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Venice gondolier sun.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00981
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun.
Uniform Title: Venice gondolier sun
Added title page title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun,
Venice Gondolier Sun
Publication Date: 03-03-2012
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers. -- Venice (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Sarasota County (Fla.)
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
General Note: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
notis - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
issn - 1536-1063
System ID: UF00028295:00981

Full Text






W0 uo0oier un Fx
PI g I

LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S NO.1 WEEKLY NEWSPAPER




MORTGAGE LOWDOWN Page 1OA HEALTH BREAK Page 14A BUSINESS BOOST Page 15A


No pets for pet rescuer


By GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

A Twelfth Circuit Court judge
this week entered a permanent
injunction against any future
ownership of animals by Marc
Wayne Marois, owner of MM
Pet Rescue and Thrift Store,
1779 South Tamiami Trail, South
Venice.
On Dec. 7, the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office Animal Services
division seized 45 dogs from
MM Pet Rescue, a retail store
selling thrift goods and dogs,


after receiving customer com-
plaints of foul odor and unsafe
conditions.
The dogs have since been
adopted; one had to be put
down.
The seizure last year was dev-
astating to a dozen volunteers,
some of whom were crying as
deputies took hours to assess
the situation and evacuate the
animals.
The volunteers pledged to help
Marois rebuild the operation.
Builders came forth to offer their
services. Marois made headway


improving the building. But less
than three months later, Judge
Phyllis Galen ruled Marois'
efforts fell far short.
In a written ruling dated
Feb. 29, Galen said Marois and
his animal rescue store are "per-
manently enjoined against own-
ing, having custody of or having
control over animals."
The ruling even bars Marois
from having his own pets.
Marois called the ruling one-
sided and vowed to appeal it,

PETS 6


FILE PHOTO
A dog is removed from MM Pet Rescue on U.S. 41 in South
Venice in December. Sarasota County Animal Services removed
a total of 45 animals and shuttered the operation over unsafe
conditions. A judge on Wednesday issued a permanent injunc-
tion against the owner.


School district gets praise, advice


By BOB MUDGE
EDITOR

An independent consultant's
report gives the Sarasota County
School District high marks but
also identifies potential savings
of more than $23 million over
the next five years.
MGT of America, a national
firm, was hired at the sugges-
tion of Citizens for Academic
Success and Excellence, a
citizens group, to conduct a top-
to-bottom study of the district
and identify strengths, areas for
improvement and cost savings.
The study cost $114,500, which
was paid by more than 60 peo-
ple and businesses, including
Gulf Coast Community Foun-
dation and the Community
Foundation of Sarasota County.
The report was released Friday
at GCCF's office in Venice.
Skip Archibald, MGT project
director for the study, began
his presentation talking about
the 73 areas of commendation
given to the district, a number
he said was substantially higher
than in districts of comparable
size. In particular, he lauded
its financial management and
its planning, which he said is
"more than a best practices
plan" and could be used as a
model by districts nationwide.
The study contained even
more recommendations
than commendations 89,
including 16 that could have
a financial impact. Potential
savings can be found, it says,
in programs (examples: adjust-
ing small-enrollment classes
and reducing by 10 percent the
number of teachers on special


SUN PHOTOS BY BOB MUDGE


Skip Archibald, of MGT of America, presents his firm's review of the Sarasota County School District at Gulf Coast
Community Foundation in Venice Friday. MGT offered recommendations that could save the district more than
$23 million over the next five years.


assignment), facilities (reducing
construction costs to state aver-
ages and eliminating portables)
and human resources (switch-
ing to interest-based bargaining
instead of collective bargain-
ing, shortening teacher aides'
contracts).
The $23 million figure is
conservative, Archibald said, as
it doesn't include money that
might be saved from renegoti-
ated union contracts, abandon-
ing the extended school day (a
separate study is recommended
on that) or establishing another
bus depot (another study that's


recommended). It does include
the cost of an internal audit,
which might identify additional .
savings, and a salary study.
District salaries are among the
highest in the state, the report
notes.
"This community clearly takes
pride in attracting personnel
to Sarasota County" Archibald
said. "You do pay well."
The salary study should be
a top priority, he said. Another Scott Pinkerton, of Citizens for
need that he recommends Academic Success and Excellence,
be addressed when funding makes a point following the presen-
tation of MGT of America's report on
DISTRICT 17 the Sarasota County School District.


Venice in


retirement


top 10

By ED SCOTT
STAFF WRITER

Local communities continue
to pile up awards, like the tall-
est sand castle on the shore.
First, Siesta Beach was named
the No. 1 Beach by Stephen
P Leatherman, professor and
director of the Laboratory for
Coastal Research at Florida
International University (aka Dr.
Beach). Now Sarasota and Ven-
ice have been named the best
and ninth-best places to retire in
VENICE 17


Fog,


smoke


close 1-75
By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
STAFF WRITER
Thick fog rolled into the area
late Thursday and mixed with
smoke from some of the 15
regional controlled bums earlier
in the day, creating extremely
low visibility along Interstate 75
from Sarasota to Venice.
The potentially deadly com-
bination, called a "super fog,"
caused the Florida Highway
SMOKE 17


Management change at Tervis


By ROGER BUTTON
BUSINEWS COLUMNIST

Patrick Redmond is taking
on the role of chief execu-
tive officer at NorthVenice-
based Tervis, replacing Barry
Wolfson, who took over in
December 2010.
A longtime resident of
Sarasota, Redmond has a
B.A. in accounting with a
minor in economics from the
University of South Florida.
He starts on Monday and
as CEO will continue on the
company's board.


For the
past 17 years
Redmond has
S held business
development
and financial
positions at
Jabil Circuit,
REDMOND a $17 bil-
lion contract
manufacturing and design
services company, most
recently as head of strategic
development for its Diversi-
fied Manufacturing Services.
Prior to that he was president
and general manager of


Jabil Defense and Aerospace
Services, serving customers
around the world. He also
served as vice president and
controller for Jabil from 1999
to 2004, when the company
saw revenue grow from
$2 billion to $6.3 billion.
Tervis, a privately owned
company, began manufac-
turing insulated drinkware
as Tervis Tumbler in 1959 in
Osprey and retains its origi-
nal retail store on Tamiami
Trail. In October 2005, the

TERVIS 17


Good morning,
Gondolier Sun
subscriber
MICHAEL HORLICK


N OITCEST NORF


LEGALS........................................ 6A
LET'EM HAVE IT.......................... 8A
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR...........9A
LOTTERY................................... 2A
OBITUARIES................................4A


OTR UO WN SECTION


OPINION............................ ..8A
POLICE BEAT............................11A
SPORTS........................................ 12A
WEATHER........................... 2A


CROSSWORD...........................4B
FINEWHINES............................7B
RELIGION .................................8B
TRAVEL.....................................6B
VENU E...................................... 3B


N I THIS EDITION


CLASSIFIED
COMICS
KIMAL LUMBER
TV BOOK
USA WEEKEND


COUPONS DEATHS
Fantastic Sam's.........................9A Richard Blendea Sr.
Twin Palms Chiropractic.......10A Lela Bogen
Venice CarWash.......................9B Carlton Ferreira
WaterWorld Purification........9B Catherine Zumbano
WheelchairVans ...................... 9A 7 5252 10075 0


1653 US41 By Pass TL-
THE GOLD STORE (Acrossfrom Abens) VENICE 941-496-4596 L
JEWELRY & GIFTS P
4 AREA LOCATIONS:
5 Naples, Port Charlotte,
BONUS1 I P Venice & Sarasota
TO SENIORS Dolla Paid! OPEN DURING

www.goldstoreuenice.comWI


PHOTO COURTESY
OF RENATA GAONA
Manuel Rebecchi,
director of Cirque
Italia, Tito Gaona
of Venice and his
daughter, Victoria, <
7, dressed as the
penguin star of the
first circus to debut S M
its American run
in Venice since the
Ringling Bros. and
Barnum & Bailey Circus left Venice in 1992. Cirque Italia's "Aquatic" show will
open March 23 in the new blue and white tent that will rise soon in the parking
lot of the former Kmart near Shamrock Boulevard and U.S. 41 in Venice."Aquatic"
plays through March 31, with tickets priced at $10-$35. A portion of ticket
proceeds will be donated to save the Venice Circus Arena. Call 941-485-7675 or
visit www.venicecircusarts.com.


rnVi i a -iiVii Vvn IV v l 3M- 1Ivil III I I ni 1IVil


-,







ALMANAC


2A SUN NEWSPAPERS


MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


COURTESY PHOTO


Cyclovia Venice II

By MONTY ANDREWS
GUEST WRITER
Cyclovia Venice is a communitywide free
event promoting physical activity, healthy
lifestyles and the connectivity of our trails,
parks, beaches and streets. On Sunday,
March 11, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., a second
Cyclovia Venice event will be held.
During the inaugural Cyclovia Venice
event, held last November, more than 1,300
people of all ages participated. Once again
West Venice Avenue will closed to vehicle
traffic from Nokomis Avenue all the way to
Venice Beach. It is quite a sight seeing so
many people of all ages walking, jogging,
cycling and skating along the route.
A project of the ACHIEVE initiative, and led
by the South County Family YMCA and Jen-
nifer Tucker-Mogensen, Cyclovia is staged in
a number of cities around the world to help
promote community and physical activity. In
reviewing the list of other participating cities,
it appears Venice is the smallest city to hold
this event.
An added benefit derived from the event
was discovered when the Bike/WalkVenice
committee was reviewing the Bicycle Friendly


ABC 7 WEATHER


OC O0


Temperature
> ..:lerda3
Normal
Record
Rainfall
Yesterday
Month
Year


Sunrise/set
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonrise
Moonset


Hiqh L:Lo
75 55
88 30
(1997) (1941)
0.00"
Actual Average
0.00" 0.11"
1.73" 5.30"


DATE
' ". I n',
6:50 a.m. SAT3
SUN 4
MON 5
TUE 6
2:02 p.m. WED 7
3:51 a.m.


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
t(Sara .:.1i ana Cnh rl.:.lle C.:unliei)
S winds at 8 to 16 knots.
Seas 1 to 3 feet, light chop.

Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
S winds at 15 to 25 knots.
Seas 3 to 6 feet, moderate chop.


E 4 TE Rr T4r JCIl TII.1E


HIGH HIGH I
PM. A.M.
7:43 10:51
8:51 10:58
9:48 11:10
10:39 11:23
11:29 11:39
*STRONG TIDE
a A.M. p P.M.


Community application. One of the questions on the
form was, "Does your community conduct a Cyclovia
event?" Rack up another point in our favor.
If you or your organization would like to sponsor
or be part of Cyclovia Venice, you can log onto www.
CycloviaVenice.org or contact Tucker-Mogensen at
jtucker@veniceymca.org.
A healthy lifestyle it's worth the effort.


March 1N..... 520
March 1D..... 109
Feb. 29N...... 749
Feb. 29D...... 264
Feb. 28N...... 741
Feb. 28D......859
Feb. 27N...... 971
Feb. 27D......009

D-Day; N-Night


March 1N.....1233
March 1D.....6589
Feb. 29N ......7720
Feb. 29D ......6272
Feb. 28N ......5153
Feb. 28D......7602
Feb. 27N ......8517
Feb. 27D......5547

D-Day; N-Night


Feb. 28........................... 1-3-10-44
MegaBall................................... 10
Feb. 24......................... 5-27-30-38
MegaBall................................... 12
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for Feb. 28
0 4-of-4 + MB ..................................$-
4 4-of-4 .......................................$1,779
57 3-of-4 + MB ......................... $273.50
1,154 1 3-of-4 .................................$40
1,769 2-of-4 + MB ..........................$18


March 1 .................... 1-2-4-16-22
Feb. 29.................. 1-13-17-29-34
Feb. 28.................. 4-11-14-24-30
Feb. 27.................... 1-6-8-19-34
Feb. 26.................. 1-9-13-14-19
Payoff for March 1
3 5-digit winners.............. $77,924.28
336 4-digit winners ...................$112
12,098 3-digit winners..............$8.50
2-digit winners ................. Quick Pick ticket


Feb. 29.............. 6-20-27-33-42-45
Feb. 25.................. 1-2-6-14-19-31
Payoff for Feb. 29
1 6-digit winner...................... $3 million
34 5-digit winners.......................$4,563
1,485 4-digit winners..................$80.50
32,880 3-digit winners ......................$5
2-digit winners with Xtra ................free ticket
Drawings occur Wednesdays, Saturdays
Estimated jackpot: $2 million


I PmERB:L


Feb. 29........................1-4-11-23-26
Powerball .................................... 14


Feb. 25.....................6-11-42-53-54
Powerball .................................... 7


Drawings occur Wednesdays and Saturdays
Estimated jackpot: $50 million ($31.2 million cash value)


Ibis
2 Bed, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage
Living 1,553 sqft
Garage 424 sq ft
Lanai 110 sqft
Entry 14 sq ft
Total Area 2,081 sq ft


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award-winning beaches and downtown Venice

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2453 Terracina Drive
Venice, FL 34292
941-484-5369


866-495-6006


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morrison
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- Florida Lot;ery
I www. f la lottery. com I^^^


ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSIFIED. CALL (941) 06O 1200


----


I


I ABC 7 Ai'iLMANAC M- MAR[* INV E1 Ih


maISUNRISUEiT m I


F r i" ~ r
.. ,i..i..: (
\ a.,: .i r.= ^




:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012 SUN NEWSPAPERS 3A


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:4A SUN NEWSPAPERS

OBITUARIES
Richard C.
Blendea Sr.
Richard C. Blendea
Sr., 75, of Nokomis, Fla.,
formerly of White Lake,
Mich., died

Feb. 27,
2012.
Richard
was born
Feb. 9,1937,
in Highland
Park, Mich.,
to Irene (Tatimer) and
Florian Blendea.
Survivors include his
wife, Conly Acton; three
children, Ruth (Dan)
Ranks of Novi, Mich., and
Kathleen (Matt) Green
and Richard (Allison)
Blendea II, both of White
Lake, Mich.; two stepchil-
dren, Richard (Viviana)
Scrivner of Chantilly, Va.,
and Steven (Meg) Scrivner
of Wichita, Kans.; and 11
grandchildren.
Services: A Celebra-
tion of Life service will
be held at 5 p.m.,
Saturday, March 3, at
Farley Funeral Home,
Venice Chapel. To share
a memory, visit www.
farleyfuneralhome.com.

Lela J. Bogen
Lela J. Bogen, 98, of
Venice, Fla., formerly of
Columbus, Ohio, passed
away Fri-
day, Feb. 24,
2012.
Born
July 24,
1913, Mrs.
S Bogen grew
up in a
house that
was built by her father in
New Holland, Ohio. She
was loving, kind, giving
and precious, a woman
who loved everybody and
everything. And she was a
lifelong Ohio State Buck-
eyes fan. Lela was also an
active member of the Sci-
oto Country Club and the
Athletic Club of Colum-
bus, giving hundreds of


MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


hours of service over 30
years. She was also an
Auxiliary volunteer at Bon
Secours Venice Hospital
for many years, serving
more than 2,000 hours.
She really enjoyed her
duties and made many
friends in the process. She
also was a volunteer at
The Elephant's Trunk for
many years. Lela married
the love of her life, Arthur
D. Bogen, who was taken
too soon in 1996.
Lela is survived by her
son Andrew of Venice,
Fla.; granddaughters
Tracey Starrett of Sara-
sota, Fla., and Dr. Chelli
Bogen of Venice, Fla.;
former daughter-in-law
Mary L. (Bogen) Moyer of
Venice, Fla.; a huge lov-
ing family; many friends
both in Ohio and Florida;
and her great-granddogs,
cats and birds that she
was so fond of.
A very special thank
you to the staff of Luke
Haven at Village On The
Isle for their kind and lov-
ing care of our Grammy.
Services: Lela's life will
be celebrated 3:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 3, at
Grace United Method-
ist Church, Venice, Fla.,
with inurnment later in
Columbus, Ohio. A recep-
tion will follow next door
to the church at 4 p.m.
at Village On The Isle,
Mark Manor, Renaissance
Room 2. Farley Funeral
Home, Venice Chapel has
been selected to care for
arrangements. To send
condolences, visit www.
farleyfuneralhome.com.
Contributions: In lieu
of flowers, her family
requests memorial con-
tributions be made to the
Sarasota Humane Society
or the Wildlife Center of
Venice.

Carlton Ferreira
Carlton Ferreira, 80, of
Venice, Fla., born in Fall
River, Mass., died Friday,
Feb.24, 2012.


Catherine D.
Zumbano
Catherine D. Zumbano,
90, of Venice, Fla., died
Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012.
She was born June 19,
1921. She is survived by
her loving husband of
68 years, Carl; and her
three children, Carline,
Anthony and his wife,
Kathy, and Philip and his
wife, Denise.
"Kay" was an avid
cruiser, traveling the
world on more than 30
cruises. Her other hobbies
included cooking, bingo
and mah jongg. Most of all,
she loved being "Grandma"
to her 10 grandchildren
and "GG" to her 10
great-grandchildren.
Services: A memorial
gathering is planned
from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday,
Mar. 6, at Farley Funeral
Home, Venice. A Mass
celebrating Catherine's
life will take place at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday,
March 7, at the Epiphany
Cathedral Chapel.
Contributions: In lieu
of flowers, contributions
may be made in memory
of Catherine to Tidewell
Hospice, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota FL 34238;
or the Venice Yacht Club
Charitable Foundation,
1330 Tarpon Center
Drive, Venice FL 34285.

OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes and crematories
only. There is no charge for
publishing an abbreviated death
notice once. Full obituaries,
notices of services and repeat
death notices will be subject to
charges based on their length.
Obituaries should be emailed
to Ikennedy@venicegondolier.
cor and must include a phone
number. There is an additional
charge for faxed or hand-deliv-
ered obituaries, and for photos.
Obituary deadlines are noon for
faxes and 2 p.m. for emails the
day before publication. For more
information, call 941-207-1110.


F R E ESeminars


Over 40 Vision
Learn how vision changes with age and
how state-of-the-art treatment options
can allow you to experience visual
freedom to live life to its fullest.
* Friday, March 9th
Noon Englewood

Elizabeth McVey, OD
Optometric Physician

Glaucoma & Cataracts
Lunch and learn how the latest glaucoma
treatment options can eliminate the expense
of drops and how cataract surgery with
advanced lenses may reduce your
dependence on glasses.

Friday, March 9th
Noon North Port
Joshua W. Kim, MD
Glaucoma & Cataract Surgeon


RSVP: 941-925-2020
CENTERFORSIGHT.NET/SEMINARS

CENTER FOR SIGHT
SARASOTA I VENICE I BRADENTON
SEE, HEAR AND LOOK YOUR BEST'"
406 N. Indiana Ave., Englewood ~ 14844 S. Tamiami Tr., North Port
THE PATIENT AN D ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE PAYMENT, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR
PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, ORTREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED ASA RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO
THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT


Haven helping disabled find jobs


By STEVEN J. SMITH
SUN CORRESPONDENT

Community Haven for
Adults and Children with
Disabilities is reach-
ing out to new clients
in North Port, Engle-
wood, Venice and Port
Charlotte.
"Out of roughly 200
clients in our Transitions,
Community Employment
Services and Occupa-
tional Training programs,
almost 50 clients served
live in those areas," said
Kim Clark, the organiza-
tion's fundraising and
marketing manager.
"Teens in the Transitions
program in North Port
and Venice are either in
a work track or a high
school program that
will further their educa-
tion and employment
opportunities."
Marla Doss, Com-
munity Haven's interim
president and CEO, said
the Transitions program
helps high school stu-
dents with physical dis-
abilities keep in step with
their peers by assisting
them with transporta-
tion or securing scholar-
ship and employment
opportunities.
"We help them find
work at local restau-
rants and grocery stores,
retail stores," she said.
"It might be a local
landscaper, it could be
Wendy's. And Publix is a
huge, huge supporter of
hiring individuals with
disabilities."
Doss said Community
Haven's early interven-
tion, physical speech
and occupational
therapy services help
children from infants to
age 5.
"More than 90 percent
of our 4- and 5-year-olds
came to us as infants,"
Doss said. "We've had


the opportunity to share
the first five years of
their lives and make a
huge impact by offering
all these wraparound
services. To help a child
with cerebral palsy or
epilepsy, for example,
we can help them with
speech therapy, physical
therapy, occupational
therapy.
"It's all about getting
a critical early start in
their lives that's the
foundation to making a
difference."
For disabled adults,
Community Haven offers
a community employ-
ment program.
"This is for people who
have gone to one of our
facilities somewhere and
have graduated from
or outgrown it," Doss
said. "They want to be


working for competitive
employment and we help
them find it."
Kathy McCabe, com-
munity employment
services coordinator
for Community Haven,
helps supply staffing to
businesses in the South
County area such as
Walmart, Bentley's Bou-
tique Hotel, T.J. Maxx and
Bonefish Grill.
"Our people are an
underserved and misun-
derstood population,"
McCabe said. "We find
that there are a lot of
societal barriers. People
see the word 'disability'
and don't see the 'abil-
ity' portion of the word.
We take a lot of pride
placing our people in
jobs in which they will be
successful and beneficial
to an employer."


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:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


'Don't overthink it'


Resources available for job seekers

navigating application maze


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT
COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR

Do you work better
alone or in a team set-
ting? Should a manager

GET CONNECTED
Goodwill Industries has been
awarded an $83,000 grant
from the Gulf Coast Community
Foundation for its Job Connection
services program.
The new Job Connection
program in North Port offers
specially trained counselors
who work one-on-one with
individuals who have barriers to
employment to provide them
support and job counseling.
The program's grand opening is
scheduled for 9 a.m. Thursday at
the new Goodwill in North Port.
"We work with applicants
to give them bus passes or gas
money and the appropriate
clothing to go to their job inter-
view,"said Dan Sidler of Goodwill
Industries.
Job counselors and life
coaches also help applicants
who have had a criminal past,
have dropped out of school, have
disabilities or other obstacles
and now want to re-enter
the workforce. Often these
individuals need assistance with
interviewing skills, filling out
an application and online job
searches.
"We do a vocational objective
to see what the type of job the
person believes they would excel
at or has experience in,"said
Margie Genter, vice president of
mission services for Goodwill.
"Then we help with the applica-
tion process. Once they get a
job, we stay in contact with the
person"
A Job Connection coach
can also review and critique a
resume for applicants.
"A resume should be one
or two pages,"said Sally Hill,
spokeswoman for the Suncoast
Workforce Board, which is also
available for residents to use
for job-seeking assistance."It
should be tailored to the type
of job you are trying to get.


be feared or a friend?
Should you ask ques-
tions if you don't know
the answer or find a
solution on your own?
Is there a wrong answer
that would prevent you

So a person may need a couple
of resumes. For example, if you
are a musician who can cook,
you may want a resume for each
job. Employers don't want pages
and pages of information. The
resume must be boiled down to
a page or two with a cover letter.
We also help with (that).
"We help people of all ages
who need a job or are trying to
reenter the workforce after a
prolonged period of time. Some
businesses consider being unem-
ployed for six or more months a
long period."
Hill said job seekers should
remember to be concise when
creating a resume.
"Employers don't want to read
irrelevant information about
applicants" Hill said. "If you
want a job in accounting, you
shouldn't list your retail experi-
ence, even if you are a great
salesman. It has nothing to do
with the accounting job."
A job and career fair is
planned for 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
April 20 at the Port Charlotte
campus of Southwest Florida
College, 950 Tamiami Trail. There
is a need for volunteers to review
resumes and help with interview
coaching. Free tables are avail-
able for organizations who want
to meet potential employees. For
more information, call Sue Miller
at 941-391-8888.
-Compiled by Elaine
Allen-Emrich


from getting a job?
"Just answer questions
honestly on a job applica-
tion," said Margie Genter,
vice president of mission
services for Goodwill
Industries. "Job applica-
tions can be tricky. There
are multiple-choice ques-
tions, some have math
equations and others
want written essays. Many
times it seems like the
same question is being
asked 18 different ways."
Don't overthink the
answers, Genter added.
"Answering the ques-
tion the way you think the
employer wants might
not be what's best for
you," she said. "It's not
recommended because
maybe you don't really
know the answer they
wanted. It's important to
answer all questions and
not leave any blank."
Genter said the days of
dropping by a potential
employer's office, meeting
the owner and leaving a
r6sum= are disappear-
ing. Many corporations
and other businesses
use the Internet to post
job openings and then
sort through hundreds of
online applicants.
Beginning Thursday,
job seekers in North
Port, Port Charlotte,
Englewood and Venice
have had a new resource
to help with filling out
applications, r6sum6
writing and employment
opportunities. A Job Con-
nection office opened


inside the new Goodwill
store, in the old Publix
building, 14879 Tamiami
Trail in the Shoppes of
North Port, along U.S. 41.
Inside the center are 12
new computers for job
seekers, including those
who have disabilities or
arrest records or who are
retired and want to re-
enter the workforce.
"In some other places
that provide public com-
puter access, they don't
generally explain how to
operate the computer,"
Genter said. "We will
work with job-seekers
on the basics. We show
how to do searches for


b ^^


jobs and find leads on
about a dozen websites
and how to upload
their r6sum6 on a job
application."
Because poor spelling,
bad grammar or unusual
fonts make a r6sum6 less
professional, a job coach
can help correct errors,
Genter said. Another
common mistake is hav-
ing an email address with
phrases like "sexybabe"
or "ipartylikeSnooki"
when applying for jobs,
she said.
"Employers and college
admissions offices will
look at your social media
accounts," she said.


"Applicants must be very,
very careful. If a potential
employer sees you with a
drink in your hand or in
a racy photo on Face-
book, it could ruin your
chances at a job."
Sally Hill, spokes-
woman for the Suncoast
Workforce Board, said
applicants also shouldn't
have inappropriate voice
greetings on their phone
while expecting call-
backs from employers.
For more information
on Goodwill's Job Connec-
tion, call 941-355-2721.
For more information
on Suncoast Workforce,
call 941-358-4080.


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SUN PHOTO BY JUSTIN FENNELL

Business exposure
Barbara and Dan Egan, right, prospective Venice GondolierSun subscribers from New York,
speak with circulation salesman Brian Dalton Friday afternoon at the Kiwanis Business
Expo at the Venice Community Center. The expo continues Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


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Home Delivery- --------------------------
Direct Phone Numbers: Wed. & Weekend Rate SUBSCRIBE TODAY! CUSTOMER
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000 Newspaper designated market 1 SERVICE POLICY:
Venice, Laurel, Nokomis, Enclosed is a check for and mail to the address below, attn. Circulation. If you do not receive
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_Weekend 75 7% Tax Included Foreign rates upon request Sat. 6 a.m. 11 a.m.


A Patient Focused, ulti-Specialty Grou


SUN NEWSPAPERS 5A


~





6A SUN NEWSPAPERS



PETS

FROM PAGE 1

saying animal services
has a vendetta against
him.
Marois didn't testify
at last month's hear-
ing, relying instead on
four witnesses, includ-
ing the store manager
and a veterinarian aide
volunteer.
Nor did he provide
any documentation
of financial ability to
maintain the opera-
tion, or provide written
procedures for proper
care, waste removal and
hygiene, or training of
employees or volun-
teers, or for evacuation
in the event of a fire or
other emergency all
required by law.


MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


When animal services
collected the dogs, more
had medical issues
than they anticipated,
records show.
According to Galen's
written injunction:
"Several were diagnosed
with coccidiosis and
at least two had tape-
worm. Two puppies,
Freeway and Pooh Bear,
suffered from pneumo-
nia. Reno showed signs
of dried fecal matter in
his fur, both ears, paws,
and on his tail, and
needed surgery. Beezer
had an ulcerated tumor
on its rear end and
suffered from lumbar
wasting, severe hair loss
on his tail, dried feces
on his body, and dental
problems. Sabrina had
rickets and sarcoptic
mange. Radio had a
left corneal ulcer. Some


dogs suffered from a
variety of skin ailments
including flea bite
allergies or demodex
mange."
Marois argued the
medical condition
predated his custody
of the dogs, which
were being treated by a
veterinarian.
But Galen said medi-
cal history reports from
Miami-Dade Animal
Services, where all the
animals originated,
demonstrate the medi-
cal conditions do not
solely predate Marois'
custody of the animals.
Further, medical
reports from Marois' vet
at South Trail Animal
Hospital showed some
dogs had never been
treated.
Dr. James Kurzydlo,
who examined the


dogs, said many of the
illnesses he found can
be traced back to lack
of proper hygiene. He
opined MM Pet Rescue
failed to provide proper
and reasonable care.
At the court hearing,
former volunteer Ste-
phen Barry said MM Pet
Rescue had air condi-
tioning problems during
the summer months. He
also testified that some
dog cages were stacked
without a pan under the
cage floor. On occasion,
urine or feces would
drop from one cage into
the cage below, he said.
Marois built a drain
into the floor of two
rooms he used to house
the dogs, but it didn't
work well. Instead, he
used an industrial vac-
uum cleaner to remove
water, urine and feces


from the drain.
Marois admitted he's
made a few mistakes,
but said that's no reason
to block his progress.
He's successfully
adopted out 240 ani-
mals, and continues to
get requests.
While he lost this
week's battle, he's not
throwing in the towel.
"That hearing was
so one-sided," Marois
said. "They wouldn't let
into evidence any of my
records. She threw out
anything we brought in.
"Then they put my
personal dogs into it.


They were never on
trial.
"If it was so bad, why
wasn't I ever cited? They
inspected me every
month for awhile. Then
they ambushed me with
five inspectors all at
once. It's the government
going after a person try-
ing to do good."
"I'm not laying down.
I just wish I had some
money to find a lawyer to
do this (appeal). There's
more than one way to
skin a cat. I want to show
I'm right about this."

Email: ggiles@venicegondolier.com


LEGAL NOTICES


FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE TO NOTICE TO NOTICE TO NOTICE TO NOTICE OF SALE
12 CREDITORS CREDITORS CREDITORS CREDITORS I30
20 20 20 20


Notice Under Fictitious
Name Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of SCS Market-
ing Group, located at 1435 E.
Venice Ave. Ste 104-230. locat-
ed in the County of Sarasota,
in the city of Venice, FL
34292 intends to register the
said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Venice, Florida, this
28th day of February 2012.
Systems Contractor Supply,
LC
Publish: March 3, 2012

NOTICE
OF AUCTION



NOTICE OF PUBLIC
AUCTION
Notice is hereby given that the contents
of the rental units listed herein will be
offered for sale at public auction per the
Florida Self Storage Act. (Statues/Sec-
tions 83.801-83,809).
Auction: Thursday March 15, 2012 at
2:00 pm or thereafter at The Storage
Bins
2359 S. Tamlaml Trail
Venice, FL 34293
(941) 493-2214
Miscellaneous Household Items
Harold Brinson, Unit F25 5X10
Harold Brinson, Unit F21 5X10
Publish: February 25, March 3, 2012

NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
20


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEXANDER C. HOOKER, JR
Deceased.
File No. 2012-CP-000602-SC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ALEXANDER C. HOOKER, JR,
deceased, whose date of death was
Febraury 15, 2012; Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Sarasota County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, File Number 2011-
CP-000602-SC the address of which is
P.O. BOX 3079, Sarasota, Florida
34230. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR


MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is February 25, 2012
Personal Representatives:
Jean Campbell Hooker
727 Thorne St.
Ripon, WI 54971
Elizabeth Gay Hooker
P.O. Box 432
Hanale HI 96714
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
Adam R. Miller, Esquire
Florida Bar No: 0903841
218 Harbor Drive South
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941) 488-9641
PUBLISH: Febraury 25, March 3,
2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SARA-
SOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELEANOR F LAMBRIGHT
A/K/A ELANOR F
LAMBRIGHT
Deceased.
File No. 2012-CP-000609-NC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
The administration of the estate of
ELEANOR F LAMBRIGHT A/K/A
ELANOR F
LAMBRIGHT, deceased, File Number
2012- CP-000609-NC is pending in the
Circuit Court for SARASOTA County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Karen E. Rushing, Clerk- Pro-
bate Department P.O. Box 3079,
Sarasota, FL 34230-3079. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE MUST FILE THEIR CLAIMS
WITH THIS COURT WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OF THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE OF THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT
SO FILLED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is March 3, 2012.
Personal Representative:
CLAUDIA STORMS
c/o 6624 GATEWAY AVE
SARASOTA, FL 34231
Attorney For Personal
Representative:
KURT F. LEWIS
Attorney for Petitioners
Florida Bar No. 119630
6624 GATEWAY AVE.
SARASOTA, FL 34231
941-921-5595
FX 941-921-3950
PUBLISH: March 3, 10, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SARA-
SOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DEBORAH P. McTIERNAN,
Deceased.


The administration of the estate of DEB-
ORAH P. McTIERNAN, deceased, File
No. 2012-CP-279-NC, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Sarasota County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address of
which is
2000 Main Street, Sarasota, Florida
34237. The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first Publication of this Notice
is March 3, 2012.
Personal Representative:
JAMES A McTIERMAN, III
12 Davy Dr
Rochester, NY 14624
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
THOMAS C. TYLER, JR., ESQ
Florida Bar No. 911585
735 E. Venice Avenue,
Suite 200
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: 941-488-4422
PUBLISH: March 3, 10, 2012

IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2011 CC006996CC


vs.
SHELIA L LACKEY
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given pursuant to the Final
Judgment of foreclosure entered in the
above-styled case, that I will sell the follow-
ing property situated in Sarasota County,
Flonda, described as:
Lot 19,Southfield Subdivision, Unit 1, as per
plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 31, Pages
34 through 34C, Public Records of Sarasota
County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder
for cash via Internet: www.sarasota.realfore-
close.com., on the 21st day of March 2012
at 9:00 a.m. Final payment must be made
on or before 4:00p.m. of the day of the sale
by cash or cashier's check, or initiated ACH
or Wire Transfer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO
FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO
LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF
YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT
BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF
RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DES MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS.
STEPHEN H. KURVIN
For the Court
Publish: February 25, March 3, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT WILSON
Deceased.
File No.2012 CP 000634NC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ROBERT WILSON, deceased, whose
date of death was November 25,
2011, and whose social security number
is XXX-XX-5089 is pending in the Circuit
Court for Sarasota County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is
Post Office Box 3079, Sarasota,
Florida 34230. The names and address-
es of the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a


CITY OF VENICE
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF VENICE PLANNING
COMMISSION, SITTING AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY, WILL
HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON TUESDAY, MARCH 20, 2012 AT
1:30 P.M., IN CITY HALL COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 401 WEST VENICE
AVENUE, VENICE, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER PETITION NO. 11-2CP:
AMENDMENT TO THE ENVISION VENICE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN,
INCLUDING REVISIONS TO THE FOLLOWING ELEMENTS: TRANS-
PORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE & SERVICE STANDARDS, PARKS &
PUBLIC SPACES AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Venice Plan-
ning Commission with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting will need a record of the proceedings and, for such pur-
pose, may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
All interested parties are invited to appear and be heard. The
Comprehensive Plan Amendment will be available for public
inspection in the Planning & Zoning Department and City Clerk's
Office, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, FL 34285. Written com-
ments filed with the Planning Commission (c/o Planning & Zoning
Department at the above address) will be heard and considered.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
IF YOU ARE DISABLED AND NEED ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CON-
TACT THE PLANNING & ZONING DEPT. AT LEAST 24 HOURS
PRIOR TO THE MEETING. (486-2626, EXT 28006)
PUBLISH :MARCH 3, 2012



PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER THE ADOPTION OF
CITY OF VENICE ORDINANCE NO. 2012-10
NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Venice,
Florida will hold a public hearing beginning at 9:00 a.m. or short-
ly thereafter, on March 13, 2012, in Council Chambers, City Hall,
401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida, to consider and act
upon the adoption of the following proposed City Ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF VENICE, FLORIDA, AMENDING
ORDINANCE NO. 2002-32 RELATED TO THE VENETIAN COMMU-
NITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT; PROVIDING FINDINGS; EXPAND-
ING THE BOUNDARIES OF THE DISTRICT PURSUANT TO CHAPTER
190, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO INCLUDE APPROXIMATELY SEVEN
(7) ACRES OF ADDITIONAL REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE BOUND-
ARIES OF THE DISTRICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Purpose of Ordinance: Expanding the boundaries of the Venetian
Community Development District to include approximately seven
(7) acres (located in the Venetian Golf and River Club).
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section
166.041, Florida Statutes; accordingly, the publication of same
must be accomplished at least ten (10) days prior to the meeting
at which the above Ordinance is to be considered and acted upon.
A complete draft of the proposed Ordinance is on file in the Office
of the City Clerk for inspection by the public between the hours of
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be responsi-
ble for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evidence at
this meeting upon which any appeal is to be based.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. Written
comment filed with the City Clerk of the City of Venice, will be
heard and considered.
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the City
Clerk's office at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.
/s/
Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk
Publish: March 3, 2012


Plaintiff,
vs.
GRACE A. DEVITO, a single woman, CITI-
MORTGAGE, INC., and FEDERAL NATION-
AL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a United
States Corporation,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the
final judgement/order entered in the
above-styled case, that I will sell the fol-
lowing property situated in Sarasota
County, Florida described as:
Lots 961, VILLAGEWALK, Unit 3B,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 44, Pages 34
through 341, inclusive, of the Public
Records of Sarasota County, Florida.
at public sale to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, via Internet: www.saraso-
ta.realforeclose.com, at 9:00 a.m.,
on May 30, 2012.Final payment must
be made on or before 4:00 p.m. of the
sate of the sale by cash or cashier's
check, or initiated ACH or Wire Transfer.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A
RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER
THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL
TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE
ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING
FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE
OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.
In accordance with the American with Dis-
abilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact the Clerk
of the Court no later than five business
days prior to the proceeding at the Sara-
sota County Courthouse. Telephone 941-
951-5220(Sarasota) 941-492-
3022(Venice) or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
KAREN E. RUSHING,
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Angelina Burchett
Deputy Clerk
PUBLISH: March 3, 10, 2012


VILLAGEWALK OF SARASOTA HOME-
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.,


CITY OF VENICE
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF VENICE PLANNING
COMMISSION WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON TUESDAY,
MARCH 20, 2012 AT 1:30 P.M. IN CITY HALL COUNCIL CHAM-
BERS, 401 WEST VENICE AVENUE, VENICE, FLORIDA, TO CON-
SIDER SPECIAL EXCEPTION PETITION NO. 12-1SE.
REQUEST FOR A SPECIAL EXCEPTION FROM SECTION 86-43(b)
TO ALLOW FOR FEWER PARKING SPACES AND TO ALLOW FOR
EXPANSION OF THE EXISTING ALF ONTO THE VACANT LOT TO
THE EAST ADDING 10 UNITS.
ON THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY:
Approximately 1.3 acre
Parcel No. 0430-14-0039, 0430-14-0037
100 Base Avenue East
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Venice Plan-
ning Commission with respect to any matter considered at this
meeting will need a record of the proceedings and, for such pur-
pose, may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
All interested parties are invited to appear and be heard. Plans
and/or details are available for public inspection in the Planning
and Zoning Department, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, FL
34285. Written comments filed with the Planning Commission
(c/o Planning & Zoning Department at the above address) will be
heard and considered.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
IF YOU ARE DISABLED AND NEED ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CON-
TACT THE PLANNING AND ZONING DEPARTMENT AT LEAST 24
HOURS PRIOR TO THE MEETING. (486-2626, EXT. 28004)
PUBLISH: MARCH 3, 2012


PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER THE ADOPTION OF
CITY OF VENICE ORDINANCE NO. 2012-08
NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Venice,
Florida will hold a public hearing beginning at 9:00 a.m. or short-
ly thereafter, on March 13, 2012, in Council Chambers, City Hall,
401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida, to consider and act
upon the adoption of the following proposed City Ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF VENICE, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE CODE OF ORDINANCES, CHAPTER 74, UTILITIES; ARTICLE I,
IN GENERAL; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE AND PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Purpose of Ordinance: Creating a fair and equitable distribution of
utility rates, fees and charges amongst all utility customer cate-
gories.
A second public hearing upon this matter will be held at 9:00 a.m.
or shortly thereafter on March 27, 2012, in Council Chambers,
City Hall, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida.
The City of Venice Code of Ordinances may be viewed online at
www.municode.com select "Online Library", select "Florida", select
"Venice Code of Ordinances".
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section
166.041(3)(a), Florida Statutes. A complete draft of the proposed
Ordinance is on file in the Office of the City Clerk for inspection by
the public between the hours of 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through
Friday.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be responsi-
ble for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evidence at
this meeting upon which any appeal is to be based.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. Written
comment filed with the City Clerk of the City of Venice, will be
heard and considered.
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the City
Clerk's office at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.
/s/
Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk
Publish: March 3, 2012


NEED 4ASH?

Sose items in tk Cssifds.


c(941) 206-1200


File No. 2012-CP-279-NC BLUE RIBBON PLUMBING SERVICE INC,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS Plaintiffs,


copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate must
file their claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is March 3, 2012
Personal Representative:
JANE A. WILSON
776 Wedgewood Ct
Venice, FL 34292
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE C. HALL, ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 199524
1314 East Venice Ave, Ste E
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941) 480-0999
E-Mail:whall@hall-anderson.com
PUBLISH: March 3, 10, 2012


NOTICE OF SALE
30


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2011-CC-006026- SC
Division Civil


PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER THE ADOPTION OF
CITY OF VENICE ORDINANCE NO. 2012-09
NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Venice,
Florida will hold a public hearing beginning at 9:00 a.m. or short-
ly thereafter, on March 13, 2012, in Council Chambers, City Hall,
401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida, to consider and act
upon the adoption of the following proposed City Ordinance:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF VENICE, FLORIDA AMENDING
CHAPTER 78, VEHICLES FOR HIRE, ARTICLE II, TAXICABS BY
ADDING DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS TO INCLUDE ALTERNA-
TIVE TYPES OF TRANSPORTATION; AND PROVIDING AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE.
Purpose of Ordinance: City Council desires to provide regulations
to allow alternative transportation options for residents and visi-
tors.
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section
166.041, Florida Statutes; accordingly, the publication of same
must be accomplished at least ten (10) days prior to the meeting
at which the above Ordinance is to be considered and acted upon.
A complete draft of the proposed Ordinance is on file in the Office
of the City Clerk for inspection by the public between the hours of
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be responsi-
ble for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evidence at
this meeting upon which any appeal is to be based.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. Written
comment filed with the City Clerk of the City of Venice, will be
heard and considered.
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the City
Clerk's office at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.
/s/
Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk
Publish: March 3, 2012





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


DISTRICT

FROM PAGE 1

permits is the reinstate-
ment of the district's Lead-
ership Academy, which
groomed teachers for
management positions.
It was a victim of cost-
cutting, but as a result the
district doesn't have much
of a succession plan, he


VENICE

FROM PAGE 1

the United States, accord-
ing to the Wall Street Jour-
nal's Marketwatch website.
"A double win for the
county!" County Commis-
sion Chair Christine Rob-
inson wrote in an email.
Added John Ryan,
Venice Area Chamber of
Commerce president and
chief executive officer:
"Certainly more good


said. Staffing is stretched
at the district level, he
said, and high school
administration is generally
understaffed.
School superintendent
LoriWhite said the district
and school board will look
carefully at the recom-
mendations, and that she
was grateful for the many
commendations.
"Overall, the report is
very positive," she said.

news for our community.
Great for our region."
Naples and Fort Myers
placed third and fourth.
Marketwatch noted
that Venice was one of the
first planned retirement
communities. That story,
including Dr. Fred Albee,
John Nolen, the Broth-
erhood of Locomotive
Engineers, the Kentucky
Military Institute and oth-
ers, is well-known among
locals.
Marketwatch's tale of
Venice includes both


"In a way, it confirms what
we've known that we
have a lot to be proud of."
Implementing the
recommendations will
be a matter of need and
money. There aren't read-
ily identified funds for
a compensation study,
she said, and some of the
areas where reductions
are recommended aren't
easily cut.
Small classes are often

benefits and drawbacks.
"There's much to like
about this city of 21,000
people located south of
Sarasota on the Gulf of
Mexico," Marketwatch
wrote. "The downtown is
charming, complete with
a library and parks. There
are plenty of active adult
communities, many of
which are built around
golf courses."
Some financial infor-
mation aboutVenice has
gone sour in recent years,
due to the downturn in


needed to catch students
up to grade level, and the
number of teachers on
special assignment -
ones who aren't assigned
to a specific class has
already been pared sub-
stantially. The remaining
ones are carrying heavy
loads helping other teach-
ers, she said.
"It's hard sometimes to
keep reducing," she said.
School Board Member

the economy. Market-
watch sees the reductions
as a net gain. Median
home price: $135,000.
Check. Low taxes? Check.
Low crime rate? Double
check.
"It's similar to Naples
... but less crowded and
(less) expensive," accord-
ing to Marketwatch.
Drawbacks Marketwatch
noticed include a lack
of walkability "if you
don't live downtown, and
the fact that the older
population might be


Jane Goodwin knew the
report will be on the
agenda of a board work-
shop March 13, but said
she wanted to hear the
results as soon as possible.
"I greatly hope we can
make changes," she said.
"There's a lot of food for
thought."
Scott Pinkerton, the
Venice financial planner
who heads CASE, said
he was pleased by the

off-putting to younger
retirees."
Marketwatch notes that
residents' average age is
68.8.
"And there's a lack of
diversity," Marketwatch
wrote. "This is not a col-
lege town, unlike some
others on our list. Plus,
hurricanes are always a
negative for those who
live in Florida."
Brad Baker, a former
Venice chamber presi-
dent, said the area was
recognized because it


SUN NEWSPAPERS 7A

report and the deep, long-
term issues it addresses.
He noted that district
employees generally gave
their employer favorable
reviews in their comments
to the MGT team, mean-
ing that they should be
on board as changes are
considered.
"I think we can really
move Sarasota County," he
said. "I think we can fly."
Email: bmudge@venicegondolier.com

"really promotes arts
and community. The
bike path provides a
unique form of exercise.
The arts are available to
all ages in many differ-
ent forms. Schools like
Pine View and charter
schools like the Sara-
sota Military Academy
promote excellence in
education. The Gulf Coast
Community Foundation
provides funding to give
Venice an edge over other
communities."
Email: escott@sun-herald.com


SMOKE

FROM PAGE 1

Patrol to shut down an 11-mile
stretch of 1-75 for more than
nine hours. At 10:33 p.m.
Thursday, the FHP closed the
interstate from Clark Road in
Sarasota to the Jacaranda exit
inVenice, rerouting drivers
to U.S. 41 and snarling early
morning traffic for up to
three hours. The highway was
reopened at 8:07 a.m. Friday
after visibility improved.
"We wish it could have been
reopened before rush hour, but
the conditions weren't right
and we considered drivers'


safety first," FHP spokesman
Lt. Gregory S. Bueno said Fri-
day. "We stay in contact with
the NationalWeather Service,
use Internet sites that predict
the climate and use other
resources to determine if and
when we need to shut down
the interstate.
"When the visibility is
extremely reduced to the point
of safety being compromised
and there's the potential for a
crash, we have to act appro-
priately. We know it's inconve-
nient to get off the interstate,
but we wanted to keep people
safe."
Sarasota County Assistant
Fire Chief John Elwood said
smoke from a 249-acre bum


Thursday morning in Sarasota
likely was not a contributing
factor in the interstate closure.
However, he agreed with FHP's
decision to shut down 1-75.
"We have learned from
past incidents," Elwood said,
referring to the Jan. 29 fiery
chain reaction of crashes on
1-75 in Gainesville that killed
11 and injured 18 after another
super fog blinded drivers. "The
lessons are, when visibility is
reduced to zero, you should
reduce your speed. It's the
same while driving in the rain
- reduce your speed."
No accidents as a result of
the fog-smoke mix on 1-75
were reported Friday.
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


TERVIS

FROM PAGE 1

company moved manufacturing,
administration and 120 employees
to the $7 million purpose-built
60,750-square-foot plant at 201
Triple Diamond Blvd., in North
Venice near the Laurel Road
interchange.
Fifteen months ago Tervis chair
Norbert Donelly announced
what were described as sig-
nificant changes when then CEO
Laura Spencer was replaced by
Wolfson. Spencer joined Tervis in
1997 and was with the company
as it became one of the fastest-
growing businesses in the area.


Revenue increased from $5 mil-
lion to around $75 million in
2010, when she resigned.
Wolfson, 61 worked as con-
sultant for six years to Tervis
and previously was president
and CEO of a $100 million
Georgia manufacturer. On his
appointment, he told the Venice
Gondolier Sun, "In the previous
six years Tervis has grown six-fold
and has reached a tipping point.
The intention is to expand our
sales to consumers, both directly
and through strategic channel
partners."
Donelly said he has no com-
ment on the change in leader-
ship at this time.

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Behavioral Health Strategic
Planning Work Group of the
Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Stakeholders' Consortium
March 5, 1:30 p.m., Room 226,
Health and Human Services,
2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-2578
Community Action Agency Board
March 8,4:30 p.m., Room 226,
Health and Human Services,
2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-2564
Community Alliance
Developmental Disabilities
Executive Committee March 6,
10 a.m., Room 227, Health and
Human Services, 2200 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-2563
Community Alliance Sarasota
Partnership for Children Committee
March 7, 9:30 a.m., Room 226,
Health and Human Services,
2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-1410
Development Services Advisory
Committee March 7, 3 p.m.,
Conference Room 8, BOB/ITC
Office, 1001 Sarasota Center Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-6637
Englewood Community
Redevelopment Area (CRA)
Advisory Board March 8, 1 p.m.,
Englewood CRA Office, 101 N. Orange
St., Englewood. Call 941-473-9795


ADVISORYBOARD VACANCIES
Visit www.scgov.netladvisoryboards or
contact the Sarasota County Call Center at
861-5000 for latest vacancies and information
about Sarasota County Advisory Boards.


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Public Facilities Financing Advisory
Board Regular Meeting March 9,
1:30 p.m., A/B Conference Room,
Second Floor, Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-5140
Sarasota Community Organizations
Active in Disaster Committee
March 8, 2:30 p.m., Room 226,
Health and Human Services,
2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-2563
Sarasota Tree Advisory Council
March 7, 3 p.m., A/B Conference
Room, Second Floor, Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-0672
Volunteers and Donations Strike
Team of the Sarasota Community
Organizations Active in Disaster
Committee March 8, 1 p.m.,
Room 226, Health and Human
Services, 2200 Ringling Blvd,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-2563

EPROCURE IS ALMOST HERE
This new, free online registration
and solicitation system is your one-
stop website for Sarasota County
solicitations, policies, procedures
and forms.
Registration is fast, simple, and best
of all, FREE. It begins March 19.
Until then, email eProcure@scgov.
net to be added to our mailing list,
so we can notify you about free
training sessions on how to use
eProcure.
IMPORTANT: Vendors must be
registered with eProcure to do
business with Sarasota County.
Solicitations via eProcure are
scheduled to begin in May.


BUILDING CODE CHANGES
Effective March 15, all permit permit
applications and construction
documents must comply with
the 2010 Florida Building Code.
Contractors, engineers, architects,
business owners or code
professionals should attend one
of the following meetings to learn
about significant code changes
and meet building officials, plans
examiners and inspectors from
neighboring jurisdictions and
municipalities.
SARASOTA COUNTY
Monday, March 12, 3-5 p.m.
1001 Sarasota Center Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-5000
CITY OF SARASOTA
Wednesday, March 28, 3-5 p.m.
City Hall, Commission Chamber
1565 First St., Sarasota.
Call 941-365-2200, ext. 4441
CITY OF VENICE
(Energy Conservation Code)
Monday, March 5, 3-5 p.m.
City Hall, Council Chamber
401 W. Venice Ave., Venice.
Call 941-486-2626, ext. 24003
CITY OF NORTH PORT
Thursday, March 8,5-8 p.m.
City Hall, Commission Chamber
4970 City Hall Blvd., North Port.
Call 941-429-7044
MANATEE COUNTY
(Energy Conservation Code only)
Tuesday, March 6, 2-4 p.m.
Commission Chamber
1112 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton
Tuesday, March 6, 5-7 p.m.
Commission Chamber
1112 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton


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Indiiduals with diabilitieswho need asistanceto participate in any of these proceedings should contact the ontyadministration at least fre () businessda beforeithe meetingtime and date at I-861-544.


kLh~





PUBLISHER
TIM SMOLARICK
PHONE: 941-207-1010
FAX: 941-484-8460
8A
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 3, 2012


OPINION


GONDOLIER SUN EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: 941-207-1101
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


SUN NEWSPAPERS


OUR VIEW



Deal with the drunks, not the drinks


Some people can imagine no bet-
ter way to celebrate the fading
of another brilliant Southwest
Florida day than to tip a clear plastic
cup of pinot grigio toward the sinking
sun.
The image is magazine ad-worthy: It
distills the essence of the "good life."
Others may think of nothing sweeter
than a sunny Saturday afternoon
spent under a beach umbrella with
friends, staring at the surf and sipping
a cold Coors. They may even get to
thinking of it as a "right."
It's not. When drinking takes place
in a public spot, it is a privilege.
And, as is often the case, an abused
privilege tends to become a former
privilege. The annoying part of the
equation is the loss of a privilege
enjoyed by many is invariably caused
by a handful of idiots who never seem
able to follow the rules.
The idiot fringe has again sparked
debate about ordinances that permit


alcohol in some public parks and
beaches in Charlotte and Sarasota
counties.
In Charlotte, commissioners voted
recently to ban alcohol at five Port
Charlotte parks after hearing neigh-
bors' complaints about groups of
transients hanging out and drinking.
The problems seemed pervasive, the
stories were persuasive: Drunkards
behaving badly were driving decent
families away from neighborhood
parks. If the ban meant some respon-
sible people lost the privilege of
uncorking a chardonnay, it also prom-
ised to liberate a public facility from
the domination of an unsavory few.
Given the conditions and the appar-
ent extent of the problem, it seemed
a fair trade-off. Commissioner Robert
Skidmore resisted, arguing it might
be the first step toward a wider ban
on alcohol at all parks and beaches.
It clearly wasn't though. This was a
limited response to ongoing problems


at targeted areas. On balance, the
stronger public interest tipped toward
a beer ban.
The issue is less clear in Sarasota
County. A challenge to alcohol ordi-
nances has been spurred by the hor-
rific death of a middle-aged woman
struck by a car and killed while jog-
ging on a Saturday afternoon in early
January.
The driver, who was charged
with vehicular homicide and DUI,
was reportedly drinking heavily at
Siesta Key Beach before the accident
occurred. Sarasota County sheriff's
deputies had ordered him to leave the
beach concession where alcohol
is sold and arrested a companion
who had become abusive. No further
action was taken, however, because
the man reported told deputies he was
going back to his blanket to sober up.
The jogger's family is rallying sup-
port for an alcohol ban at county
beaches. We expect to see a growing


crusade from supporters, as well as
push-back from those who want to
continue their drinking privileges.
Is there a compromise short of an
all-out ban? Is there some way to
clamp down on the drunken behavior
of a few while allowing responsible
people to imbibe? Would banning the
sale of alcohol at Siesta Beach help, or
would people simply carry in bigger
coolers of beer?
In Charlotte, the problem seemed
to have grown to a point that a ban
was necessary. But it was targeted to
deal with specific behaviors at spe-
cific places. In Sarasota, the defining
incident was far worse, but it was
isolated. We've seen no evidence that
boorish, drunken behavior at beaches
is a widespread problem.
Generally, that seems a fair standard
to start with. Right now, it seems a
stretch to remove everyone's privileges
based on one man's horrible abuse of
that privilege.


Next, occupy



the circus arena


Warning: This is not the
second in a series of articles
on the Venice Bypass. This is
about a visible, unappreci-
ated asset that can turn Venice
into a destination beyond
imagination.
Just walk through the creaky,
ill-fitting door of the appar-
ently ramshackle Circus
Arena off Business 41, our
other "main" street, on airport
property owned and controlled
by the city. Look at the steel
framing that has just passed
a formal structural inspection
and supports a leaky roof that
cries out for repair.
Think "The Ball Park at
Arlington," imagined and built
decades ago by a gentleman
named George W Bush, with
help from friends and an aware
community. See that framing
freshly painted and properly
lighted. Think sports.
But first of all, fix the roof,
to preserve the versatile floor
that can support ice, hardwood
flooring and whatever other
surface modern, available
technology has for us. See the
Zamboni move.
The steel framing is more
than adequate to support solar
panels provided by Florida
Power and Light, which can
power the entire airport, send
a bit to Centennial Park for
charging electric vehicles and
generate revenue for FPL, the
airport and the city.
Add in whatever the Venice
Historical Society and other
archives have to create an air
museum on one side of the
arena lobby. Develop a sound
position that the museum
and the power generation are
aeronautical uses to get Fed-
eral Aviation Administration
support for this part of arena
rehabilitation.
Put a restaurant on the other
side of the lobby to feed visi-
tors and event customers, for
further airport revenue.


Clearly, circus memorabilia
can be next to the restaurant
or the air museum for a further
customer draw.
Then put together a public/
private partnership to fund
a revenue generating exhibi-
tion/entertainment venue that
people will want to visit. Don't
restrict your imagination,
because the infrastructure is
already in place: It would be
cost prohibitive to replace the
steel that is already there and
functional. It would be more
than foolish to demolish it.
Use the Business 41 curb cut
to access the arena, the airport
and the approved hotel next
to them. The access road does
not have to go through the
arena. Expand the parking all
the way over to the airport fair-
grounds, using pervious mate-
rial like that at Maxine Barritt
park. Persuade the FAA that
this is additional aeronautical
use development parking
for all airport property events.
Beyond the visually obvious
use of the arena for hockey and
basketball, let alone name-
sake circus performances and
commercial expositions, a
multi-use rehabilitation of this
complex could rival Benderson
rowing for this region.
This is a very large facil-
ity. Think out of the box. A
nonprofit organization that
manages the arena for public
benefit can have a subsid-
iary that generates profit for
investors.
Go for it. If we need a bas-
ketball team, we have seven
council members to start.
You know the team name, of
course: The Venice Clowns.
No longer could our decisions
be criticized in vain. Criticism
would just generate better
publicity for the arena, and
you know the name of that:
The BB&T/SunTrust/OMG
Circus Arena. If Yahoo or the
banks don't have the money,
someone else will pay for
naming rights.
Repaint the logo facing
Business 41 as a nonconform-
ing sign, and add the business
name over the entrance. Why
not go for it?
Let's please get out of the
box, and occupy the arena.
Don't laugh; just do it.

Jim Bennett is a member of
Venice City Council.


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To be the superior quality, low-cost provider of information and adver-
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Walk on. I'm a visitor who
comes into town from time to
time and I enjoy being able to
just walk on and take the class
with my relatives I visit. I don't
live here long enough in order
to sign up for a class. I don't
have beaches where I live, and
it's something that's relaxing
and enjoyable for me. I hate to
see that taken away.
Best thing. I visit here for a
month every year and the best
thing I look forward to is going
to yoga on the beach. I would
be very, very disappointed if it
changed. It's uplifting and gets
my day going. I don't want that
to be stopped or changed.
Butt out. I suggest the city
and county just butt out and
shut up. The participants are
not hurting anything. Next, the
government will want us to
pay to see the sunsets.
Public too. We do not
disturb anyone on the beach
and I think yoga on the beach
should be left the way it is. It is
a public beach.
Tax them. Yes, yoga should
be scheduled through Sarasota
County. I have my own busi-
ness and I believe they should
be taxed for whatever donation
that person gets. I have to pay
taxes on my business. I have to
have a license. I have to get a
storefront. I think that it's very
nice that we have this, but I
think that person should also
be accountable.
Nothing more. I think yoga
classes on Venice Beach are
spectacular and shouldn't
have any more scheduling or
anything else.
Pay her. Sarasota County just
sees dollar signs. It's greedy.
They want to charge thousands
of dollars for something that
has been free for the last four
and a half years. Venice and
Venice Beach are totally differ-
ent from Sarasota and Siesta
Beach and we have been doing
just fine. They need to stop
meddling in our affairs down
here and leave those free yoga
classes alone. They don't care


Let 'em


Have It
about the welfare and well-
being of the general public, not
to mention the affordability of
the classes. You can't get much
better than free. She has more
than 30 years of yoga experi-
ence, she is a former Olympian,
she's a certified lifeguard and is
a huge asset to the city and the
county. The county should be
paying her. Stop making prob-
lems where none exist.
Like it. We all like the yoga
on the beach just the way it is
and want it to stay that way.
Continue. Yoga classes have
been growing and helping so
many people. If the county
takes over, it's not going to
be available because it's not
going to be free. The county
wants to charge. Elin Larsen
wants to give quality of life to
the most people she can and
she can reach them on the
beach. Those who can afford
a tip, do so, and hopefully
that will cover enough of the
people who cannot pay. They
need the exercise and their
health so they can get out and
patronize the stores, medical
services and other places like
restaurants in the community.
She likes the good, healthy air
down by the Gulf as well as the


socialization, which is good for
them too. We've seen miracles
take place when the season is
over in terms of good health.
So, I'm all in favor as letting it
continue as it has been.
Our beach. Yoga on the
beach: Those women are not
smoking, drinking, walking
their dogs or doing anything
illegal and should be permitted
to be there without having to
go through the county. It is our
beach and we should be able
to use it.
Paid up. I'm a 64-year-old
resident of Venice and former
Army Green Beret who suffered
from lower back pain for more
than 20 years after a broken
back during a hard parachute
landing fall. Then I found Elin
Larsen's yoga on the beach,
and with free lessons I am now
controlling my back pain. Now
Sarasota County politicians
want to control my use of the
free public parking, the free
public beach, the free view of
the sunrises and sunsets during
our free yoga lessons. That is
just wrong. The politicians are
not elected by us to control our
use of the free public benefits
in our lives. We have paid for
those free public benefits with
our property taxes and our
sales taxes. Let us enjoy these
benefits without sign-up sheets
and parking requirements.

The Let'em Have It line
allows readers to sound off on
issues of local interest. Opinions
expressed here are solely those
of the callers. Personal attacks
on private individuals; attacks
on or commercials for specific
businesses; local candidate
endorsements or attacks during
election season; or opinions or
comments otherwise unfit for
publication will not be printed.
If you would like to participate,
call the line at 941-207-1111.
Call no more than once a week.
Please keep your comments
brief The line is available all
hours. Caller identification is
not required.


KEEP GOVERNMENT OUT (THEN KEEP RELIGION OUT

OF RELIGION! OF GOVERNMENT!
r, 7 7/


Vjrurng ?z
GoM1 sbg
(-^o o u NK





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012



As I see it


i = Ellen
' Hillstrom



Tom and Sue Hanson
and I enjoy giving our
talks on blindness and
low vision to local clubs. I
think you will enjoy read-
ing some of the question-
and-answer exchanges:
Q. Does your hearing
really get sharper?
A. No, but one becomes
more sensitive to sounds
and smells than before.
At times I need to tell
someone not to shout
- my hearing is not
impaired, just my eyes.
Q. How do you go gro-
cery shopping?
A. I have become
familiar with one grocery
store. Using my magni-
fier, I recognize labels but
need to trust the store on
fair prices. It is frustrat-
ing when they change the
shelves.
Publix has an excel-
lent customer assistance
program.
Q. Are you afraid of
falling?
A. Who isn't at my age
(78)? I rarely walk alone.


I grasp every elbow that
is walking with me; I feel
out doorway entrances,
chair backs, walls, what-
ever. I shuffle my feet a
lot. There will be a fall
in my future, my friends
assure me, so I move
cautiously.
Q. Do you get lone-
some now that you're
confined at home?
A. Sometimes and
it's my own fault. I am
too proud to ask people
to pick me up now that I
don't drive any longer. If
I keep this up, they will
get tired of inviting me
out so I better get over
it. Sometimes they think
I do not want to go to a
play or movie because of
my limited vision.
My parents taught each
of their nine children to
become independent
thinkers, and I grew up
that way. My vision loss
now forces me to become
more interdependent
with others. Some say
it has made me a more
tolerant person.
Perhaps a lesson in
world peace is hidden in
that observation.

Ellen Hillstrom is the
state representative to the
Florida Council of the
Blind for the Venice chap-
ter Email her at ellen9l @
comcast.net.


SUN NEWSPAPERS 9A


Time makes all the difference


Why do people
volunteer?
We live in a world
where virtual, digital,
instantaneous technol-
ogy is supreme. High-
tech gadgetry designed
to "simplify" our life
in order to squeeze yet
another obligation into
an already over-booked
schedule can be found
in every household. So
why on earth would
anyone volunteer? How
could you justify spend-
ing precious time doing
something that doesn't
pay a dime?
It's hard to imagine,
but last year 64.9 mil-
lion Americans did just
that. They freely gave
their time and talents
for the benefit of some-
one else. And more
often than not, it is for
the benefit of someone
they have never even
met.
In 2011, more than
600 people right here


in South County gave
of themselves for the
benefit of the families
of Habitat for Humanity
South Sarasota County.
This is an astounding
number, consider-
ing 70 percent of our
volunteers are seasonal
residents.
A contributing factor
for this is the number of
volunteer opportunities
offered throughout the
organization. Building
homes is indeed our
main mission but this is
only one of the volun-
teer opportunities. This,
of course, creates the
largest sector of our vol-
unteer corps but this is
sometimes misleading.
Construction volunteers
are not required to be
skilled in construc-
tion. General laborers
are always needed for
a variety of tasks. But if
you have always wanted
to know how to caulk
around windows or lay
laminate flooring then
you won't find a better
opportunity than this.
It's a win-win-win for
you, our families and
Habitat.
Those with a pen-
chant for retail would
flourish at our ReStore.
We have volunteer
opportunities for floor


help, customer service,
stocking shelves, cloth-
ing, pricing and more.
Volunteering at the
ReStore still supports
our mission of building
homes since revenue
generated at the store
is used to build more
houses. If you haven't
visited the ReStore
lately, stop in and take
a look around. While
you're there you can do
some shopping and pick
up a volunteer form.
We truly have vol-
unteer opportunities
for everyone. We have
front-desk volunteers in
our office and we need
refreshment providers
to provide light snacks
to our construction vol-
unteers at the job site.
Volunteers serving vol-
unteers what greater
gift is there than that?
We need support
folding our Habitat
newsletter several times
a year as well as col-
lecting aluminum cans
for our Aluminum Can
Recycling Program. Of
course, we also have
myriad committees that
range from working
directly with our fami-
lies to strategizing on
financing to maintain-
ing a strong volunteer
program.


Professionals also
volunteer their time and
expertise. Whether it
is designing a state-of-
the-art website or taking
portraits of our families,
the time and talents of
our volunteers are very
important. We strive to
find the right fit for each
volunteer. It all begins
with a desire to give
back to something you
believe in.
Ask Habitat for
Humanity South Sara-
sota volunteers why
they do it and the most
common answer is
because they believe in
the mission of eliminat-
ing substandard housing
in our community. Step
into our ranks, stand
shoulder-to-shoulder
and join the brother-
hood. Then you will find
out what the other 600
already know.
As William James put
it, "Act as if what you
do makes a difference.
It does." Come; we can
show you how you can
make a difference.

Dena Kohlbecker is
volunteer coordinator
for Habitat for Human-
ity South Sarasota
County Inc. Email her at
dkohlbecker@habitat
southsarasota.org.


I LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


Internet sales
tax won't work
Editor:
Regarding "Let's
stop enabling sales tax
evasion":
1. Amazon is only one
of thousands of web-
sites for the purchase of
goods.
2. The object of buying
on the website is not
always to save money
- it is because desired


goods cannot be found
within the state. The cost
of shipping from out of
state to Florida is usually
greater than the Florida
sales tax. That shipping
cost aids in employment
within the state for our
logistics personnel. The
state benefits from this.
3. What would you
have the visitors to
Florida do when order-
ing on the website? How
would they know what is


taxable? If they are from
outside the U.S., would
they know that they were
to submit a tax to the
state of Florida for items
not purchased from
within Florida?
4. How much is the
state of Florida going to
pay people to submit
receipts and estimated
taxes to the state?
5. What would it cost
the state to enforce this
tax payment on the


visitors from all around
the world?
The website is an
international commu-
nications medium, not
a medium for collec-
tion of taxes. If the state
needs more money, have
several suggestions: (1)
raise speed violation
fees and start enforcing
them on the interstate
highways; (2) set up a
fee for those with hybrid
vehicles to pay for the


loss of tax moneys lost
because they do not use
as much gasoline yet still
use the same highway
structures; (3) add more
categories to the present
list of sales-taxable cat-
egories; and (4) legalize


the illegal drug trade and
establish state-controlled
stores to sell these illegal
drugs with a heavy tax on
them.

MauryJ. Biggs
Venice


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MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


Panel to discuss mortgage settlement


By ED SCOTT
STAFF WRITER

Reversing mortgage loan
servicing and foreclosure abuses
was the focus last month, when
the Obama administration
announced that the federal
government and 49 states had
reached a $25 billion agreement
with the five largest mortgage
services in the largest consumer
financial-protection settlement
in U.S. history.
Officials said the agreement
provides "substantial finan-
cial relief to homeowners and
establishes significant new
homeowner protections for the


future," according to informa-
tion provided by the Justice
Department.
The agreement benefits both
borrowers who have loans with
the banks and borrowers with
loans serviced by the banks. Resi-
dents of Oklahoma, the only state
which chose not to participate in
the settlement, will not benefit.
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi participated in the
agreement, which provides an
estimated $8.4 billion in relief
to Florida homeowners. Some
Sarasota County homeowners
likely will qualify for revising their
existing mortgages under the
program. That will be among the


topics of a panel discussion that
will be broadcast live at 6 p.m.
Wednesday by Sarasota County
government on Comcast 19 and
Verizon 32. The discussion also
will be available on the county's
website at www.scgov.net.
Twelfth Circuit Judge Lee
E. Haworth will moderate the
discussion. Panelists will include
attorneys Anne Weintraub,
Nancy Cason and Scott Peterson.
The nation's five largest loan
services Ally/GMAC, Bank of
America, Citi, JP Morgan Chase
and Wells Fargo are included
in the agreement, which is based
on state and federal investiga-
tions now closed that found


banks had signed foreclosure-
related documents without
notaries public and without
verifying that statements in the
documents were truthful. Both of
these actions violate the law.
The panel discussion will
address who is covered by the set-
tlement and what claims can be
pursued, plus how homeowners
can find out if they are eligible
and how they can apply.
According to information
provided by the federal govern-
ment, the settlement will provide
as much as $25 billion in relief to
distressed borrowers and direct
payments to the 49 states and the
federal government.


The next step may well be
immediate aid to homeowners
needing loan modifications
now, including first and sec-
ond lien principal reduction.
Loan services will be required
to work off up to $17 billion in
principal reduction, plus other
forms of loan-modification
relief, nationwide.
Also imminent may be pay-
ments to borrowers who lost
their homes to foreclosure.
Some $1.5 billion will be dis-
tributed nationwide to about
750,000 borrowers.
For more information, go to
www.nationalmortgagesettlement.
com, or call 941-861-5000.


Stalemate leads to bond default


By CAROL SAKOWITZ
STAFF WRITER

The stalemate between
the West Villages Improve-
ment District and Gran
Paradise developer Sam
Rodgers has reached the
point where Rodgers will
default on the bond pay-
ment for the second time
in two years.
Toward the end of Tues-
day's monthly meeting,
District Manager Todd
Wodraska said no bond
payment will be made for
the 1,000-plus acre Gran
Paradise section, also
called Unit 3. Wodraska
said there is only $600,000
in combined revenues and
reserves for the unit.
The debt service that
must be satisfied May 1 is
$1.75 million, leaving a gap
of $1.15 million, which is
not expected to be closed
in time.
The WestVillages


Improvement District, cre-
ated by a special act of the
state Legislature, is located
within North Port and near
State College of Florida's
South Venice campus off
U.S. 41.
At issue is Rodgers'
refusal to pay his share
of Gran Paradiso taxes
and assessments until
the mothballed $4 mil-
lion clubhouse a major
attraction for homebuy-
ers is completed. The
district, in turn, refuses to
restart clubhouse con-
struction until Rodgers
pays the taxes.
The developer has not
paid his assessments since
2008. BTI BlueGate FTCF
LLC of Coral Gables in
2010 paid almost $7.3 mil-
lion to purchase tax certifi-
cates from 2008 and 2009.
Rodgers, who attended
Tuesday's meeting,
pointed to spring 2009 as
the critical point in the


dispute. He said he feels
the clubhouse could have
been completed sooner
than March 31, 2009 the
date his taxes were due.
If it had, he said, it could
have "given a jump-start
to the community" in pre-
senting the development
to potential buyers and he
would have paid his taxes.
The development
became "dead in the water"
in April, Rodgers said,
when the district board of
supervisors voted to stop
clubhouse construction.
Wodraska said he now
has to inform the state
Department of Revenue
and agents for the bond-
holders about the situa-
tion. The next step, includ-
ing possible foreclosure on
Gran Paradiso, is up to the
bond holders.
The district is composed
of three units. Unit 1,
approximately 8,200 acres,
includes the entire district:


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Upper-Back Pain
DR. DAN BUSCH, DR. ERENE ROMANSKI


CHINKUKROPRAI U
While lower-back pain often results from
lifting heavy objects incorrectly or having
inadequate muscle strength to keep the
spine in alignment, upper-back pain is
usually caused by poor posture. A good
example of this pain-inducing posture is the
position that many office workers assume
while hunched at their desks. This improper
posture overstresses the muscles at the base


of the neck. As they battle to hold the head
upright, intervertebral discs become
strained, ligaments pull, and muscle
imbalances arise. The resulting pain may
lead many to the chiropractor. Long-term
relief may be best realized by adhering to
the posture recommendations and a
program of stretching exercises presented
by the chiropractor in hopes of staving off
further problems.


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*THE PATIENTAND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAYCANCEL
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PERFORMEDASA RESULT OF ANDWITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT Lic# 14016


the town center, Island-
Walk and Gran Paradiso.
Unit 2, about 2,000 acres,
includes part of Gran
Paradise, the DiVosta/Pulte
Home Corp. IslandWalk
project and land for the


town center. Gran Paradiso
makes up Unit 3.
A contingent of Gran
Paradise homeowners
who attended the district
meeting expressed the fear
that default would mean


electric and water utilities
will be shut off suddenly.
Wodraska said residents
who have paid their
assessments will not be
in jeopardy of losing their
utilities.


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Venice Area Garden Club
fgDER Ar?/

Twenty-Third Annual




Home Tour



Friday, March 9 S Saturday March 10


Tickets may be purchased from any member ot the
Venice area Garden Club, or at the following locations;
Cardware- US Post Office, Venice Pines, 1224 Jacaranda Blvd. 493-8636
Classic Creations in diamonds & gold, inc.- 2389 Tamiami Trail S. Venice- 497-6331
Collectors Gallery & Framery- 114 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice- 488-3029
Kerri's Jewels & Gems 132 West Venice Ave., Venice- 484-9197
The Knitting Place- 258 W. Miami Ave., (Pattison Bldg.) Venice- 486-1584
Triangle Inn- 351 Nassau Street, Venice- (Mon-Fri) 486-2487
Paper Pad- 327 West Venice Avenue, Venice- 488-8300
Village Pharmacy of Nokomis- 1095 Tamiami Trail, Nokomis- 488-8800
Proceeds Benefit the Venice Area


10A SUN NEWSPAPERS





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


Cocaine high leads to stran


ion


AVenice man was
arrested for strangling
his girlfriend after a
night of sex
and smok-
ing crack
cocaine.
According
to aVen-
ice Police
Department
LATSHA report:
Michael
Latsha, 41, 600 block Del-
phinium Drive, Venice,
rented a room two days
prior. The girlfriend was
provided crack cocaine
by Latsha for a sexual
service. After having sex,
he struck the victim in
her face and strangled her
with his bare hands twice.
She struck Latsha in
the face with a dog leash
to break free.
Once outside the
room, motel manage-
ment saw the ruckus and
called police.
Inside the room they
found a bag containing
cocaine residue and two
crack pipes in a trash
can. Latsha admitted to
buying the drugs. He was
charged with domestic
battery, possession of
a controlled substance
without a prescription
and possession of nar-
cotic equipment.

Mom takes
sitter for a ride
A woman forcibly took
her infant child back
from her estranged hus-
band, but in
doing so got
arrested.
Accord-
S ing to a VPD
report:
Charles
Bigelow
went with
PRATER
Gina Prater
to a Groveland Avenue
residence to attempt to
pick up Prater's infant
child.


Fingerprinting

goes inkless in

Sarasota County
STAFF REPORT

Because the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement and the FBI
will no longer accept fin-
gerprint cards as of April
1, the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office bought a
system to take and trans-
mit prints electronically.
The two units one at
the Sarasota County Jail,
2020 Main St., Sarasota,
and one at the South
County Jail at the Venice
Police Department, 1250
Ridgewood Ave., Venice
- cost about $14,000 for
a laptop computer, scan-
ner and printer.
Besides leaving people
who get fingerprinted with
clean hands, the new tech-
nology will also provide
people needing a criminal
background screening for
work or volunteer duties
a much faster turnaround
time 24 hours instead
of weeks, according to
SCSO spokeswoman
Wendy Rose.
The system is already in
use in North County. The
South County unit goes
live March 5.
Use of the system costs
$15, cash only. The person
being fingerprinted must
present a photo ID and
must have an originating
agency number or control-
ling agency number from
the company requesting
the background check. The
company must be regis-
tered with the FDLE to
receive electronic results.
Upon fingerprinting,


the person will receive the
number assigned to the
criminal history request,
which must be entered
into the FDLE's Civil Appli-
cant Payment System with
a credit card number to
start the process.


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction. Guilt is determined by the
courtsystem.


A male babysitter for
the child was on the rear
screened porch with the
child when
Prater tore
open the
S screen and
unlocked
the door.
Bigelow
and Prater
BIGELOW forcefully
grabbed the
babysitter's arm and took
the child.
The couple left in
Prater's van, but as she
attempted to back out
the babysitter blocked
the way with his body.
Prater pulled forward
and drove through the
yard. Again, the babysit-
ter jumped in front of the
vehicle.
He later said Prater
"lunged" the vehicle
toward him several times
when he jumped on the
hood to avoid being hit.
He hung onto the van's
hood while Prater drove
down the street trying to
dislodge him.
An observant neighbor
blocked the van in when
it pulled into another
driveway.
Prater, 39, 600 block
Altair Road, Venice, was
arrested for aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon. There was no


bond. Bigelow, same
address, was arrested for
battery. Bond was set at
$750.

Phone fight
leads to stabbing
An intoxicated Noko-
mis man allegedly
stabbed his girlfriend
after she
wouldn't
give back
his phone.
According
S to a Sara-
sota County
Sheriff's
Office
report:
Milton Arthur Watts,
40, 900 block Lucille Ave.,
Nokomis, said he was the
one who was stabbed,
and showed deputies
minor injuries to his hand
consistent with grabbing a
knife. He also had a small
bite mark on his hand.
But his girlfriend said
he was the aggressor,
becoming agitated at not
getting back his phone.
He allegedly grabbed
a fish fillet knife and
pinned her to the bed,
she said, attempting to
stab her. She bitWatts on
his right hand, and fled
the room to get help from
others in the residence.
She had cut marks


behind her left arm but
did not remember how
she received them. There
also appeared to be a
small puncture wound
on her face that seemed
to be from a knife.
Deputies were unable
to locate the knife. Oth-
ers in the house were
sleeping during the
incident and did not
hear or see anything that
occurred.
Watts was charged with
aggravated battery and
aggravated assault with
a weapon without intent
to kill. Bond was set at
$50,000.

Refusal to leave
ends in battery
An intoxicated Noko-
mis man with a history
of battery hit his friend
after he was
told repeat-
edly to
9! leave.
Accord-
ing to aVPD
report:
Richard
HAMPSON illiam
HAMPSON
Hampson,
30, 100 block Orange
Grove St., in Nokomis,
was at a home on East
Base Avenue in Venice
and refused to leave.
When police arrived,
Hampson was seated
without a shirt in the
patio area of the drive-
way slurring his words.
One complainant said he
stuck him in the face.


