Title: Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00434
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Alternate Title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Publication Date: November 4, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028295
Volume ID: VID00434
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
alephbibnum - 002730652
issn - 1536-1063
lccn - 2001229429
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Full Text


Thumbs down
Planning staff is cool to Wal-Mart


3A Shelv
Airport de\


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UNIV OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
P0 BOX 1170077007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-007


%-i>.ci -,luo nas
deep roots.
IB


Record contributions tell a story


The latest election finance report shows
incumbents raised more money, but the chal-
lengers have more contributors.


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

Pick the amount of cam-
paign funds raised by both
candidates in any preced-
ing city council race candi-
dates and you're just about
at the level that each indi-
vidual candidate has raised
in this year's race around
$15,000 give or take a few
thousand.
The combined candidate
contributions for the 2007
race will top $100,000.


So far, the race has raised
a record $99,914, according
to campaign reports filed
Friday with the Florida Div-
ision of Elections. The reports
list contributions and expen-
ditures from Oct. 13 to Nov.
1.
Mayoral candidate Ed
Martin led in total contribu-
tions. Martin reported raising
$6,580 for the most recent fil-
ing date from 76 individual
contributions, bringing his
total contributions to
$19,685.


Martin's opponent, May-
or Fred Hammett, has rais-
ed $17,474 to date. He re-
ported $7,549 in contribu-
tions for the latest filing
period from 35 individuals.
Council Member JimWo-
ods led in funds raised for
Seat 5 coming in at $7,140
from 38 contributions. His
total contributions are now
$16,763.
His opponent, Sue Lang,
raised $5,086 from 56 indi-
vidual contributions, bring-
ing her total campaign
funds raised to $15,159.
Seat 5 candidate Gary
Budway reported total cam-
paign funds at $2,500. Bud-
way is bankrolling his own
campaign and hasn't sought


or accepted any financial
contributions.
Seat 6 incumbent BillWil-
lson raised another $7,420
from 44 separate contribu-
tions since mid-October.
That brings his total to
$14,370.
Challenger Ernie Zav-
odnyik brought in another
$3,892 for the same time
period from 74 individual
contributions, bringing his
total funds raised to $13,962.
All the candidates report-
ed spending nearly all the
funds raised already, except
TWoods. He has $7.780 re-
,rnaining in his campaign
fund.
With the incumbents
and challengers running as


loosely affiliated groups, it's
worth noting those com-
bined figures.
In total, the incumbents
raised $22,109 for the most
recent filing period, with
the challengers lagging be-
hind at $15,558.
The number of contribu-
tors tells a different story.
Total contributors for the
challengers was 206. In-
cumbents brought in 117
separate contributions.
Media blitz
Whether the higher nu-
mber of contributors trans-
lates into election results for
the challengers remains to
be seen.
A media blitz is in full


swing, and the impact of a
powerful political action
committee is just being felt.
Concerned Taxpayers PC,
which supports the chall-
engers, didn't report any new
contributions, having raised
$7,350 for the year.
Citizens for Quality Gov-
ernment, a pro-business
PAC supporting the incum-
bents, raised $31,075, and
spent slightly more than
that as of Nov. 1.
Almost $10,000 of the
CQG expenditures were
made during the last two
weeks, on television ads,
newspapers and mailings.
The election is Tuesday,
Nov. 6.
ggiles@venicegondolier.com


Local taxes reflect a broken state system


Westbound traffic waits to cross the Venice Avenue Bridge Friday. The bridge is one of the local
projects funded by 1-cent sales surtax revenue.


A panel of participants recently gathered to
share their thoughts on the ramifications, risks
and rewards of the sales tax- and other tax
ideas to fund regional projects.


BY STEVEN J. SMITH
STAFF WRITER

SIt's a tax purported, to do
much good for the public.
If voters approve it Tues-
day in Sarasota County, the
so-called penny sales tax
will extend another 15 years
beyond its current expira-
tion, in 2009, until 2024. It


will fund $1.4 billion in pro-
jects, according to its de-
fenders, such as County
Commission Chair Nora
Patterson.
Opponents such as Bill
Zoller of the Sarasota Cou-
nty Council of Neighbor-
hood Associations Inc. con-
tend the school board would
get too big of a bite out of it


instead of exercising its legal
right to raise school impact
fees.
If such a tax can do so
much good, why did voters
in Charlotte County vote
down a one-half-percent in-
crease in the county sales tax-
on Sept. 18, which would
have funded school con-
struction, projects?
That was one of several
matters addressed by apan-
el of representatives from
Charlotte, Sarasota and
DeSoto counties last week
at a roundtable formed to
look at the sales tax and


other taxing options.
The participants includ-
ed:
* Marylou Sasinowski-Hoff-
man of North Port, chair-
man of the zoning board of
appeals
* Rue Berryman, former
North Port city commis-
sioner
* Lee Swift, Charlotte Cou-
nty School Board member
* Jeff Seward, Sarasota Cou-
nty chief financial planning
officer
* David Bullock, Sarasota
County deputy administra-
tor
* Steve Botelho, Sarasota
County policy & program
consultant, financial plan-
ning
* Vincent Sica, president,
DeSoto Memorial Hospital
* Jan Brewer, DeSoto Cou-
nty administrative services
director
* Paul Mercier, Sarasota
County commissioner
Unable to attend was Bru-
ce Loucks, Charlotte County
administrator, who offered
comments of his own just
after the meeting.

North Port's needs
Sasinowski-Hoffman led
off the discussion, detailing
her passion:
"I'm a retired teacher,
and although my children
are all up North, I've never
voted no on any school
issue," she said. "We're des-
perate for another library in
North Port, and we're still

Please see TAXES, 7A


Venice High might lose


school nurs
BY COURTNEY LINN
STAFF WRITER

After the recent attention
given to Methicillin-resis-
tant Staphylococcus aureus,
students at Venice High Sc-
hool know to show any sus-
picious rash to the school
nurse.
They just aren't sure how
much longer they're going
to have one.
Kendra Buchanan-Mar-
sden has been the school
nurse at VHS for five years,
but she isn't funded by the
school district. Her services
have been provided to VHS
courtesy of Venice Regional
Medical Center, which plans
to stop offering that resource
to the school.
If the district can't find
money to fund her, Bu-
chanan-Marsden won't be
at VHS after the end of the
year.
How Buchanan-Marsden
arrived at VHS isn't known by
district staff or hospital per-
sonnel; the deal was struck
betweenVRMC and the dis-
trict when the hospital was
owned by Bon Secours.
When VRMC President
and Chief Executive Officer
Melody Trimble took over
the hospital more than two
years ago, she allowed the
hospital to keep providing
Buchanan-Marsden's ser-
vices.
However, Trimble said
she told the district she
would be discontinuing
Buchanan-Marsden as a re-


