
423 6223
Breakfast All Day
Homemade Souns


\.,lll I' ,l1 1
ll 1-III-' .i- r, ii


I Veoetiae Deutal
C 9, New Patient .
$9 Special


r Tlinks to ourr Troops of nil you do!
A Little Help Nurse Registry
(941)485-0301
F'prvone Henls RPPr n Honlm!


. o
, ,. : ". -

- ,.. ..


I THERAPEUTIC
WF .1 NESS
*CENTER

.


LOrIl nn ivertens, I

4456 Tamiami Trail. Chalolle Habor. FL 3398(
941-457-7072
c-i OiC.-_-, f ior, .nnmifin.n- :om


Tim's Bed & Factory
Direct Furniture
2820 Worth Ave., Englewood. FL 34224
941-475-9988


ELECTRICAL SERVICES





KRAUTH
CONSTRUCTION INC.
(941) 809-0473
Family owned w\lh 15 years ol experience


l43i Taniianni Tral S.. Suite 3. Venice. FL 34293
941-488-6022
\ \\ .ini,)erialblinld.coni


Imperial Home Services
House Painting Windows & Doors
Lawn Service All Around Handyman
L -,, ',lo &i I 'ii-jlo
941-421-5556


Sherry A. Mearns, Business Development Director
AllPro Home Health
Top 100 Medicare-certified agency in the nation!
995 Tamiami Trail, Suite B
Port Charlotte, FL 33953
S www.allprohomehealth.net
..... ..... (877) 474-0012 (941) 258-3355


mril. .i or': Ion Bc'il t//l~r Li.I'
JUDY K PETKEWICZ.I<.m ,, .941-45 -8304 ,
941-456-8301)


aluminum
& ',,inyl
RSlfjliTlP Prd


1282 Market Circle
Port Charlotte, FL
941-766-1115
IS Inc


ROOFING a REPAIRS LLC 201
... . I -T


Sus. F W.liam Mb F PA
CPETAT'RI"CS
179e Tol .o B l sd ld
PorC.alO rie FL 3M 948
73 i941>T 737 lPv t S)


rL Pi.LrS 5AT'rE Rt U
2715 Tamiami Tiail Porl Charlolle
I.p:n M n 1S 10 D)l i .'n-. iOO irn-
941-625-2006
"Slop by ofern. you never knott nhal treasure you'll uncover!"
www.lollyseslalesareus.com


7. Martin Air of SW FL
"Serving Port Charlolltte Area"
Trusted and Reliable wilh BBB
941-235-2716

Patrice Hesion
STATE FARM
INSURANCE AGENCY
l',P i Kiiis Hili\\iu \ Poll C IliloicK FL ;'x=ii
941-627-5626


AUTOU uiRPAIR
3315-CI Tamiami Trail Punra Gorda
(941) 639-4722
I'- F ; 'E ni F r Rm 1 ii iLn U. ,1 -


r SIA
Shaefer Insurance Agency
"Prompt, Polite
& Professional" ..


Rrinn shaPefer


Q94 1 -4R8-">fi23f


%% Relax, C -
Renew, .Ku tis
Pefres sk 'y e


1305 Tamiami Trail Punta Gorda
(941) 639-7300
"I'd Give 'Em Away But My Wife Won't Let Me"
__ www. genegormans. corn


\" Native Sun
Salon & Tanning
2161 S. Tamiami Tr.. South Venice. FL 34293
941-451-9825


eaqs Gary
Miller
I i: V. A n . .- 4 n .. i .4
941.412.3456
H'W.resultsrealtygroup.org

"Life is worth hearing"


Itil S.und Caen
1 ~ earng Cen ISI


\..rn Pirl


1 4900) Tamiami Trail
North Port FL 34287
A I _.A7'-CQRRA


v e
Accepting
New Patients


:12B SUN NEWSPAPERS


(941) 9fl-3322


194 ,18 ...3-
Iqldt | _.L"l."L"ldd


4J





:WEEKEND EDITION MAY 26, 2012


Venice Coin Club solves mystery


STAFF REPORT

One of the great ques-
tions among members
of the resurgent Venice
club has been, "How
long has the club been in
existence?"
Some of the more
senior members thought
the club went back to the
1970s.
An earlier effort had
taken place through the
city's archives.
Club members found
references to the club
in the Venice Gondolier


going back to 1963. On
the other hand, no one
found any references to
when the club was actu-
ally founded and who
the founding members
might have been.
With 2013 possibly
being the 50th anni-
versary of the club,
Neal Burnett, current
club president, thought
another search would
be appropriate so the
founding members could
be honored.
Added by numismatic
researcher and author


Dr. R.S. "Bart" Bartano-
wicz, both men showed
up at the Venice Archives
May 1. Aided by clerical
assistant Joanie Somoza,
they began to research
the rather fragile
50-year-old copies of the
Gondolier. They started
with the 1960 editions
and planned to work
their way up to 1963,
which was the last year
that they had found a
reference to the club.
After two hours of
going through the
papers, both men were


exhausted and down-
trodden as they started
on the December 1960
issues. It was there that
they had their eureka
moment. The Dec. 8,
1960, issue had an
article entitled, "Coin
Club is Organized, Will
Meet Monthly, Hold
Auctions." The article
identified the nine char-
ter members, including
the driving force and
group's chair, Lt. Col.
Robert H. Johnson, U.S.
Army (ret.).
Both men's excitement


was such that Somoza
was quick to let them
know she was also
excited for them.
Of course, there was
good news and bad
news. Reading through
the article, the good
news was that the club
was established on
Nov. 30, 1960, not 1963.
The bad news is that
the club missed its 50th
anniversary.
Not put off by the
bad news, Burnett said,
"We hit a home run. We
solved a long-standing


mystery. We'll just have
a belated birthday party.
Plus, this makes the
Venice club one of the
oldest surviving coin
clubs in Florida not
that we're competing
with anyone."
The Venice club meets
the fourth Monday of
each month at 6:30 p.m.
in the Community Room
at Venice City Hall. The
next meeting will be on
Monday, June 25.
For more informa-
tion, call Jeff Scalici at
941-240-5560.


WELL-BEING

FROM PAGE 9

Church, church office
building, 513 S. Nassau
St., 7 p.m. Friday

Run/walk group
Venice running group
meets every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at
Centennial Park Gazebo
for free runs or walks
from 6-7 a.m. Runners
and walkers of all ages
and abilities welcome.
Distance and pace based
on ability. Call Tuula,
941-416-0063.

Walkabout group
The Saturday Morning
Walkabout group meets
at 8 a.m. at Volunteer
Park behind Gulf Coast
Community Foundation.
Each Saturday a different


2.5-mile route is cho-
sen. Mileage recorded;
incentive awards given.
Pets and new walkers
welcome.

Stand-up
paddleboard
Paddleboard with
Elin is held Tuesday and
Thursday, 10 a.m., at
Venice Beach, near the
pavilion. Reservations
must be made. For
more information, call
941-408-9642 or go to
standuppaddleboard
withelin.com.

Mindfulness
meditation
Crystal-clear mindful-
ness meditation instruc-
tion, based on Buddhist
philosophy, approach-
able for all spiritual back-
grounds, will be held
every Thursday 6:30-
8:30 p.m., at 251 South


Tamiami Trail, Venice.
Donations accepted. Call
941-929-4063 or go to
www.meditationvenice.
com.

Yoga basics
Joan Harn offers a yoga
basics class 10-11:30 a.m.
Tuesday and a yoga
basic back-care class
10-11:30 a.m. Friday at
Nokomis Community
Center, 234 Nippino
Trail, Nokomis. The cost


is $10 per week for those
attending monthly or $12
per session for walk-ins.
Everyone is welcome.
Call 941-485-8904 for
more information.

Yoga with Karen
Yoga with Karen is held
Wednesday through Sat-
urday, 8:30 a.m., free, at
Nokomis beach near the
lifeguard stand. Contact
Karen at kkcb4@aol.com,
941-586-7697.


Yoga with Elin
Yoga with Elin is
held Monday through
Saturday, 8 a.m. and
9 a.m.; and Monday
through Thursday,
7 p.m. at Venice Beach,
near the pavilion. For
more information, call
941-408-9642 or go to
yogawithelin.com.

Acupuncture
Acupuncture physician


Dr. Lucy Han holds free
seminars, noon-1 p.m.
Wednesday at 389 Com-
mercial Court, Suite B.
RSVP to 941-486-1555.

Zumba fitness
Zumba, Zumba Lite
and yoga classes are held
seven days a week at 417
South Tamiami Trail,
Venice. Contact Mary
Lynn Szerbin for sched-
ule at mlszerbin@aol.
com, 941-685-8445.


Bn *.O *B-T r^ ^ -


CALVARY
BIBLE CHURCH
1936 EastVenice Ave., H l
8 -70
Venice, FL Ph. 485-7070
SSound Bible Teaching MI
AWANA Clubs/Children'sChurch TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE
Hymns of the faith Bible Fellowship 9 am
"Christ centered & bible based." Worship in the Word 10:15 am
SFriendly people
www.cbcvenice.com
Swarm welcome awaitsyou and your family 700 Center Rd, Venice FL
Sundayservices -9:30,10:30&6:00 *(Garden Elementary)
(941) 525-6196


SUN NEWSPAPERS 13B








14B
WEEKEND EDITION
MAY 26, 2012


PHOTO ALBUM


CONTACT US
941-207-1102
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


PHOTO COURTESY OF JEAN JUSTICE
John and Jean Justice, left, celebrated John's 86th birthday at the wedding of their grandson
David Justice to Deya Graham at Columbia Hills Country Club, Columbia Station, Ohio, Feb. 17,
2012.


Ed Englehardt, left, secretary, and Robert A. Sprague Jr., counselor, both of Venice, attended the
recent biannual meeting of the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America-Florida, in Central
Florida. Order Governor Raleigh Worsham is front and center and wearing medals.


PHOTO COURTESY OF PENNY NUTTLEMAN
Philanthropic Educational Organization Chapter DU members
Penny Nuttleman, left, and Mary Alice Weist, right, presented
a program for continuing education grant to Amee Sams in
April. Sams is working on a Bachelor of Science degree at Keiser
University. Her son, Jarrell, looks on. PEO provides grants for
education for women. Call 941-408-7656.


Timothy Geddis, left, 10, and Toby Geddis, 9, of East Nassau,
N.Y., grandsons of Gail and Brian Fairlie, of Venice, enjoyed
Easter vacation at the beach by Sharky's on the Pier.


PHOTO COURTESY OF JIM SHUG


Beth Palmer Adams, center, founder of Venice Newcomers Club
20 years ago, was honored by Bob Bartholomew, president-
elect, and Tom Dorherty, president, at the club's 20th anniver-
sary meeting at Plantation Golf & Country Club April 18. Club
members welcomed Adams and thanked her for starting the
club that has brought together many people who are new to
the area.


Venice's Only Not-For-Profit, Faith Based
Continuing Care Retirement Community Offering:


00
000 ,O
aoo op
.. 00

FV



VILLI
ON T-
EV E RYDAY


Andrea Payne, left, Gerri Hamlin, Martha Zitta, Judy Murchison, Liza Kramer, Peg Graft, Rosemary
Kelly and Vera Wolf attended the April 11 luncheon meeting of the Venice Nokomis Woman's Club
when officers were installed. Laurie Myse and Jan Wilcox were welcomed back as two returning
members. Call 941-484-0378.


PHOTO COURTESY OF PATRICK KEIGHER


Tommy Emery, of North Port, son of Vee Garry-Chiulli, loves to
build and fly remote airplanes.


COURTESY PHOTO


Patrick Keigher, left, owner of the Cinnamon Bear Children's
Book Store and sponsor of a fundraiser for InStride Equine
Assisted Therapy; Susan Thomas, volunteer; and Jeanne"JJ"
Jeannotte, InStride volunteer coordinator greeted donors at the
Venice Farmers Market April 21.

SHARE YOUR PHOTOS
To share your photo with us, email a JPG at least 4 by 6
inches with a list of who or what is in the photograph to
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com, or mail photos to:
Venice Gondolier Sun, Attn: Photo Album, 200 E. Venice Ave.,
Venice FL 34285.


* Independent Living
* Assisted Living
* Skilled Nursing Care
* Outpatient Rehab


GE
ISLE
SNEW DAY


- (941) 486-5484
920 Tamiami Trail South
.. Venice, FL 34285


PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE KUROPATWA
Free trolley rides are offered seasonally around downtown
Venice.


PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE KUROPATWA


Barbara and Al Wycoff attended the CCW fashion show, in which Audrey, travel consultant at AAA Venice, helps a visitor at the
Barbara dressed in a '20s outfit. club's recent"Your Lucky Day at AAA" event.


PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE KUROPATWA


Full moon over Venice, not Miami.


[E.7 L; Jm

































































"HOLD ON, HELEN ... LEROY'6 SLOWLY
GAINING ALTITUDE."


"IF I WERE PERFECT, LORETTA, YOU'D HAVE
TO CRITICIZE STRANGERS."


''tI.


"LEROY THINKS HE'S FOOTLOOSE ..
I'M GOING TO TIGHTEN HIM UP."


DRESS IN IT'S NOT "
COSTUMES? HALLOWEEN


IT'S GOING TO BE A
LONG SUMMER IF I
KEEP' RUNNING
INTO HIM




/7/1"


PON'T TRY" TO AVOIP
HIM! YOU'LL BE LIM-
ITING YOURSELF
IF YOU PO. \10


I
0

0

1

bs
by
BRIAN
and
AREG
WALKER


I I






Comics Page 2 o F/N CV wwwsun-herald.com TheSun/Sunday, May27, 2012


,
,, w- = .-1 "* I ,v ,<- .* ,- .-
527. .^ .- -. WWU .cM - "*


*APY
FOR
YOUR



by parker and hart _|

7 W 50 \- A PWBT WE OWe UT WOMY\




1 I
ANOE cm TNERH TO fO WE"rAAY WI EP
TRUN Y RPAY 2aE NEV. ME MET N ER






THATGOLF6AME WHAT'S
TODAY REALLY WRONG
Mort Walker's WORE MEOUT WITH My
DRIVES?

beetle




PARN! ANOTHER WHY DO I ALWAYS OOP5! I MISSED
UNPLAYABLE // HIT THAT POND? ) ANOTHER PUTT
LIE!


F-O

5-27 PALMERR


SoME JOBS -0 VI P/ PAMWA A4lORt4, K0A01
A Ho4 AWFUL V 0E M OFF ON YOUIN V15Tr Wi
YoU J jr A A LOVE- ONE.,. -1 I Al.MAoSr o
CAbN'ITEAR
TA 1:AE 7Em... Cb c Lj


G vo

A

J o0LP YUh MI ewI oF A6oWOIL 'O A 0 01 i5r rLJor I r d -Te 3
LEFT 7 Y0loAOE4 cod& MIyP AY6B1ITrEI KOPs IWERE -PEAPI5l
pthe R A bWKEl NOT, M/eLE 'MomNE ? 7i4E PAYAT 7Tr i J

fke MAR
horrible IT- gor FRIEN9 9ouiffV1







Ji,







WOW! I DIDN'T EVEN HAVE 0TO OPEN
T HE OO! HOW DI YOU KNOW I WA
0 OING TO SURPRISE VOU WITH A PIZZ,

f-FOR INNER 1ONIG:?


OLIT /MYGARPM CUIJ 16 t4~AlJ
A 16 FUVJCTIONA roOAYAIP
I'M ME CHAIRPPI0'N.,..


Comics Page 2 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


The Sun /Sunday, May 27, 2012






Sunday, May27, 2012/The Sun www.sun-herald.com 0 F N C V Comics Page 3


THE FALSE LADY GRUNYARD HAS ABDUCTED THE
CONFUSED LORD GRUNYARD IN A SMOOTHLY
EXECUTED OPERATION...


SLYLOCK FOX and COMICS FOR KIDS


BY BOB WEBER JR.


I


411.6


Sunday, May 27, 2012/The Sun


www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 3





Comics Page 4 D/E/N/CV www.sun-herald.com


PRESS ORE. IF YOU R.-,
TO ARM ORE, bETAIt LS
ABOUT -\\S F\NAL OFFER,
PRE55TWO FOR.YOUR
LAST CRAbNC.TO
SPEAK L\ VJW TR
A RE.PRSENTAThNIE
ABOUT ACLEPTIMG
T5O OFFER,,,


U


Ar-V


. .-.

f^^ ^^(MS- ^^( **^^


The Sun /Sunday, May 27, 2012


BY~;ul






Sunday, May 27, 2012/The Sun


www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 5


__I


41.6





Comics Page 6 0 F/N CV wwwsun-herald.com TheSun/Sunday, May27, 2012


THE PHANTOM


BY LEE FALK


DOONESBURY


BY GARRY TRUDEAU


Hank Ketchamn'
Dennis the Menace


NAY-borhood
Watch


Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


The Sun /Sunday, May 27, 2012







Sponsored by S JF and GOIlEolier Slu
SIM1 ( 0111( 1 01 1IORI DA LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORID'S N.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER



qI$ ] I
IBM L LrI w! w


I'


Cathleen Pinkerton

Valedictorian
Self-motivated and focused.
That's Cathleen Pinkerton, and it's always been her, and a reason
why the 18-year-old is the school's valedictorian.
"A lot of long hours studying," said Pinkerton, who sports a 4.82
GPA. "I put so much time into school. It's been a lot of work. I know what
I have to do. I'm very focused and I get it done, then I can do what I want
to do."
She concluded her Advanced Placement tests the third week of May,
just two weeks before graduation on June 1.
"I won't have anything to do (after my tests) and I think it will be the
weirdest thing," said Pinkerton, who takes weekends off from school
work.
Although she never strived to be the valedictorian, once she knew
she was close, she worked hard at achieving it.
"I didn't even know it was going to be a possibility until my junior
year," said Pinkerton. "Once I figured it was a possibility I set my mind to
it, for sure. I've just worked so hard to get it so I'm happy it worked out.
Not like it's always been a goal, but I am going to do my best to make it
happen."
She credits her family as a big motivational factor in school.
"I have two older sisters (Kimberly, 21, and Allie, 24) that always did
well in school," said Pinkerton. "It was a little bit of a sibling rivalry, but
not really. I have a lot of self-motivation too always the type of student I
knew how to work hard and I got it done."
She said she never gotten a B overall on her report card.