Hampson repeatedly
yelled and cursed as
officers questioned the
parties. He told the offi-
cers the "drug charges will
never stick," and spat in
the patrol vehicle, tried to
smash his head into the
windows and partition
and repeatedly threat-
ened violence against the
female arresting officer
and other officers.
He was charged with
battery. Bond was set at
$1,500.

Teacher nabbed
in drug sting
AVenice High School
reading instructor
resigned this week over
two prescription pills.
According to a SCSO
report:
Megan Stuart Boone,
27, 500 block Urbana
Drive, Venice, was
arrested and charged
with selling two Adderall
pills from her personal
prescription for $12 in
aWalmart parking lot.
The undercover detective
allegedly also asked her to
obtain other medications,
but Boone declined. Bond
was set at $5,000.
The pills are used to
control symptoms of
attention deficit hyperac-
tivity disorder.
Boone was hired two
years ago at Venice High.
Anticipating the arrest,
she resigned from the
Sarasota County School
District Monday.


Man arrested
for stealing gas
A Venice man was
arrested after burglariz-
ing a North Port home in
search of gas.
According to a North
Port Police Department
report:
A man entered the
garage of a home on
Bartigon Avenue in North
Port in search of gasoline
to fill his vehicle, which
ran out of gas near the
Sumter Boulevard inter-
change off Interstate 75.
Officers determined
the man entered the
home through an
unlocked door, and was
confronted by the female
homeowner, who caught
him shaking several gas
containers. He said he
needed gas or money.
She told him to leave.
He appeared confused
and asked if he could cut a
piece of hose off to siphon
gas from the motorcycle
in the garage. She said no.
He ignored her, grabbed
a multi-tool with a knife
and cut the hose.
The man was found by
officers in the area car-
rying a red gas can and
a 2-foot piece of garden
hose.
Stephen Davie DeFuria
Jr., 26, 3900 block Sham-
rock Blvd., Venice, was
charged with armed bur-
glary of a dwelling, petit
larceny, property damage
and trespassing. Bond
was set at $10,740.


* .


SUN NEWSPAPERS 11A









WEEKEND EDITION SPORTS
MARCH 3, 2012


CONTACT US
PERRY D. PENTZ
SPORTS EDITOR
941-207-1107
ppentz@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


SPORTS SHORTS

SOFTBALL
PORT CHARLOTTE EDGES
VENICE: Venice dropped its sixth
straight game Friday night as a late-
game rally fell short in a 4-2 loss
on the road in a Class 7A-District 11
game at Port Charlotte.
Starting pitcher Emalee Sands
went the distance, allowing just five
hits and three walks, but she was
done in by untimely errors and two
Port Charlotte double plays.
Amber Yonker hit a two-run
single in the seventh to give the
Indians (1-7,0-3) hope, but a
groundout with the bases loaded
ended the game.
Venice plays Manatee on Tuesday
at G.T. Bray Park in Bradenton.
Port Charlotte 4, Venice 2
Venice 000 000 2 2 5 2
PortCharlotte 000013 x 4 5 2
Emalee Sands and Taylor Baker; Kali
Barnhill and Amy Lokker. WP: Barnhill LP:
Sands. Leading hitters: Venice, Amber
Yonker 1-3, 2 RBI; Port Charlotte, Ashley
Burke 1-3, RBI, run scored. Records: Venice
1-7,0-3; Port Charlotte 4-5.

BOYS TENNIS
VENICE DOWNS CHARLOTTE:
Venice picked up wins in four of five
singles matches en route to a 4-2
win over Charlotte Wednesday at
Laurel Nokomis School.
The Indians (6-1) had victories
from No. 2 through 5 singles by
Brian Felman, who rallied from a set
down, James Fong, James Rock and
Shiv Krishnaswamy.
Only the No. 2 doubles match
was played as darkness halted the
No. 1 match early.
Venice plays at Sarasota High on
Monday.
Venice 4, Charlotte 2
At Laurel Nokomis School
Singles
Asti Adams (Char) def. Michael Leonard
7-5, 6-0; Brian Felman (V) def. Grant Ram-
reich 2-6,6-2,10-6;James Fong (V) def. Sam
Heitmann 6-1,6-1;James Rock (V) def. Dan-
iel Combs 6-4, 6-2; Shiv Krishnaswamy (V)
def. Scott Barnett 6-0, 6-2.
Doubles
Leonard and Erick Gasca (V) vs. Adams
and Barnett, DNF (darkness); Combs and
ChandlerWilliams (Char) def.ThomasWhit-
takerand Alex Fong, 8-5.
Records: Charlotte 4-3, Venice 6-1.

SENIOR SOFTBALL
Wednesday Night
Senior Softball League
STANDINGS (as of Feb. 29)
WGACA Trainers..........................6-2
DeFina's Restaurant.....................6-2
Rugs As Art ................................. 6-2
Absolute Lawn & Landscape.......5-3
Builders Specialties................... 5-3
Yankee Carpentry.....................4-4
Manasota Hardware.....................4-4
Peluso Air...................................3-5
Critter Ridge Landscaping...........3-5
Venice Senior ..............................2-6
Tiberii Dentistry ....................... 2-6
Style Line ..................................2-6
Feb. 29 Results
WGACATrainers 23,Tiberii Dentistry 11
Critter Ridge Landscaping 17, Absolute
Lawn & Landscape 7
DeFina's Restaurant 12, Builders Special-
ties 7
Rugs As Art 21,Venice Senior 13
Style Line 19,Yankee Carpentry 18
Manasota Hardware 26, Peluso Air 7


SPORTS BRIEFS

Tennis exhibition
at Plantation
Professional tennis
player Carly Gullickson is
putting on an exhibition at
4 p.m. Tuesday at Planta-
tion Golf & Country Club.
Cost is a $10 dona-
tion, which goes to the
Plantation Community
Foundation.
For tickets, call 941-
497-4826 or 941-493-0047.

Indians Grand
Slam Fishing
tourney is March 31
The 2012 Indians Grand
Slam Fishing Tournament
will be held March 31 at
the Casey Key Fish House.
The tournament is
catch and release.
Entry fee is $250 per boat
and includes a tournament
goodie bucket, tournament
shirt and captain's meal.
Prize money of $8,000
will be handed out. The top
three will receive money
in various categories in
the Inshore and Offshore


BASEBALL CLASS 7A-DISTRICT 11


Venice no-hits Port Charlotte


By PERRY D. PENTZ
SPORTS EDITOR

Venice's Craig Faulkner thinks
hitting will come around as the
season progresses.
However, the coach will take
his pitching performances as
three pitchers combined for
Venice second no-hitter of
the season in the Indians' 1-0
victory over Port Charlotte in
a Class 7A-District 11 game at
Venice High.
Venice starter Tyson Albert
threw three perfect innings with
four strikeouts. Senior Kevin
Guthrie pitched three innings of
no-hit relief in his first action of
the season to get the victory.
"Feels good, as I was sidelined
for two weeks," said Kevin Guth-
rie. "Been throwing bullpens for
a week. First appearance back
and I'm pretty happy about it."
Guthrie finished with four
strikeouts and a walk. In the
seventh inning, junior side-arm
pitcher Cooper Hammond came
in and got a groundout and
strikeout, hit a batter, then got
another groundout to close out
the game.
Port Charlotte only had two
runners reach base on a walk
in the sixth inning and the hit
batter in the seventh inning.
"That is nice," said Faulkner
about the no-hitter. "We are
doing some good things. Obvi-
ously, we are not where we want
to be yet in getting guys in from
scoring position. When we get
guys in scoring position we have
to capitalize on them, but the
valuable thing tonight was our
pitching. Albert was very good.
We didn't want him to throw a
bunch. Kevin Guthrie came in
and did a nice job and Cooper
Hammond came in and did
what he always does."
"Their approach at the plate
is terrible," said Port Charlotte
coach Bryan Beisner. "They are


SUN PHOTOS BY JUSTIN FENNELL


Venice's Tyson Albert delivers a pitch against Port Charlotte Friday in a Class
7A-District 11 game at Venice High. Albert pitched three scoreless innings and
combined with two other pitchers for a no-hitter in Venice's 1-0 victory.


trying to do too much instead of
seeing the baseball and hitting
it hard."
A base-running error cost
the Pirates a hit in the second
inning.
A double was hit down the
left-field line but was called
out on an umpire appeal at
first base as the base runner
missed first base on his way to
second.
"Kevin Guthrie seeing that guy
not touch first base is exactly


Victories in



singles key



Venice win


Venice's James Rock stretches for a forehand against Char-
lotte's Daniel Combs in the No. 4 singles match Wednesday
at Laurel Nokomis School. Rock won in straight sets as the
Indians grabbed a 4-2 victory over the Tarpons. For more
results, read Sports Shorts.


I )[V% I,[-n, I .1111,11, As .111
iinh tl' it it l l IV I I, II
kid- 1111.1't 1 1. h, 'Il I if Ill
I, p n I llh 'lt llt .. Ii' 1
BRIEFS113


what a first baseman's job is and
he did it," said Faulkner.
"The double killed us because
it was the first batter of the
inning," said Beisner.
Venice (4-2 overall, 2-1
district) scored its only run in
the bottom of the fifth off Port
Charlotte junior pitcher Kyle
Klawonn, who allowed six hits
total and just three hits in the
first four innings.
"Great pitching performance
out of our kid," said Beisner.


Venice High pinch runner Zach Brower
advances to third base on a single in
the third inning as Port Charlotte third
baseman Adam Rodriguez waits for
the ball. Brower was stranded but two
innings later Venice scored to pull out
a 1-0 win Friday.

"You have to win games like this.
We have to figure out a way that
is all."
Indians sophomore Ryan
Miller led off with a single into
right field. Miller then stole
second base as the infielders
weren't paying attention.
"That is just the middle of the
infield being lazy," said Beisner.
"No excuse."
"Great base running by Ryan
Miller to take a base when no
one is looking. Nice piece of
hitting by Rex to get the guy
in when we needed it," said
Faulkner. "Nice job by Dalton
Guthrie to pick the ball out
of the dirt on the steal (in the
sixth inning). Little things like
that in a 1-0 game make a big
difference."
Venice's Rex Ingerick followed
with a single into short left-cen-
ter field to score Miller for the
only run.
"We had the bunt on, so basi-
cally I had to do my job and
get the guy over," said Ingerick.
"Took a strike and knew I had
to get the job done somehow.

BASEBALL113


SUN PHOTOS BY PERRY D. PENTZ
Venice's Shiv Krishnaswamy hits a backhand against Charlotte's Scott Barnett in the No. 5 singles
match Wednesday at Laurel Nokomis School. Krishnaswamy only lost two games in two sets for
the victory as the Indians defeated the Tarpons 4-2.


SPORTS 0.
CSPAORTS Sponsored by
CALENDAR


BTEN Boys Tennis, GTEN Girls Tennis,
TRK Track & Field, BWL Boys Weightlifting.
SOFT-Softball, BASE-Baseball
COMING UP Saturday
S BASE Venice at Sarasota,
._ 1 I I'B1 JVIl a.m.


Jacaranda Plaza -1635 US41 ByPass 941-492-5524


Monday
BTEN -Venice at Sarasota, 3:30 p.m.
GTEN V...- ,1 ,
BASE ii.I -,I ', IV r I1 "


Tuesday
TRK Venice at Sarasota, JV 3 p.m.
BASE Manatee at Venice, V 7 p.m.
SO FT -r..- I.1- ,-,,
I lI ,,. ,lI 1,1.-li.,'l,
IV V "- :'6


- ~--I II





:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


SARASOTA COUNTY MIDDLE SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIP




Pine View girls win third title in row


STAFF REPORT

The Pine View girls
basketball team captured
its third consecutive
Sarasota County Middle
School Championship
with a 32-24 victory over
Booker.
The Pythons finished
the season with a 9-1
record. Their only loss
was to Booker during the
regular season. How-
ever, it was determined
Booker used an illegal
player in the game.
The game was tied at
7-7 after one quarter but
Pine View grabbed a six-
point lead at halftime.
Pine View led 17-11 but
Booker came back in the
third quarter to tie it at
17-17.
The Pythons scored
two baskets in a row by
Jaclyn Kulle for a 21-17
advantage.


BASEBALL
FROM PAGE 12

When count went to 3-1,
I had a good piece of hit-
ting and hit it in the gap
where the guy wasn't."
Venice threatened in
two straight innings but



BRIEFS
FROM PAGE 12

for kids to enter.
The tournament is
held by Diamond Boost-
ers Inc. and is a fund-
raiser for the Venice High
baseball team.
A mandatory captain's
meeting will be held from
6 to 9 p.m. March 29 at
Casey Key Fish House. A
captain's meal is included


In the fourth quar-
ter, Pine View led by as
many as eight points but
Booker charged back and
pulled within five points
but no closer.
Over the last three
years, Pine View has a
29-1 record.

COURTESY PHOTO
The Pine View School middle
school basketball team shows
off its trophy and ribbons
after capturing its third
straight Sarasota County
Middle School Championship
with a victory over Booker.
Members of the team are
Charli Pogany, front row
left, Alicia LaMaida, Amanda
Rosenberg, Maggie He, Sophie
Landry and Delaney Cleary;
and Josie LaBlanc, back left,
Nisa Rogers, Rachel O'Grady,
Madison Brown, Lindsey
Heider, Jacqueline Kulle and
coach Joe DiGiacomo.

stranded four runners,
including three in scoring
position.
In the third inning, an
error, a sacrifice bunt
and a bloop single by
Ingerick over third base
put runners at second
and third base with one
out.
Klawonn got out of the


with paid registration.
Crew and guest meal cost
is $10.
For more informa-
tion, contact co-directors
Brenden Curcio at 941-
350-6739 or brcurcio@
yahoo.com or Mike Mont-
gomery at 941-716-1981
or cpmike@verizon.net.

Venice girls tennis
to play at Coach L
tennis courts
The Venice High girls


jam with a strikeout and
groundout.
In the fourth inning,
the Indians put runners
on first and second base
with one out. A strikeout
and a fly out stopped the
scoring opportunity. The
final out was on a nice
play by Port Charlotte
shortstop Nick Agosta


tennis team will be using
the Coach Lechlitner
tennis courts at Hecksher
Park for practice and
matches the rest of the
season.
The Lady Indians have
been using Pine View
School in Osprey since
VHS tennis courts are
out of commission until
2014 because of con-
struction at the school.
This has become prob-
lematic because Pine
View doesn't get out of


with a running catch in
short left field.
Venice had a perfect
game going for 5 /3
innings. A walk to Kla-
wonn on a 3-2 count in
the sixth inning ended it.
On Tuesday and Friday,
Venice hosts Manatee and
Charlotte in back-to-back
district games.


school until 4 p.m., while
Venice releases at 3 p.m.
In addition to the bus
ride between the schools,
Venice had to wait an
hour until the busses at
Pine View departed.
This is a reminder
that the public courts
at Hecksher Park will
be used on the follow-
ing dates for practices
(3 to 5 p.m.): March 6,
March 19, March 20,
March 22, March 29,
April 2, April 5, April 9


Venice 1, Port Charlotte 0 Charlotte 2-4,0-3; Venice 4-2, 2-1.
Port Charlotte 000 000 0 0 0 1
Venice 000 010 0 1 6 0 Email:ppentz@venicegondolier.com


Leading hitters: Venice, Rex Ingerick
2-3 RBI, Michael Knott 2-2. Pitching:
Port Charlotte, Kyle Klawonn (L, 6 inns., 6
hits, 1 run-earned, 2 walks, 2 strikeouts);
Venice, Tyson Albert (3 inns., 0 hits, 0
runs-earned, 0 walks, 4 strikeouts); Kevin
Guthrie (W 1-0, 3 inns., 0 hits, 0 runs-
earned, 1 walk, 4 strikeouts); Cooper
Hammond (1 inn., 0 hits, 0 runs-earned,
0 walks, 1 strikeout). Records: Port


and April 11.
The Lady Indians have
three home matches
remaining March 7,
March 26 and March 27.
Courts will be occupied
from 4 to 7 p.m. on those
dates.
The courts were
recently named for
Wayne Lechlitner, a long-
time girls tennis coach at
VHS.
For more information,
contact JimWormley at
941-915-1168.


March Rates
$49 before 8AM
$69 8AM Noon
$59 Noon 2PM
$35 after 2PM

$10 OFF COUPON
WEEKEND SPECIAL
8:00 AM 12 PM
EXP. 3/11/12



Champion Ultra
Dwarf Greens
www.bobcattrailgc.com
(941) 429-0500
Located off 1-75, Exit 179


*i ..Ion.II ,: i I



- __- r


u-ri



,n I








,Fd i 'V.


VENICE APPLEBEES A
ONLY


AlaySe cial
ALLYOUCANEATRI.- T


SUN NEWSPAPERS 13A





MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


Code changes could spur construction


By ED SCOTT
STAFF WRITER

Changes to how wind
speed is determined may
slightly reduce the cost of
constructing a new home
in Florida, according to
Sarasota County building
official Greg Yantorno.
The new Florida Build-
ing Code will become
effective March 15. All
permit applications and
construction documents
submitted then and after-
ward must comply with
the new code.
One of the important
changes to the code,
which is updated every
three years and was
approved last year by the
Florida Building Commis-
sion, is how wind speed is
determined.
Wind-speed maps are
used to show that roofs,
windows, doors and
garage doors must be
designed to withstand cer-
tain wind speeds, depend-
ing on where they are


UPCOMING
MEETINGS ON
BUILDING CODE
CHANGES
VENICE
Monday, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Venice City Hall, Council Chambers
401 W. Venice Ave.
Contact: 941-486-2626, ext.
24003

located. A home in inland
North Port Estates likely
won't be required to be
designed to withstand as
fast a wind speed as a new
home on Venice Beach.
The University of
Florida provided all
Florida counties with new
wind-speed maps. The
basic wind speed for Sara-
sota County, countywide,
will change from one to
multiple wind speeds,
depending on the location
and the type of building
being constructed.
Since 2001, Sarasota
County has required


NORTH PORT
Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
North Port City Hall, Commission
Chambers
4970 City Hall Blvd.
Contact: 941-429-7044
SARASOTA COUNTY
March 12, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
1001 Sarasota Center Blvd.,
Sarasota
Contact: 941-861-5000

that structures be built
to withstand 130 mph
winds, as determined
by a different method.
The code now has wind
speeds that range from
140 mph to 170 mph.
The way they will be
determined is different
from in the past, said Yan-
torno, Sarasota County's
building official since
2010.
"There could be some
relief on building design,
other than on the coastal
areas," he said. "On the
coastal areas, it's about
the same. Getting inland,


away from the coastal
areas, there could be a
20 percent reduction (in
required wind load) in
actually how buildings
are designed and the
methodology for design-
ing buildings."
Wind-speed lines are
established by local ordi-
nance using recognizable
landmarks such as major
roads, canals, rivers and
lake shores, whenever
possible. It wasn't possible
in Sarasota County, so
staff instead incorporated
the new wind-speed lines
into the county's geo-
graphical information sys-
tem. Building department
staff in North Port, Venice
and the city of Sarasota
direct design professionals
to the county's GIS system
so they can determine the
wind speeds for properties
near wind-speed lines.
There are quite a few
other changes to the code,
Yantorno said, but none
as significant as how wind
speeds are determined.


Bill change takes counties off health-care hook


By ED SCOTT
STAFF WRITER

County governments
avoided a financial mine
field recently when
lawmakers revised a plan
to reorganize the state
Department of Health.
Separate bills in the
House of Representatives
and Senate deal with
reorganization, which
has been on the Legisla-
ture's drawing board for
three years. The original
House bill goes further
than the Senate bill,
calling for transferring
public health responsi-
bilities and thousands
of jobs from the state
to the counties. But the
House bill subsequently
was amended to remove
such decentralization.
Passing a law with
decentralization would
cost Sarasota County
nearly $1.5 million ini-
tially and about $400,000
annually, Sarasota
County Commission
Chair Christine Robin-
son wrote in a letter last
week to state Sen. Nancy
Detert, R-Venice.
Robinson strongly
urged Detert and the rest
of the Sarasota County
Legislative Delega-
tion to oppose any bill
that would require
decentralization of the


Department of Health,
due to what Robin-
son called "the result-
ing unfair cost burden
shifted to county taxpay-
ers, as well as the poten-
tial loss of our current
volunteer health services
providing millions of dol-
lars in health care to our
citizens annually."
Currently, local
county health depart-
ments report directly to
the state Department
of Health. Contracts
between the state, the
local health departments
and county governments
dictate which services
the local departments
deliver to residents on
behalf of the county. In
recent years Sarasota
County has paid the
local health department
about $3.2 million annu-
ally for those services.
"The centralized part
of this is really important
because you get central
direction on public health
policy, procedures and
guidelines," said Deputy
Sarasota County Adminis-
trator Bill Little, who pre-
viously was administrator
of the Sarasota County
Health Department. "You
get centralized informa-
tion systems. You get cen-
tralized billing systems ...
personnel systems."
State Rep. Ray Pilon,


Two vendors

vie for hotline

By ED SCOTT
STAFF WRITER
Two companies sub-
mitted bids to maintain a
hotline residents and oth-
ers can use if they suspect
Sarasota County employ-
ees are committing illegal
or unethical behavior or \\
are not following county 8 ci,,' ,
policy.
EthicsPoint Inc. of Lake
Oswego, Ore., and Phase
V of Southwest Florida,
based in Fort Myers,
turned in their bids prior
to the Feb. 9 deadline.
Staff has not determined
when it will take a con-
tract with the chosen
vendor to the Sarasota
County Commission for
approval.
The ultimate goal for
the hotline is to uncover VN
waste, fraud and abuse.


R-Sarasota, said he
was not in favor of the
original House bill, but
"the amendments I
understand that
will be offered, remove
the decentralization
language. If this does
not occur, I will still
be against the original
language."


Decentralization could
jeopardize the counties'
ability to benefit from
services provided by
volunteer doctors and
nurses, due to a shift in
liability from the state to
the counties. In Sarasota
County, that in-kind
benefit is equal to about
$3 million annually.


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Another important
change regards how
structures are constructed
to withstand floods, again
depending on where they
are located.
Sarasota and Manatee
counties, and the cities
of Sarasota, Venice and
North Port, are working


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:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


Business fund gets a $6 million boost


By ED SCOTT
STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by support
from North Port City
Commission Chair Tom
Jones, who attended
their 2012-13 budget
workshop, Sarasota
County commission-
ers voted unanimously
to immediately allocate
$6 million that was not
spent last fiscal year to
the Economic Develop-
ment Incentive Fund.
"We have 9.8 per-
cent unemployment,"
County Commissioner
Joe Barbetta said. "This
is about jobs and the
economy. This is about
having the funds avail-
able so our economic-
development people can
be aggressive."
The EDIF originated
from proceeds derived
from the sale of tax-
vacated lots in North
Port. Some $10 mil-
lion has been allocated
to 28 businesses, four
nonprofit organizations
and two municipalities,
creating 1,039 jobs with
an average salary of
$29,400. The current
EDIF balance is about
$665,000.
The city of North Port
received $130,000 from
the EDIF in recent years
- $100,000 for its small-
business revolving-loan
fund and $30,000 to pay
for an economic-devel-
opment strategic plan
update. Jones said the
EDIF is important.
"This has been a
dramatically effective
program in Sarasota
County," he said. "In
the city of North Port,
we consider economic
development as 'Job
1-through-10.'We are
proud to be partnering
with Sarasota County."
County Commission
Chair Christine Robinson


SARASOTA COUNTY
BUDGET TIMELINE
* Workshop March 14
(annual surtax update)
* Workshop May 7 (facilities
needs/condition assessment,
capital improvement program
update)
* Preliminary property values
revealed June 1
* Workshops June 12-13,15
* Final property values revealed
- July 1
*"Not to Exceed" millage rates
set July 11
* Workshop Aug. 20
* Budget adoption (public
hearings) Sept. 10 (South
County) and Sept. 24 (North
County)
said she heard from
Venice officials who,
while they could not take
a vote on it, unanimously
supported the county
putting $6 million in the
EDIE
"This is as much about
making a bold statement
... that we are open for
business," Robinson
said. "(We had) a bad
reputation last year. We
got that business-climate
report that we are mak-
ing efforts to try and turn
around."
"You are talking to a
county that was willing
to consider coming up
with tens of millions
of dollars to produce
Jackson Lab," Commis-
sioner Nora Patterson
said. "I think the mes-
sage that we are open for
business, and willing to
help subsidize bringing
it here, is clearly out
there."
Jackson Laboratory,
a world-renowned
biomedical research
organization based in
Bar Harbor, Maine, was
thwarted in its effort
to bring a $330 million
biomedical village to
Sarasota County. State
government officials


were unable or unwilling
to contribute $100 mil-
lion lab officials said they
needed from the state
to establish the project,
which also involved
the University of South
Florida, Gulf Coast
Community Foundation
in Venice and Sarasota
Memorial Hospital.
In other action Thurs-
day, commissioners:
*Voted 3-2 to raise the
Mosquito Control mill-
age rate to the amount
needed to run that
division during the next
fiscal year at the current
service level. The move
could amount to a $12
tax increase for owners of
$200,000 properties. Rob-
inson and Commissioner
Jon Thaxton dissented.
The binding vote on this
issue will be held in June.
Commissioners had
funded this service
for 2011-12 out of the
General Fund.
Approved using
$2.47 million from the
General Fund to bal-
ance the Contracted


Human Services budget,
a $300,000 increase over


this year. The vote was
3-2, with Patterson and


Robinson dissenting.
Email: escott@sun-herald.com


44j-. *.cYi ;
t


ow F


SUN PHOTO BY JUSTIN FENNELL


'Tomatoland' talk
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WEEKEND EDITION
"MARCH 3,2012

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
941-207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


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CROSSWORD 4B


Still'Foxy' after 20 years on stage


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
The Silver Fox Follies
turns 20 this year.
The annual variety show
featuring talented seniors
ages 50 and older will run
March 14-18 on the main
stage at Venice Theatre.
Dancer Shirley Gawne,
90 going on 50, was there
at the beginning.
"Irene Fisher and I
brought in the singing
and dancing," she said
recently. "Before that it
was just a group of people
doing skits and read-
ing poems in the Green
Room (at the theater)."
Fisher and Gawne took
their inspiration from the
Geritol Follies, a Cana-
dian group they saw per-
form at Venice Communi-
ty Center in 1991 or 1992.
Gawne, a professional
dancer, moved to Venice
from Chicago in 1962.
Never missing a step, she
taught dancing in Venice.
She was a natural to lead
the first five ladies, who
would come to be known
as the Foxettes.
Gawne has a complete
collection of old Silver Fox
programs and many old
photos. She provided sev-
eral for use with this story.
The dancers' first
uniform was a T-shirt
designed to look like a
tuxedo, she said.
Today's Silver Foxes
group numbers 18, and the
costumes, which the ladies
create themselves, are far
more elaborate and sophis-
ticated. They usually do a
big production number in
each half of the show.
The show itself contin-
ues to resemble an old
USO show, Gawne said.
The director, who is paid
byVenice Theatre, is Joe
Simmons. He has directed
the show for several years.
Directors in the early years
included John McGuckin,
Rich Lehne and Howard
Crouch. Jason Brenner is
the show's musical director.
Most of the perform-
ers in the Follies follow
their muse and perform
throughout the community
all during the year, singing
and dancing in nursing
homes, schools almost
anywhere there is an audi-
ence. According to infor-
mation in a recent release
from the theater, the trav-
eling troupe reaches about
5,000 audience members
annually throughout Sara-
sota County.
A few of them, like Ben-
nett Gross, also try out for
parts in the theater's other
productions. Gross will
perform in next month's
world premier of "Stand
ByYourVan," on the
theater's main stage." For
this brand-new produc-
tion, he even had a hand
in creating his role, that of
an older man who wants
to win a van as a legacy for
his grandchildren because
he has nothing else to
leave them when he dies.
Gawne retired as
director of the dance


The Foxettes add more than color to the annual Silver Fox Follies at Venice Theatre.


troupe at the end of last
season. She continues
teaching dance classes
and, in her spare time,
has a new project. She
is trying to find as many
early Foxes as possible
for a reunion of sorts at
this year's show. Although
some have passed on, she
hopes many remain in the
area and will want to see
how the show has grown
in the intervening years.
Among the highlights of
past shows, Gawne spoke
of a performance by vet-
eranVenice Theatre actor
Shirley Taylor as Marlene
Dietrich in a German skit
from the 2001 Follies and
an early ballet num-
ber featuring four men
instead of the Foxettes.
In addition to dancing,
she also has performed
in several skits, often with
Fred Carmen, a longtime
Venice Theatre supporter.
The annual show is
a fundraiser forVenice
Theatre's education and
outreach programs.
This year's produc-
tion will run March 14-18
on the theater's main
stage. Shows are at 8 p.m.
Wednesday to Saturday
and at 2 p.m. Sunday.
Reserved seat tickets
are $24 per person. Order
online at www.venicestage.
com or by phone at 941-
488-1115. Tickets also may
be purchased at the box
office, which is open daily
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. and one
hour before all
shows.
Venice The-
atre is at 140
W Tampa Ave.,
on the island
in downtown
Venice.
Email: kool@
venicegondolier.com


PHOTO COURTESY OF SHIRLEY GAWNE
Shirley Gawne, 90, in a costume from a recent
Silver Foxes production at Venice Theatre.


PHOTO COURTESY OF SHIRLEY GAWNE


Fred Carmen, Gordon Lee, John McGuckin and Cyril Lloyd perform a ballet in the Silver Fox Follies circa 1994-95.


I


.1


,< r


.'o u TESer
Aagg lrIRLE t
Fo Folli Taylor in a dramatic scene ie
WMNNNNM.-


1


PHOTO COURTESY OF SHIRLE'I c-wIt

Shirley Taylor as Marlene Dietrich with a group of German fans in an
early Silver Fox Follies.


ate.ice Cr O- SUrRLE',' P,"ES
PHOTO oURTE E
wo fo nn kick p their heein an early Silver Fox Follies
Two foxy nunskiupc e Theatre.
at Venice Theatre.


tk~ ~ I


.I


Irene Fisher, left, and Shirley Gawne were the originators of the
Silver Fox dance troupe.


PHOTO ALBUM 10B


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0


2B SUN NEWSPAPERS COFFEE


BREAK


MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


Bessie Kofsky named Outstanding Citizen


SERTOMA CLUB OF VENICE

The first person to
receive the Sertoma Club
of Venice Outstanding
Citizen award is Bessie
Kofsky. The new program
aims to recognize com-
munity volunteers who
are not members of the
club.
Kofsky, 89, recently
helped other volunteers
erect a building at Sham-
rock Park and Nature
Center in Venice.
"She did not mind the
hot weather or the hard
work," Terry Redman
said when presenting the
award. "She was there
every day, on a ladder,
tightening bolts or hold-
ing ropes to keep the
new garage section in


place while it was being
constructed."
Kofsky also pulled
weeds and installed
plants at the new butter-
fly garden in the park.
A former World War II
Women's Army Air Corps


recruiter, Kofsky moved
to Florida in 1979. She
got involved in the con-
struction of Shamrock
Park in 1994, when it was
built, and has been there
almost every day since.
As Shamrock Park's


PHOTO COURTESY OF
PAMELA JOHNSON
Sertoman Terry Redman,
left, presents the first
recipient of the Sertoma
Outstanding Citizen Award,
Bessie Kofsky, with the brick
that will bear her name and
be placed alongside the
Venetian Waterway Park.
Sertoma President Patrick
Jaehne congratulates the
award recipient.

first volunteer, she did
maintenance, educated
the public, assisted the
supervisor with pro-
grams and special events
and helped band the
park's scrub jays. One
of the birds was named


for her. These days she
starts her rounds of
picking up trash in the
park around 6 a.m. most
mornings.
Kofsky often weeds
and plants flowers at
the SouthVenice Civic
Association center,
where she is a member
of the board of direc-
tors. She is a member
of Friends of Shamrock
Park, the Venice Area
Orchid Society, South
Venice Garden Club,
Keep Sarasota County
Beautiful and the Venice
Area Beautification Inc.
Pepper Patrol. Four times
a year she puts on her
boots to pick up the trash
in Alligator Creek. She is
a certified member of the
Community Emergency


Response Team.
Although Kofsky
received a pilot's license
in her early years, she
did not learn to drive
until her husband passed
away in 2003.
"This lady is indepen-
dent, optimistic and
willing to do anything to
better her community.
She is an inspiration to
other volunteers and is
always cheerful with a
great sense of humor,"
Redman said.
Outstanding citizens
honored by the club
will receive a brick
inscribed with their
name and award, which
will be placed beside the
Venetian Waterway Trail
behind Publix on the
island.


Plantation fashion


show on tap


By AUDREY BLACKWELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

On the heels of
the movie industry's
Academy Awards, the
Plantation Community
Foundation is hosting
its "You Ought to be in
Pictures" fashion show
and luncheon March 7,
11 a.m., at Plantation
Golf & Country Club.
Tickets for this open-
to-the public annual
fundraising event are
$35. Checks should
be made payable to
Plantation Community
Foundation, 500 Rockley
Blvd., Venice FL 34293.
Call 941-497-4826 to
reserve a spot.
Contessa Couture,
Nana's and Plantation's
golf and tennis pro
shops will provide fash-
ions. Raffles will be held
for a spa basket, spa
services, wine collec-
tions and pet photogra-
phy. There also will be a
50/50 raffle and Chinese
auction.
Proceeds will go into
the foundation's grant
fund, which supports
eligible local charities


through distributions
made every April.
According to a news
release, the foundation
supports not-for-profit
agencies and organiza-
tions involved in social
services, health, cultural
enrichment, education
and the environment.
In 2011, the founda-
tion reached a $2.1 mil-
lion milestone for grants
to the South Sarasota
County community.
Plantation Commu-
nity Foundation is a
501(c)(3) organization
dedicated to improv-
ing the quality of life in
South Sarasota County.

Email: ablackwell@venicegondolier.com


PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTY ANDREWS


Cycling class offered


Cycling 101 was held at the Venice City Hall Saturday, Jan. 28. The class is offered to cyclists of all experience levels. The next
class will be March 10. Call Huss Malik, 941-525-3753.


I *

C U: I I:5 80 -


I I] I I 1 I G'IG I, ii I
II *


I







CONTACT US
941-207-1102
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


VENUE


3B
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 3, 2012


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


SToday
Men's Prayer Brkfst, FC
Men's Prayer Brkfst @ 8:00am @
corner of Parade & Rot. W. Blvd church
prop. 475-7447
Flea Mkt and Bazaar,
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food, bakery. Sat, Mar 3 from 9-2. Off
Laurel Rd betwn 75 and 41.486-9170
Free pkg.
Free Tax Prep Help, 4-8pm
ea. Sat. @YMCA 701 Center Rd.,
Venice. For families with incomes less
than $50,000.308-4357.
Homestead reunion, 55th
Homestead-Munhall-West Mifflin Pa
reunion March 3,Elks Club, Englewood
FL. For info call D Hess 941-492-6918
Circus Bingo, 1 to 3 pm every
Saturday @ King Solomons 1250 US
41 Bypass S, Venice- Help save the
Venice Arena 941-485-7675
Venice Symphony, Robert
Moore, French Horn. Mar 3, 4&8PM,
Nazarene Church, 1535 EVenice. Call
412-4725. $20, $25, $28.
A Night to Dance, Thurs
March 8th 6:30 free lesson 7-10
dance Venice Community Ctr
Music by Memories 8 or more call
941-496-9692
Barbary Coast Band,
Barbary Coast Dixieland Show Band


at 3pm & 7 pm, Venice Presbyterian
Church, For info: 488-5525.

* Sunday
Craft Show, Country Club
Estates annual craft show & ice
cream social, 700 Waterway Drive,
Sunday, March 4 1 to 4 pm, All are
welcome
New England Club,
monthly meeting Christ
Lutheran Church 701 N. Indiana
Ave.,Englewood,FL, 12:00 noon

* Monday
AARP Free Tax Help, Low
& mid-income any age Jac Lib, 4143
Woodmere Pk Blvd 10am-4pm, need
2010 return 2011 income & deduc-
tions 888-227-7669
Monday Mornings!,
March 10-noon. Women's Resource
Center. Coffee,chats, laughs, meet
other women who share life interests!
The Needle exhibit,
Needlework thru the years, all with a
Venice connection; Venice Archives,
351 Nassau St. S, MTW; 10-4 thru
May 2
Meet the Composer,
Conversation with composer Jim
Colias, 2:30 pm at the Unitarian


Universalist Congregation, $7 at the
door. 941-365-6404
Film:"lngredients" local
food movement for better living/
eating. Hear local efforts $5.1971
Pinebrook Rd Ven 485-2105
Barbershop chorus,
Female singers visit Venetian Harmony
Chorus on Mondays from 7-9 pm at
620 E. Shamrock Blvd., Venice

* Tuesday
AARP Free Tax Help, Low
& mid-income any age Comm Ctr, 326
S Nokomis A 9am-1pm Need 2010
return 2011 income & deductions,
888-227-7669
Beantown Picnic,
Beantown Reunion March 6,10 a.m.
Oscar Schderer Park, Osprey. Bring
food, drink chairs & hometown signs.
485-0624
The Needle exhibit,
Needlework thru the years, all with a
Venice connection; Venice Archives,
351 Nassau St. S, MTW; 10-4 thru
May 2
Country Time Singers,
Country Time Singers, Free, 5 to 7 pm
every Tues. at Venice Beach Pavilion,
101 The Esplanade 412-3333 bring
a chair.
Movie: Outfoxed, Movie:


HOW TO GET YOUR
EVENTS LISTED
To get your events printed in
the newspaper, they must be
submitted via our website at
www.venicegondolier.com. On
the left side of the page, click on
"Community Calendar,"then click
on "Submit Event."
Deadlines: For events running
in Wednesday's paper, the dead-
line is 1 p.m. Monday. For events
running in Saturday's paper, the
deadline is 1 p.m. Thursday.
If you do not have the ability
to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on
your behalf at the rate of $5 per

"Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on
Journalism."Jacaranda Library: Tue. at
5:45 pm: Public invited


event; this fee does not guarantee
your event will make the printed
version. Call 941-206-1180 from
9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your
event for you.
We will print a maximum of
four lines per event at no cost
to the event submitter. You may
purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per edition.
Simply choose Paid Listing on
the Submit Event page on the
website. All paid listings will run
in the location designated for the
event type.
We will only allow one submis-
sion per event, per day. If your
event runs for more than one
day, you will need to complete

Elks Bonanza Bingo,
6-8pm Tues Ven-Nok Elks $1 Bingo,
486-1854. Dinner/sandwiches 5-7pm


a separate submission form for
each day. Multiple submissions of
the same event for the same date
may result in all the related events
being removed.
The Venice Gondolier Sun has
changed the format for Venue
in an effort to provide readers
information about the most
events we can.
We reserve the right to exclude
any submitted listing that does
not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is
no express or implied guarantee
that any free listing will be
included in any event calendar or
run in any specific location. This is
on a first-come, first-served basis.

Legacy Trail Meeting,
6pm at Oscar Scherer State Park on
US 41 in Osprey, FL, 941-861-7245


STAFF REPORT

Venice Theatre will
present two tribute band
concerts to complete its
winter season.
"Let's Hang On"
performs a high-energy
tribute to Frankie Valli
and the Four Seasons on
March 4 at 8 p.m. and
March 5 at 3 and 8 p.m.


"The Ultimate Blues
Brothers Review" pays
homage to the popular
act March 11 at 8 p.m.
and March 12 at 3 and
8 p.m.
Tickets for "Let's Hang
On" are $30. All seats for
the Blues Brothers tribute
are $25. Tickets are avail-
able at 941-488-1115 or
www.venicestage.com.


Debating for cash


STAFF REPORT

Pine View School stu-
dents will hold a speech
and debate event today
(Saturday) from 8 a.m.
to noon at the Venice
Farmer's Market on the
corner of Nokomis and
Tampa avenues. The
public is invited.
The speakers will be the
18 students who qualified


Cruise

to raise

funds for

children

STAFF REPORT

Chuck and Nancy
Parrish, of Sarasota, are
offering two cruises in
Sarasota Bay March 8 and
March 10 to raise sup-
port for the 1,200 children
in the care of the courts
because they have been
abused, abandoned or
neglected.
For the price of $250
per person, the yacht
Freedom will offer a cock-
tail buffet cruise start-
ing from Sarasota Yacht
Club Thursday, March 8,
5 p.m., and a brunch
cruise starting from
Marina Jack's Saturday,
March 10, 10 a.m.
The yacht was found
derelict in the St. John's
River and was fully
restored by the Parrishes.
They offer the cruises
out of their belief in the
425 guardian ad litem
volunteers and Next Step
mentors.
For more information,
call Tonya Schrott, Chil-
dren's Guardian Fund,
941-504-9915.


for the Catholic Forensic
League National Tourna-
ment in Baltimore, Md.,
this May. Speech perfor-
mances will be on the half-
hour. Heart crayons will be
on sale to help raise funds
for the students' travel.


increases


access


to veterans


FROM TIDEWELL HOSPICE

To deepen its commit-
ment to the care and sup-
port of military veterans
and their families, Tide-
well Hospice developed
Tidewell Honors in 2008
and recently became a
partner in the We Honor
Veterans program of the
National Hospice and
Palliative Care Organiza-
tion in collaboration with
Department of Veterans
Affairs.
The program focuses
on maximizing services
for veterans with respect-
ful inquiry, compassion-
ate listening and grateful
acknowledgment. The
overall goal is to foster
a more peaceful end-
of-life experience for


all veterans by better
addressing their specific
needs and concerns.
Tidewell has achieved
levels one, two and three
of We Honor Veterans'
four-level program. The
level three goal is to
increase access to hos-
pice and palliative care
for veterans in the com-
munity. Partners must
conduct a minimum of
three veteran-specific
presentations for admin-
istrative and clinical staff
and volunteers within the


Author Gail


Sheehy to speak


By AUDREY BLACKWELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

Tickets are still avail-
able for the Women's
Resource Center of
Sarasota County's
Renaissance Luncheon
March 12 at the Ritz-
Carlton, Sarasota. New
York Times best-selling
author Gail Sheehy will
speak on the topic "Rein-
vention of Self."
Sheehy's books "Pas-
sages" and "The Silent
Passage" are said to have


and volunteers who are


rocked the culture and
changed the way many
women and men view
the stages of their lives.
Boutique shopping
and registration begin at
10:30 a.m., followed by
the luncheon the key-
note address at noon.
Westcoast Black Theatre
Troupe will entertain.
Sheehy's books will be on
sale at the event.
Tickets are $95 and
are available by calling
WRCSC at 941-485-9724
or 941-366-1700.


referrals and long-


hospice organization, veterans. Liz Barton, term care for veterans.
Tidewell presented Vicki Bernardo, Ginny Deborah Grassman, of
Terry Acton, Sarasota Fay and Brad Fountain Bay Pines VAMC in St.
CountyVeterans Service from Douglas T. Jacobson Petersburg, spoke to 262
officer, to social work- State Veterans Nursing hospice and health-care
ers, RN case managers, Home in Port Charlotte practitioners, volunteers
community liaisons, spoke to social work-
volunteer coordinators ers about nursing home TIDEWELL I 5


PAID ADVERTISEMENT PAID ADVERTISEMENT

%0 Featured Event

* Today University of Vermont Professor of Holocaust Studies,
discusses historical and contemporary issues of Euro-
Reflections on the New Anti- pean anti-Jewish violence, Arab Holocaust denial and
Semitism, 7pm, March 7, Jewish Congregation of worldwide anti-Zionist rhetoric. Call 484-2022.
Venice, 600 N. Auburn Rd., Venice. Dr. Alan Steinweiss,


Tribute bands


to rock


Venice Theatre


Tidewell





MARCH 3, 2012 WEEKEND EDITION


ACROSS
1 Croat's cousin
5 Agreement
9 Spaces
13 Principle
18 Winglike petals
19 Taj Mahal site
20 Cassowary's
relative: var.
21 Oil sources
23 Convention
showstopper
26 Mannequins
27 Correct
28 Mature
29 Daytime tube fare
31 Word with one or
many
32 In time
33 Trap
34 Permit
36 More alternative
39 Knight's title
40 Kitchen ending
44 Noted dancer-
choreographer
49 Spinner
51 Team lists
53 "Busy as _
54 Bolger sang about
her
55 Defeat decisively
57 "Watership Down"
colony
58 Rhein feeder
60 Caravan stopover
63 Classical lead-in
65 Name for Madame
66 Typewriter part
68 Medium's asset,
for short
69 Russian villa
71 1978 Nobel
laureate
78 Net locale
79 Morse character
80 Short of funds
82 Supreme being
86 Verdi's "Pace,
pace mio !"
87 Enjoys the sun
90 Stomachache:
Comb. form
91 Planter
93 Region
95 glance
97 Portent
98 Telemarketer's
gear
100 Nav. officer
101 Silent comedian
103 Slips
104 Seminarian's deg.
106 To be, to Caesar
108 Comics squeal
109 Bronte settings
111 Brewer's grain
113 Expiate
118 1968 Neil Simon
opus


I SENIOR BRIEFS
Senior Friendship Centers
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice
941-584-0075

Classes

Classes, programs and
activities for people 50
and older are offered on
an ongoing basis. Class
fees are $3 and help
cover center operational
costs. Balance movement
class is $4 per class. Call
Tom Harlow at 941-
556-3259 if this presents
a hardship. Open week-
days 8:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Dining, noon, for 60 and
older; suggested dona-
tion is $3.50. Lunch
reservations required
24 hours in advance.
Call 941-584-0090 or
941-584-0067.

MONDAY

Memoir writing group,
9:15 a.m. Share a five-
minute story or just
come and listen.
Associated Medicare
Patients counselors,
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Small
Appliance Repair
Shop. No appointment
needed.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.


Stage Center


Edited by Linda and Charles Preston


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All rights reserved


123 Python's Idle
124 Kind of bear
125 Sums
126 1956 Noel Coward
comedy
129 Simon adjective
130 Emulate Mme.
Defarge
131 Highlanders'
negatives
132 Not taped
133 Facial features
134 JFK sights
135 Indian cattle
136 Comprehends

DOWN
1 Purposes
2 Varnish resin
3 Like the sun
4 Sesame
5 Way to stand
6 Blue-flowered
plants
7 Jeanne of "State
Fair"
8 Future frog


9 Neighbor of Lux.
10 Ed or Leon
11 Mexican money
12 Lazy girls?
13 Annie's song
14 Head for Gretna
Green
15 Nest of pheasants
16 Always
17 Weblike membrane
22 Draft org.
24 In a particular
manner
25 Beach sight, in
Britain
30 Couple
35 Airline abbr.
37 Game fish
38 Canals
40 jour (be up
to date)
41 Fork-tailed flier
42 Poplar, for one
43 Anglo-Saxon
laborer
44 Pack down
45 Old Greek coins
46 Flat elevations


Music with the Upbeat
Gang, 1 p.m.
Duplicate bridge,
12:50-4 p.m.; partner
required; $3 donation
requested
Cards, 1 p.m.
Spanish, 2 p.m.

TUESDAY

Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Video fitness 2,
8:45 a.m.
Yogarobics, 9 a.m.,
low-impact aerobics and
yoga
Woodcarving, 9 a.m.
Quilting, 9:30 a.m.
Basket weaving,
10 a.m.
Ballroom dance lesson,
10 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Craft room, noon
Single-deck progres-
sive pinochle, 12:30 p.m.
Tin Pan Alley Dance
Band, 1-3 p.m.
Cards, 1 p.m.
Caregiver Support
Group, in conjunction
with the Alzheimer's
Association, 2-3 p.m.
Low-impact introduc-
tion to Tappercise, 3 p.m.
High-impact introduc-
tion to Tappercise, 4 p.m.


47 "Gin a body_
body..."
48 Carrie or Louis
50 Learned ones
52 Lake Champlain
feeder
56 Herbal infusions
59 Sievelike vessels
61 Bring back
62 Bat wood
64 Officers' ed. center.
67 Cpl. or Sgt.
70 Majestic
monogram
72 Baby rose
73 86 Across, for one
74 Word on an
envelope
75 Man at the altar
76 Plant disease
77 Sovereign
81 Word to ID painter
82 Tennis legend
83 Suggestive look
84 Shakespearean
ruler
85 Tots up
88 Kipling's python


WEDNESDAY

Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Small Appliance Repair
Shop, 9 a.m.-noon
Senior-friendly aero-
bics, 9 a.m.
Take Off Pounds Sensi-
bly, 9:30 a.m.
Watercolor art, 9:30 a.m.
Euchre, 10 a.m.
Associated Medicare
Patients counselors,
10 a.m.-2 p.m., Small
Appliance Repair Shop.
No appointment needed.
Line dancing, 10:30 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Friendly bridge,
12:30 p.m.
Joe Rivers & Friends
performs, 1 p.m.
Crafts, 2 p.m.

THURSDAY

Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders,
Medicare assistance,
9 a.m.-noon
Woodcarving, 9 a.m.
Yogarobics, 9 a.m.
Hand and foot game,
9 a.m.
Senior-friendly aero-
bics, 9 a.m.


89 Medics' burden
92 Mixes anew
94 Opposite of WSW
96 Mimic
99 Commandment
word
101 Case presentation
102 Giraffes' kin
105 Libations
107 Crested duck
109 Filmmaker Louis
110 Overwhelms
112 Lithuanian coins
114 Implements
115 Stan's partner
116 Unsophisticated
117 Sea eagles
118 Qt. components
119 Pork cut
120 Prefix for sphere
121 Blows away
122 Ply the blue pencil
127 French
conjunctions
128 Bible segments:
Abbr.


Watercolor class,
10 a.m. to noon
Line dancing, 10 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Music by Dick Rivers,
1 p.m.
Cards, 1 p.m.
Mind Your Mind, 1 p.m.
Heighten memory, rea-
soning, creative thinking
and more. Self-assessment
questionnaires are pro-
vided to track progress.

FRIDAY

Pool room opens,
8:15 a.m.
Video fitness 3, 8:45 a.m.
Yoga, 9 a.m.
Friendly bridge, 9 a.m.
Balance movement,
9:30 a.m. Call Tom Har-
low at 941-556-3259.
Hula, 10:30 a.m.
Lunch, noon-1 p.m.
Duplicate bridge,
12:50-4 p.m.; partner
required; $3 donation
requested
Music by the Upbeat
Gang, 1 p.m.
SAppointments are
available for a free
30-minute attorney con-
sultation with Marcella
Mika, a local attorney
who volunteers her time
to assist seniors. Call


I BLOOD BANK SCHEDULE


A team from Sun-
coast Communities
Blood Bank, 1097 North
Tamiami Trail, Noko-
mis, will be inVen-
ice Sunday, March 4,
8:30 a.m.-noon, Lake-
side Lutheran Church,
2401 South Tamiami
Trail, Venice; Tuesday,
March 6, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Venice High School, 1
Indian Ave.; Wednesday,


SOLUTION TO FEB. 25


March 7, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Venice High School, 1
Indian Ave.; and Thurs-
day, March 8, 9 a.m.-
noon, SunTrust Bank,
1670 South U.S. 41
Bypass.
Call 941-735-4223 or go
to www.scbb.org for more
dates and times.

From Suncoast Communities
Blood Bank


SOLUTION TO TODAY'S


CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD CLASSIFIED CROSSWORD

CLOT PROF PASHA REPRO ABBA S W A B
RAPAHAME K A Y S ANI ON LRONERMA
ORELOlSE S I R EN P LON C NE LEOS
ACKL ED DDES T I NE TSI IBI A C H
BOBS QUASAR EDD IE GECKO

O R KREHEELS URN C H COLATEIMALT E D
ZEE MUMSH USKY GN IMOS ALIDE
REPEAT B E S HRA[SREIS
ATLA SES BUR NISH YURT KMARTENA
SHARE URGE INTO AR IE GNAR RODAN
P ET E R OUI UF OS LEERPELEU N L T
SLEDSITENT MOA RR SW S M T Y L E


STHE BIG RED BUS SCHEDULE

Florida's Blood Centers
needs all types of blood FLORIDA'S
donations. W BLOOD CENTERS
Donating blood takes
about an hour. Every March 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.,
donor receives a mini- at Walmart, 4150 South
physical and a screening Tamiami Trail; and
with each donation. All Thursday, March 8,
mobile donors will receive 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at Venice
a free movie voucher. City Hall, 401 W.Venice
Donations are taken Ave.
at 4155 South Tamiami Call 941-492-9202 or go
Trail, Venice Village to www.fbcdonor.org for
Shoppes, or on The Big more dates and times.
Red Bus, which will
be in Venice Saturday, -From Florida's Blood Centers




LOOKING FOR R


SOMETHING?

Saturday's Sudoku, horoscopes, movie

listings and Dear Abby are in the real

estate classified section along with a

bonus crossword puzzle and a host of

other features. The Sudoku solution still

appears in Our Town.


941-584-0075 for an
appointment.

Senior Friendship
Centers Inc., established
in 1973, is a not-for-profit
organization dedicated to
helping older adults live
with dignity and indepen-
dence in Sarasota, DeSoto,
Charlotte, Lee and Collier
counties. Funded in part
by state and federal agen-
cies, and support from
private foundations and
individual con, it'iimnons,
Senior Friendship Centers
serves more than 10,000
older adults annually.

Senior activities
at other locations

Safe-driving
school

Safe-driving class for
residents over 50. Choose


from several class loca-
tions in Venice.
Make a reservation for
these classes by calling
Don at 941-416-9760.

Epiphany Cathedral Parish Hall
340 Sarasota St., Venice
941-484-3505
The following free
activities are held
Wednesday:
9 a.m., exercise
9:30 a.m., knitting and
crocheting
9:30 a.m., quilting
11 a.m., rosary
construction
noon, bridge

Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 8118
832 E. Venice Ave., Venice
941-484-8118
Seniors With or With-
out Partners sponsors

SENIOR15


*-11 I *r *i' '.
WALIN FREN LY- P RIV-IgA lLISHED 967
WinerSesoalMe be ship Avilabl
NE* g eindM m eshp0sltlea 2500nulwt
No G lf estictons
ALL Initiation Fees-- *Waived


I


4B SUN NEWSPAPERS





WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


Salvation Army praises community


By SAMUEL KIM
and CHRISTINE KIM
SALVATION ARMY OF VENICE

The Salvation Army of
Venice has been blessed
to be part of the heart of
South Sarasota County.
The love and generosity
of our brethren within the
communities of Venice,
North Port, Englewood,
Nokomis and Osprey
enabled us to serve many
individuals and families


this past holiday season.
In November, we
distributed more than
425 turkeys to families in
Venice and North Port.
Our annual Thanksgiv-
ing dinner was a huge
success, with 202 volun-
teers serving more than
400 meals, including
100 meals delivered to
the homebound and the
Venice Police and Fire
departments. Special
donors for that event


included Sonny's Real Pit
Bar-B-Q and members of
the Sunrise Rotary Club,
Fellowship Bible Church
and the Venice High
School football team,
with Coach John Peacock
and his staff.
In December, count-
less additional volunteers
were busy ringing bells
at area Publix, Walmart
and Big Lots stores. Even
in these hard economic
times we were able to


71Nn --

;v __ -----


raise $120,276.71 in dona-
tions. One lovely lady
named Karen gave two
gold rings, and a couple
known only as Tim and
Carol gave an American
Gold Eagle coin. They
said this was all they
could donate and wanted
it to be used to help oth-
ers in the community.
Organizations that
helped staff the kettles
included Salvation Army
workers and volunteers
at Big Lots; Venice-Noko-
mis Methodist Church
members at Publix in
Nokomis; Venice Presby-
terian Church members
at Publix on the island;
members of St. Mark's
Episcopal Church at
Publix on East Venice
Avenue; members of the
Good Shepherd Church
at Walmart in Venice;
and members of Christ
United Methodist Church


at Publix in South Venice.
Also helping to staff
kettles at these loca-
tions were members of
the Sunrise Rotary Club,
Kiwanis Club of Venice,
Venice High Builders
Club. residents of Harbor
Lights Mobile Home
Park and many individu-
als who offered several
hours of their time.
The Angel Tree Christ-
mas present program
was heartwarming and
enormous. More than
500 children received
toys and bikes purchased
by loving and caring
donors especially for
each child. Their Christ-
mases were bright, shiny
and happy. The Galleria
Plaza provided space for
organizing these dona-
tions. Also helping with
the Angel Tree program
were Terry Purdy of
Merritt Realty Corp. and


Michael Miller of Water-
ford Companies.
All year long the Army
operates two area thrift
stores. One is in Osprey
and the other on the
bypass in Venice. Profits
from sales are used to
help those in need in
this area. Donations are
always welcome. So are
buyers.
It is because of all
these and so many other
donors that we are able
to serve the greater com-
munity and the mission
of The Salvation Army.
To donate, send a check
to The Salvation Army of
Venice, 1051 Albee Farm
Road, Venice FL 34292. Be
sure to note on the check
that it is for The Salva-
tion Army of Venice. To
learn about other ways
in which you can help or,
if you need help, call the
office at 941-484-6227.


PHOTO COURTESY OF JUDIE BAUER
Volunteers working on the Lord-Higel House restoration project retrieved 175 pounds of copper
from the house and sold it to scrap dealer Cliff Baldwin. Proceeds from the sale have gone to the
restoration fund for the historic house.




Lord-Higel House




restoration update


STAFF REPORT

Old wiring and plumb-
ing were stripped from
the historic Lord-Higel
House during recent res-
toration efforts, and the
proceeds from the sale
of 175 pounds of copper
have gone into the resto-
ration fund.
The scraps were sold to
Cliff Baldwin, of Lucky's
Moving & Hauling Ser-
vice, Feb. 21. Volunteers
Jack Buescher, Jerry
Valenta, Ron Wentworth,
Jack Bauer, Mickey Higel,
Robert Brooke, Bernard


Matthey, Ron Ashley, Ron
Higel and Robert Cope-
land spent four days of
intensive pipe cutting
and wire stripping.
The Lord-Higel House
is the oldest existing
house in Venice and will
eventually become a
Pioneer Living History
Museum. The Friends
of Lord-Higel House are
dedicated to their motto:
"Preserving yesterday for
tomorrow."
People wishing to
join the organization
or donate toward the
restoration project may


call Judie or Jack Bauer at
941-488-1937. The proj-
ect is listed on Gulf Coast
Community Foundation's
website. Go to gulfcoast
gives.org, click on "Proj-
ect," then click on "Civic"
and scroll down to the
Friends of Lord-Higel
House group photo and
"Wish list."
Donations may be
made by credit card,
beginning at $25. Per-
sonal checks may be
made payable to Friends
of Lord-Higel House and
mailed to P.O. Box 1190,
Venice FL 34284.


Sarasota County Fair



starts March 16


STAFF REPORT

The 76th annual Sara-
sota County Fair will be
March 16-25 at the fair-
grounds, 3000 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota.
Admission prices are
$8 adults, $4 senior citi-
zens age 55 and over, $4
active military and chil-
dren ages 6-17; children


5 and under free. There
will be free gate admis-
sion Monday through
Thursday from
2 to 4 p.m.
New rides and enter-
tainment will include
a sea lion splash, the
Dennis Lee show, Frisco
Tiger show, Cracker Land
band, karaoke spon-
sored by Budweiser and


Rosaire's Racing Pigs. The
main stage is outside.
Belle City Amusements
Midway offers daily
armband specials, such
as family day March 26,
when you can ride all
mechanical rides for $25
plus gate admission.
For more information,
go to www.sarasotafair.
com.


Mote speaker tackles Gulf oil spill


FROM SARASOTA
WELLESLEY CLUB

The long-term effects
of the 2010 Gulf oil disas-
ter were on everyone's
mind at the most recent
lecture sponsored by the
Sarasota Wellesley Club.
Dr. Richard Pierce,
director of the Center
for Eco-Toxicity at Mote
Marine Laboratories,
was the featured speaker.


SENIOR

FROM PAGE 4

card playing on Mondays
from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. All
are welcome. Call Irene at
941-497-5438.

Our Lady of Lourdes Church
1301 Center Road, Venice
941-497-2931
Senior singles cards and
games from 1 to 4 p.m.
Thursday. Call Elizabeth
Bonfiglio, 941-492-5528.


He helped quantify the
ecological impact of
the Deepwater Horizon
incident and discussed
Mote's involvement.
The event, held at
Plymouth Harbor, drew
about 50 alumnae,
guests and prospective
students.
Carolyn Montgom-
ery, Plymouth Harbor
resident and Wellesley
alumna, said the talk


TIDEWELL

FROM PAGE 3

and community persons
about optimal end-of-
life care and support for
veterans and families.
"Level three also
involves more veteran-
specific community
outreach presenta-
tions, setting up a


was "fascinating, just
fascinating."
Ending on a positive
note, Pierce said that all
40 turtles rehabilitated
at Mote survived their
ordeal and were safely
released.
The next lecture will
be held at the Sarasota
Yacht Club and will focus
on historic preserva-
tion. Call Allison Opal,
941-894-0456.


veteran-to-veteran vol-
unteer program, which
Tidewell has in place,
and helping veterans
and families access
veteran benefits. We
actively participate in
local, regional and state-
wide hospice-veteran
partnerships," said Irene
Henderson, Tidewell
administrative director
of volunteer and profes-
sional services.


VENICEECAR.A

The Venice Area Chamber of Commerce promotes business growth and success. We are
the front door to the community! Annually 20,000 people visit the Chamber. We look
forward to being a partner in helping you promote your business in the Venice area.
Do Business with a Chamber Member:
VACC NEW MEMBERS FOR MARCH 2012


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MARKETING & ADVERTISING
TOLL FREE WORD DIAL NUMBERS TO
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545 E Venice Ave
Venice FL 34285
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ALTERNATORS ELECTRICAL
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Mr. Dick T. Williams
(941) 375-2221
FAX: (941) 375-2864
106 Corporation Way
Venice FL 34285
chris@flagshipautorepair. com
www.flagshipautorepair.com
AUTOMOBILE-REPAIR & SERVICE
TOWING, AUTO REPAIR
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Nancy L. Eaton
(941) 375-4499
202 E Pocono Trl
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Fountains of Capri Real Estate, LLC
Barbara Deighton
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FAX: (617) 507-8555
101 Capri Isles Blvd #2
Venice FL 34292
langerich@yahoo.com
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SPONSOR: Rich Lange
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Mrs. Jamie Rawlinson
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www.heavensbest.com
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SPONSOR: Sam Prost
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Andy Liu
(941) 882-3608
FAX: (941) 882-3618
549 US Hwy 41 Byp N
Venice FL 34285
RESTAURANTS
STEAK, RIBS, CRAB LEGS, SUSHI/OYSTER/
SALAD/DESSERT BARS
Manoly Furniture Service
Larry Manoly
(866) 843-5955
1836 Tamiami Trail S
Venice FL 34293
manolyfuriture@aol.com
www.manoly.com
FURNITURE
REPAIR & REFINISHING, FIRE & WATER
RESTORATION
SPONSOR: Toni Artusa
Royal Palm Marina
Mrs. Johnna Wentzel
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779 West Wentworth St
Englewood FL 34223
jwentzel@royalpalmmarina.com
www.royalpalmmarina.com
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ZEKE'S BAYSIDE, TIKI BAR/GRILL, DOCK/
DINE, CATERING, EVENTS
Sam's Club (Sarasota Club #4772)
Jessica Acton
(941) 341-9526
FAX: (941) 371-3856
300 N. Cattlemen Road
Sarasota FL 34232
jacton.s04772.us samsclub.com
www.samsclub.com
GROCERS-RETAIL
WAREHOUSE GROCERY STORE
Sarasota County Bounce House
Brad E. Moore
(941)870-9040
231 S Tamiami Trail
Venice FL 34285
brad@scbouncehouse.com
www.scbouncehouse.com
ENTERTAINMENT
Sarasota County Government
Randall Reid
(941) 851-5000
FAX: (941) 951-5987
P O Box 8
Sarasota FL 34230-0008
www.co.sarasota.fl.us
GOVERNMENT
SPONSOR: Christine Robinson
Sir Speedy Printing and Marketing
Ms. Carol Schoff
(941) 922-1563
FAX: (941) 924-1463
3939 S Tamiami Trail
Sarasota FL 34231
orders @sirspeedysarasota.com
www.sirspeedysarasota.com
PRINTERS
PRINTING, COPYING, GRAPHIC DESIGN,
SIGNS, POSTERS, BANNERS
Sunnytime Rentals
Doug & Paige Pierce
(941) 375-8333
245 Dartmouth Road
Venice FL 34293
info@sunnytimerentals. com
www.sunnytimerentals. com
RENTALS
BEACH GEAR: CHAIRS, UMBRELLAS,
GAMES, TENTS, TOYS, BABY GEAR
SPONSOR: Katie Simms
The Legacy Trail General Store
Mari-Anne Saunders
(941) 484-1500
595 Church Street
Nokomis FL 34275
CONVENIENCE STORES
DRINKS FROZEN TREATS SANDWICHES
ENERGY BARS BIKE STOP TRAIL SNACKS
The Observer Group
Jill Raleigh
(941) 366-3468
FAX: (941) 362-4808
1970 Main Street Floor 4
Sarasota FL 34236
www.yourobserver.com
NEWSPAPERS
Venetian Academy of Music
Chandelle LaForest
(941) 237-0717
537 E Venice Ave Ste E
Venice FL 34285
venetianmusicacademy@gmail.com
www.venetianmusicacademy.com
SCHOOLS
PRIVATE LESSONS, STRING PIANO FLUTE
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West Coast Realty of Venice, LLC
Ms. Kimberly A. Gauvreau
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240 West Tampa Avenue
Venice FL 34285
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REAL ESTATE
REAL ESTATE SALES & RENTALS
6th Annual 2012 Membership Drive
February 1 March 22, 2012 (5PM)


IN PARTNERSHIP WITH www.venicechamber.com

G IOndolier Sun Join Today!
Gondolier Sun Call (941) 488-2236


ADVERTISE IN THE CLA8IFIEDS CALL (941) 206-1200


SUN NEWSPAPERS 5B









6B TRAVEL
WEEKEND EDITION TRA
MARCH 3, 2012


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
941-207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


Northern Ireland's coastal wonderland


ByTOM WILMER
GUEST WRITER

In Part I, the writer
explored the revitalized
city ofBelfast in Northern
Ireland.

The Antrim Coast
road trip is one of those
special journeys that one
savors and recalls long
after returning home.
Personally, I fondly
revisit snippets from six
months ago along with
14 years ago as though
they were yesterday.
Visualize undulat-
ing gemstone-green
hillsides etched with
bushy hedgerows, a
cliff-hugging castle or
two and ancient stone
farmhouses accented
with laconic, black-faced
sheep and Holstein cattle
languidly ruminating in
storybook fields.
The fabled "Nine Glens
of Antrim" the terri-
tory of glens and moors,
fairies and leprechauns,
as well a ghost or two
- along with the entire
North Coast are syn-
onymous with ancient,
untrammeled Ireland.
This insular region was
one of the last in Ireland
to be connected with the
outside world by road
(the first roadways were
blasted out of craggy
cliffs in 1834). And its
denizens were among
the last to retain Gaelic
as the spoken language.
The 60-mile jour-
ney along the coast,
from Larne to Portrush
(think 2012 Irish Open
at Royal Portrush Golf
Course, founded in 1888,
and ranked among the
world's top 12 courses),
wends past ancient
castles overlooking
pristine sandy shores,
rocky-beached seaport
villages, over stone
bridges, through tunnels
and along sheer cliffs.
It's no wonder the
experience is revered as
one of the world's most
spectacular drives.

Giant's Causeway
A not-to-be missed
natural phenomenon is
the Giant's Causeway.
This UNESCO World
Heritage Site is ranked as
one of the United King-
dom's top four natural
wonders and Northern
Ireland's No. 1 tourist
attraction. This rare out-
cropping of thousands
of massive hexagonal
volcanic-basalt pillars
parades out of the sea
and up the coastal bluffs.
Along the seashore,
the columns have been
nibbled away level with
the sandy beach by con-
stant wave action while
the columns beyond the
high-tide line range sky-
ward 30 feet and more.
Irish storytellers will
explain that the massive
stones are actually the
remnants of a causeway
built by the mythical
giant Finn McCool.
Mention the local
giant's handiwork to a


....



PHOTO --_.. -_ . .O .I



PHOTOS COURTESY OF TOM WILMER


A rainbow ends at a pot of gold along the Antrim Coast of Ireland.


volcanologist and he
might roll his eyes. But
everyone knows the col-
umns really are remnants
of the causeway McCool
built across the channel
to battle with his nem-
esis, Benandonner, the
Scottish giant. As further
proof of McCool's handi-
work, the same basalt
stones, remnants of his
bridge, are found on the
Scottish Isle of Staffa.

Carrick-a-Rede
Rope Bridge
The swaying rope-
bridge (originally
constructed by salmon
fishermen to main-
tain their nets) spans a
75-foot chasm between a
precipitous bluff top and
the tiny rock islet named
Carrick.
This is a mandatory
stop along the Antrim
Coast trail, even if you
are afraid of heights and
wouldn't dare venture
across the rope bridge.
The hour-long walk
from the car park is well
worth the jaunt. It's a
bird-watcher's paradise,
and on a clear day, the
cottage windows on
Scotland's Mull of Kintyre
40 miles away glint
crisply in the shimmer-
ing afternoon sunshine.

Bushmills
After a daredevil
rope-bridge adventure,
we were well primed
for a shot of Bushmills
whiskey.
The historic distillery
and town of Bushmills
are just two miles away
from Carrik-a-Rede,
which has been in


.... .rs Ie ,a- -:..
.b "/ ' -

A rainbow ends at a pot of gold along the Antrim Coast of Ireland.


The views from the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge are worth the hour's walk to get there.


business since 1608.
The distillery offers
daily tours, including,
of course, a wee dram
or two at the tour's
conclusion.
It was such an action-
packed day that by


sunset we thought we'd
traveled far, far from
Belfast but a check of our
odometer confirmed that
it was less than 60 miles
back to town.
And that's the amazing
thing about this compact


Ardtara Country House is in County Londonderry, not far from the Giant's Causeway.


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country, which is the
size of Connecticut no
matter where you motor
off to, odds are you'll
inevitably wind up not
too far from Belfast at the
end of the day.

The locals
It's the people who
make the place so
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We regularly experi-
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interactions with locals.
Whether it was a stop
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station (it took an hour
as the attendant kept
us rapt with tales and
stories), lunch at the
Interpretive Center in the
Sperrin Mountains or a
chat with a chemist in
downtown Enniskillen,
everyone cheerfully took
time out to chat, talk and
share stories.
The encounter with
the chemist was typi-
cal the proprietor was
closing for lunch and
employees were skitter-
ing out the door as the
shade was drawn.
The owner was obvi-
ously savoring the
prospect of a leisurely,
undisturbed lunch. But
he noticed us peering
through the window and
the shade went back up.
An hour later, he was still
regaling us with tales of
his life in Enniskillen and
quizzing us about our
world across the pond.
Departing the Antrim
Coastal road, we drifted
leisurely through one of
the fabled glens and then
arced across the Sperrin
Mountains.
Following a short visit
at Woodrow Wilson's
ancestral homestead, we
arrived in Londonderry
just in time for dinner at
the historic circa-1739
Beach Hill Country Inn
(www.beech-hill.com) on
the outskirts of town.
Derry is loaded with
historic architecture,
trendy shops, fine-dining
establishments and hip
pubs.
King James 1 added
the "London" prefix to
Derry by royal decree in
1613. Not surprisingly,
there are many who have
forever since ignored the
existence of the "Lon-
don" tag and continue
to call their hometown
simply Derry, while oth-
ers do so simply out of
conversational conve-
nience and affection.
"Old Town" Derry is
contained within a cir-
cular stone fortress wall
(1 mile in length), com-
pleted in 1608 in con-
junction with England's
freshly implemented
Plantation of Ulster.
Derry, like Belfast,
was once paralyzed with
sectarian violence a
time when more than
50 percent of the town's
buildings were damaged
by bombings. Today, the
ancient city beams with a
festive, welcoming atmo-
sphere. And in confirma-
tion of the city's incred-
ible evolution, Derry
was recently awarded
the coveted UK City of
Culture designation for

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WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


FINE WHINES


Synchronicity? Not so much


By BOB MUDGE
EDITOR

I don't know how local
businesses are doing or if
there's been an uptick in
home sales, but I do know
this: Traffic around town
is ridiculous.
Though I'm not an
official Venice old-timer,
I am a long-timer, so I
feel qualified to say the
roads are about as full as
I've ever seen them. And,
difficult as it may be to
believe, a higher volume
of traffic hasn't improved
the driving skills of local
motorists.
But my target today
isn't people who drive 8
mph in a 25-mph zone
(I was behind one last
week) or who would
stand a better chance of
translating this column
into Ancient Greek than
of making the correct
move at a four-way stop.
No, the issue I want to
address is an impediment
to traffic flow that I think
can actually be removed.
I'm pretty sure that
when U.S. 41 Business
was being widened and
improved about 10 years
ago, one of the benefits
we were told we would
get was that the traffic
lights on the island would
be synchronized, so that
a car traveling the speed
limit could go from one
end to the other with
minimal stops, if any. I
don't know about you, but
I usually can't go more


than two lights without
having to stop. It makes
me think that maybe the
lights have gotten a little
out of whack over the
years.
I come onto the island
via the Hatchett Creek
Bridge at least once a
day, twice when I take the
younger boy to school.
Unlike many of my fellow
motorists, I travel pretty
close to the speed limit,
35 mph. Odds are about
50-50 whether I'll have to
stop at the first light, at
Tampa Avenue. If I don't, I
can pretty much guaran-
tee I'll have to stop at the
next one, Venice Avenue.
On very rare occasions I'll
get past both only to be
stopped at Miami Avenue.
The other morning I had
to stop at all three. That's
not the kind of synchroni-
zation I was hoping for.
Traffic certainly plays
a part in whether I make
a light, but the constant
congestion in this three-
street area suggests the
problem isn't just the
number of cars. As fur-
ther proof I offer the view
from the top of the bridge
heading south. It seems
to me that if the lights
were synchronized they
wouldn't appear to be
randomly red and green
as far as I can see.
Adjusting the timing
of the lights, if necessary,
would help keep cars
moving north and south.
I'd like to know if turn-
ing lights on Business 41


at Miami (southbound)
and Tampa (northbound)
avenues would help
too. Those turning lanes
are so short that it only
takes a handful of cars to
block traffic, especially at
Miami with cars head-
ing to Venice Elementary
between 8 and 8:30. (Of
course, most of the cars
aren't supposed to be
turning on Miami, but
that's another column.)
The side streets are also
a problem, as their lights
are thrown off cycle when
the Hatchett Creek Bridge
goes up. You can wait a
long time on Miami try-
ing to turn south when
that happens, for no good
reason.
Better driving would
be a big help, but I'm not
holding my breath. If
drivers would move when
they get the chance, get
up to traffic speed quickly
and not block intersec-
tions, there would be
immediate improvement.
And guess what? We'd all
save some gas. But that's
always the case, and if
they won't do it out of
season, they sure aren't
going to do it now.
The one sure solution
to the traffic problem is
fewer cars, and that won't
happen for a couple of
months. But that could be
our chance to try to make
a few changes for when
our snowbird friends
return.

Email: bmudge@venicegondolier.com


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-0 -


Proofreading is not foolproof


Put on your editor's
cap for a moment and
see if you can find the
typo in this sentence:
"Healthy doses of pep-
per spray and adrenaline
were among the on-hand
accouterments wielded
by the two dozen Norfolk
officers that responded to
the embarrassing scene
on the National Mall a
fracas occurring far closer
to the Capitol than was
considered safe in the
judgment of the respon-
dents' commanding
officers."
The mistake, which any
editor would be expected
to catch, is "Norfolk."
Virginia police wouldn't
respond to a D.C. call.
Let's try another.
"Poring over the menu
at Chez Pierre, it's clear
that creations like opah
crepe hors d'oeuvres,
lobster bisque and
wasabi risotto Execu-
tive Chef Jonathan Johns'
signature dishes cre-
ated with the help of his
wife Madeleine were
designed to delight the
palate and supersede
his penultimate culinary
accomplishment."
No matter how care-
fully you pored over
this sentence, you
might never catch that
the writer called Johns
a polygamist. With-
out a comma before
"Madeleine," the writer
implied that her name is
"restrictive information"


necessary to identify
which of Johns' multiple
wives we were talking
about.
Editing is tough. When
you're looking for mis-
spellings, comma errors
slip by. When you're
trying to make sure
subsequent references
to Jonathan Johns are
always "Johns" and never
"John," you can forget
to check your diction-
ary's preferred spelling of
"accouterment." When
you're doing a close
reading, major logical
problems can slip by.
When you're focused on
big-picture cohesiveness,
you may not notice a bad
headline.
Last week, ESPN editor
Anthony Federico ran an
online headline about
a basketball player that
included the expression
"chink in the armor."
Because the player, Jer-
emy Lin, is Asian, it was
an ugly double entendre.
Federico claims it wasn't
deliberate. "This has
nothing to do with me
being cute or punny," he
told the New York Daily
News. "It was an honest
mistake."
A lot of people don't
believe that journalists
are capable of honest
mistakes. The more com-
mon perception depicts
editors and reporters
twisting the ends of their
waxed moustaches and
laughing maniacally
while plotting the over-
throw of society. Case
in point: On perhaps a
dozen occasions, read-
ers of my column who've
spotted errors real or
perceived in my writ-
ing, have sent me emails
asking, "Were you testing
us? Did you put that in
on purpose to see if we'd
catch it?"
My playing sneaky


mind games by insert-
ing errors into my own
writing seems, to some
people, more plausible
than the possibility I just
made a mistake.
Similarly, some people
might find it impossible
to believe that Federico's
headline, which he wrote
during the course of his
job editing stories, was
anything but deliberate.
If I hadn't spent so many
years catching, failing to
catch and even creating
bizarre errors, I wouldn't
believe it myself. But in
fact, Federico's claim that
it just slipped out and
then slipped past him is
plausible.
Editing and writing
have a way of pull-
ing the mind in many
directions at once, and
the cognitive processes
involved are complex,
mysterious and full of
surprises sometimes
nasty surprises. As both
a writer and an editor,
I've made some doozy
errors, including inex-
plicable brain hiccups
like the time I wrote a
column about lexicogra-
pher Grant Barrett, call-
ing him "Brad Garrett"
throughout.
Editors are trained to
seek out and destroy not
just inflammatory lan-
guage but any language
that could be a distrac-
tion to the story itself. So
Federico messed up big
time.
But though I can't be
sure whether his headline
was an honest mistake,
there's one thing I am
sure of: It could have hap-
pened on my watch.

June Casagrande is
the author of "It Was the
Best of Sentences, It Was
the Worst of Sentences."
She can be reached at
JuneTCN@aol.com.


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SUN NEWSPAPERS 7B


(F)









8B ELIG N
WEEKEND EDITION RELIGI
MARCH 3, 2012


CONTACT US
941-207-1110
Ikennedy@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


ANDREW SIMKINS


Cooperative

companions

Walking along creek-
side, yellow feet striding
in the low-tide mud, the
white egret was out for
breakfast. His head tilted
side-to-side in the odd
way egrets have of appar-
ently perfecting their
depth perception. I sup-
pose he was studying the
distance in preparation
for the fast plunge of that
icepick-like bill.
Surprisingly, making
her way down the creek
and parallel to the shore-
walker, a red-breasted
merganser hen joined the
morning breakfast line. I
saw the cooperative com-
petition produce a scaly
mouthful three times in
30 ticks of the clock. The
small and pursued fish
leapt away from the egret
into the waiting grasp of
one of God's great birds.
The merganser snapped
her orange bill, captur-
ing fish below the water's
surface.
Everyone was happy
with the cooperation -
both birds were benefit-
ting and eating breakfast.
OK, I suppose the fish
were not happy.
This learned behavior
by the birds and not the
fish was, I assume, taught
or stumbled onto acci-
dentally. The white egret
did not seem to mind.
Actually, as I watched this
brief drama unfold I was
put to wondering if the
action was precisely the
opposite way 'round than
I first supposed. "Per-
haps the merganser was
pushing fish toward the
shore?" I wondered aloud.
I was not the only spec-
tator on Shakett Creek. All
this manifest competitive
cooperation drew the full
attention of a brilliant
blue and white belted
kingfisher.
This much smaller
predator probably has
minnow dreams. Ring the
bell because the Shakett
Creek breakfast special
has arrived.
Perched on a boat
dock's overhanging rail,
the kingfisher's patience
was rewarded. The two
other cooperative com-
petitors journeyed by
unaware of his presence.
Breakfast was served.
Minnows were the morn-
ing's break from the long
night's fast.
These three the white
egret, the red-breasted
merganser and the king-
fisher pushed, pulled
and plucked minnows
like strong and coopera-
tive companions. Then,
the partnership and the
cooperation vanished like
the morning mist.