e
source from the hospital at
the end of the 2006-07 school
year. But, Trimble said, when
school started in August,
she did not feel the district
had taken adequate steps to
let Buchanan-Marsden re-
turn to VRMC and didn't
want to deny the school its
nurse.
"I have a daughter that
goes there," Trimble said.
So, Trimble allowed Bu-
chanan-Marsden to remain
at VHS until Dec. 31.
"I feel in good consc-
ience," Trimble said, "that I
tried to segue this program
out."
According to Trimble,
Buchanan-Marsden's posi-
tion is not being cut, but the
hospital is no longer going
to provide the school nurse
resource. Buchanan-Mars-
den is applying for positions
with the hospital.
Trimble said her focus
was providing resources for
the hospital.
Appreciated
Buchanan-Marsden's
position is rare. According
to her, she is one of a hand-
ful of nurses in the country
funded by a hospital and
not the school district or
county health, as is the case
with most schools nation-
wide.
"It's a unique situation,"
she said.
Sherri Reynolds, supervi-
sor for pupil support ser-

Please see NURSE, 7A


Venice Art Fest 20th anniversary


Her show goes on despite rare condition


Mialdc= A lifii "-

As she reached the stage to do her solo dance
routine, Kate Guscette found out she couldn't
walk.


Lisa Wheatley points out to her son, Luke, a piece of artwork
at the Venice Art Fest on Saturday. Artwork and crafts will be
on display Sunday, Nov. 4, 10-5 p.m. on Venice Avenue. The
Venice Art Fest celebrates its 20th anniversary this weekend.


SUN PHOIU BY SUSAN CAIRO
Ten-year-old artist Kate Gusette poses with the acrylic paintings
she will show at her first art exhibit. She learned to paint after
she was no longer able to dance.


EDITOR'S NOTE:
You can make a difference
in the life of someone or help
an organization that desper-
ately needs it.
If you're unsure how you
can help, but want to get
involved, visit the Friendship,
Volunteer Center at friend-
shipvolunteer.com or call (941)
953-5965.


Get involved ... and make
a difference.
BY SUSAN CAIRO
STAFF WRITER

Two years ago, Kate Gus-
ette of Nokomis was a nor-
mal 8-year-old girl.

Please see SHOW, 7A


Good morning,
Gondolier Sun subscriber,
HOWARD SANBORN


BMrfeffmti aLiajfIOWN EPfl@N 'L9 INtl
BOB VEDDER ................... 10A OPINION 10A DEAR ABBY 6B CLASSIFIED
LEGALS 8A SOUTH COUNTY RECORD ....12A PUZZLES 6B COMICS
LET 'EM HAVE IT ............9A SPORTS 14A TRAVEL 88 TV BOOK
LOTTO 2A WEATHER 2A VENUE 3B USAWEEKEND
OBITUARIES ....................16A WELL-BEING................. 5B


052 52 00775


16m"-


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SUNDAY, NOV. 4, 2007


2A SUN NEWSPAPERS


LITTLE KNOWN FAMOUS FLORIDIANS
BY JOE "FASTHORSE" HARRILL


A case of shingle


k ~~~ .. 5.piil ..



Syndicated Conteni

Availle from Commeri a iews Providers"


l-. i.


Tropical Bob was review-
ing Associated Press pho-
tographs recently when he
spotted a closeup of an
Indian arrowhead.
The caption said.lakes all
over the South are drying up,
revealing objects once un-
der water. This arrowhead
was found that way.
Something similar hap-
pened to T.B. days later.
Dirt has been blowing off
T.B.'s home property, expos-
ing whatever lies below the
surface. When T.B. looked
into a dry gulch that passes
for a ditch, he saw ... a roof-
ing shingle blown offAug. 13,
2004, by Hurricane Charley.
T.B. is willing to donate it
to a museum.


TROPICAL BOB
WEATHER OMII MNS


ISFori a L tte y


OWEN BURNS came to Sarasota on a fishing trip in 1910
and the town was never the same. He bought 80 percent of
the city from Hamilton Gillespie for $35,000 and built the
seawalls that gave Sarasota the appearance of a waterfront
resort. In 1911, Burns founded the Board of Trade and
established the first local bank. He formed the Burns Realty
and Construction Company and developed Lido and St.
Armands keys.


., .. ..::::: :, .


Watering restrictions in city and county


City of Venice
Residents in the city of
Venice may water their
lawns once a week unless
they are using reclaimed
water, which is not restrict-
ed.
Those with addresses
ending in odd numbers, or
letters A-M, may water on
Thursday; those ending
with even numbers, or let-
ters N-Z, may water on
Tuesday.
New lawns may be wa-
tered on any day during a
60-day establishment peri-
od, beginning the day of
planting.
All irrigation must take
place before 8 a.m. or after 6
p.m.
Washing vehicles and
hand-watering landscape
shrubs are allowed at any
time. Hoses must have
shutoff nozzles.
Sarasota County
Sarasota County reminds
all residents of the following
landscape and irrigation
water restrictions. These
restrictions apply whether
the source of water is a well,
pond or a utility system.
Even addresses (house
numbers endingwith 0,2,4,
6 or 8) may water only on
Tuesday.
Odd addresses (house
numbers ending with 1, 3, 5,
7 or 9) may water only on
Thursday.
Common areas with no
address, such as median or
roadside plantings, club-
house or recreation areas,
may be irrigated only on
Tuesday.
The maximum amount
of water applied is limited
to three-quarters of an inch
in each irrigation zone,
once, on each allowable
watering day.
Property smaller than 2
acres can water before 8
a.m. and after 6 p.m.
Property larger than 2
acres can water before 10,
a.m. and after 4 p.m.
Exceptions to water re-
strictions
Flower beds, vegetable
gardens and other nonlawn
areas may be irrigated as
needed using a hand-water-
ing device with a shut-off
nozzle. These areas may
also be watered using
micro-irrigation and other
forms of horticulture appro-
priate, low-volume irriga-
tion, on any day of the week.
Newly planted lawn
and landscape areas may be
watered any day of the week
for a 60-day establishment
period that begins the day

