Title: Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00405
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Alternate Title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Publication Date: August 29, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028295
Volume ID: VID00405
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
alephbibnum - 002730652
issn - 1536-1063
lccn - 2001229429
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Full Text








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LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER J FLORIDA NO. IWEE3LD"I...'.-:' R 32
SNIV OF FL OFFLORIDA
50CENTS VOLUME 62 NUMBER 69 AN EDBON OF THE SUN WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY EDITION, AUG. 29-30,2007 205 ASA 32UNIV11-007
pO BO ^,.fcc 17 007 32 3..-


Neighbors have standing


in island rental appeal


Ethanol could


energize Florida


agriculture


THIS
EDITION
OURTOWN I 1B
















First cut
These sculptors
yam what they
yam.

THIS SECTION 6A

Tit for tat?
Mediation? Two can
play at that game.

DEATHS 16A
Alejandro Fernandez
Margaret A. Cassidy
Arthur C. Letts
Alpha M. MacPherson
Frank A. Pagliaro
Lloyd M. Renk
Jerry R. Shearer,
James E.Warbington

COUPONS
Affordable Hearing....... 7A
American Import............7A
Buddy's Pizza.................7A '
Kingfish Cafe..................7A
Twin Palms Chiropractic7A

INSERT
DeSears Electronics
Furniture Warehouse
Venetian Gardens


BY BOB FLISS
STAFF WRITER

Everyone is climbing on
board the ethanol bandwag-
on.
Also called ethyl alcohol or
grain alcohol, the colorless
fuel is being touted as both a
partial solution for the
nation's dependency on
imported petroleum and a
boost for Florida agriculture.
Although there are no
commercial ethanol plants
producing fuel in Florida
today, several proposals are
on the table.
Just last week, the Uni-
versity of Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences announced a commit-
tee had selected a site in Palm
Beach County for an ethanol
demonstration plant that
would be run as a public-pri-
vate joint venture. An alter-
nate site in Taylor County was
also identified, and university
administrators will be making
a decision in the next few
weeks. The objective is to
have the plant operating by
mid-2009.
Ethanol production is cer-
tainly getting a big boost from
Florida's political leadership.
It was among many topics
discussed at Gov. Charlie
Crist's July environmental
summit. Perhaps more to the
point, ethanol may be a start-
ing point for building a new
consensus on Florida's envi-
ronmental future.
Crist's public statements
on global warming have at


times put him at odds with
the rest of the Republican
leadership in Tallahassee,
notably House Speaker
Marco Rubio of Miami. For
example, Rubio has publicly
criticized executive orders
issued by Crist that attempt to
establish fuel economy stan-
dards for vehicles sold in
Florida, far past the expira-
tion of a presumed Crist sec-
ond term.
Essentially, Rubio and the
rest of the House Republican
leadership prefer free-market
solutions to Florida's environ-
mental problems, rather than
Please see ETHANOL, 7A


Winter Haven-based chemist Bill
Widmer predicted the state's cit-
rus industry produces enough
waste to manufacture 60 million
gallons of ethanol a year.


SUN PHOTO BY GREG GILES
Appellants, their attorneys and others chat following Tuesday's
city council meeting, at which City Attorney Bob Anderson
announced legal'standing in the city's short-term rental dis-
pute.


City Attorney Bob
Anderson has con-
cluded two residents
may join the city's
appeal of a planning
commission ruling
allowing short-term
rental businesses in
residential neighbor-
hoods.

BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

Venice City Attorney
Bob Anderson announced
Tuesday that two residents
meet the state's definition
of legal standing and can
join the city's appeal in the
short-term rental dispute.
Merle Graser and NMari-
lyn Hollowell were granted'
standing in an upcoming
quasi-judicial hearing that
will go before city council,
possibly in October.
But Golden Beach Asso-
ciates Inc. doesn't meet the
definition of legal standing,
Anderson said.
Attorney Jon Preiksat,,
who represents both Hollo-
well and Golden Beach
Associates, said he was dis-
appointed the homeown-
ers association wasn't in-
cluded in the appeal.
"It was a close call. The
homeowners association
should have been kept in,"
Preiksat said.
But he acknowledged


others are illegal.
Attorneys for Milo and
investors who bought up
20 single-family residences
on and near the island to
rent out by the month,
week, or day beginning in
2005 immediately
sought to throw out all but
the city's appeal.
Graser resides directly
across the street from one
of the rental properties.
Hollowell, who lives in
Golden Beach, is surround-
ed on three sides by short-
term rental properties.
Conflicts queried
Anderson also queried

Please see RENTAL, 7A


that only about half of the
decisions in court cases
similar to this one have
granted standing to home-
owners associations.
In late May, the city of
Venice filed an appeal
when its
own plan-
ning com-
mission re-
versed a de-.
cision by
Tom Slaught-
er, planning
director.
Slaughter
found the Anderson
short-term
rentals of
the variety offered by prop-
erty owner Steve lilo and


Public to weigh in on 1-cent surtax


Carter's race for city council


The Sarasota County Commission will hold a
public hearing on continuing the 1-cent sales
surtax, which raises funds for capital projects in
the county and its municipalities.