SIMKINS 19


You're Invited
_CHRIST UNITED
I METHODIST
CHURCH
Jerry Van Dyken, Pastor
Larry Potts, Associate Pastor
Sunday Traditional
Worship Services
8:00 and 10:45 am
Contemporary Service 9:15 am
Sunday School 9:15 am
and 10:30 am
Nursery Provided for
All Services
Parking shuttle provided
493-7504


1475 Center Road, Venice
www.cume.info


I RELIGION BRIEFS


Garage sale
Venice Presbyterian
Church, 111 E. Firenze
Ave., holds its annual
Giant Garage Sale to
benefit missions, from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 3. 941-488-2258

Music
SVenice Presbyterian
Church Community
Concert Series presents
Barbary Coast Dixie-
land Show Band at 3
and 7 p.m. Saturday,
March 3, with six tal-
ented musicians playing
18 instruments. Cost: $10
Tickets at church office,
111 E. Firenze Ave. Call
941-488-5525.
The Florida Voices
come to St. Mark's
Episcopal Church, 508
Riviera, at 7 p.m. Fri-
day March 9 featuring
folk music, sacred and
gospel music and music
and songs of love from
"Across the Americas."
Free. 941-488-7714
Cornerstone Bap-
tist Church, 315 U.S. 41
Bypass South, hosts a
free concert by the Puff-
ers at 6 p.m. Saturday,
March 10. The Puff-
ers are gospel singing
artists who use a wide
variety of instruments.
941-488-1551

Yiddish movie
The Yiddish Culture
Center presents the


movie "Romeo and Juliet
in Yiddish" at 2 p.m. Sun-
day, March 4, at Jewish
Congregation of Ven-
ice, 600 North Auburn
Road. Cost: $3 for JCV
members; $5 others.
941-484-2022

Environmental
films
An environmen-
tal film festival kicks
off from 7 to 9 p.m.
March 5 with a film
("Ingredients") that
explores the emerging
local food movement,
followed by a knowl-
edgeable speaker, and
continues through-
out the month. On
March 12 ("Tapped") is
a story of bottled water,
where it comes from
and what it creates. The
festival is co-sponsored
by Green Sanctuary and
Transition Venice and
is held at the Unitarian
Universalist Congrega-
tion of Venice, 1971
Pinebrook Road. A $5
donation is requested.

Lecture
Dr. Alan Steinweis
discusses the upsurge of
anti-Jewish violence in
Europe during a lecture
sponsored by the Adult
Education Department
of the Jewish Congrega-
tion of Venice, 600 North
Auburn Road at 7 p.m.
March 7. Steinweiss is
professor of history and


FROM CHABAD
JEWISH CENTER

A Mexican-style din-
ner and comedy ven-
triloquist Ed Thomas
and Hugo highlight the
community Purim fes-
tival celebration from
5 to 7 p.m. Thursday,
March 8, at Chabad
Jewish Center, 2169
South Tamiami Trail.
The holiday com-
memorates the sal-
vation of the Jewish
people in Ancient
Persia from Haman's
plot "to destroy, kill
and annihilate all the
Jews, young and old,
infants and women, in
a single day." Partici-
pants are encouraged
to come and compete
in costume for prizes
awarded for most
innovative or funny
costume. Guests are
requested to pay $18
for adults, $10 for
children. RSVP at
941-493-2770.


director of Holocaust
studies at the Univer-
sity of Vermont. Free.
941-484-2022

Purim celebration
Ventriloquist Ed
Thomas will perform
during a Purim celebra-
tion from 5 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 8, at


Chabad Jewish Center,
2169 South Tamiami
Trail. The event will
also include a Megil-
lah reading, a slideshow
during the reading,
hamantaschen and
a Mexican-style din-
ner. The community
is welcome. Cost:$18;
$10 children. RSVP at
941-493-2770.


Pancakes

Christ United Meth-
odist Church, 1475
Center Road, offers pan-
cakes to order, biscuits
and gravy, french toast,
bacon and sausage, from
8 to 9:30 a.m., the first
Saturday of every month.

RELIGION 19


I RELIGION STUDY AND CLASSES


Venice Presbyterian
Church, 111 E. Firenze
Ave., holds a Lenten Bible
study for six weeks begin-
ning Feb. 26, Sunday
mornings or Wednesday
evenings, or two-day
retreat, facilitated by
pastors Chris Romig, Lyn
Olson and Ruffin Stepp.
Cost: $10 for guide. For
more information, call
941-488-2258.
Chabad of Venice &
North Port, 2169 South
Tamiami Trail, 941-493-
2770, offers a women's


weekly book club based
on the book "Bread and
Fire: JewishWomen Find
God in the Everyday,"
11 a.m. to noon Tues-
days for discussions
and the opportunity
to meet other Jewish
women. Pastries served.
Suggested donation: $5.
Walk-ins welcome.
The Jewish Women's
Circle presents a chal-
lah baking experience at
7:30 p.m. the first Thurs-
day of each month. Cost
per class: $10. RSVP


Venice Bible Church,
2395 West Shamrock
Drive, offers a 12-week
Women's Bible Study at
9:15 a.m. (began Jan. 9)
on the Book of Revela-
tion (Part 2 in a series)
by Kaye Arthur. Call
941-493-2788.
First Baptist Church,
312 W.Miami Ave.,
offers several classes
open to the community:
Thursday Ladies
Bible Study, with James;
Mercy Triumphs, with
Anne Hartokomis (began


Jan. 12); Tuesdays -
Ladies Bible Study,
9:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.;
6 p.m. Wednesday -
prayer and Bible study,
with Pastor Tom Hodge;
middle school, with
Pastor Nathan Rice;
children's ministries with
Bible study and activi-
ties birth to fifth grade.
At 6 p.m., Wednesday
- Game Plan for Life,
with Jeff Caudill and
Randy Koach (began
Jan. 18); Why I Believe,
with Kenny Martin: How


to Share Your Faith, with
Allan Crull; I Was Broke,
Now I'm Not (TBA);
Parents of Teenagers
(TBA); Grief Share, with
Marlene Bechtold; His-
panic Ministry, with Leo
Gomez. 941-485-1314
Calvary Bible
Church, 1936 E. Venice
Ave., offers a free com-
munity arts and crafts
class from 10:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. every Friday
in fellowship hall. Call

STUDY|9


LIBRARY BRIEFS


Venice Public Library
300 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice
941-861-1347

Great Decisions
Monday, through
the end of March,
9:30-11:30 a.m.
Discussion group looks
at major issues. Next
topic: "Cybersecurity."

Great American
Musical
Monday, March 5,
2 p.m.
A lecture by Bob
Griffiths about Stephen
Sondheim. Then, 2 p.m.
Wednesday, March 7,
a film with Bernadette
Peters and Mandy
Patinkin, "Sunday in the
Park."

Great Decisions
Monday, March 5,


SVenice-

Nokomis
united Methodist
Church
Sunday Worship:
10 AM
Children's Puppet Church:
10:15 AM
Adult Sunday School
11:15 AM
Youth Fellowship Monday
5:30 PM
208 Palm Avenue, Nokomis
Phone 488-4137
(West of US 41,4 blks. South of
Albee RdJMatthew Currie Ford)
www.vnumc.net
vnumc(sdaystar.net
Senior Pastor, Glenda Brayman 3


9:30-11:30 a.m.
Discussion group looks
at major issues. This
week: "The State of the
Oceans."

Broadway
musicals
Tuesday, March 6,
6 p.m.
Cabaret team Sonny
and Perley sing songs
from Broadway musicals
featuring composers
such as George Gershwin


and Richard Rodgers,
from musicals such as
"The Sound of Music,"
"Oklahoma" and others.
Reserve a seat by calling
941-861-1337 or at the
main desk.

Film festival
Thursday, March 8,
1 p.m. and 6 p.m.
Zac Efron is a stage-
struck teenager in 1937
New York; Claire Danes
is the older woman;


S St Mark's Episcopal Church
508 Riviera Street, Venice (2 blocks west of Venice Regional Medical Center)
Saturday 5:00 p.m. Holy Communion (contemporary music)
Sunday 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
9:30 a.m. Holy Communion (mth nursery)
10:30 a.m. Christian Education (adult andyouth)
11:15 a.m. Holy Communion
(Breakfast served 1st Sunday of each month 9 00-11 00)
Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Holy Communion & Healing Service
The Rev James H PuryearRector The Rev Earl Beshears, Assoc. Rector
Visit us on the web at: www.stmarksvenice.org
U- - - - - - -


SUNDAY WORSHIP
8, 9:15, & 11 AM
Children's Sunday School-9:15 AM


\k nice
I I' erhvterian
Church


Barbary Coast Dixieland Band
Jazz Service
at all services

www.vencepresbyterlan.org 488-2258 111 Flmne Ave. E.,Ven




j grace
'United methodist Church
Contemporary Service at 9am Traditional Service 1lam
LifeWAY Sunday School Classes at 9:30am & 10:15am
Nursery Available for all services

Pastor Thomas J. Derrough
40EFieilAe.OTeI an
94-88174-graeothiladI


and Christian McKay is
Orson Welles.

Practice your
French
Friday, 10-11:30 a.m.
If you have a basic
knowledge of the French
language and wish to
practice those skills, you
are invited to attend
weekly meetings of the
VPL French Club. Practice
French conversation dur-
ing the first hour followed


by reading from French
literature and current
topics. No registration is
required. New members
welcome.

Gardening
questions
Thursday,
10 a.m.-noon
Bring gardening
questions to receive
help from the Sarasota

LIBRARY|19


I Worship with us: Sat. 5 pm Sun. 5:30 am & 11 am
ICounseling Appointments 926-2959 443244
| -^ ......... I


iii
:it"":l' :~ I'
'rlns(
O c ."


VENICE BIBLE
CHURCH
Loving God, Loving People, Making Disciples
There's something
for every member of the family!
SUNDAY
Sunday Worship & Bible Study
9:00 and 10:40am
CHILDREN YOUTH SMALL GROUPS
493-2788
www.VeniceBibleChurch.com
2395 W. Shamrock Dr. (2 blocks west of US 41)


Food and fun at festival of Purim


PHOTO COURTESY CHABAD JEWISH CENTER
Comedy ventriloquist, Ed Thomas, and his friend Hugo will
lend some laughter to Chabad Jewish Center's celebration
of the story of the Purim miracle on March 8. The festival's
Purim meal will go Mexican this year. The reading of the
biblical scroll of Esther and Hamantaschen will also be
featured.


t LAKESIDE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
2401 S. Tamiami Trail (Across from So. Cty. Admin. Bldg.)
493-5102
web: www.lakesidelutheran.net
e email: LLC@lakesidelutheran.net
Worship 8:00 a.m. or 10:30 a.m.
Contemporary Worship 9:15 a.m.
Children's Church 9:15 a.m.
Nursery 9:15 & 10:30 am
ChritianMar ,Fam iuelini9





:WEEKEND EDITION MARCH 3, 2012


RELIGION
FROM PAGE 8

Cost: $4; children under
12, free; over 12, $1.
941-493-7504
SVenice-Nokomis
United Methodist
Church, 208 Palm
Ave., Nokomis, holds a
pancake breakfast and
garage sale from 7:30 to
10 a.m., the first Saturday
of each month. The cost
is $4 per person; kids $2
and toddlers free. Garage
sale includes tools,
appliances, glassware,
golf clubs, furniture and
more. Funds go to chari-
ties. 941-488-4137
Grace United Meth-
odist Men's Club, 400 E.
Field Ave., offers all-
you-can-eat pancake
breakfasts from 8 to
10 a.m. the first and third
Saturday of each month
through April. Sausage,
eggs, biscuits and gravy
and more, all for $5 per
person. 941-486-4153
Knights of Columbus,


STUDY
FROM PAGE 8

Anne at 941-408-9315.
Prince of Peace
Lutheran Church, 2222
Englewood Road, Engle-
wood, offers free classes
in knitting, crocheting
or Swedish weaving
at 2 p.m. Wednesday.
Practice materials will be
provided for introducing


LIBRARY
FROM PAGE 8

County Extension
Service.

Preschool
Storytime
Tuesday, 10-10:30 a.m.,
for ages 3-5

Tot time
Wednesday,


SIMKINS
FROM PAGE 8

Cooperation is beauti-
ful. Occasionally the wild
creatures put on such


512 Substation Road,
offers a pancake break-
fast from 8 to 11 a.m. the
first and third Sundays.
941-485-1663

Spaghetti supper
Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 800 South
Tamiami Trail, hosts a free
spaghetti supper from
4:30 to 6 p.m. the last
Sunday of every month.
No tickets, coupons or
money needed. All are
welcome. 941-488-4942

Donations needed
Our Neighbors'
Goods is a nonprofit
fair-trade shop at Venice
Community Church of
the Brethren at which
handcrafted jewelry,
ornaments and decora-
tive items from around
the world can be bought.
Volunteers are needed
to staff the shop. Call
941-355-2029 for more
information.
The Community
Assistance Ministry of

basic concepts. If you
are experienced, come
share your knowledge.
941-475-1231
The Jewish Congre-
gation of Venice, 600
North Auburn Road,
offers Hebrew language
instruction for adults.
Native Hebrew speaker
Chaya Perera is an
experienced teacher of
adults and children at all
levels. Classes held once
a week, on Monday or

10-10:30 a.m.
Ages 1 month to 3 years.
Play with toys, and
then story time.

Read with
the dogs
Thursday, March 8,
4-6 p.m.
Read to Suncoast
Humane Society-trained
therapy dogs.

Read-a-Thon
March 1-April 7

displays. It was a sight
I had never observed
before and am not sure
it will ever come again. It
takes three special birds
to make such an event
happen. Cooperation like
that I saw in the morning


Trinity Presbyterian
Church, 4365 State
Road 776, is collect-
ing donations of the

Wednesday. Average fee:
$10 an hour. No grades,
no tests. 941-488-8128
JCV also presents "Get
More out of Being Jew-
ish," with Rabbi Daniel
Krimsky, from 1 to 2 p.m.
Thursday. Each class
stands alone to help in a
deeper exploration into
traditional and modern
Jewish texts for enriching
your daily life. No charge.
Open to Jews of all
backgrounds, interfaith

Read any of Walter or
Steven Farley's "Black
Stallion" series and fill
out an entry form to
win an autographed
Steven Farley copy, a
Black Stallion picture
book or the grand
prize, aVIP family pass
to Arabian Nights in
Orlando.

After-school
Activities
After-school com-
puter lab, Mondays,

sun reminded me how
precious and beneficial
life can be when people
act in unity.
That morning still
makes me smile. I can
still feel the mud squish-
ing between the egret's


Pm


r "


following items for
1,000-plus needy people
in the community: bar
soap, toothpaste and

families and anyone
interested in Judaism.
For more information,
call 941-484-2022.
Buddhist medita-
tion classes will be held
at 5 p.m. Wednesday at
Unitarian Universalist
Congregation of Venice,
1971 Pinebrook Road.
Class fee: $10; walk-ins
welcome. Increase your
peace finding happiness
inside. 941-373-1600
Mindful meditation,

3:30-4:30 p.m., ages
5-12.
After-school Play
Mario, Tuesdays, 3:30-
4:30 p.m., ages 5-12.
After-school Drop-
in Crafts, Wednesdays,
3-4:15 p.m.

New nonfiction
books at the library
"Acrylic Fusion: Experi-
menting with Alternative
Methods for Painting,
Collage, and Mixed
Media," by Dan Tranberg

toes. Cooperation is
beautiful.
I plan to cooperate
more often this year. I
hope you will join me
in that conviction. I am
going to practice my solo
act less.


toothbrushes, deodor-
ant, feminine hygiene
items, bug spray, sham-
poo and batteries of all

instruction based on
Buddhist philosophy, is
held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Thursday at 251 South
Tamiami Trail. Donations
accepted. Call 941-
929-4063 or visit www.
meditationvenice.com.
New Life Assembly
of God, 5800 South
Tamiami Trail, holds sign
language classes open to
the community at New
Life Community Center
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on

(Beverly, Mass.: Quarry
Books, 2012
"Conquered Into
Liberty: Two Centuries of
Battles along the Great
Warpath that Made the
American Way of War," by
Eliot A. Cohen (New York:
Free Press, 2011)
"The Joy of Cheese-
making: The Ultimate
Guide to Understand-
ing, Making, and Eating
Fine Cheese," by Jody
M. Farmham and Marc
Druart (New York: Sky-
horse Pub., 2011)

If the cooperation I saw
modeled on Shakett Creek
were to happen with a
few more of us, God's
people might actually
make a difference if
nothing else, we could all


sizes. Drop off donations
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Call 941-492-6384.

the first and third Thurs-
days of each month. For
more information, call
941-493-0775.
Unity Church of Ven-
ice, 125 North Jackson
Road, offers A Course
in Miracles from 6:30 to
8 p.m. Tuesday in Fel-
lowship Hall. No prepa-
ration required. New
participants welcome.
Love offering. Call Donna
at 941-468-5177 or Judy
at 941-488-6440.

"The Sj6gren's Book,"
edited by Daniel J. Wal-
lace (Oxford; NewYork:
Oxford University Press,
2011)
"Thai Yoga Massage:
Postures and Energy
Pathways for Healing," by
Kam Thye Chow (Roch-
ester, Vermont: Healing
Arts Press, 2011)
"Vegan Holiday
Kitchen: More than
200 Delicious, Fes-
tive Recipes for Special
Occasions," (New York:
Sterling, 2011)

eat fish a bit more often.
Thanks for reading.

Andrew Simkins,
D.Min., is pastor ofNew
Hope Christian Church in
Nokomis.


VW 7 7 - Z'-' ,U


I 0LIIte! Ime "


PRINCESS CRUISES
escape completely-


Venice Pines Travel & Princess Cruise Lines
Cruise Sale March 8, 2012
Plan a wonderful vacation with Princess t i,-, -
with great savings and exciting extras!
Join us & Jamie Siani, Rep from Princess Cruise
Lines, for a LOVE BOAT Sales Event!
1 pm 3pm Venice Pines Travel office.

We will be offering ----------
Cruise Deals for the
day of the show as
well as shipboard -
credits & reduced
deposits with every
cruise booked.

For more information call:
Venice Pines Travel
1284 Iconrannda Blvd

_Call 941-497-7888

-too


TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE
Bible Fellowship 9 am
Worship in the Word 10:15 am

700 Center Rd, Venice FL
(Garden Elementary)
(941)525-6196


Voted #1 Produce!

14942 Tamiami Trail
Just north of Sumter Blvd.
Next to Burger King
8:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Saturday's Only

Plants Herbs Breads
Dog Items Miche Bags
Doll Clothes Custom Jewelry
Ladies Clothing Honey
Fresh Pasta

Call 941-240-6100for info.


Ensemble sings songs of the Americas
The Florida Voices will feature folk music from Canada, sacred and gospel music from the U.S. and lively music and songs of
love from South America during a free concert set for 7 p.m. Friday, March 9, at St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 508 Riviera St.
The concert is open to the public.


A Neighborhood Yard
4 ,,, Sale & Craft Fair
V March 17th

1st Baptist Church in the Pines
$10, $15 or *20 Table Reservations
& Directions 485-5074



Clothing & Household Items
Donations accepted Sats 9-12
FREE Refreshments!


Venice Car Wash and Detail Center








20% Off any detail of $75.00 or more
700 TamiamiTrail S
Please Present this in Person. Next to Venice Hospital
S (941) 485.7222 Sign Up online for extra monthly savings,
www.venicecatwash.com


F i m


SUN NEWSPAPERS 9B


A


I








10B
WEEKEND EDITION
MARCH 3, 2012


PHOTO ALBUM


CONTACT US
941-207-1102
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com
SUN NEWSPAPERS


Italian American Club member Maria Tims, left, thanks Joseph
Spinella, conductor of the Sarasota Mandolin Orchestra.
Spinella, a tenor, sang "Parlami d'Amore Mariu" to her Feb. 8 at
the Mandolins in Venice concert at the club.


Luisa Goldman, left, event chair; Bruce Brookshire, usher; and
Judy Weaver, membership chair; were on hand as 660 ladies
attended the Second Hand Rose fashion show put on by Safe
Place and Rape Crisis Center Feb. 9 at the Ritz-Carlton, Sarasota.
This was SPARCC's 25th year of fashion. Proceeds go to support
victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. To volunteer,
call 941-365-0208, ext. 106.


0 0 0
A.O oo o


PI-IUIU UUIEaSY UI UIANIE MUU IUIN
The Sarasota Mandolin Orchestra, with conductor and tenor vocalist Joseph Spinella, performed
at the Italian American Club of Venice Feb. 8.


* Independent Living
* Assisted Living
* Skilled Nursing Care
* Outpatient Rehab


VIL GE

ON T. ISLE
EVERYDAY NEW DAY


.,.. (941) 486-5484
920 Tamiami Trail South
T Venice, FL 34285


COURTESY PHOTO


PHOTO COURTESY OF GAIL WATSON
Beach Manor Villas South held its second annual ladies tea party Feb. 11. The ladies enjoyed tea,
goodies and games with prizes at the clubhouse.


The entire cast of models from the King's Gate Fashions Through the Ages fashion show, held
Feb. 17 at Jacaranda West Country Club, model fashions dating from the 1900s to the 1990s.
Rita Sunstrum and Sally Hille produced a radio station atmosphere and commented about each
decade. Hille, 91, produces a radio show and sends it from King's Gate to Marietta, Ohio.


1-
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Charlotte
Kuropatwa
stands near
a really tall
figure at
the Visitors
Center in St.
Augustine.


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COURTESY PHOTO
Janet Gibb president, hands a $500 check to James Hagler,
director of historical resources for the city of Venice, on behalf
of the Bertha Honore Palmer chapter of The Questers for the
restoration of the Venice Army Air Base memorial in Heritage
Park. Judith Lewandowski, left, treasurer, and Judy Davis, right,
vice president, look on.


I I


PHOTO COURTESY OF NORMA PENNINGTON
Tito Gaona, left, and Orlando Bevington explain the progress of
the Venice Circus Arts Foundation Inc. at the January meeting of
Women on the Go.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE KUROPATWA
Peter, left, and his wife, Colleen, came all the way
down from Canada to visit Canadian Prior Smith,
center, at the Venice Community Center in February.
Smith hosts the radio program Canada Calling.


PHOTO COURTESY OF
PHYLLIS ANGELASTRI


SHARE YOUR PHOTOS
To share your photo with us, email a JPG at least 4 by 6
inches with a list of who or what is in the photograph to
ablackwell@venicegondolier.com, or mail photos to:
Venice Gondolier Sun, Attn: Photo Album, 200 E. Venice Ave.,
Venice FL 34285.


PHOTO COURTESY OF BETHANN YOUNG


The Merry Members of Venice MS Support Group held a fundraiser at the Venice Farmers Market Jan. 28 and raised
funds for the MS Walk to be held March 24 at Lakewood Ranch. The group appreciates those who donated to the cause.


The American Legion
Auxiliary was honored
to have Mayor John
Holic sign valentines
for deployed troops
on Jan. 26. Valentines
were collected at the
Post and the Italian
American Club of Venice
and placed in each box
of items mailed to the
troops. The items were
contributed by local merchants.


w-- & -
k /' //c,


PHOTO
COURTESY
OF DEE
KING
Young-Ah Tak
performed
Beethoven's
Piano
Concerto
No. 5 under
the direction
of Venice
Symphony
director
Maestro
Kenneth
Bowermeister
Feb. 3 at
Church of the
Nazarene.


Venice's Only Not-For-Profit, Faith Based

Continuing Care Retirement Community Offering:


.
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A special publication of













23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

EDITOR

Josh Olive
941-206-1010
waterlineweekly@gmail.com

DESIGN/LAYOUT

Josh Olive
Tommy Von Voigt

REGULAR
CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Abbie Banks
Kevin Barton
Greg Bartz
Jim Branch
Billy Carl
Dave Hack
Bill Hempel
Waterman Jamie Hooks
Robin Jenkins
Tom Johnson
Jeff Kincaid
Capt. Ed Kopp
Robert Lugiewicz
David H. Martin
Capt. Mike Myers
Dave Nielsen
Cam Parson
Matt Stevens
Capt. Cayle Wills

MARKETING

Advertising Manager
Carol Moore
941-206-1291
cymoore@sun-herald.com

Display Advertising
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941-206-1264
cbeckett@sun-herald.com

Boaters' Bargains
941-429-3110

Part of the Sun family of
newspapers, published by
Sun Coast Media Group


Some of WaterLine's subject
matter consists of the writers'
opinions. We do our best to be
accurate in matters of fact in this
publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


Welcome to WaterLine's 2012 Annual
Guide to Southwest Florida Boating
and Fishing. This is the third year we've
produced this guide, and each year has
been better than the last. In fact, I'm a
little concerned about how we're going
to top this one next year. Oh, well -
we have 10 months to figure that out.
This publication is intended to have
strong appeal to less experienced


Harbor and the surr
print. That's why we
WaterLine every we
one thing we've all
about boating and 1
matter how much y
always more to lear
WaterLine in your p
our writing staff is a
able to teach. If you


S- boaters and anglers, and it contains a regularly, call 941-2
lot of basic information. Despite that, Putting a project
I'd be willing to bet that any Southwest takes a lot of effort
--- Florida water rat can learn something team, so I hope you
--_ from these pages. With the current useful. If you enjoy
fishing regulations and detailed fish- have any questions
locating maps, this guide should be a you want to send m
_- .- handy reference for anyone who spends to drop me a line at
S_ -- _- "_ _--.-- time on the water. gmail.com.
As with past years, there is much
_l that has to be left out. We only had 48
S-- -pages to fit everything into, and even if
we'd had ten times the space we would
.. -have been hard-pressed to put every-
V .PL lE PH T EH PPEP ,- thing there is to know about Charlotte
-\_-TEPLIII -PH,, ,P .-.E H-PPEP


The variety offishes in our area is, in a
word, ridiculous. From bizarre little toadfish to
regal marlin, the Gulf its associated estuaries
and the rivers that feed them are home to
literally thousands of species offish, not to
mention a stunning array of invertebrate
marine life. Here are some of the fish you may
find nibbling on the end ofyour line.

INSHORE SPECIES
These are mainly fish of the shallows and
backwaters, though being fish they may choose
to swim out into the Gulf. Inshore fishing encom-
passes the entire estuary system, from the river
mouths to the beaches.
Tarpon are perhaps Southwest
Florida's best known and most sought-after


gamefish. Growing to massive sizes 250
pounds or more is possible, though 80
to 120 pounds is more typical these
schooling fish are tough customers. Aerial
acrobatics displays are a trademark of this
species' fight. The majority of the tarpon in
our area are seasonal visitors, arriving in
late spring to spawn off our beaches and
sticking around until winter cold fronts drive
them south. There is also a resident popula-
tion that winter in the rivers, where the
tannic acid tints them a beautiful golden
color. Boca Grande Pass is the epicenter
of local tarpon action, though these fish
can be found throughout the backwaters
and along the beaches during the warm
months. Dozens of area guides specialize


. .. .
S rrrm
ZL~


in silver kings. The best baits will depend
on where you find the fish. Tarpon in the
pass on an outgoing tide may be focused on
swimming crabs and ignore any other bait.
The same fish might eagerly take a whole
dead mullet under the U.S. 41 bridge over
the Peace River a couple months later. Big
artificial baits and jumbo flies, tied just for
tarpon, also catch more than a few fish.
Tarpon are almost exclusively a catch-and-
release species, sought just for the thrill of
catching one. They're considered inedible
here, though commercially fished in the
Caribbean and Africa's Atlantic coast. Killing
a tarpon (or possessing it for a tournament
weigh-in) is legal only with a $51.50 permit
issued by the state.


wounding waters into
i'll continue to print
'ek, because there's
come to understand
fishing here no
ou know, there's
n. If you already get
aper, you know that
always willing and
don't get WaterLine
06-1000 to subscribe.
: like this together
from the whole
i find this guide
reading it, if you
or comments, or if
ie hate mail, feel free
:waterlineweekly@





Waterline Editor


Snookare another top
local gamefish, but are just as popular on the ta-
ble as they are on a line. A tropical species, snook
do poorly when the water gets cold. A disastrous
string of freezes in early 2010 killed large num-
bers of these fish, which is why the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission closed the


\/-/AT Evv-IEr LIIIE rnPH _.-T-.' J'..'n D.jLI. LE
SA hooked tarpon takes to the air during a
- 2011 Professional Tarpon Tournament Series
event. Silver kings often leap during the fight.
.d


~b~fs$ 3 M-~asaMBQr (liie Oa


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Wa44t4o ME mfl6 4iUflEi o


As you prepare for your first-ever Charlotte
Harbor fishing trip, you're about to discover
that Southwest Florida is truly a fisherman's
paradise. Boasting a year-round fishery which
spans more than 200 square miles of water, this
huge, rich estuary is home to literally hundreds
of species offish, including such popular and
sporty species as snook, redfish, tarpon, cobia,
sharks, snappers and more. Here are a few hints
to help you get started on your adventure.
Charlotte Harbor is huge in size, but most of
it is not very deep. Newcomers often comment
that their biggest shock when comparing
Charlotte Harbor to their home waters"up
north" is how shallow it is here and how
easy it is to go aground, even in relatively
small boats. Sandbars that are miles in length
lie just beneath the surface on both sides of
the Harbor, and it's possible to wade out for
hundreds of yards from the shoreline in many
places. Navigation is further complicated by
the fact that the water level changes with the
tides, sometimes as much as 2 or 3 feet up or
down in just a few hours. To minimize your
shallow-water troubles, do these two things
before you head out: First, spend some serious
time scrutinizing a chart, either on paper or
online, to get an idea of the lay of the land.
Second, invest in a good pair of polarized
sunglasses. Polarized sunglasses do an amazing
job of reducing glare, and with a pair perched
on the bridge of your nose you'll often be able
to spot the subtle changes in water color that
signal the location of shallower water.
There are hundreds of species of fish that
live in Charlotte Harbor, of which nearly 100 are
regularly encountered by anglers. These fish
come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors.
Some are good to eat and some are not so
good. Some have teeth, fins or stingers that
can inflict damage to a careless fisherman.
Most are subject to harvest regulations, which
can include both minimum and maximum size
limits, bag limits, closed seasons and special
tackle requirements. Learning to identify all
these fish and obey the myriad regulations can
at first appear to be an overwhelming task,
especially considering that most of us moved
here from areas where there are nowhere near
as many species offish but it can be done.
You can make it easy on yourself by practicing
catch-and-release fishing there are very
few regulations to worry about, since most of
the rules apply only to the harvest of fish. Get a
fishing license at a tackle shop or at one of the
county tag offices, and you can hit the water
without worrying about too much else. While
you're getting your fishing license, ask for a
copy of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commision's fishing regulations booklet; if
a printed copy is not available, visit http://bit.
ly/xMjJVD to view the rules online. Fish identifi-
cation can be a challenge for a newcomer, so it
may be a good idea to buy a fish ID guide at the
tackle shop while you're buying the license. You
might not want to carry a fish book with you on
your boat, so bookmark http://bit.ly/wU9pLb
for a fairly comprehensive fish

season until at least Sept 1,2012, on Florida's west coast. Dur-
ing winter, most snook go up the rivers or seek refuge in deeper
canals. Most anglers think of this fish as a shallow-water spe-
cies, butsnookare plentiful on some of the reefs and fish havens
out in the Gulf. Diving is a good way to locate these populations.
Inshore, snook tend to hang around structure mangrove
roots, dock pilings, bridge abutments and even seawalls will
often hold a snook or two. Often, if you can see one, it can see
you and will refuse any bait. Although this can be frustrating,
remember that it's illegal to snag a

S7,..7,,,, ... .


identification guide that you can access from
your cell phone while you've got the fish in
front of you. (Of course, most of that informa-
tion is also in the guide you're holding right
now.) Finally, buy a fish dehooking tool and
learn to use it, preferably without removing the
fish from the water. This minimizes the damage
done to the fish and to the angler during the
unhooking process.
So, you've bought some tackle, picked up
some bait, spent time looking at a chart, and
you're ready to go on that first fishing trip. Now
what? Charlotte Harbor offers so many places
to fish that you could spend a lifetime trying to
hit every possible spot. Making matters more
complicated, factors such as tides, weather, and
time of year can make certain spots or tech-
niques more or less productive a location
that produces redfish on a falling tide may not
hold any on an incoming tide, and that location
might only have appreciable numbers offish
from August to December. Your best bet is to
make your first trip or two on Charlotte Harbor
with someone who's already familiar with the
Harbor. This can be accomplished by hiring the
services of a fishing guide, or byfinding a buddy
who's fished here before and offering him a ride.
If your very first trip is going to be solo, then
there are a few tried-and-true things you can
do to have a chance at success. One would be to
get out on the flats in 2 to 4 feet of water and
drift with a shrimp suspended beneath a float
in areas where seagrass is visible on the bottom.
If you do you'll almost certainly catch some fish,
though I won't guarantee what kind. Be careful
to do this only if your boat's draft is shallow
enough that you won't damage the grass, which
is vital habitat for many species. Another option
is to anchor and fish alongside one of the arti-
ficial reefs in the Harbor. The largest and most
popular inshore reef is the"Bridge Reef" located
approximately a mile-and-a-half southwest of
the mouth of Alligator Creek, near the northeast
corner of the main body of Charlotte Harbor.
This reef almost always holds at least a few fish,
but success requires that you drop your anchor
outside the reef boundaries so it doesn't hang
on the concrete rubble which comprises the
reef. You should also be prepared to tie on new
rigs to replace those that you'll lose to snags in
the reef.
Even anglers who have fished here for years
are still constantly learning new things Char-
lotte Harbor is just that kind of place. Don't be
afraid to ask questions, and read WaterLine every
Thursday for more helpful articles to help you
become a successful Southwest Florida angler.
Capt. Ralph Allen runs the King Fisher Fleet of
sightseeing tour boats, deep sea fishing charter
boats and back bay guide boats located at Fisher-
men's Village Marina in Punta Gorda. He is an
award-winning outdoor writer and photographer
and is a past president of the Florida Outdoor
Writers Association He can be reached by phone at
941-639-2628 or by e-mail at Captain@King
FisherFleet.com for boating or fishing information
or with questions you want to see answeredin
WaterLine.

snook. When they don't have lockjaw, snook are known to
eat crabs, shrimp and fish up to about half their own length.
Live bait usually outfishes artificial in the backcountry, where
chumming with freshly killed whitebait is a popular method.
During the summer, when most local snook move out to the
beaches for their annual spawn, soft plastic baits catch a lot of
fish just a few feet from shore. Snook from 18 to 27 inches are
common, as are fish from 34 to about 40 inches. Snook 28 to
33 inches the legal slot when season is open are often
hard to find. These fish can grow to nearly 50 pounds, though 5
to 10 average. When and if snook become legal to harvest, they
are considered by many to be a top choice for dinner. Be sure to
remove the skin; itwill imparta soapy taste to the cooked meat.
Not too many years ago, redfish were a commercially
fished species here, and the population was in trouble. Strict
regulations a fairly narrow slot limit and a one-fish bag
- led to a strong recovery, though numbers have dropped
a little the past couple years. Reds are the target of several
Southwest Florida tournaments. Almost all of the fish caught
inshore are immature juveniles from 2 to 10 pounds, though
an occasional school of adult fish aka bull reds will
move in. Unlike in many places along the Atlantic coast, surf
fishing is not a popular way to target these fish here the


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bulls usually travel too far off the beaches to cast to. Bull
reds can attain weights of 50 pounds or larger, but it's rare
to catch a fish over 20 pounds or so in our area. Redfish on
the flats and under the mangrove roots feed best on incom-
ing tides. As the water floods into very shallow areas, the
fish move in, sometimes in large schools. As the fish grub
around on the bottom for mollusks, crustaceans and worms,
their tails will sometimes stick out of the water. These
warm-weather"tailing"redfish are highly sought by many
flats fishermen. During cool weather, these fish move far up
into mangrove creeks and canals. Because reds grow fast -
a fish that's under the slot in early spring may be over it by
the time fall's first real cold front arrives they are often
voracious feeders. To take in enough calories, redfish are not
above scavenging. A dead shrimp or piece of cutbait fished
on the bottom will be eagerly taken by any red that finds it.
Scented plastic baits are also popular. When reds are feeding
on baitfish, hard or soft plastics will draw strikes. Although
they have underslung mouths, redfish will hit a topwater
plug hard when they're in the right mood. As you might
expect of a fish with a commercial market, redfish are good
eating. Bigger fish are coarse, but bigger fish are also illegal
to harvest. Blackened redfish is tasty enough that it nearly
destroyed Florida's stocks.


Spotted seatrout are the third
species in the so-called "Charlotte Harbor slam"-
catching a snook, redfish and seatrout all in one day.
Of these species, the trout is likely to put up the least
tussle. Although not renowned for their great fighting
ability, trout do have one important trait that makes
them an important fish to local anglers: They often bite
best when it's cold and most other species aren't think-
ing about food. Trout, also called specks, run smaller
than many popular gamefish; 1 or 2 pounds is average,
and anything over 5 pounds is worth bragging about.
These fish don't like fresh water, and often move out
of the river mouths during the rainy season. They also
dislike warm weather, and will often retire to deep areas
near grassflats when the water heats up on summer
days. When the water is in the comfortable mid-60s to
high 70s, trout are found mostly over grass. Water 3 or 4
feet deep often holds good numbers of fish, and deeper
potholes on very shallow flats may be packed with trout.
Drifting with live shrimp fished under a popping cork is
the standard method of hunting trout. Smaller artificial


BY JOSH OLIVE


Having the right tools is important for any
project. Whether you're at work or at play, you'll
be much more efficient and effective when you
have what you need to get the job done.
Fishing is no different. But with so many
options available in rods and reels, it's easy to
get bogged down in the details when you're
selecting your gear. Let's simplify the situation.
You can take part in the majority of our local
fishing opportunities using one rod and reel
outfit: A 7-foot medium rod (rated somewhere
between 12- and 20-pound line) and a 3000-size
spinning reel, spooled with 12-pound monofila-
ment or 20-pound braid. This general-purpose
combo can be used to catch redfish on the
flats, snook around docks, flounder in the surf,
mackerel in the passes, snapper on the reefs
and bass in the canals. I suggest a 7-foot rod as
a compromise: A longer rod would be better on
the open flats, and a shorter rod would be better
when you're fishing straight down or among
the trees. Rod action is personal preference, but
I would suggest a softer rod if you use live bait
and a stiffer rod for lure fishing. If you do a little
of both, split the difference.
There are some things that your new all-
purpose outfit is ill-suited for, and those things
can be summed up in two words: Big fish. To
be able to go after tarpon, seriously big snook,
cobia and king mackerel, you need something
heavier. A dual-drag spinning reel in a 5000 or


baits also work well; tandem Love's Lures are especially
popular. Trout caught in warm weather often have soft,
mushy flesh. In cool weather, they have better texture.
It's important to get trout on ice as soon as possible
if you want them for the table. A couple related fish,
sand and silver seatrout, are also caught here, mostly in
winter. They tend to prefer deeper water than specks.


Another winter target is the prison-striped
sheepshead. These fish migrate inshore during winter and
are not put off by our coldest weather. In spring, they move
offshore to spawn and then remain there. They can be caught
offshore year-round, but because of their feeding method
they are an incidental catch on the reefs. Sheepies are crushers
- they use teeth that look eerily human to smash the shells
of crabs, clams and snails to get at the soft innards. A sheeps-
head will often grab a hard-shelled creature, crunch it and
spit it right out, then pick though the crushed shell for edible
meat. That means when you try to set the hook on a sheepie,
you're often just pulling the bait away from it. Becoming a
successful sheepshead angler is a skill that takes time to learn,
and hooking one is much easier when you're fishing right un-
der your feet which is where they are in winter, haunting
piers, pilings, seawalls and rocky shorelines. Most inshore fish
are smallish males, often around a pound or less. Big females
are more common on the reefs and can run up to 8 pounds
or more. Because of their shellfish diet, sheepshead fillets are
delicious and highly desirable.


During the spring and fall runs, Spanish mackerel
become one of the area's most-wanted fish. Water in the 70s
usually triggers the northward migration of these scissor-
mouthed eating machines. One reason for their popularity:
When they're chopping up a school of bait, they'll hit
anything shiny and moving fast through the water. While it
lasts, the action can be incredible. To speed up the dehooking


6000 size paired with a 7-foot heavy rod (rated
for line between 30 and 50 pounds) is just about
right. Line up with 30-pound mono or 50-pound
braid. The dual-drag reel makes this rig ideal
for trolling and for using big live baits, popular
methods for taking our bigger gamefish. In
addition to the species listed above, this is also a
good outfit to take on sharks up to about 5 feet,
big snapper and smaller grouper and amberjack
on the reefs, and the huge redfish that school
just offshore in fall. You probably won't be
casting artificial lures with this rod too often -
casting with heavy gear can be exhausting after
just a few throws. You will, however, probably
be doing some trolling, which works best with a
rod that has a softer tip.
So far you have two outfits: Medium and
heavy. But there are yet bigger fish swimming


process, many anglers use single-hook spoons or jigs and
mash down the barbs. This is important, because unhooking
a mackerel with multiple hooks in it's mouth is good way to
have a run-in with its teeth. Helpful hint: They're really, really
sharp. If the water gets too warm, these fish will move en-
tirely to our north for the summer, then come back when fall
starts putting a little nip in the air. Spanish also love shrimp
and will sometimes take trout anglers' baits. To reliably catch
macks, a short wire leader is a good idea. This may reduce
your strikes, but it should eliminate cutoffs. Alternatively,
use a long-shanked hook. Fish in the 1- to 3-pound range
are common, with larger fish often showing up ahead of the
main run. Spanish are oily and taste a bit fishy. Still, they're
well-liked by most people who like fish. Baking and smoking
are good ways to prepare mackerel.


Pompano also have spring and fall runs along our coast
A few fish usually stick around all winter and summer, but
May and October normally have the heaviest concentrations.
Pomps rarely eat other fish, sticking mostly with crustaceans.
This is one of the few fish you're more likely to catch on the
beach than in the backcountry, although pompano do travel
up the estuaries as far as the river mouths. An unusual method
of finding these fish is called skipping. Basically,you drive your
boatover a flat in about 4 feet of water and watch for jumping
pompano in your wake, then go back and fish that area, hop-
ing other fish in the loose school haven't been spooked. Live
shrimp, crabs and sand fleas are good baits for these fish, but
jigs are just as popular and perhaps more effective. Traditional
pompano jigs have a heavy round head and a short yellow or
white skirt Silly jigs also catch plenty offish, especially in hot
pinkoryellow. Pomps are not big fish; 1 to 3 pounds is average.
Exceptional fish may reach 8 pounds. Don't expect them to give
up easily, though their fight is big for their size. Pompano
are highly prized as eating fish.


A close relative of the pompano, permit are often
mistaken for their smaller cousins when young. They're


in our waters, so your next rig is the extra-heavy.
With this, you can take on big grouper (including
Goliath grouper up to a couple hundred pounds),
bruiser amberjack, and all but the largest sharks.
A conventional reel in a 6/0 size and a 6-foot
rod rated for 50- to 80-pound line is about what
you'll want. Braided line is not really appropriate
on conventional reels (see sidebar). The reel can
be star drag or lever drag. Many rods in this class
have roller guides, which add significant cost.
They're nice but hardly necessary.
With the three rigs we've looked at, you can
catch 99 percent of what's out there. But sport
fishing is about having fun, so I'll suggest one
final outfit. As we all know, not every fish is a big
one. To make the most out of hooking smaller
fish ladyfish, sea trout, rat redfish, and even
panfish in salt or fresh water an ultralight rod


not easy to tell apart when they're small, especially if you
don't have one of each to compare. Permit are
more rounded in profile; pompano are less silvery
and more yellow. Unlike pomps, permit get big. Although
juvenile permit are often found side-by-side with pom-
pano, adults are usually found solo over reefs or wrecks. In
the Keys, big permit are sight-fished on the flats. In South-
west Florida, not so much. But they eat the same baits
- hand-picked shrimp or silver dollar-size blue crabs are
the top choices. Fish from 15 to 25 pounds are reasonable
numerous, and they can grow larger than 40 pounds. Ju-
venile permit are fine table fish, but most anglers release
the big ones to fight another day.


Cobia are hard to target
in this area. During spring and fall, there are plenty of
these fish around, but they don't form schools like they do
along the northern Gulf coast. Instead, cobes are seen as
singletons from the river mouths to the offshore reefs. With
so much water for these fish to be scattered around, it can
be difficult to locate one. Markers and other fish-holding
structures will draw in cobia, as will an anchored boat.
Live pinfish or eel-imitating lures are among the top baits,
though cobia will eat almost anything. Small fish are rare;
most will weigh 15 to 30 pounds, and fish up to 60-plus
pounds can be caught if you're lucky. Cobia are notorious for
tearing up equipment when boated green, so fight the fish
until it's tired before you try to boat it. Also called lemonfish
for the natural mild lemony flavor of the meat.


The oddly named triple-
tail is not much of a sport fish but it's got delicate,
snow-white meat that makes it a choice fish for the
cooler. Tripletail have just one tail, but the lobes of
their dorsal and anal fins overlap the tail fin, creating
an illusion of three tails (if you squint just right, and
you're drunk). Tripletail hunters look for these fish
around surface structure. Some good examples -
marker pilings, crab trap floats, a chunk of flotsam out


and reel is just the ticket. A 1000 size spinning
reel on a 6-foot rod rated for 2 to 8 pound line. To
maximize line capacity on a small reel, braid in 4-
to 8-pound test is the way to go. Most ultralight
rods are 5 or 5.5 feet, but a longer rod will cast
a lot farther as is worth looking for. As you gain
angling experience, you may even use your
ultralight to take on larger fish, especially on the
flats or in the surf where there are few snags and
it's OK to let the fish run.
From this point, you can expand your tackle
into more specialized realms. There are any
number of rods and reels for specific purposes,
which is why there are so many choices available
at a well-stocked tackle shop. But with a care-
fully chosen arsenal of multipurpose rods and
reels, you can catch almost anything that swims
without spending a fortune on gear.


BRAIDED LINE OR MONOFILAMENT?
Braided line has taken the tackle world by storm, and there's a reason: For most purposes, it's better. It has virtually
no memory, so it's less prone to tangling. It's more abrasion-resistant, which makes it harder for a shell or toothy
fish to cut through it. In the same pound test, it's a lot thinner, so more fits on your spool. Because it's thinner, it has
less air resistance, which means you can cast farther. It does have a few drawbacks, though: It's more visible, it has
no stretch at all, it makes a bit more noise in the water, and it costs more to spool up. To hide the visibility, you'll
need a longer leader (I suggest no less than 30 inches). A longer leader will also allow forjust a bit of stretch, which
acts as a shock absorber. As for the cost, braid has a much longer useful life span than mono, so in the long run it's
pretty much a wash. You can also use mono backing to reduce the cost of spooling up. The big problem with braid
is specific to conventional reels because of their horizontally oriented spool: When you put pressure on the line, the
strand tends to dig into the line under it on the spool. This can cause binding and result in lost fish. There are thing
that you can do to counteract this, but with conventional reels, mono is usually a better choice.


WHICH BRAND?
There are few manufacturers who can
survive long unless they put out a quality
product. Therefore, it's a good idea to stick
with gear from well-known brands. It's
also a good idea to buy your gear from one
of the locally owned and operated tackle
shops. Why? Because they know better
than to sell you junk. If you tell the shop
staff what you're looking for and what your
budget is, they'll make sure you get the
most bang for your buck.






W44vo ME l o


Your top fishing resource:


The local bait and tackle shop


There's a lot to know about fishing in South-
west Florida. There are dozens of different spe-
cies of fish an angler can target, each of which
has its own preferred habitat and food source.
Many of these fish are migratory and are
found in our area only during certain times
of the year. In addition, tides can make life
difficult for inshore fishermen. Lures and rigs
that are popular and work well in other parts
of the country are rarely used by local anglers,
who have learned that fish here don't respond
well to them.
Consistent fishing success in this area requires
a certain level of expertise. One way to acquire
that knowledge is by trial and error. This method
works very well, if you don't mind taking years
to get good at it. You can jump-start your fishing
know-how by booking trips with a good local
charter captain. This isn't cheap, but if you go out
with a guide and pay attention to his instruction,
you can learn a lot about Florida angling quickly.
The downside to this is you'll have to go on a lot
of trips if you want to learn it all the fishing
changes often, based on variables such as sea-
son, weather, tides, baitfish availability, recent
rainfall, water visibility and other factors.
What if you can't afford to book dozens of
charter trips, but don't want to spend forever
learning on your own? There's a very good
third option your local bait and tackle
shop. The staff there will usually be anglers
themselves, and they definitely hear a lot of
good information from their customers about
what's going on out on the water. Want to
know where the redfish are biting? Just ask.
What colorjigs have the bigger trout been
biting? They'll know. And they also are very
good filters of bad information, having heard
all the lies and


in the Gulf. Don't give up; you may stop at 50 or more
trap floats before you spot a tripletail. In cold weather,
they sometimes seem to vanish. These fish tend to be
seen near the surface and are usually sighted before
casting. Toss a small shrimp or whitebait with as little
terminal tackle as possible, and pull the fish away from
the structure quickly or it'll wrap your line. A 2- to
5-pound fish is about average, but tripletail over 30
pounds are possible.


The past year or so has seen a huge upswing in the number
of flounder local anglers are catching. Since they live their
lives lying on the bottom, flounder are picky about their
habitat. Muddy or sandy soft bottom near rocky areas is ideal
habitat, though some fish can be found in the surf or on mixed
grass and sand bottom. Despite their sluggish appearance,
flounder can move quite quickly to attack a bait. The best
method is to bounce or drag a shrimp or soft plastic slowly
across the bottom in good habitat. The flounder around the
nearshore reefs are often bigger than the ones caught inshore.
That's because offshore you're more likely to run into southern
flounder, which can grow as large as 20 pounds. Inshore, Gulf
flounder are the more common fish, and they don't get as
large. Flounder are a commercial fishing standard and are very
good, but fish under 15 inches or so barely have enough meat
to be worth filleting.


exaggerations before.
Building a good relationship with your
local shop will pay you back handsomely. As
you become a familiar face, you'll see that the
staff will not only remember you but also your
fishing preferences, your tackle, and what baits
you like to use. Being a regular will also often
get you in on scuttlebutt and"insider info"
that's not given out freely.
So how do you get on these guys'good
side? It's very simple: When you need tackle
or bait, buy it from them. Smaller shops don't
have the buying power of a big-box store, so
you might pay a dollar or two more for your
rod, but it's more than worth it. The bait shop
staff can actually save you money, by advising
you on what tackle and baits will work best
for the type of fishing you plan to do. What
costs less: Spending money on ten lures that
don't catch fish before stumbling across one
that does, or buying a fish-slayer the first
time?
Some anglers try to play this both ways:
They go to the bait shop for information but
buy their gear at the big box or from a website.
This is a bad plan for two reasons. First, the
staff at the bait shop aren't idiots. It won't take
them long to realize what you're doing, and
your flow of good info will dry up fast. Second,
if the angling community does not support
the local shops financially, they'll be forced to
close their doors. Same result for you: No more
information.
Fair is fair. You've got to reciprocate.
Anglers and bait shops have a symbiotic
relationship. Each supports the other. With-
out fishermen, the bait shops can't survive.
Without the bait shops, anglers will have to
rely on each other for knowledge. But it's
hard to trust
S-.- -_- informa-
) tion from
a bunch of
liars, isn't
it?


Black drum are closely related to redfish but don't
have much of their sporty cousins'vigor. A black drum fight is
usually a minute or two of hard pulling (no running) followed
by the fish surrendering to fate. Even more inclined to scav-
enging than reds, they will readily take day-old dead shrimp
or crabs off the bottom. Though they're hardly sporting, black
drum can be entertaining especially the bigger fish of 30
to 50 pounds or more. A good way to hook into one of the big
boys is to soak half a blue crab on the bottom next to a bridge
piling. A photo of you holding it up will be very impressive for
the folks back home, who don't know that it only fought for
90 seconds. Juvenile drum up to about 5 pounds are fine food
fish; bigger ones get coarse and often have muscle parasites.


Bluefish are rarely numerous enough to target, but
schools of smaller fish (aka choppers) are often found around
schools of bait in spring and fall. These blues sometimes cruise
up and down the beaches, but there's little incentive to surf
fish for them as they do in the Atlantic. Why? A 20-inch blue-
fish is a pretty big one here; over there that's practically bait


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size. Fish for these guys like you would mackerel throw a
shiny artificial and reel it in fast. As with macks, a bit of wire
will increase your landing ratio. Some people find the taste of
bluefish objectionable. Trimming off the dark red meat and
soaking the fillets in milk overnight will help.


Whiting are a tasty little fish targeted by two kinds of
people: Those who want to have a big fish fry, and those who
want to use them for tarpon, cobia or snook bait. Technically
called Gulf kingfish, whiting are not much sport but sure can
fill a cooler. Big schools of these fish run the surf all summer
and can be found all through the estuaries into the river
mouths. A small jig works very well, especially if tipped with
a chunk of shrimp. To catch a bunch, a castnet or beach seine
works even better. Most whiting are small under a pound.
Though bony, they are delicious beer-battered and deep-fried.


The Rodney Dangerfield of saltwater sport fishing, jack
crevalle get no respect. This is mostly due to the fact that
they're basically inedible and were thought of for years as
trash fish. In today's catch-and-release world, however, jacks
need to be recognized for what they are pound for pound,
one of the hardest-fighting and most spirited gamefish in the
world. Jacks are merciless predators, slashing through baitfish
schools and leaving handfuls of dead and dying baits in their
wake. When they're in a feeding frenzy, any bait is likely to


draw a strike; at other times, try fishing a popper or other
surface lure, or a live bait under a float. A small jack of 2 to
5 pounds will fight like a trophy snook, and if you hook one
in the 20-pound range you'll wonder why your tarpon isn't
jumping. They can grow to more than 50 pounds, and heaven
help you if you hook one that big.












The reason ladyfish are looked down on
is that they're small. Related to tarpon and bonefish two of
the world's top sport fish they have as much fight as their
famous cousins but in a smaller package. Another name for
this fish is ten-pounder, because that's whatyou'll swear you've
got on the other end of the line. A hooked ladyfish often takes
to the air in a series of leaps that put most other"gamefish"
to shame. To get the most out of these fish, scale your tackle
down. Don't use your redfish rig to catch ladies use an
ultralight outfit Little plastic baits or spoons work great, as
do small live shrimp. Ladyfish are no good to eat but do make
exceptional cutbait for redfish, snook, tarpon and sharks (for
big fish, just cut the ladyfish in half).


Saltwater catfish are the least-wanted fish in Southwest
Florida. They're seemingly inescapable for many anglers, who
weave tapestries of curses in the air as they reel in catfish
after catfish. But it doesn't have to be that way. Catfish hunt
for edible material mainly by scent No smell, no catfish. Try
artificial if the cats are all up in your business. Southwest
Florida actually has two saltwater catfish species: Hardheads


and gafftopsails. Gafftops are easily recognized by their long
fin extensions. Its rare, but sometimes gafftops will take an
artificial lure fished near a baitfish school. Because they are
predator/scavengers, gafftops are actually edible and taste
pretty good. Hardheads taste like boat ramp muck. Most
catfish caught are a pound or so, but gafftops can get to about
8 pounds and put up a decent fight on light tackle. Catfish
slime on your line will keep other fish from biting, and catfish
spines are venomous and can put you in a world of hurt.

REEF FISH
Reef fish live in the Gulf, but noteverywhere generally,
you'll find them only near structure. Hard limestone bottom,
springs, ledges, wrecked boats or planes, coral-encrusted rubble
and artificial reefs will all hold these fish. Most reef fish stay near
the bottom; some, like amberjackand barracuda, prefer to live in
the open water above the reef itself.


Several species of grouper are among the most
popular fish in our area. Gag and red grouper are the
most frequently caught. Black grouper and scamp also
can be found. Other species are present but either rare or
found only in very deep water. All grouper are reef fish
as adults. Juvenile grouper up to a foot or so live in the
protection of the estuaries before moving out to the reefs
as they grow larger. Gags generally live in shallower water
that the other species, so it doesn't take as long a run into
the Gulf to catch them. In the cooler months, grouper
move closer to shore. Keeper-size gag can be caught in
water as shallow as 15 feet during winter, and reds can be
found in 40 feet instead of 80. Black grouper and scamp
are usually caught by accident while fishing for gag or
reds. All grouper will readily take live or cut bait, usually
fished with a heavy sinker or jighead to get the bait to the
bottom quickly. Gag will also take big plugs trolled over


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Goliath grouper are a protected species
at publishing time, but fisheries regulators are
considering whether to open some sort of harvest.
Unlike other grouper species, Goliaths can be found
inshore in very large sizes. This is because they mature
at a much larger size than other groupers the
150-pound fish living under local bridges are still babies.
Adult fish, which can weigh 700 pounds or more, move
out into the Gulf. Some live in water less than 50 feet
deep; others move into the crushing depths where it's
always night. Goliaths sometimes will eat a hooked
grouper or snapper on some reefs, drawing the ire of
anglers. If this happens, try changing locations. Goliaths
were once harvested by spearfishermen for the seafood
industry, and because they are unafraid of divers, this
practice nearly wiped them out. They are now fully
protected by law, a situation which fisheries managers
are currently looking at modifying. Regardless of
whether harvest becomes legal, Goliaths are popular
catch-and-release subjects for those who want to
catch a truly huge fish.


O O a]Dnirofl


















The various snapper species are almost as esteemed for
the table as grouper. Mangrove snapper (sometimes called
gray snapper) are the most commonly caught off Southwest
Florida. These fish are very common inshore as juveniles, and
can be seen around almost any structure. Mangos up to about
15 inches can be caught inshore; as they mature they move
into the deeper waters of the Gulf. Reefs, wrecks and rockpiles
in water from 10 to 200 feet often host swarms of mangrove
snapper. Other snapper species also grow up inshore, but are
rarely seen as they are more secretive than juvenile mangos.
Lane, mutton and yellowtail snapper are more common in
the Keys than off our coast, but all these species are out there.
For anglers willing to run out far enough, red snapper can be
found starting in about 80 feet. As with most other bright red
fish, red snapper are really creatures of deep water, so deeper
water will hold more and larger fish. To get the fish feeding, a
chum block is always a good idea. Snapper are smart and will
often refuse a baited hook, but chum works on them a bit like
alcohol does on us: Their inhibitions are a bit lower and they're
easier to fool. Chum will also bring them nearer to the surface,
where you can use lighter tackle because there's less concern
about getting snagged on the bottom. Snapper will eat fish
but seem to prefer crustaceans. Sometimes its hard to get a
shrimp past all the bait stealers; in those cases, try a small crab.
Mangroves are common to about 3 pounds, and fish of over
10 pounds can be caught.Yellowtail are smaller at 1 to
2 pounds. Big yellowtail, called flags, start at about 3 pounds,
and 6 pounds is a monster. Lane snapper are even smaller,
mostly under a pound. Mutton snapper average bigger; 5 to
10 pounds is a good fish and 20 is possible. Most red snapper off
our coast are about the size of a mutton, though fish to
40 pounds are possible it'll just take you all day to get out that
far. In addition to these species, the rare cubera snapper can also
be found in our waters.This giant- up to 100 pounds-- is a
specialist, feeding mostly on crabs and spiny lobster.You've got to
really want one of these fish to use a whole lobster as bait


Greater amberjack are
punishing fish to catch. Typically large and endowed with great
strength and endurance, AJs are viewed by many anglers as a
test of stamina. Amberjack live over reefs and wrecks starting
at about 50 feet deep, with larger fish in deeper water. The big-
gest fish, over 100 pounds, are rarely seen in our area they
prefer deeper water than is out of easy reach on the Gulf coast
Still, a 30- to 50-pound amberjack will put up a major fight
Many anglers find that one AJ is about all they really want to
catch. These fish also come in smaller versions: Lesser amber-
jack, banded rudderfish and almaco jacks are very similar fish,
but in a 5- to 10-pound package. Amberjack will readily take
large live baits, or a dead bait that's been butterflied (with the
fillets cut free at the sides but left attached at the head end).
Vertical jigs will also take AJs. Commercial fishermen pursue
amberjack, which are a delightful table fish.


Several species of porgies (pronounced with a hard"g")
call this area home. Grass, knobbed, red and jolthead porgies
can be found on shallow and deep reefs off our coast Sheeps-
head are technically porgies as well. As with many other reef
species, juvenile porgies live inshore, either on the grassflats
or in the shelter of mangrove roots. Most bottom fishermen
welcome porgies these fish are just as good to eat as
snapper though few target them. The problem is getting
to the big ones, which prefer deeper water. Jolthead porgies


up to 3 or 4 pounds are fairly abundant in waters 50 feet deep
or less, and this species is the most desirable. Porgies are not
fish-eaters and bite best on shrimp or squid. As with other reef
fish, you need to get them off the bottom quickly or risk them
diving for cover and fouling the line.











White or Key West grunts are another reef fish that
is seldom the goal but rarely unwelcome. Grits and grunts,
a Florida Cracker favorite, makes good use of this fish's
excellent flaky white meat. As with porgies, grunts are not
fish-eaters and are usually caught on shrimp or squid. Most
white grunts will be a pound or so, though big ones can top
10 pounds. Margates are another grunt that you might
catch; they're good but not quite as good as a white grunt.
Other grunts are also found here blue-striped grunts,
pigfish, sailor's choice but these fish are mostly too
small for consumption. They do, however, make excellent
bait for any number of predatory species.


Gray triggerfish are also incidental
reef catches. With thick, leathery skin protecting all the goodness
inside, triggers are a challenge to anyone trying to clean them.
If you can find someone to show you the technique, its worth
learning the snowy meat is delicious. Triggerfish eat crabs,
sea urchins and other reef invertebrates, and will readily take
shrimp or squid. Their feeding style is similar to a sheepshead's


- crush, spit and pick- so hooking them can be a challenge.
Tough baits like squid or clam will hold the hook better and are
the best options if you want to bring a triggerfish to the boat
Triggers are usually about a pound or two, but big fish can get to
5 or 6 pounds.


If you poll true seafood aficionados on their favorite fish,
hogfish will be near the top of the list. A fish with little fear,
hogfish are often targeted by spearfishermen. In fact, more
are probably taken by spear than by hook and line. Hogfish
eat a variety of invertebrates, crushing them with the special
teeth in their bizarrely gigantic mouths. Shrimp is usually the
best bait for hogs. Most fish taken are small, about a pound,
but they can get much bigger. There are 20-pound fish out
there. Part of the reason big hogs are rarely seen is that they
usually live in depths beyond 100 feet, though some are
caught in water as shallow as 20 feet.


Popular with scuba divers, curious and fearless barracuda
have fewer friends in the angling community. Known for
their trick of chopping off the back half of a fish coming to the
boat,'cudas are a decent sport fish in their own right. Over the
reefs, barracuda are strong fighters. On the flats of the Keys,
they also are notorious for incredible jumps. Unfortunately,
'cudas are rarely caught on Southwest Florida flats. Enticing a
barracuda to strike can be a challenge. Movement and flash


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are the triggers. Try ripping a spoon or a brightly colored tube
lure rapidly across the water. Using the front half of a freshly
'cuda-snipped snapper works, but be aware this is illegal in
federal waters (reef fish can't be used as bait in these areas).
Wire leader is a requirement if you want to land these toothy
torpedoes.


Lionfish are an invasive exotic species
that has become very common in some areas, particularly the
Bahamas and Bermuda. Recently, juvenile lionfish have been
taken in the Gulf. These Pacific natives have no predators in
our area and insatiable appetites potentially a very bad
combination. They rarely take a baited hook but have no fear
of divers and are easily speared. They should be killed on sight.

PELAGIC SPECIES
These fish live in open water often very deep open
water. Deepwater species are not often caught near the coast
here. Unlike off South Florida where blue water is a mile or
two offshore, you have to get out over 100 miles to find truly
deep water off Southwest Florida.


King mackerel are a migratory fish of open waters. In
the spring, kingfish fanatics await the Spanish mackerel run,
because they know the kings will be just a few weeks behind
them. As with their smaller relatives, king mackerel are


fast-swimming fish eaters with teeth designed to slash a bait
neatly in two. Their method of attack is often to chomp off
the back half of a smaller fish, then turn and gobble the front
half as it starts to sink. That's why many kingfish anglers use
a stinger rig, which features a second hook in the bait's rear
half to nab a short-striking king. These fish are known for their
line-sizzling runs, and you'll need a reel with a quality drag.
Schools of smaller kingfish sometimes will follow baitfish
pods far up into the river mouths, but that's fairly rare occur-
rence. Most fish stay a mile or two off the beaches, but it's not
too rare for them to venture into the shallows. Anglers on the
Venice Municipal Pier catch kings regularly when the fish are
running. Trolling a lure or a rigged dead bait is a good way to
hook a kingfish, or drift a live blue runner or mullet. As with
other toothy fish, wire leaders are more or less mandatory.
Use diving birds to locate the fish for the most success.
Schooling kingfish range from 5 to 20 pounds; big fish of
up to 80 pounds are more solitary and sometimes patrol the
edges of a school of smaller fish.


Cero mackerel are an uncommon fish on the Gulf coast.
They look much like Spanish macks but are usually found
alone rather than in schools. Cero prey on small fish and
squid.You might catch one by accident while fishing near bait
schools. Cero average about 20 inches and can grow to 5 feet.


Wahoo are also in the
mackerel family, but are more of an open-ocean species.
They are not common catches off our coast because the


water is too shallow for their liking a run of 80 or 100
miles is required to get to their preferred depths. When
baitfish are schooling thickly in the Gulf, sometimes a
few wahoo will crash the party in water as shallow as 30
feet. Catching one can be tough. The same methods that
catch kingfish will catch wahoo, but you need a lot more
luck because there are fewer of them out there. Nearshore
wahoo are usually on the small side 30 pounds or less.
Big ones in the ocean depths can reach about 150 pounds.


Dolphin, or mahi mahi to avoid confusion with
Flipper, are another fish of open, deep waters. Juvenile
fish, called chicken dolphin, can be found in water as
shallow as 30 feet during the warm summer months.
These fish are usually tiny, though just a pound or
two. Chicken dolphin form thick schools, which become
looser as the fish mature. Eventually, once they reach
20 pounds or so, dolphin give up schooling altogether
and travel alone or in pairs. The fish may reach nearly
80 pounds. Maximum size is attained quickly these
fish grow fast and die young, with 4 years being a very
long life. Dolphin are drawn to almost any sort of float-
ing object weed lines, tree trunks, even your boat if
you drift long enough. If dolphin are present under flot-
sam, the golden flash from their metallic sides should
be easy to spot. Any small fish or shrimp will be eagerly
taken by schoolies. Once you hook one, the school will
usually stay with the hooked fish, enabling you to catch
a double- or triple-header if you've got people to man
the rods. Big fish are usually caught by trolling or drift-
ing. A good table fish. The intense golden-green color
of a freshly boated dolphin fades rapidly to grayish once
the fish is dead.


Bonito more accurately, little tunny
-are a hard-fighting small tun 1 .l [ will r,- lily i ii 1,j111 II
During spring and fall, these fish 1.ii l.11 ,.1 i n ii' Ii ii 1111I 111
down our coast in water as shallow rj I-- I ir-11- 11 i. i--
fish are notgiven the respectoth-r II I r Tiir r I, ii i-i'r
most anglers use tackle too heavy I ,r I ,Ii I, ri- illy 1IIl1- 1 II
scaled-down equipment, their si irr ii iiIl Ihi[. ii- I- IIii- I i iri-
apparent. Bonito are a good fly fil 1 Iji-.'-' i-, irli-I n l ri
ora fast-moving jig or spoon,will 'IiInr- 111 in i [l i 11, 11
Although edible, their flesh is dal -lr iiri nI.ii-r [II ji n nI
of their larger relatives.These quall I I I 1- 1 j I iiiii jr
baitfish for sharkanglers,and seE-lr- ,11.i l' iiiii-- wj[i-r .1 ii-
often rig tunny for trolling. Avera1- rn. injr .: i : i i :: "l- 1 j.1 I
they can reach nearly 30.


Our other small tuna, the blackfin ir r I irli irv r-1l Ijr' In-'
Blackfin tuna are usually found int I-,-I, -r l "ii inv I i i.-
farther inshore during bait runs. .iil1 1 Ii .1 ri i ij[,-r ji1 l-r
50feetis a rarity. As with other tuji i r l-vii j Jrn ii. ii-i
dencytoschool.When the fish ail-, r j.nil1 Ii l [l.I-y willii ,-t
hitjustaboutanythingin thewa'-r l[I -r uwii- [r iiiiii1 J1],il
imitation is a good method ofloc iniJ' 1 iI Ij I nr i 1i j r jIlri,- I-
as their legendary bigger relative. Iii. I n ,ir i iii r ,inj ri nli
on lighttackle. Heavy equipment wiiii "',-rI"' i.-r [i1ni iil. ]ly A
much better table fish than boni- Ii 1 i rni ir,- j1, I.... I' 11111
species. Most fish will be under I lPS11,, w11 h l 11111 nInii,
of about 40 pounds. Other tunas yellowfin bigeye iliI
bluefin -do live in the Gulf bu[ r r'-ly... ii- i[in ii ilin I Iii-
of the Southwest Florida coast.


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harm. When you're releasing a shark, if the hook won't come out 7 ing them vulnerable to commercial fishing. They aren't the
S easily cut the wire as short as possible. Many anglers tend to use rarest shark in Southwest Florida, but their numbers are


giant baits and hooks for sharks, butyou'll catch more fish on
smaller baits (no bigger than halfa pound) and smaller hooks
(6/0 to 10/0). By the way,"sand sharks"do not exist it's a lazy
angler's term for any shark caught on the beach.


[ rzr"'--


Sailfish are occasional summer visitors to our area. As
with other deepwater fish, pods of bait are the reason they
come near shore. Sails are infrequent catches in water less
than 100 feet deep but are sometimes taken by those seek-
ing kingfish with big live baits. Fish are sometimes caught
on the inside of Boca Grande Pass, which is technically in
Charlotte Harbor. Unfortunately, if you do catch one in the
Harbor, no one will ever believe you. Most Gulf sailfish are in
the 30- to 60-pound range, though fish over 100 pounds are
not unheard of. Although these fish can be eaten, they're
not normally a table fish. Bigger billfishes blue and
white marlin are even more rare in shallow water. If
you go out into the open Gulf, all three species are available
year-round in water deeper than 500 feet.

SHARKS & RAYS
Sharks are misunderstood predators which generate both
fear and fascination. These ancient fish have skeletons of carti-
lage instead of bone. Due to intensive overfishing, shark popula-
tions are in trouble around the world. Because of this pressure,
there are strict limits on recreational sharkers: All but a handful
of species have a 54-inch minimum limit (exclusions: blacktip,
blacknose, Atlantic sharpnose and bonnethead), and an angler
can keep only one shark per day. Sharks excrete urea through
their skin, and urea contamination can quickly ruin the meat
if the shark is poorly handled. If your shark is destined for the
grill, gut the fish and get the meat on ice as rapidly as possible.
Contrary to popular belief, sharkguts thrown overboard will not
scare away other sharks. Sharks'razor teeth will cut monofila-
ment instantly, so use wire leader. A shark's jaws are made of
dense, bone-like cartilage. Because of this, circle hooks can be
hard to remove from the bony jaw. However, many anglers tend
to gut-hook sharks if they use J-hooks. File off the barb of a
circle hook to produce a tool that will probably hook the fish in
the jaw but which can be removed without causing additional


Bull sharks are a fairly common species in Southwest
Florida. Unlike other sharks, bulls will often swim into pure fresh
water areas and can be caught far up the rivers. All sharks are
opportunistic feeders, but bull sharks are among the least selec-
tive. Because of this, their meat is bit gamey. Whole or cut mullet
or stingray make good bull shark bait Juvenile fish to about
40 inches are common inshore; bigger fish are more common in
the Gulf but can and do show up in the shallows. Common to
6 or 7 feet, big females can grow to 10 feet and 500 pounds.


Blacktip and spinner sharks are often confused. Both are
excellent gamefish, putting up a strong fish and often leaping
clear of the water. Both usually prey on smaller baitfish like sar-
dines and herring. And both are very good eating fish.You need
to know two differences: First, only a spinner shark has black
tips on all the fins, including the anal fin. Second, while blacktip
sharks have no minimum size, spinners must be 54 inches to
keep. Blacktips average 4 or 5 feet and 40 to 50 pounds; spinners
average about 6 feet and 100 pounds.


Blacknose sharks ijr,
small, averaging about 30 inches and growing to
4 feet and about 40 pounds. They often gather in schools, and
these schools are often found associated with pods of baitfish
in water less than 30 feet deep. The tip of the snout is dusky,
making it easy to distinguish from other inshore sharks. Black-
nose sharks are an excellent target for light-tackle anglers.


Lemon sharks are protected from harvest, because
they school in winter on nearshore reefs and ledges, mak-


. _-.-; -- .> -, fewer than they should be. Lemon sharks are often seen in
- shallow water on the grassflats, where they pursue their
favored prey, mullet. These sharks commonly attain 8 feet
or longer and can grow to 400 pounds.


Nurse sharks are rarely sought by anglers because
of their sluggish fight a bit like a waterlogged tree
trunk. They will scavenge, but their main diet is crabs and
lobster. Here's a clue: Any fish that mostly eats crustaceans
is going to be an excellent table fish, and nurse sharks
are no exception. Crabs and lobster are most common on
reefs; therefore, so are nurse sharks. These are big fish,
averaging 7 to 9 feet and 150 to 220 pounds.


Our most common shark, the bonnethead
or shovelnose, is often confused with a juvenile
hammerhead. Bonnetheads have a much more rounded
snout profile, though. Most bonnetheads are under
4 feet long and weigh less than 15 pounds. These little
guys specialize in eating shrimp and crabs, though they
will take what they can get. As with other crustacean
feeders, the meat is excellent.


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FRESHWATER SPECIES
The rivers that feed Charlotte Harbor are also full of fish.
In addition to the rivers, there are many miles of freshwater
canals and thousands of small ponds (though only a few
," "larger lakes) in our area. All of these places are home to
numerous gamefish.
-'Ill .-


nl Gulf toadfsh1
is sometimes caught on shrimp or pieces
of shrimp fished around pilings, usually by anglers trying to
catch sheepshead or pinfish. This fish has a big, scary-looking
mouth full of sharp teeth but is otherwise harmless. They can
be eaten, but there's not really enough meat to bother with.
Lizardfish are
common on sandy
bottoms and will take
a hook baited with
shrimp or cutbait.
Usually under a foot
long, lizardfish sho 1ill
be handled carefully
- their nu-
merous teeth
merous teeth Two lizardfish
are sharp like caught on the
tiny needles. same hook
Inedible.


Southern puffers often steal baits
meant for other fish. These common fish love shrimp and will
sometimes take lures or flies that look like shrimp. They are
also aggressive and will attack baits out of meanness. Be care-
ful dehooking them; their buck teeth can easily cut through
bone. Puffers are usually 10 inches or less but can get twice
that size. The flesh is prized in some cultures but the internal
organs are toxic, so it's best to not to eat these fish.


Porcupinefish and cowfish don't often take a
hook, but are sometimes seen dead on the shore. These fish
are highly susceptible to red tide, which sometimes kills them
by the thousands. Both species are sometimes dried and sold
as beachfront souvenirs.


Planeheadfilefish are common in
Lemon Bay and are sometimes caughton pieces of shrimp or in
castnets. They are rarely larger than 8 inches and have no sport
or food value.


Atlantic spadefish are sometimes mistaken for sheeps-
head because they have a similar pattern. Unlike sheepies,
though, spadefish have little food value and are usually caught
by accident Spadefish form schools of several hundred fish. They
will sometimes take a shrimp, but their main diet is tiny inverte-
brates, sponges,jellyfish tentacles and plankton. Spadefish usually
are less than a pound, but fish over 5 pounds are sometimes seen.


The guitarfish looks like a cross between a ray and a
shark. These odd fish are sometimes caught by anglers in the
surf, usually on shrimp. They get to about 3 feet long and have
no sport or food value.


Moray eels are sometimes caught by reef fishermen using
cutbait for grouper or snapper. Morays have slimy skins, sharp
teeth and snappish personalities, so if you hook one it's best to
just cut the line as close to the hook as you can.


American eels were once common in local
estuaries and river mouths but are now quite uncommon.
They will occasionally take a bait fished on the bottom.
Although edible, they should be released due to their rarity.


Largemouth bass, the largest members of the
sunfish family, were once Florida's claim to fishing fame.
Long before saltwater angling was a popular pastime,
Florida-strain bass (we have our own subspecies, which
grows bigger and faster than northern bass) were draw-
ing anglers from around the country and around the
world. Although the descendents of these fish have been
stocked in waters all over the globe, Florida bass fishing
is still first-rate. Central Florida boasts a number of large
lakes where fast boats are the norm. In our part of the
state, most bass fishing is a bit more relaxed, because we
don't have lakes like that. Still, even ponds of less than
an acre can hold bass of surprisingly large size. More
than one angler fishing a neighborhood water feature
has caught a fish of over 10 pounds, and you could be
next. An average catch is more like 1 or 2 pounds. Bass
feed on a huge variety of aquatic life crayfish, frogs,
small water snakes, fish and even ducklings are part of
their diets. Plastic worms are a favorite bait, and in our
tannin-stained waters dark colors work best (purple is a
killer). Spinnerbaits and topwater plugs are also favorite
lures. For livebaiters, golden shiners are the standard.
Small sunfish also are good bait (to stay legal, you have
to catch your own on hook and line), as are crayfish.
Although bass are edible, their flesh often has a muddy
flavor. If you want to eat freshwater fish, the next species
is a better bet.


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Black crappie, known locally as speckled perch or just
specks, are probably the best-eating freshwater fish in our
area. The mild white flesh has earned them the name sac
au lait (sack of milk) in Louisiana. Unlike most other sunfish,
crappie prefer cooler water, which is why the peak fishing
season is the middle of winter. When it's warmer, they can
still be caught it's a matter of finding the deepest spots,
where the water is coolest. Specks are dedicated predators of
smaller fish and rarely take other baits, though they can be
caught on minnow-imitating lures. The basic method is to tie
on a jighead or feather jig and put a minnow on the hook. This
is often fished on a long cane pole, and sometimes crappie
anglers on larger lakes like Okeechobee will have dozens of
rods bristling out all around the boat. Big ones (they can get
to over 2 pounds) sometimes take crankbaits meant for bass.
Crappie are narrow-bodied fish and are difficult to fillet with-
out wasting a lot of meat, so most fish are scaled, beheaded,
gutted and defined (in that order), then battered or dusted
with flour and fried whole. Eating around the bones is a pain,
but that's the way it's done.


There are several more smaller members of the sunfish fam-
ily in our waters bluegill, redears (shellcracker), spotted
sunfish and warmouth. Most of these fish are hand-size or


J Redear(shelkracker) .

sinaller, bu ilhey lldke
up for small size with their willingness to bite. They will take
most small baits, including waxworms, grass shrimp, chunks of
nightcrawler and minnows. Bluegills are the most common, and
the most aggressive feeders. Bluegills are also the most likely to
be caught on artificial lures; they readily attack small spinner-
baits, flyrod poppers and even miniature


Pickerel, a miniature version of the northern pike, are
popular sportfish that are strangely uncommon in this
area. Despite being plentiful both to our north and south,
pickerel are a rare catch here. In areas where they live, they
are often caught by bass anglers using small lures in or near
vegetation. Pickerel are ambush predators, hiding in tangles
of plants and darting out to grab small fish swimming by.
They're good to eat but very bony, so they're usually released.


versions of popular hardbaits.
Small soft plastic grubs will take bluegills also, and these"qui-
eter"lures are also eaten by the other species. Though less eager
to hit an artificial, shellcrackers pull harder. To tell shellcrackers
and bluegills apart, look for a coppery patch on the forehead (a
feature of adult male bluegill) or a red


edge to the flap on the gill cover
(on most, but not all, shellcrackers). Spotted sunfish are smaller
and have distinctive coloration, very different from their cousins.
Warmouth are even easier to identify, with their much larger
mouths and stocky bodies. There are no rock bass in Florida; their
niche is filled by the warmouth. As with crappie, all of these fish
are usually prepared whole.