VALEDICTORIAN 9


Alexandra Loccisano

Salutatorian
When Alexandra Loccisano was 16 years old, she wrote her own plan
and started a business.
In addition to running her own business, the Venice High senior is
starting a nonprofit organization as well as works in a restaurant.
All this, in addition to studying and working hard at getting good grades,
which has paid off as she is the salutatorian, with a 4.79 GPA.
She is dual-enrolled at VHS and State College of Florida, which she has
done over the last two years, as well as taking advanced placement
classes.
She will be attending the University of Central Florida in Orlando.
"I like Orlando and excited for the change," said Loccisano, who also
applied to the University of South Florida. "It's a little bit away from home
and has more to offer for me and my interests."
Her dual-enrollment has given her 54 college credits. She plans on
taking six credits over the summer so when she starts at UCF, who will
already have an associate's degree.
She plans to major in business, and maybe something in
communications.
Two years ago, she started her business, called Lexi Lou Handmade for
You, which sells handmade macrame jewelry and greeting cards made
from recycled materials. They are sold at her family's business, The Olive
Grove of Venice, Florida, which sells extra-virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar,
wines, sea salts, soaps and beauty care products, as well as hosting
private dinner parties.
"At first I was making jewelry for me and my friends," said Loccisano. "I
thought I could sell these, so I put them in mom's shop. It was a hobby that
turned into a business."
SALUTATORIAN 19


A Proven Equation for Success
Expanded options here equal greater choices for your future anywhere. You can build a resume for
21st century life. Earn an associate degree for university transfer. Earn a new bachelor's degree.
Or go straight into a rewarding career, ready to contribute from day one.


SCF President Dr. Lars A. Hafner with
Outstanding Graduate Award recipient,
Venice resident Jacqueline MacPherson (center),
and fellow award finalists.


Established 1957, 39,000 graduates and counting.
scf.edu 941-752-5050 941-408-1300, x65050
Bradenton*Lakewood Ranch*Venice*eCampus
State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota (SCF) is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
to award associate and baccalaureate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA, 30033-4097, or call
404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of SCE An equal access/equal opportunity institution.


StE
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANATEE- SARASOTA


!




A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.

S E
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA[I SARASOIA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


St
STIAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I I SARASOIA


Rrl


Si.


Trevor Adkins


Richard Ashcroft Joseph Avella


Ashley Bailey


Alexander Banks


Kobin Barber


Bryan Barnes


Christian Barone


Danielle Barrett
Fw pw


Brian Basnight


Steffen Bennett


uylan Berry Scot Biegel

eqwfl


Nassim Bounamid


Audrey Bradley


learner nriggs


Brett Butler


Hunter Briggs





Jake Brown


Sandy Brogan Zachary Brower

ref1 ra!


Monica uueneman


Zachary Cain


iayler .allagnan


Darien Brown


Kasey urrougns
ri .^.1


Amoer allaanan


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 2


0


-l


Jake Arbour


.alyn Beese


JacobD Bnoy


Brian Boos


Derek Brown


Alexis utler

r"


iris Canas


I t

$10 OFF11





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


S E
SIATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAI HSA RASOIA


Jaae Capaarest


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


Kara Capno


Alexandria larnagglo wooa

^|^~" |


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


St
STIAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I I SARASOIA


isaac Carpenter


Miranda Cassidy


Jenna Cataldo Amanda Attaneo

w r^


Courtney Chapman


Andrew Chlebina


Kaley Cochran


alp


Gabrielle Compton Ke

;do r


rringan Cook Will Cook


Chiyanne Cotter


Sabrina Cotts


Amanda Coviello


Dakotah Cranford


Matthew Creager Burke Cristofori


Evan Dacey


of 201211


Chelsea Davis


RICHARD'S
WAREHOUSEi
IINCI


488-3900W


Dustin Degraaff Wesley Dehnert


Ricardo Del Real


Anthony Deniro Joseph Detert


Cogrtins aie
Lov Mm &Da


CIA

& Anelr&"
lot, L6P
M'afkoYM
iym Vj&Ar


Kevin Dorsett


Kyle Dougherty


941.244.9054

EyesOnYouEyewear.com


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 3


Lauren Clark
*f *>"'"^^H^ i


Tyler Coley


Trevor Davis


Eve Day


John Dean


I


I


I


I





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


S E
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA[I SARASOIA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


St
STIAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I I SARASOIA


Kristin Drennan Amy Duncan Jesse Edmonds


I"7
4,J


David Enander
PFW"Omk


.uke Engle Darien Entwistle

gg -. i
't L "


Jared Faulkner


Eric Fernandez


Adam Flagler-Beck


Zachary Flerlage


Grant Flessner


Nikolas Foresteire


Joseph Frantz


Victoria French


Michael Friend


Kneecca namnes Corey


Jessica Godwin


William Goetluck


Gretchen Gokey


Christopher Gould Kasey Graley


Kevin Guthrie


Laura Hackett Lonnor Hagan


Lonnor nartley


laylor navnn


Amanaa nawK


Chad Hazeltine


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 4


Kera Frost


Jordan Gray


Jacob harper


GOODWILL CONGRATULATES AREA GRADUATES!
BUT LEARNING DOESN'T END WITH GRADUATION

SHOP GOODWILL BOOKSTORE FOR
SUMMER READING OR COLLEGE PREP HELP

I 1702 S. TAMIAMI TRAIL 941.441.2906 MON. SAT. 9 7, SUNDAY 12 5

GOODWILL
Our business is changing lives





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


S E
SIATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA[I SARASO IA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


StE
STAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I I SARASOIA


Alexandra Hutchison


Jenniter HitchcocK


Peter Hoang


Incrocci Rexford Ingerick Justin Intorcia

71N

A LA


uoraon JenKs


Conner Jones


Lana Jonnson


Cynthia Jones


Rachel Jones


Garrett Johnson


Angela Josepn


Maryah Joseph


Melissa Judd


Tyler Justice Molly Kagarise


Samantha Kasmirski


Ashley Keith
-


Emily Kepler


Ainva Khacetoorian


Paul Kreider


Zachery Laman


Matia< Lamhrecht


Christina Lamon


Jessica Laurie


Forrest Lamn


Congratulations/
Chloe Dietrich, Christi Frost /
Carla Johnson, Cara Patete
& Samantha Tornese .

Class of 2012


SVenice Youth Boating Association
1330 Tarpon Center Drive
Venice, FL 24385
Y |- Phone (941) 275-9142
www.veniceyouthboating.com
Instructing Young Sailors Since 1952


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 5


Michael lorio


John Keen


Corey Lake


Thai Lam


-0*


.90,1





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


SA
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAI HSARASOIA


Jesse Leiscn


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


Michael Leonard


Michael Leopard
=.mr - .


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


St
STIAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAI SARASO IA


victoria LeSKO


Saran LISIK


Alexandra Loccisano


Peter Lomason


Alana Mahler Wright


Nathalie Malkerson


Rachael Maloney


Danielle Manthey


Natalie Markos


II Martin Brian Mashoke

rh B ~ _, -


Ryan McCarthy


Corine McClendon


Jason McClure


Devin McCollum Austin McCumber

..ara. -i


Matthew Mcguire
1i


Damon Mclntire


Devon McLauahlin


Rvan McManus


Erick Medrano


Hellen Mikulin


Margaret Mironenko Maximillian Mirra
Venice I f
Theatre IIIllI
Congratulations to )
our raduates


Victoria Mogford


Kassondra Moon


Malcolm Moore


Mia Moore


Taylor Morgan


We'll miss you
Tony, Kristin,
Abby and Hunter!


Garbiel Moskowitz


Andrew Moyer


Carolina Munoz


Gena Murphy


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 6


Daisy Lora


Jami Lu


Alex Lucchi


Lauren Lurry


Tia Milliner


i


I


4m^





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


S E
SIATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA[I SARASOIA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


St
STIAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I I SARASOIA


inanninuy Nguyen


Lauren Nielsen


Jordan Nunez


Logan O'Brien


Miranda O'Neil


Austin Uberg


Evan Ubermeier


Enya Overholser


.14ft


Jessica Parker


Heather Parrish


Matthew Parker







Moraan Perry


Robert Parker


David Peterson


mik'


rage rerrocK


Anna reyron


Natasna rnifer


Cathleen Pinkerton


Kristin Pinkerton


David Porvaznik


ary Rentschler Hannah Revels Karla Reyes Sarah Rhodes



S Congratulations to our Graduates!


Lauren Rivera


Emily Rodgers


Paula Romanenko


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 7


fer Norberg I


Kelly Ott


Ryan Ott





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


S E
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA[I SARASOIA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.



STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I I SARASOIA


Lr


Stephanie Schulz


Michae Seytried


ustin Shaner
Justin Shaner


Brooke Shipps


Alixandra Shortt


Phillip Simeoni Katherine Simms


Maaelyn >mitn


Michael Smith Walter Sostad Mick Spurlock


,...4 jii
rr^ ^ -^ ^ K


:nane :teele-wllnelm


Mackenzie Stewart


Brandon Sulzener
Brandon Sulzener


Benjamin Strall


SteDhanie Suttles


Caroline Sutton


Christina Swanson

irl


Nicholas Sypula


Jessica lapia


Austin Ihinnes


Sydney Ihinnes


'p
1


Lacee Toler
Congratulations
to ALL our
Graduating
Seniors.
Thank you for your
continued patronage;
we hope to see you
during your breaks!
The staff at ALL JAMES
GRIFFITH SALON
locations.




"So...who cuts your hair?"
Venice 941.484.2665
Boca Grande 941.964.4557
Sarasota 941.921.2665
49299?_j


Samantha Tornese


Sean Tully


David Voigt Drew Von Marschall


Joel Turner
;* B


Shyann Waggoner


Larsen Ullrich


sienna veigel


Melanie Wagner


Sebastian Uribe


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 8


Niki Wallace





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.



S E
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAMI HSARASO IA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL

SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.



St
STIAIE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAMI S .ARASOIA


Tvler Wampler


Keid Warbinaton


Kelly White


William Whitehead


Jacob Wildasin


Lawren Wilkins


r


Amber YonKer


JenniTer Lappula


Jack Zarling


Anarea Lavislan


Karrina .iemKe


ueena iinKana


VALEDICTORIAN
FROM PAGE 1


SALUTATORIAN
FROM PAGE 1


"However, if a B was a 90 (percent) I would have been 400th
in the class," said Pinkerton. "I am queen of 90s. Multiple times
I pulled it out by the skin of my teeth."
She will be attending the College of William and Mary in
Williamsburg, Va. She applied for early decision and has known
since early December that she was accepted.
"It's a small school, which I wanted, with great academics,"
said Pinkerton. "I read in a book that reviews colleges that the
student body is quirky but overall very friendly. I was like, it's
meant to be. It's just a perfect fit for me."
She found out about the college from her mom, Julie, who
works at the Rotary Futures College Resource Center at VHS.
"She's been the rock of the process of applying and making
sure everything is turned in on time," said Pinkerton.
She hasn't decided on a major yet.
"I know it's not going to be math or science," said Pinkerton.
"I want to do something I love. I love working with people. I love
English. I love reading. Maybe the communication/marketing
route. Also thought about being a special education teacher.
I'm all over the board. It changes week to week."
She has written her speech for graduation.
"It's definitely not the traditional valedictorian speech
because I am not the traditional valedictorian," said said. "It's
not serious at all."
Her being the valedictorian has surprised people.
"I got used to people being surprised," said Pinkerton. "I am
actually kind of happy because I am not putting off the air that I
am so smart. Happy that people are surprised."
Leaving Venice High after four years is bittersweet for her.
"Oh my gosh, I am graduating," said Pinkerton, who will
receive a few academic scholarships. "I still haven't wrapped
my mind around it. Happy because I love the school I am going
to but I don't know anyone going to that school. I love Venice
High but I didn't want a continuation of Venice High School for
four more years."
Pinkerton has been vice president of the National Honor
Society and head editor of school's newspaper, The Beat, and
was in student government for four years and Moose
Awareness Program for two years.
She also played basketball for three of her four years at VHS.
This past year she took off to focus on her academics.
"It was really hard because a lot of my best friends (play
basketball) and I have always played the sport," said Pinkerton.


She plans on keeping her business when she goes to college.
"Maybe expand more when I learn more about business and
marketing," said Loccisano.
Over the years, she has talked about nutrition in the Moose
Awareness Program.
"I go to elementary schools and talk about nutrition," said Loccisano.
"That is a really big part of my life. I've done so much research on it and
our business is based on it. It's something really important to me."
She is branching out and turning the program into a nonprofit
organization called Be Healthy Today.
"I'm hoping to keep it going and talk to everyone about it mothers,
kids, families," she said. "It's important for all ages."
Loccisano never thought about being at the top of her class.
"I don't think the ranking system is that important," said Loccisano. "I
have always strived to do my best and I am happy with this honor. People
kind of told me (that I was near the top). I saw it on transcript (for college)
and thought, that is so cool. Wow, I am No. 2. That is awesome."
Doing the best is what help motivate her.
"I like the feeling I get when I know I did the best on the assignment,"
she said.
Loccisano has never had anything lower than an A on a report card.
"I maybe had a B on a progress report in elementary school," said
Loccisano. "That killed me. I always try and get the highest A I can and
the highest percentage. I have to put in a lot of work."
Her academic motivation in school at a younger age came from her
parents, mom Sylvia Loccisano and stepdad Mitch Grove.
"They definitely set me up when I was younger," said Loccisano, who
has a sister, Amanda, 20, and brother, Alan, 13.
Outside of school, she likes to hang with friends but also also works at
a server at Scamotz Tomato Pies.
"I like to go to the beach," said Loccisano. "I like school. I think it's fun.
I like my business too. I really don't have a lot of free time."
One part of her life outside of school work is her musicality.
"I picked up the guitar a year ago and I'm really into singing and
playing it and the piano," said Loccisano, who plays and sings in her
family's business. "My dream since I was little is to be a star. I would
really love to be an entertainer. Make a CD and see what happens. I am
a singer/songwriter right now."
Clubs have been a big part of Loccisano's life while at VHS. She was
the president of the National Honor Society, secretary of the Key Club;
senator and historian for student government; writer, photographer and
business manager for the school newspaper, The Beat; and a member of
the Spanish Honor Society and Republican Club.


FREE APPRAISAL ON YOUR HOME ongratulation
CALL 941-488-6644 TODAY!
SPrice Your Home Accurately aiSS i 2012


* Obtain The Highest Sale Price
* Sell Faster
* Less Inconvenience


homeowners who sign a new Exclusive Right of Sale Listing Agreement with
'enice Shores Realty will be reimbursed the full cost of the appraisal not to
exceed $450 with the successful sale of the property. Homeowners must pay
he appraiser at the time of appraisal and will be reimbursed at the time of
lrinci Tho h m hn thpi i Miict nrocont rniinnn ;;t


Covi'tnue MakWing
Go*d 'D Ls ims
Wme are verq
PiiAZ of yUn.


closing. i ne homeowner may choose tneir appraiser. iviust present coupon at
time of listing appointment. Expires June 30, 2012.


Venice Shores Realty www.Live4Venice.com
211 Tamiami Trail S., Venice, FL 34285 (Island of Venice) VOTED 2011 BEST REAL ESTATE TEAM


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 9


Hi
e
t
ri


o-0


i~l Ti





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


SAE
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAI HSARASOIA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL
SECTION IS SPONSORED BY
STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


St
STFAE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANA I H SARASO IA


Ii"


Kaitlyn Lasey


vante tasola


uavid utro


Antnony Ferainana


Nicole Nicholson Carley Ottman


Joseph Paschke


Jillian Sacco


Nicholas Seed


Bridget Wagner


Stephen Butalla


Jason Cantield


Kobin Chastain


ZacharyCossey


Nicole Menke


Ashley Reyes Kelly Roach Matias Rodriguez


Andrea Slowik


Daniel Stegenga


D D -
6i <~
V, ce,

'^BBrnL
Christan
-laschoralf


Sarah Cates


Corey McMahon


I Visit Our Showroom S. 1853 Tamiami Trail, Venice, 342931


Time Flies


It seems like it was just yesterday
when you were learning to ride a bike,
play soccer, play guitar ...
and now you're graduating.

There are no limits
to what you can do!
Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 10


lyler Bassett


Demi Tozer


Luke O'Brien


Jessica Page





A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


S(t
STATF COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
MANAI SARASOIA


2012 GRADUATION SPECIAL

SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

STATE COLLEGE OF FLORIDA


A Legacy of Excellence,
A Future of Innovation.


StE
STIATIE CO I.lFGF OF FlORIDA
MANA IA- K A HAA IA


Kathleen Allen


Anna Beatty


Sarah Benderson


Nicholas Corizzi


Amber Cross


Conor Davenport


Nolan Deming


Chloe Dietrich


Christopher Dower


Daniel Dower


Joseph Dumas


Jonathan Fischler


Michael Fisher


Christina Frost
Christina Frost


Ashton Garber


Austin Garraus


Andrew Grass


Alexa Grooms


Alexis Harrison


Nathan Helgesen


Sophie Hollingsworth


Alexandra Krongel Scott Kuffer


Mathew Lipman


Julianna Lyle


Rachel Lyle


Thomas Marryott


Abigail Matthews


Joseph Mculannahan


Alexander merrill


Kachel Ollviern


Amanda Townsend


Larissa rarere


Morgan Wallace


Stevie Peacock

%rame

Their

Success

Congars!
2012 Grads


941-488-3029


114 Jokomiasge..,
penice


James Kock
Dadd

'P!G'ER $~Z

Congratulations
Class of 2012
It's 4What You
Want It To Be!
941-244-9440
Burgers, Wings
& More!
545 Tainiiani Tr. S
"On The Island"


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 11


Leland Bond


Alina Charles

















































































SCharl eSo N SPAPERSPtV
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice


G VENolier Sun
LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S NO.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER


sun
Sun Coast Media Group


Graduation 2012 May 23, 2012 Page 12







IJPIl/I


I! li Il IVJ lV


t


I;- -*
-- t.- --;-... --.. . ...-. ...-*
....;. ...-. ..... - i "


11 -


ri
U .11


17 1 *
pr I ..





Special section of the Sun


The question I always get asked


It happens every year.
It is as consistent as
the sun rising in the
east, out-of-state license
plates on the road af-
ter Thanksgiving, major
league baseball teams
training in the spring.
This is the time of year
when I get the question,
"Are we going to be 'hit'
this season?" I was just
asked recently by a nice
lady in Publix. I could tell
by her expression that my
rapid-fire answer to her
question was not the one
she expected. "Nobody
knows" is my stock
answer. I didn't mean to
sound uninterested or
uninformed, but that was


JIM FARRELL


the correct response to
that important question.
While nobody can know
if a tropical system will
affect Southwest Florida
this season, we do know
the probabilities. Let's
open the climatologic
books and review. In any


given year, Southwest
Florida has a 21.6 percent
chance of one or more
named storms making
landfall, an 8.1 percent
chance of one or more
hurricanes making
landfall and a 4.6 percent
chance of one or more
major hurricanes making
landfall. (Let me cite my
source: http://landfalld-
isplay.geolabvirtualmaps.
com/). What do you think
of those odds?
Actually, it may not
matter what the odds are
because as long as there
is any chance of a major
hurricane we should
be prepared. Perhaps
you have heard that the


2012 hurricane season is
forecast to be less active
than last year's 19 tropi-
cal storms, seven hur-
ricanes and four major
hurricanes. Even better,
this season is supposed
to be less active than
the average season of 12
tropical storms and six
hurricanes.
While the seasonal
outlook is encouraging,
we must remember where
the forecast skill is. I have
no doubt there is forecast
skill in predicting the
total number of tropical
storms and hurricanes
in an upcoming season.
JIM 18


QI
-4


1


Over 75 exhibitors:

* Hurricane protection and supplies
* Government agencies
* Insurance and financial services
* Healthcare
* Home & garden products/services
* Automotive products/services
* Marine products /services


The 2012 Hurricane Preparation Guide is a supplement to the
23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte, FL 33980-2100 ,


Charlotte circulation...................................941-206-1300
Charlotte advertising................................... 941-206-1214
North Port circulation/advertising................ 941-429-3000
Englewood circulation/advertising...............941-681-3000
DeSoto circulation/advertising...................863-494-2434


E-mail info@


Saturday, May 19, 2012

10 am. to 3 p.m.