BY STEVEN J. SMITH
STAFF WRITER

Think an extra penny in
sales taxis a small price to pay
for the capital improvements
the revenue has been used for
over the last 20 years? Or are
you looking for any tax relief
you can get?
You'll have a
chance to give
your opin-
ion next
month about
extending the
surtax for a
second time.
Sarasota
County com-
mission'er Staub
unanimously Staub
agreed to hold
a public hearing on an ordi-
nance renewing the tax, to go.
to referendum on the Nov. 6
ballot.
If it passes, the continua-
tion would be the third phase
of the series. Phases one and
two were each approved for
10-year periods. Phase two
was renewed by referendum
in 1997, to cover the period
from 2000-2009.
County Commissioner
Shannon Staub moved to

Good morning. Gondolier
Sun subscriber,
FRANCES LEININGER


approve the public hearing,
despite recent concerns that
an extra 1 cent on top of prop-
erty tax issues might prompt
the public to vote against the
referendum.
"I think that we put our
trust in the people who have
voted this in twice," Staub
said. "I'm confident people
know what the
sales tax has
done. They
know that it's
shared, that
they're not the
only ones pay-
ing it. So, if we
don't go now,
we are going to
Mercier be in a quag-
mire next
year."
County Commissioner
Paul Mercier agreed.
"The future of this county
right now depends on that
surtax if we want to maintain
our quality of life," Mercier
said.
Projected
Venice's list of projects to
be funded if the surtax is
renewed is a lengthy one,
totaling nearly $63 million.
Topping the list is expanding


PROWT SECTION


BOB VEDDER
FERTILIZER ORDINANCE
LEGALS
LET 'EM HAVE IT
LOTTO


and upgrading police head-
quarters ($9,355,792), fol-
lowed by a contribution to-
ward a performing arts facili-
ty as part of a new Venice
High School ($8,543,286), re-
placing outdated water and
sewer infrastructure ($7,475,397)
and improvements to the
city's solid waste and public
works facilities ($5,068,144).
The list of 30 projects also
includes $1,594,653 for the
demolition of the Venice
Arena, with a timeline of
2010-11: The city.has been
hoping to tie razing the arena
into any development pro-
posals for the east side of the
Venice Municipal Airport.
The sales tax would also
contribute, toward a much-
needed second jail, Staub said,
citing overcrowding in the cur-
rent jail as impetus for the pro-
ject.
"The jail population one
day this month went up to
1,200 inmates," Staub said.
"Assaults among the inmates
and assaults on officers were
escalating because there are
so many incarcerated there."
Venice is estimated to re-
ceive more than $21 million in
1-cent tax revenue through
2009. Projects the money has
been spent on include down-
town lighting, beach parking
and the Venetian Waterway
Park.
The public hearing will
take place in September.
ssmith@sun-herald.com


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR


Venice massage therapist
Ernest Roland Carter Jr. was
the first to throw his hat into
the ring for a seat on city
council.
Carter filed preliminary.
paperwork with the city in
May to run against incum-
bent Jim Woods.
Carter owns Palms Mas-
sage Therapy &
Body Works
and lives on
the island in an
82-year-old
home on the
National His-
toric Registry.
He's been a
fixture at city
council meet- Carter
ings ever since
airport devel-
opment became an issue.
Since then he's been attend-
ing every city committee and
community meeting he can,
including the Venice Taxpayer
League and Venice Neigh-
borhoods Coalition gather-
ings.
"I like to attend them all to
know what's going on in our
community," Carter said.
Carter spoke against air-
port development on numer-
ous occasions, but he's not
anti-development, he says.
In an e-mail to the Gon-
dolier Sun, Carter said he sup-


OUR TOWN 88CTION


8A OBITUARIES
5A OPINION
6A POLICE BEAT
9A SPORTS
2A WEATHER


AROUNDTOWN
CROSSWORD
DAVE BARRY
JOE GIORGIANNI
DEAR ABBY


10B THE BOOKWORM
4B GREEN SHEETS
8B MILESTONES
5B SUDOKU
5B VENUE


ports the Waterford Tramonti
condo/hotel project and the
Venice Island Resort planned
near the airport.
"The need for responsible
growth is apparent. A firm
was engaged to explore future
growth and discovered that
the -city could only handle
another 200 hotel rooms.
"These two. projects alone
will provide all of the hotel
rooms that those outside
consultants advised we can
handle," he said.
"Why would we need a
destiny 300-room Marriott
Hotel and a 200-unit time-
share, a professional golf
course and a marina when we
already have projects such as
these moving forward?" Cart-
er wrote.
"Could it be the special
interests of the few who stand
to profit from newer and big-
ger projects? Common sense


dictates that there is more to
this airport land use than
meets the eye."
Salaries questioned
Carter also questioned
council's decision to imple-
ment higher city salaries rec-
ommended in the Evergreen
study during a time of budget
cutbacks.
'As a result of state tax
reforms, the city has been
compelled to cut many low-
level service positions while
raising administration sal-
aries to an all-time high," he
said.
Fifty-six people were
awarded raises, some nearly
20-percent adjustments in
pay, many in the $10,000
range, according to Carter.
Most of those were ap-
proved in February before tax