Gar and bowfin are members of an ancient group of
fishes, which explains their primitive appearance. These fish
can survive in stagnant, polluted waters that would be fatal to
most other
species. .
Aggressive Bowfin
predators
ofsmaller
fish, gar
are the
bane of i
many
bass
fishermen because they grab
their shiners and kill them. Gar are hard to hook because of


their bony mouths, but they a ri- il Irn-iuli-n[, ijllia
Although many anglers call thtir I. 1jii- iiiiiJ[ir 'i jr [Il ii
is a species of the Mississippi niv r Ir iin ji ii- i.ii -- iri-
none here. We have Florida gar i. Ir, l y 1ii J ri- lin-1 ly
short snout; grows to about 3',1 1 i ni J I i 1 jl .i11 r
gar (more slender with a lone "ii. ii n- r n ii- irly i.
feet). Bowfin,also called mucirili ii.i vi- iin rihiii.
diets and often take lures meal I.r 1,r il -[.i.l- Ii.-ini
looked down on by many, bo\irn jr- [i-i r ....,r njirii-r.
and much more entertaining"n ii ii.- Iiiii ih n I ii .I iih-
same size.


In many parts ofth -. .i.ir y freshwater
catfish are a favorite angling [ IA-W. I- r 'iniii-1i iir
choice here and catfish are ofi ,n .iiv rii.il.-i I .iiij[ i-
bewhiskered fish are plentiful Jl ilJrvl White Ji. I
channel catfish are both silvry'v .r ,Jr i jyil jl Ijr-
common in the freshwater se' [ii,.. I il-r F'-. ,. Mly iI 1
and Caloosahatchee rivers. Yellow iiIn brown bullheads
are a bit smaller and darker ir .,I,,r jll.i All iiri IiI-
best at night or on overcast d ayv PK' J[ [ii [ii II riniill
are used to draw catfish, whi(hi inii Iv .ii *i...i.iii.nn-
anglers use baits that are rott.i ,,r iii[nrl iii i i -
baits that are fresher will wonr I-.[ -r Ir.,,, I ., i .
include chicken livers, smelly, I.n-.-- I.- 1l lin.llil 1
prepared blood baits.

EXOTIC FRESHWATER FISH
Our warm waters are an invill ii il lii ii r i ijii inii.-r
of nonnative fish, most of wh .ii u.-r.- Iinlii. -I li
accident (fish farm ponds beiij., iin I. I nl I.I.ii lin 1 1 r
into other waters) or through J[ i ni- ini ii l.- iir'jr in r
Some are also the descended' ,nI ii n.J r rI iI rr.lj-i1
by thoughtless owners.


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Solutions to your fishing problems


Various African and South American cichlids have made
themselves at home in southern Florida. In Southwest Florida,
the most common of these is the blue tilapia. If you see the
bottom of a freshwater pond or canal pockmarked by pits 2 to
3 feet wide, tilapia are the probable cause those are their
nests. Although sunfish also nest this way, tilapia nests are
usually spaced closely together. Tilapia eat a lot of plant material
(in fact, they were intentionally released as vegetation control)
but will also take meaty foods at least sometimes. They can be
caught on breadballs and worms, and sometimes will hit an ar-
tificial lure or small dark fly. These fish are delicious, and fisheries
managers would like you to kill every one you catch. In fact, live
release of this or most other exotic fish is technically illegal.


Some anglers who have heard of the incredible peacock
bass fishery in Florida are disappointed to learn that there are
none in this area. Before the state stocked these fish to control
other exotic species, they carefully evaluated the potential for
them to spread beyond the Miami-Dade area. Peacocks die in
water colder than 62 degrees, so these amazing gamefish can't
survive here. It's worth the trip, though. Heck, back when you
had to go to Venezuela for peacocks it was still worth the trip.


Another interloper that is probably not going to spread this far
north is the much-villified snakehead. These fish are aggressive
predators, but aren't nearly as bad as the media reports form a few
years back made them out to be. Fish or fish-imitating lures are the
best way to catch them. Snakeheads, which ended up here because
they are sold live in some Asian markets, are delicious on the table.


Mayan cichlids, a brightly colored and aggressive fish,
were common in Charlotte County canals until the lengthy
freezes of a couple years ago killed most of them off. There
are still huge populations of this species in Lee and Collier
counties, and a few that the freezes spared locally. It's only
a matter of time before this is a common fish here again.
Mayans will hit almost any small lure and also like worms
and small fish. They are much stronger fighters than native
panfish of similar size. Many cichlids oscars, black
acara, jaguar guapote, Midas cichlids, spotted tilapia
and a whole host of other species are common in the
canals of the Everglades and Miami-Dade County. All are
cold-sensitive, and our regular winter chill is probably suf-
ficient to keep these fish from becoming established here.


Grass carp are the
largest fish you're likely to find in freshwater canals. These fish,
which are triploid (sterile), are stocked intentionally in public waters
to reduce vegetation overgrowth. There no point in keeping them,
since they taste terrible,and it's illegal anyway.

That'salotofinformation, butthere's alot moretobesaid
about each ofthese fish species. To learn more about the fishes of
Southwest Florida, read WaterLine every week. If WaterLine doesn't
come in your newspaper, call 941-206-1000 to subscribe.


Some of the challenges an angler faces are tough
to solve. Others have simple answers. Here are some
very common troubles and how to resolve them.

Problem: I can't find fish.
Solution: Know your quarry. Gamefish are preda-
tors and need places to ambush bait. Inshore, look
for oyster bars, potholes on the grassflats, deeper
cuts, and other places where an obstruction or
sudden change in water depth creates an ambush
point. The fish will attack bait as the tide carries
it past. If the tide isn't moving, the fish probably
won't be biting. Offshore, finding structure is the
key. Not all structure is created equal. If you're not
into fish soon, move to another spot. Always keep
an eye out for diving birds this is an excellent
indicator of a fishy feeding frenzy just below.

Problem: I found the fish, but they won't bite.
Solution: Feed them what they're eating. If
they're attacking shrimp, you need a shrimp, or
something the fish will mistake for one. If they're
eating scaled sardines, you need to imitate that. If
that doesn't work, something completely different
will sometimes draw a curiosity strike. If the fish
aren't actively feeding, try a little chum slick to get
them going, or toss out some fresh-cut baitfish
or shrimp chunks. Sometimes nothing works -
that's why it's called fishing, not catching.

Problem: My line keeps breaking.
Solution: How old is it? Monofilament doesn't
last forever and should be replaced every couple
years. How tight is your drag? Some guys want to
crank it down way too tight so the fish won't "get
away."That's not what your drag is for if it
was meant to be cranked down, they'd just make
reels with no drag system at all. Dial back your
drag so the fish can take a little line; otherwise,
you're putting undue strain on the line.

Problem: The hook falls out.
Solution: Oversized or undersized hooks could be
the culprit. Your hookset could also be at fault You
don't need to put your entire weight behind setting


the hook on a redfish. If
you rip a hole in the fish's
lip, the hook won't stay in.


When the fish
are keying in on
shrimp, give them
something that
looks like a shrimp.


Problem: All I ever catch is catfish.
Solution: That's probably because you're fishing
for catfish. For you to catch a redfish, you have
to fish where the redfish are and throw a bait
the redfish want to eat. If you're soaking a dead
shrimp on the bottom in your backyard canal
- prime catfish food in a prime catfish area -
then you're catching what you're fishing for. If you
want to catch something else, you'll have to try
something else. Unless you see baitfish or shrimp
in your canal, you'll need to look for a new fishing
spot. If you do have bait, try throwing an artificial
lure that looks like the baits you see.

Problem: My arms are really, really tired
from catching too many fish.
Solution: Switch from WaterLine to another
outdoor publication. You're obviously learning
too much about local fishing. Save a few fish for
someone else to catch.

Any other questions? Send them to
waterlineweekly@gmail.com, and read WaterLine
every week to learn the answers and much more
about outdoor recreation in Southwest Florida.


,owissrtf--






in i i o
*44"6 o Etmf~im


WATERLINE PHOTOS BY JOSH OLIVE
This skiff is built for running skinny water on the flats.


Am


Here in Southwest Florida, we are
blessed with the best boating waters
in the world. What makes this area so
ideal for watercraft?
It's always boating season there's
no harsh winter forcing you to put your
boat into storage for several months
because all the water has turned to ice.
Cold fronts do come through, bringing
temporary chills, but there's usually very
comfortable weather between them.
The Gulf is usually a relatively
calm body of water. Sarasota Bay and
Charlotte Harbor are usually calmer
still, because they are protected
L. from the Gulf's swells by the
chain of barrier islands
that runs along our
coastline.


Although a large percentage of the
local population are boaters, you can
usually find seclusion if you want it.
With the huge number of small islands
just a short boat ride away, having
your own private beach at least for
a while can be a reality for anyone
with a watercraft.
The water is mostly rock-free and soft.
The worst damage you're likely to do if
you run aground is to sand a bit of paint
off your bottom and jostle your passen-
gers. In many other popular boating
waters, running aground means a good
chance of punching a boulder through
the hull.
Our
subtropical
paradise ,AM


is alive with an extraordinary array of
marine life. Dolphins, manatees, seas
turtles, thousands of water birds and
hundreds of species of fishes all call
this area home at least part of the year.
People who live elsewhere see this kind
of thing at a public aquarium or on
The Discovery Channel. We have it 10
minutes from the boat ramp.
With all of these good reasons to be
a part of the Southwest Florida boating
lifestyle, I'm surprised you're still
reading this you should be running
out to buy a boat. But before you do,
it's important to look at the different
types of boats out there. There are
some things you need to consider
about how you'll be using your boat.
Are you going to mostly use your


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boat to get you to the best fishing spots or for
cruising along the beach? Do you want to fish
inshore, offshore or both? Will your wife be
accompanying you? Does she fish, or does she
prefer to sunbathe and read? Will the kids (or
grandkids) want you to tow a wakeboard?
There are boats built to serve a specific purpose
- a tunnel-hull flats skiff, for example, is made
just for fishing in skinny water. It's understood
that you'll be sacrificing some comfort and
features to have the ability to go where other
boats just can't. Other vessels are multipurpose.
These Jack-of-all-trades boats have become
very popular lately, as families that might have
a couple boats in a more robust economy have
pared back to just one.
Most boats sold for use in salt water are
made of fiberglass, though some manufacturers
use aluminum. A handful of companies make
aluminum-hulled flats skiffs for marine use. Most
pontoon boats use aluminum, but aluminum
boats built for lake use are not recommended
for a marine environment. 'Glass is more or
less impervious to the elements, though the
gelcoat does require regular maintenance to
prevent oxidation. Fiberglass is also tougher
than aluminum and will stand up better to use in
choppy water.
If flats fishing is your thing, a tunnel-hulled
vessel may fit the bill. These boats have a divided
hull similar to a catamaran, but the space
between them is smaller. The idea is to use the
boat's forward speed to ram air into the tunnel
between the hulls, lifting the boat a bit and


1 L^^^ ^f-I ,- =-^^


OUTBOARD OR INBOARD?
Marine engines use water for coolant. The coolant water is pumped
from whatever the boat is floating in. That means a boat sitting in salt
water is using salt water for coolant. Coolant water is heated as it's
pumped through the engine. So a boat with an inboard on Charlotte
Harbor uses hot salt water for coolant, and the hot salt water flows
through the engine, where it can cause corrosion problems in many
places. Without regular maintenance meaning frequent replace-
ment o:,f :crroded: metal part an inboard enriine uced in calt later
i:an easily be di, atbled and fail due toi after leal irin into:' the h :':nibtuC-
ir:rn :hannitier An ,:uibtiarid engine ic a far teller i:h:.i:e. in large parr
because iu.hinig after ea,:h uce irth a inmple garden hnic:'e 1vill jd
niui'h to IPep l:o:rr ci: n in ,i:he.t Allthough nany niaiufa,:iurer tbuild
quality outboardc, aniaha ha an urinurpaced repurtatihn for djependi-
abilrty in niarinne :o:riitio:ri


lessening the draft. Some vessels of this type ,... = /JHo=.
can run at speed in water a couple Inches deep. -_ -
In places where other boats would just churn chPontoon boat are a vermily poutingsular
mud, a tunnel hull skims above the seagrass. This
enables anglers to get into the deep backcountry
to find hidden fishing spots. Once the boat slows,
the ram-air effect goes away and 4 of 5 Inches
of water are needed to float. Boats of this type ~
* usually have other features flats anglers demand:
MS Poling platforms, flat decks for ease of casting and -
E fish fighting, and below-deck storage to keep the
deck clear. What these boats don't have: Space for
-----90-R-


This



Could Be


YOU! I

Captain Mike Deto
over 31 Years Fishing The Gulf Waters


941-468-4845

IAYBREAKER OFFSHORE CHARTERS
1271 Beach Rd., Englewood, FL
www.DayBreakerCharterFishing.com MDETO@Verizon.net


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multiple passengers, a head (that's nautical-
speak for rest room), and big boomin'stereos.
Deck boats appeal more to families and
the partying crowd. These vessels have lots of
passenger room, usually in the form of comfy
padded seating. Although these boats have a
deeper draft than a dedicated flats skiff, they'll
still float in pretty shallow water usually
anything more than 12 to 14 inches deep.
These make good all-purpose vessels, and are
easily optioned for fishing with rod holders
and livewells. Larger models often include the
most important feature for many women -
an enclosed potty. Guys, laugh if you want, but
for women it's a deal-breaker if they have to
go over the side (OK most women). With
room for a cooler, a couple of friends and some
rockin'tunes, a deck boat is sort of a pontoon
boat minus the nerd factor.
Speaking of pontoon boats, if you can get
past their stodgy reputation, they can actu-


ally be a lot of fun. The main strike against
them: They're slow. If getting there fast isn't
a priority, this may be your boat. A pontoon
boat is basically a floating porch, with plenty
of space for lounging and relaxing. These are
a great choice for younger kids, because the
experience is much gentler.
On the other hand, if you're all about speed,
there are some incredibly fast boats on the
market. Some utilize outboard engines, but
most are built with twin inboards. This makes
maintenance more of a chore (see "Outboard
or inboard?"). Most owners of go-fast boats
pay someone else to take care of that, for the
same reason that few Ferrari owners tinker
with their engines: These are expensive and
very complicated machines.
In the protected backwaters, small boats
can travel safely in good weather. On the open
Gulf, though, small craft are at risk regardless
of the forecast. Although there are days when


the water is flat calm and you could take your
flat-bottomed jon boat right out Boca Grande
Pass, that's a bad plan. If you take on water,
you're sitting in a metal tub that can easily
sink. Local weather conditions are not the only
factor controlling sea conditions though the
surface may be glassy, swells can begin suddenly.
Forecasts are not always accurate (actually, are
they ever?), and wind can come from seemingly
nowhere. Also, small boats rarely carry visual
distress signals or a VHF radio, two absolute
requirements for venturing onto big water.
If you know you'll be tempted to go out into
the Gulf, you should plan your boat purchase
accordingly. An 18-foot center console will cost
less than the 24-foot model, but the bigger
boat is much safer in Gulf conditions. Condi-
tions can deteriorate quickly, especially if you
misjudge the speed of an approaching storm
or run afoul of the weather some other way.
Don't compromise too much on this point if


your boat's not big enough for the Gulf, it's not
worth risking your life for a few grouper fillets.
Vessels designed for offshore sport fishing are
sometimes overkill in this area. Unless you plan
to make frequent long trips either 80-plus
miles offshore or down to the Keys you prob-
ably don't need a boat meant for marlin fishing.
Of course, these large sportfishers are status
symbols for many, and if that's what you need
there's nothing wrong with it.
You have a lot of different boat options avail-
able to you. Whether you're looking for your first
vessel or want to upgrade your current boat,
the best way to decide is simple: Talk to your
local dealer about your boating needs and take
a test ride or two. The most important thing is
that you get out on the water and start enjoying
it. After all, Southwest Florida's waterways are
among the best in the world.
It would be a shame to live so close and still
miss out.


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* BIMINI TOP: The Florida sun is relentless. If your boat didn't come with T-top
or hard top, you'll either need a Bimini, stock in a suncreen company or a bright
light for all the nighttime boating you'll be doing.
* BOAT COVER: Used to protect your boat from rain, sun and damage while
towing or storing.
* SWIM LADDER: Unless you're very fit, it's not easy to swing yourself up over
the side, even if you have low gunwales. Also useful if you ever find yourself
overboard unintentionally.
* VHF RADIO: Your cell phone is not a marine communications device and
will not work more than a few miles out to sea. A VHF unit is necessary for Gulf
boaters and a very good idea for inshore.
* GPS: Navigation has progressed from a chart and compass to these little all-in-
one devices. Makes navigation a breeze, but it's a good idea to have a chart and
compass in case your GPS fails.
* FISHFINDER/DEPTHFINDER: Some do one or the other; some do both. Very
useful for knowing exactly how much water is under your hull (never give full
trust to a chart) and for finding those little grouper honeyholes.
* SKI TOWER: Connects the skier to the boat at a much better angle than the old
rope-tied-to-the-stern method you grew up with.
* STEREO: Marine stereo components have come a long way over the past
decade and now sound as good as your car or home equipment. Be sure to get
one with a MP3 player input so you'll never run out of music.
* TROLLING MOTOR: A battery-powered motor with limited thrust. Used to
operate the boat at slow speeds when it's important to be quiet and not spook fish.


Diesel

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SER VI^fBA


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So 6 OWnQ E Illo i o


Who needs a boating safety program?


Big cruisers like this are perfect
for offshore use and offer all the
comforts of home but are limited
in where they can go in the shallow
Harbor.














I 'j "


Boating is a lot of fun, but it can also be a dangerous
pastime. According to the Recreational Boating Statis-
tics 2009 report produced by U.S. Coast Guard's Office
of Auxiliary and Boating Safety, in that year there were
4,730 recreational boating accidents resulting in 736
deaths, 3,358 injuries and approximately $36 million in
property damage.
Operator inattention or inexperience, excessive speed,
improper lookout and alcohol consumption rank as the top
five contributing factors to recreational boating accidents.
Alcohol consumption is listed as the leading contributing
factor in 16 percent of boating related fatalities.
Of particular importance, 86 percent of boating
accident fatalities occurred on boats where the operator
reportedly had not received boating safety instruction.
"The data in the 2009 publication echoes the message
that life jacket wear is critical"says Rear Admiral Kevin Cook,
the Coast Guard's director of prevention policy. "Nearly 75
percent of the 736 people who died in boating accidents in
2009 drowned, and 84 percent of those victims reportedly
were not wearing a life jacket. The two most important
things boaters can do to prevent the loss of life is to wear a
life jacket and take a boater education program:'
How much do you know about Florida boating laws and
responsibilities? Take the following quiz. All answers are
either true or false. If you get all of them right, congratula-
tions! If you don't know the answers, you need to take a
boating safety course. (Answers at the end of this column.)
1. In order to rent a PWC, you must be at least 14 years old
and have a safe boating card.
2. When you buy a fire extinguisher for your boat, it must
be a type C fire extinguisher.
3 .You are allowed to tie up your boat to a lateral marker.
4. If you were born on or after January 1,1988, you must
have a safe boating card to operate a boat with a motor of 10
horsepower or greater.
5. Passengers riding on your boat are allowed to ride on
the bow of the boat.
6. When you see a diver-down flag on a boat, you must
stay at least 50 feet away from that boat.
7. The Certificate of Registration must be on board your


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boat and available for inspection by an enforcement officer
whenever the boat is operated.
8. You must have an observer on board your boat to tow a
water skier.
9. Anyone under the age of 21 with a breath alcohol level
of 0.02 can be charged with BUI.
10. All children under the age of 10 must wear a life jacket
when your boat is underway and is less than 26 feet.
How many do you think you got right? If you need to
take a boating safety course, the Coast Guard Auxiliary
can help you. The Auxiliary offers a number of boating
programs that will teach you all you need to know to be a
safe boater. Boating safety programs are a valuable tool
in learning how to safely operate your vessel as well as
learning the state and federal requirements. For more
information visit http://bit.ly/IKGICh. The U.S. Power
Squadrons also offer boating safety courses.
As always, be safe out there and I'll see you on the water.
Dave Nielsen is a safe boating instructor and vessel exam-
iner for the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Englewood Flotilla, and the
Peace River Sail and Power Squadron, Punta Gorda. Contact
him at dc.nielsen@hotmail.com.

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VENICEJETTIES" ir. I,,.,i Lj -" S
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SHEEPIESONTHEROCKS -r--II -rrCreek

r.. ,,,,OKOM IS ...... ........... .

S Rob rts C Creek

DO I NEED A LICENSE TO FISH'


l""J I"i'"i iv-1 i 1 l'.i ..r-l.lif iH t i I. i i.rIHuilli iii jieticate. 6li5 litt- P O R T C H A R IIOn
"hy., ,,,lr yr. \Jll l,'r ,1 i ,l 1 r'l1. i, I l.-, ,llr it luial Arlin -.1iiul .. the United States, youn
SHEEPIES ON THE ROCKS- i- o Piii ir ,i- .i ii, i ilej iii ii l, -111111 i iiupon 9r ,Ilie [111- 1 I1 i iliire-Ii i ii
ri ii.ii .i -r ' EN ICEI 30 H A RBO RVIE
rri r. ,ii hIf you fit one of these exemptions, you don't need a license:r anglers: 4f/4




i r i- .. A ii.i ,.i .. r i r i ie I.-iii0i i ii ri -av r.re I 0 ii.iii t1ri iceonyourhomesteadiI ioritheihomesteadtofyour h 4/A I
4, Unite d. ni I| i.iiii-nir I i i i r it v r a minor child fishing on the homestead of your par-you -




S,, >, ,, l,, |r.-isw al i, a 11 ,,, t 20 acre s or less which is located entirely within the --
Sr1 i ,i t" 1 ii rii t i iiiiiJ i nir y ithin the property lines of the owner and with nioI I ii ri y Iii r I 1S ui j l b ait, using poles or lines that o
,i :lNUDESUNBATHERS- l e-< iv ,l .i.-i r Ill : I ,: il i-,l11- ,iii. :hanism, and you are fishing for
BIG FISH FROM SHORE i, SOUeTH I II II I I ,rIin I.l Il II piod of 20 acrweveryou must have valid h
i-irivort[1111 Ill l r Ii rtb Ii-lly iiiv 11 i l Iii ii Trii management area. This does not apply www
l i ,i i r.,.VENICEii... r .,rp, iii .-ell:n iilister, crabsor shrill Fishing License. Poinp.

S* i during Free Fishing Weekend (the irst weekend of April). TT



rA E ..r.. ...R..Dk 77 (A Ir The following exemptirpons apply only freshwater anglers: S
,,II ,r v ,I r i hfrom avesseltheoperatorofwhic on your homestead orthe homestead of your




l 1 i I I a minor child fishioe ng on the homestead of your pa ro
0 i 'llJir l,1r i -hl l Id 20 acres or less which is located entirely within th pier saltwater fishing license
S A fish pond is a man-made pond constructed for the .srearv




lajrle' l l:\ I u t1 ,e r n nvr, -ly outhin the property lleines of the owner and with no srli, T SHALLO S
H tGR Ir i. *o ,- ri . ,h ni,, , IIt pond of 20 acres or more, whose owner has purchased a fish pond ixed to land who has been Little
.I | ^ ,,u r o ro ,h, it p, ,, er surface acre. Tarr p n m. I i .u



N E ,, , I ,i ~, dent Freshwater Commercial Fishing License. Pointcaid Proram by



| || li ,Ir, r ( Departmentsnookredshofand.sChildreneafandtpiFamilyernSeI during Free Fishing Weekend (the first weekend of April). u Creek i
il,r I,,ii-III r,,l Irom a for-hire vessel (guide, charter, party boat) that has a valid vessel license. ii


n Fr ak s p, J ef Tisis n a c r from a vessel, the operator of which has a valid vessel license iHe a i th Cre A inirin mut be
p~t f the oM operator of the vessel.seD,
e.ou fish for recreational purposes from a pier with a valid pier saltwater fishing license.. J BEAN
d a ng lYou have a valid saltwater products license.If










You fish for mullet in fresh water and you have a valid Florida freshwater fishing li
THE GRASS IS GREENER You are a resident who is saltwater fishing from land or a structure fixed to land who has been Myak j ( Little
iiiiii l iiidetermined eligible for the food stamp, temporary cash assistance, or Medicaid Program by the o wl sair warer can baby
nI h.r iqrj AIinrti,,rie ,r, Department of Children and Family Services. Proof of identification and a benefit issuance orrd but II can ..








i .-h c i l,,iri r h \J rii hi r i I r w WINTER HAVEN: Dur
program identification card issued by DCFS or the Agency for Health Care Administration must be prbler,, I,,r ,,,,, I,




-o jll_ jll, o" -_ SA ROAD_ 77n your person when fishing. aut the cool ,
S. ,,rii.Formore information on fishing licenses, visit www.MyFWC.com/license. N E
NGLWO LIVE THE LEGEND: The ElJobean bride
dO? H POMPANO'Thp Aintqr j. I.,,nI r,, rI lr,, 11, I 1 I&,,ID EH L
Cck ree reek ,, ,,. ,.. C"






The boys at Fishin Frank's, Jeff This is a mapr, not a chart. ., ,. r
S DO NOT USE IT FOR NAVI- SHOAL WATERS th ..
knowledgeableanglerscontrib GATION PURPOSES. If you Gorda
S outed with the Punta Gorda 20-F T Isles forwarmth.


DONTGETRUNOVER'. .in rr,," m COSTA\ FLOW-, i ,,',,






andbI m M In T oill,,i r lhi.,ll^llv m hor \el rlll m t,- l i m-S \,m o. J^' ra inuyr,,,t
it\gether on this map' That's becausePareas / r> -""^1' l




paAi icii (,, ,, .I rpa ii.- -i t n, ,usu ally : pe .,,,,,,, THrR AMIGOS: YouI' tE T
Kici at Capt.MieMerad'serackl DO NOT USE IT FOR NAVI- SHOAL WATERS.- .... u h il1 f
Capt. Mike Myers and several cangoeith-r,--. 1r
uted to this map. Thanks, guys! ignore this warning, you rill ......... I, j 20-F00T HOLE ir1,r ll :
do so at your own peril.
.h -Y POND FISHING:Someof theponds j,.


nr-.---- r. .....lrl ,,,I,.,__r__ .Ir. _,


OR FRESH? ii, a n r. ,,n i rPo, 1
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r- -,1 irar i rr ll, Iri r., a*ilrl
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Live Oak

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SGORDAN

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Black Island A






Wa444 rco M E mnnf6 HWi4UiIU6QE flU o
CAPT ED KOPP


Boat ownership can be a pain.
Consider the cost of maintaining a boat
and trailer, not to mention the time and
effort it takes to fuel your boat at a gas
station, and fighting the crowds and
parking at the few decent boat ramps
that are available. Then, you have to
take the boat home and wash it, flush
the motor if you know how to, rinse off
the salt from the trailer and its systems.
Repeatedly dunking your expensive
metal trailer in salt water will surely ruin
it within a couple of years. If you are a
seasonal boater, you will have to throw
a tarp over it, park it someplace on a
trailer while you are gone, and hope it
starts OK when you come back.
I don't mean to put such a negative
spin on an activity a lot of us enjoy, but
we've got to face reality. However, there
is another option a way to make
owning a boat much less a of hassle:
Marina storage.
I talk a lot about the benefits of
keeping your boat at a marina. This
is because I sincerely believe that the
benefits of keeping your boat out of
the salt water and protected from the
elements, yet available for you to use at
short notice, is the absolute best way to
enjoy your boat. Marina storage can pay
for itself in the long run, because boats
that are kept in a protected building stay
in much better condition than a trailered
or lift-kept boats and therefore have
a higher resale value. Boats that are
kept in a marina tend to be maintained
better due to the convenience of having
onsite servicing and detailing. For part-
time residents, marina-kept boats are
summerized properly when they are put
away for the off season. It is also great


a I


ADVANTAGES OF I


g IVO


Ii


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will~


n,, Fxr(vnna


U MARINA BOAT STORAGE
A locked and lighted facility is much more
- secure than your driveway.
live Easy and convenient storage for boaters who
live in deed-restricted neighborhoods.
Dry storage keeps your boat cleaner and
protects it from damaging UV rays and weather,
assuring you the highest resale value.
____ Many niarina al ,: offer cloraqe for your
Irailer if needed
(Complimenerary va h ral care usually avail-
able to ,urcner roiho vanir, r, :learn heir toar
Irenm.ele.
You have an e-peri t iarf onr hard io arncer
any vqueion:r, yO:,u may have aot,,,ul Vy,,ur tbjal ir
fl n, c ior
here' an orn ire ,erm:e deparimenri awailatile
o aoore an vera'u':e :c.r:erP:n ycvou may have
SMi marina orfer elharnol-free fuel
S_ ou ar eoyv Ithe ,amaraderie ,r r,:,iher
taer 3at1 Ihe marina sharing in rheiir un


A _
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(Mom
























A YEAR OF SALTWATER FISHING h


Tarpon


1
n?


1i;~
~Knwt wznK; ;


Snook . . ..I. . I f '
Redhsh .. .t. Z . ..T I r. I
Seatrout ZtW ftt ft' r? 7___
Pompano r i' W11 fW "W,1 Z V '
Permit W~ __ ?_ t, t I 't"r I -
Sheepshead .. ... I T. ZI T..
Flounder Z V r- -
Cobia Z, IftZ I ft Z tI t
Tripletail Z ,.. Z,. Z, Z'1. .f1 "
Bluehsh .V Z_1i ._ . Z__7
Spanish mackerel .Vr '.'. T. II '
King mackerel .V IT___ t 'n I 'ntI
Amberjack ..' .. Z Z.. t . 'Z '
Snapper inshore) t' i I I I Z, tVZ v
Snapper(offshore) . .t. T Z,. Z, t?'t
Gag Z X tXI'lt I W'l I I' Z, X1'1 vW
Red Grouper .r.T X .T .. t. .. Z'
Sharks f_ fl 1 T r I f'lt T I


,' Poor. lew hsh around


f Fair. you have lo be good or lu(ky


Thisis intended Io represent an average year Every year s dilferenl for example. Iloi


REEF FISHING-",,...ir .',i1-r r
[I, l II 1 r, rjllr l I rllll lr
p q1. I r-. I i i .dll ir ,r r-i
|i, i i r. r l ,- r,...I.I
i...o r. r [r ,,nriii i ,,)ri ,,,,
1". 1, 1j. i j ri jd jjj jll
Il.i rr l Hil, ( n,,.l- l r l H
irl l r l- I llH. ll l n m n.ll l Irl
l... ii ..iiii I i II, mll. rlll ,.iJ1, n
p|, I |o)l |,,, ,,an n rim-n,1r


. 9--


The boys at Fishin' Frank's, Jeff
Kincaid at Capt. Ted's Tackle,
Capt. Mike Myers and several
knowledgeable anglers contrib-
uted to this map. Thanks, guys!


,larsh- ov.ler
br, ni.i llJlir f.
andib irsi)ii Ither
par-linie.r. ic


Ii j ojrm jl llr wjil
1. ril. 3j-rl
h, urS,, ,i ~r


This is
DO NO
GATIOI
ignore
do so


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l.. eril.. ikn


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Ir l-
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\Bird MIDDLE HOLE ?
4- 6sQ4 ,[ Winegourd
d oggefly ss ey Crek)
SWol e '> [ U[ b ".





- BuH ay-ohr








S- ou Danger
I"".1iReef mr .Pir ate
dfC th Chute -Harbor
,. ,, ,I3 I r1ii, rn. a o ZEMEL ROAD
Gasparilla r'j \ . h Is I .lar, d 1 S| 41 .i ,., ri,,,,,i ... LOWER HOLE --


y T TurtleBay Time To Go ng









.. ... ,,,,,,..;am,,, .... Bac Bay Fish inghi n
-- Bull Bay Cross, T t / \EaR D1,d-
c DevilfishV B l B



FBayouI Danger7 7

TARPON HOLEi Iriri i HITTHE DOCKS lFOO Light T kl
*-I-.l I 1 % II ,l / %jl. I II, IIIrIi r -,|-..1
ii i k omr, |- r .m .r..I .... fr ... Back Bay Fishing
B^ arpo^ h in,- 1,3. 1.1111,h ,nl^ I3 r ri-i, r
@ P unPoint aao rL.j .iiii wi













c taoI Id D [p A, [L ahy....I .r [GRnDE a
ii FISH THE Ca
l, RrSHOAL r

SRGTwo



















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T I M l .,,, ,,,mi, ,,,m, r, "I",
x ... EE I jlSL











. . P anther t ndon Isla











It'Cs < \o' REDFiSHHOLE:ThimaII a Island VETERANS BOULEVARD-
1\ Firshinh, MATLACHA Anthrfmiy nAI
, .7 Ky.rrrr t, (r, k ri i i, Denteres i r 7r- - 'rTr r RIVER TARPON: When
#--- W -- ^ -- -- ^Wt *_ I .1 jj 4 lj the silver kings are upriw I
SCharlot tastibutlileuse
l I ". 11 ._ __ 1\\l 1 r_,r_, a bait isthe tail half ofa
iood. expe lone or Iwo , E<(ellenl. fish all over l \ ..... ,, || Bl a __ hahead o h Fih it o
under fishing was much beller Ihan average for much of 2011 F t . R. r the bottom orunderaflo ,u a
W HAT S A POTHOLE fir.nl. 1, i ... i ay often found be-
,,[, IIil irk ,rr i ,n ill i,1], riii. in- ur 9 A ~ -
Siijriii irjiinr-H -ijH a i r rO TAriIL CORAL








-t o ,ROCKS |0" 1-ii
Island
Key> ;BaR Pine





















a map, not a chart. _o
USE IT FOR NAVI- ISH HOE mall Island






e-- .this warning, you i .-:__ I ; ::iiI.jsla~,Isan
at your own peril. ., ui i r r B MATLu ACH rAnnthcrf





Sppr .r ,rWr1-u 'n 1, RIVER TARPi i l

t~e et er ( u r 18r r~ h i r n NO 1NAVIGATION: a fantastic but l "






Ai.. feetof ra .,,nu,,l UNDERTHELINES:The,- .' I, ,. S o SUMMERLIN ROAD
under oweng was murlowwath beer an average for muri 1of1 tri t shean imela a t
Foster 00 RbckhCreeA











WHATSAOTOL ,r, ,,,,I.. ji rBi Pa id
.1Blind Prus Sanibe n..-, i ai- i.i .e r n -i

san Island





.Cattle Poin


IT USE IT FOR NAVI" ell
PURPOSES. If you FINDING TRIPL ET AIji' iyim m., eel" Bird Point r"
e this warning, you ir, o o ,,, i.. ri i inh- r ,, ,1r, S a 0
at your own peril, hu,,,, Lb-,I, I,,rh hn -x In- jl ur3 F ,
hrAlf ,,r Imfm h ,i lh hi]hl IIn, I, ,in rBu






., a ,3 dint, ,


1 ? -(








to be able to call the marina before you return
and have the service department get your boat
washed and prepped for your return.
Many people think that a dry storage marina
is too expensive and not a reasonable choice
for them. This is far from the truth. I love the
convenience of simply calling ahead to have
my boat placed in the water. When I arrive,
my boat is waiting for me at the dock, has
been started, and is fueled with non-ethanol
gas and ready to go. When I return from a day
on the water, I simply tie up the boat at the
dock, unload my gear, and let the marina staff
rinse off the boat, flush the salt water from
the motor, and return it to its secure rack. How
much more would you use and enjoy your boat
if you had this kind of service available to you?
That short sunset ride that your wife bugs you
to do is much easier to make happen. Taking
friends and family out on the water is suddenly
not a chore. Just think how popular you will
become. Wait a minute -on second thought,
let's just keep this between us boaters.
Marinas today are offering these services
at more than reasonable rates that bring
the convenience of keeping your boat at a
marina a reality to most boaters. Think of
it this way: For the price of a new trailer,
you can get as much as three years of full
service dry storage. I consider boating an
affordable alternative to other family activi-
ties. Compared to other activities, such as
expensive theme parks, or just taking your
family out to dinner and a movie, boating
is always the more affordable way to spend
time with your friends and family. Ten gallons
of gas and a cooler of your favorite food and
beverages will provide a weekend of fun and
memories you will all experience things
that others just dream about. Make sure you
e-mail me some pictures of the fun you are
having for publication in WaterLine.
Capt. Ed Kopp has been with Marine Dynamics in
Englewood formanyyears and is experienced in all
facets of the marine business. He also draws from
the knowledge and experience of his friends in the
marine industry. Ifyou have any questions about
this article or any other marine subject, contact Ed at
941-716-2493 or Ed@MarineDynamics.com.


r o o WEQDlia o


li jQ~f* t&Mo e


In most parts of the country, storing your
boat for the season means draining all of
the fluids and wrapping it up or putting it
inside. It's called winterizing. Here in Florida,
snowbird residents do just the opposite -
boats are stored for the summer. More steps
must be taken to ensure your boat makes
through the hot summer and will be ready
for you to enjoy when come back to Florida to
escape the dreary winter weather elsewhere.
Whether you have you marina perform this
service or do it yourself, this process is a must
if you leave your boat for the summer.
Summerizing your boat can mean
different things for different kinds of boats,
especially sailboats. We are focusing on
powerboats. Let's start with a question every
boater asks: What about ethanol? Everybody
has an opinion about this subject, but the
basic fact is that you should not use any
ethanol blended gas in your boat. I know
this is impossible for a lot of boaters. So
what do you do? If you are using ethanol
fuel and you have to let your boat sit for any
length of time even just a couple weeks
- run your fuel tank as low as possible, put
a quality conditioner in the tank, and drain
any remaining fuel from your engine's fuel
system. If you ignore this advice, expect a
big repair bill in the fall. Ethanol-free fuel
is still available at many marinas. If you
have this fuel in your tank, you can use
the old rule of storing your boat with a full
tank of gas, add a quality conditioner and
then run your motor until you are sure the
conditioned fuel has run through the fuel
system. This will still have its limits. If you
are going to let your boat sit for 6 months or
more with fuel in the tank and engine, have
the marina or a friend periodically start the
engine and let it run for ten minutes. I've
seen a lot of clogged injectors and seized
fuel pumps due to boats sitting for long


periods of time without being started.
There are other things you must do to
summerize your boat. Change your gearcase
lube. This should be done every year anyway,
and you do not want to let your engine sit
with milky gear lube from a leaking seal.
Changing your gear lube is way cheaper than
replacing a seized gearcase later. Consider
fogging your engine if you know that your
boat is going to sit for a long period of time.
A qualified shop can help you with this
simple process, which will be done differently
depending on the type of engine you have.
Flush the engine with fresh water, or, even
better, flush with salt terminator. Disconnect
the batteries and apply some grease to the
terminals. Small power drains in modern
boats -things like stereo memories and
carbon monoxide detectors can kill a
battery over a short time. Make sure the
boat is clean and dry, including the bilge.
Drain and put a conditioner in any fresh-
water tanks. Mold and mildew loves our
humid Florida environment, and uncovering
the boat to a moldy, stinky mess when you
return can be disheartening (and a lot of
work to clean). Protect all the upholstery and
plastic surfaces with a coat of 303 Protec-
tant. Remove anything cloth or paper that
can mildew towels, paper maps, books,
etc. Spray any moving metal parts (hinges,
door slides, engine and engine bracket) and
electrical connections with a good corrosion
guard or silicone spray. Remove any batteries
from flashlights or electronic gadgets and
store in a sealed container. Remove the drain
plug and make sure your scuppers drain
freely to prevent rain water from accumu-
lating. Close all seacocks. Unfortunately, here
in Florida we have to deal with pests such
as mice or roaches. Spread a little boric acid
around in compartments for roaches, and
if you think there is a chance you may be


visited by a mouse while you are away, put a
little poison in the boat, not a trap. They love
to chew on wires and fuel lines. Wash your
trailer thoroughly with fresh water, spray
all the moving parts with a good corrosion
guard and air up the tires. Finally, fully cover
the boat or store it inside (even better, both)
while you are away. Ask a friend to check on
your boat once in a while. What about those
hurricanes? Make sure you have insurance to
cover any damage the marina or storage
yard is not responsible.
When you return you can reverse the
process. Inspect the trailer: Do the lights
work? Air in the tires? Bearings greased?
Brakes work? Winch strap not frayed?
Ratcheting mechanism on winch working
soundly? Inspect the boat and motor to make
sure it is safe to hook up the batteries and
add fuel if needed. The batteries may need
charging. Put in the plug. Start the motor
and watch for any fuel leaks from dried-out
lines or connections. If you have an inboard/
outboard, you may want to change the
impeller. Check the horn, navigation lights,
steering, bilge pump, and any other systems.
Check for any leaks from plumbing such as
livewells and water systems. A sign of a leak
is water in the bilge accumulating from a
not-so-obvious source. Make sure all the
required safety gear and anchor are on the
boat. Be sure the registration tag is current.
Give your boat a well-deserved scrub-a-dub,
and take it out for a short run just to be sure
everything is A-OK. If you keep your boat at
a marina, call them before you arrive and
they will be happy to prepare your boat for
you. Or maybe you have a friend who could
get it ready. I'm sure he will be enjoying your
boat too, so it's the least that he can do. If
you followed these guidelines, you should be
ready to enjoy another season of our beau-
tiful Florida winter boating weather.












Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester in
state waters; included in aggregate bag of 20
reef fish in federal waters
Season: none
Notes: 9

AMBERJACK, GREATER



^V~~- si~


Size limit: 30"min.
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed June 1 July 31; subject to ad-
ditional closure in federal waters if quota is met
Notes: 1,3,4,5,9

AMBERJACK, LESSER
BANDED RUDDERFISH


Size limit: Slot 14"to 22"
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 5 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 1,4,5,9

BLACK
DRUM h


Size limit: Slot 14"to 24"
(may possess one over 24")
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 7,8

BLACK
SEA BASS



Size limit: -
10"min.
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

BLUEFISH





Size limit: 12"min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 1,5

BONEFISH A


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited
Season: none
Notes: May be possessed temporarily at the
site of capture for photos, measuring and
weighing. 1,5

COBIA


Size limit: 33"min.
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester or 6 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season: none
Notes: 1


CRAB, BLUE
Size limit: none ,
Daily bag
limit: 10 gal- I- _,, A
Ions whole
Season: .
Closed Sept.
20-Oct. 4 in
state waters beyon13 niile3.
Closed to trapping July 10-19 in
odd years for trap cleanup. Traps not allowed in
federal waters.
Notes: 5 trap maximum. 10

CRAB, STONE
Size limit: 2.75"
min. from
nonmoving
claw tip to
base of first
joint -
Daily bag ,
limit: 1 gal-
Ion per harvester
or 2 gallons per vessel, whichever is less
Season: Closed May 16 to Oct. 14
Notes: 5 trap maximum. Possession of whole
crab illegal; harvest claws only. 10

DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)






Size limit: none in Gulf
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester or 60 per
vessel, whichever is less
Season: none
Notes: 5

FLOUNDER


Size limit: 12"min.
Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: Harvest by gig or spear is allowed. 2,8

GROUPER, BLACK


Size limit: 22"min. (24"min. Monroe County)
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within ag-
gregate bag of 4 grouper (1 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County). Aggregate bag
1 for gag and black grouper in Monroe County.
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

GROUPER, GAG


Size limit: 22"min. (24"min. Monroe County)
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within aggre-
gate bag of 4 grouper (1 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County). Aggregate
bag 1 for gag and black grouper in Monroe
County.
Season: Open July 1 Oct. 31
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9
..............................


Size limit: n a
Daily bag limit: Zero hjrver pr:ohibitled
Season: na
Notes: FVVC may allow harvest at some point;
go to www.MyFWC.com for current info.


5a O aiw E? a aI \ G i o



LAOgit Ae (]t


3DDtOo


GROUPER, NASSAU


Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

GROUPER, OTHER
(CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND AND TIGER)


Daily bag limit: Zero, harvest prohibited.
Season: n/a
Notes: n/a
..............................


Size limit: 20"min.
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within aggre-
gate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

GROUPER, SCAMP


Size limit: 16"min. (20"min. Monroe County)
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within aggre-
gate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

GROUPER,
SNOWY j


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within aggre-
gate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: none
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

GROUPER, SPECKLED HIND
GROUPER, WARSAW


Size limit: rnone
Daily bag limit: 1 per vessel ,within j lqreqlae tci
of 4 grouper (aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: none
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester within aggre-
gate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)
Season: Closed Feb. 1-March 31 (Jan. 1-April
30 Monroe County)
Notes: 2,3,4,6,9

HOGFISH 7/


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 1,4,5,9
..............................


SNAPPER, OTHER
(BLACKFIN, DOG, MAHOGANY,
QUEEN, SILK AND YELLOWTAIL)
f." .-


center of fork. Highly Migratory Species permit I REDFISH .
required to harvest in federal waters. All har-
vested fish must be reported to NOAA within 24
hours; call 800-894-5528.
.............. ,
MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER
Size limit: Slot 18"to 27"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester or 8 per ves-
sel, whichever is less


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb l-Aug. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever is less; Sept.
1-Jan. 31: Aggregate 50 per harvester or per vessel
Season: none
Notes: Harvest or possession of striped mullet
prohibited in Punta Gorda between 6 p.m. and 6
a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See http://bit.ly/urExej.

OYSTERS
Size limit:
3"min. shell
Daily bag limit:
60 pounds or 2 5-gal- 'i. ,
Ion buckets whole in shell
per harvester or per vw el
Season: Closed July
1-Sept. 30
Notes: Go to www.Flonda
Aquaculture.com for allowable harvesting areas.

PERMIT


Size limit: i
n 15 nn.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. 2,5,7,8

WAHOO


Size limit: 10"
min. in state waters; 12"min. in federal waters
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester within ag-
gregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season:none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER
LANE i-. ,


Season: none
Notes: Gigging, spearing or snatching pro-
hibited. Illegal to harvest or possess in federal
water. Transport limit 6 per person. 2,5,7

SEA TROUT, SPOTTED





Size limit: Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one
over 20")
Daily bag limit: 4 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,5,7

SHARKS, ALL
SPECIES


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9
..............................


Size limit: 8" min.
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester in
state waters; not included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester in Gulf; included in
aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in federal waters
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER,
MUTTON ,t:,,,


Size limit: Slot 28"to 33"
Daily bag limit: 1 per harvester
Season: Closed until at least Sept. 1. Go to
www.MyFWC.com/Fishing for latest regulations. S
Notes: $10 snook permit required to harvest Di
when license is required, including free resident li
shore fishing license. State regulations apply in S
federal waters. 2,5,6,7,8 NI

SPINY LOBSTER A
Size limit: 3" carapace min.; must be mea- sl
sured in while still in water
Daily bag limit: 6 per harvester during regu-
lar season. Special limits apply during sport
season; contact regional FWC office for current
sport season regulations.
Season: Closed April 1-Aug. 5, except sport
season last consecutive Wed. and Thur. in July.
Notes: Recreation trapping prohibited.
$5 Spiny Lobster permit required to
harvest when license is required,
including free resident shore
fishing license. For full rules, see
hbip tilt Iv mHZEHl 5,10 .


i


Size limit: none ', ,,Ii
Daily bag
imit: none "
Season: none
lotes: This invasive species is native to the
outh Pacificand is spreading through the
itlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Kill all
pecimens on sight. Fins have venomous spines.

UNREGULATED SPECIES
The following species do not have established
bag limits, so the daily bag limit is two fish or
100 pounds per harvester, whichever is greater:
Atlantic croaker, barracuda, blackfin tuna,
bonito (little tunny), cero mackerel,
gafftopsail catfish, grunts (all species),
hardhead catfish, jack crevalle, ladyfish,
palometa, pigfish, pinfish, porgies (all spe-
cies), sand bream mojarraa), sand seatrout,
silver seatrout, spadefish and whiting.

PROHIBITED SPECIES
The following species are closed to all harvest
and if captured must be immediately released
unharmed: Goliath grouper, Nassau grouper,
Atlantic angel shark, basking shark, bigeye
sand tiger shark, bigeye sixgill shark,
bigeye thresher shark, bignose shark,
Caribbean reef shark, Caribbean sharpnose
shark, dusky shark, Galapagos shark, great
hammerhead, lemon shark, longfin mako
shark, narrowtooth shark, night shark,
scalloped hammerheadsilky shark, sand
tiger shark, sandbar shark, sevengill shark,
sixgill shark, smalltail shark, smooth ham-
merhead, spiny dogfish, tiger shark, whale
shark, white shark, manta ray, spotted
eagle ray, longbill spearfish, Mediter-
ranean spearfish, roundscale spearfish,
sturgeon, Florida queen conch.

NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is the straight
line distance from the most forward part of the head
with the mouth closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is the
straight line distance from the most forward part
of the head with the mouth closed to the farthest
tip of the tail with the tail compressed or squeezed
together while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of for-hire
vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must use
non-stainless steel circle hooks when using natural
baits. Anglers must possess dehooking device and
venting tools and use when appropriate.
5. Must remain in whole condition until landed
ashore.
6. Harvest by spearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple or treble hooks in conjunction
with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand perch, fish
designated as reef fish are illegal to use as bait in
federal waters or aboard a vessel with a federal
reef fish permit.
10. No harvest of egg-bearing females.


Size limit:
54" min., except Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose,
blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and smooth
dogfish (only exceptions to 54" min. in federal
waters are Atlantic sharpnose and bonnethead)
Daily bag limit: In state waters, 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less; in
federal waters, 1 per vessel
Season: none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. 1,5,7
..............................


k- --_ '; '
Size limit: -
16 nmn.
Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
10 snapper per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER,
RED






Size limit: 16" min.
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester within ag-
gregate bag of 10 snapper per harvester
Season: Closed July 24-May 31 in state waters,
closed Oct. 1-May 31 in federal waters (subject to
early closure in federal waters if quota is met).
Notes: 2,3,4,5,9

SNAPPER, SCHOOLMASTER


~


b


MACKEREL, KING
......#OS ize limit: "
Slot 11"to 20"(may possess one over 20")*
S-- ---" I Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester*
_"' -- Season: none*
Size limit: 24 m n. N otes: No more than two fish over 20"per ves-
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester sel. Hook and line gear only; spearing legal only
Season: none in federal waters. Rules differ in Special Permit
Notes: Bag limit reduced to 1 per harvester Zone; see http://bit.ly/rA94BJ. 1,5,7
in some state waters when federal waters ..............................
are closed to harvest. See www.MyFWC.com/ I POMPANO,
Fishing for current regulations. 1,5 FLORIDA


MACKEREL, SPANISH





Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: Transfer of Spanish mackerel to other
vessels at sea prohibited. 1,5


Size limit: 12" min.
Daily bag limit: 15 per harvester
>-Season: none
Notes: 2,5,7

SHRIMP, EDIBLE (ALL SPECIES)


Size limit: N
11"minimum
Daily bag limit: 6 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: May harvest with cast net or seine. 1,5,7

POMPANO,
AFRICAN


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: ilh po:ie ,ron limat
Season: none
Notes: .Il arpon 3ag required to harvest :or
possess. For special Boca Grande pass rules, see
http://bit.ly/uYwhLS. 6,8

TRIGGERFISH, GRAY



t .



Size limit: 14"(12"in federal waters)
Daily bag limit: None in state waters;
included in aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in
federal waters.
Season: none; subject to closure in federal
waters if quota is met
Notes: 1,4,5


SSizelimit: V -
none Size limit:
. Daily bag limit: 0 ",nr,
'* 5 gallons heads on per Daily bag limit: Included in aggregate bag of
harvester or per vessel 10 snapper per harvester
Season:none Season:none
Notes: 5 Notes: 2,4,5,9

SNAPPER, CUBERA SNAPPER, VERMILION


Size limit: 24" min.
>Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester or per vessel
Season: none
Notes: May be harvested by hook and line
only. 1,5,7
..............................


'. Size limit:
10"min.
.ii Inmayv po,:,e -' per Daily bag limit: 10 per harvester; not
el) included in aggregate bag of 10 snapper per
:luded in aggregate bag of harvester; included in aggregate bag of 20 reef
ester if under 30" fish in federal waters
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9


-
J:


7Size limit: Blue marlin 99"min.; white marlin
66"min.; sailfish 63"
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 1 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: Measured from tip of lower jaw to


Si, e lnit Slot 12 [to
harvester or per vess
Daily bag limit: Inc
10 snapper perharve
Season: none
Notes: 2,4,5,9


Size limit: `0 nmin V
Daily bag limit: 4 per hjrve;ter within jIare-
gate bag of 4 grouper (3 per harvester within
aggregate bag 3 Monroe County)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: 100 pounds per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 4,5,9


State waters extend from the shore 9 miles out into the Gulf of Mexico. Federal waters extend from 9 miles out to 200 miles. These regulations were correct as of Jan. 1, 2012, but are subject to change at any time by the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission and/or the National Marine Fisheries Service. Visit www.MyFWC.com and www.nmfs.noaa.gov for current regulations. This list does not contain every fisheries rule with which an angler must comply. Ignorance of the law is no excuse.


SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)


SNOOK, Size limit: none
ALL SPECIES Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Season: none
Notes: 1,5 i 4

~-- .* _LIONFISH ,


MARLIN, BLUE
MARLIN, WHITE
SAILFISH A


GROUPER, YELLOWFIN
GROUPER, YELLOWMOUTH












Note: Sometimes saltwater species may be Daily bag limit: Aggregate 24 per harvester WALKING CATFISH


found in fresh water in Florida. To harvest
these species, you must have a regular or
shore saltwater license (except mullet; see be-
low). You do not need a freshwater license to
specifically target saltwater species in a fresh-
water environment, but if you do not have a
freshwater license then any freshwater species
must be immediately released unharmed.
(If you plan on doing this, just get a combo
license and save yourself the headache.)

BLACK BASS


Size limit: South Florida (south of S.R.
80): 14"maximum; one fish larger than
14" may be harvested daily. Central Florida
(north of S.R. 80): 14"minimum. Lake
Okeechobee (see http://bit.ly/Akzt7G for
definition): 18" minimum. Lake Weo-
hyakapka (Walk-in-Water): Slot 15"to 24";
may possess one over 24". Lake Trafford:
Slot 18"to 22".
Daily bag limit: 5 per harvester (Lake
Weohyakapka: 3 per harvester)
Notes: Bag is aggregate for all species of black
bass, but only largemouth black bass are found
in Southwest Florida. Special limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1,3

PANFISH
(INCLUDES BLUEGILL, REDEAR SUNFISH
[SHELLCRACKER], FLIER, LONGER SUN-
FISH, MUD SUNFISH, SHADOW BASS,
SPOTTED SUNFISH STUMPKNOCKERR],
WARMOUTH AND REDBREAST SUNFISH)


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Aggregate 50 per harvester
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1,4
C.RAPPE(.SPE KL.EDPERCH)
CRAPPIE (SPECKLED PERCH)


Size limit: none'
Daily bag limit: 25 per harvester
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 1

SUNSHINE BASS


Notes: This regulation also covers striped and
white bass, which are not found in Southwest
Florida. Sunshine bass, a striped/white bass
hybrid, are stocked by the state in waters
around Florida. Special bag and size limits
may apply in Fish Management Areas; see
below. 1


introduced by state biologists to control other
nnnn,;ifiv fiho( 1 1


CLOWN KNIFEFISH


...................... non natdive; ishs.1l,3 y ^ ^
CHANNEL CATFISH ***********



^ 9' ^BULLSEYE SNAKEHEAD
'S, ,^BBGRASS (ARP. .-. s


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 2
BROWN BULLHEAD"
YELLOW BULLHEAD
YELLOW BULLHEAD


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: 2

FLORIDA GAR
LONGNOSEGAR


Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Be careful if preparing for consump-
tion; the roe is toxic. 2
......................
BOWFIN




Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Can be confused with nonnative
snakehead. Look under chin for large flaplike
scale and check for a short anal fin; this will
positively identify a bowfin. 2
......................
CHAIN PICKEREL
REDFIN PICKEREL




4. '
Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: none
Notes: Special bag and size limits may apply
in Fish Management Areas; see below. 4
....... .... ... ...
AMERICAN EEL



Daily bag limit >"'ii-
Notes 2


MULLET, STRIPED AND SILVER





Size limit: none
Daily bag limit: Feb 1-Aug. 31: Aggregate
50 per harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever
is less; Sept. 1-Jan. 31: Aggregate 50 per
harvester or per vessel
Notes: Harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda be-
tween 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb.
29. See http://bit.ly/z9J6v3. May not be
harvested by spear fishing in fresh water.
Any resident fishing for mullet in fresh
water who has a valid Florida freshwater
fishing license does not need a saltwater
license. 2

BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
Size limit: 17"maximum (may possess
one over 17")
Daily bag limit: 2 per harvester
Notes: Nonnative species intentionally


Size limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero; harvest or possession
prohibited without a permit
Notes: These fish are introduced to areas
where vegetation overgrowth is a problem.
Grass carp released in Florida are triploid,
incapable of spawning.

ALLIGATOR GAR



SSize limit: n/a
Daily bag limit: Zero; harvest or possession
prohibited without a research permit
Notes: Despite popular belief, alligator gar do
not occur in Southwest Florida. These giant fish
are restricted to the Panhandle in this state.

NONPROTECTED EXOTICS
These fish are unwelcome invaders in Florida's
waters. These fish have no bag or size limits
and are all popular food fish in their native
countries. Other than peacock bass and grass
carp, exotic fish may not be returned to the
water nor may they be used as live bait, and
should be consumed or disposed of properly.

BLUE TILAPIA


SPOTTED TILAPIA


OSCAR.............
OSCAR i ai f


MAYAN CICHLID


JAGUAR GUAPOTE


Mi AS........... Ci
MIDAS CKH LID


BROWN HOP'LO


SUCKERMOUTH CATFISH


k

i


~CL~aePZ~i~i~B~~


-*


d


Notes: There may be multiple species in
Florida; patterning may vary. Can be confused
with native bowfin. Snakehead lacks large flap-
like scale and has long anal fin (on the belly).

FISH MANAGEMENT AREA
SPECIAL REGULATIONS

For FMAs not listed, see www.MyFWC.com/Rules
AndRegs/Freshwater_FishRules_regions.htm.

Lakes Tohopekaliga (West Lake Tohopeka-
liga), Cypress, Hatchineha, and Kissimmee),
Polk and Osceola counties: Open to fishing. No
bag limit for channel catfish. Minnow lift nets, fish
traps and trotlines may be used.

Manatee Lake, Manatee County: Open to
fishing. Trotlines may be used from sunset until 9
a.m., SundaythroughThursday. Outboard motors
more than 20 hp may not be used. No bag limit for
channel catfish.

Webb Lake, Charlotte County: Open to fishing
during posted hours. Gasoline motors may not be
used on boats. Panfish bag limit: 20. Channel catfish
bag limit: 6. Bluegill and redear sunfish less than
8 inches in total length must be released imme-
diately. Black bass must be released immediately.
Vehicles may be used only on designated roads.

Marl Pits 1 and 3, Charlotte County: Open to
fishing. Panfish bag limit: 20. Bluegill and redear
sunfish lessthan 8 inches in total length must be
released immediately. Channel catfish bag limit: 6.
Black bass must be released immediately.

Marl Pit 2, Charlotte County: Open tofishing.
Bluegill and redear sunfish less than 10 inches must
be released immediately. Bluegill and redearsunfish
combined bag limit: 10. Channel catfish bag limit:
6. Black bass must be released immediately.

Tenoroc Fish Management Area, Polk County:
Fishing is allowed only by FWC permit. All anglers
must check in and out at theTenoroc Fish Manage-
ment Area headquarters and deposit their valid
fishing license with the custodian unless otherwise
instructed. Days and hours of operation and quotas
shall be as designated bythe FWC and posted at
area headquarters (currently Fridaythrough Mon-
day only). Quotas will be established for each lake,
and fishing is permitted in designated lakes only.
Lakes may be closed to public access for manage-
ment purposes or if access to the lake exposes the
publicto danger, by posting notice at the Tenoroc
check station office. Quotas for open lakes may be
temporarily increased to accommodate anglers
during times when other lakes are closed due to
management construction projects, road repair,
unsafe access or special recreational events. All dogs
must be leashed, except as authorized by FWC. Un-
less otherwise specified, Tenoroc FMA harvest
restrictions are: Crappie bag limit: 10. Crappie
lessthan 10 inches in total length must be released
immediately. Sunshine bass bag limit: 6. Channel
catfish bag limit: 6. Black bass must be released im-
mediately. Fish may not be filleted, northeir head
ortail fins removed, until the angler has checked
out at the area headquarters. Cast nets and minnow
seines are prohibited. No person shall have any gun
under his/ her control while underthe influence of
alcohol or drugs. Public access is prohibited in areas
posted as"Restricted"for protection of threatened
or endangered species, or environmentally sensitive
areas. Motor vehicles may be operated only on
named roads, designated parking areas, and fishing
ramps as designated in the area use brochure.
Vehicles may not obstruct designated roads, boat
ramps, gates orfire lanes. Swimming and float
tubes are prohibited.

Regulations for Tenoroc lakes are as follows:
Gasoline motors may not be used on boats on Lakes
A, Butterfly, C, F, Fish Hook, G, Half-Moon, Horseshoe,
Hydrilla, Legs Lost, Lake East, Lost Lake West, Tern, 2,
3, and 4 (primitive launch only on Butterfly, F, Fish
Hook, G, Half-Moon, Lost Lake East, Lost Lake West,
and Tern). Lakes B and 5: Boats are restricted to
idle speed-no wake. Black bass 15 inches in total
length or longer must be released immediately.
Black bass bag limit: 2. Pinic Lake: Gasoline
motors may not be used on boats. Black bass bag
limit: 2. Black bass 15 inches in total length or longer
must be released immediately. Pine (formerly
East and West Pasture Lakes) and Derby Lakes:


L o a]D [l~fl](a]Sa BQaU01oa o R


NOTES
1. Game fish. Ma, ''Il, "i i.- I h i.I-i I 1ii Il
line or rod and re-I ih,-r, I. ,.i i, iiiih .ii Iih
numberof rods a' i, ii.i-r rI i.,- 1.1, 1,,1i 1.
filleted, nor their ii,- III r 1 II ii r rii.. 1 I iiiii
you are done fishin.lj i.r Ihi- 11, i .1hi 11 ini I
sell, offer for sale .r ir II. l 'i ..,r i ,.1 ih. IIt
unless specifically; iirrii,,i l I., ihI fI F .-i -
that licensed anglr- rI,, iri l-i, ,r ii .,i Ii,
bag limit of legal, ih r.-i.-iI ri
2.Nongamefish I.1, i .-1 i in, i,
Pole and line (r r.,.l ,ii rili ihl-r i,,. ir.-
on the number ,i .1r. ii II inl r ,iii iji
Bush hook, setli I ,- r ir..iiii I,. i ii h., 11I I.
or other substanc- i. ii.,, l.l..r111 11. iri rlh
oranypartofan).i jii, i. h i ih hi .: .1-ii.-
and trotlinesmu' i Ii n t-k i.ii r-' rii,
withtheharvester ii, rit iii 'Iilr..
SAt night by boi 'iii i rri. .i '.ii" .
During daylight ii.ir. I,, riiiiiill, ,,| url
spears, gigs, snal. h,,ii ri..I,, ,,r I,,,i
and arrowfrom I,,,I ..r Ir,..r, i, i r .- -.- ,I
Dade County ca -..lI "I iin 1 I M IJI
ofthe L-31N an I i I 11id- n. .Ii r i,
Bythe use of c( i ni.-
3. Illegal to use a- Iii 1 hti.- ..r I i, lir
4. May be used a. Il i "..1i, I r r...l i 1. r-i ..r
pole and line anciihii.

Boats may not be u. 1lI iihir hliii I .i~ i.jir- --.rlI
above,noone 16yE ir- ,r ,,*i.i r -hii d rI ii,,h ,,-
Derby lakes unless ...r,,ii1,iiiin l I, i hiill iii lr ii.
yearsofage. Panfisl I,. ii l r' i Ii 'I Aii.ll r- 1, n 1- ,|
no more than 5 blu .iiil iil r-ls- 1r .I irn., ... ii.
or longer in total leiljlh lir i Cemelery Lake
Boats may not be u.-,l Aii.l-r rn,, IIl. rn.r
than bluegill and -Ii- Ir -iiir h .. h. i r ,- ri. r
intotal length perc i, LakeCrago i ir.ilr..ii.lh
bass, crappie and slii iii., I'- ip-1 IIf .,il
and bag limits appl, VWir- r lI r,1,, i, .-I ir
nongamefish.Trotl I,.- ri, I"- ir.r,,j .I,-I
until 9a.m. Nobag hlniriiii l.r ini- i i-h '.,.-
are restrictedto idle Ip--i 1 II,

Lake Istokpoga, Highlands County i i,
fishing. No bag lim I i.r.i -hiiin-i r. r '-l I ,.i ..
15 inchesor more i I i,,I I hllh liiii-.. iiii l 'J1
inches must be rele iiiri-,iih -1l, rI I .
bag lim it:3. Only I.1i I,,.i rl,,, I~- 1 ., h,.
or greater in total I lIn.i i,.ii.j I- r ,ii Iw,
taken bycast nets, liip, ni, ir..lhi. I
lines, bush hooks a'i I ir :iri r i. llr H ni i
Commercial Fresh i 1i-r Hi rii-r I.r... liir l'(if

Mosaic Fish Managemeni Area (formerly
Cargill Fort Meade Mine), Polk and Hardee
counties:Opento ri.iiihn fi.hiiii i i. 11 1 ,I i,
by daily permit issu lI I., iIh- VF i All i,.ilr-
must check in and ('li ii ii' 1- I..11.,. r-Il -i 111,,1i
the designated ent-, lini iIr i ii1- -..i-r I ..I
instructed. Days an I ht r ..i r '..i r 1i.Ii. .n it I .i .
shall be asdesignal -l I, h1i- ,V I I -i,,,. I[ I II
the Mosaic creel stc;i Ii I, j l. ii, I1.I... i, i .. i11
Fridaythrough Moril f, I iiil i. l rriinrl l 1ii
designated lakes orll, All ..iiir I ii- lu it riIre III,
areas,so posted,ar- .'1 11.. piulii. rih-ii.i Al,
lake may betemporrni,, -. i.-i .li -111 ..1 .. lr
management purp .- --.rnll ih- -. i 11 I II..
to the lake exposes Iti- lillr ii i..I ii. r I,, Ii..- ini,
notice at the creel si iii. Unless otherwise
specified, Mosaic FMA harvest resinctions are
Black bass must be r i.- .-i1 irin .-iii, I-, i..iini-i
bass bag lim it: 6. CI pI|- I'I riinni I11 1 r 1iIi n Ii .
than 10 inches in tc II hlli riii I1 I' rIl -Iw 1
immediately. Chanimi-. ildr-ii.llj ii I. r i. iri i,h r
not be filleted, nor :h-ir hii- I. ..rr I niri r r,,... -I
until the angler ha', hi 1-i -l I ,i 1i, 1 .1 ., r Il
station. Disposal ofr r .i r, iiir i ll. .ii l [1.1 ..., ri..|
ertyisprohibited.Tillii. i i ti r. lh ,I i .iiii i .1I
guns is prohibited. '. IIr.r tn. I- I. i, j |-r I|,|
only on designated r. jl. I iril.ii r ,I iini i.,,
ramps.Vehicles ma, i..li rI.-irni ,. 1-ji l. r..,l i
boat ramps, gates or ir- I .i '- .i ,,.i 1 i, I ..II
tubes are prohibited :..i.ih ri i n I,- rmr-, ,. '.-
from designated lal I., v i no. i1 ,11..11, .
seines by permission.. i, In, ii l l,,l r i iiiii.- ril
motors morethan II IIt rll i,,.I I ~- .

Regulations for individual Mosaic FMA lakes
are as follows: Haul Road PII 1 :,. I1,.. i.
inches in total leng-i ..r i.., ..-r rni-1. r I -.
immediately. Black II. lijrii1i -' Long Pond
(LP2 West): No bco II irrnnli

Hardee County Park, Hardee Counly lit p- i..
fishing. All anglers ii ill iilr Ii 1in- f'Iir nr in,
trance,the designa. l hiilr, i.nl il1-ii l.. i-ri .
instructed. Angling ir..rI I,. i 1. I.Il.,1 i 1 I,, iilr,
pass issued by Hard- ,I iuni, A ii, n. iilr..rn, -I.,r,
does not require an niir, 1. j ii l -... lii ri .
posted attheParkriiiuiilrrlin.l ill,- ii iI. ,r.
of operation and q ri I.r Ir- i.i 11r I.ri;h.ih j r
posted atthe Park rihililr IInl fI .,iin i. - ri rrinii
ted in designated I L, i i, Al,, i1i- r, I, I.I
to public access by iIrdl i nl, .r n,, i ~i.ln1 i
purposes, orin the Ii i1i ii ..i .. i1, I I
exposesthe public-,'I 11 ii. r I,, i..ii.i i ii.n 1.- Ii
the Park main entrant 'I I. I,. ri i Ir111 l, -I1,
immediately. Sunshti u i. 1 ,,.I .lini I (' in i.i
bag limit:20.Crap[: I- IIIi iriii il i ri n I- .
than 10 inches in tCo Ii iiii~i jiriiir. 1 I rl r I1
immediately. Chanili lrn- lilidl.i ii.lj I. r i.l lrin ,
not befilleted, nor :hi, r h,- il *r I 1I ril rr-... -
until the angler ha' I-n li, F rI (ir ij..ll,, ,i r .i
remains within Har I ,iiil, F'r i r ir..iinll ,l
Taking offish and v lill.- 1 '. .ii i J 'i r, i..inil.1l
Motor vehicles may I,- ,[j-r Ill| l.,,l, ., l-u. i..IhII l
roads, parking area- lin.Ii,"i r rinir. in. i rni ,
not obstruct design i1il jI1"II. II rr ij. 1iI Inr
lanes. Swimming a iI i,, Il il,-r. Ir ||r[,i|l|.|l|






I^vv^^^ o iiaamf^Yi fm iiningn o *1i
BILL HEMPEL~


While boaters are generally a congenial
group, tempers can flare at the boat launch
ramp. Fists have been known to fly in a sort of
"ramp rage":This is usually the result of boaters
not following a few simple guidelines and
spending too much time in the ramp area. On
hot summer days, boaters are anxious to get
under way and they have little patience waiting
for a ramp hog. Ramp etiquette is easy, because
one simple rule covers it all: Spend as little time
as possible on the launch ramp.
The ramp is no place to learn how to back
up a boat trailer. If you are not accustomed to
backing up in a tight spot, spend some time in
a vacant parking lot practicing the art. Many
launch sites have an informal protocol. If it is
your first time at a specific ramp, park in the
staging area and watch a boat or two launch.
It may save you time and embarrassment
later. Whenever possible, have another person
with you. It makes the launch a lot faster and
smoother, and also minimizes the chances of
losing control of the boat after it is launched.
Patiently wait your turn in line no one likes
a line jumper who tries to squeeze in when
another trailer or boat is on the ramp.
To minimize time on the ramp, park in a
staging area and prepare the boat for launch.
Remove all tie-downs, except the bow (winch)
line. Put all your gear aboard. Be sure the drain
plug is in. Check the battery condition, prime
the fuel bulb, turn on the blower, set the motor
or drive unit to the proper trim level, and put
the key in the ignition. If you are alone, tie a
line from a boat cleat to the trailer so you don't
lose control of it during the launch. Only after
all this is done are you are ready to back into
the launch ramp. Back down until the boat
just begins to float off the trailer. Now you can
untie the bow line and power or push the boat
off the trailer. If you have a partner, have him
start the boat and immediately move it to a
courtesy dock while you take the vehicle to a
parking spot. If you are alone, take the boat to
a courtesy dock first, then immediately come
back and remove your vehicle.
While each of the steps are important, the
two most common and most disastrous mistakes
are failing to put in the drain plug and removing
the bow line before launch. A missing plug will
quickly fill your boat with water, and a discon-
nected bow line may result in a launch on the


ffnIII]=@MID
DO
/ Minimize time on the ramp.
V Know how to back up a trailer.
V Wait your turn.
V Follow any existing launch protocol.
V Prep for launch in a staging area.
V Wait until ramp is clear before pulling in.

DON'T
X Block or hog the ramp.
X Untie your bow line prior to launch.
X Load or unload equipment while on the ramp.
X Jump a waiting line.
X Forget to install drain plug.

parking lot concrete instead of in the water.
When you are returning home, it's even
more important to minimize your time on
the ramp. Tempers are usually shorter after
a long day in the hot sun and ramp rage can
escalate more quickly than in the morning.
Park the boat at a courtesy dock while you
retrieve your vehicle and secure a place in line.
Only after your trailer is backed in the water
should you pull your boat onto the ramp for
loading. Quickly secure the bow line and pull
the trailered boat back to the staging area.
Here you can offload equipment, secure all
tie-downs, pull the drain plug and get ready
for the trip home. Before you hit the road, run
a safety check of your boat and trailer. Make
certain the engine is trimmed up, and there
is no loose gear to blow out on the trip home.
Check the hitch and safety chains, plug in the
lights and, if a hose is available, flush out the
salt water from the brakes.
A little preparation and thoughtfulness is all
you need to avoid being a ramp hog. Just be
considerate of others and spend as little time
as possible with your boat and trailer on the
ramp.
Bill Hempelis the Assistant Safety Officer for the
Peace River Power Squadron and a member of the
USPS national marketing committee. Contact him
at billmarl@comcast.net.


WATERLINE PHOTO BY JOSH OLIVE
When you're loading or unloading
your boat, the goal is to spend as
little time on the ramp as possible.


D 0w w


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' I. \/I-TEPLIIIE PH'.,TC. B, JC'.SH '.LI.E ; --.
A trip with a guide is a great way to get ;f .
- acquainted with fishing Charlotte Harbor. ..,
<-^ wi~r: \ -^.i~wy"-'': --< !jba~?!^ff- .f^'.a S ,.- s'"


HOW MUCH DOES
A GUIDE COST?
The minimum you should expect to pay
for a four-hour trip is $300. Many guides
charge more than that, and there's
usually a good reason. As with so many
other things, you mostly get what you
pay for. Guides who offer cut-rate trips
may be doing so because they're still
establishing a reputation for themselves
or because their services are in low
demand for some other reason.


Southwest Florida is home base for
hundreds of fishing guides. Some of them
are professionals in every sense of the word;
others are not. When you go on a trip with a
guide, you have expectations of a good time
on the water in exchange for your hard-
earned dollars. If you do your homework and
ask around a little, that's exactly what you
should get.
The first thing to remember about a charter
guide is that you're paying him to work for
you. As with any other service, you shouldn't
just go with the first guy you find in the phone
book. Call several and chat a bit. Visit the
guide's website. Get a recommendation from a
friend, or from one of the local tackle shops.
Once you are comfortable you've found
someone who will do a good job and whose
personality will mesh well with yours, tell him
exactly what your expectations are being
up-front from the start will prevent misunder-
standings. Be reasonable about what you expect.


Wanting to catch tarpon in August or big trout in
January is reasonable; wanting to catch tarpon in
January or big trout in August is not.
Every fisherman has a favorite fish. So
does every captain. Most are versatile and
capable of catching whatever is swimming out
there, but there are definitely some who are
better at targeting certain fish than others.
If you want to fish specifically for sharks, it
makes sense to hire a guide who is known for
catching sharks. Also, a guide's boat will make
a difference in what you target. If he runs a
16-foot skiff, don't expect to go out on the
Gulf and catch amberjack.
If you want to catch fish and have fun, almost
any captain can do that. If you want to learn,
though, be sure your guide understands that
ahead of time. Some will even offer teaching
services on your boat. Don't be shy about chat-
ting it up and asking questions while you fish.
Most guides are very willing to tell you about
the Harbor and all it has to offer.


By the time you get on board, your guide
should already have loaded the boat with
ice and bait. If you have to take the time to
go catch bait, your allotted time should start
after that chore is done. Be sure to mention it
- again, merely to avoid misunderstandings.
While you're on the water, listen to your
guide. You're paying him for his ability and
experience, so it will serve you well to take
advantage of it. If you fished Turtle Bay last
year and caught the heck out of big redfish,
but your guide says the big redfish are at
Pirate Harbor, you're probably best off going
to Pirate Harbor. If you insist, he'll probably
take you to Turtle Bay but if the bite is
lousy, it's not fair to blame him.
Some captains don't make a single cast for
themselves while they have clients on the
boat. Others will wet a line, especially if they
know they've got experienced anglers. Don't
be afraid to say something if you feel your
guide is paying more attention to his own


fishing than to you. Some less-professional
guides treat customers more like fishing
buddies. If that's what you want, no problem.
If it's not, speak up. Remember, you're the one
paying him to work for you.
Even the best charter captains have bad
days fishing. If you have a really blah day,
many guides will deduct part of their fee and/
or offer you a discount on a future trip. Don't
expect to pay nothing for your trip, especially
if the bad fishing wasn't something the guide
could have controlled. After all, it costs him
money for the fuel, the wear on his boat, bait
and all his other expenses. If the weather
changes dramatically the day before your
charter, call him and ask how he wants to
proceed. He may ask you to reschedule, or he
may say he can find the fish you want.
As your trip winds down, decide whether
you'll be tipping your captain. Everyone knows to
leave a tip for a waiter. What a lot of people don't
realize is that most charter guides also expect to


0


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30 - ? r relIiri bird vj r: r rc pr'tiatilv reeij I,:, ti nrq viuur rwi n murii:hie r 1c i1 vc r rir I ire r v j rl'he'd e C r HFir r rir
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.. :-, .' -' .. :" -- -:r ir r P ri cP 0 ri buy a ri ir. u l icia.. ii:." ,rj -e ii_ r--r_ ilreqi' . -u n i tre a I C' u yi i r I :c ri t.il .cartc: 'r v i y -
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in .--.- -0-.-.+ ..N


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get a tip for a job well done. How much? If your
guide goes above and beyond or stretches your
trip by a half-hour to keep you on a hot bite, a
$50 tip is much appreciated. If he goes way above
and beyond, $100 isn't out of line.
After your day on the water, be sure to give
a report to the tackle shops that you talked
to before you hired your guide. They'll want
to know how your experience was good,
bad or indifferent. Reports from a captain's
customers are a big part of the recommenda-
tions a shop makes, so you'll be doing your
part to ensure others have a good time on the
water. Charter captains live and die by good
word of mouth, so if you had a great time be
sure to let others know.
Robert is a crustacean relocation specialist at
Fishin'Franks, located at 4425-D Tamiami Trail
in Charlotte Harbor. Call 941-625-3888 for more
information about the shop or for local fishing
info. You can also visit them online at www.
FishinFranks.com.


INL S S


7HIPF ;-


SALES *

PARTS *
* SERVICE *


Fa o e;


Upper Charlotte Harbor
Punta Gorda, Florida
(941) 575-3000
www.fishville.com


U


M o rna Trwrla3i o E[ta3
ROBERT LUGIEWICZ


.............


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Natural baits are any live or dead animals, or
any parts of them, used to catch fish. You can catch
many bait varieties; others are usually purchased. The
following list is extensive but does not cover every
possible baityou can use.