Be an Earth buddy.
Recycle this newspaper.
" 'I


the plant material is in-
stalled. New plantings must
be at least 50 percent of the
planted area. However, no
irrigation is permitted be-
tween 8 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Car washing is limited
to once per week; however,
fundraising events are still
allowed.
Guidelines for
well owners
As a result of below-aver-
age rainfall amounts, some
area wells cannot draw wa-
ter from current groundwa-
ter levels. Because signifi-
cant rains that would raise
the water table are not
expected soon, Sarasota
County has issued the fol-
lowing guidelines for resi-
dents about their well sys-
tems.
If you are losing water
pressure from a well that
cannot draw water, call the
Environmental Health Divi-
sion of the Sarasota County
Department of Health, 861-
6133.
The wells affected are
those of older construction
with surface pumps. None
of the newer, larger-diame-
ter wells with submersible
pumps have reported any
problems.
Some wells can be ret-
rofitted with a submersible
pump or can have the exist-
ing drop pipe lowered.
Property owners will need
to check with a licensed
water well contractor or a
pump company to see if this


type of repair can be per-
formed.
In some areas, residents
may be able to connect to
existing county water lines,
Sarasota County Utilities
Permitting can check on
water availability and pro-
vide information on con-
nection costs, fees and
financing options.
If county water lines are
not currently accessible on


a particular street, residents
can contact Sarasota Coun-
ty Program Management to
determine if an assessment
can be established that
would enable them to
receive county water ser-
vice.
For more information,
call the Sarasota County
Call Center at 861-5000 to
reach Utilities Permitting or
Program Management.


Nov. 2: ........... 120
Nov. 1........ 759
Oct. 31.............242
Oct. 30.............385


Nov.2........1-9-11-17-26
Nov. 1.........2-10-19-25-36
Oct. 31......... 3-7-17-22-25
Oct. 30.......4-11-12-20-28
2-digit winner- Quick Pick ticket


I X I Nov. 2 .............9627
", N J Nov. 1...... 2395
M .w*R Oct. 31. .....1305
l~ l Oct. 30 ........... 4706


Nov.2........11-21-25-36
MegaBall................... 10
Oct. 30........... 1-2-28-42
MegaBall ........................ 7
Drawings occur Tuesday and Friday


O ct. 31 ................................................... 8-13-16-17-40-46
Oct. 27............................................... 13-20-33-38-41-45
Oct. 24...................................................8-29-30-41-42-46
Payoff for Oct. 31
1 6-digit winners- $3 million
45 5-digit winners- $6,054.50
2,801 4-digit winners- $79
61,088 3-digit winnbrs- $5
Drawings occur Wednesdays, Saturdays
The estimated jackpot is $3 million


BALLOT

What do you want
at the Venice Airport?


K& Municipal style
golf course


or

SA giant luxury hotel on the
S., beach with an exclusive golf course?

Because whether you know it or not,
that is one of the core issues you will
be deciding in Tuesday's election.
VOTE FOR
ED MARTIN SUE LANG
ERNIE ZAVODNYIK
Paid political advertisement, paid for by the Concerned Taxpayers PC,
independently of any candidate; P.O. Box 118, Venice, FL 34284
g www.vent.fcom/ctpac Ed Martin for Mayor of Venice (seat 7); Sue Lang for
City Council seat 5; Ernie Zavodnyik for City Council seat 6


PRESERVE O;R EMPHASIZE OPEN, PROTECTT
"SMALL TON CHARM" RESPONSIVE GOERNMENT UR ENVIRONMENT


... ...


fni kA










Revised Wal-Mart plan

raises new concerns


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

Revised plans for the
proposed Wal-Mart on
Laurel Road at Interstate 75
will be considered by the
Venice Planning Commis-
sion on Tuesday, Nov. 6.
The retail center plans
aren't much different from
those considered at the Oct.
16 commission meeting,
but the staff recommenda-
tion is.
The city of Venice plan-
ning and zoning director is
recommending the plan-
ning commission turn
down the latest site and
development plan for the
proposed Renaissance retail
center by Waterford Com-
panies.
In a memo dated Oct. 30,
Zoning and Planning Direc-
tor Tom Slaughter reiterated
his original concerns with
the project.
The proposed project
remains "significantly in-
consistent to land use, site
design, architectural stan-
dards and building design,
open space, landscaping
and pedestrian circulation,"
Slaughter wrote.
The revised plans, he
said, raise new questions,
some of which require an
additional technical review
that wasn't previously con-
templated.
The new retail center


plan essentially eliminates
about 30 parking spaces
and adds a new pocket park
on the west side of the park-'
ing lot.
Slaughter said he was
perplexed why the project
planners would include a
park at the opposite end of
the retail center when it
could have been located
near the housing complex
planned on the east side of
the 73-acre development.
New drawings also reveal
a typical gas station foot-
print next to the park, he
said, something that wasn't
previously disclosed.
Earlier plans that includ-
ed three bridges over a
waterway that runs the
length of the development
on its northern side are now
gone. Slaughter said the
commission may want to
see those back in the plan.
And the phase-four plan
for residential units was
entirely rearranged, and
includes a new access point
on Laurel Road.
That portion of the site
plan wasn't even supposed
to be considered at Tues-
day's meeting.
"Now that it's here, we
have to comment on it,"
Slaughter said.
Original plan
The original plan was to
build 20 acres of mixed-use
commercial retail and office


space, including a movie
theater complex and res-
taurants, next 50 acres with
residential homes and con-
dos with up to 731 units,
creating a village atmos-
phere.
But poor economic con-
ditions led to significant
revisions in the plan by the
developer going from 731
proposed housing units on
73 acres to 200 units and
eliminating a central park to
make way for a retail center
anchored byWal-Mart.
The revised plan was a
major change in use from
that described to the com-
munity back in April when
its concept development
was approved.
Following the Oct. 16
planning commission meet-
ing- where staff and public
comment express concern
over the lack of green space,
access to the development,
and architectural design -
the developer revised the
site plan further and resub-
mitted new plans this week.
Planning staff "deter-
mined little, if any, substan-
tive site and architectural
design changes have been
offered that specifically
address the planning com-
mission and the public's
concerns," Slaughter said in
a written review.

ggiles@
venicegondolier.com


Exercise your right to vote.