Please see CARTER, 7A


Traffic advisory issued


The 1-75 bridge over
Jackson Road (mile marker
192) Venice will have one
lane closed in both direc-
tions (northbound and
southbound) until 5:30 a.m.
Wednesday due to con-
struction activity.
Other intermittent lane
closures due to mainte-


nance will take place on 1-75
near State Road 681 (Venice
Connector) through Aug. 31
from 6 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. in
the northbound lanes, and
from 7 pm. to 6 a.m. in the
southbound lanes. The
speed limit will be reduced
to 60 mph during lane clo-
sures.


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fl I fLMM IDEJU I fL L-BMERICAN PROmFIE wn


6B AMERICAN PROFILE
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2A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007


BACK IN TIME
STORM ON CASEY KEY, 1957


















PHOTO COURTESY OF VENICE ARCHIVES
A Casey Key cottage damaged during a June 1957 two-day
tropical storm. For more on this and other historical materials,
visit Venice Archives and Area Historical Collection at 351 S.
Nassau St., across from West Blalock Park. The mission of
Venice Archives is to collect and preserve historical and arche-
ological material relating to Venice and the communities of
Nokomis, Laurel and Osprey, whose histories have been inter-
woven from 1867 to the present. Hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday and Wednesdays. Call 486-2487 for more information.


Sb *IIT7E


'Copyrighted Material

indicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers',


l I ** *qw- n
a -- sO** 0.


r *r..


DOE starts teacher misconduct site


BY JASON WITZ
STAFF WRITER


The Department of Ed-
ucation has started a Web
site allowing anyone to
check if disciplinary action
has been taken this year
against a Florida educator's
certificate.
The online database,
www.myfloridateacher.com,


offers information on teacher
misconduct cases brought to
the state level. Using this pub-
lic information, parents are
able to view compliant sum-
maries against educators,
including any penalties that
may have been applied to
their certificate.
"We just wanted to take
information that was already
available and make it more


accessible," said Jennifer
Fennell, DOE spokeswoman..
The disciplinary action can
range from a letter of repri-
mand to a suspension or
revocation of the certificate.
The Web site will not display
information on current inves-
tigations.
Searches with no results
indicate disciplinary action
has not been taken against


any educators in the district
since Jan. 1.
Sarasota County has five
educators who received disci-
plinary action, including two
who canno longer have cer-
tificate.
For more information, call
(850) 245-0438. *

jwitz@sun-herald.com


Bet on disaster futures


Opportunists always look
for ways to turn a quick buck.
It's the American way.
Tropical Bob expects capi-
talists to soon take note of
money to be made from disas-
ters.
The premise? Everyone
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the world is full of bad acci-
dents now. Take, for instance,
the melting of arctic ice. The
polar ice cap is disappearing
at a record pace.
It's time for disaster cruises.
Luxury liners could float
gawkers right up to the last
iceberg. They'd snap digital
photos of the last polar bear
and send smiley messages -
"Having a great time" to
envious friends.


TROPICAL BOB
WEATHER COMMENTS


FlriaSoter


Aug. 27 ......900
Aug. 26......104 r
Aug. 25 ......705
Aug. 24 ......507
Aug. 23 ......786


Aug. 27 ......11-12-19-22-35
Aug. 26 ........7-17-26-34-35
Aug. 25........6-22-24-28-35
Aug. 24..........2-6-16-27-31
Aug. 23..........2-6-12-24-28


Aug. 27 ....8500
XM Aug. 26 ....2611
-8 Aug. 25 ..9398
'w V 1A Aug. 24 .... 4979



MegaBall ......................... 21
Aug. 21 ...................2-5-9-15
MegaBall.......... ............ 13
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings


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Aug. 25 .......4-8-22-26-32-49
Aug. 22 ...22-31-32-36-48-51
Aug. 18.....4-11-22-44-45-47
Aug. 15.......7-8-37-49-51-53
Aug. 11.....3-11-22-23-24-51
Aug. 8.........3-4-10-29-30-38


Payoff for Aug. 25
4 6-digit winners: ........... $13M
334 5-digit winners: .$3,839.50
16,381 4-digit winners: $63.50
307,771 3-digit winners: $4.50
Drawings occur Wednesdays, Saturdays


The estimated jackpot is $3 million

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Lawmakers look to fix no-fault