SALTWATER BAITFISH
Almost any small fish can also be used for bait,
as long as they aren't juvenile gamefish or other
regulated species. To keep your baitfish alive,
get them into the livewell as quickly as possible.
A bait flopping around on a hot deck won't last
long. Don't take any more baitfish than you need.
Remember, the fish you want to catch rely on
these baitfish as a food source, and if they don't
feed well they won't reproduce well. There's a lot
of bait out there, but there are also lots of guys
with castnets.
BALLYHOO: These look a bit like needlefish,
but only the lower jaw is elongated. Most
commonly used as a rigged trolling bait for
pelagic gamefish, ballyhoo can also be castnetted
inshore and used as bait for other species.
BLUE RUNNERS: A small member of the jack
family, these fish are a good bait for king mack-
erel, cobia, amberjack and other open-water fish.
Usually used live, blue runners are durable on
the hook and are ideally suited to drifting or kite
fishing. Also used for grouper. Chum and catch on
a sabiki.
BONITA: Used as cutbait for sharks. Size your
baits to the fish you want to catch. Catch offshore
or buy frozen.
CATFISH: Although most anglers curse catfish,
they can be an outstanding bait for sharks. Tarpon
also like them, especially when they're in the rivers.
CIGAR MINNOWS: AKA round scad, these are
another small jack species. Tarpon like them, as
do most open-water gamefish. Catch on a sabiki,
or on small bare gold hooks.


MATCH THE HATCH
When fish are used to eating a certain food,
it makes sense to use that as bait. For example,
sheepshead at El Jobean aren't eating sand fleas,
because there are no sand fleas there for them
to eat. Instead, they're eating small crabs and
oysters. Using sand fleas as bait here is not a good
plan. But at the Boca Grande phosphate docks,
just a couple hundred feet for the beach, sand
fleas are a fine choice. Another example: In winter,
most of the whitebait disappears. Many anglers,
having gotten used to using whitebait during the
long summer, will go to great lengths to locate a
few. But even if they find some, whitebait is not
nearly as effective in winter. Why? Because the
fish have switched over to other foods that are
more abundant in the cooler months.


GLASS MINNOWS: Bay anchovies, also called
glass minnows, are an important forage fish but
are tough to use as bait because they're small and
delicate. They make great chum, ground or cut
into pieces. Must be netted.
EELS: Infrequently used, but small eels are a
well-known cobia favorite.
GRUNTS: Hand-size grunts are excellent
grouper or amberjack bait on the reefs. Smaller
ones, including pigfish, are great for trout, reds
and snook inshore. A 3-inch pigfish under a float
is a hot ticket for big trout.
KILLIFISH and SAILFIN MOLLIES: Rarely used
in this area, but very popular for flounder and
redfish in many other parts of the Southeast.
Killies can be caught on tiny hooks baited with
shrimp bits; mollies can't. Both are easier to seine
or dip-net.
LADYFISH: One of our most underrated
species, ladyfish not only are great fighters on


light gear but also are fantastic bait. Use cut or
whole for sharks, tarpon and monster snook,
or cut into smaller chunks for redfish. Take only
what you need for the day they get mushy if
frozen and thawed.
MULLET: Three mullet species are found in
Southwest Florida. The striped or black mullet
is the largest species, common to about three
pounds, and is the only one usually eaten (smoked
or fried). White mullet are the midsize fish, usually
about a foot long. Fantail mullet are usually less
than 8 inches long and are used only as bait. All
three mullet species can be found in shallow fresh,
brackish or salt water, usually over muddy or
grassy bottom which they root through to find tiny
invertebrates and algae. Live or cut mullet are a
top bait choice for most fish-eating species, and are
oily enough to make very good shark bait. Because
of their diet, they are difficult to catch on hook and
line. A castnet works much better.
NEEDLEFISH: These toothsome critters are
not often used as bait but can be outstanding for
big snook. Sometimes, when a big snook ignores
every other bait, a live needlefish will entice a
strike. Both the upper and lower jaws of a needle-
fish are long and pointed. Catch with a small
baited hook skimmed across the surface.
PINFISH: These small porgies are very common
on shallow grassflats and around dock pilings.
They won't usually be found with predatory
fish everything like to eat them. Tough and
durable, pinfish are easily caught on a sabiki with
bits of squid on the hooks. You can also chum
them up on the grassflats and castnet them. Pins
are super bait for redfish, snook, tarpon, cobia
and all reef fish.
SAND TROUT: Small sand trout are good bait
for snook. Big sand trout are good bait for big
snook, and also for cobia. Sometimes, they're the
only bait that matters. Catch on chunks of shrimp.


SPANISH SARDINES: These fish are similar to
whitebait but are less deep-bodies and usually
larger, to about 16 inches. They are edible and
are in fact one of the several species canned
commercially as sardines. Often bought frozen,
or catch your own with a castnet or sabiki. If you
get frozen sardines, you should brine them before
use to toughen them. No, you can't use canned
sardines as bait they fall apart.
SQUIRRELFISH: Sand perch, known locally as
squirrelfish, are irresistible to big grouper. Some-
times you may find them at the bait shop, but
usually you'll have to catch your own. Cut shrimp,
fished over sandy bottom on a small hook, will
catch sand perch. This same method will catch
many less desirable species, so if you don't start
bringing up sand perch in a few minutes try
another spot.
STINGRAYS: A live bait for seriously big fish,
stingrays are a favorite food of hammerhead and
bull sharks. Goliath grouper are also known to
enjoy a ray snack. If you aren't ready to hook a
500-pound fish, you aren't ready to use a ray for
bait.
WHITEBAIT: There is no one species called
whitbait. Whitebait is a generic term that
includes threadfin herring, scaled sardines (aka
greenbacks or pilchards) and Spanish sardines
(usually just called sardines), among other small
schooling fish. These fish are too delicate for bait
shops to carry alive, so you'll have to catch your
own with a cast net or sabiki rig. Keep them in an
oxygenated baitwell and don't overcrowd them
- it's better to have 20 live baits than 60 that
are all dead. Threadfins get to about 10 inches
and scaled sardines to about 6 inches. Both are
top inshore baits. Spanish sardines grow to about
14 inches and are great inshore or offshore as live
or cut bait.
WHITING: See sand trout.


OTHER SALTWATER BAITS
SHRIMP: There are dozens of shrimp species
that live in the area, but for bait purposes we
divide them into two categories: Shrimp and
grass shrimp. Grass shrimp are small (under 2
inches) and are rarely used for bait, except for
panfishermen. Shrimp, on the other hand, are
hands-down the most popular bait in Florida.
They can be used live, dead or frozen and
thawed, either whole or cut into chunks. Very
few fish will turn down shrimp, but they also
draw lots of bait thieves. You can dip-net your
own (their eyes glow at night in a flashlight
beam), but they're a lot easier to buy.
BLUE CRABS: Very common in the estu-
aries, these crabs are good bait for many fish.
Small ones (silver dollar size) can be used live
for permit, cobia and tarpon; bigger ones can
be cut to use for redfish or black drum. Also a
good bait to target big snapper on the reefs.
If a crab has an egg mass under its tail, let it
go. Catch in traps or with a dip-net.
PASS CRABS: These crabs (technically,
they're iridescent swimming crabs, Portunus
gibbesii) look a bit like small blue crabs but
have longer claws with a pink tint. They're
called pass crabs because Boca Grande Pass is
where they're often seen, swimming on the
surface on strong summer outgoing tides.
Tarpon love them. Usually dip-netted.
FIDDLER CRABS: Easy to see on sandy or
muddy shores but hard to catch because they
scramble into their burrows when you get
close. The top bait for big sheepshead, fiddlers
can also be used for porgies, snapper and
hogfish on the reefs. Only males have a big
claw; remove it before using the crab as bait.
MUD CRABS: These small dark-colored
crabs are found among rocks and oyster
shells, usually over muddy bottoms. There
are actually several species. Be careful not to
collect juvenile stone crabs, which are illegal
to possess. Used mostly for sheepshead.
SAND FLEAS: More properly called mole


crabs, these little guys aren't fleas at all.
Fantastic bait for sheepshead, black drum and
pompano. Dig your own along the surf zone
of Gulf beaches or buy frozen ones.
OYSTERS: Although they are a pain to
collect, oysters can be harvested from pilings,
bridge abutments and oyster bars. They make
a good (if a bit delicate) bait for sheepshead,
redfish and black drum. You can also scrape
them and barnacles off the pilings with a hoe
to make sheepshead chum.
SQUID: Rarely caught here, squid are
nonetheless very popular bait. Whole squid
are an excellent red grouper bait. Smaller
pieces catch porgies and grunts. Squid is a
very tough bait and difficult to steal from the
hook, so it's an excellent choice for tipping a
sabiki rig.
MARINE WORMS: Few people bother to
collect these here, but any marine worms you
find are great bait for redfish and sheepshead.
You can also use earthworms as a substitute
(but don't tell anyone that's a secret).

FRESHWATER BAITS
CATERPILLARS: Many caterpillars are good
panfish bait. Collect your own cutworms, or
buy waxworms at the bait shop. As with true
worms, sometimes more effective cut in half.
CATFISH BAITS: A wide variety of smelly
things are used as catfish bait: Cut fish left in
the sun, rancid chicken livers, stinky cheeses,
various blood dough concoctions, etc. There
are lots of others, both commercially avail-
able and homemade, but the thing they share
is the ability to make you retch.
CLAMS: Freshwater clams (round ones
with yellow-brown shells) can be pried apart
and the soft part used to catch sunfish, or
put several on a hook for catfish. Don't use
mussels (oval with dark shells), which are in
decline.
CRAYFISH: These look like a miniature
lobster. Bass love them (actually, so do
redfish, but that's another secret). Collect


your own in traps of by dip-netting in weedy
areas. Sometimes you can find them crawling
on land at night after heavy rains.
CRICKETS: Cheap to buy at the pet shop.
Crickets and the related grasshoppers are
good bait for sunfish and cichlids.
EXOTIC FISH: A number of exotics, including
tilapia and jewel cichlids, are very common and
can be easily netted. Regardless, under Florida
law, these fish cannot be legally used as live
bait all you can do is dispose of them. Using
goldfish and other aquarium fish as live bait
is also against the law. It is permissible to use
them as cut bait, but if you have live specimens
on the water you are flirting with a citation.
The only exceptions: Platies and fathead
minnows.
GOLDEN SHINERS: A standard for big
largemouth bass, shiners are easily chummed
with bread pieces and caught on bread balls
on tiny hooks, or you can buy them. It takes
a lot of oxygen to keep these baits alive, and
once they're dead you may as well toss them
overboard.
GRASS SHRIMP: A good bait for sunfish,
grass shrimp are easy to dip-net along weedy
shorelines. Use a light wire hook. You can
use big ones (1.5 inches is a big one) singly,
or put several on a hook to make a bigger
mouthful.
MINNOWS: This covers almost any small
nongame species, including mollies, mosqui-
tofish, killifish and a bunch more. Bass and
crappie love to eat them all. Seine or dip-net.
SUNFISH: As long as you catch them
yourself on hook and line, bluegill and other
sunfish are legal to use as bait using hook and
line. Live bluegills are a excellent big-bass bait.
WORMS: Big ones (nightcrawlers) are a
good choice for bass and catfish. Small ones
wigglerss) are readily taken by sunfish and
cichlids. You can dig your own wigglers, if you
can find a good spot for it, but you'll have to
buy nightcrawlers. Sometimes cutting one in
half or into pieces can draw more strikes.


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CATCHING METHODS
THE SABIKI RIG: A sabiki is just several
small hooks spaced 12 or so inches apart. The
hooks can be plain or dressed with a small
skirt. You can also use small chunks of bait.
Most commercially made sabikis have three to
six hooks. To use, tie a sinker to the end and
cast out or drop down and jig.
CASTNET: The gold standard in bait collec-
tion, a castnet makes it possible (sometimes
even easy) to collect a day's worth of bait in
a few minutes. Learning to throw a net well
is an art, and not one that can be learned
quickly. In fresh water, castnets must have a
mesh under one inch.
SEINE: A seine is basically a wall of mesh
with floats on top and sinkers on the bottom.
Smaller seines require two people to operate;
big ones can be used by one person in conjunc-
tion with a set pole. In salt water, seines must
be less than 500 square feet with mesh no
larger than two inches; in fresh water, a seine
must be not more than 20 feet long, not more
than 4 feet high, and have a mesh no larger
than one inch.
DIP-NET: Any net with a handle may be
regarded as a dip-net. Sometimes a regular
landing net will work, such as for larger blue
crabs, but in most instance the mesh is too
wide and will allow your bait to slip through.
Specialized dip-nets with extendable handles
are used for shrimping from bridges and piers.
To be legal, your net's perimeter must be less
than 96 inches.
TRAPS: Trapping gamefish is prohibited, so
bait traps must be small. In salt water, traps
must not exceed 2 feet in any dimension, with
a throat or entrance not exceeding 3 inches
in height by 3/4 inch in width. In fresh water,
traps must be no more than 24 inches long,
12 inches in diameter, and have a maximum
1-inch funnel entrance. Any unregulated
species may be taken in traps.


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L 00 Choosing and using artificial lures


Catching fish is hard enough when you're
trying to tempt them with something they can
eat. Why would you want to handicap yourself
by using a lure made of metal or plastic? In
many circumstances, it's actually easier to get
fish to bite on artificial lures. It's often more
work, because a lure depends on the angler for
its fish-appealing action, but it's often possible
- even likely for a lure fisherman to catch
more than a bait fisherman.
Manufacturers of artificial lures put a great
deal of though into how to make their prod-
ucts catch fish (and fishermen). Many years of
innovation have brought us to where we are
today. There are literally thousands of options
for anglers who want to use artificial lures, but
most can be sorted into one of the following
categories:
SPOONS: These lures are made from shiny
metal that flashes erratically as the spoon is
pulled through the water. The legend goes that
an angler lunching on his boat accidentally
dropped a spoon overboard and saw a fish
attack it as it fell. The earliest spoons were
made from flatware, much to some housewife's
chagrin, but now spoons are made in a huge
variety of sizes and shapes. The most popular
here are eighth- to half-ounce models in gold
with some sort of weedguard. Spoons can be
worked by simply casting them out and reeling
them in, or you can impart bouncing or jigging
motion. No matter how you use a spoon, they
are prone to spinning, so it's good idea to use a
quality swivel so your line doesn't get twisted.
JIGS: A jig is nothing more than a hook
weighted at the eye with a piece of metal,
usually lead. Jigs can be dressed with nylon,
feather, bucktail or plastic skirts (an undresses
jig is called a jighead). For fishing in shallow
water, a jig may be as light as 1/64 ounce, or
can be 16 ounces or more for deepwater use.
Most jigs weigh between an eighth-ounce and


With size limits and
closed seasons restricting
the fish an angler can keep,
most of the fish you catch
are going to have to go
back in the water. It's up to
you to help them survive to
fight another day.
Some fish can hurt you.
Catfish have venomous
spines, snook have sharp
gill covers, and several
fish sharks, snapper,
mackerel, barracuda and
seatrout have sharp
teeth and aren't shy about
using them. Always be
careful.
Don't gaff a fish you
intend to release. Use a
net or your hands to land
the fish. If you use a net, be sure it has soft
cloth or rubber mesh. Rough nylon mesh will
scratch off slime.
Wet your hands before handling the fish.
Never use a towel or dry gloves, as this
will rub off the fish's protective slime coat.
Deslimed fish often die of skin infections.
Better yet, use a dehooking tool and avoid
handling the fish at all.
Keep the fish in the water as much as
possible. The bigger the fish, the more
important this is the weight of a large
fish can crush its internal organs if it's not
buoyed by water.
If you're lifting the fish for a photo, hold it
with both hands. It's OK to use a BogaGrip on
the mouth as long as you support the fish's
belly with your other hand. Never handle a
fish you plan to release by just its lower jaw.
This can cause damage that will kill the fish
slowly. It may swim away, but it won't be
able to eat properly.
Use circle hooks if you're using natural bait.
Circle hooks are designed to hook fish in the
corner of the mouth, making it much easier
to remove the hook from the fish.


4 ounces, but for inshore use you'll rarely
use on heavier than half an ounce. Jigs
are usually most effective when bounced
across the bottom. A special type of jig
called a silly jig is meant to be worked
erratically in midwater; silly jigs are often
paired with very small teaser flies. Other
heavy lures made of metal (butterfly jigs,
diamond jigs, etc.) are also called jigs, but
most are designed to be worked vertically
rather than cast outward like the jigs most
of us are familiar with. Ajig can be used in
combination with a spoonlike blade to make
a spinnerbait, popular for both largemouth
bass in fresh water and redfish in the salt.
SOFT PLASTICS: These lures are made in
sizes from an inch long up to enormous, and
in shapes meant to resemble fish, worms,
lizards, shrimp, crayfish, frogs and anything
else a fish might eat. The main thing they have
in common is that the plastic is meant to move
in a lifelike way in the water. Many have curly
or paddle-shaped tails that are designed to
swim when retrieved. Often, soft plastic lures
are impregnated with scent of some sort, either
to attract fish or to convince them to hold onto
the bait longer after they strike. These baits are
usually sold unrigged; depending on the action
desired, soft plastic lures can be rigged on bare
hooks, weighted hooks or jigs (either dressed or
plain).
SWIMBAITS: Technically a type of soft plastic
lure, swimbaits are shaped like small fish and
are usually sold with a weight and hook already
embedded into the lure. Swimbaits are easy
to use just cast it out and reel it in and
come in sizes from 2 inches to the size of an
adult mullet.
TOPWATER PLUGS: These lures are prob-
ably the most exciting to catch fish with. Even
the most jaded old salts get a thrill when a
gamefish blows up on a topwater. There are


If the fish is deeply hooked, cut the leader
as close to the hook as possible. This will
cause less damage to the fish than a crude
surgical procedure to remove the hook.
If you use lures with treble hooks, consider
filing off or mashing down the barbs.
Multiple hooks cause multiple wounds to
the fish. Also, it's often time-consuming to
remove multiple hooks, and a quicker release
is better for the fish's survival chances.
When you release a fish, slide it gently into
the water. Don't ever literally throw it back
- the shock of hitting the water's surface
hard can stun or kill the fish. If you're fishing
from a pier, drop it headfirst from as low a
height as you can. If you're fishing from a tall
pier or bridge, lower the fish to the water in
a pier net.
Generally, the less time a fish spends
in your livewell, the better. But a livewell
makes a good "emergency room"for very
tired or stressed fish. Be sure the water is
well-oxygenated, and close the lid once the
fish is inside the dark well will calm the
fish. After a few minutes, the fish should be
OK to release.


'I


I a number of different
types. Walk-the-dog lures are torpedo-shaped
and are meant to be worked with rapid, short
rodtip twitches, which cause the lure to dart
back and forth in a zigzag pattern across the
water. Poppers have concave fronts to make
splashes and noise when the lure is tugged
sharply. Prop baits have small propellers at the
front and back of the lures (sometimes just
the back) that churn as the lure is retrieved.
All topwater plugs work best in low-light
conditions early morning, late evening or
overcast days and in water less than 6 feet
deep. Otherwise, fish are wary about coming
to the surface to hit a bait.
JERKBAITS: Most anglers are familiar with
jerkbaits (think of the original Rapala Minnow).
These lures have short plastic lips, which cause
them to dive under the water's surface. They're
usually worked by jerking the lure under,
reeling it for a few seconds and then allowing
it to float back up. Varying the amount of time


RLaishley
MARINE INo
A 6 0


between jerks and the speed of the
retrieve can make a huge differ-
ence in the interest fish show these
.. lures; you may need to experiment
- to discover what works best for
a give set of conditions. As with
topwater lures, jerkbaits are
usually most effective in low light.
a soft Sometimes, soft plastic lures are
ajighead also called jerkbaits.
isy steps. CRANKBAITS: Many crank-
baits are also lipped, but the
lip of a crankbait is longer
S because the lure is intended to
be worked underwater most or
all of the time. There are also
lipless crankbaits (like the Rat-
1-Trap) that rely on the shape
of the lure to cause it to dive.
All crankbaits are designed to vibrate on
the retrieve and often work best when simply
cast out and reeled back in. Much of Charlotte
Harbor is too shallow for many crankbaits that
are popular up north.
TROLLING PLUG: A specialized type of
crankbait meant to be towed behind a moving
boat. Of course, you can troll with most lures,
but these baits are designed specifically to be
used at trolling speeds and to dive to a certain
depth range. Trolling plugs are usually big and
usually expensive, but they're also a fantastic
way to target big fish in relatively deep water
without having to use natural baits.
TWITCH BAITS: Usually made of hard plastic,
twitchbaits are weighted to be neutrally
buoyant or sink slowly. Unlike most other lures,
a twitchbait has virtually no action except what
the angler imparts with twitches of the rodtip.
Because of this, it can take some time to learn
how to catch fish with these lures. Once you get
the hang of it, though, there are few hard baits
that are more effective.


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THE TROUBLE WITH TREBLES
Many lures feature treble hooks. Trebles are a blessing and a curse: They are very effective at hooking fish that
hit a lure, but they also can easily end up in your shirt or your skin. Trebles also often do quite a bit of damage to
a fish, especially if a lure has more than one set of hooks. It's very common to have fish hooked in the eye, gills
or other areas along with the mouth. To help reduce these issues, it's a good idea to use a pair of pliers to mash
down the barbs, or file them off.



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FAVORITE LURES
With so many choices available on store
shelves, choosing artificial lures can be tough.
To help you stock your tackle box, we posed this
question to our WaterLine writers: If you could
only have three lures to use in Charlotte Harbor,
what would they be and why?

CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
1. A white bucktail jig with a red head. It's
the simplest lure I know, but also the most versatile
- you can hop it across the bottom, swim it across
the top or jerk it through the midwater. You can also
add a bait to sweeten it.
2. A gold Johnson Sprite spoon. This classic
lure can really catch fish, and the treble hook ensure
a hookup better than a single hook.
3. A 4-inch soft plastic jerkbait in olive
green. I like the shape with the tail that tapers,
because I can use that style to walk the dog. These
work well on an unweighted wide-gap hook or a
jighead.

JEFF KINCAID
1. A Sebile Stick Shadd in Amber Fashion
or Blood Red Amber. I have immense confidence
in this lure it's got incredible action and can be
worked a number of ways. Fish just hit it.
2. A weedless gold spoon, because it can be
retrieved fast or slow to mimic crabs or pinfish, and
there are so many fish that will eat it. It's also a very
durable bait.
3. A scented soft plastic lure is an easy choice
because it smells like food. MirrOlure Li'l Johns are
probably my favorite, because they're less messy
than some other options and still catch fish.

ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
1. A weedless gold spoon, because it can
be bounced off the bottom like a jig, reeled at a
moderate pace, or ripped across the top to catch
almost any game fish.
2. A Rapala Skitterwalk or Zara Spook Jr.,
because the excitement of a topwater strike is incred-
ible, it makes a great fish locator, and learning to fish it
effectively has taught me to be a better angler.


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3. A 3- or 4-inch soft plastic lure the most
versatile lure I know. It can be rigged weedless or
on a jighead, worked fast or slow, and catches just
about everything.

CAPT. MIKE MYERS
1. A quarter-ounce spoon with a treble
hook, because there's not a single predatory fish in
the ocean that won't eat it. It's also impossible for a
fish to tear it up.
2. A quarter-ounce red jighead with a white
soft plastic paddletail. Just like a spoon, anything
will attack this lure, and the red/white combination
is the best pattern known to man.
3. A 3-inch Rapala X-Rap in the mullet
color pattern. It's easy to use, and it can turn on a
reluctant bite.

JOSH OLIVE
1. A DOA CAL paddletail rigged on a
weighted weedless hook. It's just an amazing lure
for this area. If I could only have one color, it would
be Glow/Gold Rush.
2. A white bucktail jig with a red head.
This lure is used less often than it ought to be -
it's a fish-catching classic and can be used as is
or rigged up with a plastic tail or natural bait to
sweeten it.
3. A single-hook gold spoon with the
weedguard broken off (I find the weedguards on
most spoons cause more problems than they solve).

MATT STEVENS
1. A MirroLure MirrOdine in the cracked ice
gold finish. It's the lure I've had the most success
catching snook and trout with.
2. A DOA CAL shad tail. It's so versatile, and you
can catch anything on it. It's great for pier fishing.
3. A Zara Spook Jr. This lure is a lot of fun to
work, and it's a trout killer. I've thrown a lot of
topwater lures, and this one just seems to do the
job best.

CAPT. CAYLE WILLS
A gold spoon, a silver spoon, and a Bone SL
Zara Spook Jr. All of these lures have stood the test
of time and just plain catch fish.


Handling fish for release


CLOTHING SHOES
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Here are some basic truths: Taxes are going
to go up, gas will cost more, and the ozone
layer ain't what it used to be. If you spend any
time in the outdoors under the sun, you're
exposing your skin to ultraviolet rays. Too much
UV causes sun burn, and the damage caused
by sun burn can lead to skin cancer. For those
people who haven't hear, some skin cancers can
kill you. That's probably something you'd prefer
to avoid.
Fortunately, it's not that difficult to protect
yourself. There are a number of excellent
sunscreens on the market, which if applied
according to the manufacturer's instructions do
a very good job of preventing sun burn. If you
spend only a limited amount of time outdoors,
sunscreen may be all you need. For those of you
who spend more time under the sun, protective
clothing offers a more economical alternative.
In addition to being cheaper in the long run,
you can also avoid getting sunscreen on your
hands (sunscreen acts as a fish repellent). As
an added bonus, these articles of clothing are
usually made from materials which dry quickly.
SHIRTS
There are a number of options here. Button-
down nylon or cotton shirts with multiple
pockets and mesh back panels have been
around for years. Newer to the market are
shirts made from stretchy synthetic microfiber
with built-in (not topically applied) UV protec-
tion, including such popular local brands as
RedZone, Breathe Like A Fish and Gator Dave
Apparel. Because it's part of the fabric, the UV
protection in the microfiber shirts is permanent
and doesn't wash off, even after repeated


laundering (check the label for the actual sun
protection factor).
The microfiber not only dries very quickly, it
wicks moisture away from your skin and evapo-
rates it to cool you in the heat. This wicking
action also helps you feel warmer in cool condi-
tions, especially if the microfiber shirt is worn
as an underlayer. As with button-down shirts,
microfiber shirts are made in long-and short-
sleeve versions. Obviously, the long-sleeve
models offer more sun protection, although
many of the shirts marketed for women are
short-sleeved.
PANTS
As with shirts, you have a number of
options for pants, and as with the shirts the
UV protection should be built in. Good models
are available from Columbia, Bimini Bay and a
number of other makers. They are made from
polyester or nylon, but not microfiber (it would
wear funny). You can choose from pants with
full-length legs, shorts or even models that
convert back and forth, with legs that zip off.
It's no good to wear quick-dry pants if you're
wearing cotton underwear that soak up the
water, so get some nylon ones (Jockey makes
some that work well). Some anglers prefer to
go without, which is also an option if you're
comfortable with it.
HEADWEAR
Hats and face coverings are key components
of your outdoor uniform. Although you don't
need to buy a special hat, most caps either
don't breathe well (so they're hot to wear) or
don't offer much sun protection (especially if


you have some hair loss). Calcutta and Glacier
Outdoor make hats with removable neck
protectors; Glacier says theirs is 50 UPF, but
Calcutta makes no such claim. Head and face
coverings have become very popular, not only
for sun protection but also to keep wind burn
at bay. Buff makes the standard (in fact, many
anglers now use buff as a generic term), but
Dr. Shade and other makers do them as well.
Breathe Like A Fish even makes one that's built
right into a shirt for added convenience. When
you're buying a head and face cover, be sure
to check the label some models don't have
built-in UV protection, so you can get a burn
anyway. Many face-covering garments are
made from microfiber, with the same wicking
action as microfiber shirts to keep you cool.
GLOVES
When you're keeping the sun off, don't forget
your hands. Columbia, Buff and Dr. Shade make
sun-resistant gloves, most of which are finger-
less to allow ease of handling fishing gear and
tying knots. Made of comfortable synthetic
materials, these gloves are meant to be worn
all day long. Buff makes three models: Fighting
Work Gloves, which have a thick leather palm
and enclosed fingertips; the Angler Gloves,
which have a thinner leather palm; and the
Water Gloves, with a silicon grip on the palm. A
sun burn on your hands can be very painful, so
don't forget this important part of your outfit.
FOOTWEAR
No manufacturer that I know of sells a shoe
marketed as UV protective, but any good pair
of canvas or leather sneakers will block out the


sun. Water socks made of mesh and sandals
allow some sun to get through. If you plan on
doing much wading, a pair of wading shoes are
a good idea. If you plan to wade in winter, a
pair of hip or chest waders is a beautiful thing
to have not for keeping the sun off but for
keeping chilly water off your skin.
SUNGLASSES
A good pair of polarized sunglasses is
indispensable any time you're on the water.
Polarized lenses not only keep the UV from
damaging your eyes but also cut glare from
the water's surface, allowing you to see
what's below: Bottom contours, obstructions,
bait, fish, whatever. Costa is a very popular
brand in this area not cheap, but very
nice glasses. If you can't drop the money for
the good ones, get something. They probably
won't work as well or last as long, but at least
your eyes won't be naked. Being on the water
without sunglasses that protect against UV
is dangerous, both in the short term (surface
glare has caused more than a few boating acci-
dents) and long term, contributing to cataracts.
A day on the water is usually a lot of fun,
but most of you know what it's like to pay the
price later if you don't protect yourself from
the sun. With the quality outdoor apparel
that's available now, you can have the peace of
mind that you're protected while also making
yourself more comfortable and saving money
on sunscreen it's win-win-win.
Jeff Kincaid is the owner and operatorof Capt. Teds
Tackle in Port Charlotte. Contact him at www.CaptnT-
edsTackle.com or 941-627-6800, or stop in at the shop
(1189 Tamiami Trail, in frontoflngman Marine).


Ib @0@0d@









SPF & | UPF ihil'"l ly Liillli i l '.llt l l l. i riij-l i
SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. It is nrli- n .i I.P1F U il I, ..r .ill niiii-r PI ,-. F I. i j. i..r 1 [ ,
of UV radiation dose required to produce reo,,iii: jII t- tI1- r, r iii I ii- i '- tv-j1-r J i -nl i n1 Iur iiiii- r j1 1h diii.
redness on skin that has been protected wit'i iii n r,-ii rr iiiii.i- [r i iiiir -i iii ul, ii J iii uI l riiiulljh ir i11
from the UV radiation dose required to prod i.- iiii- i l- Fli- Ij-i r jii --11-it-l nmr In V rri lm ii ,l r i '.- [ riiiiiF-1 111i
redness on unprotected skin (using a clinical [o I- [ri -- .ii iii -l 1 i Fllir iij Iilim IiI in il-r tii ,il- i I [ii- jiiui.in
dure on human skin). SPF tells you how much lullntt i ul ulildvuIti rddld[iull [lld d Idb nrl blucik. UPF vdlut drt
will take for your skin to begin to redden with the product used in the fabric's UV transmittance test by spectropho-
,ii Il. iii f vi n.r I il IIi .ijI trli-, i-i Tlii- ii-r, -iil jji]- n I 'ii-i t-n r i ]iiilIi.-l it
r 1 ] I IV rn J [l [ ] J [ II, i. l i. ri1 j.- 0P'r,., I l ly | i iilnli- l"'.nii'rPn ,, ,n n


- --- -- ------- -.. --

.--W. ET.-P-L ;: -PH:'TC' B. JC.'SH OLIVE --
This angler is well-protected with a Gator Davetpparelshirt, a Buff, a pair
of Dr. Shade gloves, sunglasses, a tightly woven cloth cap and zip-off nylon
pants. All the sunscreen he needs is a dab on the bridge of his nose.


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WATERLINE PHOTO BY JOSH OLIVE
Scouting for new locations is one way to
take your angling skills to the next level.


Those are always good places to look
because that stronger current will usually
remove bottom sediment, causing those
places to be deeper. Some of the most
productive places to fish in the Harbor are
bottlenecks: The passes, canal bridges and
even the U.S. 41 bridges.
Because of our unique tides, when
you apply current flow to finding a new
spot you have to take it to the next level.
You just can't go there during a summer
incoming tide, see moving water, and
think that spot will produce all year long.
You can't even assume it will produce
during a tide that is outgoing. You have
to visit that hole several times during
different tides and at different times of the
year to see when it holds fish. Shoreline
points are notorious for producing only
during certain tides and particular times
of the year. The current around a point
changes dramatically during a tide change,


i:-


shrimp throughout the year, chances are
that spot will hold more juvenile redfish.
However, if there are whitebait or other
baitfish present, you will more than likely
catch legal and oversized redfish there.
An apparent lack of food at a given spot
doesn't mean that fish won't be there.
There are times when you can still catch
fish in areas that are devoid of food, and
sometimes those areas can be very produc-
tive. Those will be"highways" that fish use
to travel between feeding locations. A good
example is catching fish while drifting
between reefs offshore.
That brings us to structure. We all know
structure is important, but do we truly
understand what structure is? Bridges,
docks and mangrove shorelines are
familiar examples, but there are other
things out there that I would say qualify.
Grassflats are structure, because the
grass gives batfish and their predators


- together, your success rate will increase. I and sometimes our low winter water concealment from each oth
S- keep that in mind when I'm watching for a makes the area around those points just the slightly deeper depress
new spot. I look for current, shoreline and too shallow to hold fish. grassflats, are another exal
-- -- bottom topography, bait or food avail- Another item to look for is food avail- ture. When you drive up to
SU ability, and structure. ability. This is much more complex than at the color of the bottom
SMany times current is the most impor- just seeing baitfish in the area. You have you. You see light and dark
S-_ ---- tant. Fish need to eat, and moving water to have a solid understanding of what your light being sand and the d
S- fires up most of our fishes'appetites. target species feeds on throughout the Now look closely at the lig
S._ -.o --- o that makes current key in choosing different stages of its life. For example, a and you will start to see ar
.__-- a new spot. I want to see good moving juvenile or rat redfish will primarily feed just slightly darker in shadi
-- water during the first couple of hours of on crustaceans, a slot redfish will eat potholes. They might only I
a tide change. There are places where the crustaceans and small fish, and a bull red deeper than the bottom ar
A_ ___- -__ current will be stronger, such as natural will feed primarily on small fish. So if you those few inches can hide
-- or man-made bottlenecks and points, locate an area that is full of crabs and grass It may not seem like much,


ler. Potholes,
ions along the
mple of struc-
the flats, look
you see around
bottom, the
ark being grass.
ht colored areas,
eas that are
e. Those are the
be a few inches
ound them, but
a predatory fish.
but on a very


flat bottom any small change becomes
structure for prey or predators.
Structure is important, but it's useless
on its own. Going back to the three basic
needs of fish eat, reproduce and not
get eaten structure is simply a place
to not get eaten. It's a safe haven. Fish
aren't going to actively feed at these areas
because doing so would put the fish in
jeopardy. A good example of this are our
resident juvenile tarpon in our canals.
The canals provide structure and protec-
tion for the fish while also providing food.
However, they only feed at times when
they feel safe and will completely ignore
food items when they don't.
Breeding grounds are another excellent
place to catch fish. Now, some fish feed
while spawning, like snook, redfish and
tarpon. Other fish, like largemouth bass,
get lockjaw while breeding. Some species
it will depend on how the intensity of the
pressure to spawn; sheepshead are a great
example of that.
Fish with long breeding periods are
usually hungry while spawning and so are
easily caught. All you really need to do is
understand where and when they breed
and go there. Redfish spawn on shorelines
from mid-August to mid-October, so the
flats are littered with them at that time of
year. Snook spawn on full and new moons
from May through September in high-
current passes.
Fish with short spawning periods
usually don't feed heavily while they are


spawning. They have better things to do.
These types of fish usually have a very
active or even violent spawning ritual,
or they actually stick around and protect
their eggs while they mature. You can
usually trigger these species to bite by
threatening their eggs or nests. These
fish usually become very territorial and
will strike at invaders to keep them from
eating the next generation.
Some fish (like sheepshead, which
spawn in the winter) are influenced by the
amount of breeding pressure. Head out
to Alligator Reef when the water is clear
in the winter and watch the sheepshead.
If you see a large fish with a smaller one
alongside, that is usually a large female
being coaxed to breed by a smaller male.
That fish will usually take a bait. However,
if you see a large female being harassed
by several males, the chances of her
eating are slim.
Putting all of this together will help
you pick out new fishing spots that are
productive, and having a long list of loca-
tions from which to choose will help you
be a more consistently successful angler.
But don't ignore the places that don't seem
quite so "fishy." Sometimes it's better to be
lucky than good.
Capt. Cayle Wills owns and operates Bad
Fish Charters on Charlotte Harbor. You can
contact him at 941-916-4538 or Capt.Cayle.'
ReelBadFish.com. You can also visit him online
at www.ReelBadFish.com or www.facebook.
com/BadFishCharters.


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Whether you're new to the water or an old salt, you have
to agree that boaters and anglers use some terminology that
takes a while to pick up. I thought a glossary of some of these
words might be useful to you. Although the following list is far
from complete, it should be enough to get you started.

ABEAM: At a right angle to the keel or centerline of the
boat.
ABOARD: On a boat.
AFT: Toward the stern.
AGROUND: When a boat's hull is in contact with the
bottom. If this happens under power, it's called running
aground. If the boat can't be freed, it's called hard aground. If
the tide goes out while you're aground on a flat, you may end
up high and dry.
AID TO NAVIGATION: Any device intended to assist
navigators in determining their position or safe course, or to
warn them of dangers or obstructions to navigation (channel
markers, lighthouses, buoys, etc.).
ALGAE: Single-celled or multicellular plantlike organisms.
Water rich in nutrients often causes an algal bloom (rapid
growth) of unicellular species. Multicellular species (kelp,
sargassum, etc.) are called macroalgae or, more commonly,
seaweed.
ANCHOR: A device used to secure a vessel to the bottom.
There are many designs. In some cases, even a concrete block
can be used as an anchor.
ANCHOR PIN: A long, thin rod used to stake out a boat.
Can be manual (i.e., Stick It) or power-operated (i.e., Power
Pole).
ARTIFICIAL LURE: Any bait not organic in nature;
usually made of plastic, metal, wood, feathers or some
combination thereof.
BACKCOUNTRY: Inshore areas characterized by narrow,
shallow waterways and heavy mangrove growth. There is
open water in the backcountry, but getting to it is often
difficult. Sometimes used to refer to any inshore waters.
BAG LIMIT: The quantity of a given species that may be
taken by a harvester each day. For the purposes of the bag
limit, a harvester is a person actively engaged in catching
fish. Someone who isn't fishing, has no license or is too
young to hold a rod is not a harvester, which means they
cannot collect any part of a bag limit.
BAIT: Any natural or artificial lure used to entice fish to
bite a hook.
BARRIER ISLAND: A large sandbar between inshore
and offshore waters. Barrier islands naturally shift over time,
a process that humans try to control because beachfront
property is expensive. Good luck!
BENTHIC: Used to describe any organism that lives on
the bottom. If attached to solid objects, benthic creatures are
called sessile.
BILGE: The compartment at the bottom of the hull where
water collects and must be pumped out of the vessel.
BIMINI TOP: An open-front canvas top for the cockpit of
a boat, usually supported by a metal frame.
BLIND-CASTING: A method of sportfishing in which an
angler casts a bait to an area he supposes a fish might be, as
opposed to sight-casting.
BLUE WATER: Water so deep it appears royal blue. On
this coast, it takes a run of more than 100 miles to reach blue
water.
BOATING SAFETY COURSE: A class intended to teach
one how to be a safe vessel operator. In Florida, required for
anyone born on or after Jan. 1,1988, to operate a vessel.


BOTTOM FISHING: A fishing style that utilizes natural
baits and heavy sinkers to target reef fish (usually grouper
and/or snapper) in the Gulf.
BOW: The front end of a boat.
BRACKISH: Water that is a mixture of salt and fresh.
During the rainy season, the entire harbor is often brackish
due to heavy river flow. When it's dry, brackish water may
extend far up the rivers. Brackish water is often murky and/or
tinted brown, but not always.
BRAID: Fishing line usually made from synthetic fibers.
Popular braids are characterized by small diameters and high
tensile strength.
BUCK SNOOK: A small snook (16 to 24 inches). Snook
are almost always male at this size and become female when
they get larger.
BUCKTAIL: Ajig dressed with natural hair or nylon
bristles.
BULL REDFISH: Generic term for a large redfish. Usually
reserved for fish longer than 30 inches.
BUMPER: A plastic foam- or air-filled device used to
absorb shock when a boat contacts a solid object or other
boat.
BUOY: Any floating object anchored to the bottom,
except a vessel.
BUSTING BAIT: Large fish attacking small fish at the
water's surface.
CANAL: A long and narrow man-made waterway. May be
filled with salt, brackish or fresh water.
CASTNET: A circular net 4 to 30 feet in diameter,
weighted at the edges, designed to be thrown. The netter
grips an attached rope to retrieve the net.
CATAMARAN: A boat design with two hulls separated by
an air space. The deck connects the two hulls.
CATCH-AND-RELEASE: To capture fish with no intention
of harvesting them.
CHANNEL: A navigable pathway of deeper water through
an area of shallower water. Some are natural; others man-
made.
CHART: A map of a waterway, usually marked with
approximate depths.
CHINE: An angle in the hull, or a line formed at the point
at which the sides of a boat meet the bottom.
CHOP: Short, steep waves; usually seen as adjective form
choppy.
CHUM: Small pieces of food or liquid (blood, fish oil, etc.)
used as a scent attractant and to get fish started feeding.
CLEAT: A stationary device used to secure a rope aboard
a vessel.
CIRCLE HOOK/J-HOOK: A circle hook is designed to catch
the corner of a fish's mouth. Circle hooks are required to harvest
reef fish. A J-hook is any hook that is not a circle hook.
COCKPIT: The area of the vessel where the captain's
controls are located. In smaller vessels, this usually also
includes the seating area.
COME ABOUT: Steer in the opposite direction.
CRAB TRAP BUOY: A Styrofoam float used to mark the
location of a crab trap.
CRANKBAIT: An artificial lure, usually hard plastic,
designed to dive and vibrate rapidly when retrieved. May
be lipped (for example, the Bomber Fat A) or lipless (for
example, the Rat-L-Trap).
CREEK: A narrow natural body of water, usually flowing.
Freshwater creeks may flow for many miles. Tidal creeks are
brackish or salt water and have no natural flow (water moves
only with the tides), and may be as short as 100 feet.


CREST: The topmost part of a wave.
CRIMP: A metal tube used to secure cable wire or mono-
filament fishing line in place of a knot.
CURRENT: Moving water in any form.
CUT: A narrow body of water that connects two larger
bodies.
CUTBAIT: Pieces offish used as bait. Usually cut from
whole fish, not fillets.
DECK: The upper part of a boat except for the cockpit.
DECK BOAT: A boat designed for maximum deck space.
Differs from a pontoon boat in that it is usually built on a
vee hull.
DEHOOKER: A tool used to remove a hook without
handling the fish.
DRAFT: The distance from the boat's waterline to the
bottom of the hull.
DRAG: A device that creates friction on a fishing reel to
put pressure on a fish as it pulls line from the spool.
DREDGE: To remove bottom sediments, usually to allow
easier boating access in a pass or a canal.
DRIFT FISHING: Fishing from an unanchored boat with
no propulsion system engaged.
DROPOFF: A sudden change of depth.
EAST WALL, WEST WALL: The east and west sides
of Charlotte Harbor. The East Wall extends from roughly
Alligator Creek to Matlacha Pass. The West Wall extends from
Cattle Dock Point to Cape Haze Point. Both walls feature
extensive mangroves. The East Wall has a much larger area
of flats.
EPIRB: Emergency position-indicating radio beacon; used
to guide rescuers to you when you need rescuing.
ETHANOL: A fuel additive used for road vehicles. Should
not be used in marine engines.
FATHOM: Equals 6 feet of depth.
FISHFINDER: An electronic device that uses sonar
to illustrate objects beneath the surface of the water.
Sometimes called a bottom machine. A depthfinder also uses
sonar, but shows only water depth.
FLARE: A pyrotechnic signaling device, usually used to
indicate distress.
FLAT: A large area of shallow water (1 to 6 feet deep),
with a more-or-less-level bottom. Most flats are called by
what covers the bottom (grassflats, mudflats, etc.).
FLAT HULL: A vessel design that utilizes a flat hull bottom
to minimize draft. Flat-hull vessels handle waves poorly.
FLOAT PLAN: A written plan detailing a boater's on-the-
water plans and left with a responsible party in case of
misadventure.
FLUOROCARBON: A plastic material often formed into
thin strands and used for leaders. Fluorocarbon's refractive
index makes it almost invisible in water.
FOLLOWING SEA: Waves or tidal movement moving in
the same direction as a vessel.
FREE-LINE: To fish a live bait with no weight or float.
FWC: The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion; sets regulations for harvest of game and fish on Florida
lands and waters.
GAFF: A large hook attached to a pole used to land fish.
Gaffing is a safer way to handle toothy fish, but should be
used only for fish that will be harvested.
GATOR TROUT: A large trout. Here, usually any specimen
larger than 5 pounds.
GILL NET: A net with a mesh designed to be large
enough to allow a fish's head through, where it gets caught
by its gill flaps. Illegal for any use in Florida.


GPS: Global positioning system; a satellite-based naviga-
tion system used to determine precise location.
GUIDE: A licensed professional who takes individuals
or small groups on a boat for fishing, ecotourism or other
purposes.
GUNWALE: The sides of a boat.
HARD BOTTOM: A section of seafloor that is shelly or
rocky. In the Gulf, hard bottom is often limestone. A ledge is a
dropoffin a hard bottom area.
HARVEST: To kill an animal.
HATCH: A door or panel covering a compartment.
HAYWIRE TWIST: A method used to secure single-
strand wire without crimping.
HEAD: Nauti-speak for a rest room.
HEADING: The direction in which a vessel is traveling.
HEAD SEA: Waves or tidal movement moving in the
opposite direction as a vessel.
ICW: The Intracoastal Waterway, a system of man-made
and naturally occurring channels that allow a boat to traverse
the coast without being exposed to the open Gulf.
IDLE SPEED: The forward speed produced when your
motor is idling.
INBOARD MOTOR: A vessel engine contained within the
hull. May be diesel- or gasoline-powered.
INSHORE: In this area, any salt or brackish water except
the open Gulf of Mexico.
JACKPLATE: An adjustable outboard motor mount
attached to the transom of a boat, allowing the motor to
be moved up and down vertically for better shallow-water
performance.
JERKBAIT: A diving artificial lure, usually with a short lip,
designed to be retrieved while action is imparted by sweeps
of the rod.
JETTY: A man-made wall that extends out into the water.
Often made of large rocks.
JIG: Usually, an artificial lure made using a jighead.
May be constructed using soft plastic, feathers, nylon
fibers, natural hair or any combination. Also refers to other
heavy lures made of metal (i.e., butterfly jig, diamond jig),
designed to be worked vertically in the water column.
JIGHEAD: A hook with a lead weight molded onto it.
The lead may be any of several shapes; most commonly
round.
KEEL: The central structural basis of a vessel's hull.
KEEPER: A fish that is legal to harvest.
KEY: A small island.
KNOTS: Speed expressed in nautical miles per hour. For
example, 10 knots is 10 nautical miles per hour. Never say
"knots per hour:' Multiply by 1.1508 to calculate miles per
hour, or multiply mph by 0.869 to calculate knots.
LANDING NET: A large handheld net with a handle, used
to bring a fish ashore or into a boat.
LEADER: A section of fishing line or wire between the lure
or bait and the main fishing line (also called running line).
Leader may be used for stealth (lower visibility) or to prevent
breakoff due to abrasion on rough surfaces or sharp teeth.
LEE: Away from the wind.
LINE: The thin strand of material used in angling to connect
the angler and the fish. Also, nauti-speak for any rope.
LIVE BAIT: A natural bait (shrimp, crab, small fish, worm,
etc.) that is still alive.
LIVEWELL: A tank aboard a vessel used to keep harvested
fish alive. Usually plumbed with a pump to allow circulation of
fresh water. When used for live bait, referred to as a baitwell.
Some boats have dedicated livewells and baitwells.


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MANATEE ZONE: An area with special vessel-speed
regulations to protect manatees from harm.
MANGROVE: One of several species of trees that form
forests along the undeveloped shores of Charlotte Harbor.
Mangrove roots are vital habitat for hundreds of species,
from snails to Goliath grouper. Also referred to as bushes.
MANGROVE ISLAND: A small island formed by sedi-
ment captured by mangrove roots.
MARINA: A docking facility. Often additional related
services repair, parts, fuel, storage, etc. are offered.
MARKER: A sign on the water, attached to a fixed
pole or buoy, that demarcates a channel or conveys other
navigational information.
MATE: An assistant aboard a for-hire fishing vessel.
MONOFILAMENT: A thin strand of nylon used as
fishing line.
MOOR: To attach a vessel to any fixed object.
MOORING FIELD: A series of buoys anchored to the
bottom, intended for short- or long-term mooring of vessels.
MOUTH: The end of a river, creek or canal where it flows
into a larger body of water.
NAUTICAL MILE: 1.1508 statute miles.
NO-WAKE ZONE: An area where vessel speed must be
kept sufficiently low that no wake is produced.
OFFSHORE: In this area, anything occurring in the open
Gulf of Mexico.
ON PLANE: When a vessel skims across the water's
surface rather than pushes through it.
OUTBOARD MOTOR: A self-contained vessel engine.
Usually gasoline-powered.
OYSTER BAR: A colony of oysters, often found in shallow
water and exposed at low tide. Large oyster bars may be
called oyster reefs.
PARTY BOAT: Usually, an offshore recreational charter
fishing vessel that charges a per-person flat rate. Also called
a head boat. Alternatively, a boat used to party.
PASS: A connection between inshore waters and the Gulf
of Mexico. Passes are often deep and have strong currents,
which are appealing to fish and make swimming (and
sometimes boating) unsafe.
PELAGIC: Animals that live in the open ocean, often near
the surface.
PFD: A personal flotation device, or a life jacket.
PIER: A structure consisting of a walkway raised on
pilings and not intended for mooring a boat. Similar struc-
tures intended for boat mooring are called docks (for small
vessels) or wharves (for ships).
PIER NET: A circular net 3 to 6 feet in diameter, attached
to a rope and used to land hooked fish from a high pier or
bridge.
POINT: A strip of land that extends into the water.
POLARIZED LENSES: Lenses which affect light waves
to cause an apparent reduction in light reflection and glare.
Used to see fish or bottom contours from above the water's
surface.
PONTOON BOAT: A vessel that utilizes enclosed tubes to
provide flotation, which allows for a flat, open deck.
POPPING CORK: A fishing float designed to make noise
to attract fish.
PORT: Nauti-speak for the left side.
POSSESSION: The retention of any fish or other organism
for longer than is required to safely release it For most fish
commonly encountered, possession is strictly regulated.
POTHOLE: A sandy area on a grassflat. Usually slightly
deeper than the surrounding area. Also called a sandhole.
PROP SCAR: A strip of bare sand on a grassflat caused by
a boat's propeller digging into the bottom. Some grassflats
in high-traffic areas have more prop scars than grass.


PUSH POLE: A fiberglass or carbon-fiber pole used
to propel a boat forward by pushing against the bottom.
Usually used from a special platform.
PWC: Personal watercraft (i.e., WaveRunner,
Jet Ski, etc.).
RAT REDFISH: A redfish less than 18 inches long (too
small to legally keep).
RED TIDE: A bloom (rapid growth) of an alga (Karenia
brevis) that naturally occurs in Florida's salt waters. In heavy
concentrations, the algae produce toxins that can kill fish
and other marine animals. Blooms may make the water look
dark or milky.
REEF: An underwater aggregation of rock or coral. An
artificial reef may be made of rubble, concrete or by inten-
tionally sinking a vessel.
RETENTION POND: A small body of water intended to
temporarily hold stormwater runoff.
ROCKET LAUNCHER: A tubular rod holder that is not
inset into the gunwale.
ROD HOLDER: Any device used to hold a fishing rod for
temporary storage or while fishing. Commonly inset into a
boat's gunwales.
RODE: A line used to attach an anchor.
ROLLER: Generic term for large wave.
RUB RAIL: A strip of rubber or plastic on the outside of
a boat's hull, usually at the top of the gunwale, to prevent
damage when contacting a solid object or another boat.
RUDDER: A steering device that uses water resistance to
change a boat's direction.
RUN: A fish swimming while hooked. Also, the
large-scale migration of certain fish species (mackerel,
sharks, etc.)
RUNNING LIGHTS: Lights required to be used on all
boats longer than 5 meters while operating at night. The
basic running lights are white to the stern, red to port and
green to starboard.
SANDBAR: Often shortened to bar. On the flats, the
shallower areas between troughs. On the Gulf beaches, the
shallower areas created by wave action (usually the shal-
lowest is closest to shore, with one or two more farther out).
In most cases, bars run parallel to shore.
SAND SPIKE: A long rod holder (often a simple PVC
tube) for beach use.
SCHOOL: A group offish, usually of a single species.
Depending on conditions and fish species, fish in a school
may be a fraction of an inch apart or several feet.
SCHOOLIE: Many pelagic fish (king mackerel, mahi, etc.)
school as juveniles and are more or less loners when adult.
Schoolies are the young ones.
SCUPPER: A drain hole to remove water from the deck.
SEAGRASS: Any of several rooted plants found in shallow
water (0 to about 10 feet in this area). Sometimes seen
uprooted and floating.
SEAS: In weather forecasts, the expected wave height
(i.e., seas of 4 to 6 feet).
SEASON: The time when a fish can be legally harvested.
Seasons are often closed to prevent harvest during
spawning.
SEAWALL: A concrete or stone wall used to prevent
erosion of waterfront property. Usually colonized by
barnacles, mussels and other sessile organisms.
SEAWEED: Any nonvascular marine plant (macroalgae).
SEINE: A small-meshed net with floats at the top and
weights on the bottom. Differs from a gill net in that the fish
are scooped by the net, rather than entangled.
SHEET: A line used to control the setting of a sail.
SHOAL: An area with water significantly shallower than
the surrounding area. Also, a school offish.


SHORT: A fish too small to legally keep.
SIGHTCASTING: A method of sportfishing in which the
angler sees an individual fish (or school offish), then casts
a bait to it.
SIZE LIMIT: The minimum or maximum size of a fish
that may be legally harvested. Depending on species,
measured to the middle of the tail fork or overall with the
tail squeezed.
SKEG: A downward or sternward projection in front of
the rudder.
SKIFF: A generic term for any small boat.
SLAM: The feat of catching one each of several different
species in a day of fishing. The Charlotte Harbor slam is a
trout, a redfish and a snook. For a Charlotte Harbor grand
slam, add a tarpon.
SLOT LIMIT: A size limit with both a minimum and a
maximum. For example, redfish must be between 18 and 27
inches to be harvested.
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY: A warning issued when
winds have reached, or are expected to reach within 12
hours, a speed approaching gale force.
SOFT PLASTIC LURE: An artificial lure molded from
flexible polymer, often in the shape of a worm, shrimp
or baitfish. May be impregnated with scent for added
attraction.
SOLUNAR TABLE: A chart showing times when fish are
more likely to feed, based on the positions of the sun and
the moon.
SONAR: A method of using sound pulses to detect and
sometimes view images of underwater objects and/or the
sea floor.
SPILLWAY: A section of a dam that is open to allow
water through, usually during times of high water.
SPINNERBAIT: An artificial lure which combines a
jig (usually dressed with a plastic or rubber skirt) and one
or more thin metal blades. The blades spin as the lure is
retrieved, creating flash and vibration.
SPLITSHOT: A small lead weight partially split in half,
designed to be attached to fishing line with pliers (not with
your teeth!).
SPOON: An artificial lure made of shiny metal, designed
to attract fish by reflecting light. Usually shaped roughly like
the bowl of a tablespoon.
SPRING: A location where an underwater river breaks
through the ground. Springs may occur on land or many
miles out to sea. Similar to a sinkhole, except a sinkhole does
not flow.
STARBOARD: Nauti-speak for the right side.
STERN: The back end of a boat.
STRUCTURE: Any permanent or semipermanent natural
or man-made object in the water.
SUSPENDING LURE: An artificial lure designed to
neither float nor sink. Usually made of hard plastic.
SWELL: A large wave with a long wavelength, seen only
in open water.
SWIMBAIT: An artificial lure designed to have a
swimming motion when retrieved. Usually made of soft
plastic.
SWIVEL: A device with two or three eyes to which fishing
line is tied. Each eye turns freely, reducing or eliminating
line twist.
T-TOP: A rigid roof for the cockpit of a boat. The sides are
left open.
TAILING: Fish feeding in such shallow water
that when they lower their heads, their tails stick
up out of the water. Practiced especially by redfish;
also by hardhead catfish, sheepshead, snook and
stingrays.


TELL-TALE: On an outboard motor, the small hole that
spits water out above the waterline. This indicates the water
pump is functioning.
THRU-HULL: Any hole drilled through the hull of a boat,
usually to fit plumbing or electronics.
TIDES: The rising and falling levels of the sea. When the
water level is dropping, the tide is outgoing; when it's rising,
it's incoming. A neap tide is the weakest and occurs at the
first and third quarters of the moon. A spring tide is the
strongest and occurs at the new and full moons. A hill tide is
the local term for a summertime full-moon tide.
TOPWATER BAIT: An artificial lure designed to float.
Commonly retrieved using the"walk-the-dog" method -
twitching the rodtip every second or so to make the lure dart
back and forth.
TOWER: A metal superstructure on a vessel used to
increase viewing height above the water. Found on both
large offshore boats and smaller flats-fishing vessels.
TRANSDUCER: In a fishfinder, the device that creates
and receives sound waves to produce the image.
TRASH FISH: A fish not valued for food or sport.
TREBLE HOOK: A hook used on artificial lures that
consists of three hooks at 120-degree angles from one
another.
TRIM: The relationship of vessel's hull to the waterline.
TROLLING: A fishing method that utilizes a bait or lure
towed behind a moving boat. Also, to fish a bait or lure in a
similar way from a pier, a bridge or a seawall.
TROUGH: On the flats, the deeper areas between
sandbars. On the Gulf beaches, the deeper areas created
by wave action (usually one in the surf zone and one
to three more farther out). In most cases, troughs run
parallel to shore.
TUNNEL HULL: A vessel design that uses air pressure
to reduce draft while on plane. In many cases, tunnel-hull
vessels can operate in shallower water than flat-bottom or
vee-hull vessels.
TWITCHBAIT: A sinking or suspending artificial lure
that has virtually no action other than that imparted by the
angler.
UNDER WAY: When a vessel is not anchored, moored,
made fast to the shore or aground.
UNREGULATED SPECIES: Organisms whose harvest is
not specifically limited by law.
VEE HULL: A vessel design that is meant to cut through
water. Usually provides a comfortable ride, but has a deeper
draft than other hull designs.
VENTING TOOL: A hollow needle used to puncture the
swim bladder of a fish. Intended to release gas that builds up
in some species when pulled to the surface from depths of
50 feet or more.
VESSEL SAFETY CHECK: A survey conducted by the
Coast Guard Auxiliary to determine if a vessel has the legally
required safety equipment.
WEEDLINE: A floating line of any marine plant or
macroalgae. Also, a stand of plants rooted in shallow water
and projecting above the surface.
WHITEBAIT: A generic term for small baitfish, usually
scaled sardines.
WHITECAP: Wind-driven wave with a frothy crest.
WINDWARD: In the direction the wind is coming from.
WINTERIZING: Preparing a boat for several months of
storage during cold weather. Not necessary in Florida.
WIRE LEADER: A metal leader used to prevent fish teeth
from cutting off the hook. May be cable (multistrand) or
single-strand.
WRECK: The remains of a boat or aircraft sitting on the
bottom, usually not placed intentionally.


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I love going out on the water and catching
my own dinner. There's nothing like fresh-
caught fish. Parasitic infections, food poisoning,
and choking on fish bones? Those I don't like
quite as much.
I have a feeling that a lot of you reading this
article like to eat fish. If you are a fisherman
who is not a fan of eating your delicious finned
friends, read on anyway. Most fishermen have
friends or neighbors who beg them for fresh
fillets every time they get home from a fishing
trip even you catch-and-release guys get
asked, I bet. It's a good idea to know how safely
keep, clean and prepare your catch without
making yourself sick (or your neighbors, just in


case you get into that giving mood some day).
The first thing to decide is how you will
keep your catch fresh and safe for consump-
tion. Keeping your fish alive until you're
ready to clean them is always the best bet.
Unfortunately, that's not always an option for
everyone. Keeping your fish on ice is the next
best thing. You should always bring plenty of
ice on every fishing trip, just in case. You never
know when your baitwell pump will fail and
believe me, a dead fish that's been floating
around in your baitwell all day is not edible.
Fish are very perishable, and due to their strong
digestive juices, it doesn't take long at all for
them to start decomposing.


To properly ice your catch, you should line
the bottom of your cooler with at least an
inch-thick layer of ice. Lay your fish over that ice
without overlapping them, then cover them up
with another layer of ice. Repeat this process
until you have filled the cooler with what you
intend to keep for the day. Please, only keep
enough fish for a meal or two the next few
generations of anglers will thank you. If you
ice your catch properly, it can stay good in your
cooler for a couple of days. A big cooler with
lots of ice will keep fish longer than a 12-pack
size cooler or one with 5 pounds of ice in it. I
can't tell you how many times I've gotten home
from a trip and, due to assorted life issues, was


unable to clean myfish right away. I always
take great care when icing my catch, and there
is no doubt in my mind that my fish will be OK
until the next day. A rule of thumb to see if
your catch is still fresh is to look for clean red
gills and bright unclouded eyes, and make sure
there is no strong odor. A fresh fish will have a
mild fresh smell to it. If it makes you go "whoa"'
then let it go in the garbage, that is.
Now it's time to clean your catch. I'm not
going to go into any details on how to fillet
your fish. There's a different technique to clean
just about every edible fish we have in South-
west Florida and there are a lot of them. It's
something you really need to show someone


rather than tell them. If you don't have any
friends with filleting skills, YouTube is a great
Internet tool for you to use. There are videos on
there for cleaning everything from flounder to
(my personal favorite) sharks. What I will tell
you is what you will need to get the job done
properly: A sharp fillet knife (use a 6-inch blade
for smaller fish and a 9-inch blade for larger
fish; a knife sharpener to keep your knife sharp;
running water to wash off your fish fillets and
to keep your work station clean; a 5-gallon
bucket to hold the carcasses and scraps; and
cling wrap or zipper bags to wrap or store your
fillets for freezing.
You should make it a habit to really check out
each fillet as you're cleaning your fish. Cut out
any deformities, off-color areas, worms if you
don't like them (just so you know, they won't


hurt you just saying) or anything that just
doesn't look right. Fish bones are a pet peeve
of mine. I go through every fillet thoroughly
and cut out every bone I find. There is nothing
worse than biting into a tasty piece of fish and
getting stuck in the mouth by a bone it can
ruin a meal.
If you plan on eating your fish soon after you
have cleaned it but not the same day, it's OK
to store the fillets, covered, in the refrigerator
for up to two days. If you're not going to cook
it that soon, you should get it into the freezer
ASAP. Try to get as much air out of the bag you
are using to freeze your fish in before you place
it in the freezer. This will cut down on freezer
burn, which will make your fish taste stale.
Another good method to avoid freezer burn:
Put the fillets in a freezer bag, fill it with water


,. .


and freeze it. Label each bag with the type of
fish that's in it and the date you froze it. About
3 months is as long as you really want to keep
your fish in the freezer, and it should never be
in there more than 6 months.
The best and safest way to thaw frozen fish
is to leave it in the refrigerator overnight. If you
need to thaw it out faster, then place the frozen
fish in cold water until thawed. You never want
to just leave your frozen fish on a counter or in a
sink to thaw this can actually be dangerous.
Again, fish spoils quickly. At room temperatures
it starts to grow bacteria, some of which can be
very harmful to us, in just a matter of minutes.
Cooking your fish will kill off many of these
microbes, but there are a few that heat does not
kill. A microwave oven is also another quick way
to thaw your fish, but I have found that it can


\Iw-TEPLIIIE PH-.,TC.B, J'.,SH '-.LI. E
This small worm can be removed from
the fillet if desired. If it's left, it probably
won't be noticed when the fish is cooked j


change the flavor of your prized catch. I don't
know about you, but I like my redfish to taste
like redfish, not jack crevalle.
I cannot stress enough the importance of
proper fish handling and preparation. Your health
and well-being, as well as that of your friends and
loved ones, depends on it. Just remember to keep
your catch clean and cool so no one gets sick. And
no, you cannot give bad fish to your neighbors, no
matter how pesky they may be.
Capt. Mike Myers, owner and operator of
Reelshark Charters, is a full-time Charlotte Harbor
guide. Having fished the waters all along the
Southwest Florida coast for more than 35 years, he
has the experience to put anglers on the fish they
want. His specialties are sharks, tarpon and Goliath
grouper. For more info, visit www.ReelShark.com or
call Capt. Mike at 941-416-8047.


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-(DOCK/LIFT/SE
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CALL 941-206-1000


CAPT. MIKE'S FAVORITE RECIPES
SHARK BITES: Cut shark meat into bit size pieces. Sprinkle each piece
with salt and pepper on both sides. Dip the pieces in egg, roll them
in Italian bread crumbs and drop them in hot oil. Fry until they turn
golden brown. Enjoy.
BAKED POMPANO: Mix 2 cups of real mayonnaise, lemon juice to
taste, and salt and pepper or your favorite seasonings. Cover four
pompano fillets completely with this mixture. Bake at 350 degrees
until the tops turn a nice light brown. Enjoy.


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Tarpon, Snook Redfsh Grouper
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';''


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FISHING
ANTIQUE TACKLE COLLECTORS
The Charlotte County fishing tackle collectors club meets at
6:30 p.m. on the last Wednesday of each month at the Charlotte
Park Civic Association clubhouse, 420 Pompano Terrace in Punta
Gorda.This is a public club, open to all.The cost is $3 per meeting.
No annual dues; come to a meeting and pay the $3 or attend all
12 meetings, $36 total.
ANGLERS FOR CONSERVATION
AFC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in Satellite Beach,
Florida.The AFC's mission is to create a new generation of coastal
stewards using community-based angling education, habitat
restoration and applied conservation science. AFC invites you to
join, participate, learn and ultimately improve both the environ-
ment and your angling experience.To become a member, visit
www.anglersforconservation.org.
CAPE CORAL BASS CLUB
We promote families fishing together in tournaments. Meetings
are held on the firstTuesday of each month.These meetings are
held at the Moose Lodge #2395,419 Cape Coral Parkway E., Cape
Coral starting at 7:30 p.m. promptly.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR FLY FISHERS
The Charlotte Harbor Fly Fishers meet the second Wednesday of
each month at the Charlotte Park Civic Association, 420 Pompano
Trail, Punta Gorda. For more information, contactJamie Allen at
jamiesoutfishin@gmail.com or 941-628-9031.
COASTAL CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION
The CCA is an organization of saltwater anglers who work to
conserve, promote and enhance marine resources. The Charlotte
chapter meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Charlotte
Harbor Event & Conference Center, 75Taylor St., Punta Gorda.The
meetings are free and open to the public. Call 941-505-8556 or go to
www.ccaflorida.org. For more information on the Sarasota chapter,
visit www.ccaflorida.org/chapters/sarasota.html.
ENGLEWOOD FISHING CLUB
The Englewood Fishing Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second
Thursday of each month at Bay Harbor Ford, 1908 S. McCall Road.
Annual membership dues are $35 for a family membership. All
general meetings are free and open to the public.Visit www.
englewoodfishingclub.net or call 941-697-8592.
FISHIN'FRANK'S CLUB
The Fishin'Frank's fishing club meets on the second Wednesday
of each month at Luigi's Italian Restaurant (3883 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte). Meetings start at 6:30 p.m. and wrap up by 8 p.m.
There are no dues and the public is invited to attend these free
meetings, but you must call 941-625-3888 to reserve a seat. All
area anglers are encouraged to come out to enjoy the camaraderie
and learn something you can use on the water. Kids 10 years of


age or younger must be accompanied by an adult and proper
behavior is required.
FISHING RIGHTS ALLIANCE
The FRA advocates the sustainable use of and access to marine
fisheries. The FRA promotes reasonable and effective fisheries
management policies and acts to assure that fishery regulation
is based on sound scientific methods using valid data and an
accurate picture of the fishery.The FRA will stand up and fight to
protect your fishing rights. For more info, go to www.thefra.org.
FORT MYERS BASS CLUB
The Fort Myers Bass Club is a nonprofit club established in 1978
in Lee County and aligned with the FLW and TBF. The club has
members in Lee, Collier, Charlotte and Sarasota counties.The
club has one tournament each month. For more info, contact
Dave Jodoin at 941-232-8223 or tritondave21@comcast.net.
GULF COAST BASS MASTERS
Collier County's only B.A.S.S. Federation affiliated bass fishing
club holds its meetings on the third Tuesday of each month,
with a tournament scheduled for the following Sunday. Call
Terry at 239-597-4973.
GULF COVE FISHING CLUB
The Gulf Cove Fishing Club, for Gulf Cove residents, meets on the first
Tuesday of the month October through June. The meetings are held
at 7:30 p.m. at the Hope Lutheran Church hall in Gulf Cove. The
club also holds a monthly fishing tournament and a fish fry. Call
941-698-8607 or e-mail GulfCoveFishingClub@gmail.com.
NO MOTOR ANGLERS CLUB
The No Motor Anglers Club is a no-membership-fee angling
club dedicated to canoe, kayak, wading and land-based
fishing.The club meets at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of
each month at the Port Charlotte Center, located at 2280
Aaron Street.To join the club or for more info, visit www.
nomotoranglersclub.com.
BOATING
COASTAL VENTURES CRUISE CLUB
Coastal Ventures is a membership-oriented local cruise club.
The group meets at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday of the month
in the private meeting room at Bentley's in Osprey (1660
S. Tamiami Trail). The club cruises once a month and offers
discounts on slips. Join them for a meeting or visit their website
at www.coastalventurescc.com. For more details, contact John
Pemberton at 941-234-6599 or susianj@aol.com.
ENGLEWOOD COAST GUARD AUXILIARY
Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 87 meets at 7 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of each month at Lemon Bay Park, 570 Bay Park Blvd.,
Englewood. Meetings include a short program for education,
introduction of guests and updates from the staff officers. Flotilla 87
is seeking new members. For more info, visit www.coastguard


englewood.com or contact Sandy Bilsky, FSO-PS (personnel services)
at fso-ps-87@coastguardenglewood.com or 941-474-7400.
FISH TALE BOAT CLUB
The Fish Tale Boat Club was founded in 1999 in Englewood
to organize boating and related opportunities for boaters
desiring to participate in group cruising. Monthly trips are
planned for visiting locations on the west coast of Florida
and longer trips to the Keys and Bahamas. They also anchor
out and raft off at local coves for fishing and social events. If
you are interested in joining them, visit their website, www.
fishtaleboatclub.com, or call Jack Landis at 941-474-1910.
ISLES YACHT CLUB
The Isles Yacht Club, the "Friendliest Club in Southwest
Florida,"works to associate those persons having a common
interest in boating and to provide boating and social facilities
for its members and their guests.The IYC offers many activities
other than boating, including over 20 clubs within our Club
that offer specific activities in a wide variety of areas. Call the
office at 941-639-7551 to arrange a visit to the clubhouse,
located at 1780 West Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.
NORTH PORT COAST GUARD AUXILIARY
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 92, North Port, meets on the
second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at 7030 Chancellor
Blvd., North Port. Visit www.a0700902.uscgaux.info or contact
Liz Frey, 941-627-3837 FC or Bernie O'Grady, PS, 941-625-3667.
PORT CHARLOTTE YACHT CLUB
Formed in 1958, Port CharlotteYacht Club is the area's oldest
yacht club. The club has consistently hosted more than 50
on-board and land-based events each year for its approxi-
mately 120 members. Call 941-889-1658, e-mail us at info@
PortCharlotteYachtClub.com, or visit us at www.PortCharlotte
YachtClub.com for more info about club events.
PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON
The Peace River Sail & Power Squadron, chartered in 1972,
is part of District 22 of the United States Power Squadrons
and serves all of Charlotte County. The squadron prides itself
in its safe boater education program. It is always looking for
like-minded people to join as members. The squadron meets
at 5:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the
Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club, 4400 Lister Street, Port Charlotte.
Visit www.puntagorda-boating.org or call 941-637-0766.
PEACE RIVER VALLEY AIRBOAT ASSOC.
The Peace River Valley Airboat Association meets at 7:30 p.m.
the first Tuesday of the month at the Moose Lodge in Arcadia.
All boaters and water craft users of any kind that enjoy the
Peace River and surrounding lakes are invited. For more info,
call 863-494-4882.
PUNTA GORDA BOAT CLUB
The PGBC offers year-round boating and social activities for both


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powerboaters and sailors.Established in 1951, the PGBC is the
oldest boat club in the area.Monthly cruises for both power and
sail include day trips, short and extended overnight trips and
combined power and sail cruises.Each month we have dinner
meetings, theme parties, social gatherings, mah jongg and much
more.PGBC offers something for all our members at a reasonable
cost. Visit us at www.PGBoatClub.org or call 941-639-3828.
PUNTA GORDA COAST GUARD AUXILIARY
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 98, Punta Gorda, meets at 7
p.m. on the first Wednesday of every month at the Punta Gorda
Isles Civic Association, 2001 Shreve Street. The Auxiliary is the
volunteer civilian branch of the Coast Guard. They offer safe
boating courses and vessel safety checks, as well as numerous
other public service activities involving boating. For information
on services or joining the flotilla, callTom Gramza at 941-639-
3236.
RAGHAULERS BOATING CLUB
The Lemon Bay Raghaulers, a social and boating club, meets on
the third Wednesday of each month at the Cape Haze clubhouse.
Newcomers are always welcome. Call 941-697-2523 for more
info.
SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION
The SSCA is the oldest and largest worldwide organization
supporting the liveaboard cruising lifestyle. Founded in 1952
by six liveaboard couples in California and now headquartered
in Florida, today's SSCA remains true to the traditions of its
original members: sharing cruising information, fostering
camaraderie, and leaving a clean wake. For more info, visit
http://ssca.org or call 954-771-5660.
VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON
The Venice Sail and Power Squadron, chartered in 1958,
is located in Venice on the southwest coast of Florida.The
Squadron is associated with District 22, which covers the west
coast of Florida. Meetings are held at 6 p.m. on the second
Thursday of each month at West Coast Seafood Grille, 550 U.S.
41 Bypass North. For more info, visit www.usps.org/localusps/
venice or call 941-485-SAIL (7245).
SAILING
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASSOCIATION
Open to catamaran and trimaran sailors or those who want
to be. Members exchange ideas about equipping and sailing
their boats, and also organize informal races, cruises and raft-
ups in Charlotte Harbor and nearby waters. Meetings are held
at 6 p.m. on the first Monday of each month at the Panda Inn
(3092 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte). No dues. For more info,
go to groups.yahoo.com/group/CHMA.
ENGLEWOOD SAILING ASSOCIATION
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organization dedicated to the positive development of local


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youth through sailing. To learn more about this group, call
941-257-8192 or visit www.EnglewoodSailing.org.
MARCHING & CHOWDER SOCIETY
The sailing club with the very unusual name started over 32 years
ago in Cape Coral with sailors from all over Southwest Florida
as charter members.The unique name came from an effort to
make it forever obvious that this was not a"knife and fork yacht
club;'but a group of offshore sailors who wanted to race, cruise
and explore the coasts of Florida, the Keys, theTortugas, and the
Bahamas. The name also describes the offbeat informal humor of
the offshore sailor. For more info, visit www.cmcs-sail.org.
PUNTA GORDA BOAT CLUB
The oldest boat club in Punta Gorda, established in 1951, PGBC
was instrumental in bringing the very first of many regattas to
Charlotte Harbor.PGBC is truly a boaters club offering monthly
boating and social events at a very affordable price.Enjoy all or
some of the day trips, overnight cruises, sail regattas and annual
cruises.Visit us at www.PGBoatClub.org or call 941-639-3828.
PUNTA GORDA SAILING CLUB
The Punta Gorda Sailing Club supports interest in both racing and cruising.
Meetings are on the second Wednesdayof each month at 7 p.m. with
the sodal hour beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Punta Gorda Civic Associa-
tion, 2001 Shreve Street, Punta Gorda.Visitors are always welcome.
SARASOTA SAILING SQUADRON
The Sarasota Sailing Squadron is a nonprofit organization
founded by interested residents of the city of Sarasota for
the purpose of promoting sailing. Since its inception, the
Squadron has been dedicated to the promotion of recreational
sailing, racing, cruising, sailing instruction, boating safety and
youth sailing instruction. All sailors and visitors are welcome
to visit the Squadron grounds at 1717 Ken Thompson Parkway
and utilize our facilities. For more info, visit http://sarasota-
sailingsquadron.org or call 941-388-2355.
SINGLES FOR SAIL
Charlotte Harbor Singles for Sail club meets everyThursday, except
the second Thursday of each month, at 7 p.m. for happy hour at
Portofino's Waterfront Dining, 23247 Bayshore Road, Charlotte
Harbor. Singles who have an interest in sailing are invited to join
us there, or call 941-235-7245. Visit www.singlesforsail.org.
MODEL SAILING CLUB
The Sun Coast Model Sailing Club actively races four different
classes of model sailboats at South County Regional Park in
Punta Gorda. The park is located off Cooper Street and the lake
is at the north end of Education Avenue. Racing currently takes
place from 10 a.m. to noon Mon., Tues., Wed. and Sat., and
from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Mon. and Wed. For more info, call Jack
941-575-1183 or visit www.SunCoastModelSailingClub.net.

PADDLING
DRAGON BOAT PADDLERS
The Charlotte Harbor Paddlers'dragon boat team is looking
for new paddlers. If you enjoy paddling and would like to


learn more, visit www.charlotteharborpaddlers.com or
contact Peg Gutmann at 941-505-9840 or mgutmann@
hotmail.com.The club would like to recruit members to
develop other competitive dragon boat teams, including
academic, community and breast cancer survivor teams.
PARADISE COAST PADDLERS
The Paradise Coast Paddlers Club meets the second Tuesday of
each month at 6:30 p.m. Meetings are held at North Govern-
ment Center, 2335 Orange Blossom Drive, Naples. For more
info, go to www.paradisecoastpaddlers.com.
PORT CHARLOTTE KAYAK CLUB
Port Charlotte Kayakers meet at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday
outside the Port Charlotte Beach Complex, 4500 Harbor Blvd.
New members always welcome. 941-235-2588.
SW FLORIDA PADDLING CLUB
Paddleheads since 1993, the SW Florida Paddling Club is a
group of friends who paddle around Lee and Collier counties
and beyond to enjoy natural Florida environment and wildlife.
For more info, call Pat Owen at 239-410-0167 or visit http://
groups.yahoo.com/group/swflpc.
VENICE LEMON BAY KAYAKERS
This group is for kayakers and canoeists of all skill levels. Members
enjoy paddling inshore waters and the nearshore Gulf of Mexico
from Bradenton to Fort Myers, and occasionally further.There are
no club officers, no official structure, no dues. Individuals volunteer
to perform various tasks.Visit www.venicelemonbaykayakers.org
for trip info, or e-mail paddlersl@comcast.net.

DIVING
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB
The Bottom Time Dive Club meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday
of the month at Church of the Good Shepherd, 401 W. Henry St.,
Punta Gorda. Anyone interested in diving is welcome. Free; open to
the public. For more info, call 941-380-0213 or 866-380-0213.
SARASOTA SCUBA CLUB
Meetings are held the first Thursday of each month at
7:30 p.m. at the Fraternal Order of Police Hall, located at
3600 Circus Blvd., Sarasota. Doors and the bar (beer and wine)
open at 7 p.m. For more info, visit www.sarasotascubaclub.org.
VENICE DIVE CLUB
Suncoast Reef Rovers meet at 6 p.m. the third Wednesday ofthe month
at the Nokomis Community Center, 234 NippinoTrail, Nokomis. Visit
www.suncoastreefrovers.com or call Doug Jones at 561-715-0173.