"I've lived in Venice for over forty years If you believe quality of life is
I ve seen a lot of city councils-and our defined by more than lust ONE
present members stand out among the rest thing, vole for:
They listen to the city's residents, and they've FFred nammget, Mayor
preserved Venice's smalltown character im Woods, Citv Council Seat Five
while allowing it to grow. I can't remember Bil WillsOn, COit Council Seat SIx
any council that's done a better job "
-Bob Johnson, Venice Resident NOVEMBER 6, 2007


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SUNDAY, NOV. 4, 2007


SA 01 Il N'M\AOIQDAPDcq


Elections chief accused


of improprieties


Airport planning workshops


delayed indefinitely


BY GEORGE MCGINN
STAFF WRITER

Sarasota County Sheriff
William Balkwill said he is
looking into a criminal com-
plaint filed against Kathy
Dent, Sarasota County Sup-
ervisor of Elections.
Winifred Rush, 55, who
lives in North Sarasota
County, filed the complaint
recently after
she said an
incident she
reported at
the polls dur-
ing the 2006
elections was
never investi-
gated.
"First, we Dent
have to make Dent
sure it is a
legitimate complaint," Balk-
will said. "And Kathy Dent,
will get to have her say."
"I felt it was my duty to
say that my vote was influ-
enced," Rush said in an
interview.
In the complaint, Rush
stated that on Nov. 7, 2006,
she was handed two articles
by a poll worker at the
Temple Sinaion 4361 Lock-
wood Ridge Road, Sarasota.
On. the November 2006
ballot was an amendment
to switch from touch-screen
voting to paper ballots.
The articles discussed
the topic of touch-screen
voting versus paper ballot
voting, according to the
complaint. Rush said both
articles were favorable to
touch-screen voting. One
was written by Dent, and
the other was written by
Paul DeGregorio, who at the
time was the chairman of
the U.S. Election Assistance
Commission.
Rush told Sarasota Coun-
ty Sheriff Deputy Kaye
Tritschler that the handouts
influenced her vote, because
-on the ballot was a decision
for voters to determine if the
county should switch to
paper ballots.
"They were lying right
next to where I was signing
in on the table," Rush said.
"I understand that it is a
class-three felony, ]lut it
bothers me that (D)ent)
would influence my vote."
Rush said she is not affili-
ated with Christine Jennings,
who lost a close congres-
sional race to Vern Bu-
chanan. Neither does she
know Levko Klos, who has
officially filed to run for
supervisor of elections in
2008.
And Rush is not familiar
with Sarasota Alliance For
Fair. Elections. SAFE was
responsible for putting the
paper ballot amendment
before the voters.


Furious
Rush said despite the
screen not registering her
vote twice, the third time it
worked. She read both arti-
cles while she was waiting.
"It made me furious. I told
the poll worker I wanted to
file a complaint, and told her
she had no right to influence
votes," Rush said. "She told
me that she was only doing
what she was told."
When Tritschler asked
Rush why she waited al-
most a year file her com-
plaint, Rush said Dent al-
legedly never investigated
her complaint, and it did
not appear in the Conduct
of Election Report.
"I waited for some an-
swer to my complaint, some
determination, but I felt it
was ignored," Rush said.
Dent could not be
reached for comment.
However, through a pub-
lic records request, the Sun
obtained copies of e-mails
and the handouts provided
to poll workers.
In an interview with Dent
earlier this year, she said her
Q&A and the DeGregorio
articles were there to help
voters with questions about
how safe their vote is.
On the slip that was
attached to both articles and
sent to all precincts, Dent
instructed poll workers to
distribute the articles to vot-
ers "who have questions or
concerns about the Sarasota
County voting equipment
security or chain of cus-
tody." The slip also said the
DeGregorio article was
designed to "shore up vot-
ers' confidence in electronic
or touch-screen voting sys-
tems."
In an Oct. 27 e-mail Dent


sent to all her staff and tem-
porary election workers, she
wrote: "I believe his (De-
Gregorio's) message is im-
portant to the voters and
may instill confidence in
them. This is not about vot-
ing systems but about peo-
ple going to the polls and
knowing their votes will
count."
Under investigation
A copy of the Conduct of
Election Report obtained by
the Sun does not mention
any complaints about the
two articles.
According to the form,
Dent was required to report
"any additional information
regarding material issues or
problems associated with
the conduct of the election."
Dent checked this box
"yes," but the attached re-
port reported only machine
and power failures. The
report was signed by Dent,
Sarasota County Commis-
sioner Paul Mercier, and
Sarasota County Judge
Phyllis Galen.
"We are looking into the
complaint now, and may be
contacting the state attor-
ney's office," Balkwill said.
"If we have to, we will have
the complaint looked at by
FDLE (Florida Department
of Law Enforcement) to
eliminate any conflict of
interest."
The complaint alleges
Dent campaigned within
100 feet of a polling loca-
tion, and neglected her duty
or engaged in corrupt prac-
tices. Each item would be a
class-three felony, and with
a conviction, each would be
punishable by up to five
years in prison.
gmcginn@sun-herald.com


S1 C Sales Tax Extension*
North County South Countyl
* New Road Construction NIewoad Construction"
A 4 Lane Bee Ridge ld. E of 1-75 $20,500,000 Holnorie Av-arel Rd. $5 lm ion
Widen Frutiville Rd East of 1-75 S10,500,000
Honore Ave- Bee Ridge to10 Fruitile $10 Million . ,
Transit lSCATI Maintenance Facility S4.4 mlllop
Trans sa SCAT) Vehicle Purchases S24,050,000
* TransiISCATlStop&Stlleeipro.vemiens $3 million
E Hone Ave- FruilvilIe to 17thi Si $2 Milion
HonoreAve- .it tloCooper CrN Part $3 Million
SHonore Ave- Clark Rd to Procior Rd S5 Million
Gn it .q w Ir, I IirInRd S Millon
to %a. $8A r va
LockwoodI Ridige- FruliIille I o0 17h Si $2,836,000
Mciroshtid .-Si.e Loop Rd c4 ilion
io PmroorIRd million
* TOTAL $97,286,000 TOTAL $15,000,000 *
* Let's do this right and approve this *
c sales tax extension at the NEXT election. '
Paid for by Don O'Connell A concerned citizen.


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

Airport charrettes (de-
sign workshops) have now
moved from the back burn-
er into the refrigerator.
City Manager Marty
Black announced on Friday
that due to a busy schedule
and pending approval of the
airport master plan, the
design charrette will be
"indefinitely delayed."
"(It will) only (be) re-
scheduled upon city council
transmittal of a revised air-
port master plan, receipt of
FAA (Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration) notice of ap-
proval, and only if city coun-
cil determines future need
to move forward," Martin
wrote in a Nov. 2 memo to
the mayor and council
members.
Consultant work was
suspended weeks earlier
and will not be "authorized
until and unless council
provides that direction at
some future time," Martin
wrote.
Airport Manager Fred
Watts has been working
with airport consultants The
MEA Group and city staff to
prepare materials needed to
answer questions raised by
city council regarding alter-
natives to existing safety
area configurations and the
impact it would have on air-
port operations.
Once that is complete, the
city manager and city attor-
ney will refine the material
for presentation to FAA rep-
resentatives or their consid-
eration and response, Martin
said.
"We are attempting to
secure a commitment from
the FAA to have regional


and local representatives
attend a local forum to pro-
vide insight into their
responses at the conclusion
of this process," Martin
wrote.
The effort should take
several months to com-
plete, he said.