BY BOB FLISS
STAFF WRITER

Florida's no-fault insur-
ance law dates back to the
1970s and is really showing
its age.
So when the Legislature
convenes for its budget-cut-
ting session Sept. 18, the
agenda will probably also
include finding some kind of
fix for no-fault.
The Republican leadership
last week introduced a bill
that would keep the $10,000
of personal injury protection
coverage, but limit payments
for outpatient care to $5,000.
Hospital emergency rooms
could still claim the full
$10,000.
The bill would also extend
a revised no-fault law through
2012:
Property tax and property
insurance reform have occu-
pied most of the Legislature's
attention through a 10-week
regular session and two short
special sessions this year.
During this time, everyone in
the Capitol has known that
no-fault is supposed to sun-
set on Oct. 1, unless, at a min-
imum, the Legislature passes
an extension.
But no-fault, which started
off as a legal avenue to pro-
vide accident victims some
quick financial relief, has
turned into an embarrass-
ment that has helped make
Florida one of the most


expensive states in which to
insure a vehicle.
Clinical
No-fault's mandatory
$10,000 PIP has become a
magnet for fraud. The $10,000
is disbursed to accident vic-
tims to cover emergency
room care and outpatient
treatment It can even be used
to cover injury losses other
than medical bills for exam-
ple, lost wages, or even the cost
of hiring help for domestic
chores during recovery.
The problem is that the
$10,000 coverage represents a
pot of money that makes an
attractive target for scam
artists but is too small to justi-
fy going to court over. So,
many PIP claims get paid by
insurers on virtually a "no
questions asked" basis.
. The ready availability of
PIP money has spawned a
whole class of outpatient "PIP
clinics." State regulators have
cracked down on some of the
clinics' more outrageous
practices, which have been
known to including employ-
ing "runners" to contact
recent accident victims for
appointments. PIP clinics
tend to be concentrated in
Miami-Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
Outed
Amid all the reports of PIP
fraud, one fact that gets lost is
the degree to which the med-


ical profession has changed
since no-fault was enacted in
the 1970s.
"At the time when PIP was
instituted, most people who
were in a car wreck were
treated at the hospital," Rep.
Paige Kreegel, R-Punta Gorda,
said. "That slowly changed to
outpatient treatment of these
problems and that paral-
lels a general trend toward
outpatient treatment."
Although the economics of
PIP cry out for serious reform,
the politics this year have
trended more toward extreme
caution. There's a feeling in
Tallahassee that half of the
legislators are afraid that a PIP
sunset would mean financial
disaster for hospitals and
accident, victims alike. The
other half, looking at the
fraud aspect, would just like
PIP to go away.
But now, Gov. Charlie Crist
and Chief Financial Officer
Alex Sink have both stated
they favor a cautious exten-
sion rather than letting PIP
sunset. The Democratic
minority in the House is also
on record for extension -
and both Rep. Mike Grant, R-
Port Charlotte and Kreegel
note that the Senate is going
to take a cautious approach
to nearly any issue.
The unknown
Although pro-PIP forces
have taken a long time to
mobilize, there's finally a real-


ization in Tallahassee that
nobody really knows what
would happen after if nrio-
fault expires Oct. 1. So, the
House Republican leadership
at least has staked out a posi-
tion with the 30-page bill
introduced last week.
"I suspect that has been
put out there for the Senate to
comment on along with
the insurance companies and
hospitals. By the time all is
said and done,, there will be
massive changes to that doc-
ument," Grant said.
"My gut feeling is that it
has at least a wifik and a nod
from the Senate," Kreegel
said. "Because of that, this
may be the fix although
there may be some tweaking
at the last minute. There also
may be some digging in of
heels at the last minute."
The insurance industry
has been split into three
camps on no-fault's future,
explained Sam Miller, execu-
tive vice president of the
Florida Insurance Council, a
Tallahassee-based industry


lobbying group.
The state's top-tier auto-
mobile insurers would simply
like PIP to go away Oct. 1.
State Farm has been particu-
larly aggressive since early
this year in publicizing that its
typical auto policyholder
would save about 16 percent
just by not having to buy PIP
any more.
The industry has argued
that the vast majority of PIP
claims would still be covered
by some other type of insur-
ance regular health insur-
ance or uninsured motorist
coverage.
But Miller noted that there
are smaller carriers who
would prefer a reformed no-
fault law rather than a tort-
based system. Smaller insur-
ers have less money to hire
lawyers and, if nothing
else, PIP has kept a lot of cases
out of court.
At fault
Florida's hospitals and
health insurers also want a
reformed no-fault law. And


there's more involved here
than just hospitals being
stuck with emergency room
bills.
"The impact of PIP as
we peel back the many layers
of it has an impact on the
state budget, it impacts our
court system, our Medicaid
program, police officer pen-
sions, children's health care
and the rental car industry,"
said Rich Rasmussen, vice
president of the Florida
Hospital Association.
'A classic example would
be our court system," Ras-
mussen said. "There were
about 275,000 accidents in
Florida last year. Without no-
fault, we move to a fault-
based system.
"In every one of these
cases fault would have to be
determined. If that's indeed
the case that there has to be a
finding of fault, or a lawsuit,
or some kind of legal remedy
put into place then that's
going to cost money."
bfliss@sun-herald.com


CORRECTION
An Aug. 26 article incorrectly stated businessman Steve Albee was hired by the city of
Venice as an airport charrette consultant. In fact, he was hired by airport consultant
Hanson Inc., according to Albee. The Gondolier Sun regrets the error.