Charlotte Harbor Event &
Conference Center,
75 Taylor Street, Punta Gorda


Hurricane preparedness seminars at
10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Featuring WINK-TV meteorologists, Wayne
Sallade of Charlotte County Emergency
Management, and the American Red Cross


Sun Newspapers
Chairman...................................... Derek Dunn-Rankin
Publisher........................................ David Dunn-Rankin
Advertising Manager..................................... Tom Lovasko
SExecutive Editor..............................................Chris Porter
Section Editor........................................ Garry Overbey
sun-herald.com Cover....................... .................... Samantha Benoit


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 1





Special section of the Sun


Atlantic hurricane forecast:



Storms close to the coast


By MEGHAN EVANS
ACCUWEATHER METEOROLOGIST

AccuWeather's 2012
Atlantic Hurricane Season
forecasts 12 named tropi-
cal storms, five named
hurricanes and two major
hurricanes.
The 2012 hurricane
forecast is near-normal
for the Atlantic Basin.
Predicting exactly
where storms will make
landfall in the U.S. would
be extremely difficult, but
there are some indica-
tions of areas where
storms may brew and
coasts that may be vul-
nerable based on weather
patterns anticipated this
summer.
"Home-grown" storms
in the western Atlantic
and Gulf of Mexico, near
the U.S. Coast, are a pos-
sibility this year.
"Fronts coming down
during June and July
could cause energy to
break off and develop
tropically," Paul Pastelok,
AccuWeather.com lead
long-range forecaster,
said.
"Another big storm
is possible for the East
Coast with heavy, flood-
ing rain," Pastelok added.
"With a ridge (of high
pressure) over the Rockies
and a trough (of low pres-
sure) over the Great Lakes
and Appalachians, the
East Coast will be open
for a hit (this summer).
Of course, this depends
on where the storms
form."
Although the overall
forecast numbers for


2012 are lower than 2011,
AccuWeather.com meteo-
rologists warn that it only
takes one major hit to the
U.S. to have a huge and
devastating impact.
"People should take
preliminary precautions
and make preparations
for hurricane season. Get
a hurricane plan together
and get hurricane sup-
plies in order, such as
materials to mitigate
property damage. Make
a family plan for evacu-
ation, including what to
bring," Kottlowski said.
The 1992 Atlantic
Hurricane Season is an
example of how overall
numbers can lead to a
false sense of security
and one storm can break
"hurricane amnesia" for
places that have not had
a direct hit in years.
The tropical season
started slow and there
were low numbers
of named systems in
1992. During the entire
season there was one
subtropical storm, three
tropical depressions, two
tropical storms and four
hurricanes.


MCT GRAPHICS


RANS
B23S"fi '


Atlantic storm season
Forecasters at Colorado State University
are predicting a below-average
number of tropical storms for the
Atlantic region in 2012.
Atlantic
Major hurricane cean
landfall prediction
Chance of 2012 storm names
a major hurricane Alberto Kirk
(Category 3-5) --East Beryl Leslie
making landfall Coast Chris Michael
U S. Debby Nadine
2%) Ernesto Oscar
Florence Patty
Caribbean Gordon Rafael
Gulf \ Helene Sandy
oast Isaac Tony
M JJoyce Valerie
SWilliam

Caribbean Sea
Now 2012 compares
012 co res Annual average
Predicted named storms from 1950-2000
. .eeeseee 10 Named storms
4 Predicted hurricanes *********4 9.6
2 Major hurricanes Major hurricanes
Source: Colorado State University **0 5.9 @2012 MCT


Page 2


Friday, May 18, 2012




Special section of the Sun


A


S_~~
Ut:, ~i


..r -'

i
7P h
71
(


Iij3


* d
* ,


A.-:: -


0-
vat'
a


1I U m f


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 3


~3tr




Special section of the Sun


The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale


The Saffir-Simpson
Hurricane Scale rates a hur-
ricane's wind intensity on a
scale from 1-5, with 5 being
the worst.
Category 1: Winds 74-95
mph; coastal flooding, dam-
age to trees, unanchored
mobile homes, shrubbery,
poorly constructed signs,
piers.
Category 2: Winds
96-110 mph; coastal and
low-lying flooding; damage
to roofs, doors, windows,
landscaping; considerable
damage to mobile homes,
signs and piers.
Category 3: Winds 111-
129 mph; structural damage
to small homes and utility
buildings; mobile homes
and signs destroyed; foliage


blown off trees; rising flood
waters 3 to 5 hours before
storm; areas continuously
lower than 5 feet above sea
level could be flooded 8
miles inland; evacuations
of low-lying homes may be
required.
Category 4: Winds 130-
156 mph; extensive dam-
age to roofs; landscaping
destroyed; total destruction
of mobile homes; major
flood damage; flooding in
low-lying areas could reach
several miles inland.
Category 5: Winds
stronger than 157 mph; total
roof failure; major structural
damage; landscaping wiped
out; extensive window
and door damage; major
flooding.


FILE PHOTO
A striking reminder of a hurricane's destructive capability.


uminum


nyl


* Screen Room Supplies

SComposite Panels

Gutter Supplies


Building Products, Inc.

Aluminum Soffit

Vinyl Siding


941-766-1115
www.avbpinc.net
1282 Market Circle, Unit 1


Port Charlotte, FL 33953 ., .: --' ]


&


'51'hh]11'


Page 4


Friday, May 18, 2012




Special section of the Sun


ER Extra" Online Wait Times
When you positively need emergency care, the last
thing you want to do is wait around for treatment.





Just something Extra to make your ER experience positively great.


Charlotte Regional
Medical Center
809 East Marion Avenue I Punta Gorda, Florida 33950 941-639-3131


P Peace River
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
2500 Harbor Boulevard I Port Charlotte, Florida 33952 941-766-4122


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 5




Special section of the Sun


Sale Good For A
Limited Time Only!

1 8$39.95
I I
A/C Check and

System Evaluation!!
S (add an eval. of your gas or pool pump heater
for an additional $24.95) Expires 6/30/12
I .


HAYWARD'


* FREE ESTIMATES ON NEW EQUIPMENT
24 HR. EMERGENCY SERVICES

FINANCING AVAILABLE
6 MONTHS OR
12 MONTHS SAME AS CASH
www.sharkeysair.com
e-mail: sharkeysair@comcast.net

Sharkey's Air, Inc.
Phone: 941-625-2143
Toll Free: 877-625.2143


License #CAC058014


Member of the
Chamber of Commerce


I I PI H POOLPRODUCTS I


Q3[nnB=c?


ow many hurri-
canes? Will it be
busier than normal
or not nearly as active?
It doesn't really matter,
because as we learned 20
years ago, it only takes
one.
It will be 20 years in
late August (24) since
Hurricane Andrew
slammed into southern-
most Miami-Dade County,
inflicting damage that
at the time surpassed
anything we had seen.
Andrew, 10 years later
classified as a Category 5
storm, was South Florida's
first major hurricane in
28 years. You see, they
don't happen very often,
but when they do the
pain they cause can last a
lifetime.
August will also mark
eight years since Charley
took his infamous side
trip into our area while
supposedly heading
for Tampa. He brought
violent winds and a $3.2
billion damage total. The
one thing he didn't bring,
nor did Donna 44 years
earlier, was storm surge.
Often misunderstood,
storm surge is the ocean,
or in our case the Gulf of
Mexico, coming in your
back door. The sea rises
ahead of and to the right
of an approaching storm.
Charley was too small,
moving too fast and was
too close to the coast
as he came up from the
South. Donna passed east
of the Punta Gorda and
Port Charlotte area and


*1


WAYNE SALLADE


pushed all the water from
the Peace River.
The storm surge is
responsible for taking 90
percent of the lives lost
worldwide in hurricanes,
typhoons and cyclones.
The water rises quickly
and overruns the land,
cutting off roads and
flooding homes. Detailed
models of various storm
tracks show us that it
wouldn't take much of a
hurricane to drive 10 to 12
feet of water (or more) up
Charlotte Harbor and the
Peace and Myakka rivers.
Let's say you live near
the Cultural Center of
Charlotte County and
continue to think there's
no way water from the
Gulf could reach you.
You'd better think again.
If you're in that part of
Port Charlotte, you live
in the B zone for evacu-
ations, identified now by
reflective (orange) vinyl
collars on stop signs
that will be used to alert
residents when they are at
risk. Those closest to the
water will find red collars
WAYNE 18


Hurricane Season:


Busy or not, it


only takes one


Page 6


Friday, May 18, 2012


SOfLAR LoEADY[.
A/ UNMoIoT~S o!
-GENiEOAO RSi lT l I
nCiOOLBING/EAI
& POOL HEAT PUM
SPECIALIST l0^^
- GS R ELECsTRC -




Special section of the Sun


NUMBERS TO KNOW
EMERGENCY
911 (during a hurricane, do not use 911 unless it is life-threatening)
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
Charlotte County Emergency Management: 941-833-4000
Charlotte County Sheriff's Office: 941-639-2101
Charlotte County Fire and EMS: 941-833-5600
Charlotte County Public Works: 575-3600
Punta Gorda Police Department: 639-4111
Punta Gorda Fire Department: 575-5529
Englewood Area Fire Control District: 941-474-3311
Englewood Water District: 941-474-3217
American Red Cross: 941-629-4345

SARASOTA COUNTY
Sarasota County Emergency Management: 941-861-5000
Sarasota County Sheriff's Office: 941-861-5800, SCSO non-emergency assistance:
941-316-1201, North County office in Sarasota: 941-861-4081, South County
office in Venice: 941-861-1704
Sarasota County Fire & EMS: 941-861-5000
Sarasota County Public Works: 941-861-5000


North Port Fire Department: 941-240-8150
North Port Police Department: 941-426-3111, 429-7300
North Port Utilities 24/7 emergency: 941-240-8000
American Red Cross: 941-379-9300

DESOTO COUNTY
Emergency Management: 863-993-4831
Arcadia Police Department: 863-993-4660
DeSoto County Sheriff's Office: 863-993-4700
DeSoto County Fire & Rescue: 863-993-4842
Animal Control: 863-993-4855
American Red Cross: 863-494-2348
FEDERAL/STATE AGENCIES
Florida Division of Emergency Management: 850-413-9969,1-800-226-4329 TTY
Florida Department of Insurance: 850-413-2842
Florida Power& Light: 941-639-1106
National Weather Service: 813-645-2323
Small Business Administration: 1-800-827-5722
Florida Department of Elder Affairs: 1-800-96-ELDER, 850-414-2000
Florida Department of Financial Services: 1-800-342-2762
National Flood Insurance Program: 1-800-427-4661,1-800-621-FEMA (disaster
assistance)
Citizens Property Insurance Corporation: 1-888-685-1555


SLaser Gum Therapy

Do you have bad breath, bleeding
or sore gums?

NO CUT, NO SEW, NO FEAR!

SUSAN R. BROOKS, DDS, PA

General and


Cosmetic Dentisry

* Implant Dentistry
* Crowns & Bridges
Fillings & Extractions
Teeth Whitening
Dentures and
Same Day Denture Repair
in house lab


Dr. Susan R. Brooks


New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
Financing Options Available
We Accept Insurance


www.susanrbrooksdds.com
3440 CONWAY BLVD. SUITE #2A
PORT CHARLOTTE
Office Hours
Monday-Thursday 8AM 5PM
Friday and Saturday by Appointment


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 7





Special section of the Sun


JIM
FROM PAGE 1

Consideration of El Nino/
La Nina, sea surface tem-
peratures, salinity, pres-
sure patterns and other
predictors have a good
track record. The prob-
lem is that while there
is skill in predicting how
many tropical cyclones
will form, there is very
little comparative skill in
forecasting where they will
go. So let's remember that
even if the 2012 hurricane
season turns out to be
below average, it will be
above average to us if we
have a major hurricane
make landfall.
So if "nobody knows,"
what can we do? Here
comes another stock
answer. Browse this hur-
ricane guide and become
familiar with its contents.
Inside, we have compiled
the necessary informa-
tion to help you through
this hurricane season.
Keep this guide handy
so that you can refer to
it if Southwest Florida is
threatened this season.
Together, we can make
2012 a safe season.

Jim Farrell is chief
meteorologist for WINK-TV.


WAYNE
FROM PAGE6

nearby, while upland
streets (Port Charlotte,
Deep Creek and South
County) are marked in
yellow and green.
Volunteers from various
groups and Emergency
Management staff have
installed more than 9,400
of these markers across
Charlotte County. There
may not be one on your
corner, but I'll bet there's
one pretty close to you.
We started the project a
year ago by doing the ma-
jor corridors (Edgewater,
Harbor, Peachland, etc.)
first and then work-
ing our way into each
neighborhood.
When an evacuation is
deemed necessary, we will
do it by zones (A, B, C, D)
that are identified by the
colors red, orange, yellow
and green. Should red (A)
and orange (B) be told it's
time to go, those residents
should think about whom
they know in yellow and
green and plan to go there.
Don't be a hero, know
your zone.
Wayne Sallade is
Charlotte County's
director of emergency
management.


MIU\UURDO IML O& AU C U 'LLT1 LM
"IBestnerv ic e in Touwun i "n


Nitrogen lire Filling Service
SOPvicO TPFck Now Available!



MON-FRI: 7:30AM 6PM
740 Tamiami Trl Port Charlotte, FL
5 Blocks North Of Toledo Blade Blvd. (On US41 &Venango)
MURDOCKTIREANDAUTO@EMBARQMAIL.COM


... 7,






A


L5'


SUN FILE PHOTO
Robert Skidmore, Charlotte County Commissioner, kicks off the
county's evacuation collar program by installing the first one Thursday
morning on a stop sign at the West County Administration Building at
6868 San Casa Drive, Englewood.


s28/l Bulk Mulch
Providing. ..... .. .952 I .. ... l
With Aoupon CanSbe combined with other ers or coupons Ep 70/12


100 Bag Limit
SMurdock Stones Etc. *941-629-6665 941-698 9769
S iWh CouS. pon CanP becombned wlth oherofers orcouSpns Expl 0/1

94-296 6 94 6 8-976
TOLFI 6-7-6SWBMroktnst-o


I '41 r) ,r,' z mr u o,~ ir. r'r'Nimr, r )IVOC St~rQ
WHOESAE IREPRIES- CMPLTEAUT REAI oflo
0,3 rly 00Xf~ 00#0.


Page 8


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


Hurricane protection alternatives


By RACHAEL TAFT
STAFF WRITER

Eight years after
Hurricane Charley,
many Charlotte County
residents are beginning to
get nervous about bump-
ing up their hurricane
protection.
"A lot of people are feel-
ing like they've stretched
their luck and they've
waited long enough (to
protect their homes),"
Active Door & Window
owner Ed Volk said.
While steel hurricane
panels are still the cheap-
est form of hurricane
protection, they are
quickly becoming a thing


of the past. The panels
are heavy, can be difficult
and time-consuming
to install, and need to
be stored when not in
use. Clear storm panels
are one alternative to
the typical steel panels.
They can be removed,
but many homeowners
leave them up year round.
Impact-resistant windows
and doors are a more
attractive and permanent
alternative, but impact
glass can be a pricey
investment.
Wind abatement
screens, or hurricane
fabric, are a newer option
available at an economi-
cal price. Screens comply


SUN FILE PHOTO
Retrofitting houses with the latest hurricane protection can make a
lot of difference.


with Florida
Building Code
standards, but
the fabrics may
vary in strength,
so homeown- I
ers should shop
around. Most
screens claim to
block 97 percent
of wind and
rain, but Volk
cautioned that
if the glass beneath the
screens breaks it may al-
low water into the home.
Most screens are mounted
and must be put up and
removed, but they are
lightweight and easy to
store.
Perhaps the most popu-
lar form of hurricane pro-
tection is the accordion
shutter. When Charley hit,
some residents had been
so used to storm threats
they didn't put their storm
panels up in time, Volk
said. Reasonably priced
and easy to use, a home-
owner can close accordion
shutters over windows,
doors or the lanai in just a
matter of seconds.
Rolling shutters, which
roll down over an open-
ing, are a similar but more
expensive option. They
can be deployed at the
push of a button with the
motorized option, which
makes them a good option
for less able-bodied resi-
dents. Bahama shutters
are another alternative.
The shutters remain over
the windows or angle out
as awnings and are avail-
able in various colors to
offer a decorative touch.
Protecting all the
openings of an average
home typically costs
between $2,000 and
$6,000, Volk estimated,


SUN PHOTO BY RACHAEL TAFT
Hurricane fabric is a newer form
of protection some homeowners
are using to secure their homes.

with prices ranging from
$6 per square foot for
steel panels to more than
$200 per square foot for
some rolling shutters.
The insurance premium
discounts a homeowner
could receive from pro-
tecting their home could
eventually cover much of
the cost, he added. If the
home is found to have
all openings adequately
protected in a wind
mitigation inspection,
the homeowner could
qualify for significant
savings. Protecting all
the openings of the home
is important, because if
one area blows open, the
entire house could go.
"Don't get caught
unprepared," Volk said. He
added that the garage is
also an opening to think
about. A large percent-
age of garage doors were
wiped out in Charlotte
County during Hurricane
Charley, Volk estimated,
so homeowners should
consider bracing their
garage door or replacing it
with an impact-resistant
garage door.