ENVIRONMENT & CONSERVATION
AMERICAN LITTORAL SOCIETY
The Southeast chapter of the American Littoral Society is an
all-volunteer group that serves members in the Gulf states,
based out of Sarasota.The ALS is a national nonprofit member-
ship organization, dedicated to the environmental well-being


of coastal habitat."We care about the Coast" For more info, call
Dave Bulloch at 941-377-5459 or John Sarkozy at 941-966-7308.
CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVERWATCH
Caloosahatchee River Citizens Association Riverwatch is a nonprofit
organization dedicated to the protection of the Caloosahatchee River
and its watershed, through education and promotion of responsible use
and enjoyment by all people. Meetings are held the first Wednesday
each month at 630 p.m. at alternate locations in Fort Myers and
LaBelle. For more info, visit http://crca.caloosahatchee.org.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR SIERRA CLUB
Sierra Club Greater Charlotte Harbor Group meets on the third
Tuesday of each month at the Harold Avenue Recreation Center,
23400 Harold Ave., Port Charlotte. For more info, call Nicole Noles at
941-661-9113 or visit www.florida.sierraclub.org/charlotteharbor.
KEEP CHARLOTTE BEAUTIFUL
KCB works with the community through cleanup and litter
prevention like the Great American Cleanup, Coastal Cleanup, Illegal
Dumping Task Force, Adopt-A-Road, Adopt-A-Shore and the KCB
Student Calendar Art Contest. If you're interested in helping, e-mail
keepcharbeautiful@charlottefl.com or call 941-764-4390.
SARASOTA BAY ESTUARY PROGRAM
The Sarasota Bay Estuary Program is dedicated to restoring Sarasota
Bay. The SBEP Citizens Advisory Committee meets at 4:30 p.m. on the
first Monday of each month at Dan McClure Auditorium (Sarasota-
Bradenton International Airport, 5900 Airport Auditorium Lane). For
more info, call 941-955-8085 or email morgan@sarasotabay.org.
SARASOTA BAY WATCH
Sarasota BayWatch is a grass-roots, non-profit, citizen-based organiza-
tion dedicated to preserving and restoring Sarasota Bays ecosystem
through education and citizen participation.You can become an active
partidpant by joining as a member and volunteering in Sarasota Bay
Watch's on-going effort to protect and restore this valuable natural
resource. For more information orto become a member, visit www.
sarasotabaywatch.org or email info@sarasotabaywatch.org.

BIRDING
AUDUBON OF SW FLORIDA
Audubon of SW Florida chapter offers a variety of field trips, programs
and services for its members and the community, including fund-
raising for environmental efforts and assisting with the management
of Audubon of Florida's sanctuary properties in Lee County. Meetings
are held on the third Thursday of each month at Rutenberg Park's Eco
Living Center, 6490 South Pointe Blvd., Fort Myers.
PEACE RIVER AUDUBON SOCIETY
The Peace River Audubon Society meets monthly, October to May
on the third Thursday of each month from 7 to 9 p.m. at HolyTrinity
Lutheran Church, 2565TamiamiTrail, Port Charotte. Saturdayfield trips
andTuesdayWalkAbouts are free and open to the public Nonmembers
are welcome. For a schedule, visit www.PeaceRiverAudubon.org.
VENICE AREA AUDUBON SOCIETY
TheVenice Area Audubon Society meets from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on


the fourth Tuesday of each month from September through May.
Meetings are held at the Venice Audubon Center and Rookery at
4002 S. Tamiami Trail in Venice. Info on VAAS's 23 field trips and 9
programs from Sept. through May is at www.veniceaudubon.org.
VENICE AREA BIRDING ASSOCIATION
VABA is a group of friendly birders that have weekly field trips and
a few trips that are out of the area.There is no charge unless there
is an entrance fee. There are no general meetings. You can get on
the mailing list by e-mailing Abbie Banks at amberina@ aol.com.
For more club info, visit http://abbiesworld.org/references.html.
The club welcomes new birders and anyone interested in nature.

OTHER
DING DARLING WILDLIFE SOCIETY
"Ding"Darling Wildlife Society, a nonprofit Friends of the Refuge
organization, supports environmental education and services
at J.N."Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge. For information
on how you can be a part of this group, call 239-472-1100,
ext. 233 or e-mail director@dingdarlingsociety.org.
ENGLEWOOD SHELL CLUB
The Englewood Shell Club brings together people interested in
seashells. Club members share their enthusiasm and experiences of
mollusks of all kinds, but are most interested in Florida shells.The club
meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month from October
through April at Elks Lodge 2378,401 N. Indiana Ave., Englewood. For
more info, contact Christine at anglinc@comcastnet or 941-473-0829.
FLORIDA TRAIL ASSOCIATION
The Alligator Amblers chapter of the Florida Trail Association
meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. every third Thursday at Bass Pro
Shops in Fort Myers, 10040 Gulf Center Drive.The club works to
promote hiking, trail building and maintenance, as well as other
outdoor adventure opportunities. For more info, call 239-415-
7795 or visit www.amblers.floridatrail.org.
GULF COAST MINERAL AND FOSSIL CLUB
The club meets at 6 p.m. the first Monday of each month at
the Venice Library, 300 S. Nokomis Ave. For more info, contact
GeraldineVest at gvest201@yahoo.com or 941-408-1711.
SARASOTA SHELL CLUB
The Sarasota Shell Club meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of
each month September- April.The agenda includes a program of
interest to shell collectors. Meetings are held on the second floor of
theWaldemere Fire Station (2070Waldemere Street, Sarasota). Call
941-492-5296 or e-mail info@sarasotashellclub.com.
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA FOSSIL CLUB
The club meets at 7 p.m. on the second Saturday of each month
at Edison State College, 26300 Airport Road, Punta Gorda.
Meetings feature a guest speaker, programs on archaeology and
paleontology, fossil identifications, raffles,and fossil items for sale.
Members also enjoy two field trips a month. Club volunteers speak
at local schools, participating with fossil shows and exhibits. We
have served Southwest Florida for 26 years. For more info, e-mail
blondiel638@comcast.net.


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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 2 EINICIV bDtur:1D, i*.1Dr::h S t'.Jlt


Like pickups? Here are two


t's well known in the old
car hobby that antique
trucks are fast gain-
ing in value and interest,
especially in the south
where they have always
been popular. Vintage Ford
and Chevrolet half-ton
versions are so much in
demand it's almost impos-
sible to find a good original
model for sale. Today's
article features two such
trucks, one a very pretty
turquoise-colored, three-
owner 1965 Ford Fl, the
other a one-family-owned,
white 1961 ChevyApache
- each with an interesting
background.
The Ford is the property
of Larry Francis, 70, a man
who's name most of you
have had in your pocket
if you shopped at the Port
CharlotteWalmart. He was
the general manager of
that store at both its past
and present locations until
retiring in 2007.
Lee, my wife who lived
in Port Charlotte for many
years, knew him as a true
"hands-on" manager.
She told me Larry always
seemed to be in the store
visiting each department
and speaking to custom-
ers. That's the way he was
taught starting inWalmart
Store No. 1 in Rogers,
Ark., by none other than
the founder, Sam Walton
who lived only 10 miles
away. Francis was a quick
learner, became assistant
manager there, then man-
ager of store No. 6 located
in Fayetteville, Ark., later
moving to other new and
larger stores "up north."
Walmart became his
life, but cold weather was
not for him nor his first
wife, Cathy, and when
the Port Charlotte store
management position
opened up, they moved
south and never looked
back. No more ice, snow
or heavy winter clothes for
this couple. Larry quickly
adjusted to the Sunshine
State and grew to person-
ally know many, many new
residents as well as "long
timers." His wife Donna,
co-owner of the fun truck,
is also a dyed-in-the-wool
Walmart employee of 25
years. Presently this lady
has a very responsible po-
sition as invoice manager
for the Punta Gorda store,
overseeing all the bills for
Dale Barghausen, general
manager.
Larry and Donna mar-
ried in 1997 after Larry's
first wife passed away in
1994. Larry has two grown
children from his first mar-
riage. Carli Francis is an
assistant manager of the
MurdockWalmart store,
daughter Michelle is hap-
pily employed at a business
that sells antiques in St.
Louis, Mo. Seems the entire
family loves retailing!
Back to the pickup. It's
an Fl series that Mr. Fran-
cis has known since 1965,
when it was bought new
by a man in Rolla, Mo.,
then later purchased by a
friend of Larry's in Har-
rison Ark. In 1995 Francis
can


nDon and Lee
i 'fl MA Royston
persuaded the friend to
sell it to him, and soon the
truck wound up in Port
Charlotte.
It's been restored both
inside and out except for
the headliner, which will
be replaced soon. The en-
gine and all the drive line
components including the
three-speed, manual trans-
mission are original. Larry
says the "Ford has never
been hit" and the odom-
eter reading of 125,000
miles is accurate.
It's plain and simple to
operate bringing back the
nostalgia of motoring years
ago. Larry and Donna
enjoy relaxing taking
Sunday afternoon drives
on a semi-regular basis,
knowing its reliability will
get them home safely.
Sure beats the old pickup
he learned to drive at age
12 in Fredericktown, Mo.,
about 90 miles south of
St. Louis.
Besides being proud
of the Fl, he is also very
proud of his church, Trinity
United Methodist Church
in Charlotte Harbor. He
works at the church to pro-
vide food and hot meals
free to those in need. Just
last week they served 118
meals in one day and
distributed food for close
to 300 families. Very com-
mendable indeed!

Chevy Apache
The other pickup is a
1961 Chevrolet Apache
half-ton model that has
been in the family of the
present owner, Ronald
Robert Fillman, 68, since
his dad, Robert S. Fillman,
purchased it new in Ros-
eville, Calif. He used the
Chevy as regular trans-
portation to go back and
forth to his job as senior
design engineer for Aerojet
General in Sacremento,
and to carry the family on
local camping and fishing
getaways.
No one ever gave any
thought to selling it,
because this truck was
so easy to drive having
a two-speed Powerglide
transmission, and could
tote whatever was needed
to be taken anywhere.
The years and miles
went by, Ronald's father
passed away in 2007 leav-
ing the Apache to Ronald
who had gown up with it.
He and his wife of 35 years,
Ernestine, were glad to
be able to call it their own
as they have a lot of fond
memories riding as pas-
sengers many times.
Ronald was in the Navy
from 1960-1964 then
worked in the construc-
tion industry for what he
says "seemed forever"
until injury to his back and
shoulder. Tests proved this


SAVE THESE DATES
*Saturday, March 10, 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m., and Sunday March
11,11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Laishley
Park, Veteran Motor Car Club of
America Antique Auto display
during Clear Channel's Seafood
Festival. Lots to see and do with
many vendors, varied music,
etc. For more information, call
941-575-0202.
Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Muscle Car City's 3rd
Anniversary Gala, 20 quality
Anniversary Plaques, 150 dash
plaques, major door prizes,
Music by Tommy's Traveling
Tunes, show cars pre-register
$15 the day of the show $20
plus the driver receives one free
entry ticket to the museum.
Rain or shine! Free to public and
spectators. For more informa-
tion, call 941-575-5959.
Saturday, March 24, 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Mega Yard Sale at the
Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harbor-
view Road, Charlotte Harbor.
Donations Needed. Monetary
offerings welcome. Proceeds
to benefit the Charlotte County
Homeless Coalition. Antique car
display by the Veteran Motor Car
Club of America. For additional
details, phone 941-206-1220.

fellow has MS, finally retir-
ing totally disabled in 2002,
yet determined to keep
going by getting out to
cruise-ins with "Old Betsy."
By the way, the odom-
eter shows 179,000.
His wife used to work at
a company known as Ju-
dy's Originals, a children's
clothing manufacturer for
20-plus years, she is also
retired. The Fillmans have
three daughters, Rosemary
in Portland, Ore., Juanita in
Phoenix, Ariz., and Anita
who resides in Cape Coral.
Prior to going out on their
own, each lived at home in
Phoenix with their parents.
I first met Mr. Fill-
man at the Punta Gorda
Home Depot Cruise-in
and again on the lot of
Muscle Car City where
I learned of his and the
truck's background, both
interesting enough to use
in a column.When Larry
Francis came along in his
Ford, a match-up was cre-
ated, Lee took the photos
and I penned what you are
reading today. I've been
asked for months when
another truck column was
coming out, hopefully this
article will take care of that
subject, at least for the
Ford and GM people.
I too have owned trucks, a
1950 Ford, 1949 Chevrolet
five-window, two 1955
Chevys, one an early series
model with overdrive that
looked like a 1954, and a
fancy 1955 GMC with the
massive chrome grille,
big stockV8 and factory
installed Hydromatic, all
during the period of 1958
thru 1983. The reason they
no longer belong to me,
is that too many friends
always wanted to borrow
them to haul something.
At the present time how-
ever I do own a restored
1961 Dodge Military M37
with fold-down canvas top
and 6,000-pound winch.


PI'H TCS B. LEE RIH'. STllll


Larry Francis with his 1965 Ford Fl pickup.


Larry's 1965 Ford Fl series pickup.


Ronald Fillman, owner of the white'61 Apache.


The 1961 Chevrolet Apache pickup.
Happy \\ 111. k \ I L I11 1\..1 1 ..11.1-
anniversary ii",' iii .t II.I p,,I
Sllu. i nlul m l p '..,l nlll
.\s iI I .h 2"<1 \ '. i '. l- .il .l InI \ itin l 1.1 n lnrnt'.


I .I lI .l I ll I.MlYl \ '.1 ,L1
IIl Itlll lllni Li n I i l.\i lnl
Kl ii 11 11h \itin I I tll\
I ll lillig |llr I\ Il llllg tp
Vrlli. r11 \-u p .-uh' 1\ h |'l
i. i., p, l. \ Ils I h.Ii
\ l i "V l 1.,,,,, phI,,ns,
S. II Ib h.11 I'.lsl ::1 111 -lr ll._
pubhhlis,'.l


Olll 'lhai ll \\ .1 1ll 11.1l \s
.dli n .- lll \ ,l\ .,l \ | ,.11

tlll' pubhlsh'l phs-.h' lll
David Dunn-Rankin .inl.
hils I.llh'l i. h lll,1111 ,111 i ,I
tili, h, iil. Derek Dunn-
Rankin I .Iiskillln-L t III i.d,
[lls 11 1 ilulnil l i' i k lII lt Ill


I .1.1 I t. ll, I .I '.l I n..I'

h, all.n I i .\n 'llh.,l's |i .s|
( 11 11m111tlllll l\ ll\ .11 .1
In, i, i, i. i ullllll h' In l \ ',ll'
treii i I tof
tillllh, i :0 b t-i'Ht'i of ilj'

AiIi. i i. i, 1-a SI I Floi ]ia ReyionI
tI th itll Jlt : t."t /.ll /of

tilhl 1iM' V t-,I' C 1h11 /i / I i't

clll i'i-I'll mhi /l i:OIII


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 2 E/N/C/V





Saturday, March 3, 2012 F/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 3


2012
2 FOCUSsE
O o sE L308913




WAS 17994
$22,400


20FRD F- 5 0REG CAB
I I =I I IE i- 1 88


WAS
$35,775


20FRDFUSIONSE
~~T I


2FR TAURUSSEL
m STK#CG133021


2012EnAE
FORDEDGESEL
-- TCBA78073


WAS 19,939
$25,135 619,vr


WAS $ ,983 2,5 WAS $
$29,25098 $37,980 32


FORD ESCAPEXLT
SSTK#CKB88129


XLT 2011 E
i SUPERCAB FORD F-
L STK#BPA79069 /


WAS $ 7
$26,090


SUPER DUTY
CREW CAB XLT
I STKeREC66499


WAS
$40,255


GRAND OPENING PRE-OWNED SALE
2002 Mitsubishi Montero .........................................$3995 2003 Infinity G CP ................................................. $11875
1996 Cadilac Deville only 71k miles ...........................$4989 2005 Chrysler 300 only 45k miles ............................$12995
2002 Chrysler 300M ................................................ $5789 2010 Honda Civic ....................................................$13825
2003 Dodge Durango ..............................................$6789 2008 Mazda CX7 ..................................................... $13850
1997 Camaro Z28 ....................................................$6989 2010 Dodge Avenger .............................................. $13989
2002 Chevy Tahoe 4WD .........................................$7989 2009 Kia Sportage only 20k miles ...........................$15950
2006 Buick Lacrosse CXL ..........................................$8989 2011 Ford Crown Victoria only 18k miles ................$17580
2003 Lincoln Aviator .........................................$10755 2010 Ford Explorer EB ........................................$19995
2010 Ford Focus .................................................... $10875 2009 Lincoln MKZ only 22k miles .............................$19996
2006 Honda Ridgeline RT ......................................$10889 2012 Ford Mustang convertible ............................$24988
2010 Chev Cobalt ..................................................10988 2010 Cadilac Escalade EXT Premium ....................$48885


27,126*


Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 3





The Sun Classified-Section A Page 4 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


Reader shouldn't fall for this song and dance


Dear Tom and Ray:
I had a heater core on a
'99 Dakota Sport replaced,
and I now have heat all
the time without it being
turned on. I was told that
I was feeling heat from
the engine because there
is no insulation on the
firewall. I didn't have this
problem before the new
core was installed. What,
if anything, did they forget
to do? Greg
TOM: Boy, you're an
understanding guy, Greg.
They give you a song and
dance like that, and you
say, "Okey dokey" and
walk away. We could use
some customers like you!
RAY: That's not heat
from the engine bleeding
through, Greg. That's heat
from the heater. And it's
likely the fault of the guys
who changed the heater
core.
TOM: But before we
conclude that they're ab-
solutely to blame (we'll get
to that soon enough), let's
look at one other possibil-
ity. The heater controls in
this truck are operated by
engine vacuum. There's
a check valve under
the hood that helps the
system maintain vacuum
during hard acceleration.
RAY: Right. So if that
check valve were broken,
your blend doors (the
flaps behind the dash-
board that regulate how
much heat comes into the
cabin) can pop open dur-
ing hard acceleration.


CLICK and CLACK

TALK CARS
by Tom & Ray Magliozzi


Because anyone who owns a car
needs a laugh twice a week.
TOM: So if you're get-
ting a surge of heat only
when you're accelerat-
ing hard or climbing a
hill, then this five-dollar
check valve could be the
problem.
RAY: But if you're get-
ting heat all the time -
which is what you say in
your letter then these
guys screwed something
up. Maybe they jammed a
blend door so it can't close
all the way. Or maybe
they forgot to reattach a
vacuum hose.
TOM: The reason
they're trying to get rid of
you is because rescuing
the Chilean miners was
easier than getting to the
heater core in this vehicle.
They don't want to do it
again. For free. So they're
hoping you'll just go away,
or start driving around in
your bathing suit.
RAY: So you're just
going to have to be a little
more insistent when you


go back to see them, Greg.
Bring a couple of large
friends with you. Or a
lacrosse team.
TOM: They don't want
to take out the dashboard
again, but that's what
happens when you screw
something up you have
to do it again until you get
it right.
RAY: Sure. Ask my
brother about his years in
eighth grade.

There are many
better options than
an old Bug
Dear Tom and Ray:
I'm hoping you can
assuage my fears. My
24-year-old daughter
told me today that she is
buying an old VW Bug.
She spoke with her father,
my ex-husband, and he
was very supportive. He
also advised her to not
let her mother talk her
out of buying one! I had
a VW myself when I was
her age, and I know how
cool they are. However, I
also know that the heaters
and defrosters don't work,
they rust out and they are
not safe in collisions. I am
concerned for her safety.
Do you have any words of
assurance for me regard-
ing this issue, or any
information I can pass on
to her that might convince
her otherwise? Thanks
much! Maryann
TOM: Well, now we
know why he's your EX-


husband, Maryann. Un-
fortunately, it's two against
one now, so you're going
to be hard pressed to talk
her out of it.
RAY: But, of course,
you're right. The oldVW
Bugs were death traps.
They provided almost no
structural support in an
accident. In fact, if you
look closely, you can see
"Swanson Hungry Man"
stamped on the body
panels.
TOM: They leaked gas,
they handled poorly, they
blew around in the wind,
they had lousy brakes and
they couldn't get out of
their own way. And that
was when they were new!
RAY: Age, disrepair, rust
and the increased size and
weight of other vehicles
on the road have only
made them less safe to
drive now.
TOM: And, of course,
old Bugs have none of the
modern safety equipment
we take for granted these
days, like crumple zones,
door beams, antilock
brakes, air bags and stabil-
ity control.
RAY: So I see two
options for you, Maryann.
One is to decide that this
is a perfect time to move
to Bali for a few years and
study jewelry-making.
That way, you won't be
around while she's driving
this Bug, and you won't
have to see her in it every
day and worry constantly.
TOM: The second


option is bribery, which
has a long and successful
tradition. You can offer to
help her buy something
that's equally appeal-
ing but a lot safer. I don't
know what her tastes are
exactly, but if an old Bug
appeals to her, perhaps a
newer Bug might, too? Or
a Mini Cooper? Or a new,
very cute Fiat 500? Or a
1972 Lincoln Continental?
RAY: It'll cost you, Mary-
ann. But poor spouse
selection always does.
Ask any of my brother's
ex-wives.

Is induction
service a waste
of money?
Dear Tom and Ray:
The local Honda dealer
charges $120 for a fuel-
induction service every
30,000 miles. I can buy
a can of BG 44K injector
cleaner as a gas additive
for $20. Does the gas-ad-
ditive cleaner work as well
as the dealer's induction
service? If the gas additive
is sufficient, how often
should it be done? Or am
I wasting my money on
both options? John
TOM: For $120, the
dealer probably is hooking
your engine up to a ma-
chine that forces a solvent
through the fuel system
and cleans the injectors.
The cans of BG 44K and
Chevron Techron do simi-
lar things, although the
machine probably does a


better job.
RAY: But I would guess
that the dealer also is
cleaning the electronic
throttle area the fuel
additives won't do that.
That has to be sprayed
separately.
TOM: You can find
out by asking the dealer
exactly what's included in
his fuel induction service.
If he says, "We dump in a
can of fuel cleaner," you
have your answer. But I'm
guessing it's more than
that.
RAY: On the other hand,
you may not need any
of these things. Unless
you're having problems
with misfires or rough
idling, it's unlikely that
anything's dirty enough
to worry about. Gasolines
have enough detergents
in them these days that
dirty fuel systems rarely
are a problem. Especially
on cars with fewer than
100,000 miles on them.
TOM: So unless the
engine is idling roughly, or
the computer has stored a
code indicating misfires,
I think you can save the
$120. And the $20, John.

Used cars can be a great
bargain, and reliable, too!
Find out why by ordering
Tom and Ray's pamphlet
"How to Buy a Great Used
Car: Secrets Only Your Me-
chanic Knows." Send $4.75
(check or money order) to
Used Car P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.


Canadian International Auto Show fuels dreams


AP PHOTOS
At right: People talk
next to a Mercedes-
Benz SL 550 Coupe/
Roadster at the
Canadian International
Auto Show in Toronto
held Feb. 17-26.


At left: A Ferrari 458
Spider is on display
at the 2012 Canadian
International Auto..
Show in Toronto.



Car owners waiting longer to replace vehicles


By JERRY HIRSCH
Los ANGELES TIMES

LOS ANGELES So
much for the long-held
notion that Americans
purchase a new car and
flip it every three or four
years.
People who buy new
cars are holding on to
their vehicles for a record
amount of time, an aver-
age of almost six years,
according to the automo-
tive research firm R.L.
Polk & Co.
The recent recession
has pushed people to
hold on to their cars and
pay off their loans. In the
process, they discovered
oon


that their vehicles were
more reliable than they
might have expected, said
Mark Seng, a Polk analyst.
Automakers are looking
at the trend and believe
that it's one reason it will
take some time for auto
sales to return to the pre-
recession levels as more
people learn to live with
older cars.
It coincides with what
Hyundai Motor America
Chief Executive John
Krafcik says is "a funda-
mental change in the way
Americans think about
their automobiles."
An automobile has
dropped in importance
in the hierarchy of social


status since the reces-
sion, he said, making "the
need to change your car
to show who you are less
important."
Geoff Moore, a Los An-
geles screenwriter, agrees.
"We drive our cars until
the wheels fall off," he
said. "It seems wasteful to
keep flipping cars."
Moore and his wife,
Nicki, just replaced a 1995
Honda Civic with 140,000
miles with a new Subaru
Forester, which they
intend to keep for at least
a decade. They also own a
2005 Volvo station wagon.
Polk said the typical buy-
er of a new car keeps the
vehicle for 71.4 months,


an increase of almost 18
months since 2006. Be-
cause its review of car reg-
istrations includes leases,
people who buy their cars
outright are probably hold-
ing on to the vehicles even
longer, Seng said.
Improving auto quality
is pushing the trend, said
David Champion, senior
director of Consumer
Reports' automotive test
center.
In the past, people sold
their cars well before they
reached 100,000 miles,
which was about the
mileage at which driv-
ers thought the vehicles
would be worn out.
"You would sell the


car at 60,000 miles to
get some residual value
out of it. But nowadays
100,000 miles is only half-
way through the life of
the car," Champion said.
Automakers have also
lengthened their war-
ranties. Most new cars
come with a three-year
or 36,000-mile war-
ranty. Hyundai includes
a five-year or 60,000-mile
warranty and goes to 10
years or 100,000 miles on
the powertrain.
John Maigler, a retired
United Airlines mechanic
and manager from Des
Plaines, Ill., purchased a
Kia Soul in 2010 because
he liked the 10-year or


100,000-mile warranty on
the powertrain.
"I keep my cars a
long time. I am cheap,"
Maigler said.
The trend isn't ex-
pected to reverse, even
if the economy takes off
and people feel secure
enough financially to buy
new vehicles.
"Longer ownership pe-
riods are with us to stay,"
Krafcik said. "Longer
loan terms tend to drive
longer ownership periods
as people pay down their
loans. Cars are better
and last longer. And the
brands that have longer
warranties, like Hyundai,
are gaining market share."





Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 5


2000


EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

PROFESSIONAL
2010





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rates. Your office or mine.
941-585-4253

BARBERS & HAIRDRESSERS
booths for rent 9 available
immediately! Visit Us at
525 Tamiami Trail #3
Come with your own tools!!!



BOOKKEEPER, part time.
Weekends and knowledge of
Quickbooks a must. Start at
$10/hr. Send resume to
kelly@smugglers.com
BOOKKEEPING/DATA
ENTRY, Must have min.
2 yrs. exp. data entry,
Quickbooks, financial
reporting, billing, payroll
as bookkeeper.
Professionals only.
Apply online to:
oppsflorida@comcast.net

Mortgage
Loan Processor
Charlotte State Bank &
Trust is seeking a high ener-
gy, professional individual
with a commitment to cus-
tomer service and team
work for our Loan Opera-
tions Department as a Mort-
gage Loan Processor. This
position requires a minimum
of 3 years mortgage pro-
cessing experience.
Responsible for preparing
and processing residential
loan documentation for
FHA, secondary market and
portfolio loans.
Apply in person or send
resume to Charlotte State
Bank & Trust, 1100 Tamia-
mi Trail, Port Charlotte, FL
33953 or e-mail resume to
tshremshock@csbtfl.com
EEO/AA


L BANKING
4 2015


ASST. BRANCH MGR. Teller,
New Acct, Consumer Lending Exp.
Fax: 941-306-0901 or email
Hr@SabalPalmBank.com
COMMERCIAL CREDIT
UNDERWRITER
Growing community bank with
expanding credit department
needs fully trained,
experienced commercial
underwriter/portfolio
manager.
Fast paced environment,
overtime may be required.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Experience
required in C&l and CRE
underwriting. Finance or
accounting degree preferred.
Full benefit package
provided.
Email resume to
remch@floridashoresbank.com
RESIDENTIAL LOAN
PROCESSOR
Experienced residential loan
processor for fast growing
community bank.
Knowledge of loan process-
ing from application to
closing rerequired; knowledge
of Calyx software preferred.
Fast paced, energetic
environment; excellent wages
and company paid benefits.
Please submit resume to
Florida Shores Bank, fax
941-237-2001,
Attn: Loan Operations.


CLERICAL/OFFICE
2020


PART-TIME CLERICAL, data
entry, filing entry level
accounting office. Fax Resume
941-764-0608.
RECEPTIONIST/CLERICAL,
F/T Comp skills a must. Exp
w/phones a plus. Email or fax
resume. No Calls.
941-639-2161 or
hr@andreaegroup.com


MEDICAL
2030


ADMISSIONS
DIRECTOR
To provide outside market-
ing & assessments for 120
bed nursing facility. Must
be a self starter with
strong customer service
skills apply to administra-
tor
Heritage Health Care Cen-
ter, 1026 Albee Farm
Road, Venice
Phone: 941-484-0425
Fax (941) 484-6203

ARNP/ PA full time for
local dermatology practice.
Experience is a plus but
not necessary. Must be
energetic & hardworking.Fax
resume to: 941-613-2401

CNA AND CPR CLASSES,
DAYS, EVENINGS,
Weekends & Private
Tutoring. $225
PRACTICE MAKES
PERFECT 941-249-1643

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIES!
CNAs needed immediately in
Port Charlotte (239) 207-8215
HHA#20008095 EOE



COOK PRN,
Must have experience in
long term care
Apply in person:
Quality Health Care
6940 Outreach Way
North Port
(941)426-8411
EOE
Drug free work place

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job oppor-
tunities available:
PTA $38 hourly PT/FT
Nurses & CNA's Nights
Fax resume to (863)-494-
9470 For questions call:
(863)-494-5766


MEDICAL
l 2030


DON/CNO
Signature Heath Care of
Port Charlotte
Gold State Survey
Facility
High acuity, high volume
building
3-5 years in senior
management role
State Survey experi-
ence required
High compensation
position
Top tier benefit package
Send resumes to
admin.portcharlotte@
signaturehealthcarellc.com
EEOC/DFWP


LCSW LICENSED or license
eligible, FT $62,400/year to
start, benefits available after
60 days. PT no benefits
$30/hour. Call Dr. Wilcox at
941-467-6347 or send
resume to
kimwilcox@hotmail.com
M/A & PHLEBOTOMIST,
F/T needed for busy cardiolo-
gy/internal medicine practice.
Cardic exp a MUST. Please
fax resume to 941-639-7205.


MDS COORDINATOR, RN
3.0 EXPERIENCE
Salaried Position,
Flex Hours
Send Resume or
Apply in person:
Quality Health Care
6940 Outreach Way
North Port, FL 34287
FAX (941)423-1572
EOE
Drug free work place
MEDICAL ASST PT
with front desk experience.
Send resume to:
North Port Sun, Dept 4083
13487 Tamiami Trail
North Port, FL 34287

^KL~~SK^MlBT'f^


MEDICAL
L 2030


Med. FrontOffice /Admin
Asst for N Port Dr. Medical
office exp required. FT
w/benefits. Fax resume to
941-426-2571.
MEDICAL front office posi-
tion. Strong medical termi-
nology and billing skills.
Immediate opening. Please
Call: 941-629-2111.
MEDICAL ASSISTANT, Full
time. Medical office experi-
ence A MUST! Excellent bene-
fits. Fax resume ASAP to 941-
629-6711. EOE
MRI TECHNOLOGIST
needed for high volume
outpatient imaging center.
Must be MRI certified. Full-
time with competitive pay and
benefits. Please send resume
to kdraht@advimaging.com or
fax to 941-235-4667
NURSE needed for busy car-
diothoracic surgical practice in
Venice. Offering competitive
salary and excellent benefits.
EHR experience a plus.
Resume to: PO Box 3130,
Ocala, FL 34478 or FAX to
(352) 547-1340.
NURSES
ALL SHIFTS & VISITS
RN UP TO $75/VISIT
LPN UP TO $48/VISIT
HHA UP TO $24/VISIT
MEDICARE & PRIVATE DUTY
BONUSES/401K
SARASOTA/ARCADIA/VENICE
UNS 941-244-2590

RN Supervisor
3:00pm 11:00pm
Salaried Position
Must have Supervisory
experience and computer
literacy essential. Long
Term Care experience
required. Email resumes to:
ktolley@villageontheisle.com
or call: 941-486-5471 to
make appt.
Village On The Isle
910 Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL 34285
EOE Drug Free Workplace


Do W7U have


something like


this in


^aao or :?'
^< ^J -1- "--t^J o^





The Sun Classified-Section A Page 6 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


L MEDICAL
l 2030


OPHTHALMIC TECHNICIAN,
EXPERIENCED only, COA/COT
must refract. Fax letter/resume to
941-9244751
RN- Port Charlotte Rehabili-
tation Center is seeking an
EXPERIENCED RN for our
11-7 shift. We are seeking a
self-starting, well organized
professional with excellent
communication and leader-
ship skills. Very competitive
wage and benefits package
for the right candidate.
Please apply in person at
Port Charlotte Rehabilitation
Center, 25325 Rampart
Blvd, Port Charlotte.

HORIZON
HNEALTHCARE
7 INSTITUTE
Www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Corner of 41 & Toledo Blade
YOU can become a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
in just 8-10 months
Classes Start Each month
Call for Class Dates
NIGHT CLASSES
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Open House every Thurs
9am-7pm
Start Working hn 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
LPN Board Review (200hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506
Corner of 41 & Toledo Blade



Life ]a(
Care -----
Center
of punta Gorda
www.LCCA.com
We're Life Care Centers of
America, the nation's largest
privately-owned skilled care
provider. If you share our
heartfelt approach to caring
for the elderly, consider join-
ing our family at Life Care
Center of Punta Gorda. We
offer competitive pay and
benefits in a mission-driven
environment.

Director of Maintenance
Full time

Long term care experience
preferred. Must have the abili-
ty to plan, organize, develop,
implement, and interpret the
programs, goals and objec-
tives of the Maintenance
department.
Call 941-639-8771 or fax
resume to 941-639-3422 or
come visit with us at 450
Shreve St. Punta Gorda EOE

Classified = Sales

MUSICAL
mo:2035





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN '


RESTAURANT /
HOTEL
2040


The Boca Grande Club
is hiring for Cleaning
position, F/T, experi-
enced, seasonal work in
Boca Grande. Tolls paid,
Drug Free workplace.
EOE
Contact Belinda
941-964-2211 or
ops@bocagrandeclub.com


The
SUN II

PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
CLASSIFIED
SELLS
CALL TODAY!
941-207-1200
Venice/Englewood
North Port areas
OR
941-206-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas


U


Read The


RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
2040







NOW HIRING
Experienced Line Cooks
Please Apply in Person
LAISHLEY CRAB HOUSE
150 Laishley Court
Punta Gorda
LINE COOKS FT or PT apply
in person between 2-5 pm
Joe Crackers Sports Grill
1020 El Jobean Rd PC
ASKI US
HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
The Perfect Caper
Restaurant in Punta Gorda is
now hiring professional
Wait Staff & Bartenders.
We are accepting applications
between 1 & 3 daily. 121 E
Marion Ave. # F
SKILLED TRADES
S2050




A/C INSTALLERS,
SERVICE TECH & HELPERS
Must have exp, own tools,
FLDL, Full Time.
Top Pay + benefits. DFWP
Apply in person:
AA Temperature Services
24700 Sandhill Blvd.
Deep Creek
NO PHONE CALLS!


SKILLED TRADES
2050


CONCRETE, LANDSCAPE &
curbing installer needed, EXP
ONLY. Call 941-628-3502
MARINE FORKLIFT OPERA-
TOR, Exp. Only Apply. Harbor
at Lemon Bay. 727-735-5036
PLUMBING TECHNICIAN,
must have knowledge of all
phases of new construction,
service & residential plumbing.
Temp to Perm position. Seri-
ous inquires only. Must have
great driving record. Ask for
Megan 941-624-3150


RE-PIPERS, wanted for
fast growing company,
must have min 5 yrs expe-
rience. good driving
record and well groomed,
This drug free company
offers a benefit package.
Call 941-473-2344

RV TECHNICIAN
Immediate opening
Full Time. Job includes
chassis, plumbing,
carpentry, appliance
repair, LP gas systems,
electrical systems. DFW,
Non-Smoker.
Call Craig Hinshaw at
(941) 966-5335
or fax to (941) 966-7421
PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR YOU
Venice, Englewood,
North Port 207-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas
Call 206-1200

UPHOLSTERER/SEAM-
STRESS, Fully experienced.
Englewood 941-662-0464
UPHOLSTERY/CANVAS
SHOP, looking for exper. help
full or part time call 276- 0488


SALES
Lw 2070


/ NEW
BUSINESS
DEVELOPER

We are looking for
energetic, result driven, and
success motivated sales
professionals who want to
WIN! You will be selling
advertising in the largest
classified product in the
state of Florida. Because
of our track record with
customer success, we offer
viable solutions to keep all
types of businesses top of
mind and to bring them
customers. We want to hire
experienced self-starters
who have excellent
communication and
customer service skills.
We Offer:
*Competitive salary plus
commissions
*Vacation
*Health Insurance
*Sick and short term
disability.
0401(k)
*Training
*Advancement opportunities
If you are looking for a
career in a positive
environment with growth
potential and have a real
desire to succeed,
please contact
gkotz@sun-herald.com
We are a drug & nicotine
free workplace.
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing
required.


NEED CASH?


SALES
2070


AD SALES Rep, sal/comm
Venice Gulf Coast Living
Magazine send resume to:
venicemag@aol.com
INSIDE SALES
Established Product
Downtown Punta Gorda
Flexible Hours
Commission Based
Call Jodi
941-205-2340
REAL ESTATE
Are you worth 100%?
At Sun Realty You Are!
Call Gary Hicks
1-877-649-1990 or email
gary@naplessunrealty.com

s//s//s
IN THE SUN
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....

/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
JFind A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service


Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


Be Smart. Be Informed.


E s Every Day.
NEWSPAPERS Every Day.


I











S U N NENEWSPAPERS'





Find the people here to keep your home, business and transportation running smoothly.
Include Your Business in This Director Call 866.463.1638


)AR C it


AC/DC
AIR CONDITIONING

FREE
Service Call
With Any Repair! -
$39
Maintenance
Special
941-716-1476 0
Lic.#CAC1814367


- EErEMI


S.O.S.
SPECIAL
2Ton. 16 50 Seer
Straight
Cool
Changeout
Installed

$2795
cash customers
I]. ]i-llh-, |I :pL R,-Hii.


- urn


Air Conditioning
& Heating
Service
Installations
Free Estimates
Commercial Residential
Serving Sarasota and
Charlotte County
423-1746
Kevin Woods Owner


-'4i


I I


IPIc


Money Problems
Got You Feeling
Overwhelmed
and All Alone?
Don't go it alone!
Non-protit agency can help'
CONSUMER DEBT COUNSELORS
FREE, CONFIDENTIAL and
NON-JUDGEMENTAL
CONSULTATION
941-255-3236 or 800-801-3325
wwA'J debtreduction org


IDIOM emov4


Steel /uminum
ak ,jyClear
W ccordion
NSTALED or
DO YOOJRSELF
WINDOW
REPLACEMENTS
& INSTALLATIONS


..II=18


'clB Catitll tnIil
H % II, -, il .
N .. I. I !.... I-;
N.-
Pool Cages Screen
Lanais Acrylic Rooms
Screen Entries
*Rescreens
Garage Screens
Handrail
Hurricane Shutters
Window Replacement
.4 i) .4.0.8.8
1941) 10S-S500
,."...n: ,:,.,: i,.,-


II


iFie ASSURANCE WILDLIFE TRAPPING
O H 0 'ur It ildllilc E.xpertn i
I The Nuisance .\niimal Remoi al
repairs! fromli iour home .\NYTINIE!
ALL SER\ ICES Gi.\R.\NTEED!
I5 941-493-1567
('ell: 941-456-TRAP
S223M6 ,


9* -


with my ad in the
Business &
Service
Directory

SYou CanToo!
Call Today
to reserve
yourspace


) A I 4


) Yorder


Peace River Wilderness Eco Tours -Guided Fishing Trips -Museum Gilh Shops
Cozy Collage Rentals Boat Slip Canoe 8 Kayak Rentals
r 941-627 tSH13.474)

& V-................... ......


Full) Bidedd, Liteiied
\ & Isiiur d Naliial FlIi'idd

ESTWE .S WE
SPECI LIST
A. IA Rllo llt ZERO R.E.
PI RHt lll .
PII't'l 1/h 1-llat'lm isll fi) S Ier
Priniic i *inp l i n I. 9 4( 1 -1 -8i
A1 '" -A"'-6 941-575-9758


i. , , ; .. . -, '-4


)!tIr-(


)U! IlrI


,) iha Srie


WI I I


,'aN B:LE |
mRepairL
35 YearsExeence


Complete Auto &
Light Truck Repair
Transport &Towing
Service
Welding, Metal
Repair & Fabrication
I buy unwanted
and junkcars
941-626-3724
LC, #MV-84601


Margie from
Hairbusters
is now at
Co(01 ersatiol0
Hair Salon/ Barber
2" Ii I l., ,i. i.I l I I
',, 1 t I, ,l .l, [ I 2.
941-623-7759
Call for Specials
Walk-ins welcome!


U-ORZNTL


BILL
JACOBSEN
Bobcat & Concrete
Driveways
Pavers
Sidewalks
Ulility Pads
Culverts
Bobcal Services
Vegetation Grinding/
mS* Mulching Z
No Job Too Big or Small
941-391-0694
Pou-Jac Inc 0010641


II


HALL'S TRUCKING
& BOBCAT SERVICES
Concrete Removal
Stone Washed Shell
Fill Dirt Mulch
Shell Driveway Installed
Small Tree & Brush Removal
Commercial & Residential Clean-Ups
Reasonable Rates & Reliable Service
(941) 485-5717
Cell (941) 716-3650


Specializing in:
.Additions Kitchens & Baths
Remodeling Interior Trim Work
Custom Homes
LeVasseur
Building & Remodeling Inc
51.ie LOVa0umu. PI*Imedenl
FIo all your con nc lion need. r all ~ loday
941-698-9045
www levBBasurOulldlna.com
rft l. rCA


-unI


-)hilm


BOB'S
CABINET
SOLUTIONS
941-276-0599
Over 33 'ears Expenent e
For all tour cabinet and
t ouInertop needs
I(, ,i .i FREE :.iii 1 -i

I .. =2 '-: -


Jeff Drake
Custom Carpentry
Err'f'lD,tli r >mt R hi,,

Remodels
j New Construction
Kitchens & Baths
E Windows Doors!
Li Illla IIIt 1 i1 II,.

941-815-6123


DIRTY
CARPETS?
Call Blue Dolphin
Cleaning



Carpe t Til *Utholstery
We also 0o
house cleaning!
941-313-1790
FREE ESIIMAES
--- LLIU ---


CARPET
CLEANING
PLUS
Deep Steam Cleaning
4 Rooms $9900
Tile & Groul Cleaning
40%OffSpid.
New Van & Mounted
Equipment!
_941-623*6216'
'.. ;m;;me.t pt 0n.


BI~I~iilO~I~iiO


-


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..


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--


..


1I. i I I


Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 7


I) luinum^^^


) lBeauty lSlon


I-


.1


I I '
~Hs~


~r~a~ra~ie~i~










NEWSPAPERS




Find the people here to keep your home, business and transportation running smoothly.
Include Your Business in This Director Call 866.463. 1638


c 11 3104Olc




bin
ii I


)ITea l


A-STAR
CLEANING
SERVI ESp


Move-Outs
Weekly, Bi-Weekly,
Monthly
941-626-0622
Free Estimates
Lic. I Ins


i\\indrllith HownOi r itr


. .
\\lNDER\OMAN
TO THE RESCUE

(941) 544-2976


-4I H


ir ir


Cleaning,
Organizing
Staging and
Decorating
Honest
Experienced
and Dependable
,"'.i" inin, 11'I 'i ,: .iF7

941-445-3402
203-695-8138
Your budget
is my goal!


HOME & OFFICE
CLEANING
Senior caregiver
& organizer
I I ,, I. 1 1 I. 1' 1.
Ih tl/iv. 1 litly tilv
I ,,,, I,, l I, ,,,,,,-,

Lic./Insured Ashley
941-421-9232


-TiEW


:% AFFORDABLE:
I COMPUTER &
*I HERE IT'S LAPTOP REPAIR
NO)TAJOB. ITS [
A P.SSIO\X"I IDLCOMPUTERS i
Free Estimates Available6days
I Certified I


U41-879-2348


941.764.3400
2270-F Tamiami r P.C.


-)ce


-or


9= IG


') Constructi o(


I d

-anH-idabliRalR s

Fas leks
941-921-7552
www.fastteks.com


Frustrated \iith
lour Computer?




SLearn NewApps *iPhone
* Downlads *MSOffice
* Organize Files & Photos Lots Mon
Call Lori
941-223-6869


li -II-- =I


Specializing in
Walks & Drives
Foundations & Pool
Decks, Flocrete
No Job Too Small



Since 1978


BILL
JACOBSEN
CONCRETE
Driveways
Pavers
Sidewalks
Utility Pads
S Culverts 0
* Bobcat Services
No Job Too Big o0 Small
941-391-0694
I-- .. 1 ., 1 , 111. 4 1, J


TEDDY'S
HANDYMAN &
REMODELING,
Inc.
No Job Too Big
or Too Small!
(941) 629-4966
Licensed & Insured
CRC 1327653
Ill.II till


BLUE Krauth Construction
IROT ENT. ,. NM
'ALL CONSTRUCTION
( N \t' Hoin ( .ontruc'tioinIi
i Commercial .d(ition1, j
Residential R in,,ddli,
t~ t- . .1 . 17 a


1,1 Interior/Exterior I)rachcd (G.;ragei
ENew/Existing il11h & )Door Replacemeiiinri
"Just Call and Ask!"' '
941-662-0266 941-809-0473
Lic.4CBC1258748


D I airs
, Water damage
.All Repairs BIG
& small
*Expert Texture~
Finish Matching
*Handyman services
offered AsRr RA
941-268-3522


COMPLETE
DRYWALL
* Hang
* Finish
* Patchwork
* All Textures
* Popcorn
Removal
* Paint
Matt Potter
941-232-8667
Free Estimates
Lic. CRC1328482 & Insured


GARY
DRAKE
Dryer Vent
Cleaning
And Inspection
Prevent Fires
Go GREEN!
Phone 941-204-6468
Over 30 Years Experience
Lic#773-00006427 / Ins.


Lj air" u!g


941204901

SMi-. &Isue


ROGER P.FRECHETTE
SR.&JR.
"THE GO TO GUYS'"
Dryer Vent Cleaning
$99 SPECIAL I



U Cn j n tr ol l o rirr -. t
Can R ilin g A/CVm nts BI ,," "
L.4 1'61. -22.11.1. I ri.ua
L uflrnI'l .lrJl >f .F l uinr.j Pul I nrr ]

9/11 eal ?.ll?+ll


* Bush Hogging
Excavating
Clearing
Grade
* Fill* Driveways
FREE ESTIMATES

SDS
941-505-0444
Licensed & Insured


Need a Floor
-Plan of Your
HIouse?-

created'
,scaled plan ,
fori low cosi
Call Bill
941-421-9786


)infraion


The State of Florida
Requires all Contractors to be
Rei.stered or Ceritiied.

Be ad\ ised to Check Licen.se
Null bers \\ it t[he Stite 1)\ Calliln'
1-850-487-1395 or onl11 the \Welb
I 7I(//,' idtll tiI \ 1,III


luniue etoaion


I. u................................ m I


Aloha
Coastal, Inc.
I ,. .h, ai..n ,,
n., .11 n1. 1" n1 nh ,'
Specializing in...
Relinishin' Repair
-On-Sile Touch Lip
SAnliquec
MOBILE SERn ICE
(941) 284-5702
I i,, .h I,.
j i i I -


Assembly
Company.com
We Assemble
Boxed Furniture
Desks Hutches
Files Chairs
Bookcases Too!!!
800.243.6699
Don't Fuss
Call Us


;AAGE 00D t
OVER CHARLOTTE


IMPACT RATED DOORS
GARAGE DOOR OPERATORS
GARAGE DOOR SCREENS
*Se vice& Installation
SFamily Owned and Operated
Residential &Commeicial
625-6258
FREE ESTIMATES
ON NEW DOORS


ImimN IIIIIrIHM RiIIIII


DON'T
FALL!


III~


941-780-3346
grabbarguy.com
Licensed & Insured


Motmis SoAMiUfef ,s-

*Resreemning P'4M wineSeailg *Pmt aeamel
R IotBa* ntg *Pm*i f *xtum e tNdmur qafr
*k IJIM *llXqpxrr In-lzftitg h *Uectrilitm
SGutter Cleaning Roten* edfpo t Rq*aBs itrwbthetinig
Venice Native
Serving Sarasota County

941.485.2172


Reach over 150,000 potential

customers with your full color ad.
Call today to reserve your space.

941-429-3110 sUN4
Email: special@sunnewspapers.net


I- t.


1


- -


1. 11 -IR %


11 11 . . .. . I


'


07 777 ==i, i i M017=111. ,, i i lil


'


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 8 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


) laing 71


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Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 9


Handm













A Crene


Bill's Handyman
Service
* Ceiling Fans
Lights
Faucets
SClogged
Drains
* Toilets
* Appliances
* 15+ Yrs Experi-
ence
941-661-8585
Ucensed


ODDS & ENDS
HANDYMAN
SERVICES
Our Goal is 100% Satisfaction
INTERIOR
REMODEL
Including
Living in
Place
Modifications
Home Watch
Services
941-445-3768
30 years experience
Owner Walt Ernst
Sarasota County Only


Your Total Home
Maintenance Provider
Courteous, Prompt, Dependable
& Affordable Service
CALL DON
941-85-3760
25+ Years
Licensed


k k kM
POSIBL FRRE

pl:ne
Fre Estimae! rpMea

Same ay Sevice! Et


Landscapi
Free Landscape Des
Let me show you what $1000 %
Make an Appointment today, Call Charlie 2
Planted Serving Lee and Charlotte Count
Royal 10/12ft 3 for $399 Foxtail Closeout
Growing Grounds 13036 Ficus Tree Ln. ~


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'II IFRE








:11fihr 'a '1


Moving & Delivery
Honest, Reliable
Courteous
Very Low Rates
15 yrs. Experience
Lie. & Ins.
941-237-1823
FI Mover Reg. No. IM1647


P Find the people here to keep y
Include Your Busine:


D M4


JR MASONRY
& TILE
STUCCO, CONCRETE,
BRICK, BLOCK, STONE
PRESSURE WASHING
YOUR REPAIR
RESTORATION
SPECIALIST
VETERANS AND SENIOR
DISCOUNTS
No Job Too Small
(941) 716-0872


- I


-II


TWO MEN AND A TRUCK

"Movers
Who
Care"
0 We sell boxes!
359-1904
U.S. DOT No. 1915800
Fully Licensed and Insured


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SUNEWSPAPERS




rour home, business and transportation running smoothly.
ss in This Directory. Call 866.463.1638



J & J HANDYMAN DANTHECo
HANDYMAN Dave Beck SERVICES HANDYMAN Handma
'Pressre The Handyman, m DO IT ALL WITH Painting sure
Washing Kitchen & Bath JUST ONE CALL Cleaning, sh
Countertops Bathroom Carpenet,
and Much More! Drywall & Kitchen Laminate floorin
S Over 30 Years Texturing/Painting Interio and Tile Remodels
Experience & Ceramic Tile ExteriorPainting Kitchens Paini All your
Satisfied Aluminum Screens Carpentry Bathroom Repair Pain
Customers Dryall Service Door Installation Carpentry M e Frot!
941-525-7967 941-7661767 CeilingTexturing HomeMaintenance Anything? I _JlI O
941-493-6736 CRC 1327942 Flooring -69 941-7 0
Li. & Full Insured Licensed & Insured 1ail h 7 4 9 4
Call For FREE Estimate Member BBB Lal I 'I L Licens



WRIGHT & SON TJ MILAZO SR.
ANDSCAPINGINC. 941-475-0058 Hoop's Lawn
Dave Beck I LAWN CUTTING Service
T LD -"WE CAN DO ANYTHING Venice Mowing MOST LAWNS Accepting
1The HBshHogging ng oo New Customers
SNorth Port Ston$20-$25 Lawn Cutting
*Kitchn & Brush Mowing Pt. Charlotte Desigan $20 $25 Lawn Cutting
Kitchen & Lot & Rotond nation TRIM BUSHES Weeding
ml ree, Lot & Vegetation Rotonda -Trees
Mulching love Shrubs PLANT DESIGN M rimming
a Re m de g Mul ing & S.G.C. operate
Ceramic Tile Tee, Stump Removal a S. WEEDING & MULCHING Sod
ESelective Clearing re Equipment S Serving Englewood, Cape Haze Palms
Great Work Ethic Rotonda, S. Venice and North Port Landscaping
C 3 94 1-4566332 Satisfied Customers DEPENDABLE SERVICE
CRC 132792 FREE ESTATES PROM DEPENDABLE SERVICE 94125817
Licensed & Insured i65m 941-426-7844 45 YEARS EXPERIENCE 1-258-8175
Member BBB Lic. Ins. LIC.& INSURED Res./Com. Lic./Ins.





[ g ^ j Fstomized Kurbing
VIBURNUM GREAT We Sell and Install
Igte FOR PRIVACY
HEDGE!
will do! Italian Cypress
,39-265-2766 Palms
tMan athrs to
12/14fPlanted$99 i 5 ards F, e owivery
12/14ft $99 choose Sf roomw ,1, A.i lVW.l l
On Pine Island I 4at11-00002010Is
Licl11-0000201ins i I










SUN NEWSPAPERS
NEWSPAPERS


n rn ma tne people nere to Keep your nome, business ana transportation running smootniy.'
Include Your Business in This Directory. Call 866.463.1638 j


-oite


Residential, Commercial
Interiors and Exteriors
QUALITY WORK
AFFORDABLE PRICES
Free Pressure Washing with
ext. painting. 26 yrs. exp.
FREEESTIMATES
ReferencesAvailable
Lic# 10-00007724& Insured
(941)255-3834


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SUEIR Larr'sPantl.*




No Job Too Small
Ming Northeast
Fu STIMATES Workmanship and
Serving Southwest Florida Reasonable Prices
941-474-9091 Fully Licensed
Licensed & Insured and Insured
0103673 0405875


Reach over 150,000
potential customers with
your full color ad.
Call today to reserve your space.
941-429-3110
SUNase
Email: special@sunnewspapers.net


)-Paitin


) PlumhI / LeaDeecion


Alexander's
Painting Etc.
25 year Pro Interior/Ext
Drive/Garoge/Deck
Pressure Wash/Repair
Remove/Install
Pre-Rent/Sale Spec.
Free Est, Ref, Lic, Ins.
941-496-9131
or
941-223-0941


II:
Mi ke Dy m n


Al's Painting
& Home Services
Residential
InteriorlExterior
30 Years Experience
Free Pressure Wash
with Paint Job
Free Estimates
References Available
941-240-6576
Cell: 941-661-9066
Ins. / Lic# 12-00009789


IPI II


SAVE MONEY!
On all Your Plumbing Needs
Full Service Plumbers
Swift Plumbers.com
Aaron Swift, Inc.


4 | Backflow Testing
ONLY $19.95
4 ~Call Swift Plumbers NOW


State license # Q842652


Utility Department
Charges $3S00


,81 oi xi'iU *TI 42 -'370III1


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NiNFT
PmHHmm^


retiredd but not tired'
Faucets, Sinks, Stools, Garbage
Disposals, Pressure Tanks,
Water Softeners/Filters Etc.
Most Anything,
Just Ask
Ross I
Master Plumber
RF11067393

1-941-204-4286


Peace of Mind
that your home and pet are well
cared for while you are away.
Overnight In-Home Pet Sitting
& Pet Care, Catering to
Daily Pet Activities
Also Overnight Home Sitting
Catering To Your Needs


Ju resseller
(312) 399-4223
Full Time Punta Gorda Resident
Professional & Friendly


OrinlrW


)-TinI


LICENSED1m
PLUMBE
30Yer


Complete Pool
Service and Repair
I. Bi-weekly
* Chemical Service
* Leak Detection
Licensed & Insured
Owner Operated

941.585.1711


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* senior
Discounts



941-375-1103
Lie. Ins


P --------------*1
* FREE
Automatic pool vac
w/purchaseofa I
Hayward' Heat Pump wcoupon
or Gas Pool Heater 3/31/2012
Free Estimates on new AC systems I
I Service & Repairs on
Iall AC systems & pool heaters
Sharkey's Airlne.
www.sharkeysair.cotm~ I
941-625-2143 877-625-2143
CAC05801 ,3
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Bailey's
Painting
and
Pressure
Cleaning
* Exterior/ Interior Painting
* Soffit and Facia Repair
Lic.& Insured in Sarasota,
No. Port & Charlotte Counties
CHAMBER MEMBER
Seenrizn theL
1983
941-497-1736


Jenkins
Home Improvement
*Pressure Washing
SDriveways
SPool Decks & Cages
* Soffit & Facia
* Seamless Gutters
SRepairs
; Painting
Also Vinyl Siding, Soffit
& Facia Installation
941-497-2728
Owner/ Onerated Lic./Ins.


Benson's
Safe No
Pressure
Roof Cleaning
Roofs
Pool Cages & Lanais
Driveways... ETC!
941-697-1749
941-587-5007
Lic./Ins.
BensonsSoftRoofWash.com


John's Rescreening
& Handym~ Service
*Pool Cages -
* Lanai's & Entries \
* Garage Slider Screens
* 25 years experience
"Don't let the bugs bite
Coll for Free Estimates"
1oP job too small,
A'We do them all
941-883-1381
Lic. 9341 & Insured


) YordeIIre


SCREEN MACHINE
$50 Tops, $30 Sides
Complete
Rescreen $1095
(up to 1500 sq ft)
Add
"No See Umm"
screen for $100
FREE ESTIMATES
(941) 879-3136
Lic.#22454&lns.


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM
& I INC.
SPECIAUZING IN
SCREEN ROOMS
NEW AND RE-SCREENS
20+ YEARS SIPERIENCE

See website for
Special Offers

LiG# SA37, AL0511


E & F
E&F
Rescreens
Famig Owned 6& OpeatEd
*Pool cages
*Lanais
*Entrgways
*Garage Sliders
Honest. Dpendable.
Quality Sevlce
Refernces Available.
FREE ESTIMATES
Ucensed & Insured.
941-915-7793
or 493-4570


Randy Haskett
Screening
Licensed & Full Insured
25 yrs. of experience
SPECIALIZING IN
RESCREENING
POOL CAGES
& LANAIS
Also Repairs, Entryways,
Garage, Sliders
No Job Too Small
809-1171


* Specializing in
Pool Cages
* Serving Sarasota
County Since 1978
* Free Estimates

941-484-2232
Lic./Ins.


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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 10 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


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Saturday, March 3, 2012 EINICIV The Sun Classified-Section A Page 11


V. fSUNEA


' Find the people here to keep your home, business and transportation running smoothly.
Include Your Business in This Directory. Call 866.463.1638


)Rofn (I


)Ro ofing


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I .. ..I


Re-Roofing & Repair Specialists
LEONARD'S ROOFING,


S& INSUL
Mark
Kaufman bAI
.,. Roofing Shingle
2011 Remodeling Big 50 Award Winner inodadl Tle
"The Best of the Best" Chosen out of 800,000 I Built-up
remodeling contractors nationwide iM
Reroofs & Repairs Shingle Tile Metal Flat
ag Call Nowfora FREEEstimate 941 -473-3605 Reagan Le
Coupons atwww.markkaufmanroofing.com Lic #CCC044038 Lic.#


CaU
ENGLEWOOD
ROOFING
Family Owned Since 1961

NEW ROOFS
RE-ROOFS* REPAIRS
Commercial & Rwdesttial
State Uc.#CCC 1325079
Reroofs Are Our Spec*ly
Bus: 941-474-5487
Fax: 941-475-0799
Call Ron Call John



sIlBreakwater
STUCCO REPAIRS, CRACKS,
RUSTY BANDS, INTERIOR AND
EXTERIOR PAINT, NEW
CONSTRUCTION
NO JOB TOO SMALL
FREE ESTIMATES
COMPETITIVE PRICING
QUALITY SERVICE
941-234-6773
-lasnuod Sl&nil


PROFESSIONAL
TREE SERVICE
Complete Tree Work Exp
Stump Grinding Fl
All Palm Trimming Profe
Hedge Trimming Tree
Lic. #001053- Insured Insta
941-624-4204
25 years experience in 94
Charlotte County and ww
North Port Fu




Skater Works We


G i
941-484.1
Shallow Wel s Installed & Repaire
SPumps Instlled & Repaired
Irigaton Installed & Repaired
JackSlirom, Owner
Statells #

8529909


)I IT ofn


.ATION INC.
Family owned and
operated since 1969
Single Ply
*Metal
Full Carpentry
Service Available

onard 488-7478
RC 0066574


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Liene


CERAMIC NTLE R IJONE MIC LEMON BATILE
SALES AND/OR Convert bath tub to
SINSWa Installation Of All easy access shower
SINnfA ION RepaOir & Rep Tile, Marble Stone Handicap access shower
35 YC Wood Flooring Shower repair & replace
35r RS R > Loose or Hollow Shower Bath Remodel Free In-Home Shopping
NO JOB TOO SMAL FloorTile New Construction Licensed & Insured
12 ondo W. & Remodeling Owner/Install
12 yrs. In Rotonda West. Over 20 Years in Englewood
Free estimates. EE ESTIMATES 20x20 Porcelain
Installer/Owner. Established 1988 from $3.69
1ll Jim 941 -204-2444 Professionally Installed
941-697-5948 Lic. #AAA006338 & Ins 474-1000


-fm4l


ert Tree Services
essional certified Arborist
Sales. Pruning. Designs
llations. Stump Grinding
Removal
10% SENIOR DISCOUNT
1-426-8983
w.northporttree.com
Illy Licensed & Insured


-4^M


RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
New Constriction
& Remodels
Rusted bands &
Wire Lath Repair.
Spraycrete &
Dry-wall repair.

(9414957453
0 P) P 4


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Trailer Repair
Major & Minor
Boat/Utility
Trailers
Springs, Axles
Bearings, Tires
Lights & Wiring
Englewood
Trailer Center
941-460-9700


Dietrich Warehouse
Tree Service BayRentals
EExpert Tree Bay entails
Timming For small businesses starting at
A*'Removal $200 per/mo Zoning is ILW for
AllPhases most types of businesses
9 of wawn Care
LICENSED & INSURED Sizes 325sq. ft. to 4,000 sq.ft.
OWNER OPERATED Venice Warehouse Complex
941-408-8654 (941) 485-8402


HHW^ndoII


3ll3rll4


3634


Juan Carlos Mendez Owner
Licensed & Insured
Free estimates and
affordable prices!


WE DO
WINDOWS
&
PRESSURE
WASHING
New Customer
Specials
Package Deals
Res. & Comm.
Free Estimate
Lic/Ins.
941-661-5281


Window Sliding CustomJome epair8, Inca
Window Sliding CEwi i
Cleaning GlassDor Windows, Door s & I
ALPHAOMEGA Wheel Repairs more...
BUILDING
services Free Estimates Jeff Reinhardt
10% ff Since 1981 *Replacement Windows* Interior Doors
9411 06 -6445 Hurricane Protection Garage Doors & Patio Doors
with this ad Exterior Doors Maintenance, Repairs, Install
Windows, Doors Complete Handyman Service
8 6-53 Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE
i8653c 43c Home Repairs 941.321 .1873
Lie. / Insured Lic. / Insured ..AAA 00


U.


VOTED BEST OF THE BEST
IN CHARLOTTE COUNTY

FI1 a IPAIS LL Why replace it when you can save it!
JUST CALL
E fj*I STEVE & 12 Year Warranty Preserves & Rejuvenates
HAVE A
GREAT DAY Increases Wind Protection Mildew Resistant
METAL-TILE- SHINGLE Any Color Even Clear R24 RValue Shingles
S FLAT ROOFS Built-up Tile Foam Polyester Metal Flat Roofs & More
Over 28 YEARS EXPERIENCE -
OverS 2 YEASTXPEORINCE GREAT WORK 426-9354 423-5458 800-221-6751
IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA AT A GREAT Lic#AAA7719 G
Small or Large Repairs to Total PRICE' 1 0
Replacement Steve's the Man for the Job! I10 U Discount
Lic CCC-1326838Bonded insuredd


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Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 11


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7^^^^^^Wf^FM^M^^^^^1 in,







The Sun Classified-Section A Page 12 EINICIV Saturday, March 3, 2012


SALES
Lw 2070


FURNITURE REFINISHER &
repair person. PT. Exp. need-
ed. Call Gino (941)-916-1455
REAL ESTATE OPENING
Realtors! Are you looking for
a full service office with great
technical support, NO DESK
FEES, in house training and
buyer & seller leads?
Call today for a confidential
interview.
ERA Advantage Realty, Inc.
(941)-255-5300
i.ament@embarqmail.com
ROOM for ASSOCIATE/
BROKER ASSOCIATE
at existing real estate office
North Port or Port Charlotte.
Call Bill 605-228-6598
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
* SALES **
** CASH PAID DAILY**
Excellent workplace! Great
hours & benefits. Base vs.
Generous Commission aver-
age $15+/hr. Port Charlotte
941-625-8800


SALES
PROFESSIONALS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Experienced Preferred
but not Necessary.
Gene Gorman Auto Sales
(941)-639-1601
WATCH US GROW.
The Furniture Warehouse
sales associates experienced
in retail sales. Energetic &
enthusiastic. Salary, commis-
sion, benefits.
941-223-6812

CHILD/ADULT
CARE NEEDED
2090

CHILD CARE TEACHER
FT excellent pay w/benefits.
Tolls paid. FCCPC pref.
Boca Grande
(941)-964-2885
NURSERY WORKER needed
for Port Charlotte preschool.
Benefits include free tuition.
No experience necessary. We
will train. Call 941-625-7011
WANTED: LIVE IN CAREGIV-
ER/Port Charlotte, Mature
female pref. 24/7 cooking,
cleaning, various other house-
hold activities for retired male
w/breathing problems. Free
Room/Board & wkly compen-
sation. Call 941-764-0344
GENERAL
2100


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!
Earn up to
$100-$300 per Day!
If you enjoy talking with peo-
ple and are ready to make
great money fast, give us a
call. We work in high traffic
retail locations, special
events, etc promoting home
delivery of the local paper.
This is an enjoyable, year-
round position with potential
to earn $400-$900+ per
week!
Positive work environment.
Must be outgoing, depend-
able, professional. We use a
low key sales approach that
doesn't require high pressure
to make sales. Those select-
ed will be given training and
taught how to make great
money while having fun! Flex-
ible hours. Perfect for
retired, semi-retired. Man-
agement opportunities avail-
able for right person.
Serious inquiries only. Good
transportation and cell phone
required. Background check.
Only the best applicants will
be considered to begin
training and earning money
this week! For interview
appointment call today
813-531-5640.


S GENERAL
2100


CHILD CARE Provider for
after school program. Hours
are 2:30-5:30, M-F. Must be a
high school graduate, and
over 21 yrs old. 45 hr DCF
credentials preferred.
Fax resume to:
941-964-8171 or call
941-964-0827 and ask for
Angela.
LAWNCARE/LANDSCAPING
Englewood, Clean FL Lic,
Reliable, Call A-Z
(941)-474-2554 Iv msg.

MODELS NEEDED
All types & ages 5 yrs/ up
941-955-9128
New and Used Managers
Finance Managers
Internet Sales Managers
Sales People
Up to $5000.00 sign in bonus
Sales People needed
IMMEDIATELY
with or without experience
Full Training Program
$400.00 average commission
Send Resumes to Kevin:
Kevincovert2@aol.com
or Derrick
DERRICKMULLIGAN@AOL.COM
Arcadia Chevrolet
Arcadia, Fl 34266

"I NICE A I
V Gondolier Sun
Part time position now
available for a
Customer Service Rep.
at the Venice Gondolier
Sun.
We are currently seeking
a individual with computer
exp., good typing
& spelling skills, and
good phone/customer
service skills.
Apply in person:
200 E. Venice Ave.
Venice, FL 34285
No phone calls please.
SALES ASSOC. M.-Sat.
Computer.Apply 8-3, 24123
Peachland Blvd. C4 PC 33954
TAXI DRIVER, Non-drinker.
Start immediately.Royal Car-
riage Taxi 941-485-4258







THE GASPARILLA
INN & CLUB

We currently have
openings within the
following areas:

Housekeeping
Bellman

For more details please
call 941-964-4570.
Resumes can be sent
directly via email to:
smoore@gasparillainn.com
or via fax to
941-964-4571





WE'RE BUSY AT
WARM MINERAL SPRINGS
the following positions are
available:
Licensed Massage
Therapist
Licensed Esthetician
Licensed Nail Tech
Apply in person:12200 San
Servando Ave North Port

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!


PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
2110

DRIVER/HELPER, NEEDED
North Port Natural Florist,
Apply in person. 13632 Tami-
ami Trail, North Port.
HOUSEKEEPER FOR Banana
Bay Motel. Non smoker, Fri &
Sat 10-2 $9/hr. Apply in per-
son at 23285 Bayshore Rd,
Port Charlotte.

3000








NOTICES

HAPPY ADS
S 3015





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638



PERSONALS
3020


A LONELY WIDOWER Hopes
to Find A Lonely Widow Who
Wants Marriage So We Can
Help Each Other. 941-629-0543
ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307

SClassified = Sales
BODY SCRUBS
AND MASSAGE
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041
MEGAN
Total Relaxation
941-600-4317
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
RELAXATION STATION
1225 US 41 Unit B3.
Charlotte Trade Center.
N of 776. 941-625-0141
SENSATIONS Stress
Release 941- 766-7995.
3860 Rt. 41, 2 mi. north of
Punta Gorda bridge.
Hiring apply in person
SINGLE MAN LOOKING FOR
SINGLE WOMAN
941-284-7939
THE GIRL NEXT door,
941-483-0701 North Port

CARD OF THANKS
3040


ST. JUDE NOVENA May the
Sacred Heart of Jesus be
adored, glorified, loved and
preserved throughout the
world now and forever. Sacred
Heart of Jesus have mercy
upon us. St. Jude, worker of
miracles, pray for us. Say this
prayer 9 times a day. By the
8th day your prayers will be
answered. It has never been
known to fail. Publication must
be promised. DEH


SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
3060

ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING-1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers 800-370-1570
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on Environ-
ment. Nationwide certifications
and Local Job placement
Assistance! (877)994-9904.


IMAGINE MEDICAL PREP
CNA, HHA, MEDTECH, CPR.
941-429-3320

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
3065

BIBLE STUDY
Rev. 20:4 "Fill Your Lamps"
Call Tom (941)-423-5458
CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave.
Venice Friday at
9am. Study fea-
tures video teachings of noted
Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, PG
Thursday @ 10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study
Open To Everyone!
941-639-6309
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
TRAVEL/TICKETS
L3080


DIRECT AIR travel vouchers 3
round trip $450 9418897771
DIRECT AIR, 2 round trip
vouchers, $338 941-505-
1895
RAYS VS Red Sox on March
18th and 31st 2 Tixs to each
game $180 941-276-2568
RED SOX VS. PIRATES MAR 9
SEC.207 $70 978-866-5496
Yankees Tickets, (2) pairs
Wed 3-21-12. $75 a pair. 941-
764-8269

LOST & FOUND
L : 3090


FOUND CAT, black, near
Edgewater and Harbor Blvd
area 941-629-2708.
PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR YOU
Venice, Englewood,
North Port 207-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas
Call 206-1200
FOUND CAT: NEAR BAY
SHORE DOG PARK CALL
941-916-1531
FOUND CAT: On Casey Key,
neutered male, tame, white
w/tiger markings. No micro
chip. 941-484-1706
FOUND: CELL PHONE
East Englewood area
941-830-3660
LOST behind the ear hear-
ing aid. Sat., Feb. 25, at Stu-
dent Academy yard sale, on
Field Ave. in Venice. 203-800-
5782


LOST & FOUND
: 3090


LOST CAT: Punta Gorda Air-
port Rd. Long Hair Black Cat
w/4 white paws, white on
breast & side of nose, Name is
Sassy, REWARD!!!! 941-639-
5543


LOST CAT: solid white female,
"Miss Kitty" spade, shots, no
collar. Lost Monday night in the
Charlotte Harbor area.
REWARD! 941-625-5118
LOST DOG: REWARD! Cran-
berry area North port 11
Ibs, shih-tzu type, silver &
champagne, very timid,
answers to lila. 423-613-
5341 or 941-776-1360
LOST DOG: Washington Loop
PG, Yorkie, Male, answers to
King Kong, red collar, 941-
286-3834
LOST: 14K Firefighters Pen-
dant, lost on Sat 2/25 vicinity
of Lowe's or Sunoco in Venice
or Merchants Crossing, Engle-
wood. Reward! 941-276-4087
S ARTS CLASSES
S3091


BASKETWEAVING CLASSES
in Punta Gorda.
Beginner & Advanced
Classes Monthly.
Call Teresa 941-347-7640
BEACH GLASS & Shell Jewel-
ry @ Creative Classes. Day &
evening, call Susan for info.
Venice 941-492-2150
KNIT &
CROCHET CLASSES
Beginners/Advanced. work at
your own pace.
Call Barbara (941)-445-4941
CREATIVE SHELL CLASSES
Saturday 10am 2pm
Learn award winning designs
All supplies furnished
Go home with finished piece
Call Linda (941)-493-2276
GREETING CARD CLASS
3-16-12 at 9:30am in PG.
Receive your own blossom
punch & make rubberstamp
cards (5). No experience
necessary. Pay $18 by 3-6-12
nferb@hotmail.com
Call Nancy 815-979-8912
MOSAICS
Thursday 6 9pm
Call Rosemary at
941-697-7888
PG BOAT CLUB
802 Retta Esplanade.
Tues. 8am.
WOODCARVING
941-505-4246 941-575-
4276
SHORT STORY WRITING
WORK SHOP SUNDAYS 1-4
PM FEB. 19TH APRIL 8TH
$75 CALL JOANNA FOR INFO,
VENICE 941-993-0660

DANCE CLASSES
S3093


BELLY DANCING
Charlotte Cultural Center
Saturday, 11am.
941-276-0935
EDUCATION
L 3094


TM PROGRAM
Warm Mineral Springs
Every Saturday at 11am
LECTURE
Reduce stress, Improve
health.
** WEEK NIGHT **
Psychic Development Classes
starting soon 941-743-0800
Sandy Anastasi Lisa Freeman
Readings always available
medium2u@gmail.com


EXERCISE CLASSES
3095


400 W. Retta Esplanade
Saturday at 9:30am.
TAI CHI QI GONG
CURVES COMPLETE
WEIGHT LOSS
Try it for one week FREE
Curves Towles Plaza
941-639-8525
FREE YOGA WITH KAREN
on Nokomis Beach,
Wed,Thur, Fri & Sat 8:30 am.
Bring a small blanket.
941-586-7697
FREE BASEBALL INSTRUC-
TIONS & travel baseball try-
outs, ages 8-14, for spring
season. Storm Baseball.
For more information call
(941)-421-9822
GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
KRIYA YOGA MEDITATION
1250 Rutledge St.
Unity Church of Peace
Monday at 7pm.
941-423-0029
MARTIAL ARTS Shaolin Kung
Fu Training. Flexible schedul-
ing. For more information call
941- 421-9822
YOGA CLASS FREE
FREE Hatha Yoga Class Thurs-
day's at 8:30am to New Stu-
dents with Yoga for Every Age.
Instructor Ilse Mindling RYT
This class is suitable for those
with little or no experience.
Proper alignment, movement
and breath will be emphasized.
Relaxation/meditation is part
of every class. Beginners
welcome. Punta Gorda Isles
Civic Assoc.
2001 Shreeve St. See
http://www.yogaforeveryage.com
or call 941-204-0095
for more info.
PIs. bring your own yoga mat.
RELIGION CLASSES
Z3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta
Gorda Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES
S3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 7 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-423-8171 or 941629-
2077

5000







BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 12 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012







Saturday, March 3, 2012 EINICIV The Sun Classified-Section A Page 13


APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
5020

CLEAN DRYER VENT
BE SAFE & SAVE $35
(941)-204-9070
ADULT CARE
L5050


VOLUNTEER HEALTHCARE
SERVICES companion &
errands etc. sponsorship &
donations accepted Faith 941-
763-2326
CHILD CARE
L 5051


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
PALM CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY PRESCHOOL
Openings available for all age
groups 941-255-5544
COMPUTER SERVICE
5053


*1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR &
TUTOR... IN YOUR HONEI
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. 941-451-3186
COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
CLEANING
SERVICES
L5060


LuLu's Cleaning & Land-
scaping
Relax Let Me Do The
Work! 22 yrs. exp.
941-416-0975
AIMEE'S PROFESSIONAL
HOUSEKEEPING
941-391-6976 or 941-815-
6668 Senior Citizen Discount,
Licensed & Bonded
HONEST, EFFICIENT, DEPENDABLE,
excellent references 26 yrs. exp.
please call 941-429-2118
ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!


HEALTH & BEAUTY
5088


HAIRCUTS, COLOR, MANI-
CURE, PERMS Will go to your
home. 941-201-9853 #PU213849
S HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
5100

ALL ASPECTS OF MASONRY:
stucco, concrete, brick & block.
JR Masonry & Tile 941-716-0872
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.


CERAMIC TILE
installed from
$1 per sq ft. Call now!
941-979-9902
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
FCI CONSTRUCTION Con-
crete, Masonry and Demoli-
tion. Driveways, Additions,
Commercial Buildings. Lc./Ins.
941-628-5965
HURRICANE SHUTTERS
Installed or Do-it-yourself
Window Replacements &
Installations. 941-769-1679
JEFF DRAKE CUSTOM Car-
pentry. Remodels, new
const., Kitchens & baths,
Windows & doors. We do it
all. 941-815-6123
ODDS & ENDS
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Interior Remodeling,
Living in Place Modifications,
Home Watch
941-445-3768
QUALITY DECKS Pool
Decks, Garage floors,
Patios & more. FREE crack
Repair with renovation.
941-375-1103
STUCCO REPAIRS, interior/
exterior paint. New Constr.
Breakwater Const. 941-234-
6773 Lic.#CGC1508016

& TREE
: 5110

A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
Quality Work Done Right the 1st
Time by an Exp. Drug-Free Crew
Tree sales, prune, install,
design, removal, stump grinding
Professional Arborist.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com


& TREE
5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify


ATTENTION SNOWBIRDS
Will mow your yard and watch
your home $75 monthly. Pic-
ture sent weekly. Servicing
Pt Charlotte, North Port,
Englewood, and Venice.
Jason Allee Lawn Care LLC.
(941)830-2488
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
MEDICAL SERVICES
5120

r -- ------ in
S AYURVEDA
I MANUAL THERAPIES I
* 941-764-9080
S Specializing in
Pain Management& &
STherapeutic Massage

Jessica Jensen-Nelson
LMT CST, 13yrs exp
S located at
I Genesis Full Service Salon I
* 2000 Rio De Janiero Ave.
Deep Creek
* For more info visit:
S ayurvedamt.com I
SLic#'s MA66262, MM28632
L. -.-.-. .J
MOVING/HAULING
5130


MOVING TRUCK going north
can take your things&save you
$ mid Mar/Apr. 941-356-0217
L PLUMBING
L 5160


THINK PLUMBERS are too
high? Give me a try! Retired
master plumber. Lic.
RF11067393
Ross (941)-204-4286
POOL SERVICES
L5165


AZTECH POOLS Personal-
ized
Complete Pool Serv. & Repair
Lic/Ins. 941-585-1711


DIRT BUSTERS PRESSURE
CLEANING LLC. Walls, Drive-
ways, Sidewalks, Roofs...ETC.
No Job Too Big or Small 941-
2864671 / 6288326 Lic./lns.