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cheeses; unpasteurized milk; pat6; caffeine; alcohol; and unwashed vegetables. For more information, visit www.SmileTrain.org.
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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29,2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM














Trial set for Tammi House lawsuit


BY GEORGE MCGINN
STAFF WRITER

Sarasota County has its
day in court set in the dis-
crimination lawsuit against it.
But the government and
Tammi House attorneys must
first convince a federal judge
of the merits of the case.
U.S. District Court Judge
James Whittemore scheduled
the trial to begin on Sept. 4 at
the Middle District Court-
house in Tampa. He is esti-
mating the trial will last up to
three weeks. Whittemore
ordered that nine jurors will
be selected to hear the case,
with the hope that six will
remain to deliberate.
And if the U.S. govern-
ment, Tammi House and
Renaissance Manor attorneys
fail to prove the merits, of their
case, there will be no trial.
Renaissance Manor operates
the six-building Tammi
House complex for residents
with mental disabilities and
substance abuse.
Oral arguments will be
heard Aug. 29 in response to
the county's motion for sum-
mary judgment claiming that
by following its own zoning
laws and Florida Statutes, it
did not intentionally discrim-
inate against Tammi House.
And that is not the only
hurdle facing the Tammi
House and Sarasota County.
Both have motions to exclude
expert witnesses on which
Whittemore must first rule
before the trial starts.
Survey questioned
In one motion, Sarasota
County is asking the court to
exclude the testimony of one
of Tammi House's expert wit-
nesses.
Harry Swartz was hired by
the Tammi House to conduct
a survey of the living condi-
tions of its residents.
At the Aug. 17 hearing,
Attorney Lynn Calkins, repre-
senting Sarasota County,
challenged the methodology
Swartz used in gathering his
data. She said the survey was
biased from the start.
According to federal court
documents, the survey report
states, "To help prevent the
county from closing Tammi
House, we are gathering
some information about its
residents and their opinions
about it as a place to live
while recovering from addic-
tion."
"Swartz's survey is biased
opinion based on flawed
methodology," Calkins said to
Whittemore. "He gathered
information based on the
statement that the county
was trying to close them
down."
Calkins also claims that the
questions themselves are
misleading because they are
unfairly worded to suggest
answers "favorable to the
Tammi House" and the
claims made in the case.
Whittemore asked Tammi
House's lead attorney, Beth
Pepper, whether the survey
started the way Calkins
claimed. She said she does
not believe the survey said
that.
As both parties were look-
ing for the survey to present
to Whittemore, the judge said
he would just pull it up on his
computer.
"The survey reads on the
top 'to prevent Tammi House
from being closed down' and
it asks the residents what they
think about it," Whittemore
said.
"That is a question of
methodology," Whittemore
said, adding that it might be
questionable whether the
survey was indeed flawed. He
has yet to rule on the county's
motion.
No threat
Swartz stated in his 15-
page report that the Tammi
House complex is compatible
with the neighborhood it is
in. He also states that the uses


at the Tammi House do not
create traffic congestion in
the nearby neighborhood. He
conducted his survey and site
visit in April of 2007.
"There are not enough


nearby neighbors to feel the
effects of the traffic pro-
duced by (the) Tammi
House," Swartz wrote in his
report.
Swartz said that the Tammi
House does not threaten the
"safety, or security" of the
neighbors nearby.


Zoning code in issue house across the street for
In 2004, Sarasota County central activities.
said that activities at the On May 16, 2005, Ren-
Tammi House in Warm aissance Manor, along with
Mineral Springs violated both residents Tracey E, Richard A.,
zoning laws and Florida and Gerard 0., filed a federal
statutes. Tammi House con- lawsuit against Sarasota
sists of six homes that each County and two individuals,
house six people, and a main Joseph and Maria Serna, who


live next to the complex.
Then on June 30, 2006, the
U.S. Justice Department filed
a lawsuit charging Sarasota
County with housing dis-
crimination against disabled
individuals. It is prosecuting
the county for refusing to
allow Renaissance Manor to


operate the Tammi House.
Oral argument on the
summary judgment motion
is scheduled for 2:30 p.m.,
Aug. 29, at the Middle District
Court, Sam M. Gibbons
Building, in Tampa.

gmcginn@sun-herald.com


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4A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007. -










WFflI~JF~flAY AL IC, ~ 2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


The round-about route to mediation


Sarasota County invoked mediation Monday over
the Bella Citta project; Venice invoked mediation
Tuesday over a planned county round-about.