Lease policy reviewed
In other airport news, the
Airport Advisory Board and
airport manager are review-
ing proposed changes to


policies that would affect
future leases and negotia-
tions.
Martin said he's request-
ing new procedures that
include preliminary autho-
rization from council and
the city attorney before staff
begin any new lease negoti-
ations.
The policy review is
expected to occur over the
next two months.

ggiles@
venicegondolier.com


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Trail Committee
Treasurer, Southwest Florida
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PRESERVE THE GRACE AND C0 A"

* Former CEO, Manatee Community College, Venice Campus
* Former President The Venice Hospital Foundation
* Venice City Council Member since June 2006
* Leadership on Boards: Venice Little Theatre, United Way, Chamber
of Commerce, Boys & Girls Club, SCOPE (Affordable Housing,
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Venice one of top ten places to retire in America!
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Endorsed By The Venice Gondolier Sun
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jim Woods City Counc il Seal


------- o~iVn"" IN


.4A -')UI'4 IN4tVV%:)r/Arr-rlO


?I I


A








SUN NEWSPAPERS 5A


Endorsements mirror split in community


As election day nears, it's not politics as usual
in the city of Venice ... or is it?


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR


Friday's Gondolier Sun
endorsement marks anoth-
er first in an already unique
city council campaign.
Nearly every candidate for
office has now received a
newspaper endorsement
from the Gondolier Sun or
the Herald-Tribune over the
past week.
The exception is Gary
Budway, who many believe
is a long-shot in the three-
way race for Seat 5.
In every case the Sun's
endorsements were the op-
posite of the Herald-Tri-
bune's picks.
The Tribune laid out its
endorsements on Oct. 28
favoring challengers Sue
Lang for Seat 5 and Ernie
Zavodnyik for Seat 6, and
incumbent Fred Hammett
for mayor.
The Sun spread its en-
dorsements throughout the
week, culminating in Fri-
day's endorsement of the
challenger Ed Martin for
Seat 7 (major). Earlier it
endorsed incumbents Jim
Woods for Seat 5 and Bill
Willson for Seat 6.

Endorsements
The Herald-Tribune sup-
ported Lang over Woods,
writing, "She often criticizes
the council during public
meetings, and her points
are usually on the mark."
The Sun said it had a con-
cern that she could be "a
disruptive influence on
council."
The Sun picked incum-
bent Jim Woods, with some
reservations (the same ones
described by the Herald-
Tribune) because of his
experience and community
involvement.
When the Sun endorsed
incumbent Bill Willson for
Seat 6 for. being a "tireless,
worker," the Herald-Tribune
picked Ernie Zavodnyik as


being "more likely to listen"
to public sentiment.
Both newspapers charac-
terized the mayor's race as a
close call.
The Herald-Tribune en-
dorsed current Mayor Fred
Hammett for his "substan-
tial record in elected public
office, albeit a mixed one,"
while the Sun threw its
backing behind opponent
Ed Martin for his communi-
ty involvement and past
leadership roles.
Another first was seeing
challengers (with the excep-
tion of Budway) and incum-
bents run as a loose knit
team, sharing a similar plat-
form, advertising dollars
and look-alike campaign
signs.

Odd
Also unseen in previous
elections is the part political
parties are playing in this
"nonpartisan" election.
City rules are almost
nonexistent about conduct-
ing nonpartisan elections,
and what little guidance
there is speaks only to the
actions of candidates, not
political parties.
Venice resident John My-
ers received all the party
mailers, including a paid
political advertisement post-


card each of the last three
days.
On Tuesday a couple
canvassing for candidates
stopped by as well, he said.
Myers said he received
two additional postcards
from candidates, and a
Waterford Companies letter
paid for by the Republican
Party of Sarasota County
supporting some of the
candidates.
"I was pretty shocked
when I got the mailer from
the Republican party," My-
ers said. "It seems a little
odd to me. I thought this
was supposed to be a non-
partisan race."

Party politics
The political parties have
differing views on the in-
roads they've made into the
city of Venice council race.
Both the Democratic
Party of Sarasota County
and the Republican Party of
Sarasota County sent out
mailers on behalf of candi-
dates they support.
The Democratic Party
carried out its mailing in
early October as part of an
effort to get people to send
in their absentee ballots-
early, according to Chair
Rita Ferrandino.
The Republican Party
mailed oversize postcards
in three separate mailings
supporting the incumbents
this week.


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I Hear You And Share Your Concerns.
The Future Of Venice Is In Your Hands.

* Preserve the charm of Venice through proper planning and
protecting the environment.

* Provide a strong, diverse economic base for a healthy, thriving
business community.

* Pledge to address the needs of younger families: affordable
housing, community activities and conveniently timed city
government meetings.






Endorsed By: Venice Herald-Tribune Venice Neighborhoods Coaltion
Venice Taxpayers League Manatee-Sarasota Sierra Club
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Ernie Zavodnylk for City Council Seat. 6.


Republican Party chair-
man Eric Robinson makes
no apologies for his organi-
zation's involvement.
He says party politics will
play an increasing role in
city elections in the future.
"We're involved because
nationally we've decided to
groom candidates so we are
not having people who have
no experience ... (and) they
(opponents) don't get a
foothold," he said, compar-
ing the city election to a
minor league team.
"We got involved in the
city of Sarasota races back
in 2000 ... (we've) been
involved ever since. Nobody
seemed to raise a fuss over
it.
"We will get more and
more involved in more and
more elections.
'Nonpartisan' has to do
with ballots and the actual
process of voting. This isn't
the election we're in right
now. It's the campaign,"
Robinson said.

Another take
Chairwoman Rita Ferr-
andino said the Democratic
Party of Sarasota County
has no intentions of in-
creasing its role in city elec-
tions.
But. she defended the
actions already taken.
Ferrandino said she was-


n't involved in last year's
decision by her organiza-
tion to endorse Ernie Zav-
odynik over incumbent John
Simmonds. Simmonds won,
but the race was close, a dis-
play of the power of an
endorsement.
She supports the mailout
that was sent earlier, but
said it doesn't compare to
what the Republican Party
did.
"My tiny inclusion (sup-
porting the Venice candi-
dates) of one absentee post-
card mailed only to democ-
rat households ... does not
equate to buying multi-
thousand dollars of airtime
on local television," she


said.
"We're doing almost noth-
ing. I encourage you to look
at the number of Democrats
in Venice that would have
received this, versus what
the Republican campaign is
doing. It's not even an app-
ropriate comparison."
When asked if her party
intends to play an increas-
ing role in city elections, she
downplayed its role.
'Absolutely not. It's my
job is to get out the Demo-
cratic, vote. It's really up to
the candidates,to run their
(owri)race. I doh't intend to
get that confused."
ggiles@
venicegondolier.com


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WE DON'T WANT TO LIVE IN CANYON CITY

---SO---
WE WILL VOTE FOR SUE, ED AND ERNIE!