Email: rtaft@sun-herald.com


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 9





Special section of the Sun


Prepared to stay put


W ith a hurricane
on the horizon,
most people go
somewhere out of harm's
way.
Reporters and editors
go to work.
This is our third hurri-
cane season in Charlotte,
and I figured it time to
talk to my wife, Sandy,
about her blowing town
while I slogged through
the wind and the rain to
get the story.
"I'm not going any-
where," she said when I
asked her what our plans
should be. "What? Me
and the cat take off for
Jacksonville? Hmmm. I
mean, Jacksonville?"
Jacksonville was hy-
pothetical but I got her
drift. Sandy also happens
to be a freelance pho-
tographer. "I'd probably
run and take photos," she
said. "After I hauled all
the stuff off the lanai."
We use our lanai as
storage space. We still
haven't learned to the
true meaning of Florida
downsizing.
"I'd fill the tub with
water," she decided.


i IVwri
RUSTY PRAY
"Why?"
"So I'd have some water
to rinse off with. I'm
not going to do it in my
Perrier. I'm not taking any
Marine showers."
A hurricane is on its
way and one of the first
things she would do
would be take a bath.
Hmmm, indeed.
We started to go over
a checklist of supplies
we'd need in case of a
hurricane. Nothing on the
list surprised us, and we
already have much of it.
The list said we needed
enough food for three
to seven days, including
fruit juices.
"We need our Sunny D,"
she said.
"We don't drink Sunny


D," I pointed out.
"You don't have to
refrigerate it."
"Oh."
She started thinking out
loud.
"I'd get some dry ice
to keep the beer cold.
We have a bottle opener,
too, so we'll be able to
get the cork out of the
wine bottle." She then
broke into a rendition of
Mary-Chapin Carpenter's
"Down at the Twist and
Shout."
Now that's what I
call planning for an
emergency.
Continuing down the
list, I came to blankets
and pillows. She just
mushed up her face at
that one. Too obvious to
warrant a comment.
I came to special items
for babies and the elderly.
"No, we don't need any
of that. I'm old but I'm
not that old."
How about a flashlight
and batteries. "We have
one. We need more. We
need more batteries, too."
A radio that runs on
batteries? "We have two.
I don't know if either of


them works."
Fully charged cell
phones? Check.
Cash? With small bills?
"Oh, geez, we'll have to
get that. We don't usually
carry any."
I figured our impor-
tant documents are safe
because we have them in
a strong box. But Sandy
pointed out that the
box is fireproof but not
waterproof. So we'll make
sure we store the box in a
plastic tub.
We finished the check-
list, and despite our
lighthearted approach to
the project, we learned
something. With apolo-
gies to George Carlin, we
need more stuff.
It was a good exercise.
One that's worthwhile for
everyone in the county.
And don't forget to fill
the tub. You can never be
too clean in a hurricane.
Rusty Pray is editor of
the Charlotte Sun. He can
be reached at rpray@sun-
herald.com.


- AT AMBIANCE SALON SUITES

Dawn Hamilton,
Nail Tech /Sylist/BI Wilson for Facia& Nails




1665 Tamiami Trl* Unit 7 Port Charotte, FL
WWW.HAIRANDNAILSBYDAWN.COM
dmcjh4448@verizon.net
mm mmm m u I m


Wei Adver Ie In P


FOR ANY HEARING


LOSS: No Loss Limitation


riiil ri i k -ij ,--

S99' e Lifestyle Hearing
8ea 2221-C Tamiami Tr
Any Size or Style (941) 625-3366


Page 10


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE STORM
BEFORE THE STORM:
Purchase all hurricane supplies.
Gather all necessary documents and supplies.
Make sure all phone numbers including insurance companies, impor-
tant agencies and relatives are with your hurricane kit.
Secure boats and vehicles.
Fill gas tanks.
Know your evacuation route and destination.
Before lowering a TV antenna or satellite dish, make sure to turn off
and unplug the TV, and avoid power lines.
Turn off all swimming pool pumps and filters, and wrap them in
waterproof materials.
Turn your refrigerator and freezer to their coldest settings ahead of
time to keep food fresh longer in the event of a power outage.
Secure property by protecting windows and doors.
Bring in all outdoor furniture and items.
Notify local officials of those with special needs.
Fill bathtubs and sinks for extra water to use for the toilet or washing.
Listen to radio or television reports.
Turn off and unplug electronics such as computers, microwaves and
smaller appliances.
Follow all evacuation orders.

DURING THE STORM
If you stay at home during a hurricane, you should take the following
precautions in addition to those mentioned in the "Before the Storm"
section.
Stay away from windows and doors, even if they are covered. If you
live in a two-story home, go to an interior first-floor room.
As the storm approaches, move your family to an interior section of
the house such as a hallway, bathroom or closet.
Close all interior doors and brace exterior doors if possible.
Lie on the floor, under a sturdy object if possible. Some protection is
afforded by covering with a mattress during the height of the storm.
If the eye of the storm passes over, it will be calm for a short period
of time. REMAIN INDOORS! As soon as the eye passes over, winds will
increase rapidly to hurricane force from the opposite direction.
Remain calm. It may take several hours for the storm to pass.
Listen to local media for the most current information.


INIIl IuI felaoin-'.
Real iud i)ahlinel% i%,, parfltle hardd'
Chlite '(li'In tolht,
* NEW GRANITE COUNTERTOPS
Chliite Irl'hit'f%
* NEW UNDERMOUNT STAINLESS S
* NEW KITCHEN FAUCET .i, i, i, Alltt,
* INSTALLATION OF APPLIANCES


FREE ESTIMATES 416260
C.Iner S,:e- .c.np n- 94142O


THE DAY AFTER: RULES TO FOLLOW TO STAY SAFE
If you can get water, boil it before you use it. Charlotte County Utili-
ties will likely issue an indefinite boil water order for residents after a
storm.
Inventory all damaged items before clearing away debris.
Make as many temporary repairs as you can, but look out for
hazards gas leaks, electrical problems or structural damage before
proceeding.
Save all property remnants and receipts for any items you buy to
repair your home or business for insurance purposes.
Report any downed electrical wires or any wires that are sparking by
calling (800) 4-OUTAGE(468-8243).
Don't drive through flooded roads. Driving through water can cause
vehicles to break down and can leave drivers in a precarious situation,
especially if driving over terrain that cannot be seen.
Be wary of carbon monoxide gas hazards. Engines, generators
and some stoves people use when the electricity is out give off carbon
monoxide gas that can prove poisonous. Burning wood or charcoal also
may cause dangerous fumes.
If you're returning to a home you have evacuated or beginning the
cleanup process, look out for gas leaks, roof damage, water damage or
other structural concerns as well as downed power lines and any interior
electrical problems before beginning work.
Don't eat food that may have spoiled in a power outage or that was
exposed to flood water.
Pay attention to media reports on the radio, television or in newspa-
pers.
Avoid candles. Use flashlights and battery-powered lanterns instead.
Don't walk or play in standing water
Disinfect and dry out buildings to avoid mold or mildew damage.
Protect against mosquitoes; wear mosquito repellent.
Be careful on the roads. Many local streets are covered with
debris, from twigs to turned-over trucks. Be especially cautious when
approaching intersections with inoperable streetlights.
Check on neighbors, especially the elderly.
Don't walk around outside in the dark. With streetlights out, you may
not notice a downed power line in your path.

Sources: The Centers for Disease Control, Florida Power & Light and
the Independent Insurance Agents of America.
















2886 TAMIAMI TRL* PORT CHARLOTTE
WWWMRCLOCKSHOPCOM
HOURS:MO-RCICSH CO3-5m


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 11








Be prepared for damage ... and avoid surprises


Besides the requisite
flashlights, batteries,
drinking water and
non-perishable food, con-
sider adding the following
to your hurricane prepared-
ness list as soon as possible:
a general contractor or
home builder; a plumber;
an air conditioning con-
tractor; an electrician; a
door and window installer;
and, if appropriate, a septic
contractor, and pool and spa
contractor.
Knowing whom to call
BEFORE a disaster as well as
what's covered under your
insurance policy can make
all the difference in avoid-
ing costly impulsive repair
decisions or being surprised
after a hurricane or flood.
Leslie Weed, executive
officer of the nonprofit
Charlotte-DeSoto Building
Industry Association, can
refer you to more than 300
area licensed contractors
- including the key trades
above as well as aluminum,
drywall and roofing contrac-
tors and companies that
specialize in debris removal,
garage doors, gutters and
painting. She can also
answer questions about
insurance.
"We're not just a network-
ing organization," Weed
said. "All our members care
about their industry and the
community."
C-D BIA members serve
all of Southwest Florida
and can be found at www.
cdbia.com or by calling
941-625-0804.
While the organization
has done a lot of "heavy lift-
ing" in verifying appropriate
state and/or county licen-
sure, there's still additional
vetting required.
Check to see if a contrac-
tor or company has any
complaints filed with the


.D r-
DAVID MORRIS


state's primary clearing-
house by calling the Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services at
800-HELP-FLA (435-7352)
and the Better Business
Bureau of Southwest Florida
at www.westflorida.bbb.org
or by calling 727-535-5522.
Don't just look at the BBB
letter rating, but consider
the number and types of
complaints received.
Also, check consumer
complaint websites includ-
ing www.complaintsboard.
com, www.complaints.com
and www.consumeraffairs.
com. Additionally, authenti-
cate references and testimo-
nials, and trust the recom-
mendations of friends.
To verify licensure your-
self, make sure the company
is properly licensed with
the state and county where
the work is being done,
understanding that not all
contracting services require
a state license. For those
where it is required, contact
the Department of Business
& Professional Regulation
at 850-487-1395 or online
at www.MyFloridaLicense.
com. County licensure can
be verified in Charlotte
County at 941-743-1209; in
Sarasota at 941- 861-5000;
and in DeSoto at 863- 993-
4811. Before hiring anyone,
get everything in writing and
read it twice before sign-
ing. Don't be embarrassed


to ask questions or feel
pressured into making an
uncomfortable decision.
Remember, consumers have
three business days (includ-
ing Saturday) to cancel IN
WRITING a sale made in
the home or any place other
than the seller's fixed loca-
tion business establishment.
And never pay in full up
front. Hold back a portion
and then promptly pay the
balance upon completion.
Now to insurance.
Unlike the wind dam-
age caused by Hurricane
Charley, tropical storm Fay
in 2008 was responsible for
massive flood damage, al-
though our area was spared.
However, many Florida ho-
meowners while covered
for hurricane damage may
be denied insurance cover-
age for water damage.
Here's why. If hurricane
winds blow out your win-
dows and rain causes water
damage, your homeowner's
policy has you covered since
the wind was the proximate
cause of the damage. In
other words, there wouldn't
have been water damage if it
hadn't been for the wind.
But most insurance
companies will deny a claim
if it's determined that water
damage was caused directly
by flooding, calling that an
"excluded peril."
If you have a mortgage
and live in what FEMA
determines is a "high risk"
flood zone, getting flood
insurance isn't an option.
You're required by the lender
to purchase a policy. If you
live in a "moderate to low
risk" zone, flood insurance
isn't required. And regard-
less of risk zone, if your
home is mortgage-free, you
don't have to get it.
"The peril of flood is
excluded from the standard


homeowners policy, and
nearly half of all floods
occur outside of federally
designated flood areas," said
Jim Nolan Jr., president of
Punta Gorda's Nolan Family
Insurance.
That's most likely accord-
ing to the National Flood
Insurance Program be-
cause all hurricanes weaken
to tropical storms and move
inland. The threat of tor-
rential rain and high wind
over large areas intensifies
the risk of flooding. A tropi-
cal storm can produce more
rainfall than a category 5
hurricane.
"As tropical storms move
inland, rainfall dumped in
short timeframes can result
in flash flooding that can
last up to a week or more,"
explains the NFIP. "Only
a few inches of water can
cause thousands of dollars
of damage."
NFIP statistics show the
average premium for a
yearly flood insurance policy
is around $558. Compare
that to average flood insur-
ance claims from 1999 to
2008 of almost $50,000.
"Flood rates are the same
regardless of who writes
the flood policy," Nolan
said. "There are, however, a
number of companies that
will give you a discount on
your homeowner's insur-
ance if they also write your
flood insurance."
Residential and com-
mercial property owners
in lower risk areas may be
eligible for a less expensive
policy.
Homeowners, condo-
minium owners and even
renters can buy National
Flood Insurance any time
including those in non-
ground-floor units because
even if there is no water
damage, buildings can be


Page 12


Special section of the Sun


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


uninhabitable due to dam-
aged foundations.
There's usually a 30-day
waiting period after the
premium is paid before the
policy becomes effective.
To find an insurance agent
or get information, visit
www.floodsmart.gov or call
the NFIP referral center at
800-427-2419.
As general insurance
reminders, Nolan said a
storm has to be a named
hurricane for the high hurri-
cane deductible to apply. "If
it only becomes a tropical
storm, then your regular
all-other peril deductible
applies," he said.
Also, because it varies
widely between companies,
Nolan suggested checking
to see how your pool cage
is covered for hurricane
damage.
Finally, remember that


Florida law prohibits
extreme increases in the
price of food, water, hotels,
ice, gasoline, lumber and
equipment needed as a
direct result of an officially
declared emergency. If you
suspect price gouging,
call the Attorney General's
hotline at 866-9-NO-SCAM
(966-7226).
Read David's column in
the Sun every Monday.
For consumer issues,
contact David Morris, con-
sumer advocate c/o the Sun,
23170 Harborview Road,
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980,
email dmorris@sun-herald.
com or leave a message at
941-206-1114.

SUN FILE PHOTO
Homeowners should save all
receipts from repairs made after
a hurricane.


You may already know us as Storm Smart
Industries and GoEnergySmart. We have
brought these two entities together under
our new brand, The Smart Companies. This
hurricane season there's no telling what could
happen, but with our comprehensive range
of storm-protection solutions, you can be
prepared. Smart Companies offers certified
protection at every price level, from our Storm
Catcher Hurricane Screens" to high-quality
impact-glass solutions. You'll never look at


ShMART

THE WISE CHOICE FOR YOUR HOME
PROTECTION I TECHNOLOGY I SOLUTIONS

SARASOTA CHARLOTTE
LEE COLLIER

(239) 274-2752


storms the same way again.

IC. STORM STORM G ENERGY
5 0 ASMAR sAHER SMART


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 13


-~





Special section of the Sun


Nutrition key in post-hurricane recovery efforts


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

One of the most important
preparations you can make for
your family during hurricane
season is making sure the
cupboard is stocked with the
best and most nutritious foods
available.
With the power likely
out and the community in
possible disarray, it's doubtful
a grocery store or a fast food
joint will be open in time to
answer the call of a growling
stomach.
Instead, your home should
be fortified against pending
hunger with any number of
healthy options, including
low-sodium canned foods,
granola bars and dried fruits


and nuts.
Doing so will ensure you
have the energy to start
putting things back together
after the storm passes and the
winds calm.
"People feel a little over-
whelmed when planning
for an emergency," said Kim
Hayek, clinical nutrition
manager at Fawcett Memorial
Hospital. "Choosing healthier
items is always better in order
to make sure you're getting
enough energy when dealing
with that emergency."
Items such as canned fruits
are important to have on
hand, but make sure you're
buying canned fruit that's
packed in water or juice, not
in heavy syrup, Hayek added.
Hayek also recommended


having a backup fuel source
like propane for cooking. But
if that's not an option then
Hayek suggests high-protein
canned foods that are palat-
able while cold but are low in
sodium, such as canned tuna
and chicken.
"People need to make sure
they're stocking energy-dense
and calorie-dense foods,"
Hayek said.
Wayne Sallade, director
of emergency management
for Charlotte County said all
homes should be stocked with
72 hours worth of nonperish-
able foods during hurricane
season.
It can take as long as three
days for emergency respond-
ers to mobilize and bring
food into an area affected


by a hurricane, according to
Sallade.
It took roughly 20 hours for
food to be brought in after
Hurricane Charley in 2004,
but Sallade said he doesn't
want the community to rely
on that time-frame should
another storm blow through
Charlotte County.
"I don't want people to
have a false sense of security
who remember that. We had
supplies here almost instan-
taneously, but it likely won't
materialize that way again,"
Sallade said.
Yet, even more important
than three days' worth of food
is stockpiling enough po-
table water for that three-day
period. Each person needs at
least one gallon of water per


4 ~ ~ ~ h *C -. L;


STOR SUPLIE FORPET
e^CATS n D C
P^^ifLAYFUL 5TUFF FOR HMA5

Thunderehir^t o Najtural GIrmfcin Rernldieea3^^B

4458 94926917 catd- iuf e
9- -B~injruTpfi^^~i^^^^^


&
(






4.

c<
;.'<
c<

';
Q


*" ",. I4 *a *- t4 C -


This is TV

worth
switching

Sfor!
1020 El Jobean Rd.
SW corner of SR 776 & US 41
(941) 629-9311.1
seepismv.com CenturyLink- prism
seeprismty.com 1






HOME DECOR GIFTS FURNITURE

Charming Home
Accessory Store Packed
With Furniture, Rugs,
Lamps, Wall Art
& Much
Much More!
941-979-5373


&


2O


Page 14


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


day, Sallade said.
A human being will not
starve in three days, Sallade
said, but the body will not
function without water,
especially in a post-hurricane
landscape, so all homes
such put a greater focus on
stockpiling enough potable
water.
"You're going to have a lot
of activity and the more activ-
ity you have the more you're
going to crave water," Sallade
added.
With Hurricane Charley
nearly a decade old, Sallade
said he was a little con-
cemed that new residents to
Charlotte County might not
have the experience or un-
derstanding of what it takes
to fortify their home with
the right amount of foods to
survive those post-hurricane
days.
Sallade recommends


that new residents educate
themselves, but he also
recommends that everyone
just keep it simple when
stocking their pantries for the
hurricane season.
Like Hayek, Sallade
suggests nuts, cereals and
canned milk as items that will
be "shelf stable" and provide
your family with the nutrition
and energy they need to start
picking up the pieces.
Make sure the food is
rotated and fresh. And
make sure the potable water
is switched out every six
months. Water kept in warm
areas or sunlight has the
potential of growing bacteria,
Sallade said.
For more information
contact the Charlotte
County Office of
Emergency Management at
941-833-4000.
Email: dwindiester@sun-herald.om


SUN FILE PHOTO
Low-sodium canned goods are recommended if you want to eat
healthy after a hurricane.


www.BisqueltStudi


t

'y Studio Fundrlsers
.com Fundraisr
o.com


We put the

"ART"

in Portq!


* 0i-_ _i R l C"S,&A--


1931 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte
www.bisqueitstudio.com


An Artful Experience For Everyone

No Appointment Is Ever Necessary

Walk-Ins Welcomed

WE OFFER

POTTERY PAINTING, GLASS FUSING,

CANVAS PAINTING,

CLAY HAND BUILDING



941-624-5955


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 15


TIP




Special section of the Sun


a HOME OFFICES & CLOSETS
a MUCH MORE OTHER STUFF
(941) 235-1300
1489 MARKET CIRCLE, #309 PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33953
WWW.JCAOS.COIVM





COUNTERS
& other stuff inc.


I --' *'" *" gigs


Page 16


Friday, May 18, 2012




Special section of the Sun


SOLVING THE PROBLEM OF
CONTAMINATED FOOD
FOOD TO DISCARD
Do not attempt to save the following foods:
* Opened containers and packages which have come in contact with floodwater.
* Unopened jars and bottles with paper seals, such as those containing mayon-
naise or salad dressing.
* Containers of spices, seasonings and flavorings.
* Flour, sugar and coffee in canisters.
* Paper, cloth, fiber or cardboard boxes, even if the contents seem to be dry. This
includes salt, cereals, pasta products, rice and any"sealed" packages of crackers
or cookies within a larger paper box.
* Dented, bulging or leaking tin cans. Cans that have been tossed about and are
found far from their normal storage spot. Seams on these cans may have been
weakened or their seals broken, causing contamination or spoilage.
* Jam or jelly sealed with paraffin.
* Containers with non-sealed, fitted lids, such as cocoa or baking powder.
* Commercially bottled carbonated beverages, if the cap is crusted with silt.
* Foil- or cellophane-packaged foods.
* All fresh vegetables and fruits that do not have a peel, shell or coating, that can
be removed before use, such as leafy vegetables. Also, fruit with damage at the
stem end that would allow water to contact the inside.
* Fresh meat, fish and poultry that have been in contact with flood waters.
* Home-canned foods, even if the jar seems tightly sealed.