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR


It was purely by coinci-
dence the Venice City Council
invoked mediation only one
day after the county invoked
mediation on a separate pro-
ject.
Or was it?
On Tuesday, city council
agreed it had no choice but to
invoke mediation over a
round-about the Board of
County Commissioners pro-
posed earlier this summer at
Jacaranda Boulevard and East
Venice Avenue.
City Manager Marty Black
said a Gondolier Sun article
last week, which quoted de-
velopers apparently antici-
pating the round-about, gave
him pause. Later, he learned
county planners were moving
ahead with rezone petitions
for the round-about, and
gathering the necessary
paperwork to ensure devel-
opers at the intersection pay
for it.
All this took place after
Black received assurances
from commissioners the
county would cease all activi-
ty on the round-about until
the city and county held a
joint meeting. That's sched-
uled for Sept. 19.
"Unfortunately, the county
is proceeding. I regret we are
forced to do this," Black said.
Commissioners voted 3-2
on Monday, Aug. 27 to send
the Bella Citta rezone petition
to mediation.
Both are invoking the
alternative dispute resolution
process within the joint plan-


ning agreement adopted
early this year. It's the first of
its kind in Florida, heralded as
step toward improved plan-
ning between counties and
cities.
In acting, the BOCC reject-
ed its own staff finding that
the joint planning, agreement
between the county and city
of Venice was followed when
the Venice Planning Com-
mission approved the Bella
Citta rezone petition in June.
In July, city council was
prepared to give its okay to
the three-story, 165-unit de-
velopment in North Venice
when the BOCC threatened a
"legal review," arguing the
new development isn't com-
patible with the surrounding
area. The proposed condo
project borders 5-acre resi-
dences in Sogento Ranches.
The Sorrento Ranches Home-
owners Association has been
fighting the project vigorous-
ly.
City planners met Aug. 1
with their county counter-
parts to explain their position
on compatibility and zoning
review procedures that apply
to the JPA, apparently to the
satisfaction of county staff.
But commissioners dis-
agreed with their staff.
Commissioners Shannon
Staub, Joe Barbetta and Jon
Thaxton voted instead to
invoke mediation.
Barbetta said the project
called for too many units.
c Thaxton acknowledged
the county has previously
approved projects like Bella
Citta in the past. Still, he
voted for mediation and


wants to see more mitigation
over the compatibility issue.
Commissioners Nora Pat-
terson and Paul Mercier
appeared satisfied with the
county staff position.

"It was never our
intent to create
another whole level
of review."
City Manager
Marty Black



New reviews?
County Administrator Jim
Ley cautioned the BOCC it
was inviting itself to weigh in
on a quasi-judicial proceed-
ing of the city of Venice.
City Manager Marty Black
appeared disappointed by
the BOCC decision, but not
surprised.
He's concerned about the
impact this decision will have
on other planning and zoning
projects in the future.
"It was never our intent to
create another whole level of
review," Black said.
The next step will be for
city and county officials is to
select from a list of area medi-
ators. If the county and city
can't agree on an acceptable
mediator, the city would then
request the appointment of a
mediator by the chief judge of
the circuit county for Sarasota
County.
The city and county will
split the cost of mediation
services, which could take up
to 90 days to conclude.
Other council news
Venice City Council took
the following actions Tues-


day:
Designated September
2007 as National Estuaries
Month.
Directed the city manag-
er to write a letter to county
commissioners in support of
the Wildlife Center of Venice.
It's the last place left in
Sarasota County to treat
injured wild animals.
Acknowledged Police Ser-
geant Kevin McGrath for 25
years of service.,
Reappointed John Os-
borne and Dawn Stoddard to
serve another three-year term
on the Parks and Recreation
Advisory Board.
Reappointed Council
Member John Moore to serve
another two-year term on the
Sarasota County Tourist De-
velopment Council.
Approved a request by
the Venice Aviation Society
Inc. to use council chambers
when the community hall is
in use.
Approved the transfer of
$36,000 for legal services.
Approved the expendi-
ture of $1,710 for a fireproof
safe from a Department of
Community Affairs grant.


BY STEVEN J. SMITH
STAFF WRITER


After a delay of a month
and a half due to concerns
raised about language, the
Sarasota County Commission
passed a comprehensive fer-
tilizer ordinance Monday.
"We refined it and tried to
make it fair and clear to any-
body that's going to be apply-
ing fertilizer," said Coun-
ty Commissioner Shannon
Staub. "It's a pretty aggressive
first step."
Staub said the ordinance
would play a role in stem-
ming red tide and algae in
area water bodies and should
take effect in about six to
seven months.
Highlights of the ordi-
nance include:
A limit of 4 pounds of
nitrogen per 1,000 square feet
of landscaped area per calen-
dar year.
Establishment of a 6-foot,
low-maintenance zone near
ponds, streams, water cours-
es, lakes, canals or wetlands
in which fertilizing, mowing
and watering would be


reduced.
I*e A limit of 1/4-pound of
phosphorus allowed per
1,000 square feet, per applica-
tion.
A limit of 1/2-pound of
phosphorus allowed per
1,000 square feet, per year.
Establishment of a no-
fertilizer zone within 10 feet
of any water body.
Authorization for code
enforcement officers to make
inspections of all land uses to
ensure compliance.
Training of licensed pro-
fessionals in order to apply
fertilizer.
Fines for violations: first
offense, $100; second offense,
$300; additional offenses, $500.
"I think the real signifi-
cance of the ordinance is to
get people to realize there is a
cause and effect with the way
fertilizers and pesticides are
applied and how it affects our
environment," said County
Commissioner Paul Mercier.
"I still believe the ordinance is
going to be more educational
and communicative to the
public than anything else."
ssmith@sun-herald.com