WE FEEL THAT OUR OPINIONS COUNT

---SO---
WE WILL VOTE FOR SUE, ED AND ERNIE!



WE WANT VENICE TO RETAIN ITS SMALL TOWN CHARM

---SO---
WE WILL VOTE FOR SUE, ED AND ERNIE!


WE WANT TO GROW BETTER BUT NOT BIGGER AND BIGGER

--SO--
WE WILL VOTE FOR SUE, ED AND ERNIE!


WE WANT ALL OF THE PRE-ELECTION PROMISES KEPT

---SO---
WE WILL VOTE FOR SUE, ED AND ERNIE!





WE ARE ALL TIRED OF THE OUT AND OUT FABRICATIONS
FROM THE INCUMBENTS CONCERNING THEIR SUPPOSED
AND MOSTLY IMAGINERY ACCOMPLISHMENTS


THE CITY OF VENICE NEEDS ALL OF OUR VOTES FOR

SUE LANG COUNCIL SEAT #5

ED MARTIN MAYOR SEAT # 7

ERNIE ZAVODNYIK COUNCIL SEAT # 6



Paid political advertisement paid for by the Concerned
Taxpayers PC, independently of any candidate.


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President: Derek Dunn ilannkn 200 asto Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285. Wed. & Fri. 504 Circulation Department, 200 E. Venice Ave., Venice FL 34285. Sat. 8 a.m. 11 a.m.
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A


op,


SUNDAY, NOV. 4,2007


I .








RA 01q INI KrttlAIODA PcRDC


OA 6UIN iNvvjr/-trt-nNUA



How safe are you from the superbugg'?


Recent deaths, new statistics fuel public
awareness and fear of staph infection


BY DR. MARK
ASPERILLA
SPECIAL TO THE SUN
PAPERS

The truth is: We have cre-
ated a monster.
It is not something that
happened overnight, but
rather over time and now
it is coming back to haunt
us.
The monster is officially
known as methicillin-resis-
tant Staphylococcus aureus,
lately referred to as the
superbugg." Once the al-
most exclusive domain of
health care facilities, strains
of this bacterial infection
are now being found in
communities at large in
locker rooms, gyms, prisons
and poor urban neighbor-
hoods.
Three deaths from MRSA
earlier this month a 17-
year-old Virginia high sc-
hool student, an 11-year-
old in New Hampshire and
a 4-year-old in Mississippi
- demonstrate how dan-
gerous MRSA can be. As of
this writing, officials still
have not determined just
how these children became
infected.
Punctuating the events
was a report by the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention stating that
more 'than 90,000 Am-
ericans acquire potentially
fatal infections every year.
The study, published in
the Journal of the American
Medical Association, fur-
ther reported that annual
deaths from MRSA may
reach 19,000 thousands
more than those who die
from AIDS. MRSA is app-
earing at more than double
the rate than was reported
only five years ago.
While it's true that MRSA
poses a public health con-
cern, MRSA has unlike
flu and other epidemic
pathogens one positive
distinct quality: It's pre-
ventable.

On the move
The human race has
been victimized by staph
infections since long before
knowing they existed.
Staph bacteria naturally


occur in about 30 percent of
the U.S. population, and are
usually found on the skin or
in the nose. This is called
"colonization," and most of
these people will never
develop the next stage,
"infection," where the bac-
teria enter the body and
begin to reproduce. How-
ever, colonized individuals
are just as capable of trans-
mitting the disease as
infected ones are.
Staph is not an airborne
pathogen; it must be spread
by contact, usually through
the hands. However, it can
also spread through infect-
ed towels, linens, wound
dressings, clothes and raz-
ors. There is also evidence
that MRSA can be acquired
by touching a contaminat-
ed shopping cart.
According to the CDC,
overall rates of disease are
consistently highest among
seniors (65 and older),
blacks and males. Crowded
living conditions and poor
hygiene are included am-
ong the risk factors.
There are no vacciha-
tions available to prevent
MRSA, and only a laborato-
ry test can determine if
there is an infection.
Initial symptoms can
include raised or boil-like
lesions that may spread,
causing pain, swelling and
redness. Fever may result,
as may chills, chest pain,
fatigue, head and muscle
aches and shortness of
breath.
Traditionally, staph in-
fections have been almost
always found in health care
facilities, primarily hospi-
tals, where they can poison
the bloodstream and cause
septic shock, wreak havoc
on surgical sites, attack
heart valves and lungs, bur-
row into bones and joints,
infect the urinary tract or
cause pneumonia.
But MRSA has been mov-
ing out of the health care
setting rapidly forcing
us to separate the infection
into two major types: health
care-associated MRSA and
community-associated
MRSA, which is found out-
side the hospital, nursing
home or clinic. Health care-
associated MRSA is more


common, but is also more
resistant to antibiotics.

Staph strikes the
Sunshine State
A 2004 incident opened
up a whole other path of
investigation. In January of
that year, the Environment
News Service published an
article with the headline,
"Are Florida Beaches Safe?
Health Department Doesn't
Know," after documentary
filmmaker Gary Burris con-
tracted MRSA after shooting
footage at Fort Myers Beach.
That he had sat down on
wet sand raised the ques-
tion of MRSA's viability in
seawater.
"While there is no direct
link as yet," the organization
reported, "MRSA infections
involving beach activities
and commercial fishing
have become increasingly
common in Florida."
And that wasn't the first
- or last time MRSA
would be news in Florida. In
addition to the three Sara-
sota and five Hardee County
students reported in the
Sun this month, there have
been these headlines:
* In Volusia County, several
fishermen and at least one
surfer contracted MRSA in
2003. In some of them, the
condition advanced into a
flesh-eating infection, which
occurs in about 10 percent of
cases. In this advanced con-
dition, the bacteria attack
and dissolve muscle tissue,
causing gangrene, which in
turn leads to treatment by
massive tissue removal or
amputation, and can even
lead to death.
* Two years later, that coun-
ty's health authorities re-
ceived reports of a cluster of
MRSA infections affecting
both mothers and new-
borns in the maternity and
delivery unit of a hospital.
* Also in 2005, Nassau Cou-
nty saw an increase in what
was believed to be spider
bites. The real culprit: com-
munity-associated MRSA,
with more than 50 cases,
reported.
The war against staph
infection has raged for cen-
turies with little success.
(It was not the arrow of a
Calusa Indian that killed
Ponce de Leon when he
tried to colonize Southwest
Florida in the 1500s, but the