FOOD TO USE
The following foods are safe if you wash and sanitize their containers before use.
Also wash, sanitize and peel fruits or vegetables.
* Undamaged tin or aluminum cans. Be sure to wash and sanitize the food
container BEFORE opening the can.
* Potatoes Wash, sanitize, dry, peel and cook before using.
* Citrus fruits Wash well, sanitize and peel before using.
* Apples and other fruits can be sanitized, peeled and cooked before eating. Do
not eat raw fruit, even if it has been sanitized.
IF ROOM
During a hurricane emergency, leave the refrigerator and freezer plugged in
and turn them up to the coldest setting as they can maintain food-preserving
temperatures for up to two days after power has been lost.
If freezer stops working, the food in the freezer will stay frozen depending on:
* The the amount of food in the freezer. A full freezer will stay cold many hours
longer than a freezer only one-quarter full.
* The type of food in the freezer. A freezer full of meat will not warm up as fast as
a freezer full of baked food.
* The temperature of the food. The colder the food, the longer it will stay frozen.
* The quality of the freezer. A well-insulated freezer will keep food frozen much
longer than one with little insulation.
* The size of the freezer. The larger the freezer, the longer the food will stay
frozen.


Bad Fuel will cause Gas or Diesel

Generator Failure Fuel Tank Cleaning
.. We Can Re-New Your Fuel
Fuel Filtration & Purifying


941.815.6631
Mobile Service 24-7

kT -IlFAl


LLC


COMPLIMENTARY
BOTTLE OF
.1 r GAS-SHOK
WITH EVERY FUEL
POLISHING
GAS-SHOK DESL-SHOK


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 17


SiERV Ef





Special section of the Sun


Food in the freezer: What's safe?


Staff Report


During a hurricane emer-
gency, leave the refrigerator
and freezer plugged in and
turn them up to the coldest
setting as they can maintain
food-preserving tem-
peratures for up to two days
after power has been lost.
Open the refrigerator and
freezer only when necessary
to maintain food preserving
temperatures for as long as
possible.
Use dry ice in the
freezer if it is available.
After placing the dry ice
into the freezer, cover the
freezer with blankets, quilts


or some other insulated
covering.
Be sure the covering
does not obstruct any air
ventilation openings, as the
power may go off unexpect-
edly and ventilation in the
freezer will be needed.
It will also help to put
crumpled newspapers
between the freezer and the
covering. Avoid contacting
the dry ice with skin.
Use paper or gloves in
handling the dry ice to
avoid a severe burn.
If the freezer stops work-
ing, the food in the freezer
will stay frozen depending
on:
The the amount of food


in the freezer. A full freezer
will stay cold many hours
longer than a freezer only
one-quarter full.
The type of food in
the freezer. A freezer full
of meat will not warm up
as fast as a freezer full of
baked food.
The temperature of the
food. The colder the food,
the longer it will stay frozen.
The quality of the
freezer. A well-insulated
freezer will keep food frozen
much longer than one with
little insulation.
The size of the freezer.
The larger the freezer, the
longer the food will stay
frozen.


The following steps
should be taken in the
event the freezer stops
working:
Estimate how long the
power will be off to deter-
mine how long the food will
stay frozen. With the freezer
closed, the food in a fully
loaded freezer will usually
stay frozen two days. If the
food is in a freezer with
less than half a load, it will
probably not stay frozen for
more than a day.
If the food is stored in the
freezer at home, refreeze
the food quickly by turning
the temperature control on
the freezer to the coldest
setting once it is operating


left us with 2 inches of water and $7,800 in repairs'
But we were fortunate. We had purchased flood insurance from
ourAAA Insurance Agent and it saved us thousands of dollars.
Our agent told us:
Homeowners insurance doesn't cover flood damage.
You're 3 times more likely to have a flood than a fire.
Flood insurance can cost just pennies a day.

Remember...Only flood insurance covers you in a flood.


NATIONAL FLOOD
S gooB Insurance
* Flood insurance is providedbyAuto Club South Insurance Company and is


Percentages based a 30year mortgage period


Page 18


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


again.
Clean the freezer before
refilling it. Place the warmer
packages against the refrig-
erated surface if possible,
but stack them so air can
circulate around them. After
the food is well-frozen, turn
the temperature control to
its usual setting.
If the freezer is too full,
move some of the colder
packages to the refrigera-
tor, and return them to the
freezer gradually.
Thawing and refreezing
Foods that have been
frozen and thawed require
the same care as foods that
have never been frozen. Use
refrozen food as soon as
possible.
Partial thawing and
refreezing does reduce the
quality of foods, particu-
larly fruits, vegetables and


prepared foods. Red meats
are affected less than many
other foods by partial
thawing and refreezing.
Food that has thawed may
be safely refrozen if it still
contains ice crystals or if it
is still cold about 40 de-
grees Fahrenheit and has
been at this temperature no
longer than one or two days
after thawing.
Thawed fruits can be
refrozen if they still taste
and smell good.
Fruits usually ferment
when they start to spoil. A
small amount of fermenta-
tion will not make fruits
dangerous to eat; however,
it may spoil their flavor.
Care should be taken
in determining whether
thawed meat and poultry
should be refrozen. Meats
and poultry become unsafe


to eat when they start
to spoil. Therefore, each
package of food should be
examined before determin-
ing whether it should be
refrozen.
If the color or odor of
the thawed food is poor or
questionable, dispose of it,
as it may be dangerous to
eat.
If refreezing the thawed


SUN FILE PHOTO
Emergency workers may offer
hot food, but residents should
stock up on non-perishables like
canned goods, dry milk, juice,
snacks and fruits before the
hurricane hits.
food is not possible, can-
ning it may be the only
practical solution to saving
most, if not all, of it.


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 19





Special section of the Sun


DISASTER SUPPLY KIT Prepare for three to seven days
VITAL SUPPLIES
* Water: at least 1 gallon daily per person
* Food: non-perishable packaged or canned food, juices, dry milk; foods for
infants or the elderly; snack foods. Plastic bottles or juice pouches hold up better
in ice chests than cardboard juice boxes.
* Formula, diapers and other baby items.
* Medicines, prescription drugs.
*Non-electric can opener.
* First-aid kit.
* Cash Banks and ATMs may not be open or available for extended periods.
*Battery-operated radio or TV.
* Flashlights or lanterns.
* Extra batteries.
*Keys.
* Pet care items proper identification, immunization records, medications,
ample supply of food and water, a carrier or cage, muzzle and leash.
* Important documents insurance polices, medical records, bank account
numbers, Social Security card, important phone numbers, family contacts all
in a waterproof container.
* Fire extinguisher.
HELPFUL ITEMS
*Cooking tools, fuel.
* Disposable plates, utensils and cups.
* Disposable washcloths and towels.
* Blankets and pillows.


* Clothing seasonal, rain gear,
sturdy shoes.
* Toiletries, hygiene items, mois-
ture wipes, sanitizing wipes.
. Toys, books and games. f
SFuel make sure car is filled;
keep extra in proper gas cans.
* Filled propane tanks for grill.
* Ice and ice chest. A plastic one
will not sweat onto carpets or
floors like Styrofoam ones some-
times do.
SMatches. FILE PHOTO
. Non-electric clock.
Stern. o Stock up on ice before the hurricane hits.
. Plastic drop cloth.
SCellular phone with extra batteries and/or car charger.
. Portable generator.
. Extension cords.
STool kit.
. Sunscreen.
. Insect repellent.
. Yard gloves for clean up.
. Extra chlorine for pools.
. Current credit card checks, in case large expenditures are needed and credit
cards aren't accepted.
*Trash bags.


We helped care for many pets when Hurricane Charley
came through in 2004; most of us were not ready. Let
us help you prepare your pet for this upcoming
hurricane season.
r --- i
Mention you saw us in the
2012 Hurricane Guide
and receive a
Free Pet Exam and2012 DistasterKit
$44.00 value
I- .* 3 nl'' .: I I ,, I ,: l I. :.l 'A hl l' | l:.. ll- r.~i l : l-.I1.1 : i, I i -
bl, I:, r'.E.,: h;.9r ll' : r,: il, I: iU :. I. II I ,l' l hl I I


F AI lC

(91 637600


Debbie Marks, DVM
Dogs, Cats, Birds, Exotics
446675


Brett Beckman, DVM
Fellow, Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
Board Certified Veterinary Dentist & Oral Surgeon
Board Certified Academy of Pain Management


Page 20


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


HOW TO DISINFECT GROUNDWATER
BOIL:
* Run water from faucets for several seconds to flush any sediment or other
contaminants from the plumbing.
* Bring water to a rolling boil for one minute.
* Boiling will kill most types of disease-causing organisms
* If water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths.
* Allow water to cool before consumption or use for food preparation.

HOUSEHOLD BLEACH:
* Add eight drops of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach to each gallon
of water.
SBleach will kill some of disease-causing organisms
* Stir mixture well and let it stand for 30 minutes before consumption.

TINCTURE OF IODINE:
* Using common household iodine from a medicine cabinet or first aid kit, add
five drops of 2 percent U.S. Pharmacopoeia to each quart of clear water.
* For cloudy water, add 10 drops and let the solution stand for at least 30 minutes.

CHLORINE/IODINE TABLETS:
* These tablets containing the necessary dosage for drinking water disinfection
are available in drug and sporting goods stores.
* Follow instructions provided.
* If no instructions exist, use one chlorine/iodine tablet for each quart of water.
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Charlotte County Utilities


VEHICLE SAFETY TIPS
* Pard your iehi:le in a :l'oed garage
* If you have a se,:nd vehicle that vonrt fit in the garage, park it outside and
lightly against rhe garage door
* Fill up [he gas lank before the smorni
* Keep a cell phone i:harger for the :ar handy With no ele:lrin:ily you i:an
charge your :ell phone rhii wnay
SKeep a loolbio in the trunk
* Hawe several caring of lire sealant available asr nails will be ori the roads
* Do not drive through flooded roads
* Do not run thie irehiie in the garage
: _. / _,,. s+ Irk


If possible, park your car in a closed garage during a hurricane.


1.jJ1 .1 ,!5j II L


24 HOUR SERVICE
With No Overtime Charge!


S... ... :..
i. ... i; .: . ' E ti. ,, ,.. E : .


'T C


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 21


. h: i ; : :!";
;;qr^ ".~:;~


,,l i : ...... :: .. ::.
, ...... .. .. :... .,:,





Special section of the Sun


HURRICANE SHELTERS

CHARLOTTE COUNTY HURRICANE SHELTERS
* Kingsway Elementary School (only Red Cross shelter), 23300 Quasar Blvd., Port
Charlotte
CHARLOTTE COUNTY HURRICANE REFUGES
(can only go AFTER the storm)
* Charlotte Harbor School, 22450 Hancock Ave., Port Charlotte
* Cultural Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte
* Friendship United Methodist Church, 12275 Paramount Dr., Tropical Gulf Acres
* L.A. Ainger Middle School, 245 Cougar Way, Englewood
* Lemon Bay High School, 2201 Placida Road, Englewood
* Liberty Elementary School, 370 Atwater St., Port Charlotte
* Meadow Park Elementary School, 3131 Lakeview Blvd. NW, Port Charlotte
* Murdock Middle School, 17325 Mariner Way, Port Charlotte
* Myakka River Elementary School, 12650 Wilmington Blvd., Englewood
* Pilgrim United Church of Christ, 24515 Rampart Blvd., Port Charlotte
* Port Charlotte High School, 18200 Toledo Blade Blvd., Port Charlotte
* Port Charlotte Methodist Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte
* Port Charlotte Middle School, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port Charlotte (pet friendly)
* Sallie Jones Elementary School, 1221 Cooper St., Punta Gorda
* South County Regional Park, 670 Cooper St., Punta Gorda
*Ventura Lakes Clubhouse Building, 27110 N. Jones Loop Road, Punta Gorda
* Vineland Elementary School, 467 Boundary Blvd., Englewood
NOTE: Do not depend on a particular Refuge Site being open. Refuge Sites may or
may not be opened depending on the size of the storm and thepredicted landfall area.
Charlotte County has no Refuge Sites if there is a Category 3 orhigherstorm affecting


the area.
If you are transportation
dependent, call 941-833-
4000 to request an
application forspecial-needs
assistance. "
SOUTH SARASOTA
COUNTY HURRICANE
SHELTERS
* Glenallen Elementary
School, 7050 Glenallen
Blvd., North Port
* Heron Creek Middle School
(pet shelter), 6501 W. Price
Blvd., North Port
* North Port High School FILE PHOTO
(pet shelter), 6400 W. Price
Blvd., North Port Residents should bring their own blankets
* Pine View School (pet and pillows, as well as toiletries, if required
shelter), 501 Old Venice to go to a shelter.
Road, Venice
*Toledo Blade Elementary School, 1201 Geranium Ave., North Port
* Venice Community Center, 326 Nokomis Ave. S, Venice
* Woodland Middle School, 2700 Panacea Blvd., North Port
* Atwater Elementary School (also available to Charlotte County residents), 4701
Huntsville Ave., North Port
For more information, contact the Sarasota County Emergency Management office
at 941-861-5000 or go to http://allhazards.scgov.net


VOE BETO TEBS
INCAROT COUNT


ROOFING & REPAIRS LLC



*. .":*


METAL, TILE, SHINGLE, & FLAT ROOFS

GREAT WORK AT A GREAT PRICE! -

Over 28 Years Experience in Southwest Florida

.I..- CC.. B O ND -

*


JUST CALL STEVE
AND HAVE A
GREAT DAY!


oI

<-I


'L


Page 22


Friday, May 18, 2012




Friday, May 18, 2012
DESOTO COUNTY HURRICANE SHELTERS


* Main shelter (Red Cross
approved): DeSoto Middle
School, 420 East Gibson
St., Arcadia.
* DeSoto County Special
Needs Shelter: South
Florida Community College
in DeSoto County, 2251
NE Turner Ave., 863-993-
1757. Anyone seeking to
use a special-needs shelter
must preregister.
For more information,
please call the DeSoto
County Emergency
Management office at
863-993-4831. The office
is at 86115 East Oak St.,
Room B-1, Arcadia.


FILE PHOTO
Hurricane shelters
are required to be
at least 18 feet
above sea level.


EMERGENCY MEDICATION
According to Florida statute 465.0275, a pharmacist
may dispense a one-time emergency refill of up to a
72-hour supply of prescribed medication in an area
under a hurricane warning issued by the National
Weather Service.
The pharmacist can also dispense up to a 30-day
supply of a prescription under certain circumstances
as outlined in the statute. Contact your pharmacist to
get a full picture of the law so you won't run out of
medicine during or after a hurricane.


Special section of the Sun


CALL 941-625-6271
FOR AN IN-HOME ESTIMATE!


C IR WorCd granite, Inc.
Family owned & operated since 2004

Visit Our Showroom For Details
1544 Market Circle, Bldg. 9
Port Charlotte, FL
www.crwgranite.com
licensed & insured


BES P IC BES QAIY S


Page 23


IN INNOVATIVE

CONSTRUCTION
STATE CERTIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTOR MY SAFE FLORIDA HOME CONTRACTOR
LICENSE #CGC031533 www.innovativeconstruction-fl.com SINCE 1997

10% OFF (UP TO $5,000)

SAVE $500!
ADDITIONS REMODELING
KITCHENS & BATHS SCREEN ROOMS
STORM PROTECTION DOORS & WINDOWS
PAINTING WOOD & TILE FLOORS
ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS
COMPUTER ROOMS CUSTOM CLOSETS

FREE ESTIMATES!
GREAT PRICES!
CALL NOW!

S BARRY GERBER 941.585.7572


TALK T US BFORE OUR FNAL DCISIO
^^^^WE WILL MAKE IT RIGHT





Special section of the Sun


WHAT TO BRING TO A SHELTER
Hurricane evacuation shelters are provided for public use in the event an evacuation becomes necessary
and you have no other place to go.
Shelters are usually crowded, noisy and often without generators. Therefore, when the power goes out,
they are dark and unventilated. It is highly recommended that if you plan to evacuate your home, make
arrangements to stay with a friend or relative who lives outside the evacuation area or flood zone.
You will probably be more comfortable in less crowded area among friends and loved ones.
Weapons, alcohol and smoking are not permitted in public shelters. Most also do not allow pets.
If you go to a public shelter, bring the following
items:
Change of clothes, rain gear and sturdy shoes.
SToiletries and personal items.
Blankets or sleeping bag and pillows.
SIdentification.
Games, toys, books or other forms of quiet
entertainment.
Special items for infants and the elderly.
Special dietary needs.
SNonperishable foods for snacks. i 4-
Battery-operated radio or television, along with
extra batteries.
Medications.
SUN FILE PHOTO
When going to a shelter with a young child, be
sure to bring any necessary items like formula,
special foods, medications, diapers and toys.


SPECIAL NEEDS CHECKLIST
The following are items that residents with special needs would
need to bring to a special-needs shelter:
A list of your current medications and at least a three-day
supply of the medications.
Documentation of specific medical information.
Medical equipment that is needed, such as oxygen, nebulizers,
wheelchairs, and diabetes equipment.
Nonperishable dietary items, especially required dietary foods.
Electronic equipment, such as a flashlight, radio, extra batteries
and cell phone.
Personal care, such as clothing, socks and shoes.
Important papers, such as doctor's orders, prescriptions and
insurance information.
Identification with current address.
Sleeping items, such as a pillow and a blanket.
Personal hygiene items.
Something to do, such as books or games.
SA first-aid kit.
Personal equipment, such as glasses, hearing aids and dentures.
DON'T BRING:
Pets, except as medically determined, such as a seeing-eye dog.
Firearms.
*Alcohol.
Perishable food items.
-Source: Special needs shelter application


Reliable Honda Generators Keep The Lights On!