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Sarasota County adopts

fertilizer ordinance


VENICE GONDOLIEF SUN 5A


WEDNESDAY. AUG. 29,2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM


I EXTRA 30% OFF ALREADY-REDUCED HOME CLEARANCE PRICES I


"













VENICE GONDOLIER SUN OBITUARIES WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007


Alejandro Fernandez
, Alejandro 'Alex" Fer-
nandez of Venice died
Thursday, Aug. 23, 2007.
Heritage Memorial is in
charge of arrangements.
Margaret A. Cassidy
Margaret A. Cassidy, age
70, of Venice, passed away on
Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2007.
She was born in Brooklyn,
N.Y. on July 18, 1937. She was
a homemaker. She moved to
Venice 20 years ago from New
Jersey. She was a member of
Epiphany Cathedral and
Jacaranda Tennis Club, both
inVenice.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 49 years, John T.
Cassidy; three sons, John
Cassidy of West Milford, N.J.,
and Kevin Cassidy and
Dennis (Veronica) Cassidy,
both of Oak Ridge, N.J.; a
brother, Marty Leonard of
Norfolk, Va.; sisters Joan
Croteau and Rose Kelly of
Venice, Pat Gregory of
California, Ann Whiting of
Arizona and Kathy Chjarello
of Venice. She was prede-
ceased by a sister, Dorothy
Young. She also leaves behind
five grandchildren.
Services: A Memorial Mass
will be held at 1 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 30, at
Epiphany Cathedral. Farley
Funeral Home in Venice is
handling the arrangements.
Friends may visit anytime
online at www.farleyfuneral-
home.com to sign a guest
register book and extend con-
dolences to the family.
Contributions: Memorial
donations may be made to
the American Cancer Society,
South Sarasota/D@Soto Unit,
2801 Fruitville Road, Suite


250, Sarasota, FL 34237.

Arthur Clarke Letts
Arthur Clarke "Art"
Letts, 90, Venice, Fla.,
and formerly of
Chicago, born Dec. 21,
1916, died Friday, Aug.
24, 2007.
Art was a World War II vet-
eran serving in the U.S. Navy,
and he worked for Kaiser
Aluminum Company and
retired as a field engineer. He
was a member of Sahib
Shrine Center, the Keystone
Cops, Venice Shrine Club,
Masonic Old Glory Lodge,
Westchester, Ill., the Amer-
ican Legion and the Blind
Veterans of America.
Survivors include his wife,
Nancy Bing Letts; a son,
Arthur Michael Letts of Ven-
ice; nieces Elizabeth Bacom
of Petersburg, Alaska, and
Cindy Meseke of West Chi-
cago, Ill.
Contributions: In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be made
to Sahib Shrine Center at 600
Beneva Road, Sarasota, FL;
or TideWell Hospice and
Palliative Care of Venice.

Alpha M. MacPherson
Alpha M. MacPherson, 94,
of Venice died Friday, Aug. 24,
2007. Farley Funeral Home,
Venice Chapel, is in charge of
arrangements.

Frank A. Pagliaro
Frank A. Pagliaro, 77,
ofVenice and formerly
of New York, died
S Tuesday, Aug. 21,
2007.
He was born April 12,1930,
in Flushing, N.Y. Frank was a
master sergeant in the U.S.
. Air Force. He was a member


of the South Venice Yacht
Club, America Legion Post
159, Elks Lodge 1854 Venice,
National VFW Post 14000, Air
Force Sergeants Association
and the Venice Moose Club.
He was a member of Trinity
Presbyterian Church. He
graduated from LaSalle
Extension University.
Survivors include his
wife, Jacquelen of Venice, a
son, Mark Pagliaro of Venice;
stepsons Gregory, Dirk and
Daniel Miller, all of Mich-
igan; four grandchildren;
two great-grandchildren;
and several nieces, nephews
and cousins.
Services: Services will be at
1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, at
Ewing Funeral Home.
Contributions: Memorial
donations may be made to
Loveland Center Inc. 157
South Havana Road, Venice,
FL'34292.