ensuing infection.)
But the tables turned
duringWorldWar II with the
arrival of a new weapon -
which would later turn
against us.
The monster created
Although penicillin was
discovered accidentally in
1928, it took more than 10
years to isolate it so that it
could be used in a vaccina-
tion. At last, humankind
had something with which
to annihilate staph infec-
tion.
It worked for decades,
in fact. But then something
began to go wrong. Strains
of staph were not respond-
ing to the antibiotics that
once killed them so effi-
ciently. Scientists began to
wonder why.
The crisis can be ex-
plained by three major cau-
sative factors. First is the
excessive and unnecessary
use' of antibiotics by health
care providers. For decades,
some physicians were pre-
scribing antibiotics for ill-
nesses that don't respond to
antibiotics cold, flu, viral
infections or bacterial
infections that were so
minor, they would eventu-
ally clear up on their own
without intervention.
Second are the patients
who don't finish their cours-
es of antibiotic treatment,
thus allowing the bacteria
to build up a resistance.
Sometimes patients save
these medicinal "leftovers"
ana take them later- unpre-
scribed when they con-
tract another illness. This also
opens the door for bacterial
resistance.
Third are the antibiotics
given preventively to cattle,
pigs and chickens. It goes
into them, and they go into
us along with the residual


effects of the medicines. In
addition, runoff from feeding
areas can contaminate drink-
ing water with these antibi-
otics, allowing humans to
ingest them in small doses
that bacteria can learn to
resist.
By 1961, MRSAwas identi-
fied. Starting with methicillin,
MRSA gradually became
resistant to a host of antibi-
otics.
As bacteria frequently do,
staph had been adapting to
its enemy, changing to sur-
vive and doing it faster
than new antibiotics could


be developed.
While there is certainly
no cause for panic about
MRSA, there is definitely a
need for caution. Both
physicians and patients
need to handle antibiotic
use responsibly. Much of
the damage is already done.
But, if we're not careful,
MRSA could potentially de-
velop a resistance to any
and all antibiotics.
And no one wants an in-
fection that's unstoppable.

Dr. Mark Asperilla is an
infectious disease specialist.


Be an Earth buddy. Recycle this newspaper.


(1


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Veteran' s Affairs Seminar
Friday, November 2nd 2:00pm-3:00pm
Please join us for an informative presentation about understanding
benefits for Veterans. Join County Veteran' s Advocates speaker
Greg Worth at our community to gain more insight on this
subject. Please RSVP by October 31st.
Wine & Cheese Open House Series
Tuesday, November 6th & 20th 1:00pm-3:00pm
Please honor us with your presence at one of our upcoming events
featuring fine wine and delicious hors d' oeuvres. Our professional
staff will be present to meet with you and discuss how living at our
community can eliminate the burden of maintaining a home so
you are free to pursue your interests, friendships and active
lifestyle. Please RSVP 4 days prior to each event.
Elder Law Attorney Seminar
Thursday, November 8th 2:00pm-3:30pm
Please join us at Aston Gardens at Pelican Pointe for an informative
presentation by Elder Law Attorney Michael Chiantealla who
specializes in estate planning. Learn about Durable Power of
Attorney, Patient Advocate Designation documents, and the role
of living trusts in your overall financial plan. Act today, and Sea in s
ensure peace of mind knowing your financial future is secure for tomorrow.
Please RSVP by November 5th. P le 1ec l
Lunch & Learn sp c r
Thursday, November 8th l:30pm-li:Opm
You're invited to join us at our upcoming 'Lunch & Learn" event at our beautiful community in Aston Gardens at
Pelican Pointe. Sample our delicious cuisine and learn about the many services and options we offer, including,
activities and social events, apartment styles and financial options, personalized care for independent residents, fitness
programs. RSVP by November 5th.
Veteran' s Day Reception
Monday, November 12th 2:00pm-3:00pm
Please join us for an exciting Veteran' s Day Reception! We' II be providing cocktails and hors d' ouvres to honor the
Veterans in the Venice Community. Meet our team, mingle with our fantastic residents and let us know how you can
make Aston Gardens at Pelican Pointe your home today. Please RSVP by November 8th.
Call 941-240-1000 today to RSVP!



AstonGardens
AT PELICAN POINTE
A SW E SENIOR LIVING COMMlUNITY


AL#10612


1000 Aston Gardens Drive Venice, Florida 34292 941-240-1000
Independent Living Assisted Living Alzheimer' s Care / v
www.sunriseseniorliving.com asa "


Note:
* Only candidate .
running that lives off
the Island -
approximately 5,600
voters on Island and
approximately 9,700
off Island. Council
already has 5 Island
members.


* Committed to one,
3 year term without
pay or benefits
* Independent of any
organizations/special
interest groups
* Golf course should be
saved and operated as
a low cost municipal
course.
* Off Island areas must
not be over built with
excessive density
height and developers
to pay service
connection costs for
projects.
* The current salary
system incentive
programs need to be
reviewed.
* Airport leasing &.
expansion programs
need complete review.


Retired corrections supervisor for State
of Michigan at men's maximum security
prisons and a certified Department of
Corrections weapons instructor


Past President and presently
2nd Vice President of
Curry Creek Homeowners Association


President of Michigan
Correction Officers chapter and
labor management co-chairman


Certificate from University of Michigan
& Wayne State University for Advanced
Grievance/Bargaining


Certificate from University of Michigan
Career Counseling Programs


Past President & business agent for
municipal 'employees union


Past President Labor and District
Councils Essex County AFL/CIO


Member of Venice
Exploratory Harbor Committee


Political announcement paid for and approved by
Gary Budway for Venice City Council Seat 5


SUNDAY, NOV. 4, 2007







SUN NEWSPAPERS 7A


Ql IUNIDAV MNV A 9(n17


TAXES from page 1 A
for our own hospital."
Berryman said the penny
tax is a great resource for
funding.
"Who's going to miss a
penny?" Berryman asked.
"Look what the penny sales
tax has given us in the past.
In North Port, it has funded
the new city hall, the new
North Port police station,
North Port High School."
Charlotte's defeat
Swift concurred, although
he was clearly smarting from
the decisive defeat the half-
penny tax for school pro-
jects in Charlotte County
suffered just more than a
month ago.
"I wish (Sarasota County)
better luck than we had,"
Swift said. "In Charlotte Cou-
nty, the measure failed by a
margin of 70 percent to 30
percent."'
Why such a steep differ-
ence in the result?
"We think the reason was
bad timing," Swift said. "In
this time of a depressed
housing market and scarci-
ty of good jobs, people in


Charlotte County were sim-
ply wary of the prospect of
paying more in taxes of any
kind even those that
would help our schools."
Loucks was mindful of
Charlotte County's impend-
ing extension of its own
penny tax, coming up next
year.
"We'll need the revenues,"
Loucks said. "We have more
projects than we have mon-
ey to do them. But we're
going to wait until after tax
reform goes on the ballot in
January so as not to get the
issues confused. Then we'll
start communicating with
the community and our
-board on what the projects
are and whether or not peo-
ple want to do it."
Sarasota's challenge
"We've been fighting the
perception our state legisla-
tors have been putting out
for some time now that
taxes of any kind are a bad
thing," Mercier said. "The
state has put enough eco-
nomic constrictions on local
government, and it's time
those coconuts changed
their tune."