EU2000i


IN
STOCK
NOW


EU3000iSA







* 1i I1t \\,lll, 1i I',I .
* \ "r ti'l ii r I'r uni "


Visit Our Booth 8 At The 2012 Hurricane Preparedness Expo
Saturday, May 19th 10:00am 3:00pm Charlotte Harbor Events Center
we can help you determine your basic home power needs

'. t Abel's Marine We Can, We Will, ...We're Abel!
O I 7- V -11 Please read the owner's manual before
S' 7341 Sawyer Circle, Port Charlotte, FL Ps *em. B
Now Open 941-698-4006
saturday 8-No www.abelsmarine.com a deae
Nvww~abelmarinexomproducts Consult your local Yellow PagesEq i m n


EU1 000iA



IN
STOCK
NOW


Page 24


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


BOAT SAFETY TIPS
BEFORE A HURRICANE:
* Find a place to noor your boat Male sure the water ~will be deep enough at lo
ride
* Male a practice run to see how long it lakes to navigate and secure
* heep all records including insurance papers recent photos of the vessel reg-li
tralion, equipment inventory and agreements with other important documents
* Have available lines of adequate lengths
* Ue havingg gear for all lines to prole:T them from i vear a[ ,onta:t point Old
rags work. ell
* Use fenders of adequate size and strength Old tires world well
* Use oversized anr:hors
* .eep fuel tanks full
* heep baleneri, shared An etra baltery my c:ome in handy as well
* Maintain bilge pumps

WHEN A STORM THREATENS:
* When securing lines consider tide fluctuations and storm surge If the line is
Tro short. [he boal :an be pulled unde r or be damaged by riing [ide5
* Secure the boa from all angles s he ivind direlions switch
* Remove all movable equipment
* Seal all openings It the boat
* if the boal is left on a davit, leave the boat drains open
* Those securing a boa[ on a trailer
Place t,,ooden blods berIteen the frame member and the able inside each
wheel Let about half of [he air out of the tires Fill the boat i 3 full of water To


help hold it down Tie the boal and [railer to a urong oble,:I uinmg heavy-duly
line If your boat i:annot be secured in this manner. remove the boat from the
trader Partially fill the boat ivith water and lie down the trader

WHEN A HURRICANE WARNING IS ISSUED:
* Leave early for land Do not bloi:k the pa!age of other boat[ Help other secure
their boats Followv dire tions from lo:al state and national officials
* Do not stay aboard
* Do not try to outrun or nioe around a hurri:anre Seas will be very rough

AFTER A STORM:
* (heic for damage
* ClIoely war:h for debris and obsiructioni in the water
* Vessels that hate sunr must be removed


FILE PHOTO
Boats should
be secured
from all angles
before a
hurricane.


There are Choices...then there is the

Smart Choice

...... I


LEXINGTON MANOR
ASSISTED LIVING


FIVESTAR*SENIOR LIVING"


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 25


ALF # 10548








Generators a plus for hurricane preparedness


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER

After hurricanes Charley,
Frances and Jeanne in 2004,
a light went on for many
residents: They needed a
generator.
And after the 2004 hur-
ricane season, Charlotte
County Emergency
Management Director
Wayne Sallade said last
year, more people realized
having a generator on hand
after a hurricane could
ease some of the problems
caused when power lines
were down.
Residents even started
looking at "whole-house'
generators," referring to
propane-gas generators
that produce enough juice


to power an entire house.
However, those systems are
expensive.
Most people opt for
smaller, gasoline- or diesel-
powered generators that
have only enough power for
a window air-conditioning
unit and maybe one room.
Sallade's best advice is "do
your homework," and check
out home improvement,
hardware and other dealers.
The county's "All Hazards
Guide" does offer basic
information and safety tips
about the use of generators.
But Sallade also recom-
mends visiting the Florida
Power & Light Web site,
www.fpl.com, under its
"Storm Center & Safety"
page. Those without
Internet access can call FPL


SPineapple Storage

A SAFE AND SECURE PLACE
Store You Boat, RV, Trailer, and Much More!
SFriendly, Courteous Service Security Fencing ,I _"
S24 Hour Recorded Surveillance 24 Hour Access
Personalized Security Pass Code Entry Pest Maintenance
Exterior Facility Lighting Climate Controlled Units Available
S: 941 I550-062
25477 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda, Florida 33950
AH www.pineapplestorage.com


SUN FILE PHOTO
Without power, post-hurricane days can be hot. Generators can power
a window AC unit.


Outlet Stor '--ft'
"Buy your mattress where it's built"
Bedmasters is SWFL's home for custom made
ill' Luxury & Affordable mattresses.
Over 30 years of Experience!
I1, *MATTRESSES LATEX MEMORY FOAM
WATERBED CONVERSIONS
', ; RV AND BOAT MATTRESSES
Never Undersold
Locally Manufactured With Pride


(941) 255-3722
New Patients Always
Welcome.
Referrals by Primary Care
Physician Not Required!
The Allergy Relief You Need.


ELIN M N
Bop Cpile fegs


I 3410 Tamiami Trail #1, Port Charlotte, FL 33952


Page 26


Special section of the Sun


Friday, May 18, 2012






customer service toll free at
800-226-3545 and ask a cus-
tomer representative to be sent
the company's information on
emergency generators.
When talking about safety, _-_ '
FPL and emergency manage-
ment officials make one point
clear: Don't run a generator in
a garage, indoors or in other
enclosed spaces, due to the \
danger from carbon monoxide .. \. -
produced by a generator's
exhaust.
Inexpensive carbon monox- r
ide detectors, similar to smoke '
alarms, are readily available
and recommended as an
added safety precaution, the
Charlotte County All Hazard '-'
Guide recommends. The county
guide also reminds people not
to store fuel indoors or try to
refuel the generator when it is
running.
The hazard guide is free and
available in libraries and other
public buildings. Generators should not be run in a garage, indoors or other enclosed spaces.



etis Impor

Iee is Critical,

& Shoulder
& shoulderr
J irft Replacement, Hip, Knee & Shoulder


SUN HILE PHOTO


Friday, May 18, 2012


Special section of the Sun


Page 27






WHERE TO BE SAFE IN A HURRICANE ---
SAFER STRUCTURES
The best buildings to be in during a hurricane are ones
designed not to interfere with wind swirling around them.
Windows and garage doors are weak points that should be-
covered with shutters or plywood. Prior to a hurricane's arrival,
clear yard debris that could puncture a window. .-, '
Inside, look for a small, windowless room near the center -
of the house to ride out the storm. A bathroom or closet usually ..
fits the bill. Ifa bathroom is to be used, lie inside a bathtub i
with a mattress to protect yourself from glass or other debris. '
*If possible, find a room surrounded by concrete blocks. '
Mobile home dwellers shouldn't try to ride out a storm at ,: f -
home, because no matter how well-secured the mobile home "
is, it isn't designed to withstand hurricane-strength winds.
Shelters are an option for those who do not want to move
far from home during a hurricane. There is one Red Cross-certi-
fied hurricane shelter for incoming storms in Charlotte County.
A GEOGRAPHY MADE FOR WIND AND FLOODING
One requirement for a shelter to become Red Cross-certi-
fied is an elevation of at least 18 feet above sea level which
is why Kingsway Elementary is the only Red Cross hurricane
shelter site for incoming storms in Charlotte County.
SCharlotte County is low-lying. Some of the highest ground SUN FILE PHOTOS
is in Deep Creek, which is in the 20s of feet above sea level.
Consequently, most of the region is subject to flooding during During the storm, the safest place is under a sturdy object to protect yourself from
a hurricane. falling or flying debris.



T ST-D I

1;350 S Ft o Nigt'Club partnatm t cl
lighting, spec e. system, instructori-
special cushioned wood dance flob a
/ ZUMBA CLASSES.
% j. pd ~idfy I rgldayro :.pm.
it a ,tot
av :3~i 1:3


Page 28


Special section of the Sun


Friday, May 18, 2012




Friday, May 18, 2012
F:e. ied r ,:an find ,:,u rihai3 e3a,:ua3 ,:,ri -i:rine ire y Ir v e in ib ...incal rhe
,harl,:rIe i,:,unry Ener:enr:y:v Operar:nri (Cntrer c iveticre hrp :hrl:Ille
(cunlyvl ,:Ini, Emnerqrn:v '.ara tra (Cun resiJenrir :an find their e1a,:u-
aiIrn area anrd helier rintrnirtin ajt hipr np i:3p j :, nc e Eia:uallIn
ricrniaiNrin E a:ua ,:Inln,:,rnia :n ap.
Ihe ,rinly par r f 'ei. ,r, (cL unlv al3 real nr fI:r fil'::dinril urinq a
hurrn.:ane are area arun hrid 'he Fe'e F: iver Hiqh ivind i:.an p'c'e a hreal [1:
.e:.,rl,, reci: ienri tibeauce the relalriely Ilr lard din ei n t :'intrinbule nliui:h
: vi 11 iij i jenirirajnri aa 3 I:rn'i nfliCv inilan: d Eva,:uee frion'i hurricane
palh choulij nlie nrirt h or norlhoie- rci rhe ,prile,:ed path


Special section of the Sun


Downed power lines are a common hazard after a hurricane.


Be prepared for severe weather
with help from Batteries Plus.
Batteries
Power inverters
Flashlights
Charging devices
UPS backup systems


PORT CHARLOTTE
1690 Tamiami Trail
(Next to Perkins &Taco Bell)


BatteriesPlus. -I
The replace it place"


Page 29


liI O~CII






Special section of the Sun


SS3V19


-isj


II


Page 30


Friday, May 18, 2012


r.
h .i
a
u

i 'I.I
.I

d
i
. .)
I:




Special section of the Sun


saQlV-1HOIH


;r
;.. 1
ii cs,'~~
~rr' *
CB
I


W1 I;
**^*'l-
' ''.


.r. I
"i:, i J


I.cs -1
71'.1


331VNVAI


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 31


yn.~.'-~
~?". '''
!~T~ %





Special section of the Sun


941-235-2474
866-486-2474 Fax
dawnzsite@gmll.con


Allphase Insurance
Services, Inc.


3280 Tamiami Tril, Unit 54B,


at Promenades Mall rurl %IA
Visit our website at allphasensurancel.com
HOME *AUTO *BOATS FLOOD CLASSIC CAR A
4a A-7tw"L.m


IUU, rFL. SK


RVMC


ALL SUMMER
L June July August
Entire Household Only $99!
$99 without Pool use
5 125 with Pool includes FREE Swim Lessons


Membership includes classes, heated
pools, child watch, discounts and more!
Starts May 21st. New members only.

(941) 629-YMCA
www.CharlotteCountyYMCA.com


FREE ESTIMATES
INSURANCE WORK -
FACTORY TRAINED TECHNICIANS



23309 Harborview Rd. Port Charlotte
941-629-3731 1IC I


13 Years
In A Row


2726 F Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte, FL 33952


Low Energy
Extreme Fatigue
Burn-Out


Feel Happy,
Healthy & Vibrant
Naturally


941-391-6616
www.DetoxSpaSite.com


Dawn Cash
Owner


I


t~I
i~z:


Sf \


Page 32


Friday, May 18, 2012


~fi~ -


lal





Special section of the Sun


~L~J/ ~p


_5.JOSEPH'S
DELI & CATERING N www.JOSEPHsDELIPC.COM


10 Ch
$5.


ity+


Bermuda




4. -










Islands .


San Juan t .
SSao Antigua
Domingo SI. Klhs I -

Dominica

SI. Lucia 9 -
St. Vincent ., Barbados
S_ Grenada
-- 'Tobago

S Carac s 1Trinioad










- 76 0 I I I. I 6 1 5,
650, ,0_ 5.5,


. I l


P

---ii


|BI1NOILAN
FAMILY
INSURANCE
7\AGENCY, INC.


"Our family dedicated to
brotectinz vou and your family"


Jim Nolan, Jr, President
NOLAN FAMILY
INSURANCE


Phone: 941-639-1122
www.nolanagency.com
301 W. MARION AVE.
Punta Cnrda. FI 339Af


1979 3
Annii


HURRICANE IMPACT WINDOWS
FACTORY DIRECT PRICING






sTiR IT EIGHT
WINDOWS
941.270.3373
WWW.STORMTIGHTWINDOWS.COM
Lic & Ins Lic#CGC1515345 -


_____________________________________________________________________ A ___________________________________________________________________


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 33


ic NEW DINNER SPECIALS NowServing
voices F,,h & (h,p H.oh M-iao La eagna
AA .Rua,..iAuJu> .(,,un., Fi,.d(,kh.l. Beer& Wine
99 Spagh.ltt. Marhabll Auhudnifi FaolaI Plaoni
SSpinoad Laosgna (hick.n Palm.oan Paoia Dinner Served Al
Auih.nmic Gyro Plaii.r Fii-d Shump Bbk.l Day Everyday

offe .Soft Drini
:2 at In, .* Sandwich .
K Your Choice of '"p '
Meatst g.,Bc H -, Entree Salad '
Home Fries or Grits c* "P r s.up
..... d la drf n nlf t Car ll'.t I' .... r I I... In l..-I.I.


bUi


I I I l i l l l l


I I .


D 12012
rCa ru v





Special section of the Sun
81


Friday, May 18, 2012


n e
iin"
0


Page 34








Factors behind the forecast


By MEGHAN EVANS
ACCUWEATHER METEOROLOGIST

Based on numbers of
expected storms, hurricanes
and major hurricanes and
not factoring in potential
impact to land, 2012 is
expected to be less active
than last year.
There are a couple of
factors that have led the
AccuWeather.com Long-
Range Forecasting Team to
forecast lower numbers of
named storms this year.
Compared to 2011, this
Atlantic Hurricane Season
will start out with a less-
conducive environment for
tropical storms to develop.
The official start of the
season in the Atlantic is
June 1.


Strong high-level
winds are in place over
the western and central
Caribbean, promoting
increased wind shear. If
these high-level winds do
not abate, increased wind
shear will inhibit tropical
storm development early in
the season.
Strong wind shear, which
is the change of wind speed
or direction with altitude,
causes building clouds to
be tilted, restricting verti-
cal development. Unless
a tropical system has a
vertically oriented core,
its ability to develop are
diminished.
The surface pressure
across the Atlantic is not as
low as it was in 2011, when
there was below-normal


GRAPHICS
surface pressure across the
Caribbean. The surface
pressure is now near to
above-normal in the same
region.
When surface pressure is
lower, it promotes tropical
storm development.
"If numbers are low
early in the season, then
overall numbers for the
entire season will turn out
lower than the forecast,"
AccuWeather.com Expert
Senior Meteorologist Dan
Kottlowski cautioned.

Transition
into El Niio
A shift into an El Niflo


PROVIDED BY ACCUWEATHER
pattern is expected by
the peak of the Atlantic
Hurricane Season, which
occurs around Sept. 11.
El Niflo is a phenomenon
classified by above-normal
water temperatures in the
central and eastern equato-
rial Pacific Ocean. It is often
associated with diminished
development of tropical
systems in the tropical
Atlantic.
"A change to El Niflo
forces the westerlies to mi-
grate farther south, causing
increased [wind] shear that
will diminish or perhaps
shut down further develop-
ment beyond September,"
Kottlowski said.


Sgglesocndsqueak) '7 t


A Children's Boutique Filled To The
Brim With Hand Painted Furniture,
Lamps, Signs, Pictures, Clothing, Books,
& Squeaky Shoes. You Wouldn't Want
To Miss This Wonderful Shop. 20% off
941-979-5375 1 non-sale
Open Mon-Sat lOam.4pm item
I 0 LJBA POR *HROTF


Friday, May 18, 2012


Special section of the Sun


Page 35








Island evacuation: Timing is everything


STAFF REPORT

When it comes to hur-
ricane evacuation, island
residents' most critical
decision isn't if, but when.
Charlotte, Lee and
Sarasota counties can order
evacuations for barrier
islands with the approach
of a Category 1 or stronger
hurricane, usually within
24 hours of expected
landfall.
That order can be issued
48 hours before anticipated
landfall for Palm Island,
which is accessible only by
boat.
But ultimately, if, when
and how to evacuate is
a decision each resident
makes for himself.
And it must be made
sooner than mainlanders.
The decision to stay or go
is "not much different than
it is for anyone else, except
(islanders) have to leave
earlier and their avenues
for escape are more re-
stricted," Charlotte County
Emergency Management
Coordinator Jerry Mallet
said. "Without question,
they are going to be the
first to be evacuated."
Therefore, he said, is-
landers must be prepared.
"They have to have an


evacuation plan and know
when they need to go and
where they are going,"
Mallet said.
Responsibility for making
that decision is clearly
spelled out in the Thornton
Key and Palm, Don Pedro,
and Knight Islands com-
munity plans.
"It is important to note
that island residents have
chosen to live in a high-
hazard area and must take
individual responsibility for
their decision and for the
safety of themselves, their
homes and their families,"
a statement in the plan
reads.
It is the jurisdictional
county's responsibility to
notify residents of a man-
datory evacuation.
Hurricane evacuation
procedures have been
outlined by the three
primary island advisory
groups Manasota Key;
Thornton Key/Palm/Don
Pedro/Knight islands; and
Gasparilla Island.
The plans discuss notifi-
cation, evacuation, re-
entry, and power shortages.
Notification: Residents
are encouraged to have
a weather radio and stay
abreast of a storm's ap-
proach because evacuation


UN IM ILLt IMUIU
The decision to stay or go is even more crucial for people living at or
staying on barrier islands.


alerts will be issued via
radio and television.
Public service officials
will also notify residents
either by public address
systems, phone or by going
door to door.
Evacuation: An evacu-
ation order is issued for
the barrier islands for an
anticipated category 1 or
stronger storm, usually
approximately 24 hours be-
fore the expected landfall.
That order can be issued
48 hours ahead of time, in
some cases.
On Thornton Key, it's


probably a good idea to
skedaddle when Charlotte
County Fire and EMS
officials at Station 10 start
moving equipment off
the island and then leave
themselves.
Routes: During an
evacuation, all bridges
- Tom Adams, Kosinski,
Anne Merry, Boca Grande
Causeway become one
way for eastbound traffic
only.
No one will be allowed to
come onto the islands.
Once off the islands,
sheriff's deputies will be


.DISCOUNT ROCK/SHELL-, 1


I CUSTOMIZED CURBING Ifis'.kusat I
|I 941-624-0188 941-623-6192 Booth n Po
I= Come visit us 19500 Peachland Blvd., Port Charlotte .
2 blocks east of Home Depot
L o A+ Rated Hire Craftsmen, Not Installers.


Partners in Recying!


www.charlottecountyfl.gov www.wm.com
941.764.4360 941.629.1106


Page 36


Special section of the Sun


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


stationed at pivotal inter-
sections to direct traffic out
of the area.
Once evacuation is or-
dered, drawbridges will be
locked in place to accom-
modate vehicular traffic.
Palm Island: Charlotte
County Emergency
Management Director
Wayne Sallade often recalls
how he has been asked
the following question for
more than 20 years:
How do those people
living on those bridgeless
islands get to the mainland
in an emergency?
And, Sallade has re-
sponded with the same
answer for more than 20
years.
"How'd they get out
there in the first place?
They'll come back the
same way they conveyed
themselves out there."


Private boats and Palm
Island Transit's ferry are the
only ways on and off the
island.
Because relatively few
residents live on the island
during summer's hurricane
season, Palm Island Transit
maintains evacuations
have "been orderly."
But the key is to plan
ahead 48 hours ahead.
Charlotte and Lee county
officials, as well as planners
at the Southwest Florida
Regional Planning Council,
say there will be no special
ferry assigned to the island
to assist evacuation even
if one existed.
So, be prepared to wait
since it takes more than 30
minutes for the small ferry
to make a roundtrip.
Also, deteriorating wind
and water conditions will,
at some point, shut the


ferry down.
If you hear a distinct sig-
nal tone from the Station
10 siren, the ferry has shut
down and you've missed
the boat.
Re-entry: Manasota Key
and Gasparilla Island have
"phased re-entries."
First-phase entry is by
emergency officials to
sweep for injuries, rescues,
hazards, and assess dam-
age. Next in are utility
company workers.
The third phase is an es-
corted entry with residents
allowed to check on homes
and retrieve valuables.
Entry requires valid iden-
tification such as a driver's
license, utility bill, tax bill
or other papers that show
name and address. Passes
are issued to residents for
future re-entry.
On Palm Island and other


smaller keys, there is no
re-entry plan. Residents
return to their homes when
the ferry starts running
again or by private boat.
However, they are urged
to wait until Charlotte
County Fire and EMS
officials have swept the
islands.
Mallet emphasis the
importance of present-
ing valid identification,
noting the absence of these
documents can be the
difference between getting
home quickly or waiting for
hours, even days, to do so.
"Bring identification
that verifies who you are
and where you live," he
reiterated.
In case of an extended
power outage on Manasota
Key, generators at sewage
lift stations can be fueled
by propane.