6000
q v D


MERCHANDISE
GARAGE SALES


6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006
6007
6008
6009
6010
6011
6012
6015
6020


Arcadia
Englewood
Lake Suzy
Nokomis
North Port
Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
Punta Gorda
Rotonda
Sarasota
South Venice
Venice
Out Of Area
Flea Market
Auctions


MERCHANDISE


6013
6025
6027
6030
6035
6038
6040
6060
6065
6070
6075
6090
6095
6100
6110
6120
6125
6128
6130
6131
6132
6135
6138
6140
6145
6160
6165
6170
6180
6190
6220
6225
6250
6260
6270


Moving Sales
Arts & Crafts
Dolls
Household Goods
Furniture
Electronics
TV/Stereo/Radio
Computer Equip
Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
Antiques &
Collectibles
Fruits/Veges
Musical
Medical
Health/Beauty
Trees & Plants
Baby Items
Golf Accessories
Exercise/Fitness
Sporting Goods
Firearms
Firearm Access.
Bikes/Trikes
Toys
Photography/Video
Pool/ Spa & Supplies
Lawn & Garden
Storage Sheds/
Buildings
Building Supplies
Heavy Constr.
Equipment
Tools/Machinery
Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
Restaurant Supplies
Appliances
Misc. Merchandise
Wanted to Buy/T rade


PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR YOU
Venice, Englewood,
North Port 207-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas
Call 206-1200


6000






MERCHANDISE

AUCTIONS
6020


NEED CASH?
Sell your items at auction!
Estate sales, antiques, collec-
tables, machinery, real estate,
business liquidations, invento-
ry reduction and more. Call
Key Auction 941-380-1413.
Holly Opauski, Auctioneer
AU4312 AB3149.
ARTS AND CRAFTS
S6025


ART FRAME, professional,
18x24 1 left only $25 717-
659-0146
ART FRAMES, Professional,
20x24, each only $28 717-
659-0146
The
SUN

PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
ART FRAMES, professional;
28x22 each only, $36 717-
659-0146
CRAFTS CLOSING craft
room, incredible value for all
$265 941-625-8983
CRICUTS, 2, new in box. 1
Create $100, 1 Imagine $225.
Details call 941- 421-9984
NEEDLEPOINT PRINTED
Canvas Englewood $5 941-
473-1026
SCRABBLE GAME, VGC, $6
Englewood 941-473-1026
DOLLS
6027


ANTIQUE CHINA 5 porce-
lain head, hanky clothes $150,
OBO 941-764-9196
CLASSlFIED
SELLS
CALL TODAY!
941-207-1200
Venice/Englewood
North Port areas
OR
941-206-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas


DOLLS
6027


ANTIQUE DOLL Frozen Char-
lotte in Silere Watch Case $85
941-637-6474
DIONNE QUINTUPLETS doll
costumes cut out book $85
941-637-6474
DOLL CARRIAGE Victorian
Doll Carriage Orig. Paint Wood
Wheels $225 941-637-6474
DOLLHOUSE STRAWBERRY
Patch 25x55" New in box $90,
OBO 941-766-0637
EEGEE DOLL Hard plastic,
molded hair $30, OBO 941-
875-4020
STEIFF BEARS 4 Steiff Bears
Tea Set $495 941676474
L MOVING SALES
6029



ORIENTAL RUG Handknotted.
Indian Bijar, high knot count,
8.4x11.6. virgin wool. 50%
below appraisal. $1,800, OBO
941-876-3701
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


4FT FLUORESCENT light fix-
tures (2) new in boxes $110,
OBO 941-697-1110
50'S CHANDELIER piece of
art $400 941-623-3496
AC UNIT Rheem 7F62 $150
941-661-9684
AIR CONDITIONER Like New.
Fedder's A/C unit 5000 BTU
$30 941-662-1234
AREA RUG 5x7.tan w/ white
border.new. $95, OBO 941-
235-2203
AWING NEW Roll up in original
box size 9'7" x 8' $120 941-
639-1379
BED KING pillow top mt/bx
$200 941-697-0777
BED QUEEN, firm plush, mat-
tress/boxspring. $100
941-697-0777
BED SKIRT King Size Ight mel-
lon color cotton eyelet lace
exc.cond. $12 941-625-5211
BED SPREAD, White crochet,
hand made Queen-King. $250
941-227-0676
BED, KING BAD back? firm
mt/bx, gst. room $250 941-
697-0777
BLANKET KG. wht w/sm.pink
flowers cotton poly v.nice
102x90 $19 941-625-5211
BLIND-LEVOLOR CORD-
LESS honeycomb white 72"
wide $100 941-629-8955


Uat SI 1 O B io oeI


ILI;


I AUTO REPAIR aEEo HK?
COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR E 11 f YlR ffEHIC LE
No Job Too Big or Too Small V No Title...No Problem / We Pay Cash .r
All Makes & Models / Flatbed Service
A SENIOR DISCOUNT 941-524-2448
941-249-1565
941-822-7204 MPM AUT


S Autobody Parts Locator
New or Used
Autobody Repair & Painting

Call 863-990-2561
18 Years experience in SWFL
vi eQ ?c 4 ( 0 )


L.


Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 13




Saturday, March 3, 2012 Saturday, March 3, 2012


NEW2071 TOYOTA
COROLLA LE
STK#T11329
WAS:............................... $20,632
DISCOU ....................... $4638
OW.1594E L 149EA
E~IM 4 FoR l9,,


ALL NEW20W TOYOTA
CAMRY SE
STK#T20280
WAS:................................ $26,877
DISCOU ....................... $4,881
Now:" .l,1 L J s1991MO


NEW2Ef3TWTA
PRIUS HYBRID
STK#T20331
WAS:............................ .... $28,138
DISCOUNT...................... $4,142
Nows23m992*2491o


(TOYOTA


N0 A
CAMRY HYBRID
STK#T20261
WAs:............................... $29,313
DISCOUNT:...................... $5,319
-so 4WL4USE


ICji~sLCi


A


SV


NEW2072CHEVY NEW24WO 'EW2072CHEVY NEW2077 BUICK
SONIC SILVERADO MINDED CAB EQUINOX LT ENCLAVE
STK#STK#C20103 STK#C20093 STK#C20292 STK#CB11227, Was: $39,824
AS LOW AS LEASE FOR LEASE FOR

s199/MO. s299/Mo. s299/Mo: s34481


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OWNER---
APPRECIATION Days


t!I.*:I~

K~rS~~


'I D 1' .


NEW2012 HYUNDAI
ACCENT GLS
AUTOMATIC STK#H20657
WAS:......................... $18,309
CONSTRUCONDISCOUNT...... $2,348
MILITARY REBATE: ..............-$500
NOW 15461'


ELANTRA GLS
AUTOMATIC* STK#H20653
WAS:........................ $21,254
CONSTRUCTONDISCOUNT...... $2,549
MILITARY REBATE: ..............-$500
-sW18205'


COMING I
O ING HYUnDRI REBATES AND DISCOUNTS
HYNDA UPTO s6,500!


.yEW2072 HYUNDAI
SONATA GLS
AUTOMATIC STK#20385
WAS:........................ $22,694
CONSTUCION DISCOUNT:...... $2,695
MILITARY REBATE: ..............-$500
REBATE:............................. -$500
-NOW$ 18,999'


NEW2072 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE GLS
AUTOMATIC, LOANER. STK#H20174
WAS:........................ $29,984
CONSTRUClON DISCOUNT:...... $6,389
MILITARY REBATE: ..............-$500
REBATE:............................. -$500
No-W22,595


jlt,'


Ww


flsl ,/!/:


NEW2072 MAZDA
3i SPORT
AUTOMATIC, STK#M2027

s16990


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NO PAYMENTS F 129/M. 0 o
90 DAYS Ti lNI NIl,


AKYACTI77P


NEW 2072 MAZDA NEW2072 MAZDA NEW2072 MAZDA
6 SPORT 5 SPORT MIATA MX-5 SPORT
AUTOMATIC, STK#M2044 AUTOMATIC, STK#M2014 AUTOMATIC, STK#M2042

17990' 18990' s23990

I REBATES AND DISCOUNTS 7/liN O. 0O% "
UPTO S5,5001 O 1i 13 /M0. FINANCING. CG


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NEW 21IJTFRTIWSER NEW2072 RAM NEW2072JEEP NEW2077 CHRYSLER
200 LIMITED 1500 REG. CAB WRANGLER 300 SEDAN
V6, LEATHER V8ORAS, 20" WHEELS
FORASLOWAS LOWAS LOWAS FORASLOWAS

16999 19964 25617 2336

.. USAA MEMBERS RECEIVE 72011 300' ON THE LOT TO SELECT FROM s7,500 FF
0L T 01TO AN ADDITIONAL S1,000 OFFD0 AOLL 30FF T C11K1f1
Jeep ON SELECT 2012 MODELS" ATOVVIU U OFF ON ALL RAM TRUCKS!"


TIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES I


I


NEW2072 MITSUBISHI NEW2011MITSUBISHI NEW 2012 MITSUBISHI
GALANT ES OUTLANDER SPORT ES ECLIPSE SPYDER GSSPORT CONV.
A S S 1 .;",*-, K P" VA...SA 1 1 h..J .i -.. .. hn .....

$300OFF! Is179 861 .25436

SI REBATES & DISCOUNTS NO PAYMENTS FOR LEASES 9 0
SUPTO 5.O 90 DAY STARTING 40U NAc I
Ko UP TO S5,000! 90 DAYS AT /MO. ER F/ARC,,


QUALITY PRE-OWVNED VEHICLES


0 44 /2008 CHEVROLET/ 2008 CHRYSLER 2011 TOYOTA 2008 TOYOTA 2010 RAM / SCAN A 008 MITSUBISHI/ 2004 CHRYSLER

.2 1; I"' ,- COMPLETE LIST OF OUR E r = .
m1.3"i'T %5 CERTIFIED & QUALITY
AUTOMATIC, STK#M2045B AUTOMATIC, STK#D20122A AUTOMATIC, STK#PT5971 AUTOMATIC, STK#PT5946 AUTOMATIC, STK#D20020A AUTOMATIC, STK#H20786A AUTOMATIC, STK#Dl1709B
S11,956 $16,938 $17,939 $17,980 $19,991 PRE-OWNEDINVENTORY! 6,942 7,448
2009 BUICK 2010 TOYOTA 2010 DODGE 2011 HYUNDAI 2010 TOYOTA 2010 TOYOTA 2005 MERCURY / 2006 VOLKSWAGEN




$20,937 $20940 $22938 $25952 $26,939 $27541 IBi $11,933 12941


2008 CHEVROLET7



AUTOMATIC, STK#C20177A
$7,791
2007 HYUNDAI /



MANUAL, STK#PH5367
$13,928


2003 SATURN


$7,963
,"rflu R"Al1'rk 7


6 SPEED MANUAL, STK#M2053A
$16,514


2005 CHRYSLER



AUTOMATIC, STK#D11682A
$9,742
2007 CHEVROLET /
V I i :V1 101 '.'N1 ]: I 101.


AUTOMATIC, STK#C20281A
$16,936


2000 TOYOTA /



AUTOMATIC, STK#T20167B
10,928
2009 MINI /



MANUAL, STK#PC5910A
$16,939


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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 14 E/N/C/V


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 15


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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 16 EINICIV Saturday, March 3, 2012
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"..::...iii ..iiii..D.. ................'
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That Can Save So Many...


SNS UN
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Charlotte DeSoto Engle ood Norh Porn Venice


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 16 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


Ill~r~rrrrrrrrrrrrrrr~ll.,,.;;;~.~l----






Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 17


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


BOXES: 50 avail. w/ moving
supplies.$45 Englewood.
949-870-5255
BOXSPRING/MATTRESS
QUEEN Simmons Plush,Like
NEW $450 941-268-8951
BOXSPRING/MATTRESS
QUEEN size w/frame Like
NEW $150 941-268-8951
BRASS FLOOR LAMP WITH
SHADES $10 941-255-9152
BREAD MACHINE BETTY
CROCKER USED ONCE MINT
COND. $35 941-505-7929
BRITA 10-CUP filtration pitch-
er w/refill (in box) $20 941-
276-1881
BUTTERFLY DESSERT SET
10 piece by Royal Gallery $80,
OBO 941-423-2091
CEDAR CHEST w/shelf 47L X
18W X 20h vintage 1945-50
$125 941-408-0805
CEILING FAN Hampton Bay
with light tropical good cond.
$35 941-575-8229
CHAIR CUSHIONS(4) Black,
box edge.New w/tags. Pier 1.
$66 941-276-1881
CHANDELIER BRASS,
crystal, w/long chain. $75,
OBO 941-697-1110
CHANDELIER FREDERICK
Raymond, etched glass, down-
rod $100 941-661-9684
CHINA NORITAKE "Affec-
tion", service for 8,bowls etc.
$375 941-637-9207
CHINA SERVES 8. Sterling
Rose,62pcs,lovely $45 941-
475-5429
CHINA SERVICE for 18 Fine
Porcelain (Diane)w/Extras.
$175 941-681-2444
CHINA-CARLTON JAPAN,
Svce for 8 w/extras-New! $65,
OBO 941-625-6947
COFFEE MAKER 10cup,
white. $5 941-627-5815
COMFORTER CROSCILL
King 9 pc. king set, perfect
$45 941-475-5429
DECORATOR PILLOWS
1 Pair New, Pink & Mauve Flo-
ral Pattern $5 941-488-0417
DEHUMIDIFER WHITE years
old $50, OBO 716-374-2950
DEHUMIDIFIER CONQUEST,
40-PINT, AUTOMATIC $50
860-941-8073
DEHUMIDIFIER OLDER
model, low usage. $30 941-
474-7387
DESK W/TOP SHELF medi-
um Oak finish, large, Smart!
$70, OBO 941-474-3299
DISHES BARCLAY 50s' Place
setting for 8, Complete $100
941-426-8180
EGYPTIAN ART Sculptural 2
pedestal columns 2 wall hang-
ings. $100 941-467-4112
FLOOR LAMP 3-arm chrome
adjustable Sonneman eyeball
lamp. $249 214-906-1585
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


FLATWARE SILVER Service
For 12 $175 941-488-0417
FOLDING SHELF Metal deco-
rative w/leaves black & cream
$65, OBO 941-735-1709
FRAMED PICTURE Picture
Gold-Framed Callah Lily. $100
941-743-6053
GRANDFATHER CLOCK Wal-
nut $150 941-423-9371
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
ITALIAN TILE:SMALL box,
8"x10".0ff white. $10 941-
276-1881
JARS LG. heavy Italian Glass
(for pasta,soap,shells, etc.) 2/
$13 941-276-1881
JUICER ACME Supreme
Excellent $50 941-423-9371
LAMP W/PLEATED Shade
28"H Excellent (Englewood)
$20 941-681-2444
LANAI FURNITURE: PVC
table, 2 cushioned recliner
chairs & ottoman, misc.
chairs, $200. 941-743-4455.
LGE BLUE dome light. 110
elec. $15 941-624-6685
MARGARITA MACHINE
USED ONCE MINT COND $60
941-505-7929
MATTRESS, QUEEN AND
BOX. Brand New will sell
$175. Also have KING. 941-
629-5550
MATTRESS/BOX.
New- Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS & boxspring king
excellent condition $350 941-
625-1863
MATTRESS SIMMONS KING
PILLOWTOP AND BOX SPRING
$250 941-544-3221
MICROWAVE countertop
style, white. $15 941-627-
5815
MIRROR 30" round with bevel
edge. Fancy brass frame.
$80, OBO 941-743-2656
MIRROR 36X50 Light maple
w/brass trim, beveled edge.
$80, OBO 941-743-2656
MIRROR ANTIQUE WHITE
BAMBOO WICKER 29W-46H
$15 941-255-9152
MIRROR DECORATIVE Gold
36"x33" Excellent $30 941-
423-9371
MIXER KITCHENAID White,
Nice, Englewood $125 941-
473-1026


Nautical decor, used boating
supplies. Mariner's Trading
3622 US 41, Port Charlotte 2
blks N of Gators 941-629-1341




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SUNM




ORIENTAL RUG domestic
7.6x9.6 (wine) $100 941-
993-2001
PICTURE FRAMES, 35, all
sizes, wood & metal, $2-$8
each. Call 941-624-3146.
PICTURE GOLD Framed Pic-
ture of Iris $100 941-743-
6053
ROTISSERIE & BBQ, Ronco
complete kit,never used $100
941-828-0171


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


ROTISSERIE OVEN Foreman
all parts and manuals, excel-
lent cond. $35 214-906-1585
RUG 8X10 MUTED BR&GR
$75 941-255-3186
SEWING MACHINE Singer
mdl 99K, exc cond, attach-
ments $175 941-474-3641
SEWING MACHINE Singer
vintage Featherweight. Exc
cond. $300 571-251-4101
SHOWTIME ROTISSERIE
GRILL NIB BRAND NEW $100
941-486-8388
SILVERWARE, GLD&SLV
ptrn.srv12, wd.case.must see
$99, OBO 941-625-5211
SPACE HEATER electric oil
circulating radiator $35, OBO
734-626-8724
STEAMER COMMERCIAL
Garment Steamer. Ex Cond.
$60, OBO 941-979-8496
TOASTER OVEN Oster. Black
and stainless. Like new. $12
941-625-0408
TROPICAL PRINTS: Sea, sky,
palms. Aqua/pastels.Pr/ $59
941-276-1881
UTILITY CART folding
groc/beach metal cart $30
941-237-1085
VACUUM DIRT Devil Dyna-
mite Plus.v g cond.Hepa filt
$20 941-505-6290
VACUUM KIRBY GOOD
WORKING CONDITION $30
941-486-8388
VACUUM KIRBY Selfpro-
pelled $65 941-979-8496
WASH STATION Vintage, mir-
ror, candles, & B/B $75 954-
665-9007
WET/DRY VAC RIDGID-
3.5HP-9 Gal.-Like new-PGI-
Atchmts. $45 941-661-0990
WINDOW TREATMENT 5
panel tan/brown (91"L) & track
(101L) $169 941-698-9899
WINE RACK holds 6 bottles
$25 941-227-0676

HOLIDAY ITEMS
S6031


KEEPSAKE BARBIE orna-
ment 7 1996 -4 1997 $20
941-227-0676

FURNITURE
L 6035


2 BLACK leather steno
chairs $25 941-347-7750

3PC PATIO Set white Wicker
$200, OBO 941-467-3107
A FURNITURE SHOPPE
BUYING QUALITY Used Furniture
941-473-1986
ARMOIRE WHITE (6'H) Quality
wicker,pocket doors.As new.
$449 941-276-1881
BAR & stools Black,19"W-
39"L-30"T exc cond fits nook
$125 612-616-3752
BAR STOOLS 2 floral design
w/matching accent pillows.
30" $75 941-697-1736
BAR STOOLS Exec Con 30"T
cream color,contemporary
$175 612-616-3752
BAR STOOLS Oak Highback
Oak Swivel 30" high Exc cond
$150, OBO 941-697-1736
BAR STOOLS Set of 2 light
wood, round seat w/cushion
$45, OBO 941-735-1709
BAR STOOLS set of 4.black
metal w cushion.silver back
$100, OBO 941-223-0675
BAR STOOLS, 4 Bamboo
High Back, Brown Leather
Seat $175 941-268-6822
BED MATTRESS/BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED, CRAFTMATIC Style
single with remote $195, OBO
941-391-1582


L FURNITURE
6035


BEDRM SET older solid dress-
er, end table, chair & double
bed. $150 941-473-7000
BEDROOM SET 2 Twin beds,
nightstd, chest, It.color $150
941-475-5429
BEDSIDE CHESTS (2) solid
oak 2 drawers each $400
941-451-8339
BISTRO SET Round Glass
Table -bronze metal- high
sw.chairs+ halfmoon match-
ing table LIKE NEW $195,
OBO 941-876-3701
BOOKCASE 3 Shelves.
Brown Size 2ft by 3ft. $15
941-286-7229
BOOKSHELF BAMBOO &
Wicker, Light Brown, 5
shelves. $15 941-276-8970
BUFFET 2 doors, marble top,
brown $495, OBO 941-429-
5684
CHAIR, BEDRM, Barrel type
Rose color,suede feel. $29
941-475-5429
CHAIR, SPINDLE oak, ex
cond $10 941-474-5963
CHAIRS 2 wood/open sides
grn/whte knub cotn fab exc
cond $150 941-726-9850
CHAIRS 40 oak spindle chairs
from a restaurant. $10 941-
456-3633
CHAIRS LEATHER Arm-
less,ex $35 941-474-5963
CHAIRS: QUALITY natural
wicker/rattan, highback.As
new.Pr/ $249 941-276-1881
CHAISE LOUNGE 67" L X 3ft
W, light green fabric, like new
cond. $375 941-391-0021
CHEST OF drawers painted
white heavy solid wood $25
941-473-7000
COCKTAIL TABLE ornate iron
base with oval beveled glass
top $300 941-451-8339
COCKTAIL TABLE, Oak 2
END TABLES $150, OBO
630-664-8789
COFFEE TABLE & End Table
Glass Top, Iron, Square/Rect.
$150, OBO 941-429-5684
COFFEE TABLE & end table,
solid wood & glass, sturdy!
$50, OBO 941-625-6947
COFFEE TABLE 48x48,rattan
sides,wood top $95, OBO
941-637-9207
COFFEE TABLE and 2 end
tables, glass tops, rattan $40
941-639-0612
COFFEE TABLE BEVELED
GLASS WITH METAL FRAME
$50 941-497-1749
COFFEE TABLE Glass top, off
white metal. Perfect cond.
$25 941-743-0328
COFFEE TABLE Solid Oak
Mission Style square,
Originally 450.00 Asking
$150, OBO 941-235-9692
COFFEE/ 2-END tables
wood/glass $150 v.g. condi-
tion 941-629-8955
COMPUTER ARMOIRE
Antique white, louvered doors.
$75, OBO 941-766-8077
COMPUTER DESK Large,
Multi Level, Blk/Wood $75,
OBO 941-429-5684
COUCH LG & LOVESEAT LT
BEIGE WITH LT BLUE FLOW-
ERS $300 941-255-9152
COUCH RECLINER navy
leather Good condition. $65,
OBO 315-727-9712
COUCH, DESIGNER, Perfect.
Sage green fabric Memory
foam $495 941-240-8980
COUCHES NEUTRAL Colors
& Flowered,Nice Condition (2)
each $40 941-268-8951
COUCHES SET with matching
camel speakers $375, OBO
941-628-6532
CURIO CABINET Double
Doors shelves lights Top and
Bottom $325 941-268-6822


I FURNITURE
OO 6035


DESK (52") & chair, all wood,
$125. Dining room table, 72",
glass, 8 wood chairs. $250.
941-743-8085
DESK HON, metal, beige,
3-drawer, 24"x45". sturdy,
$30, OBO 941-625-6947
DESK PIER-ONE Upright
desk excellent condition,black
$125 612-616-3752
DESK, FRENCH PROVINCIAL
46L, 23W, 30 HIGH 3 DRAW-
ERS $20 941-255-9152
DINETTE RATTAN glasstop
table 4 chairs w/casters like
new $400 941-706-7538
DINETTE SET 40X60" oval
table, 3 leafs, 4 caster chairs
$235 941-474-7387
DINETTE TABLE w/leaf 4
White upholstered chairs. $50
941-497-5539

DINING CHAIRS 8 Solid Oak
chairs to match Amish table
$250, OBO 941-697-1736
DINING RM Set Oval glass
42x58,4 uphol.wheeled chairs
$150 941-637-9787
DINING RM TABLE glass,
stucco base, 4 upholstered
chairs $125 941-488-6469
DINING RM: Hutch 64x80,
Table 42x64 Golden Pine Broy-
hill-USA $350 941-575-9217
DINING ROOM Oak set w/
Buffet Colonial, Pedastal
$400, OBO 941-429-5684
DINING ROOM set glass
table, 6 chairs, like new $350,
OBO 941-697-7541
DINING ROOM solid wood
w/6 chairs, 3 leafs, china cab.
$275, OBO 941-764-7903
DINING ROOM TABLE glass
top w/4 padded chairs, exc.
cond. $90. 941-380-1456
DINING SET like new dark
wood glass top 4 chairs $299
941-627-6542
DINING SET: tbl w/6 chairs,
lighted china cabinet w/glass
doors, med oak, 2 sets linens.
$750 941-544-3221
DINING TABLE Double
Pedestal Amish Solid Oak
$499, OBO 941-697-1736
DISPLAY CABINET glass and
mirrored front, 3 sections
$250, OBO 941-697-7541
DR HUTCH Beige very good
cond $300, OBO 941-467-
3107
DRESSERS SOLID Maple Lg
long Women's 3 drawer w/ mir-
ror & Man's tall 4 drawer $150
941-625-0522
END & Coffee Tables All wood
sturdy. $50, OBO 941-735-
1709
END TABLE wrought iron ped.
inlaid stone top. $75, OBO
941-223-0675
END TABLES 2 faux marble
18x18x18 /pedestal base
$50 941-726-9850
ENT CENTER, oak, 60 W, 71
H, 19 D, lighted, $250 941-
575-0442
ENT. CENTER dark oak,
96"w, 78"h w/glass doors &
lights. $400 941-544-3221
ENT.CENTER 3-PC Cherry
98W, 24D,81H $499, OBO
941-629-6254
ENTERTAINMENT ARMOIRE
Thomasville light cherry wood
ex cond $495 941-625-1863
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
3-pc, oak, lighted, glass
doors, adjustable shelves.
Exc. cond! $150, OBO
941-426-3577
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
bamboo $75, OBO
941-473-7000
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Nice! Drk Cherry Wood Color
$350, OBO 941-380-8334
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
white wash w 27" tv & vcr,
$125 obo 941-493-8053


FURNITURE
6035


FOYER TABLE with mirror
antique beautiful condition $60
941-575-8229
FURNITURE Dinette table 48"
beveled glass top with 4 chairs
$50. Custom made Mirror
w/verde frame 40 X 30
$75.00. Coffee table, End
table, Occasional table, all with
beveled glass tops & Verde
wrought iron all for $100.00
OBO 941-496-9350
FUTON BLACK metal with
mattress. $30 989-245-2130
GLASS Table Top 5'X3',
3/4" thick, beveled edges
$475, OBO 941-639-9293
JEWELRY ARMOIRE 6 draw-
ers, a mirror and lots of hooks.
$100 941-475-3553
KIT TABLE wood 2'/5'open
4'/5'4'tall w storage $300,
OBO 941-223-0675
KOHLER KITCHEN sink
33x22 lakefield almond gd
condition $150 474-3194
LEATHER COUCH Trendy,
cobolt blue, 3 seater $200,
OBO 941-429-5684
LEATHER SOFA, dbl chair & 2
Ig ottomans in dk brown nice!
$499 941-629-5264
LIVING ROOM set 2 couch-
es,floral print, 3 tables $300,
OBO 941-697-7541
LIVING ROOM Set 3pc good
cond $499, OBO 941-467-
3107
LOVESEAT DARK green Ital-
ian leather, like new. $275
941-356-0217
LOVESEAT light floral, excel-
lent condition. $100 941-505-
1895
NIGHTSTANDS 2 ETHAN
ALLEN Good Condition $100,
OBO 630-664-8789
OFFICE CHAIR Tan Leather
wheels swivels GC gd quality
$150, OBO 941-735-1709
PATIO CHAIR $5 941-347-
7552
PATIO FURNITURE LIKE NEW!
Oval Tbl, chairs, 2Lounge ch.
$195, OBO 941-876-3701
PATIO SET 3-pc. wrought iron
28" glass top table, w/2 chairs
$35 941-575-4459
PATIO SET 4pc new, never
used. $325, OBO 941-235-
2203
PATIO SET beveled glass
table, 4 arm chairs, rattan $80
941-639-0612
PATIO SET BRZ. ALUM. 5
PC. GLASS TBL 4 MO'S NEW
$220, OBO 941-626-6879
PATIO TABLE White and Glass
Table, six chairs & cushions.
$30 941-276-8970
PIANO BENCH 26"L x 12
1/2"W x 22"H, walnut w/stor,
exc cond. $12 941-343-7863
POWER-LIFT RECLINER
Stylecraft, blue, from <45 to
standing $250 207-701-8856
RECLINE, LANE Big Man
Cost 700.00 Asking $295
941-240-8980
RECLINER CHAIR COMFORT
$100, OBO Port Charlotte
941-391-6551
RECLINER DK.GRN.
Pet/smoke free home. Good
cond. $25 941-743-0328
RECLINER ROCKER Choco-
late, Plush pillow arms
VGCond. $75 954-655-9007
RECLINER tan, excellent con-
dition, $100 941-505-1895
ROCKER RATTAN white wash
swivel rocker. excellent condi-
tion. $50 517-694-3639
ROCKER RECLINER aqua
leather Good condition. $95,
OBO 315-732-1740
ROCKER/RECLINER BLUE
$40 941-629-0432
ROCKER/RECLINER
La-z-boy, tan $75
941-255-3186






The Sun Classified-Section A Page 18 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


L FURNITURE
OO 6035


SIDE BED FURNITURE PORT
CHARLOTTE $35, OBO 941-
391-6551
SLEEPER SOFA Qn,Lt earth
tns,tweed,gd cond 150, OBO
616-304-8403
SLEEPER SOFA, LOVESEAT
WINE COLOR GOOD COND.
$250 941-544-3221
SOFA & Love Seat Soft colors
Rattan Accents Clean NPt
$249, OBO 941-276-5525
SOFA AND loveseat Hickory
Hill, Red, Modern and comfort-
able $300 607-368-8755
SOFA BED Queen Great con-
dition $100, OBO 941-485-
4549
| ADVERTISE WITH THE I
SUN CLASSIFIED
SOFA EXC Condition Mauve
Floral Tuft Back/Seat $275
941-268-6822
SOFA FULL size, Floral,Like
New $150 859-338-1886
SOFA GREEN 84"long wood
bamboo arms. ex cond $300,
OBO 941-766-8077
SOFA LIGHT floral, excellent
condition, $100 941-505-
1895
SOFA NEW PWR RECLINE
Beige Microfiber $400, OBO
734-282-2343
SOFA Sleeper Colonial/Coun-
try Style Nice! $150, OBO
941-380-8334
SOFAS (2) OLIVE 92"
EXCELLENT COND. $450
941-493-1792
SWIVEL CHAIR w/ matching
Ottoman off white, material
$55, OBO 941-429-5684
TABLE DECORATOR Round
w/Lined Table Cloth & Glass
Top NICE $20 941-681-2444
TABLE W/2 chairs, walnut.
Table is small with drop leaf
$150 941-451-8339
TABLE W/DRAWER,
42x25x30, Qn Anne legs. $40
941-766-0857
TABLE, ANTIQUE Duncan
Phyfe solid wood, drop leaf, gd
cond. $275 941-661-9684
TABLE, OAK w/6 chairs & 2
leaves, $350, Dresser + Mir-
ror, Vermont Maple $250 obo
941-488-5218
TABLE, SOLID wood, 2 chairs
Good condition. $65, OBO
315-727-9712
TRIPLE DRESSER with mir-
rors solid oak, light color $400
941-451-8339
TV ARMOIRE Coastal antique
white,louvered doors $75,
OBO 941-766-8077
TV CABINET w/doors
20x38x52 Dark wood $50
941-698-1253
TV STAND Black,shelfs
side,front, 19"W-32"L-19"H
$25 612-616-3752
TV STAND black-small glass
doors & shelf $25
941-544-1128 NP area
TV STAND OAK 36X17 Swivel-
Top $25 630-664-8789
WOOD DRESSER w/Mirror
10 drawers dark color $100,
OBO 941-735-1709

ELECTRONICS
L 6038


COLOR VIDEO NOW red
w/black case & 2 SpongeBob
games $15 941-626-9027
COPIER PRINTER fax hp
c6100$25 941-228-1745
DIGITAL PHOTO Album
Accepts all media cards
Ex.Cond. $25 941-585-7740
HEADSET MICROPHONE,
Shure w/manual, cost 425.00
Asking $85 941-624-6685
SPEAKERS FISHER digital
comp overload protect
reconed $68 941-697-1102


ELECTRONICS
6038


STRAIGHT TALK phones Pair
of new phones $50, OBO 941-
613-0124

STV/STEREO/RADIO
z ^6040


24" SANYO TV $30 941-
875-1838
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
MOVIES LOTS of DVDS ex.
Cond. $2 ea. 941-585-7740
SMALL "BOOMBOX"
cd/radio/tape bat/elec $10,
OBO 941-661-7092
SPEAKER 4" Muzek Patio
Blaster model #OWI-701 $50,
OBO 941-735-1709
SPEAKERS FISHER 2 model
sty-690 3-way $200, OBO
941-769-5995
TELEVISION PANASONIC
32" older but works great $45
941-504-8049
TELEVISION 19 in. Color TV
$20 941-743-0567


TURNTABLE STANTON Top
of the Line! 1/2 price $200,
OBO 941-626-2832
TV 36" Magnavox, with
remote. Good cond. $50
443-852-0105
TV JVC 36"/w Black Console
Stand exc. condition $100
941-564-6598
TV RCA 21" Color with
remote. Not flat screen. Great
picture. $20 941-505-4686
TV RCA 27" tube type all
papers, excellent condition.
$50, OBO 941-875-1757
TV, JVC 14" COLOR cable
ready, barely used $55 941-
639-1517

COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
6060

31N1 PRINTER HP6200
Printer, Copier, Fax, Scanner.
$100 941-743-6053
COMPUTER ALL in 1 xp win-
dows plus printer. hd built in.
$250 517-694-3639
COMPUTER GATEWAY CPU
tower-Keyboard printer-no
monitor $50 941-445-5619
COMPUTER PRINTER Kodak
ESP3 like new, needs Ink car-
tridges. $35 941-661-0631
COMPUTER SYLVANIA 7"
laptop windows ce explorer
6 $50, OBO 941-875-1757
COMPUTER TABLE Like new,
6 foot. $75, OBO 941-628-
6532
CORNER COMPUTER desk
Good condition $35 941-743-
0567
DAVE IN-HOUSE-OFFICE corn-
puter repair, set-up Serving Char-
lotte Co. 10+ yrs 941-629-6337


COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
6060

DELL TABLET: Streak 7"
Android 3, like new w/case.
$200 941-764-3454
GOLF CLUB mouse new looks
like a driver $5 941-228-1745
HP PAVILLION 520 PC
READY TO ROLL HP 750
ALL IN ONE PRINTER SET
$140 941-875-1838
KEYBOARD & Mouse Log-
itech Wireless Ex.Cond. $18
941-637-0268
LINKSYS WIRELESS broad-
band 2.4ghz router v fast cost
80+ only $24 941-697-1102
MONITOR -KDS 16" Crt. Flat
Screen,See Working EC $20,
OBO 941-637-0268
MONITOR 17" color CRT
screen. Great picture. $15
941-743-2656
MONITOR DELL 19" Wide
Screen w/speakers Ex.Cond.
$30 941-637-0268
PC DESK L shaped 4.5 X
4.5 with upper shelves. EX CD
$75, OBO 941-244-2405
PC WIN-XP, LAN, Modem,
internet ready, 1GB, 250GB,
CD, DVD $99 941-743-3482
PRINTER EPSON All in One,
new black ink $20
941-697-4989
TURBOTAX DELUXE 2011
Software new boxed disc. $25
941-764-8804
CLOTHING / JEWELRY
ACCESSORIES
6065

ANTIQUE GUMBALL/PEANUT
machine with dancing ballerina.
Must see! $350 941-423-8471
CLOTHES GOOD CONDITION
FEMALE MALE PC $399, OBO
941-391-6551
CLOTHES JUNIORS 3,5,S,M
New & Newer any10 $25
941-544-1128 NP area
JACKET LEATHER Men's Lrg
Budw Dale Jr. auth red/white
New $100 941-423-9371
LADIES CLOTHING sz. 12-14
dressy & casual $10, OBO
630-664-8860
LEVI'S DRESS SLACKS blue,
34"W 30"L NEW, $12 941-
627-6780
MEN'S HAWAIIAN SHIRTS LG
- ASST'D COLORS $5
ENGLEWOOD 941-475-7577
MENS SS Shirts size XL $3
941-350-4825
RAINCOAT LONDON Fog Sz
12 brown removable lining Exc
Cond $25 474-3194
RING, 14K Irg opal surround-
ed by 2ct of diamonds. 1st
$900 takes it 941-769-2389
TURQ NECKLACE 4 strand-
chaca canyon $200 941-237-
1085
TURQ NECKLACE 4 strand-
chaca canyon $200 941-237-
1085
WATCH CHICOS Makelle
Watch.Brand new w tags $50
941-628-6371
WEDDING DRESS White, size
10 veil, ring pillow, undergar-
ments $150 941-993-9856
CHECK THE .
CLASSIFIES!

ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

1870 INDIAN Tomahawk awe-
some weapon $200 941-268-
1748
1883 HAWAIIAN Trade Doller
400,000 Minted, HOLED but in
EX CD $295 941-244-2405
1920 ENOCH Woods & Sons
set of 4, serving pieces 5
$400, OBO 941-875-4020
2 WAGON Wheel Hub
Lamps,Great condition. $250
941-661-8568


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

20 NORMAN Rockwell plates
orig boxes & papers BARGAIN
ea $10 941-639-1517
ACTIVELY BUYING!
Older Paintings; All American
Subjects; Landscapes, Marine,
Beach Scenes (Esp. New Eng-
land), Also European, Asian,
Russian, ETC. Oriental Rugs,
Porcelin, Jade, ETC! Early Fur-
niture, Jewelry, Silver, Ivory,
Any Quality Investment Items.
Please Call Tyler on Boca
Grande 941-306-8937 (Cell)
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639 -9338
ANTIQUE DESK Very nice
school desk in great condition.
$150 941-661-8568
ANTIQUE HEADBOARD &
Footboard & frame,unique
$75 941-624-5946
ANTIQUE MAPLE chest of
drawers with mirror $275,
OBO 941-639-3211
ANTIQUE PEDAL CAR, over
50 years old, $300
941-423-8471
ANTIQUE PRIMITIVE Cord
Bed, youth size, over 100 yrs.
$125 941-624-5946
AVON PLATES Assorted
plates, Christmas 70's 80's.
$3, OBO 941-456-0936
AVON TOWNHOUSE SET
canister w/ cookie jar; 1983.
$50 941-639-0838
BEER MIRROR. Budweiser
salutes the U.S. Coast Guard.
$40 941-627-0919
BEER MIRROR. Budweiser
Salutes the US Marines. $45
941-627-0919
BETTY BOOP light 3feet tall
with statue of liberty crown
$150 941-423-2585
BIKE COCA COLA OLD 26"
HUFFY, ALL ORIGINAL GOOD
COND. $225 941-286-5666
BOSTON ROCKER
$200, OBO after 5pm only
941-628-5293
BUDWEISER MIRROR.
Clydesdales/wagon/cases of
beer. $40 941-627-0919
BUREAU 4 drawer chest with
inserts.Handsome. $140 941-
423-6085
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
COMIC BOOKS 50 FROM
THE 1990's EXCEL.COND.
$1.00 each 941-627-6780
DESK OAK side bye side 4
shelves 3 drawers glass door
$499 941-697-6592
DISNEY CHRISTMAS Orna-
ments In Original Boxes $7
941-258-7666
ELVIS BUST $30 941-627-
6780
ELVIS STAMP Collection- 1st
Day/Issue. Unopened. $100,
OBO 941-626-0967
FIESTAWARE VINTAGE
Fiestaware many pieces $5
941-350-4825
GOLD CARNIVAL Glass pitch-
er & glasses perfect vintage
pcs $75 941-639-1517
HESS TRUCKS 16 total,
1991-2006, in box.
$30 each 941-637-0505
HESS TRUCKS, 12 trucks
from 1988 to 2006. NIB. Each
$50, OBO 941-626-5099
INDIAN BELT Buckle Shaman
belt buckle,silver $80, OBO
941-268-1748
INDIAN RUG 54"X
31".tan,reds&brns. $45, OBO
941-235-2203
IRISH DRESDEN figurine
"Christine"-Celtic Melodie-vin-
tage pc $50 941-639-1517
KIDS PARADE Tow Truck Gas
powered $475, OBO 941-
474-0192


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

MILLER LITE beer tap. Super
Bowl 32 in San Diego. $20
941-627-0919
NEW BIG DADDY ROTH RAT
FINK LATEX MASK $75, OBO
941-474-0192
NORITAKE CHINA Carleton,
platter, vegetable, casserole
$75, OBO 941-875-4020
OX YOKES 4"&5' wood
carved make a chandelier oak
$125 941-697-6592
PITCH FORK quilt rack
wood.great for hanging quilts.
$95, OBO 941-235-2203
PITCHER & Bowl Stafford-
shire Calico Brown, Large
15"bowl,-13'Pitcher $175
941-661-0990
TELEPHONE KELLOGG OAK
telephone $150 941-475-
2760
TRUCKS, 8 Hess, 4 BP. Other
cars & trucks. Over 150.
$500/obo. 603-969-0053
VINTAGE CANVAS Golf bag
made in England &9 vintage
clubs. $150 941-214-8168

MUSICAL
6090


ACOUSTIC GUITAR Lyon by
Washburn New with case $95
941-575-8229
ACOUSTIC GUITARS (2) 36"
(1) 31" W stands only $48
941-697-1102
BANJO NEW Morgan Monroe
MNB1 w/case Excellent tone
$449 941-626-5399
DRUM SET 5Pc Dk Red
w/cymbals& hardware Ready
to play $200 941-268-0301
GUITAR AMPLIFIER First Act
good condition $20, OBO
941-697-4020
GUITAR FIRST Act Discovery
$45 941-423-9190
GUITAR, BRIAN Bell Signed
Excellent condition $150, OBO
941-697-4020
GUITAR, FENDER squier strat
Royal blue,will take best offer
$150, OBO 941-697-4020
HARMONICA NEW IN BOX -
$10 ENGLEWOOD 941-475-
7577
KARAOKE SYSTEM Player,
amp, mixer, speakers, moni-
tor, mike, CDs, & books. Pro-
fessional system. $1,300 obo
941-743-5261
KARAOKE SYSTEM, Vocal
changer, 2 speakers, 1 woofer
$125 941-423-9190
I Classified = Sales
KEYBOARD 88 keys, Yamaha
dgx-505, excellent $499 434-
945-0104
KEYBOARD CASIO MK-1200,
73 keys, exc/condition. $85,
OBO 941-766-7659
KEYBOARD GEM WK2 Pro-
fessional w/stand & case
$400, OBO 941-769-3895
KEYBOARD STAND and seat
heavy Duty $50 941-276-
1126
SNARE DRUM New Ludwig
Black Birch w/new Ludwig
stand $110 941-268-0301
SNARE DRUM Tama
Swingstar Chrome, w/stand
$75, OBO 941-697-4020
SPEAKERS SET of 2, 60HM
Philips,1 subwoofer Sony, 60
imp. $45 941-423-9190
S MEDICAL
a6095


3-WHEEL SCOOTER
needs batteries, H/D model.
$200, OBO 941-505-7929
BED-RAILS FITS any size bed
$110, OBO 207-604-0848
COMMODE CAN be used at
bed side or bathroom $18
941-426-5379


MEDICAL
L 6095


COMMODE CHAIR Rubber-
maid full back & arm rests,
adj. legs $85. Foot Bath Plus
Electric Massager Dr. Scholls,
new, $55. 941-624-3146.
CRUTCHES (WOOD)
adjustable used good condi-
tion $10 941-629-8955
ELECTRIC LIFT bed Serta
twin bed Foot,head, massage.
New $150 630-240-4092
ELECTRIC LIFT Sarita w/sling
for transfer from bed to chair.
$450 941-637-7176
ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
Merits, Call during evening
$350, OBO 941-204-8036
ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
used only 2 weeks, new bat-
teries excellent condition
$1,500 941-625-0522
ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR
with extras $340 941-474-
7387
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
HOSPITAL BED all electric
$200 941-408-0197
HOSPITAL BED Excellant con-
dition w gel mattress. $400,
OBO 941-628-6532
MOBILITY SCOOTER good
batt w/chgr-ed cond $450
941-408-0805
OXYGEN TANK HOLDER FITS
JAZZY POWER CHAIRS $45
860-941-8073
POWER SCOOTER Celebrity
X,Very good,Call evenings
$350 941-204-8036
SCALE DETECTO working,
missing 2nd arm on height
$175, OBO 941-735-1709
WALKER FOLDING w/front
wheels cost $100 never used
$15 pt char. 941-627-9736
WHEELCHAIR NEW condi-
tion. $125 941-474-7387

| HEALTH/BEAUTY
Z 6100


FOOT BATH CONAIR MINT
CONDITION & BATH SALTS
$25 941-505-7929
FOOT SPA Dr. Scholls, Deluxe
w/massage, heat & bubbles.
$30, OBO 941-625-6947
MAKEUP, CINDY Crawford
unopened kit retails over
$150.00 $75 941-628-6371
TREES & PLANTS
S6110


BLACK BAMBOO Timor Trop-
ical Black clumping. $45
941-833-3326
VIBURNUM Great for
Privacy 1-15gallons, Barrel
Freeze cloths avail.
SUI'S NUSURY 941-488-7291
Plants- bromeliads, crown of
thorns, lillies, cacti, yucca,etc.
$3 Punta gorda 941-740-4769
SUSE CLASSIFIED!






Saturday, March 3, 2012 EINICN The Sun Classified-Section A Page 19


TREES & PLANTS
Z 6110

POTTED PLANTS 5 Large 3
ft $125, OBO 941-661-7092
WHOLESALE TREE'S Best
Prices. Rainy Seasons coming,
Guaranteed Installation. (941)
626-6612
BABY ITEMS
S6120

BABY SWING $15, OBO
941-623-3723
BOUNCE & Play Pink, age 9-
18 months, New Condition
$50, OBO 941-429-5684
CLOTHES O-9MO Girls, 54
pcs, $50 after 5pm only 941-
628-5293


FISHER PRICE Rainforest
High Chair $60, OBO 941-
249-2231


INFANT CAR seat w/base
Chicco cortina hazelwood new,
$85 941-429-8507
JUMPEROO BY Fisher Price
good cond. $25 941-474-
4994
LARGE PACK n play plus
accessories $40 941-697-
4989
PACK N Play Like New. Light
brown w/ safari animals.Call
Theresa $35 941-473-7175
PORTA CRIB-PLAY Yard Easy
Push Button Fold $20 941-
486-0189
ROCKING CHAIR Blue cush-
ion,glider type rocker GC
$100, OBO 941-735-1709
I ..^. I" l...I..I" I
SPA BATHTUB Pink,
Infant/Baby, Newborn Insert
$35, OBO 941-429-5684
WALKER-PINK CADILLAC up
to 12 months, fairly new $75,
OBO 941-429-5684


PACK N Play Like new. in box
w/cover $40 941-505-6290
GOLF ACCESSORIES
6125

2 FOR 1
GOLF LESSON SPECIAL
Short Game School
Playing lessons on the course
4 45 minute lessons
Total cost person #1 $120
Total cost person #2 FREE
YOU AND A PARTNER
SPLIT THE COST!
Gary Bower
Dir. of Golf/Teaching Pro.
614-527-9527
CLUBS LH Cobra SS-1 offset
Woods&lrons, Aldila Shfts, Grt
Cond $200 941-505-4686
CLUBS, BAG, balls, irons,
woods, everything. Great
value. $150 941-356-0217


BABY ITEMS BABY ITEMS
6120 L 6120


GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125

CLUBS, BEN Hogan, comply
set, deluxe Dunlop bag, great
cond. $200 941-356-0217
CLUBS, LADIES Dunlop,
comply set, bag, shoes excel
cond. $125 941-505-4686
CLUBS, LADIES Lynx irons &
stainless woods, bag, putter,
all exc. $200 941-356-0217
DRIVER LH Cobra 460 off-set
bassare lite flex shft 12.0 loft
M speed $65 941-505-4686
DRIVER, COBRA 460 : Off-
set, reg flex, 9.0 loft, M
Speed. $65 941-764-3454
DRIVER, Taylormade Super-
fast EC, Lite, reg shaft,10.5
$95 Rotonda 309-224-1406
GOLF BALLS, LIKE NEW
good brands 100 for $20.
Venice area 941-445-2344
GOLF CART cover full cover
for ezgo golf cart.like new
$65 941-426-7663


GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125

GOLF CLUBS and Shoes
Paragon 1/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/P
$125, OBO 941-735-1709
GOLF CLUBS BlackHawk Tita-
nium graphite woods, irons
$300 941-743-6053
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
GOLF CLUBS, RAM, Never
used. Free putting system.
$150 941-423-0036
GPS, GOLFLOGIX Over 30k
courses. Works fine. $35
Rotonda 309-224-1406
IRONS CALLOWAY FT's 3-SW
graf reg flex. Ex condition
$200 941-426-1745
IRONS, NICKLAUS Polarity
used twice, like new, Venice
golf store 299.00---4-5
hybrid-6-SW Grathite Reg. Flex
$190, OBO 401-556-2931
WILSON STAFF GRAPHITE
Irons, 4-PW, $120 Matching
Driver $20. 941-916-2990


There's a


better way to



move that old


furniture.



Unload your


) unwanted


items and


I pick up


some quick


cash!


ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFEDS!


One Call Moves It A11...941-429-3110


:America's BEST Community Daily
****************************************...........**************************.....***


AB LOUNGER Like new, not
used enough! $35 941-575-
5966
AERO PILATES hardly used,
beginner tape & extras includ-
ed $100, OBO 941-697-5917
BIKE STAND w resistance lev-
els, makes any bike stationary
bike, $50 obo 863-993-3044
ECLIPSE STAIR STEPPER
$100
941-889-8565
EXERCISE BIKE WESLO Pur-
suit 350, computer,mag. adj.
$70 860-941-8073
EXERCISE MACHINE
WELDER PRO $155, OBO
941-391-6551
PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR YOU
Venice, Englewood,
North Port 207-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas
Call 206-1200


________________________________________


L


Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 19







The Sun Classified-Section A Page 20 EINICIV Saturday, March 3, 2012


FITNESS
44 6128S

INSTEP JOGGER GREAT
WORKING CONDITION $75
941-486-8388
IRON WEIGHTS with 4 bars &
bench, 4281bs total $300,
OBO 941-423-2091
JUST PLAY SPORTS
Buying & Selling New & Used
Exercise Equipt. 941-255-1378
PILATES PWR GYM LIKE NEW
$225 941-255-3186
STATIONARY BIKE Good
Condition, Program Board
$300, OBO 941-429-5684



STATIONARY BIKE Stamina
sitting position w/ back rest
$125, OBO 941-735-1709
TRAMPOLINE EXERCISER
36" GC $15, OBO 941-766-
0637
TREADMILL KEYS milestone
1200,foldup,10mph $295
860-941-8073
TREADMILL PRO-FORM digi-
tal Ex cond. Folds up $250,
OBO 941-504-1033
TREADMILL PROFORM
2.75hp 10 prgms 18x56 orig
700. $200 215-514-4750
TREADMILL, SEARS Proform
495P1 like new. $100
941-625-6769
WEIDER PRO4900 3 Station
Like new $300, OBO
941-423-2235
SSPORTING GOODS
S6130


DIVERS BELT 51bs.adjustable
weight, NEW $10 941-627-
6780
ELECTRIC HELICOPTER
shuang ma #9100 nib $75
941-255-2169
FISHING SINKERS fishing
sinkers 6&8oz egg $1.00 ea
941-474-1590
FISHING STUFF, 4 rods, 4
reels, landing net, 2 tackle
boxes of supplies, much more.
$125. 941-624-3146.
FISHING TACKLE Box $5
941-488-0417
HELMET HJC FG-23 DOT
approved, XS in good condi-
tion. $10 214-906-1585
LACROSSE GLOVES warrior
hypno red size 12 $43 941-
426-5379
LACROSSE HELMET warrior
viking size m color red $55
941-426-5379
LACROSSE SHOULDER
PADS vapor mill. pro gear size
L $21 941-426-5379
PAINTINGS (3) by Kenneth
Aunchman. Good for pool
room. $300. 207-691-3096
PITBOSS CARD table top fold
up reversible in zippered case
only $44 941-697-1102
SPOTTING SCOPE Bushnell
Spacemaster 15-45 x 60
$250 941-697-8771
TANK BOOT, 80cft, ORANGE,
Rollproof design. $5 941-
223-7673
TENNIS RACKET Prince LXT
Storm Lite w/cover $15 941-
426-1745
TENNIS RACQUET Head TiS6
like new, incl cover $40 941-
426-1745
TENNIS RACQUET Wilson
Hammer 4 Carbon Matrix
w/cover $30 941-426-1745
WEIGHT LIFTING BELT HD
Bollinger leather, sz 30-40"
$10 941-223-7673
FIREARMS
1 ^ 6131


9MM CZ never fired, new in
case. $495, OBO 941-621-
3391 or 239-877-6818


L FIREARMS
L 6131


9MM HIGHPOINT $350.001
call 941-875-2393
9MM MODEL CZ82, $335
firm. (941)-681-2674
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
A COLLECTOR buying US GI
45's, Carbines, Garands, Ger-
man Lugers, Walthers, K98's,
Swords, Daggers. 941-705-5145
DAN WESSON 357 W/7
1/4"barrel $450 obo/trade
941-473-7000
FLORIDA CCW Classes.
$50 Per person. Group rates
available. 941-882-0656
www.tarpongunnery.com
HANDGUNS-380ACP $150
9mm Mak mint! $350
941-276-3818
MOSSBERG 12ga. auto vent
rib $350 VERONA 12ga, auto
vent rib made in italy $425
both nice guns 336-312-0038
WANTED AR15 carbin 5.56
flattop, adjustable buck stock
(941)-275-7778
WANTED: GLOCK, 9mm
compact, must be in exc cond
& priced right. 941-735-6236
YUOGO SKS unissued, milled
rcvr, all matching #'s, 8mm
grenade launcher w/Tapco
AR15 style dark earth stock, 5
matching 20 rds detachable
mags, 882 rds ammo. Exc.
cond. $600 941-769-1367


Ml Care


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FIREARMS
ACCESSORIES
6132

GUN CABINET oak, 8 gun, w/
brass drawer pulls. $275.
607-368-8755

BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
LOS 6135

4-BIKE CARRIER hitch, Sarus
type 2" great shape $75 941-
474-0109
ADULT TRIKE, Schwinn Merid-
ian 1 yr old $250, OBO
941-223-0272
BICYCLE SINGLE SPEED
White wall beach tires,wide
seat $50 941-697-8771
BICYCLE, TRAILMATE 26"
men's, many extra's, $75. Call
941-624-3146.
BICYCLES SINGLE speed
nice condition $50, OBO 717-
926-7622
BIKE, ROYCE Union mens
speed, needs TCL & tires
$25, OBO 941-637-9207
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
ELECTRIC BIKES (2) Men's &
Women's eZip Electric Com-
fort Trailz Bikes. Hardly used.
2 chargers, 3 batteries, brand
new spare motor. $300
941-697-5338


BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
6135

FOLDING BICYCLES New
tires, 1 speed, Price is for pair
$300 941-681-0701
MOUNTAIN BIKE Giant 26",
18 speed, MINT Condition.
$100 941-286-5275
MOUNTAIN BIKE MENS
18sp,shocks,Roadmaster
NICE $80 941-697-8771
MOUNTAIN BIKES Huffy
Mens or ladies 18 speed. $55
941-214-8168
NEW BIKE lock kryponite u-
lock $10 941-228-1745
ROAD BIKE, 1983 SCHWINN
LeTOUR MENS LARGE FRAME
$200 863-494-3061
TOYS
L 6138


HOTWHEELS HOTWHEELS
many pieces $2 941-350-
4825
LGB 2080 S Electronic
Engine has Sound & Steam
$325, OBO 941-575-6556
N SCALE Train track: Bach-
mann EZ track, 50+ pieces,
turnouts. $50 941-764-3454
RED WAGON radio flyer
seats 2 $60 941-227-0676
THOMAS TRAIN Table Set
Imaginarium $90, OBO 941-
249-2231


TOYS
L 6138


THOMAS TRAIN Take Along
Set Huge Lot! Track & Trains!
$65, OBO 941-249-2231
V TECH Smile 17 games,
usb,car charger,ex.condition
$125 941-879-2269

VIDEO
6140

5 CAMERAS some vintage.
$50 941-629-4857
CAMERA, CANON A520 digi-
tal 4MP,4xZoom,card,case,ex-
cond $40 941-828-0171
CAMERA, CANON. 35MM
EOS Elan, like new, v good
workingcondition. $85. 941-
505-6290

DIGITAL CAMERA purple-digi-
tal-1 mo.old-case $50 941-
237-1085
DIGITAL CAMERA purple-digi-
tal-1 mo.old-case $50 941-
237-1085
FLASH EXTENSION, Off shoe
flash cord, like new $12 941-
505-6290
GIMP 2.6 for Photographers
Image Editing Guide & Soft-
ware $30 941-240-5682
KINOTELEX TELEPHOTO 2x
converter Screw mount type
$25 941-423-2585


PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
6140

TELEPHOTO LENS Soligar
80-200mm screw mount.
Gd cond. $25 941-423-2585
TELESCOPE MEADE ETX90,
Tripod, Case, Extras. $350
941-585-7740
TRIPOD SLIK U-212. Never
used. $75 941-743-8752

POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES
6145







**SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
We buy used & move hot-
tubs. Serving Charlotte &
Sarasota over 13yrs.
941-625-6600
| A V^ I Io Wl I H I He. |
_____SUIN CLASSIFIEDS____
AUTHORIZED DEALER
NORDIC HOT TUBS


TWO-MORROW'S ENTERPRISES,
941-460-9700


245 ib Tech 25OSis Cares 251 IHlp WuaCd 252 Hep Wa
2 CTomnv 1Emplhp .
- vICE



A -7ATE
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CoM



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tahu



AVcnO

YOU CAN PLACE AN AD IN THE

CLASSIFIED SECTION


,Rar
OR HAVE ONE TO OFFER
KEIlI
,% In
I hir
ALL 941-429-3110 AT THE CLASSi FIED.
Tn. b I



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The Sun Classified-Section A Page 20 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012






Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 21


6000
qv 1D


MERCHANDISE

L ARCADIA AREA
GARAGE SALES
6001

OPEN DAILY Closed Sun-
day 10:30-? 2834 SW
Highway 17. Thift Store in
Front of the Amvets
[-SAT. 9AM-12PM
315 E Magnolia St.
Entire House! Everything Must
Go! Come see!
rSat. Mar 31 7-? 1761 Se
Cherry Dr. Soup de nuts
- SAT. MAR. 3rd 8a-2p
Toby's Park 3550 NE Hwy
70, Clubhouse decorations for
sale at Clubhouse.
DSAT. March 3rd 8am-12pm
Cross Creek RV Resort
Annual Yard Sale 6837 NE Cubitis
Ave. All Welcome!

GARAGE SALES
6002

-FRI.-SAT. 8:30-1:30 28
Bunker Lane. Household
goods; wood doors; stainless-
fridg; sinks; granite countertop
-Sat Mar 10, 2012
I8am-lp Quality Self
Storage, 3041 S. McCall Road
Englewood, FL 34224. HUGE
Community Yard Sale!
Antiques, Furniture, Tools, Col-
lectibles & Great Stuff!
[SAT. 10A-3P 75 Taylor
St. Annual Port Charlotte
Doll Sale at Charlotte Harbor
Event Center $4.00 donation.
[SAT. 8-12 Oak Forest
community at Rt 776 &
Yosemite Dr. ANNUAL RUM-
MAGE & BAKE SALE
SSAT. 8-2 Bay Vista Blvd
Subdivision off old Engle-
wood Rd. Annual Yard Sale,
many houses with many nice
items for sale follow signs
m- SAT. 8-2:30 Annual
UPoint-of-Pines Community
Sale, Aqua View, Lemon Bay &
Deer Creek Streets by
Howards Restaurant
OSAT. 8:30-1:30 445
Purdy Street. Furniture,
clothes, Tools, & lots of
misc. household items
[- SAT. 8A-1P GIANT
ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE
2840 Waxwing Ln. Edgewater
club. Something for everyone.
SAT. 9-1 7344 Skycrest.
i iOff Oceanspray .Every-
thing from framed Golf prints
to holiday items,
[ SAT. 9-3 6610 Gasparilla
Pines Blvd. The Sanctuary
at Cape Haze Yard Sale.
Household treasures, bou-
tique, jewelry, baked goods.
SSAT. March 3, 9- 1,
SVillage of Holiday Lake
MHP. 771/ Gasparilla Rd.,
(1 mile off 776)
Treasures on all streets
throughout Park.
SAT. ONLY 9:30-4
FISHERY RD. Off Placida
Fishery Restaurant
ANTIQUES &
COLLECTIBLES MARKET
[ SAT.-SUN. 8-3
1511 Rossanne PI.
Tools, lawn care, fishing,
household & more.


GARAGE SALES
6002

SATURDAY 8 1
6100 Toucan Drive
Lemon Bay Isles Lakeside
Club, Bargains Galore
Garage Sale

USE CLASSIFIED!
m-SUN. 9-2 3460 N.
Access Rd.. Near Spin-
naker. Tringali Rec Center,
INSIDE AND OUT. New & used,
antiques, plants. Food for pur-
chase.

LAKE SUZY AREA
GARAGE SALES
6003

[-] ANNUAL YARD/
BAKE SALE
Sat. March 3rd 8:30-1
NORTHSHORE CONDO CLUB-
HOUSE, 12144 SW Egret Cr.
off Kings Hwy. Furn., linens
kitchen items lamps, etc. Cof-
fee & Baked goods available.

NOKOMIS/OSPREY
GARAGE SALES
6004



FRI.-SAT. 9:30-5
416 Signorelli Dr. Sculptors by
Antonio Capparella, fine art,
deKooning drawings, Duncan
Phyfe sofa, RCA Victor Vitrola,
cigarette machine, col-
lectibles, mens & ladies furs,
1920 gas range & more.
[ SAT. 9AM-2PM,
1500 KINGS WAY,
OFF 41, 1 MI E. ON
LAUREL RD. IN
KING'S GATE PARK
FLEA MARKET CRAFTS,
MUSIC, FOOD, BAKED
GOODS! SERVICE DOGS
ONLY. RAIN DATE SUN.
MARCH 4.

NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES
6005

[-FRI.-SAT. 8:30-? 1433
LJonquil Terrace off Toledo
Blade, furniture, decorative
light fixtures, diecast cars,
hotweels, beer items, house
accessories etc
-]FRI.-SAT. 9-3 5964
Brickell Dr. Furniture,
Household, Christmas Village
Items, Linens & MUCH MORE!!
-]SAT. 8-1 4450 Jody Ave.
Dance Studio Liquidation
furniture, household items, &
costumes, so much more!!!!
ISAT. 8-2 2426 Music.
Furn, w/d, books, kitchen
items & lots of misc.
-ISAT. 8-2 5348 Nolting
Terr. Antique radio, lawn
chairs, furniture, TV, candles,
camping equip., inflatable raft,
copper & silver items, Xmas.
[-SAT. 8-2 7181 Primm PI.
tools and household mer-
chandise.
-] SAT. 8-2 Duck Key Annu-
Sal Community Multi-Family
Sale, South end of Pan Ameri-
can Blvd. Rain date Sun 8-2
SAT. 9-1 2969 Wells Ave.
ITools, household items. &
misc.
mSAT. MARCH 3, 8A-1P
Community garage sale,
Charleston Park Home Owners
Association. Entrance on
Spring Haven Dr.


NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES
6005

[ SAT.-SUN. 8-?
L3923 S. San Mateo Dr.
Multi Family Sale. Tools,Tools
& More Tools!! Drill press,
furniture, china cabinet, Dell
computer, computer desk.
Lots of items for everyone.
-SAT..& SUN. 10-3 2171
Wenona Dr. ESTATE SALE-
Sectional, lamps, clothing,
bedding, antiques, china.
PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006

rFRI & SAT 6AM-2PM
S Annual Garage Sale
First Baptist Port Charlotte
20035 Quesada Ave.
[FRI 8-4.-SAT. 8-3
1349 Millport St. Futon
Matt., kids clothes, toys, hard-
ware, cd's, small furn, & more.
F-FRI.-SAT. 8-1 23109
Hammond Ave. Off Orlan-
do near Veterans Blvd
1FRI.-SAT. 8-1 451 Dog-
wood St. Off 41 &
Collingswood. Bedroom set,
books, DVDs, etc.


FRI.-SAT. 8-2
22198 New York Ave.
Everything must go, jew-
elry, furniture, art sale &
oils & prints. Multi family
[FRI.-SAT. 8-61SH SUPER
GARAGE SALE 9 PERSON
22404 Delhi Ave. Off Peach-
land Orlando
[-FRI.-SAT. 8A-2P 19104
Cochran Blvd. Tools, pool
pump & heater, NEW whole
house water treatment, misc.
IFRI.-SAT. 9 4 17299
Lake Worth Blvd. Paint-
ings, books, colletibles,
antiques, tools
llFRI.-SAT. 9-? 3442
ISwanee Rd. Sign on Kings
Hwy. SWF HORSE RESCUE
2nd ANNUAL GARAGE SALE.
Multi Families donated items.
Anyone wanting to donate call
Linda at 941-626-5229.
Robella fishing boat 250 SW
Series, bedroom furn. All dona-
tions go to the horses.
-FRI.-SUN. 9-4 3620
LBesself Road. Between
Elmira & Westchester Blvd.
Household items, something
for everyone even your pets.
LOLLY-S ESTATES R US
Used Furniture & Thrift Store.
Household, Furniture,
Collectibles & MUCH MORE!!
2715 Tamiami Trail P.C.
Open Mon.- Sat.lOam-5pm
941-625-2006 628-0941
We ALSO Buy Entire
Contents of Homes!
[SAT 9-1. 3310 Loveland
LBlvd. Lakes Edge. Clothes,
household items, books.
200+ Families. Under Tent.
-SAT-SUN 8-? 3138 New-
Obury St. Solid wood TV
armoire,Collectables & Antique
radios
-SAT. 10A-3P 75 Taylor
St. Annual Port Charlotte
Doll Sale at Charlotte Harbor
Event Center $4.00 donation.
- SAT. 8-1
1111 Forrest Nelson BI.
Indoor Community Sale
[-SAT. 8-1 1330 Kenmore
St. MULTI FAMILY SALE!!
Quesada to Kensington to
Wardell to Kenmore
F-SAT. 9-2:30 17347
Lakeworth Blvd. 33948
Household, Electronics,
Books, Knick- Knacks & MORE!


PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006

m- SAT. 8-2 22513 Glen
I Ave. corner of Idlewild &
Glen, rocking wooden crib,
stuffed animals, barbie's,
porcelain dolls, small kit.
appli., clothes, kitchenware,
entertainment center,
computer monitor, keyboards,
& lots of misc.


SAT. 8-3
COMMUNITY
GARAGE SALE:
Sponsored Buena Vista
POA. Over 400
Waterfront Properties
Participating!
Harbor Blvd. off
Edgewater toward P.C.
Beach Complex. Many
Sellers. Numerous Items!
rISAT. 8-4 1962 Cedarwood
ISt. Highway Holliness
Apostolic Church. (766 to
Sharke or Mercury) Large
Sale. Variety of different items,
household, furniture, clothes &
bake sale 941-276-4222
SSAT. 9-3 2103 Corfell St.
IHousehold items, camping
equipment, vintage pieces
[SAT.-SUN. 8-? 20210
Albury Dr. True Estate Sale:
Furniture, dishes, bedroom set,
twin beds- whole house full!
- SAT.-SUN. 8-5
531 CORRIENTES CIR.
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE
SAT.-SUN. 8AM-3PM
124 Mccabe St. 33953
a few tools, household items,
lots of misc.

PUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES
Z 6007

S ALLIGATOR PARK
ANNUAL PARK WIDE
YARD SALE
March 3rd 8am-lpm. Vendors
wanting to participate call
941-639-7222 for available
space. 6400 Taylor Rd.
LIpWiM SALEXi^
FRI. MAR 2-TUE. MAR 13
9AM-? 16161 Juarez Cir. Rt
41 S R on Burnt Store Rd,
approx 7 miles, left on Zemel
Rd, 3rd r to Juarez. Hover-
ound with battery, ladderback
chairs & more call 941-575-
1686 during week.
FRI.-SAT. 7-2
II 221 Durrance St.
HUGE Multi-family sale,
downtown PG. Antique furn,
John Deere collectibles,
country decor, new toys
and clothes. Much more!
mFRI.-SAT. 8-12 2616
Via Veneto Drive. misc
household,furn,generator
F-FRI.-SAT. 8-2 1425 Pine
LIsland Court. At the end of
Bal Harbor MUST SELL EVERY-
THING, furniture, clothes, kit.
supplies, decor, misc house-
hold item & more.
-FRI.-SAT. 8-5 36250
Washington Loop Rd. Craft
supplies, sm. appl, tools,
dump trlr, furniture, exercise
equip., books, CDs, movies.
-FRI.-SAT. 9-1 4326 Palm
lDr. off Rio Villa, tools, fur-
niture, plants, lamps, complete
Q bedroom set, computer
esk, and misc items.
SSAT. 10A-3P 75 Taylor
IiSt. Annual Port Charlotte
Doll Sale at Charlotte Harbor
Event Center $4.00 donation.


GARAGE SALES
6007

[FRI.-SAT. 9-3 5274
Duncan Rd P.G.. Lots of
tools, boat & fishing equip.,
cook books & household
items
OLD TOWN RESALE SHOP
9 1PM
THURS., FRI. & SAT
3849 ACLINE RD.
nSAT ONLY 8-12 215
IlRio Villa Dr. WINDMILL
Village MHP, Wide Yard
Sales. Over 30 homes
throughout the park. This is
the Big One!!!
SSAT. 8-1 4300 Riverside
Dr. River Forest Village-
Trash & Treasure Sale! Fur-
niture, Household, Jewelry,
Tools, Sporting Goods &
MORE! Raffle for Baskets.
ISAT. 8-1 Rio Villa Lakes
Community Garage Sale.
Loft Bed w/mattress, 46"
projection TV, tools, tool
bench, Jr. golf club set.
Something for Everyone!.
-SAT. 8-12 PGI 1223 Via
Tripoli. Mini Estate Sale.
Great Collection of crystal &
brass, kitchen items, X-mas.
SAT. 8:00-1
D 14270 Burnt Store Rd.
MULTI FAMILY INDOOR SALE!
Something for Everyone
r-SAT. 8:30-3 2562 Brazil-
lia Ct, PGI: bears, books,
collectibles, household, deco-
rations, pictures/frames, tools
costume jewelry & much more
[ SAT. 8AM-NOON
PG Chamber
City Wide Garage Sale
401 Taylor St. &
225 W. Virginia Av. Parking
lot of Centennial Bank &
Koch, Zeman & Walsh. Sell
your goods. 941-639-3720
r-SAT. 9-1 Punta Gorda RV
IiResort Clubhouse, Bay-
nard Dr. Annual craft & bake
sale. Handmade jewelry, tow-
els, paintings, craft items, etc.
Baked goods & lunch available
For info call (845)-283-8145
SAT. 9-4 South Shores
Annual Treasure Sale joins
Burnt Store Marina Sale
located next to Portabellos.


SAT. 9-5 11027 Pine Trail Rd.
Household furniture, some
antique: sofa, curio cabinet,
desk, dressers, barstools, etc.

lEstate Sale
SAT.9-4-SUN.9-1 4001 San
Masimo Dr. BSI, Art/old
records, collectibles, furniture,
& electronics, something for
everyone,NO EARLY BIRDS!!!
SATURDAY 8am-Noon
Burt Store Presbyterian Church
11330 Burnt Store Rd.
Treasures & Treats Sale
-ITHU.-SAT. 9-2
15207 Blackjack Cir.
Off Wshington Loop.
Household & misc.


THURS.-SAT. 8-5 5211Black-
jack Circle. Praire Creek West.
2 Homes of Household Misc! A
Little Bit of Everything!

GARAGE SALES
6008

FFRI.-SAT. 7:30 120
Spur Dr. Miscellaneous


GARAGE SALES
6008

-FRI.-SUN. 9AM-4PM
107 Bunker Rd. Tools,
fishing gear, household items.
SSAT.-SUN. 8-3
2 Sportsmans Place
Rotonda W., School supplies,
toys, misc hsehld, Xmas & more

GARAGE SALES
6010

-FRI.-SAT. 8-3 2929 Sies-
ta Dr. 6 Families! House-
hold, deco, clothes, bed sets,
furn, linens, jewelry, much more
-SAT. 8-2 377 Sea Grape.
iHuge 2 family: metal
rolling cart, quality baby items,
file cart, dvds, clothing, books,
decorator items, household.
SAT. 8-2
ED Trinity Presbyterian
Church 4365 SR 776
WHITE ELEPHANT SALE
SAT. 8AM-2PM
4425 Yacht Club Dr.
South Venice Yacht Club
From Rt 41, take Baffin Rd W,
Cross Shamrock, Follow
Signs. Household, Tools, furn,
Jewelry, books & more!
SAT. 8AM-2PM
4432 Pompano Rd.
Three Family Sale, lots of
misc items. Come See!
-SAT. 8AM-2PM
O Venice Presbyterian Church
ANNUAL GIANT GARAGE
SALE, On the Rialto 2 blocks
south of Venice Regional
Medical Center
[ SAT. 9AM-1PM
Southwood Community
Garage Sale. US 41 between
Plantation & Venice East Blvd.

VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
6011

F-FRI.-SAT. 8-12 3221
Meadow Run Dr. MOVING
Household Yard Misc
MOVING SALE
E ANTIQUES, ORIENTAL &
MISC, CALL FOR DETAILS
941-343-3817
[-SAT. 8-1 3312 Meadow
Run Circle. Center Rd.
to E. Village. Follow signs.
Moving! Great selection.
SAT. 8-1 Venice Municipal
iiMHP. Clubhouse, 780
Tamiami Trail S. Business 41.
BAZAAR FLEA MARKET &
RUMMAGE SALE Baked
goods, crafts, lunch and so
forth. Enter Park off Cockrill
at Firenze St. South behind
Rialto Plaza (goodwill). Club-
house on corner on Firenze
and Cooper St. (On the Island)
Look for Signs. For Informa-
tion call: 941-485-0293.
[- SAT. 8-2 300 Blackburn
Pt. Rd., Osprey. Pine Run
Community. Goods Galore!
Furniture, housewares,
clothes, decor & much more.
I SAT. 8AM-1PM
317 Parkside Dr. tools,
kitchen, etc. Too much to list!
[-SAT. 8AM-2PM Strada
LD Argento & Strada D Oro
COMMUNITY YARD SALE!!
(Off Capri Isles Blvd., Near
Edmondson)
TUES. 3/13, 9-4
SPRING ARTISAN BIZAAR
Venitican Golf & River Club
Laurel Rd. (East of 75)
Hosting Humane Society.
Crafters...Unique Items!
Public Welcome!