Bullock agreed with Mer-
cier.
"The current system is
broken, and we don't have
the leadership at the state
level to help us through our
current crisis," Bullock said.
"Some have suggested we
institute a state income tax,
but I don't think that's likely.
We simply need to take the
options available to us and
utilize them in more and
more creative ways with
the help of Tallahassee or
without."
Seward then presented a
sobering scenario for a
future without the penny
sales tax.
"Because of legislative
impacts, we faced $7 mil-
lion in reductions for fiscal
year 2008 and we're looking
at between $15 million-$20
million more in cuts for
2009," Seward said. "With-
out the penny sales tax,
we'll see funding for ser-
vices such as libraries and
roads being seriously jeop-
ardized."
Botelho echoed Seward's
remarks.
"I invite all Sarasota Cou-
nty residents to log on to


scgov.net and click on the
'Common Cents' icon to get
even more important infor-
mation on what the tax will
do for them."
Alternative Solutions
Sica suggested county
governments should con-
sider legalized gambling.
"I've heard five slot mac-
hines equal around $1 mil-
lion in revenue," he said.
Mercier countered with
another revenue generating
idea gaining traction an
Internet sales tax, which he
said could raise $300 billion
nationwide and $6 billion in
Florida alone.
"Buying on the Internet
is almost tax dodging,"
Mercier said. "It generates
money that I believe is sup-
posed to be paid back to the
state of Florida.
"This is a nationwide
problem and Congress will
have to address it. And rev-
enue that's being lost th-
rough legislative moves
could be recaptured this
way."

ssmith@sun-herald.com


NURSE froam page 1A

vices for the Sarasota Cou-
nty School District, is trying
to find funding to keep Bu-
chanan-Marsden on staff at
VHS.
"We are trying all differ-
ent avenues," Reynolds said,
"private donations, business-
es and foundations."
Reynolds said she thou-
ght the reason Buchanan-
Marsden was being removed
from VHS had something to
do with legal issues.
Trimble said she's not sure
what the district was referring
to but said it might have to do
with sovereign immunity, a
legal doctrine that protects
people who work for the gov-
ernment.
Buchanan-Marsden, as an
employee of a private hos-
pital, would not be covered by
sovereign immunity although
her services are provided to a


government agency.
All of the high schools in
the Sarasota County School
District have access to a full-
time nurse but, according to
Reynolds, having one full-
time is not required.
Reynolds said if funding is
not found to keep Buchanan-
Marsden on at VHS, a part-
time nurse from the county
health department will be
provided, which is where the
district typically gets its nurs-
es.
Buchanan-Marsden's de-
parture will not go unnoticed
byVHS.
"It has been a great asset
having Kendra," said Prin-
cipal Candace Millington
said. "(She) is a great service
to the students and staff. Her
expertise is greatly appreciat-
ed."
clinn@venicegondolier.com


SHOW from page 1A


She liked listening to
music on her iPod, and the
beat always made her want
to dance everything from
ballet to hip-hop to jazz to
tap. Then, while warming
up for a performance, things
changed.
At first her dance instruc-
tors thought she had pulled
a muscle. After the pain did-
n't go away, her parents, Lisa
and Tim Gusette, took her.
to the doctor. That is when
kate's life as a dancer ended
- when she found out she
had Legg-Calve-Perthes dis-
ease.
It is a rare condition, es-
pecially in girls, that affects
the hip in growing children.
The problem occurs when
the arteries to the hip clot
off and the hip bone be-
comes brittle. The bone un-


der the surface of the joint
collapses and causes pain.
Children with LCPD, like
Kate, will likely experience
osteroarthritis and possibly
need hip replacement sur-
gery early in adulthood.
"It's a life-altering dis-
ease, not life-threatening,"
Lisa Gusette said.
Since Kate can no longer
dance, ride a bike or partic-
ipate in physical education
classes at Laurel Nokomis
School, she had to find an
activity she could do while
sitting down. She decided to
paint.
"At first we were just
looking for something for
her to do with her extra
time," Lisa Gusette said.
Not wanting to push her
into anything, they suggest-
ed art classes at a new stu-


dio for children in Venice.
"Kate paints for hope;
you can tell from the bright
colors in her artwork," said
Charlene Yoder, instructor
at Real aRt for Real PeoPle,
Venice.
After a year and a half,
Kate will be having her first
art show.
Because she has been in
and out of hospitals during
this time, she decided to
donate a portion of the pro-
ceeds of the show to two
charities that now have be-
come very important to her:
the Greater Orlando Chil-
dren's Miracle and the Chr-
istian Children's Fund.
. Kate feels blessed in
other ways, said her mother.
She has found a passion in
playing the violin and piano
and encouraging others


with her story.
Her medical future looks
brighter also. Recently a spec-
ialist in Switzerland who has
operated on five children
with the same disease has
agreed to look over her
medical history.
You can meet the artist
Friday, Nov. 9, from 6 to 8:30
p.m., at Real aRt for Real
PeoPle Art Studio, Venice,
485-1732.
"Sometimes when you
have to stop doing what you
are good at, don't give up,
try something else," said
Kate.

scairo@
venicegondolier.com


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The Future of Venice Depends

on Your Vote on November 6

Fred Hammett
Mayor, Seat 7
N 6 years Venice City
Planning Commission
A 4 years on Venice Code
Enforcement Board
Current treasurer,
Southwest Florida
Planning Council

Bill Willson
City Council, Seat 6
Six-term board member
Venice Area Chamber
of Commerce
Chamber liaison to six
City boards
Instrumental in development
of Venetian Waterway Park


Jim Woods
City Council, Seat 5
a Former CEO of Manatee
Community College,
South Campus
N Former President of
Bon Secours Venice Hospital
Foundation
0 Extensive community service
leadership positions

Fred Hammett, Bill Willson and Jim Woods are
the only Venice City Council candidates who have
demonstrated their commitment to Venice's quality
of life by addressing a variety of issues-from civic
beautification to the preservation of natural resources
and opportunities for working people and youth.


A paid political advertisement paid for by Citizens for Quality Government,
a political action committee, independently of any candidate.


I


U.


OUNWAT, NUV. l+, 4UU/




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