Step One
(1) Aesthetic
Consultation, including
VISIA Computerized
Complexion Analysis
valued at $75




Bring in this ad
and receive our
Introductory Offer
on Steps 1, 2 & 3
of the Exclusive
JVAI 4 Step Approach
Not Combinable with other offers
Sold as as Package Only
Expires 8/19/12


Step Two

(1) Hydradermabrasion
Treatment with Glysal Peel
plus OBAGI Skin Care
Starter Kit valued at $206



Step Four:
I Advanced j
I e atments


TOTAL PACKAGE

VALUED AT $2759

FOR ONLY $1700


YOU SAVE

$ 1059!!!

Voted Best Proud Member of:
Vein Specialist +i


A.... A 2


0% 00


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 37





Special section of the Sun


PREPARATION TIPS REGARDING YOUR PETS
* Make sure pets are vaccinated. Pet shelters will require proof of vaccinations.
* If you don't have a current photograph of your pet, take one.
* Each animal should have a properly sized pet carrier. Carriers should be large
enough for the animal to stand and turn around.
* Pack a disaster supply kit for your pet that includes: proper ID (including immuni-
zation records and a photo), ample supply of food, ample supply of bottled water,
medications, muzzle, collar and leash. It is also a good idea to pack a roll of paper
towels and a few trash bags for cleanup.
* Include your pet in your evacuation strategy. There are few special shelters that
allow pets and they are for those who have no other place to go. Other possible
refuges for your pet are veterinary clinics, boarding facilities and friends or relative's
homes.
* If a storm is imminent, bring pets indoors well in advance. Remain calm and be
sure to reassure them frequently. Put them in a carrier.
* As an alternative, ask your veterinarian if they provide emergency care for pets
following disasters. Obtain the numbers to several veterinarians outside your
immediate area in the event your own veterinarian's office has to close because of
the emergency. Contact a friendly neighbor and make a reciprocal agreement to
take charge of each others'pets in the event of an emergency when one of you is
not home. Exchange cell phone numbers if you both have them, and make sure
both of you know the location of your pet emergency kits. Make a list of all the
aforementioned phone numbers for your emergency kit.
Source: CharlotteAnimal Hospital


FILE PHOTO
When preparing for a hurricane, don't forget to pack a pet
disaster supply kit.


Private
Mailbox = M.BA.
j BUSiNg"5 SE VICE CeNTmi
Documents Packing Shipping
FREE E-mail or
Text Notification


S Don't waste
your time or Gas
on checking an
emtpy mailbox


ifth




iQhe

Fed~xfli


APPLY FOR YOUR
"SMART" MAILBOX TODAY!


MBA ... YOUR "COMPLETE"
BUSINESS SERVICE CENTER
Serving Charlotte County Since 1994.


"SMART" Mailbox
Program

V Professional Image and
Real Street Address (Not
a P.O. Box)

VE-mail or Text Notification
upon arrival of mail or
packages

V ISecure Mail and packages
with 24 hour access

V Accepts packages from all
carriers

V "Smart" Business related
services: Fax, Copies,
Shipping, Notary, Internet,
Printing and much more,
all in one location.

pPrivacy and Anonymity

V Virtual Mailbox Available


AVAILABLE NOW
iat
SM.B.A.
Documents Packing Shipping
RIGHT HERE!
RIGHT NOW!
WIDE
Format
Printing
SSigns
Banners
Posters
canas





Lowest
>1 Prices
Available


3821 Tamiami Trail Between Conway & Gardner Across from Gatorz 764-6245


_~__


Page 38


Friday, May 18, 2012








Protecting livestock when a hurricane strikes


STAFF REPORT

Experts say preparation
is the byword for protecting
livestock when a hurricane
strikes.
But there is little you can
do for horse and cows to
protect them from high
winds and rain.
DeSoto County
Cooperative Extension
Agent Jim Selph said the
best thing livestock owners
can do to protect livestock
when the storm is at its
height and winds are roar-
ing over the landscape is
- nothing. Animals such as
horses and cows should be
left outside in their natural
habitat and not closed up in
a barn.
A raging storm triggers
an animal's instincts to find
safety.
"Cattle are pretty good at
just taking care of them-
selves," Selph said. "They
will herd together under
a tree and turn their back
sides into the wind."
Cows are hurt during a
storm mainly by random
threats like flying debris,
falling trees and lightning
strikes.
On the other hand,
herding can be not so good
a thing. "I have seen 30 or


FILE PHOTO
Livestock should be left outside during a hurricane as they will likely find their own way to safety.


more head of cattle killed
by a single bolt of lightning
when they were herded
together," Selph said.
Horses have more cause
to fear things that have
been manmade.
"Horses are much more
excitable than cows," Selph
said. "Instead of calmly
grouping together with the
come-what-may attitude of
cows, horses have a ten-
dency to try and flee, which
inevitably leads to a high-
stakes game of chicken with
their fences. Lots of horses
were injured by barbed wire
during Hurricane Charley."
Horse owners are


encouraged to use board
fencing or some sort of
barbless, high-tensile
strength wire to contain
their horses instead of the
normal barbed wire widely
used for fencing by the
agriculture industry.
Cows don't have much to
fear from fences.
"If cows really want to go
through or over a fence, it's
not going to stop them,"
Selph said. "There is not a
cow out there than cannot
jump over a five-strand
barbed wire fence if it wants
to."
For smaller livestock such
as goats, being left outside


during a hurricane is better
for them, he noted, but the
fence should be made of
a tight mesh, rather than
barbed wire, because they
can slip through or under-
neath it.

Be prepared
Provisions should be set
and stockpiled for livestock,
Selph said, just like they are
for humans.
Animals need a source of
water if there is not a pond
or lake nearby they can
drink from. Electric well-fed

LIVESTOCK 140


* FREE DELIVERY! Accept all Insurances
* FREE Antibiotic
* Compounding Meaid Part D, Tricare, Express Scripts, Staywell,
* o res Prices Eve ay Workman's Comp, Share of Cost, Long Term Core, ALF

-
+ I


It domALl,, doof

A&, I wi{ow Co.



24 Hour Emergency Service

(941) 255-3770
18480 Paulson Dr. Port Charlotte
(Across From Sun Flea Market) A A


Friday, May 18, 2012


Special section of the Sun


Page 39





Special section of the Sun


LIVESTOCK

FROM PAGE 39

water sources may not work
after power is severed by a
hurricane.
Hay and feed are also big
considerations for pastures
that may be overstocked for
any length of time. It usu-
ally takes 3 acres of bahia
pasture grass to support one
cow. Malnourished livestock
may result if that ratio is
exceeded for a long period
of time.
Horses likewise need
stocks of feed and hay to
support them.
According to Selph,
commercial feed and hay
distribution can be inter-
rupted in the aftermath of
a hurricane, so it is best to
have ready just in case.


Cow danger
Selph said the biggest
danger livestock presents
after a storm can be found
on the roads. Livestock
invariably escapes after
fences are destroyed during
a storm and whole herds
could end up missing.
"People need to watch
out for animals and downed
fences on the roads when
driving after a storm," Selph
said.

Identifying scattered
livestock
One of the best things
stock owners can do,
Selph said, is to mark their
livestock with tags, brands,
or electronic identifying
tags, so they can be easily
reclaimed after the storm
passes.


Moore Hair LLC Whole Life Wellness LLC
By Bethany Moore Lori North, Lic #BW7101
941-979-7413 941-661-3834
Stylist Body Wrapper


* Haircuts
*Color Retouch
SPartial Hi-light
* Perms


$20 & Up
$35 & Up
$40 & Up
$55 &Up


NEW CLIENT SPECIAL!
$10 ff
S Any Chemical Service
L--------- J


* Detoxifying Mineral Wraps
* Lose Inches Naturally
* Firm & Tighten Skin
* Restore Vital Nutrients

NEW CLIENT SPECIAL!
$10 Off
Transformation Body Wrap
L ---------J


"Because when you look good, you feel good."


166U TMIHi RAIl# OR CAEELIJWIFRLOTTIKE, FlLS


Page 40


Friday, May 18, 2012




Special section of the Sun


Terms to know when the weather


How alerts are issued
Before watches and warn-
ings are issued, the National
Weather Service, private
forecasters, newspapers,
radio and television stations
normally try to alert the
public to potential weather
dangers.
Often, forecasters begin is-
suing bulletins on hurricanes
three or four days before the
storm hits.
Forecasters can't issue alerts
for the danger of severe thun-
derstorms, tornadoes and
flash floods that far ahead.
Usually, the National
Weather Service's Severe
Storms Forecast Center sends
out alerts the day before dan-
gerous weather is likely. Most
television weathercasters


highlight these alerts on the
evening news the day before
threatening weather.
A weather radio is one of
the best ways to stay tuned-in
to dangerous weather.
These radios receive broad-
casts from special National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration radio stations.
NOAA is the federal agency
that includes the National
Weather Service. The
broadcasts are fromWeather
Service offices. Broadcasts
include ordinary forecasts of
several kinds, including boat-
ing, farming, traveling and
outdoor recreation as well as
general forecasts for the area.
The stations immediately
broadcast all watches and
warnings.


Some weather radios have a
feature that turn on the radio
automatically when a watch
or warning is broadcast. Such
"tone alert" weather radios
are highly recommended for
places where large numbers
of people could be endan-
gered by tornadoes or flash
floods.
These include schools,
nursing homes, shopping
center security offices, hospi-
tals, and recreation areas such
as swimming pools.
A NationalWeather Service
Web site has information on
weather radio, including a list
of weather radio stations in
each state.

Weather Terms
Here are some of the terms


gets tough
most commonly used by the
NationalWeather Service
when referring to hurricanes.
Tropical disturbance: A
moving area of thunderstorms
in the tropics with a poorly
organized rotary circulation.
Tropical depression: An
area of low pressure, orga-
nized rotary circulation of
clouds and winds to 38 mph.
Tropical storm: Well
organized counterclockwise
circulation of clouds and
winds 39-73 mph. The storm
is assigned a name.
Tropical storm watch: The
possibility of winds between
39-73 mph affecting the area
within 48 hours.
Tropical storm warning:
TERMS 142


BlueCross BlueShield

of Florida
An Independent Licensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association
3718 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte, FL 33952
YOUR LOCAL OFFICE


* Health Insurance
* Medicare Supplement


* Life Insurance
* Dental Insurance


* Medicare Advantage Plans Specialty Insurance


SWFL/ INSURANCE
A S S OC A T E S, N C
941%6243444 P


p q


During this hurricane season
make sure you're covered!


rHITCO

INSURANCE AGENCY L.L.C.


O c 0 [?3(]M



www.whitecoininsurancepg.com
info@whitcoinsurancepg.com

Calday! 941.257.0692

ContactWhitCo Insurance to review
your policies to make sure you have
the coverage to protect you and your
family after the storm.


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 41





Special section of the Sun


TERMS

FROM PAGE 41

The likelihood of winds
between 39-73 mph affecting
the area within 24 hours.
Hurricane: When a tropical
storm reaches winds of 74
mph or more it is classified a
hurricane.
Hurricane watch: A hur-
ricane may threaten your area
within 48 hours.
Hurricane warning: A
hurricane is expected to strike
your area within 24 hours or
less.
Tornado watch: Tornadoes
and severe thunderstorm are
possible in your area.
Tornado warning: Tornado
sighted in your area, take
shelter.
Storm surge: The strong
winds associated with


hurricanes and tropical
storms cause the sea level
to rise above normal tidal
heights, with giant wind-driv-
en waves and strong unpre-
dictable currents sometimes
covering 50 miles.
Advisory: A method for
disseminating hurricane and
storm data to the public every
6 hours. Small craft warnings
are released as necessary.
Special advisory Warning
given anytime there is a
significant change in weather
conditions or change in
warnings.
Intermediate advisory: A
method for updating regular
advisory information every 2
or 3 hours as necessary.
Coastal flood warning:
A warning issued by the
NationalWeather Service
that significant wind-forced
flooding is to be expected
along low-lying coastal areas


if weather patterns develop as
forecast.
Coastal flood watch: An
alert issued by the National
Weather Service that signifi-
cant wind-forced flooding is
possible along low-lying
coastal areas if weather pat-
terns develop as forecast.
Flash flood watch/ flash
flood warning/ flood warn-
ing: A warning issued by the
NationalWeather Service
that indicates the expected
severity of flooding (minor,
moderate or major), as well as
where and when the flooding
will begin.
Eye Wall/Wall Cloud: An
organized band of clouds
immediately surrounding the
center of a tropical cyclone.
Eye wall and wall cloud are
used interchangeably.
Forward speed (hurri-
cane): The rate of movement
of the hurricane eye in miles


per hour or knots. If you track
hurricanes and use official
advisories for your informa-
tion, be aware that Public
Advisories show wind speeds
in miles per hour (mph) and
Forecast Advisories show
wind speeds in knots (Kt).
Generally 1 knot = 1.15 miles
per hour.
Gale warning: A warning is-
sued by the NationalWeather
Service when sustained winds
within the range of 39-54
miles per hour are either
predicted or occurring. Gale
warnings are not normally
issued during tropical storm
situations.
High wind warning: A high
wind warning is defined as
1-minute average surface
winds of 40 mph or greater
lasting for 1 hour or longer, or
winds gusting to 58 mph or

TERMS 144


941.475.8110 busey.com


II rI I


Page 42


Friday, May 18, 2012


Member FDI(




Special section of the Sun


mlmiE


4=


o [prorrtt
0 MIOfR=t



S10% OFF "
* All Service and Sales
SVaBd ony at ni of purchase I
i ----m


941-629-2400


ww .Dad.rgeoro fac boo com/Da nd D, ereag 5


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 43


^__.1
i .= ...


o~r~a~n~8~tii0~


ffm. it *o


ansOI5


m am







Special section of the Sun


TERMS
FROM PAGE 42

greater regardless of duration
that are either expected or
observed over land.
Severe thunderstorm
warning: A warning issued
for a specific area by the
NationalWeather Service
when a severe thunderstorm
has been sighted or indicated
on radar. These storms are ca-
pable of producing damaging
winds greater than 55 miles
per hour, frequent lightning,
heavy rainfall and/or hail.
Severe thunderstorm
watch: An alert issued
by the NationalWeather
Service when conditions are
favorable for development
of severe thunderstorms.
These storms are capable of
producing damaging winds


greater than 55 miles per
hour, frequent lightning,
heavy rainfall and/or hail.
Small craft advisory:
A warning issued by the
NationalWeather Service for
winds from 20 to 33 knots
inclusive or for sea condi-
tions either forecasted or
occurring which are consid-
ered potentially hazardous to
small boats in coastal waters.
Special marine warning:
A warning issued by the
NationalWeather Service for
hazardous weather condi-
tions, usually of short dura-
tion, not adequately covered
by existing marine warning.
Such weather conditions
include sustained winds or
gusts of 35 knots or greater.
Storm surge: The large
dome of water, often 50 to
100 miles wide, that sweeps
across the coastline near
where a hurricane makes


landfall. The surge of high
water, topped by waves is
devastating. The stronger the
hurricane and the shallower
the offshore water, the higher
the storm surge will be.
In the United States, most
deaths from hurricanes are
a result of storm surge. In
this area, a storm surge of
over 20 feet is possible with a
category 4 or 5 hurricane.
Storm tide: If the storm
surge arrives at the same
time as the high tide, the
water height will be even
greater. The storm tide is
the combination of the
storm surge and the normal
astronomical tide.
Sustained wind: The
surface wind obtained by
averaging observed value
over a one minute period.
Tornado: A relatively
short-lived local storm, that
is composed of violently


rotating columns of air that
descend in the familiar
funnel shape from a thun-
derstorm system.
Tornado warning: A warn-
ing issued by the National
Weather Service when a
tornado has been sighted or
has been detected on radar.
Warnings will give the loca-
tion of the tornado, the area
immediately affected by the
warning and the direction of
travel. In this area, tornadoes
sometimes occur quickly and
dissipate before a warning
can be issued.
Tornado watch: An alert is-
sued by the NationalWeather
Service when weather
conditions are favorable for a
tornado to develop and that
the sky should be monitored.
Water spout: A relatively
small tornado over a body
of water with winds rarely
exceeding 50 miles per hour.


740 Tamiami Trl Port Charlotte V2 Mile North of Toledo Blade
941-255-5799 www.ClintonCasual.com


COME SEE US A T THE HURRICANE EXPO
800TH #26

Gulf Shore



1 3941 Tamiami Trail
Store #6950
Punta Gorda, FL
(941) 575-9799


Page 44


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


Hurricane myths


MYTH: "Only protect the
windows and doors facing
the ocean."
REALITY: Wind can come
from any direction, particu-
larly with hurricanes and tor-
nadoes. These storms' winds
generally move in a circle, so
depending on where the eye
of the storm is located, wind
can come from virtually any
angle. Additionally, hurricane
winds are turbulent and may
change direction quickly.

MYTH: "Nothing can
stand up to a strong hur-
ricane, [br] [br] so why bother
preparing."
REALITY: It's easy to un-
derstand why people might
think that after seeing the
damage caused by Hurricane


Andrew, a Category 5 storm.
But it's not true. Many, if not
most, of the buildings that
failed during Andrew did so
because they had a few cor-
rectable flaws, most notably
the lack of strong shutters
and doors.
Retrofitting those houses
with modern hurricane pro-
tection, including some little
things like adding Florida
International University's
"magic" nails to the roof,
can make a lot of differ-
ence. (FIU researchers have
found that using nails with
a twist in them to hold the
roof's plywood to the rafters
dramatically increases the
structure's strength).

MYTH: "Tape windows to


prevent damage or shatter."
REALITY: This is a waste
of effort, time and tape. It
offers little strength to the
glass and NO protection
against flying debris. The
tape will only help to keep
the glass from dispersing.
After the storm passes
you will spend many a hot
summer afternoon trying
to scrape the old, baked-
on tape off your windows
(assuming they weren't
shattered). Further, taped
windows can create a false
sense of security when
families shelter in place.
Once a hurricane warning
has been issued, you would
be better off spending your
time putting up shutters
over doors and windows.


MYTH: "The best thing to
do if a hurricane is coming is
to evacuate to Orlando."
REALITY: It's a traditional
way to think, but it's not
true. Residents of Southwest
Florida should stay in a
strong building as close
to home as possible, but
outside of the evacuation
zones announced for that
particular storm.
If you head upstate, you
run the risk of getting caught
in traffic and being trapped in
the middle of nowhere when
the hurricane arrives. Also,
buildings in Orlando are, in
general, poorly constructed
compared to buildings here,
and provide a much lower
MYTHS148


Small things

MAKE A BIG


DIFFERENCE
Bottled water. A flashlight
and radio. Fresh batteries.
Having the little things
ready can make a big
difference when a storm
hits. State Farm" can help
before as well as after.
F Contact one of these
State Farm agents for
tips on how to prepare
S or visit statefarm.como.