00110GE & YORD SOLES







The Sun Classified-Section A Page 22 EINICIV Saturday, March 3, 2012


POOL/SPAl
& SUPPLIES
44 6145

BABY BARRIER Like new,
43'7" in 3 sections $300, OBO
941-268-0219
BASKETBALL BASKET
w/storage 35x24x12 for pool.
$35 941-766-0857
HOT TUB large 7 person
Hot Spring Grande. Exc cond.
$1,500 423-773-6336
SOLAR BLANKET 12x24 new
in box heavy duty. $85
941-979-8763
SOLAR PANELS for Pool 7
solar panels for pool 4x10
$100 941-697-8771
SPA, 2-PERSON steps &
cover incl'd. Only 3yrs old
$2,800 941-423-7859
SPA, LEISURE Bay Salida
Seats six, cover included.
$2,500 941-423-0036
TAYLOR TEST Kit NEW, Never
opened. model K-2009 $20
941-223-7673
WE MANUFACTURE
SPAS & SWIM SPAS
3 Person $1995
5 Person $2495.
Swim Spa $8995.
Whsl prices 941-462-0633

LAWN & GARDEN
Z 6160


1/2 BARRELS, Fiberglass 25-
30 gal. Growing containers,
many available. $5
941-485-7543
The S'
SSUN 14tO,.-

PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!
FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
DOLPHIN FOUNTAIN White
Plastic Fountain, Electric. $20
941-456-0936
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
GAS GRILL $50, OBO 941-
623-3723
GAS GRILL Broilmaster, G-3,
with one 201b OPD tank, new
parts $100 941-474-0542
GORILLA-LIFT, made for
heavy trailer tail gates $200
941-623-3496
HEDGE TRIMMER Electric,
good condition $7 520-240-
9928
JOHN DEERE #10 dump
trailer $250 941-627-6896
LANAI SET Table 72 x 42 + 6
chairs $100 Good Condition.
941-429-2624
LAWN WAGON Dumps,
hooks to lawn tractor $30,
OBO 941-685-4363
LAWNMOWER 22" SelfPro-
pelled Elec Start,Like New
$200 941-979-8496


LAWN & GARDEN
6160


LAWNMOWER CRAFTSMAN
High Wheel Push Mower $50
941-485-0681
LEAF SHREDDER CRAFTS-
MAN 7.5 BRIGGS AND STRA-
TON $275 941-627-6896
MOWER CRAFTSMAN Rotary
22" side discharge 6 h.p.
$100 941-697-6592
PROPANE TANK. 20 pound
w/ opd. $20 941-474-0542
PUSH MOWER Robie 22"
High Wheel $75 941-485-
0681
RIDING LAWN mower, Mur-
ray, 16HP, runs great, tuned-
up $499 941-268-0226
RIDING LAWN mower, Yard-
man 13HP, runs great, tuned-
up $450 941-268-0226
RIDING MOWER SNAPPER,
28", 11hp, works good.
$165 941-625-6536
SHOP SWEEP 19" WIDE $50
941-627-6896
SMALL ENGINE REPAIRS
mowers, weed eaters, chain-
saws, etc. 941-637-7772
SPREADER SCOTT'S 3000
Drop Style, NEW $35 941-
268-8951
UTILITY TRAILER 6'x8'with
loading ramp and 4' side walls.
$450, OBO 941-204-0864
WEEDEATER ELECTRIC
string trimmer, good condition
$7 520-240-9928

BUILDINGS
6165

SHED BUILDING very nice
$495 941-626-3102

BUILDING
SUPPLIES
6170

AUX POWER Transfer NIB
Briggs & Stratton 6 Circuit 30
amp $199 941-258-7666
AWNING, ALUM louvers
adjust, bay window, 102" wide
$60 941-426-0275
AWNING, ALUM. Louvers
adjust, 65in. wide. $50 941-
426-0275
DEADBOLTS PAIR forged
brass new-in-box chrome finish
$20 214-906-1585


DOORS
DOORS,2,36X77,W/GLASS
,JELDWEN,GLASS,IN,DOOR
23X65.$50 941-429-2624
USE CLASSIFIED!
ELECTRICAL CONDUIT 2 in.
x 26 ft, 10 & 16 ft. length.
$14, OBO 941-244-2405
ELECTRICAL PANEL
100 amp wall brkrs $50,
OBO 941-286-0767
EYE BROW Windows 1 tan, 1
white, never used, each $50,
OBO 941-429-5684
FAUCETS(3) MOEN, bath-
room, Chrome. $75, OBO
941-637-4995
FRONT DOOR lock Schwlage,
new$115 Sell $35, OBO 630-
248-3596
JELD-WEN door & window
Glass 2 doors (36") 72 x 80
Frame $100 941-429-2624
LUVER DOOR 6'8" x 2'6" $20
941-629-4847
SINKS (2) American Stan-
dard, white, oval, ceramic
$25 each 941-637-4995
SLIDING GLASS DOOR
3'X6'6"no track 2 for $25 obo
941-629-4847
SLIDING GLASS doors(3)
5' X 8' solar glass, new.
$425, OBO 941-637-9207
THRESHOLDS EXTERIOR
Aluminum 2, each 33". New.
$10 941-766-0637


TOILET AM.STANDARD,
elongated, white $25, OBO
941-637-4995
WINDOW NEW 27X13 White
Half Circle $50, OBO 941-
423-2091
WINDOW VINYL & Glass
28x32" Frosted New $15
941-766-0637

HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
6180


WANTED USED
MECHANICAL PLATFORM
SCALE
5001b capacity or more.
Call 941-416-6293

TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


AERATOR WATER TANK
Fiberglass 250 gallons $100
941-485-0681
AMPROBES, 4 DIGITAL,
AND manual. $160, OBO
941-697-1110
CAR RAMPS $20 941-456-
0936
COMPOUND MITER Saw 12"
Chicago saw in great shape.
$60, OBO 941-441-7418
DIAL CALIPER 0-12" in wood
box $150; Combo Square
+box $100 941-639-0838
DIAMOND TIP blade new 9"
wet tile blade $15 941-228-
1745
DRILL, RIGID 1/2" spade han-
dle single speed, reversible
like new $100 508-801-7447
ELECTRONIC MEGGER "Bid-
die" new in box. $450, OBO
941-697-1110
EXTENSION LADDER, 16 ft,
aluminum $30 Venice 941-
488-3068
EXTENSION LADDERS 16
FT. ALUMINUM, EACH $45
941-575-4459
FLOOR SWEEPER Nobles
Scout 28 2006 walk behind
needs batt/excond/usedl0x
$1,200, OBO 941-475-5924
GENERATOR 110 220 8hp
4,000 watt $300 941-408-
0197
GENERATOR BRIGGS &
Stratton 5500watt 10 hrs.
$400 PGI 941-661-0990
GENERATOR COLEMAN
Powermate 1850 120VAC
12VDC $195 941-637-9501
GENERATOR COLEMAN
powermate generator, 6250
watts new $400 obo 941-875-
1838
GENERATOR NEW SPORTS-
MAN 2000WATT 2.4HP $250
941-380-1945
GENERATOR POWERMATE
6250 new in box. $499 941-
769-5995
GRINDER/BUFFER Baldor -
1/2 HP $200 941-623-3496
JIG SAW Ryobi 9" like new
condition,/saw blade Portable
$75 941-474-0109
LADDER,6FT. STEP, FIBER-
GLASS $45 941-575-4459
PASLODE FINISH Nailer LIKE
NEW, many extras. $300 941-
624-3091

PUMP HOMELITE transfer
pump. $100 517-694-3639
PUMP SPRINKLER Flotec
FP5172 47 GPM $100 941-
475-9146
RO PUMP SYSTEM, Whole
House $499 941-485-0681
SAWZALL DEWALT 303M,
Case, Blades, $45 Englewood
941-473-1026
SILVER SOLDER hi TM half #
in 18 in. strips or B 0. $100
941-624-4244


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


SOCKET SETS SK 1/2" &
3/8"; screwdriver & plier kits;
$200 941-639-0838
TABLE SAW 10" delta $60
941-408-0197
TABLE SAW Crafsman 10" w
wheels, extensions, table top,
blades $150 941-423-8471
TABLE SAW ON WHEELS in
ENGLEWOOD $50 941-475-
7577
TAP & Die Set Dayton 40 pc
model 4X575A. EXC. COND.
$30 941-223-7673
TECUMSEH 5.5HP 3/4 shaft
horizontal eng. w/ohc $150,
OBO 207-604-0848
TOOL BENCH Craftsman with
router and scroll saw. $300
941-423-0036
WANTED USED
MECHANICAL PLATFORM
SCALE
5001b capacity or more.
Call 941-416-6293
WELDING EQUIP: steel table,
.023 wire spools, asst clamps;
$250 941-639-0838
WORK BENCH Steel legs
2"solid maple top 6'Long
Great cond. $75, OBO 941-
889-7255
Clasifie = Sales

OFFICE/BUSINESS
EQUIP./SUPLIES


OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Preowned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
COPIER HP190 DigColor EC
Xtra Ink,LN $30 941-637-
0268
FILING CABINET tan two
drawer cabinet good condition
$26 941-416-0321

RESTAURANT
SUPPLIES
L6225

FOOD WARMERS 2 working
pieces 1600/2200 watts
$200, OBO 941-735-1709
RESTAURANT CUTTING
board 4'x8" almost new $50
941-623-3496

BIRDS
6231


COCKATIELS 3 HAND fed
babies, ready now, $50 each.
2M & 1 F 941-627-3210
MACAW, BLUE & Gold w/Lg
cage, about 5 yrs old, $600
941-740-4245
CATS
6232


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
SIAMESE MIX female, 3 yrs.
shots, spayed, beautiful, good
w/ kids. FREE TO GOOD
HOME! 941-475-4486

DOGS
6233


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
FREE TO GOOD HOME:
Chocolate lab, good w/kids ,
good family dog 5 yrs.
spayed, must find home: 609-
385-5509 PC


DOGS
L 6233


FREE TO good home, Jack
Russell adult male w/disabili-
ties. 941-416-0369
JACK RUSSELL mom & 2 pups
(8wks/no shots) need loving
home. $300/all 941-416-0369
MORKIE: Maltese/Yorkie mix,
lyr old, current shots, good
w/kids. $200 239-209-7235
YORKIE PUPPIES male cham-
pionship bloodlines,AKC, ready
for new home 941-475-4894
YORKIES AKC, 10 wks old, 1
M, $350; 1F $500. Shots &
health cert. 941-475-4913

S PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
6236 1

PET CAGES 3 wire pet cages,
s,m,l $15 each 941-475-
1375
PET CARRIER (Small)Canvas
print w/pouch.Unused.Nice.
$19 941-276-1881
PET CARRIER Sherpa New
Med. 17X11X10.5 $40, OBO
941-764-9196
S APPLIANCES
S6250


COMPACT FREEZER Sears
White 3.0cf Good condition.
$45 941-697-7888
COOKTOP BRAND NEW in
box!. Whirlpool Gold Ceramic
glass surface. Stainless/black
30" $450 941-426-3540
DISHWASHER WORKS good
and looks good $50 941-504-
8049
DRYER WHIRLPOOL, white,
next to new! $150 941-249-
2674
ELECTRIC RANGE Self-Clean-
ing Convection Glass top
Bisque $250 941-883-1786
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
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and follow the prompts.
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all. FREE ads are for
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FREEZER MAYTAG white
upright 14sq ft exl con $175,
OBO 941-698-1996
MOST WASHERS, Dryers &
Fridges repaired for $65
or less. 941- 460 0763

NEW CENTRAL AIR Still
in box. 13 SEER.
Comfortmaker
(Carrier brand)
10 Yr. Warr. $1,440
941-465-5208
OVEN/MICRO/SPEED-
COOKER Advantium Great
cond $250 941-883-1786
REFRIGERATOR GE 25 cuft
side by side water/ice almond
$100 941-875-9739
REFRIGERATOR GE Stainless
Steel w:ice & water in dbl dr.
$300 941-661-9684
REFRIGERATOR, ADMIRAL
21 CUFT w/ice maker,
almond, $299. 607-368-8755


APPLIANCES
6250


REFRIGERATOR, ALMOND
side-by-side, 35x67. $70
843-729-3874
REFRIGERATOR,FRIGIDAIRE
$150, OBO 941-302-9121
STACKED WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore good cond. $475
740-310-9115
STOVE KENMORE $175,
Kenmore Washer & Dryers
$200 941-255-5853
WASHER & DRYER
approx 3-4 yrs old, exc cond!
$350 941-286-9001
WASHER KENMORE looks
good and works good $65
941-504-8049
I WASHER WHITE, good I
cond. $125 941-258-5876

MISCELLANEOUS
: 6260


5" WESTERN BIT sweet iron
mouth w/copper roller. Like
new $25, OBO 941-743-2656
5TH Wheel RV Cover asking
$275. Tyvek 31-34ft New
Paid $400 Call 440-478-1880
BATH TUB Glass Sliding Door
60" $35, OBO 941-830-0272
BOOKS 20 DANIELLE STEEL
PAPERBACKS LIKE NEW $5
941-475-7577
BOOKS WESTERN Louis
L'Amour westerns $1.50 941-
408-0805
BOOKS, ROMANCE 30, vari-
ous, $15. after 5pm only
941-628-5293
BOOKS, WESTERNS 40 vari-
ous, $20 after 5 pm only
941-628-5293
BOOKS: James Woods & oth-
ers!! paperbacks!! 8for $20
941-544-1128 NP area
CANOPY COVERS (2) white,
10X20, with poles $100 each
941-460-8187
CARTOONS & greeting
cards. Personalized by artist
$20 & up 941-624-6685
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPER
Oct 3, 1863 Annexation of
Canada $30 941-4888531
EARRING DISPLAY tower,
revolving/holds 48prs of ear-
rings $15 941-575-1864
EDISON BOOK Operations &
Supply Chain Management.
Verna $50 540-810-3015
EDISON TEXTBOOK College
Algebra Essentials 3E $80
434-945-0104
EDISON TEXTBOOK Commu-
nicating effectively,10th Ed
$55 434-945-0104
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak 1/2 facecord FREE DELIV-
ERY. $120 941-526-7589
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak firewood, full half cord
$150 941-628-0557
GAS GRILL, Brinkman table
top grill never used. $50 941-
661-0631
HONDA REPAIR MANUAL For
1992-1995 Civic & Del Sol
$25, OBO 941-423-2091
HURRICANE FABRIC screen
for door 64"x83" $199, OBO
941-423-2014
HURRICANE FABRIC screen
for window 74"x76" $199,
OBO 941-423-2014
HURRICANE FABRIC screen
pull down for lanai 203"x89"
$399, OBO 941-423-2014
PARK BENCH 33"x22"x18"
cast iron w wood slats new
$20 941-445-5619
PATRON BOTTLES (40) clean
no labels w/cork. $1 each
941-629-8955
PHILLIES-RAYS 3/15 base-
line box secl01 W/pkg 2tks
EACH $85 941-697-8598
PLASTIC HANGERS 75
GOOD in ENGLEWOOD $3
941-475-7577


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 22 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012





Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section A Page 23


MISCELLANEOUS
S6260


BINOCULARS 5.5X12X, with
case. $25 941-423-9190
PURPLE MARTIN Bird House
$75, OBO 941-764-5804
RAYS VS TWINS 3/6 PCS Sec
205 In Shade $20 each
941-276-1354
RED SOX 3/10 SAT NITE vs
RAYS EACH $50, OBO 941-
276-1354
RED SOX VS BALT FT MYERS
3/6 2 TKTS EACH $35 941-
276-1354
RED SOX VS RAYS 3/27 FM
GMSR, no seat, EACH $50
941-276-1354
STAGE LIGHT, American DJ
Prof. model# P-56A/SPECIAL
$50, OBO 941-735-1709
STORM SHUTTERS 19 alu-
minum panels & 2 clear. 82
inches high. Upper & lower
tracks included. $250
Sold!
SWAROVSKI SILVER Crystal
Cute pair of hedgehogs one
small & one medium. Both
retired. $100 941-743-5263
SWAROVSKI SILVER Crystal
One owl and one owlet, both
retired and very nice. $100
941-743-5263
TELEPHONE. Unusual golf
bag and club style. NOT A
REAL BAG!! $30. 941-423-
2585
TICKETS RAYS vs. Tigers
March 8 section 215 $45
941-235-1343
TONER CARTRIDGE 2 NEW
HP 98A TONER CARTRIDGES
$100, OBO 941-743-0614
WORLD SERIES Bottle 2011
w St Louis Cards & Series
logos $2 941-445-5619
YANKEES-RAYS 3/21
FIdRes W/pkg 2tks EACH
$90 941-697-8598

WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE
6270



CASH PAID FOR WWI WWII
KOREAN, VIETNAM ,
GERMAN,JAPANESE, ETC.
Military items (941)416-3280
COSTUME JEWELRY want-
ed before you have a yard
sale call me!941-623-6439
WANTED USED
MECHANICAL PLATFORM
SCALE
5001b capacity or more.
Call 941-416-6293


7000


TRANSPORTATION

BUICK
7020


1995 BUICK CENTURY Low
Miles! Auto, Leather! $2,488
941-639-1601 DIr.
1998 BUICK LESABRE
104k mi, $2,500. call Bob:
sold
1999 BUICK LESABRE cus-
tom, 86k mi, pwr, Ithr, gd tires,
clean $3,900 941-828-0171
2000 BUICK CENTURY
70K, Auto, PW, PL $5,988
941-639-1601, DIr.
2000 BUICK LESABRE Nice
& Clean, runs great, $5,500
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277 dir
2003 BUICK LESABRE, Cus-
tom 60k mi, Lthr., Fully Loaded
$7988 941-639-1601, Dir.


CADILLAC FORD
7030 L 7070


2000 CADILLAC DEVILLE
white w/gray top, MINT, 73K,
see car near Townsend Glass
$5,000 941-629-2125
2002 CADILLAC ELDORA-
DO Leather, Auto, All Power!
$7,988. 941-639-1601, DIr.
2003 CADILLAC CTS V6, 4
dr, silver, 57,268 mi. $11,754
877-219-9139 dir
2004 CADILLAC DEVILLE
All the options, 69k mi, $9490
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277 dlr
CHEVY
L 7040


2001 CHEVY Monte Carlo
2dr, 34,567 mi. $5,500
****SOLD****
2003 CHEVY MONTE Carlo
SS, 2 dr, black, 113,242 mi.
$7,785 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 CHEVROLET HHR LT
$12,999 941-627-8822
PRO POWER AUTO SALES
2010 CHEVY CORVETTE
AUTOMATIC, TARGA TOP,
ONLY 13K $39,911



20 CHRYSLER
7050


2000 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONV. Only 80k Mi.! AC.
$4,988. 941-639-1601, DIr.
2001 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Convertible, 75k mi, JXi,
$6,200, OBO 941-475-7375
2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING
LXT, 2 dr, convt, white, 6,309
mi.$7,985 877-219-9139 dlr
2005 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
Touring, blue, 68,318 mi.
$11,875 877-219-9139 dlr
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUIS-
ER 20kmi, $10,400 Cream
color Bob: 941-626-0875
2008 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser
$8,590 941-627-8822
PRO POWER AUTO SALES
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING
25,600 mi, inferno red/gray,
2.4L, $11,500 941-743-7766

DODGE
7060


2000 DODGE VIPER
ONLY 14K ORIGINAL MILES
$44,989


2007 DODGE OMNI 024,
SLT, white, 50,293 mi.
$14,879 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 DODGE CHALLENGER
200 MILE NEW CAR $39,988


FORD
L 7070





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN '
1111IPIR


1997 FORD ESCORT Sta-
tion Wagon, 62k mi, Arca-
dia,$2,800. 203-530-5391
2001 EXPEDITION XLT 4 WD
5.4 V8, mech. 100%, 3rd row
seat, loaded, asking 55600
obo 845-706-7924, 235-1560
2004 FORD THUNDERBIRD
Convertible, 38,000 mi,
w/hard top + extra's.
$21,000 obo 954-650-1938
2005 FORD THUNDERBIRD
SUPER NICE LOW MILES,
GREAT CAR $22,989


2010 FORD TAURUS
LTD $24,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
JEEP
7080


1992 JEEP CHEROKEE
Runs Good, Economical $2180
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277 dir
2001 JEEP WRANGLER
Auto, A/C, Low Miles! $7988
941-639-1601, DIr.
2003 JEEP WRANGLER X, 2
dr, blue, 84,665 mi. $9,950
877-219-9139 dlr
2006 JEEP GRAND Chero-
kee tan, 101,975 mi. $10,980
877-219-9139 dlr
2006 JEEP WRANGLER
LWB, unlimited, yellow, 56,613
mi. $16,978 877-219-9139 dir
2006 JEEP WRANGLER X, 2
dr, manual, 4X4, blue, 32,696
mi.$15,950 877-219-9139 dlr
2006 JEEP WRANGLER X,
manual, 4X4, blue, 32,696 mi.
$18,754 877-219-9139 dlr
2008 JEEP WRANGLER
RUBICON, ONLY 15K MILES,
RED $24,989


2008 JEEP WRANGLER X,
6sp/4wd/tow pkg delux sound
$16,000 310-997-5640
LINCOLN
7090


1992 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
77K, exc. mpg. Well main-
tained. Needs paint. $2,700.
941-460-0202
2003 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
Signature, beige, 53,769 mi.
$10,875 877-219-9139 dlr

MERCURY
L 7100


2004 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS Sharp, low
mileage car, 35,674mi,
$9,800 www.pctcars2.com
941-473-2277 dlr
2004 MERCURY GRAND
Marquis, tan, 78,189 mi.
$8,875 877-219-9139 dlr
2006 Grand Marquis GS,
Great Local 65K, $9,990 OBO
after 4 pm 941-232-2599
2006 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS 23K $12,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
OLDSMOBILE
7110


1998 OLDSMOBILE 88
LS, Leather 122k mi.,$3950
1 owner 941-475-3745
2003 OLDSMOBILE SIL-
HOETTE silver, 87,072 mi.
$7,895 877-219-9139 dIr
PLYMOUTH
L4 7120


1999 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
with handicap seat, 120kmi
Call 941-473-1223


L PONTIAC
W 7130


2004 PONTIAC GTO
YELLOW, ONLY 41K MILES
$15,911


2008 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
24K AUTO $20,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2009 PONTIAC VIBE hatch-
back, white, 40,058 mi.
$12,478 877-219-9139 dlr
S SATURN
00 7135


2002 SATURN L100 white,
66,091 mi. $6,987 877-219-
9139 dir
2009 SATURN SKY
22K MILES $20,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
PRO-POWER
AUTO SALES
(941)-627-8822
USED SATURN SALES
PARTS & SERVICE
"THE SATURN GUYS"
98 SC2 Coupe.......$2,199
95 SW1 Wagon...... $2,399
01 SL2 Sedan.........$3,099
99 SL2 Sedan.........$3,299
00 SL2 Sedan..........$3599
03 VUE SUV.............$5,595
03 ION Sedan..........$5,999
05 VUE SUV.............$6,499
02 VUE V6 AWD.......$6,899
07 ION Sedan..........$7,999
08 Aura XE Sedan..$10,599
08 Astra XR Sedan..$11,299
08 vue XE SUV........$13,499
23440 Janice Ave.
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

SCION
S7136


2011 SCION XB White
1,350mi, XM Radio. $17,500.
941-764-6194
ACURA
L 7145


1999 ACURA TL 3.2 base, 4
dr, silver, 146,895 mi. $5,875
877-219-9139 dlr
2007 ACURA TSX base, 4
dr, auto, black, 67,238 mi.
$16,875 877-219-9139 dlr
AUDI
7147


2007 AUDI A4
$19,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
BMW
7148


2002 BMW Z3 CONV.
Leather, Auto, Low Mi!
$12,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2004 MINI COOPER S, PW,
PL, A/C. Loaded! $10,988.
941-639-1601 DIr.
2006 BMW Z4
CONVERTIBLE MUST SEE
ONY 43K MILES $22,988




NEED CASH?
2009 BMW 3351
ONLY 16K MILES, LOADED
WITH EVERYTHING $35,988


2010 BMW M3
LOADED WITH UPGRADES
MUST SEE!! $66,989


2011 BMW 1281
ONLY 7K MILES, SILVER,
2 DOOR $31,989
*^JlfiM


HONDA
7160


1997 HONDA DELSOL S, 5
speed, white, 72,738 mi.
$5,987 877-219-9139 dlr
2001 HONDA CIVIC Ix 1
owner, 61k mi, exc. cond.
$6,000 firm 941-915-2035
2002 HONDA CIVIC silver,
63,722 mi. $8,955 877-219-
9139 dir
2003 HONDA ACCORD LX,
4 dr, green, 26,752 mi.
$11,457 877-219-9139 dlr
2004 HONDA ACCORD
black, 66,932 mi. $13,487
877-219-9139 dlr
2004 HONDA CIVIC SI, 2 dr,
manual, blue, 114,051 mi.
$8,972 877-219-9139 dlr
2006 HONDA ACCORD EXL,
4 dr, gray, 38,265 mi.
$16,785 877-219-9139 dlr
2006 HONDA ACCORD LX,
SE, 4 dr, white, 82,503 mi.
$11,578 877-219-9139 dir
2006 HONDA CIVIC hybrid,
silver, 22,456 mi. $15,789
877-219-9139 dlr
2006 HONDA CIVIC SI, 2dr,
manual, gray, 28,367 mi.
$15,346 877-219-9139 dir
2006 HONDA S2000 con-
vertible, manual, blue, 58,022
mi.$19,950 877-219-9139 dir
2008 HONDA ACCORD
REALLY NICE CAR ONLY 33K
$18,989

2009 HONDA ACCORD Cer-
tified EXL, 4 dr, gray, 20,290
mi.$19,547 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA ACCORD EX,
4 dr, black, 33,497 mi.
$17,845 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA ACCORD EX,
4 dr, red, 17,388 mi. $18,872
877-219-9139 dlr



2009 HONDA ACCORD EXL,
4 dr, silver, 43,209 mi.
$18,245 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA ACCORD EXL,
black, 30,575 mi. $20,578
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA ACCORD LX,
beige, 32,427 mi. $16,789
877-219-9139 dir
2009 HONDA ACCORD red,
56,185 mi. $18,745 877-
219-9139 dir
2009 HONDA CIVIC Certified
EX, black, 23,067 mi.
$16,875 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC Certified
EX, gray, 37,439 mi. $16,548
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC Certified
hybrid, silver, 44,586 mi.
$17,200 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC Certified
LX, 4 dr, red, 19,498 mi.
$16,785 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC hybrid,
blue, 61,203 mi. $15,895
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC hybrid,
polished metal, 17,640 mi.
$19,876 877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC LX, 4 dr
blue, 17,689 mi. $15,453
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA CIVIC LX, blue,
38,823 mi. $15,234 877-
219-9139 dir
2009 HONDA CIVIC LX,
white, 38,708 mi. $15,234
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA FIT base,
black, 32,132 mi. $13,875
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
pewter, 48,488 mi. $22,458
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA ACCORD LX,
gray, 22,436 mi. $17,589
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CIVIC Certified
LX, gray, 25,903 mi. $15,758
877-219-9139 dir


HONDA
7160


2010 HONDA CIVIC Certified
LX, polished metal, 8,633 mi.
$16,834 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CIVIC Certified
royal blue, 22,647 mi.
$15,875 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CIVIC Certi-
fied, LX, 4 dr, red, 19,498 mi.
$14,950 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CIVIC EXL,
gray, 38,342 mi. $17,687
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CIVIC LX, 4 dr,
gray, 39,625 mi. $15,990
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CIVIC LXS, 4
dr, gray, 54,922 mi. $13,578
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CROSSTOUR
EX, 4 dr, FWD, blue, 8,885 mi.
$25,950 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA INSIGHT
14K $17,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
f GET RESULTS )
USE CLASSIFIED!
2010 HONDA INSIGHT Certi-
fied LX, black, 16,773 mi.
$16,540 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA INSIGHT EX,
white, 39,537 mi. $16,875
877-219-9139 dir
2010 HONDA INSIGHT LX, 4
dr, black, 8,075 mi. $20,550
877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA ACCORD Cer-
tified EXL, white, 15,162 mi.
$23,897 877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EX, 2
dr, black, 20,706 mi. $21,458
877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA CIVIC Certified
EXL, 2 dr, black, 6,017 mi.
$19,897 877-219-9139 dlr
2012 HONDA ACCORD Cer-
tified, SE, 4 dr, white, 4,686
mi.$22,458 877-219-9139 dir
2012 HONDA CIVIC Certified
hybrid, LX, silver, 866 mi.
$20,987 877-219-9139 dlr

HYUNDAI
L 7163


2003 HYUNDAI TIBURON
2 DR Coupe, 11,771 mi,
FWD, 6 speed, 2 seat, AM/FM
cassette/CD player, GT V6,
silver, a/c, alarm, pwr brakes,
pwr locks, pwr steering,
pwr win, cruise, keyless, air
bag, ABS, leather, alloy
wheels, tinted glass, sunroof,
Ultrasports package, $8,950
765-571-0174
2005 HYUNDAI SONATA V6,
4 dr, blue, 112,845 mi.
$6,879 877-219-9139 dlr
2006 HYUNDAI SONATA
V6, 4door, 70K, exc. cond.
$8,950 941-639-4044

INFINITI
7165


2003 INFINITIT G35 2 dr, sil-
ver, 126,748 mi. $11,875
877-219-9139 dlr
2006 INFINITI G35
34K $17,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
JAGUAR
7175


2000 JAGUAR STYPE
ONLY 60K 4 OL, REALLY
CLEAN $9,989


2005 JAGUAR VANDEN
PLAS EXTRA CLEAN LOW
MILES $19,911


2007 JAGUAR XJ
SEAFROST GREEN, LOADED,
EXTRA CLEAN $32,989
ISSSSS^







The Sun Classified-Section A Page 24 EINICIV Saturday, March 3, 2012


L JAGUAR
47175


2007 JAGUAR XK
CONVERTIBLE ONLY 20K
PAMPERED MILES $41,989


2008 JAGUAR XJR
BOTANICAL GREEN ONLY
31K, RARE $42,989


2008 JAGUAR XK
BLACK, ONLY 33K CERTIFIED
$44,989


2009 JAGUAR XKR
ONLY 10K MILES LOADED,
SAVE $$$ $66,989


KIA



2009 KIA BORREGO EX,
copper, 27,849 mi. $18,759
877-219-9139 dir

LEXUS
L 7178


2005 LEXUS ES330 4 dr,
red, 56,298 mi. $15,950
877-219-9139 dlr
2005 LEXUS ES330
43K MILES $17,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS ES350
CERTIFIED $23,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS GS350
ALL WHEEL DRIVE $33,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS GS350
ONLY 40K MILES NAVIGA-
TION, EXTRA CLEAN $29,989


2008 LEXUS LS460
CERTIFIED $39,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS LS460
RED 20K CERTIFIED $45,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS SC430
35K CERTIFIED $41,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2009 LEXUS ES350
CERTIFIED $24,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2009 LEXUS IS250
29K CERTIFIED $25,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS ES350
CERTIFIED $32,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS HS250H
27K CERTIFIED $28,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS IS 2500
Convertible. 9K, Warranty.
$38,500. 941-496-8869
2010 LEXUS IS250 CONVT
18K CERTIFIED $39,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS LS460L
CERTIFIED 15K $64,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS IS350
CONVERTIBLE 7K $42,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
MAZDA
L 7180


1995 MAZDA MIATA high
miles, runs good. $2,850
941-624-3144
2001 MAZDA PROTEGE 4
dr, silver, 50,003 mi. $6,687
877-219-9139 dlr
2002 MAZDA MIATA CONV.
AC, PW, PL, PB. $8,988
941-639-1601, DIr.
2008 MAZDA MIATA auto,
convertible, silver, 15,395 mi.
$13,950 877-219-9139 dlr
2008 MAZDA MIATA
EXTRA CLEAN, HARDTOP
CONVERTIBLE $21,989
^^KQFiSi~iSS


2000 MERCEDES-BENZ
SC430, 1 owner, 120kmi,
Black, 941-815-6081

L MINI COOPER
7192


2005 MINI COOPER CONV.
Leather, AC, All Power.
$12,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.

MITSUBISHI
7195


2003 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
conv. updates 50k mi Exe Con
$8,500 obo 715-415-4360
2007 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
ONLY 47K, SILVER, LEATHER,
EXTRA CLEAN $15,989


2009 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
RED 20K $16,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
NISSAN
7200


1996 NISSAN MAXIMA
looks & runs great, 1 owner,
$2500 941-624-3162
2000 NISSAN MAXIMA 4 dr,
white, 96,731 mi. $5,987
877-219-9139 dir

ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
2005 NISSAN 350Z
$16,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2006 NISSAN 350Z convt, 2
dr, RWD, manual, white, 42,447
mi. $21,457 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 NISSAN Z
4K MILES $35,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
SPORTS CARS
L7205


1992 TOYOTA MR2
T-tops, very nice, $3500 obo.
Call 941-889-8565.
2006 BMW Z4 3.0 auto,
Non-smoker. Black w/red
leather, 89k mi, warr. to 100k
$18,000 941-639-5839
TRIUMPF-TR7 1980 exc.
cond, engine rebuilt 2011;
body exc. racing orange color;
$7,900; 941-661-5128
SUBARU
7207


2003 SUBARU OUTBACK
Legacy, greem, 52,933 mi.
$12,478 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 SUBARU IMPREZA
silver, 12,356 mi. $17,878
877-219-9139 dlr
TOYOTA
7210


2000 TOYOTA SOLARA,
Auto, AC, All Power! $5,988.
941-639-1601 DIr
2002 TOYOTA AVALON
Loaded. Selling for my 93 yr
old aunt. Only 15K mi. Well
maintained. Car needs noth-
ing. $9,500. Call Clint 860-
205-6742
2003 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE,
4 dr, beige, 64,475 mi.
$11,897 877-219-9139 dlr
2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 4
door, red, 39K mi, 1 senior
owner, good cond. $9,500.
941-807-0120
2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 4
dr, 1.8L, white, 84,821 mi.
$8,945 877-219-9139 dir


2007 TOYOTA CAMRY
17,000 MILES $17,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR


SmI IVmVUin Vn mmm m
SOLARA Convertible,
32,000 mi, 6 cyl., FWD,
automatic, 4 seat, AM/FM
cassette/CD player, All
season tires, SLE V6,
white, auto, a/c, pwr
brakes, pwr locks, pwr
seats, pwr steering, pwr
win, cruise, air bag, ABS,
leather, alloy wheels,
heated seats, tilt, tinted
glass, rear defogger,
Very Nice, $18,000
908-655-6698
2009 TOYOTA CAMRY
21K $17,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2009 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE, 4dr, red, 4,255 mi.
$14,897 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
white, 6,867 mi. $15,987
877-219-9139 dlr
2011 TOYOTA COROLLA
6,000 MILES $18,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2011 TOYOTA PRIUS
BLIZZARD PEARL, ONLY 300
MILES $24,989


VOLKSWAGEN
7220


2004 VW BEETLE
CONVT 35K MILES $14,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2006 VW BEETLE 2 dr, red,
52,892 mi. $9,950 877-219-
9139 dir
2010 VOLKSWAGEN GOLF
4000 MILES $16,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 VOLKSWAGON GOLF
ONLY 4K, BLUE $18,989


VOLVO
L 7230


2000 VOLVO C70 CONV.
Auto, Leather, Low Miles!
$7,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2008 VOLVO C3OV
$18,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR

ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
S7250

1940 CHEVROLET COUPE
350/350, posi, disc brk, no
rust, $25,000 941-456-3301





1953 MG TD Convertible,
4 cyl., 4 speed, 2 seat,
red, $16,000, OBO
941-473-1268
1982 T-BIRD rebuilt 302
motor & transmission, rare
muscle car $3500 firm call
John 941-979-7806
RAT FINK WATCH NEW RARE,
$75, OBO 941-474-0192
BUDGET BUYS
S7252


1993 GMC JIMMY Runs Good,
economical vehicle $2180
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277dlr
ADVERTISE WITH THE
SUN CLASSIFIED


MERCEDES TOYOTA
L 7190 L 7210


BUDGET BUYS
7252


1999 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS LS, VCG, loaded,
$3550. '86 Grand Marquis LS
reliable $2000. 941-629-0557
2002 CHEVY CAVALIER Is
64k mi, VGC, $3,200
941-875-9833




www.pctcars2.com
WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS
941-473-2277

AUTOS WANTED
7260


JUNK CARS WANTED
Fair S$ Paid 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550
WE BUY CARS
$500 CASH +UP
Frank 276-0204
ALL VEHICLES Wanted
Dead or Alive, Top $$
Paid, Starting at
$400/$5000 Free pick
up 941-623-2428

WE BUY CARS in any condi-
tion, any make, any model.
Title or no title, no problem.
Paying up to $15,000 Call AJ
813-335-3794

I BUY SCRAP CARS,
TRUCKS AND WRECKS
941-456-1342

ARE YOU IN
NEED OF CASH??
Up to $1,500. Junk-Gem
No Title...No Problem!
Flatbed Service.
941-524-2448
WE BUY unwanted vehicles
with or without title any condi-
tion, year, make or model. We
pay up to $20,000 and offer
free towing. Call Cindy at 813-
505-6939.
$$ TOP CASH $$
FOR CARS & TRUCKS.
DEAD OR ALIVE.
941-485-7515

AUTO PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
7270

50'S AUTOLITE flip top with
drawers Spark plug cabinet
$250, OBO 941-474-0192
BED LINER REMOVABLE
50X38X12 FOR SUV/MINIVAN
$25 941-613-1136
CAR TIRES 4 used tires
P225/60 R18 $40 941-456-
3633
CARGO LINER Weather-tech,
fits '05-'07 Chrysler-Dodge
Grand Caravan, black. $50
941-743-4089
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


AUTO PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
7270

DISTRIBUTOR & COIL,
Mallory, for SBC. $175
941-876-4263
DODGE MOTOR & TRANS-
MISSION 225 slant six engine.
w automatic transmission.
Turnkey. $395 941-743-7747
DOUBLE BARREL carb &
manifold, Holley. $175
941-876-4263
FOCUS ZX-3 ground effects
kit brand new $100 941-468-
3375
FOCUS ZX3 new front fenders
(louvered) $25 941-468-
3375
FORD FOCUS Wagon Parts
2000,ex condition $100 941-
879-2269
FORD REAR Bumper
Chrome,99 F-250, good condi-
tion $75 941-624-5946
GRILLE E-150 Ford van. Fits
95-02. $30 941-627-2026
MIRRORS MULTI-FIT. Came
off '94 Chevy 1 Ton. Good.
Both for $45 863-558-3486
MOPAR Small Block Heads,
pair, $50. (941)-743-7747
POWER MIRROR fits 01- 08
Chrysler minivan driver's side.
NIB $100/obo 941-626-5099
REAR END Differential From
Chevy 1-Ton. '87. Runs Good.
Gas $350 863-558-3486
RUNNING BOARDS Van or
truck good cond. $95, OBO
941-625-4228
STEPSIDE FENDER Rear,
Chevy, 88-98, Very Good con-
dition $300 863-558-3486
TAILPIPE TIPS Chrome Corsa
oval shape (3). $45, OBO
941-766-7659
TIRES (2) 185-70-14 great
shape. $70 for both. 941-
473-2197 after 10 am
TIRES (2) Michelan, used,
P235/55R/18, good cond.
$100 for both 941-473-0268
TIRES Two P225/60R 19"
Michelin Latitude in Ex Cond.
$65 941-979-8496
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TONNEAU COVER Roll-up
Dodge 2003-08. 8' bed. $395
330-559-1758
TONNEAU COVER, Black,
2007 Chevy longbed. $100
863-993-3044
TRUCK TOOL box diamond
plate. will fit 61" truck box. ec.
$100 517-694-3639
WANTED 9 in 3rd member
positraction for Ford
765-426-2928
WATER PUMP for Ford 7.3
Dsl.engines Brand new $75
941-624-5946
WATER PUMP housing for big
block Chrysler, excellent cond.
$75 941-626-5099
WHEELS '07 mustang 16X8
like new $40 941-468-3375

VANS
L 7290


1994 CHEVROLET G-20
Auto, Cold Air, No Dents or
Rust. $1100/obo 941-697-
5234
1994 FORD E-150 turtle top
conversion RV van only 94k mi,
great condition, A MUST SEE!
$6,900 941-445-3943 dir.
1995 GMC Conversion
119K, runs good, $2400/obo.
941-445-3573
1997 CHEVY VENTURE great
condition, only 112K MI, $2,900
941-445-3943 dir.
2002 DODGE RAM 1500,
Conver Van, extras, 90,400mi.
$6,650 obo 941-661-8367
2002 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, green, 159,313 mi.
$6,875 877-219-9139 dir


VANS
L 7290


2003 MAZDA MPV Mini-van,
Clean inside & out, cold f/r air,
third row seat., $4,950, OBO
859-200-2777
2004 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY w/only 57k mi,
$7,900 1 owner 941-445-
3943 dir.
2005 CHRYSLER TOWN &
Country Touring, silver, 8,694
mi. $9,785 877-219-9139 dlr
2005 FORD E-250 cargo
van, runs great $7800
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277dlr
2006 CHRYSLER TOWN &
Country Lim, beige, 73,611
mi.$14,234 877-219-9139 dlr
2006 CHRYSLER TOWN &
Country, SWB, LX, red, 67,460
mi. $8,754 877-219-9139 dir
2006 DODGE CARAVAN,
silver, 83,285 mi $6,000
Nice Condtion 941-460-8961
2006 DODGE GRAND CARA-
VAN STX, 3.8V-6, 4sp auto,
AC, power drivers seat & slid-
ing doors, stow & go, new
tires, + much more. 102kmi,
very good cond. $7,550.
586-201-7133
2007 HONDA ODYSSEY
Certified LX, gray, 62,600 mi.
$14,950 877-219-9139 dlr
2007 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, desert rock, 56,432 mi.
$20,789 877-219-9139 dlr
2007 TOYOTA SIENNA
$19,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
( NEED A JOB?--
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
2008 HONDA ODYSSEY
black, 60,324 mi. $21,875
877-219-9139 dir
2008 HONDA ODYSSEY EX,
white, 99,909 mi. $13,758
877-219-9139 dir
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY EX,
silver, 14,420 mi. $22,950
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, green, 49,335 mi.
$26,875 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, mocha, 18,041 mi.
$29,875 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, slate green, 49,335 mi.
$23,950 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
gray, 15,785 mi. $31,785
877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
Certified EXL, gold, 4,374 mi.
$31,475 877-219-9139 dlr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
black, 3,867 mi. $33,879
877-219-9139 dlr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
Certified EXL, black, 3,867 mi.
$33,879 877-219-9139 dlr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
Touring, silver, 5,978 mi.
$37,895 877-219-9139 dlr

TRUCKS/PICK-UPS
7300


1986 CHEVY Silverado 1/2
ton, cold air, like new interior,
SC truck, very clean $5600
OBO 216-401-7676
1993 FORD F-150 v8, work
truck, 8ft bed 139,584 mi,
$1200 obo 941-423-2091
1993 GMC SIERRA 1/2 ton,
4.3L, cold a/c, $1900
941-639-8161
1994 CHEVY SILVERADO Ext
Cab, 4WD new 5.7 eng. & new
paint $4900 obo 941-966-5044
1998 FORD F-150 Xlt, ext
cab, w/cap, 81k mi, exc.
cond. $5,800 941-493-1268
2002 CHEVROLET S-10
ext. cab, V6, auto., very
clean. $6300 941-474-7832
2002 DODGE RAM 1500,
gold, 83,583 mi. $8,975
877-219-9139 dir


The Sun Classified-Section A Page 24 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012






Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 25


BOATS-POWERED
7330


03/03/12
12' TRACKER, 5 HP Mercury
4 stroke, ex. cond., $1,550
OBO. Call 941-575-2550.
13' 2004 Boston Whaler,
40hp EFI, extras, Bimini top,
$7900 OBO 941-575-6556


Sport, 40hp Merc EFI, Bimini,
GPS/FF ,Cover, Low hrs, Exc
cond! $8,000 941-697-3342
WANTED: 14 or Ibtt John
boat w/ trailer & 10-20 hp
motor. Call 502-558-8460





15' 2006 SEAPRO trll:ir g
motor/trim tabs, 2 live wells,
color chart plotter, alum trailer,
bimini top, 60hp 4 stroke Yama-
ha, $7,800 941-223-8731


15' KEY WESI Ub, bUhp
Yamaha, alum. trailer. Bimini
top. Trolling motor. Fish &
depth finder. VHF radio. Fish-
ing seat. SS props. $8,000.
941-323-0704

A I- A


55HP Yamaha, tilt & trim, bimi-
ni top, galvanized trailer,
recent service $4,750 OBO
941-716-6792
15' PONTOON T.L.C. OK
wanted $499 941-979-9380
16' 2000 CAPRI 90HP Merc.,
Trailer, Bimini Cover. Runs
Great! $4,200 941-628-8634
| ADVERIISE WIIH I HE
SUN CLASSIFIED
16' FIBERGLASS boat,
motor, trailer, all extras
$1,200, OBO 941-249-2058


fish center console 90hp
Yamaha w/tilt & trim, Fresh
Annual service, bimini top,
2006 aluminum trailer used a
ffew times a year and garage
kept $8250 obo
941-716-6792
17' SCOUT 172 Sport Fish
1999, 90hp Yamaha, Alum.
trlr. Fish finder, live well, swim
platform & stereo. Very good
cond. $6,800. 941-460-9745
ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!






18' 1955 Chris Craft
Sportsman, restored
mahogany, all original,
$18,750. (941) 629-3350
18'2OO1 HYDRA SPORT
*FRESHWATER BOAT*
Center Console, 115hp
Yamaha 4 stroke, aluminum
trailer, t-top, full cover, fish
finder, live well, great cond.
$8,000, OBO 941-830-
2415


18' LARSON 2005, blue & white,
less than 30 hrs, Volvo Penta
inboard $13,000 941-268-3974


.w I .IVI- iV I r i or", I j *Z bAKnnm : -' 1-if
w/ trailer. Ctr console, Yama- since repowered 99; FW 'til
ha 130 2 stroke w/SS prop, 06; Always covered; Runs &
EC $6,900 941-626-4571 or looks great; Must See!
941-627-5777 $6000. 941-698-7945


- VvLLnn.-I 1JUnll JOll- 25' TROPHY PRO 2004 2-200
son 2003, SS prop, Trailer. HP Merc. Optimax SW low hrs SS
$3,500 603-303-7171 props full head RayNav C-120 VHF
Exc cond. $39,500 941-697-9254


26' 1992 SHAMROCK
STALKER w/ trailer. 2001 5.8
260 Hp PCM engine .good
boat. Needs a Little TLC
$10,000 Bob 941-628-1334


Lo rlNi II I LWVIIIn JOb, urFO
fish finder. Fly bridge w/dual sta-
tions. $6,500. 941-473-4035


4.3 engine I/O, access. orig.
owner $3,500. 941-505-2667


18 MAVERICK, 2008, I ii.il 1
150 4 Stroke. 300 hrs. Jack
plate. Power pole, 24 V trolling
motor, batt. charger & Ameritrail 22.5' CHRIS CRAFT Loaded,
er w/swing hitch. Exc. shape. 175 Johnson, low hours, great
$28,900. 941-639-6440 cond. $8,000 941-828-1020


19 D nrLIInen udpri. I/U.
AQ131 Volvo/Penta 275. Not
running,as is $1k. 941-889-9815


cona. garage maintained yry
new Ttop $5K 941-637-9114
16' SYLVAN alum. boat,
motor, trlr & xtras, great fish-
ing rig. $2900. 941-626-1050
16' SYLVAN alum. boat,
motor, trlr & xtras, great fish-
ing rig. $2900. 941-626-1050





17' '94 KEY WEST renter
console w/New control GPS
Both in excellent cond.New
Battery Bimini top & more Trail-
er $5,500 941-493-1792


23 CHRIS CRAFT p:.-p tI
1999 w/Volvo Penta 5.0 V8
& Bimini.
Only 400 hours. New
batteries, new boat covers,
all new manifolds, elbows,
spark plugs & belts!
$11,500, OBO 941-505-4250


19' TROPHY L-'. 1 I-21 F:r:e,
'02 alum trlr. Boat, motor & trlr
in exc cond. Lots of extras.
$8000, OBO 941-627-2017


S:- o HJH UU/, L, lIs, O.LL
20' GRADY WHITE .:: -' Mercruiser, I/O, 320 HP,
Yamaha, motor, boat & trail in $40,000 941-697-5862
great shape. Extras. $5,900.
941-426-1566 .,


17' 2000 ANGLER 70 HP 150hp Yamaha, only 227 hrs
Yamaha OB, w/trailer, Garmin fish finder, boat cover alum,
GPS, Stored under full canvas trailer good cond. $16,500
cover. $6750 941-488-3057 941-743-5141


Loaded, full canvas & screen-
ing, new engine 2009. Two
biminis, galley, enclosed head,
sleeps 4, fridge, inside stor-
age, galvanized trailer.
$21,800. (941)-493-8320


J *J n L UK -"ui j ri
1997 (Osprey) T/260 Mere
I/B. New bimini & Eisenglass,
4.5KW gen. Color elec. Sleeps
6. REDUCED to $39,900. Bob
Nordstrom CPYB 978-852-
4844 World Class Yacht Sales


low hrs. Ext. Warranty- 5 L Engs.
AC. Gen $89,000 941-875-4852

DECLASSIFIED


BOATS-POWERED
7330



~._ -- .d t '-


UdanII I I/,o/U IVIels )j J IIis,
top electronics, gen, 2 TVs,
Central vac, Icemaker, new
batts, camper canvas, new
bottom 7/10, and much more,
$139,900 OBO, PG, owner
motivated, 941-380-7077





40' DEFEVER TRAWLER
1980, twin diesel, new fiber-
glass decks, fuel tanks, water
tanks, $69,90 $59,000
239-292-1915


Sporttisn Zuuu Iwin 43U MH
Diesels, 8 KW Gen., Very com-
fortable clean, quality boat.
Well maint. $195,000 941-
697-5808
BUY IT!
SELL IT!
FIND IT!
SUN CLASSIFIED!
Charlotte RV & Marine
Sales & Repairs
Florida's largest indoor
pre-owned boat showroom!
Consignments wanted:
We'll sell your boat for FREE!
Full-service Repairs:
insurance claims, engine,
electrical, hull, trailers.
US 41 at Kings Hwy,
Port Charlotte 941-883-5555
www.CharlotteMarine.com
kwr___ rFs~


38'- 1980 PRESENT Trunk
Cabin Trawler. 120 Ford
Lehman, Vetus Bow
Thruster, "Scotties" Alu-
minum Fly Bridge Enclo-
sure. $59,000 NOW
$45,000 OR WILL TRADE
941-347-7400

SAILBOATS
7331


32' WELLCRAFT MARTINQUE -
$39K '96, Twin 350's 420 hrs. 14' AQUA CAT 14, & trailer,
Sleeps 6, 1 owner, Exc. Cond. easy to launch off the beach.
941-697-2499 Ideal family boat. video at

$1,850 941-276-4140
S- -I Q 7 http://youtu.be/Csq9d5SfCUE


35' SUNDANCER 310 1:-111,
2-350 gas inboard engines,
camper top, fully equipped w/ 26' GRAMPIAN Restored, 3'
extras. REDUCED TO draft, Good main & JIB. New top
$68,900. 972-569-7661 bottom paint. $5,000 860803-9487


36' 1998 CARVER Mariner
350, Twin Merc Cruisers, All
electronics, Shows like new.
$110,000 941-255-5311


mar, tA, near, in mast Tuning, 1
owner, $89,950. 941-347-4670
email irvina32@centurylink.net


SAILBOATS
7331


34 CATALINA l::op, 1'I t.
11.9' beam, 4 ft draft wing
keel $38,500 941-697-0295





35' PEARSON 1978 $23,900
www.P35-4Sale.com
941-460-0055 Andy

L PERSONAL
WATER VEHICLES
7332

2001 YAMAHA XLT 1200, 3
sweater, adult riden, garage
kept Exec Cond. $2,475. 917-
902-3940 or 941-743-8183

MISC. BOATS
7333


11' 1992 HILL Deep well
$250 941-456-3633
9' WEST MARINE Inflatable,
New, no papers. $300, OBO
941-505-4081
9.8' ACHILLES dinghy, large
pontoons, oars, 2 seats $100
941-637-8140

OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES
7334

18HP EVINRUDE '59. FW
from NC. Like new, low hrs.
Tank. $499. 941-473-1854
2 1/2HP 2001 Mercury,
$700; 5 1/2hp Johnson Sea
Horse 1962 Model CD19S,
$200. (941)-485-6909
SUZUKI 2008 DF2.5 4-stroke
outboard motor w/owner's
manual. $499 941-637-8140

BOAT STORAGE/
DOCKING
7336

BOAT DOCK for Rent Direct
Access to Boca Grande 20
min. No Bridges, water & elect
inc. $200 mo PG. 941-637-8523
BOAT, RV, TRAILER STORAGE
Close to RV & boat repair facility.
US 41 Osprey. 941-966-4477
DOCK with lift, 20K Ibs, sail-
boat access, dock length 30',
$300 Mo. 1305 Osprey Ct.
Punta Gorda. (941)-833-8322
DOCK: 8 min to Ponce Inlet
$250/mo 941-575-0970

FLOATING DOCK 10' x 18'.
Candock. Good for PWC or up
to 15' boat. new $6k, sell for
$4.5k. 941-575-7105

MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
L 7338

BOTTOM PAINT brown
INTERLUX pd $212 gal, make
offer. 941-637-1382
COCKTAIL TABLE Rectangu-
lar folding Tbl.Rope design-PGI
$25 941-661-0990
DOWNRIGGER, PENN elec-
tric model 820 $300 941-
474-2454
ELECTRIC MOTOR Motor
Guide 821bs thrust, less than
25 hrs. $420 941-637-4775


SSUNCOAST BOATING


BOATS-POWERED
7330


f... I L.VANl LJu r L Iual, .
hp Evenrude, fishing ready,
Loaded, Reduced to $5,000.
or OBO 941-505-0602


Tournament Edition. 821b
trolling motor with 3 new bat-
teries. polling platform, full
cushion package, 468
garmin gps, vhf, stereo.
Excellent condition, 2000,--
250 HP. Yamaha ox66 .
22,500 OBO
Justin 941-586-0029.

1.th Tl -


BOATS-POWERED
7330


BOATS-POWERED
7330







The Sun Classified Page 26 EINICIV Saturday, March 3, 2012


TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS
7300


2003 CHEVY 3/4 TON,
Bought to tow 150001b 5th
wheel. C2500HD diesel/
auto,lots of power and many
miles left.941-625-2213
2003 FORD RANGER red,
86,260 mi. $8,452 877-219-
9139 dir
s 2E IT!

2004 FORD F-150 5.4Triton,
runs perfect 97k mi, $11,900
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277dlr
2005 DODGE RAM 1500
50K mi, showroom new, exten-
sive chrome access & other-
wise incld new custom wheels
& fuel door, hood scoop, alum
tool box, new step rails, dual
exhaust & bedliner Carfax
1st $9,150 828-777-5610 cell
2006 CHEVROLET SILVER-
ADO 2500HD, 3/4 ton, crew
cab, 6ft bed, 4x4, Duramax
diesel, Allison auto, LT pack-
age, 350K mi, LT285/75R16
tires, service recs available.
$12,000, OBO 941-916-5395
2006 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 $12,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2006 CHEVY SILVERADO I
44, red, VERY VERY hard
to find 77k mi, $11,900
pctcars2.com
941-473-2277 dir
2006 FORD F-150 Super
Cab XLT, Bdlnr, Running Brds
$12,988. 941-639-1601 Dir.
2006 FORD F250 diesel,
Super Duty, blue, 104,288 mi.
$24,567 877-219-9139 dir
2006 TOYOTA TACOMA Pre
Runner, 4 cyl, 5sp, 69K mi.
Big tires, tow pkg. Runs great.
$16,000. 941-356-0217
2007 FORD F150 XLT, white,
59,245 mi. $18,751 877-
219-9139 dir
2007 TOYOTA TACOMA
Sport, silver, 50,410 mi.
$21,457 877-219-9139 dir
2008 FORD F150
$21,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 HONDA RIDGELINE
RTL, white, 51,949 mi.
$22,950 877-219-9139 dir
2010 DODGE RAM 1500
Hemi, Bhorn, 34,137 mi.
$23,876 877-219-9139 dir
Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here


MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
7338


FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS
7300


2011 HONDA RIDGELINE
RTL, nay, white, 5,394 mi.
$33,214 877-219-9139 dir
ROYAL PALM
MOTORS
BUY HERE 0 PAY HERE
www.RoyalPalmMotors.com
(941)-681-2136
www.pctcars2.com
WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS
941-473-2277

SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
7305

1998 GMC JIMMY
*Sharp Sport Utility* $4,990
pctcars2.com 941-473-2277dlr
2000 HONDA CRV 4WD,
white, 94,240 mi. $5,950
877-219-9139 dir
2000 NISSAN XTERRA sil-
ver, 95,736 mi. $6,786 877-
219-9139 dir
2002 CHEVY BLAZER
*RED & READY* $5,990
pctcars2.com 941473-2277 dir
2002 HONDA CRV LX, silver,
191,906 mi. $4,950 877-
219-9139 dir
2002 NISSAN PATHFINDER
RWD, 165,688 mi. $6,987
877-219-9139 dir
2003 FORD EXCURSION
SUV, 73,450 mi, AWD, 5
speed, 3 row seating/cap
chairs /bench seat, CD player,
All season tires, dark blue
metallic, auto, a/c, alarm, pwr
brakes, pwr locks, pwr seats,
pwr steering, pwr win, cruise,
keyless, air bag, ABS, leather,
heated seats, rear pass dim
ctrl, 3rd row seats, tilt, tinted
glass, rear defogger, rear
wiper, fog lights, tow pkg,
Eddie Bauer Edition/beige
int/full weather tech cargo
mat/all elect & mech fully func-
tional, $11,500
941-429-6599
2003 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
PERFECT $14,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2004 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
EXT. LT, PW, 3rd Row!
$8,988. 941-639-1601, Dir.
2004 GMC ENVOY white,
105,457 mi. $7,890 877-
219-9139 dir
2004 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
ULTIMATE, Moonroof, Lthr!
$10,988 941-639-1601, Dir.


& EQUIP.
7338

OUTBOARD ENGINE Motor
support, used for trailering
boat $39 OBO 630-248-3596
OUTBOARD ENGINE whale
tail Brand new $35, OBO 630-
248-3596
PFD'S 4 Type II Near shore
buoyant vests, white organizer.
$25 941-575-5966
POLING STAND Like New off
Flats Boat $275 941-625-
8449
PUSH POLE Graphite. Like
new, must sell. Cost 600.00
new, now $275 630-248-3596


SHORE POWER cords 30 A
125 V, 50ft yellow, clean $35
941-575-5966


Used boating supplies, nautical
decor. Mariner's Trading
3622 US 41, Port Charlotte 2
blks N of Gators941-629-1341


SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
7305

2007 HONDA CRV EXL,
black, 60,367 mi. $17,854
877-219-9139 dlr
2007 JEEP GRAND Chero-
kee Larado, red, 48,495 mi.
$14,367 877-219-9139 dlr
2007 MAZDA CX7 blue,
58,121 mi. $14,257 877-
219-9139 dir
2007 NISSAN PATHFINDER
4WD, V6, black, 53,863 mi.
$17,895 877-219-9139 dlr
2007 TOYOTA RAV4
$14,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 BMW X5
$32,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 HONDA CRV EXL, blue,
59,839 mi. $18,875 877-
219-9139 dir
2008 HONDA CRV EXL, sil-
ver, 55,051 mi. $18,950
877-219-9139 dlr
2008 HONDA ELEMENT LX,
black, 57,805 mi. $16,987
877-219-9139 dlr
2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE,
low miles, dk cherry red,
$15,800 941-697-9708
2008 LEXUS RX400H
24K CERTIFIED $38,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 LINCOLN MKX
BLACK, LOADED ONLY 32K
MILES $26,988


2008 TOYOTA RUNNER
34K $29,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2008 TOYOTA LAND
CRUISER $52,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR



2008 TOYOTA SIENNA
SAND LOW MILES POWER
DOORS, REALLY NICE
S$21,988


2009 HONDA CRV LX, 4WD,
blue, 37,080 mi. $17,584
877-219-9139 dlr
2009 HONDA PILOT gray,
49,189 mi. $24,578 877-
219-9139 dir
2009 LEXUS RX350
CERTIFIED $29,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2009 NISSAN MURANO
$23,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR


MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
7338

WET SUIT Henderson Aquat-
ics men's short leg M/L like
new $30 941-637-8140
CANOES/ KAYAKS
S7339


13' OCEAN BIG GAME with
anchor trolley, $775; 13' PEL-
ICAN 130T, tandem, sit on
top, purchased Feb. 2012
$385 sold 941-697-2675
16' HOMEMADE flat bottom
swamp canoe hunting fishing
$125 941-697-6592
PUT CLASSIFIED
TO WORK FOR YOU
Venice, Englewood,
North Port 207-1200
Pt. Charlotte Areas
Call 206-1200

16' MONARCH +trolling mtr,
SQUARE BACK CANOE. $375.
941-468-0452


VEHICLES
7305

2010 ACURA MDX
NAV DVD $38,990
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 AUDI 05
BLACK EXTRA CLEAN, ONLY
27k MILES $40,989


2010 HONDA CRV
35K $21,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 HONDA CRV Certified
EXL, urban titan, 18,367 mi.
$24,587 877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CRV Certified
EXL, urban titan, 18,367 mi.
$24,587 877-219-9139 dir
2010 HONDA CRV EX, blue,
40,889 mi. $20,457 877-
219-9139 dir
2010 HONDA CRV EXL,
bronze, 11,060 mi. $23,875
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CRV EXL,
green, 12,869 mi. $24,587
877-219-9139 dlr
2010 HONDA CRV silver,
29,568 mi. $24,879 877-
219-9139 dir
2010 LEXUS RX350
CERTIFIED $34,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2010 TOYOTA RAV4
$20,911
(877)-211-8054 DLR
2011 FORD EDGE SEL,
black, 19,544 mi. $24,875
877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA CRV EX, titani-
um, 2,650 mi. $24,987 877-
219-9139 dir
2011 HONDA CRV EXL,
white, 8,173 mi. $24,897
877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA CRV SE, titani-
um, 4,289 mi. $22,478 877-
219-9139 dir
2011 HONDA PILOT Certi-
fied EXL, gray, 10,143 mi.
$30,458 877-219-9139 dlr
2011 HONDA PILOT silver,
26,773 mi. $30,457 877-
219-9139 dir
2011 NISSAN CROSSOVER
black, 18,284 mi. $19,758
877-219-9139 dlr

4 X 4'S
7310


1999 GMC YUKON, Great
cond! Red, leather, 112k mi
$3,750 941-697-2152

TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
^ 7341

BOAT TRAILER 2006
adjustable 8-12 ft. $400 941-
456-3633
HITCH REESE, 1800 Ib, bolt-
up kits for multi-vehicles.
$125, OBO 941-249-1481
OPEN & ENCLOSED Utility
Trailers, Trailer Hitches & Wiring.
Two-Morrow's Enterpnses,
9414609700.
ROY'S TRAILER COUNTRY
New- Pre-Owned Storage
Cargo-Utility-Trailers Parts
Repairs-Tires-CustomBuilt-Trail-
ers-Hitches/Wiring 941- 575-
2214. 4760 Taylor Rd. P.G.
TANDEM AXLE heavy duty
trailer 5'X10' built in ramps,
$500 941-234-2396
TOW DOLLY swivel ramp,
heavy duty, spare tire, tie
downs, elec brakes,
P205/75P14 tires. $550,
OBO 941-743-5261
TRAILER HITCH DRAW TITE
2000 Ib cap. off Mustang
$150, OBO 941-391-6211
TRAILER HITCH tor Dodge
Caravan $100 941-875-2393
TRAILER JACK 1000lb.
capacity, swivel mt., new in
box. $65 obo, OBO 941-626-
5099


TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
7341

TRAILER HITCH For Hyundai
Sonata $35 941-697-4165
UTILITY TRAILERS Great Prices
WEST COAST TRAILER
(941)698-9902


SCOOTERS
7360

1981 GOLDWING 1100,
3500K mi, runs, $2000
231-388-0593
1981 SUZUKI GS 1100,
good condition $1,100
941-624-0349
1985 HARLEY FXWG orig.
Sr. owner, 21kmi exec cond,
$7,700. 941-575-0015
2003 HD 1200 Anniv., winshid,
bags, new tires, 43 mpg, 7,800k
mi, $5500 OBO 941473-7766
2005 TRIUMPH Daytona
955i. 11,000 miles.
3,000, OBO 863-990-5406
2006 GOLDWING, 17K mi, 1
owner, w/4k worth extras, See
to appreciate 941-426-1345
2006 HARLEY XL883 low,
exc. cond., extras, 6700k mi,
$5300 941-456-3301
2007 SUZUKI M109R
1783cc, vtwin cruiser, pearl
white, 7k+ miles. $8700
941-766-0868
2011 49CC mint cond. low
miles well maintained, $750
320-630-2132
H-D ladies high heel boots,
sz 9-1/2 $40 941-685-4363
H-D LEATHER JACKET mens
sz XL heavyweight $100 941-
685-4363
HD VEST ladies, sz XL,
beautiful, $40 941-685-
4363


Red u'~ie
2005 SUZUKI BURGMAN,
Cycle/Motor Scooter. Silver.
23k Mi. 400cc Engine. Great
on Gas! Well Maintained.
$2,150. 317-727-2460 (Cell)

S CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
7370

1988 Jayco Travel trailer 19'
good condition. $1,000 OBO.
Call 941-979-0284.
2005 28' JAYCO FKS, Jay
Flight, 1 slide, clean, hardly
used, $12,900 317-702-2290
2005 FLAGSTAFF 5th wheel.
30', super slide, w/hitch. Exc
cond! $9,000 941-276-0215
2006 RAPTOR TOYHAULER,
36 FT. 5TH WHEEL: NEW
ROOF, NEW FLOOR, NEW
AWNING, NEW TIRES, GENER-
ATOR, FUEL STATION. EXC.
CONDITION. $20,000 FIRM.
CALL: 941-661-9059
2008 DUTCHMEN 18 ft.,
New Condition w/Full
bath/kitchen, sleeps 7.
Extras! $7,999 obo
941-626-6579
2009 Montana 3665 RE 38 ft.
4 slides. 5th WH. Asking 35K.
No reasonable offer refused.
Must sell 941-223-5441
2012 ROAD KING 40' 4 elec
slides, 2 BR, W/D, 2 ac, tri
axle, $33,000 302-983-8125

CLEAN. USED
5TH WHEELS &
TRAILERS
FROM $14,900

RV World Inc. of
Nokomis
2110 US 41, Nokomis
941-966-2182


CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
7370

36' 2002 5th Wheel Jaco
Designer, 3 Super Slides,
Washer & Dryer. $17,000.
(941)-626-0652
NEED A RELIABLE tow vehicle?
2003 Chevy 2500HD Diesel
/auto could be your answer.
GCWR = 20-22,0001bs. 941-
625-2213
PROWLER 31' 2001, super
slide, Fiberglass. Al cond.
$7,900 OBO 941-753-9028
WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5thwhls, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passen-
ger vans. Cash paid on the
spot. for quick sale.
941-347-7171

MOTOR HOMES/
RVs
S7380

2001 FOURWIND CHATEAU
28' Class C 32k mi, gen, 454
Chevy, new tires & brakes, Ex
cnd, $17,500 firm 941423-7771
2002 DODGE 1500, Con-
ver Van, set up as camper with
110V, AC, 90,400mi. $6,900.
obo 941-661-8367

2012 WINNEBAGOS
Great Prices Great Financing
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld of Nokomis Inc.
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com
32' SOUTHWIND, chevy eng.,
discounted to $3500 or
trade for car. 941-661-0044
Charlotte RV Center
Great selection of pre-owned
RVs! Buv-Sell-Trade-Financing
We'll sell your RV FREE! AsR
about our marketing. Repairs -
Maintenance-Parts-Body Shop
US41 at Kings Hwv. Pt Charlotte
(9411 883-5555
www.CharlotteRVcenter.com
RV Collision Repairs
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182
RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Brake Flush
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
New tires & balance
RV propane & bottles
Water leak test
Roof Reseal
RV World Inc of Nokomis
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

RV'S WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/TRADE
Call: Mark
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 Nokomis
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
From $2,899
CHEVY HHR's
Many to choose from
Blue-Ox Tow hitches.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
(941) 627-8822 P.C.
RV/CAMPER PARTS
7382


2) 22 1/2" Hub Caps for RV
$30 941-743-0582





TOW BAR Falcon 5250
w/cables & wires like new
$225 941-426-7663
WHEEL COVERS- 19.5 Stain-
lessS, Hardware. Very Nice.
$150 863-558-3486


1ISUNCOAST BOATING


The Sun Classified Page 26 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012






Saturday, March 3, 2012 EINICIV The Sun Classified Page 27


I~~ I
I, ,


4148H$9,949
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo& Pricing on this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 7176


'11 Chevy Impala

399313,981
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo & Pricing on this Vehicle "
at 800-530-6385 Ext 727


4098H10,974
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo& Prcing on this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 717


4074H14,941
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo & Pricingon this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 122


'08 Honda Civic

39758 0,981
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo & Pricing on this Vehicle "
at 800-530-6385 Ext 778


'08 Mazda Miata Special V

4159H15,899
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo& Pricing on this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 123


,38171 1,698
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo & Pricing on this Vehicle "
at 800-530-6385 Ext 779


4051H15,975
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo& Prcing on this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 724


'08 Chevy Silverado

3977H12,981
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Special nfo & Pricingon this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 720


'07 VW EOS
407 815,981
4076HB 51981
FREE 24 HR RECORDED
"Speciallnfo & Pricing on this Vehicle"
at 800-530-6385 Ext 125


-rn-i4


'07 Lexus IS250

1r 7,928
r-Drr IA D I re %Dfflrrff"


'07 Chevy Avalanche '09 Jeep Wrangler
.. 17,994 4$18,499
rl'4HrFr r r r-r--H rl'r-


FREE 24 HR RECORDED FREE 24 HR RECORDED FREE 24 HR RECORDED FREE 24 HR RECORDED FREE 24 HR RECORDED
SSpeciallnfo & Pncinglon this Ve hile Special Info & Prcing on this Vehie H Special Info & Picing on this Vehicle H Special Info & Pricing on this Vehicle H'Special Info & Prcing on this Vehicle
at 800-530-6385 Ext 726 at 800-530-6385 Ext 727 at 800-530-6385 Ext 728 at 800-530-6385 Ext 729 at 800-530-6385 Ext 730



Sat g.n- .r ad.vey-unay12- --pr
Servce:Mon ri.7arn.6p, St. am 4:0pm nglwoo, PntaGor a 152 aminniTrI
Por ChrloteFLA395


'09 VW Tiguan
S1 6,781
r-Drr IA D Drleffl~ff"


12 Chevy Cruze
41 1 7,897
i-Drr il-- n ii rrnil- rr


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Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 27


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The Sun Classified Page 28 E/N/C/V


Saturday, March 3, 2012


20TH ANNIVERSY PACKAGE
* 32 HWY MPG.
* 175 HP 2.5 Liter Engine
* Nissan Intelligent Key"m keyless entry all
Bluetooth Hands-free Phone System+

$3,650 OFF MSRP
$1500 Nissan Customer Cash, $500 Altima Bonus Cash (ends 2/13/12), $500 College
Graduate, $750 NMAC Captive Cash on MY1 2 Altima Sedan and Coupe through 2-14-2012 on
the purchase or lease on select new 2011/12 Altima Sedan 2.5 S and Coupe. (Available on loans
up to 60 months. Must provide proof of gradutaion. See dealer for all details and Coupe through
2-14/2012.


OR

I


OR


$ 1 79 LEASE
$ ^PER MONTH
**39 MONTH closed end lease" 2012 Altima 2.5 S $179/39mo. With ZERO down plus
inceptions, acquisition fee, first months payment and (tax,titles,and $599.50 doc fees) MSRP
$23,510 (12K per year) W.A.C. through NMAC. Example Stock#1 2340N All inclusive
of dealer and manufacturers incentives, rebates and $1000 Nissan Lease Loyalty Cash.
$500 Nissan Grad Cash and Nissan Special Military offers may apply. 0% APR 60 months
FinancingWAC through NMAC on select Altima MY11 and MY12 models.


'12 NISSAN SENTRA
4 to choose from



01

O0APR/36 MO.
6 5 39 mo. closed end
$156 LEASE
2012 Sentra model 2.OS *39 mo closed end lease/1 2k per year, $156
monthly with ZERO down plus inceptions, 1st months payment, acquisition
(tax, tag and $599.50 doc fees) and Incudes all dealer and manufactur-
ers incentives, rebates $500 Nissan Lease Loyalty Cash. WAC through
NMAC. Example stock #12511N MSRP $19,0600%APR-36 months
through NMAC with approved credit. $500 Nissan Grad Cash and Special
Nissan military Cash may apply.


'12 NISSAN VERSA
4 to choose from



R 01

0APR/36 MO.
$B 46 39 mo. closed end
$146 LEASE
2012 Versa Hatchback *39 mo closed end lease/1 2k per year, $146
monthly with ZERO down plus inceptions, 1st months payment, acquisition
(tax, tag and $599.50 doc fees) and Incudes all dealer and manufactur-
ers incentives, rebates $500 Nissan Lease Loyalty Cash. WAC through
NMAC. Example stock #12511 N MSRP $19,060 through NMAC with
approved credit. $500 Grad Cash and Special Military offers may apply.
See dealer for details.


'12 NISSAN LEAF*


2 to choose from
100% ELECTRIC, ZERO-GAS Nissan LEAF
$ 39 mo. closed end
379 LEASE
'1 2 Nissan LEAF SV $379, 39 mo lease through NMAC with
approved credit. $2599 Due at signing plus 1 st mo payment,
tax tag, inception fees, $599.50 doc fee.1 2,000 miles per year.
Inclusive all incentives and rebates.









SUN WSAPR Cass iles a eal &Estate
America's BEST Community Daily" Arcadia Englewood North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Venice
INIETI LSIIDRA SAESCION LOK0 00 R: SEECMC NIE
Clssfids Rel stt-100Idvrtsng0Ra Etae T &M vi0Lsins:Ra l stt, *re roetyTrnfes


FEATURED PROPERTY


AND OUT. Move-in ready. Value galore 4
and aggressively priced & located in a
quiet fresh waterfront setting. $89,850


KITCHENS, BATHS, CLOSETS, GARAGES & MORE


For all your
Remodeling Dreams
Call (941) 637-8080
Visit our Design Center
1203 West Marion Avenue
Across from Fisherman's Village
www.sandstarhomes.com
blog.sandstarremodeling.com
CGC013881/CGC055986


0D"g Mo1]t in O it N.. .....

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852658 wwwnauilusolss.OMLc.CC639-LCSCO68


GSt


SINGLE FAMILY HOMES & GOLF VILLAS


SEASON SPECIAL GOOD THROUGH APRIL 2012

OPPL1 I


Ana&Sa nlR tlI m i


Searching For The

Perfect Home?

www.welcome-home.com








SWelcome Home

Real Estate Magazine

in touch with
real estate, ii C





Sbanksand ne
1 -i I
IW '" 0 H m


',' Welcome oHome me.
,, Real Esltatoe Mgine
.'., can bring .. .
','". in touch with " o .
.', real estate, kul. (. 4 M1 >,|^
banks and new1
construction.



1 www.weleome-home~corn |


Saturday, March 3, 2012


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified-Section B Page 1







The Sun Classified-Section B Page 2 EINICIV i*~1cjrc;L .f' L'..' IL


1000 OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE
1010 1010


OPEN HOUSE
1010


REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."


1010
1015
1020
1030
1031
1035
1040
1060
1070
1075
1080
1090
1100
1100
1115
1120

1205
1210
1240
1280
1300
1320
1330
1340
1345
1350
1360
1370
1390
1420

1500
1515
1520
1530
1540


REAL ESTATE
1010- 1650
Open House
Real Estate Auctions
Homes/General
For Sale
Waterfront Homes
For Sale
Foreclosures For Sale
Golf Course
Community For Sale
Condos/Villas For Sale
Townhouses For Sale
Duplexes For Sale
Tri-Plex For Sale
Apartments For Sale
Mobile Homes For Sale
Interval Ownership
Out of Area Homes
For Sale
Trade/Exchange
Wanted To Buy
RENT
Lease Option
Homes
Condos/Villas
Townhouses
Duplexes
Apartments
Hotel/Motel
Mobile Homes
Misc. Rentals
Efficiencies
Room To Rent
Rentals To Share
Vacation/Seasonal
Wanted To Rent
LOTS
Lots & Acreage
Waterfront
Out Of Area Lots
Commercial Lots
Trade/Exchange


BUSINESS
1600 Business For Sale
1610 Business Rentals
1615 Income Property
1620 Commercial/
Industrial Prop.
1640 Warehouse & Storage
1650 Farm/Ranches
OPEN HOUSE
1010


03/03/12

:Zl i I'm wm
*SU'E LLASIFrIDS


11414 Bertolini Dr
Open Sun 1 4pm
Go down to the last gate.
Beautiful m/f villa with
upgrades.
F/T activities director
Ginny Derrough PA
Wheeler Real Estate
Direct: 941-400-9595



Onluv

Aztec & Asociates
18585 Klingler Circle
Saturday, 11-2
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE VIEW
Saltwater Lake Home
with Gulf Access Pool,
Boat Lift, and New Dock
All this for under 200K!
Hosted by Stacy Scarrow
& Sue Rueckel
941-916-0000
www.RealEstateByTheWorkingGirls.com


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150 000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!






CAPE HAZE WINDWARD
4628 ARLINGTON DR.
SUN MARCH 4, 1-4PM
3/3/3 w/pool/Htub/Sun Rm
on Coral Creek,3768 Sq. ft.
Dock, Beautifully landscaped
(316) 990-2224
941) 661-3649
ENGLEWOOD FRI.-SUN.
2p-4p 130 Broadway Terr
3/3/3 heated pool, 1/2 acre,
$319,900 941-228-6900



ENGLEWOOD SUN. 11-3
1 Dominica Dr. Boca Royale
Golf & Country club Check in
@ guard Station for Info.



OPEN HOUSE
SAT 11am -2pm
199 Allworthy
$125,000
Reduced 3/2/2 in Section
15. Good layout & space.
(Peachland to Allworthy)
OPEN HOUSE
SAT. l0am 4pm
4343 Flamingo Blvd.
Port Charlotte -$269,000
3/2/2, like new, sailboat,
gourmet kitchen, pictur-
esque views. (41 to Edge-
water to L on Flamingo.)
Open Sat. & Sun. 1-4 PM
RIVRWOOD REALTY RESALES
4 miles west of 41 on 776
941-743-9663


Open House Sat. 11-2
Waterfront Pool Home
NEW CONSTRUCTION




PORT CHARLOTTE :: ::.
plete includes lot 17318 Foremost Ln.
2 weeks for completion Elegantly
updated New Home Chad McCrory,
Re/Max Anchor of Marina Park 941-
628-6197 chad.mccrory@remax.net
OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-3
16 Open Houses
Lots for Sale
Waterfront Home Community
55+ Resident Owned
Sailboat access-Marina-Gated
WINDMILL VILLAGE
of Punta Gorda
215 Rio Villa Dr
www.windmillvillage.org
I .- I


Open House Sunday
March 4 1-4
1781 San Silvestro Dr.
Pelican Pointe
Golfside 2 bed/2ba/2car
Villa UPDATED
PRICE REDUCED
$189,900
Louise Clapp,
Pointe of Palms Real Estate
941-716-2339


Open Sat. 1-4, 911 N.
Boundary Rd., Englewood
34223. 3/2/1 w/Pool. Move-
In condition. $149,000.
Susan Gamble, 941-445-3122
Weichert Realtors,
Realty Extraordinaire.
PORT CHARLOTTE 127
Harrisburg St. Prestiguous
Area 15, 4BR pool home,
Open House 10-2 Sat & Sun


UIt'L MUUt SUNI 1-
999 Chickadee Dr.
4/3/3 Pool/Spa. 2,500sf a/c.
$60,000 in Upgrades, Incredi-
ble Garage! Move-in Ready
$419,000 Joe Hayden
(941)321-2964 ERA Preferred
Properties. Inc.
REDUCE


rm v%,,m ,rm,,,1.1 m,.-- ,mN.
1-3 2154 Wonderwin St.
2/2/2. Move in Ready!
$77,00. Now $72,900-
Sold!!!!!
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max Palm
Realty, 941-979-2843



NEED CASH?
Punta Gorda Open Sat 1- 4
7316 Satsuma, Burnt Store
Meadows, 4 BR + den, built
'04, saltwater pool. $200,000.
Robyn Sigurdson, Five Star
Realty 941-662-9636





ROTONDA SUN. 12-4
21 LONG MEADOW PL
3/2/3 Estate home on 2 lots.
Deco drive, htd pool
w/pavers $225K
Fla. Golf Properties
(941)-698-GOLF (4653)


Stay On Top Of Sales and Prices

in YOUR Neighborhood!
Check the listings in
AREA PRtOPERTY TRANSFERS
Every Saturday in your
Sun Newspaper's Real Estate Classifhed Secion


Scott Coulombe
scoulombe sun-herald.com
941-429-3118


MICHAEL SAUNDERS & ('OMIP.AN
ANNOUNCES TOP SELLING AGENTS
IN ITS SOUTH SARASOTA AND
CHARLOTTE COUNTIES OFFICES
FOR 2011


Company Finishes The Year With

$1.52 Billion in Total Sales

SARASOTA, Florida (Febru!ir I '' 2! I Ii.lc.l S.iiiiii.! & (i.:' ,ii.in, !-s 'li.:il Id.:
announce its top performing i il.,! .r-'!ii l_-d .dii.i.. id If'.i l- S.:,' i .ii.Si ji,.l.i .i!d
Charlotte Counties sales offices ;.: 21 11

The top-producing individual a.:is i- ci C'.irnl Shr.iart iB..:.c., i ,ii.il MI.rli.i Pilk
(Venice), Helene Johnston (Pl.iiii.ii rii. i .in.1 Ca'.i s E i .:' .: :I I .idi i k.ial Lv\c i\
(Punta Gorda/Burnt Store).

The top-producing teams for 2!! 'i cic Ihi> Calend.a-P.iir Tam.iiii iin..i.iii :. .Jriiiler
Calenda, Sandy Limberger and Ken & Siue P.Irr IPPiLiii. Gi:.i BiLi!l Sil.: .Jii-.Ainn
Sckowska & Nell Taylor (Vennic. I B.Imbi & Ford tlilln 1I Ph!.Il.!..:iii D'lmir.il Beniiin
& Marci Storey E!i!iici :.:'di aid .Jiilin \\eis III & Heathe'Ir SIchI len ll Thii C.ii.(n!!!!!!ii
Division).

Also cited for outstanding perf'.:.mniiiiic iii 'i i Bm%-cl \\I l/ienll .iin !id I .ii.!! i :..!
Maryanne Kurtz & Daniel (OlAII '.i ciici c. Sut.in Briiii.l; Sio'II .Jillnisiiii. Riuh
Brooker and Cindy Dillander Pl.iii-i..!.' I P.amela.i NIee; Eli/.llllt Biiur. Elli Ba.Ir &
Michael Hollenbeck, Susan Akl\.iiekr Resre .ii. .Jinii MI'LeIIdIIi Ei . .:..:. I .J.Il'kie
Kennedy, Laura Kovac, Shel'rre \\ 1el. .kJl.nne B.IIlln.. Biuh H.irsl .ind .Jii.in
McMahon (Venice), Sheila Mecls .idkl K.iren \\ illin.iiiiii Piiiii., ..:.ii .inld Ke in H\ de
(Boca Grande).

The company, with 24 sales oflicce in SuNiioui l N i.ii i dil nd Clailoihc ( OtlllliC.
finished 2011 with $1.52 billion in loul i.l'S \olinic jIn incici Jic of i',".. o\i
2010. Unit sales for the year \\ cic liup bI 12 ".. o\ ci 2i1li

About Michael Saunders & ('onipm).i:
Now in its fourth decade of ser :c. I'.:. S.I.: IIil c.i F!.:!! j I[ ci.:.ll S i.iiijili &i C..:! .i ,
has grown from a single sm all ,.:'!'n ii il.: .. I hli ,.:.i :i 21 24 -1,iill--i ic ..:,''Ii ii !ii.:'ic
than 550 professionally trained .iss..:. uls .iic 5 I'" -ii iiin iiil:'i. P.: i '11 .:1 i kl-'
affiliations including Christie a iiin ii,,,, i /',, a i i, i,. ,, i .. i i ,t,
of the World, Luxury Portfolio in .ia,,,.,. I .,,,ti \l.t ,i .,,, iin i,,,.II..,,,i i/'. ,I/i ll \miid lih'
company's message to qualified l"'i ,:i. 2I..:.l.i! C' ii'u ii l I I 'i.iJdl l !',.:.il'd! C',",.:..h
for our properties.
M ichael Saunders & C '.:'i''.i i iiii.l .1- Ih "iilh !.Lii i'- Ili.:'!i.iv- 'i dl.:!!.i
volume in the latest Real Trends i,'' I I.:,! Il 5i !.i-" i i.I l i l'i.:I!. '!.L~Ci lh' i -i i S .Ii !. i'
included among the 35 most infliciil.ll Pei.ll.:!. i Il .!-, i.! '-.ii'
For more information ibout liclhl S. ji~ ii & Copllllini placlls call
1-888-552-5228 orvisit us oin thi \\cb .Il Mhiclh IlStindsi. coin


* Round Town in Real Estate!


The Sun Classified-Section B Page 2 E/N/C/V