SMike Martin, Agent
425 Cross St., Suite 114
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Bus: 91-505-2550
www.mikemartininsurance.com

LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR STATE FARM IS THERE
|A NC*" " .


W I Watch together. Listen separately.
series With direct sound technology.

Introducing Wi Series by
Stark.ey Stremn ster o -dun
di.r'tly to your hard,9 aid fro, The sound finds you.
your TV. adio or -omput-r. l r


Snecv k i -lsii. Sarky
* No pairings.
* No wires. dII-
* No kidding.
* The latest in noise reduction.


U has been in business since 1991. We strive to offer you
the best hearing devices available plus an exceptional patient experience. We know how
important your hearing is. Please call us today to begin your life of better hearing.



ir. Tn- C fDkinrlTkor l T r l .I n.k.o r r. i. i ii-- T,


r -- r j 1 r .

r I HiE]L For more information call
,' I Er'- TER I
o T La Playa Plaza 2i05
2811 Tamiami Trail, Ste. A, Port Charlotte, FL


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 45


ws o ne houl awl ihc wlumn
W> Em;i dircund shnl, -s In
C"" ""...vw.. u~a u







Rebuilding Charlotte County schools after Charley


By RACHAEL TAFT
STAFF WRITER

It took six years and
$215 million to rebuild the
Charlotte County schools
destroyed by Hurricane
Charley.
The hurricane hit on Aug.
13, 2004, just four days into
the school year. The dam-
age was devastating, leaving
six schools beyond repair,
including the Baker Center,
Punta Gorda Middle,
Charlotte High, and Neil
Armstrong, Peace River and
East elementary schools.
Port Charlotte Middle and
Deep Creek Elementary also
sustained some damage
that forced the schools to
remain closed a few extra
weeks for repairs.
"It was the biggest


disaster in the history of our
country as far as educa-
tion," district spokesman
Mike Riley said.
More than 6,000 students
were displaced and forced
to cram into the remain-
ing schools once classes
resumed two weeks later.
Students attended in split
sessions, with one body of
students using school fa-
cilities in the morning and
another in the afternoon.
Once students were back
in class, the district turned
to formulating a plan of
action.
Over the course of the
next year, modular cam-
puses were erected on the
sites of the old schools, a
large endeavor in itself,
allowing students to move
back to a normal schedule.


REBUILDING CHARLOTTE COUNTY SCHOOLS
Timeline and Cost
December 2004- Baker Center opens modular campus
February 2005 Punta Gorda Middle School opens modular campus
April 2005 Charlotte High, Neil Armstrong and Peace River elementary
schools open modular campuses
May 2005 Peace River Elementary opens modular campus
July 2005 East Elementary opens modular campus
October 2006 Construction begins on Baker Center, Neil Armstrong Elemen-
tary and Punta Gorda Middle
November 2006 Construction begins on Peace River Elementary
May 2007 Construction begins on Charlotte High
August 2007 Baker Center opens ($15.8 million), Construction begins on East
Elementary
October 2007 Neil Armstrong Elementary opens ($22.8 million)
January 2008 Peace River Elementary opens ($23.8 million)
May 2008- Construction finishes on PGMS ($37.5 million)
August 2008 Punta Gorda Middle opens to students
September 2008 Construction finishes on East Elementary ($21 million)
November 2008 East Elementary opens to students
April 2009 First building at Charlotte High opens
August 2010 Final buildings at Charlotte High open ($85 million)


BROTHERS
9I SERIE INC.UU'EI


Page 46


Special section of the Sun


Friday, May 18, 2012





Friday, May 18, 2012
At the same time the district
was formulating a plan of
action. The district held
planning meetings with the
community to gather input
and sought out architects
and contractors to take on
the projects.
"It was actually like
building 12 schools,"
assistant superintendent
of student support Jerry
Olivo said. Meanwhile, the
damaged structures were
demolished once they were
designated complete losses
by the insurance companies
and Federal Emergency
Management Agency.
Construction on four
of the schools began
in the fall of 2006, fol-
lowed by Charlotte High
and East Elementary in
spring and summer 2007.
Construction lasted from as
little as 10 months for the
51,000-square-foot Baker


Special section of the Sun


Center to just over three
years for the completion of
the entire 375,000-square-
foot Charlotte High
campus.
"The closest catastrophic
event to a school district
was Hurricane Andrew in
Miami," Olivo said. "It only
destroyed two schools, and
those two schools took six
to seven years to rebuild."
The process may have
been easier if the district
rebuilt the schools identical
to their prior construction,
but the schools had been
facing growing student
populations and there
was the clear need to have
buildings that could better
weather a storm.
"The decision by the
district was to build bigger
and better and prepare our-
selves for the 21st century,"
Olivo said. The new schools
boasted increased campus


security and
state-of-the-art
technology in the
classrooms.
"It sped up our
building plan
by 10 years,"
Riley said. "The
schools that
were destroyed,
the children
deserved newer
schools than
what they had. It
made a big dif-
ference with the
pride they have
in their schools."
Email: rtaft@sun-herald.
com
SUN FILE PHOTO
Charlotte County
Schools, particu-
larly ones in Punta
Gorda, were devas-
tated by Hurricane
Charley.


G & S JEWELRY

1931 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte 941-993-9893
* HOURs: MON, WED, FRI 10. 1 TO 6PIM T IES, THI.IRS 10,\M TO 8PM S\T 10( 1 TO 5PiM SUIN 12 TO 4PM

^I4I !4HA |_ __ RAFTE D J


* Beginner to Advanced
* Stringing
* Stitching
* Viking Knit
* Wire Wrapping
* Kumihimo
* Freeform Peyote


* Bridal

* SPEC Occasion

* Holiday

* Custom Designs


* Girls Night Out

* Kidz Kamp

* Princess Birthday

* Open Beading


* Books / Magazines
* Gemstones
* Swarovski
* Findings
* Loose Beads
* Tools
* Wire / Fireline


Page 47


'I


'' '' ''




Page 48


Special section of the Sun


MYTHS
FROM PAGE 45
level of hurricane protection.
There's no guarantee the
hurricane won't follow you up
the turnpike.
Besides, if it's a bad storm,
you'll want to get home as
soon as possible to take care
of your property.
MYTH: "Light candles if
the power goes out."
REALITY: Never use
candles, gas or oil lanterns
during a storm. If a fire
is started in your home,
emergency responders may
not be able to respond to
your emergency. Only use
flashlights or battery-powered
lanterns during the storm.
MYTH: "Storm surge won't
bother me I'm two whole


blocks from the beach!"
REALITY: A storm surge is
a wind-driven dome of water
that rushes inland ahead of,
and to the right of, the center
of a hurricane. The dome can
reach to 25 to 30 feet in the
right place on the coastline
in a Category 5 land-falling
hurricane. It will NOT stop in
a block, or two blocks, or in
some cases, for miles.
The National Hurricane
Center has developed a com-
puter model called SLOSH
to predict surge inundation,
which has been found to be
very accurate. In a Category
1 hurricane exiting the state
at Fort Myers, the surge will
affect the immediate coastal
area only. A Category 5 land-
falling hurricane at Bonita
Springs could push the Gulf
of Mexico inland more than
12 miles. Remember: 90
percent of the people who
die in a hurricane drown in


the storm surge. Plan ahead.
MYTH: "Sandbags can
prevent water from entering
a home."
REALITY: Sandbags are ef-
fective when used to channel
or direct water away from
a home, provided they are
properly filled and main-
tained. Fill sandbags only
half full, tamp into place and
limit placement to three lay-
ers, unless a building is used
as a backing or sandbags are
placed in a pyramid.
MYTH: "It's safe to stay in
a high rise because you're
above the flooding."
REALITY: Not true. The
winds in a hurricane, espe-
cially a strong storm, increase
dramatically with height, so
the forces on windows and
doors at the higher floors are
greatly exaggerated. It's true
that the interior of the second


Friday, May 18, 2012
or third floor is normally a
safe place to be, but if your
high rise is near the water,
you still should leave so you
don't get trapped.
MYTH: "The best way
to keep your house from
blowing apart is to leave a
window open opposite the
wind, so the pressure inside
the house can equal the
pressure outside."
REALITY: Also not true. The
strongest forces that work on
a house during a hurricane
are caused by the wind
speeding by the structure
creating a strong suction force
on the downwind comers.
Low pressure (suction) is
created on the lee side of the
house. Opening a window
there can lower the pressure
inside the house as well, sub-
jecting it to higher stress, not
less. Keep all windows closed,
locked and shuttered.


We Str To Make Our Servie
T M. S T C4C*hp J-1% 1 sU
OW! 1 -1dK% !


- Charlotte County


2Y



it Ci


We Service All Makes And Models
Port Charlotte 625-1000 1544 Market Cir., Unit 911
"Serving Charlotte County for 27 years."
Lee 239-278-1555 Collier 239-732-6800


o "a r 2008 2009 2010
I Br1 (fl


OFF~
~J~hl4





Special section of the Sun


Will climate change increase hurricane damage costs?


By MEGHAN EVANS
ACCUWEATHER METEOROLOGIST

A recent study found
that a warming climate
may increase the fre-
quency of intense hurri-
canes, resulting in a rise of
hurricane damage costs on
the order of tens of billions
of dollars a year by 2100.
Changing demographics
alone were found in the re-
search to cause substantial
changes in the future.

Changing
demographics
to cause increase
in damage cost
Changing demographics
in the future are expected


to lead to a significant
increase in damage losses
caused by hurricanes.
While increasing value of
coastal properties plays a
role in hurricane damage
costs, increasing develop-
ment of coastal areas is
momentous.
There have already been
noted increases in popula-
tion along both the Gulf
and Atlantic coastlines of
the U.S.
According to the U.S.
Census Bureau in 2010,
the population density
increased by 32 percent
along the Gulf Coast
and 17 percent along
the Atlantic coast from
1990-2008.
Many of the densely
populated communities


along the Atlantic and
Gulf coasts are less than
10 feet above mean sea
level, according to NOAA.
This puts coastal com-
munities at risk for storm
surge damage on top of
wind damage and flooding
rainfall.
In addition, NOAA
reports that more than half
of the nation's "economic
productivity" lies within
coastal zones of the United
States.
"We see changes [in
hurricane damage costs] on
the order of 50 percent or so
over the next 100 years due
to demographics alone,"
Kerry Emanuel, professor
of Atmospheric Sciences at
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, said.


Climate change
influences on
damage costs
On top of changes in
population near coastlines
and other changes in de-
mographics, the research
performed by Emanuel
found that climate change
may have a profound
impact on the cost of
hurricane damage in the
future.
"Globally, we actu-
ally expect the number
of storms to decline. And
that's because the middle
part of the atmosphere,
2 or 3 miles above the
surface, gets drier in
a relative sense as the
COSTSs50


Protect your investment during hurricane season & throughout the year.

FULLY ENCLOSED DRY STORAGE
Our indoor complex is for the serious boater who appreciates the amenities of a World Class
Marina, yet wants to ensure his/her investment is protected and secure while in dry dock.
Here you'll get the peace of mind you deserve.


31 F"
.. .GU....L.A


* Pristine State-Of-The-Art Facility I!l IE!
* Fully Enclosed For Boats Up To 75 Feet
* 5 Forklifts up to 42,000 lb Capacity -
* 2 Travel lifts up to 70-Ton Capacity .y


B 15001 Gasparilla Road,
Placida, Florida
(941) 697-2280 or (800) 541-4441
www.gasparillamarina.com


h o I~~J'. suul 11'


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 49





Special section of the Sun


COSTS
FROM PAGE 49

climate warms," Emanuel
explained.
But while the overall
frequency of storms may
decrease, the frequency of
more intense hurricanes
may increase. This seem-
ing discrepancy arises
since the factors that
influence the frequency of
storms are different from
those that influence the
strength.
"Now as you warm
the climate, the driver
for hurricanes, which is
really that the sea surface
becomes warmer and
that allows hurricanes to
become more intense,"
Emanuel added. "Most of


PHOTO PROVIDED BY NOAA


A collapsed house in North Carolina that could not withstand the 15-foot storm surge caused by Hurricane
COSTS 1 52 Floyd in 1999.


ProSports Academy, located in the pristine and historic
Punta Gorda, Florida is committed to providing the
finest training systems,professionals and facilities to
efficiently and ethically enhance our athletes' peak
performance.

Encompassing all sports and competitive levels,
ProSports Academy has integrated research-based
physical, technical and tactical training programs in
an aspiring envirnoment that promotes long-term
growth and develops the total athlete.

941. 505. 2551 I prosportspuntagorda.com



'1 ProSportsAcademy
10* 1 AI ilTI E IOPIMWENUT
(Q


Deaian Fiaca Serice
RetirmentSpecilist


Tired of low Interest R tie (CDs?-T!
Would 6% 8% Stable 1onii I0icoiiie
Help Weather the Storm?

Call 8Me!

Mutual Funds
Financial Planning
Life IISuIraince
LT Health Care
Refiremneni Plans/IR As
CDs & Bonds
Non-Traded REITs
Filed & Variable.nInuilies
Tal Slralegies
Socks

J1rr7y qalloran, MBA Offering FinancialAdvice since 1982.

Tel: 941-205-2277 150 W. McKenzie Street, #111
TF: 866-587-2276 Punta Gorda, Florida 33950
Fax: 941-205-2276 Jerry@DFSinvestments.net
Jerry O'Halloran is registered with, supervised by and offers
securities through Kovack Securities, Inc.
446681


Page 50


Friday, May 18, 2012





Special section of the Sun


HURRICANE SEASON 2004... I


sheild
__ne _


FREE MOTORS!
with New Roll-Down
Hurricane Shutter
I g MUST
PRESENT
t -- COUPON.


We Repair & Maintain
All Makes Of Shutters!
1 0%/ OFF
Total Service Bill
MUST
PRESENT
COUPON.


Friday, May 18, 2012


Page 51





Page 52


Special section of the Sun


COSTS
FROM PAGE 50

the models show in most
but not all places that
the frequency of intense
hurricanes goes up with a
warming climate."
With an increase in


stronger hurricanes, the
study found that very large
rises in damage costs from
hurricanes may occur.
"We see changes quite
large potential changes -
in hurricane damage [by
2100] on the order of tens
of billions of dollars a
year," Emanuel said.
Besides using theory to


D arper's Maniifacturing Specialties, Inc.
SE;ioblihed 1980 Li(cend & Inured =AAA00951

riH i I'lr FREE PERMIT *
S IFor Any Order Over $1,500 (Up To $150)

Screened Front Entries
9w 9 Garage Screens
(Sliders & Eectric)
* Screenrooms/Carports Lanai Enclosures
* Pool Cages Glass, Acrylic &
Vinyl Windows

(941) 629-3490 R
70 Sandhill BlId.. Units 901 and 902. Deep Crk www.harperalumspecialties.com







Kids Eat Free Tuesdays, All Day!


analyze how the frequency
and intensity of hurricanes
will be effected by climate
change, Emanuel utilized
a technique called "down-
scaling." He embedded
high resolution, special-
ized hurricane models
into four different global
climate models.
The uncertainty of the
damage cost of hurricanes
in the future, factoring
in climate change, was
described by Emanuel as
"a great deal."
"Of the four models, one
produces essentially no
change at all, two models
produced a change on the
order of 20 billion dollars a
year and the fourth model
produces a change of
almost 70 billion dollars a
year," Emanuel added.

Implications of the
research
People and organiza-
tions who need to make
long-term plans such as
building seawalls or levee
systems can use the results
of Emanuel's research.
"The city of New York
needs to decide whether
and how much to spend
on seawalls that might
help protect New York
City from storm surges,"
Kerry said, giving an ex-
ample of the implications
of his research. "Now,


Friday, May 18, 2012
storm surges are interest-
ing. They are one of the
major sources of damage
caused by hurricanes.
They are like tsunamis
but they are not gener-
ated by earthquakes but
by hurricane winds. But
you have a twin problem
because not only do you
have a greater potential
incidence of stronger
storms in New York City,
but the storm surge is
riding on a sea level
which is elevated because
of climate change. So, the
twin perils combine in
this case."
"So, if you want to
build a seawall, you're
thinking on a 50-year
time scale or maybe even
100-year time scale. You
want that seawall to last
a long time and you have
to decide how high to
make it and how strong
to make it."
Emanuel also gave the
example of the World
Bank, explaining that
knowing the financial
demands that might be
caused by climate-related
damages, would be very
useful.
On the other hand, an
organization such as an
insurance company need
to know information on a
much shorter time scale.


Port Charlotte
'1700 T1 inih n i Tr,=il -1 J1-2c.._-11 C_.



ONLY $6.99
Burger. Fries and Coke


I.=_.-.1; ,:-; : ... . .... ....... -.. -... ..


PLAN AHEAD
IT'S ALWAYS BEST TO BE PREPARED
We can help you plan and relieve your family of having to make tough decisions
during a period of great stress & grief... Call us for answers to your questions.

"ROYAL PALM
MEMORIAL GARDENS


27200 Jones Loop Road
Punta Gorda, Florida 33982
Call (941) 639-2381
www.royalpalmmemorial.com








Deadliest hurricanes in US history


By VICKIE FRANTZ
ACCUWEATHER STAFF WRITER

The top five deadliest
hurricanes to impact the
U.S. claimed the lives of
about 15,200 people and
impacted the states of
Florida, Georgia, Louisiana,
South Carolina and Texas.

Galveston, Texas
Galveston was im-
pacted by a hurricane
that made landfall as
a Category 4 storm on
Sept. 8, 1900. Winds were
estimated to be in excess
of 140 mph. The storm
surge reached 15.7 feet,
according to the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA).


Meteorologists of the
era had little knowledge
of the behavior of tropical
storms. They believed the
hurricane would take the
usual northeastern track
after crossing over southern
Florida. The residents of
Galveston had little to no
warning about the powerful
hurricane headed straight
for the town, according
to Erik Larson, author of
Isaac's Storm.
Communication from
Florida was cut off as the
hurricane's outer bands
brought high winds and
heavy rain into southern
parts of the state. Florida's
meteorologists were un-
able to report the track of
DEADLIEST 154


AP FILE PHOTO
In this September 1900 file photo, a large part of the city of
Galveston, Texas, is reduced to rubble after being hit by a surprise
hurricane Sept. 8,1900. More than 6,000 people were killed and
10,000 left homeless from the storm, the worst natural disaster in
U.S. history. Hurricane Ike's eye was forecast to strike somewhere
near Galveston late Friday, Sept. 12, 2008, or early Saturday, then
head inland for Houston.


A1 AI I igig
WilliamT.McKenzie r.,





629.3443


3443 Tamiami Tr., Suite D,
Located in Professional Gardens


Friday, May 18, 2012


Special section of the Sun


Page 53