Lloyd M. Renk
Lloyd M. "Butch" Renk
died Saturday, Aug. 18, 2007.
He was born Sept. 23,1949,
in Princeton, N.J., and gradu-
ated from Petty School,
Highston, N.J. He moved to
Florida in the 1980s and
worked at a filling station for
10 years.
He is survived by his father,
Lloyd M. Renk Sr., and his
mother, Phyllis M. Janick
Renk.
Services: A Celebration of
Life is being held at 5 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 8, at the North
Jetty Fish Camp.
Contributions: Memorials
may be made to the Moffitt
Cancer Center, 12902
Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL
33612-9497.


k Jerry R. Shearer
Jerry R. Shearer of
Nokomis died Friday,
Aug. 24, 2007, in
Venice. He was 78.
He was born Dec. 24,1928,
in Waco, Texas, and arrived in
the area in 1991 from Silver
Spring, Md. He was an emer-
gency preparedness specialist
with the Federal Highway
Administration, Department
of Defense. He served in the
Navy as a lieutenant com-
mander during the Korean
War.
Survivors include his wife,
Mary of Nokomis; three
daughters, Jeri Lipsitz of
Sandy Spring, Md., Joan
Lastova of Sterling, Va., and
Margot Cuppett of Cedar
Springs, Mich.; and five
grandchildren.
Services: Funeral services
will be at a later date. Lemon
Bay Funeral Home, Venice
Chapel, is in charge of ar-
rangements.

James Ellis Warbington
James Ellis War-
bington, 80, of Ven-
ice, passed away Sat-
urday, Aug. 25, 2007,
peacefully at his
home surrounded by his
family.
James was born Nov. 2,
1926, in Royal Oak, Mich. He
came to Venice 40 years ago
from Boynton Beach. He
was the founder of Jimco
Maintenance and retired in
1992 after 40 years of owner-
ship. He was a Baptist, a
member of the U.S. Navy
serving during World War II
as a gunner and a member
of the American Legion in
Venice.
Survivors include two


daughters, Lori O'Rawe and
Lynn Moseley, both of
Venice;. one son, Reid
Warbington, also of Venice;
three granddaughters, Kel-
sey O'Rawe and Kara Mose-
ley, both of Venice, and
Cecilia Warbington of Sara-
sota; three grandsons, Ro-
bert Moseley and Reid
Warbington Jr., both of
Venice, and Jimmy War-
bington of Minnesota; and a
niece, Carol Ann Hardee of
Tampa.
Services: Services for James


were held at 2 p.m. on
Sunday, Aug. 26, at Farley
Funeral Home, Venice
Chapel, with burial at Venice
Memorial Gardens on Center
Road.
Contributions: In lieu of flow-
ers, donations may be made
in James' name to TideWell
Hospice and Palliative Care,
5955 Rand Blvd, Sarasota,
FL 34238. Friends may visit
anytime online at www.farley
funeralhome.com to sign a
guest register book and
extend condolences.


LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE October 24,1996 and March 1 st file their claims with this court
Johnson's Towing of Venice 2002, respectively. The must fie thir claims with this ourt
gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien names and addresses of the per- THIN MONTHRS AT LI THE
and intent to sell these vehicles on sonal representative and the per- TON OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
09/19/2007, 09:00 a.m. at sonal representative's attorney are TION OF THIS NOTSICE
604 Tamiami Trail N, Nokomis, set forth below. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
FL 34275-2137, pursuant to sub- All creditors of the decedent and WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
section 713.78 of the Florida other persons having claims or NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
statutes. Johnson's Towing of demands against decedent's PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
Venice reserves the right to estate, including unmatured, con. ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
accept or reject any and/or all tingent or unliquidated claims, on YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
bids. whom a copy of this notice is DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
served must file their claims with IS BARRED.
* 1995 CHEVROLET this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
1GCEG25KOSF137060 THREE MONTHS AFTER THE The date of first publication of this
- 1994 DODGE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- notice is August 22, 2007.
2B6HB21Y4RK110871 TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
* 1993 CHEVROLET TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF Personal Representative:
2G1FP22P8P2132307 SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS /s/ Benny Slabyhoudek
- 1997 INFINITI NOTICE ON THEM. 3835 Calliandra Dr.
JNKAY21DOVM501365 All other creditors of the decedent Sarasota, FL 34232
Sand persons having claims or
PUBLISH: AUGUST 29, 2007 demands against the decedent's Attorney for Personal
estate, including unmatured, con- Representative:
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE tingent or unliquidated claims, must /s/ James L. Essenson
Johnson's Towing of Venice file their claims with this Court James' L. Essenson, Esquire
gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER Florida-Bar No. 359033
and intent to sell these vehicles on THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBU- 2071 Main Street
09/26/2007, 09:00 a.m. at CATION OF THIS NOTICE. Sarasota, FL 34237
604 Tamlami Trail N, Nokomis, ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS (941) 954-0303
FL 34275-2137, pursuant to sub- NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV- PUBLISH: August 22, 29, 2007
section 713.78 of the Florida ER BARRED.
statutes. Johnson's Towing of THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
Venice reserves the right to TION OF THIS NOTICE IS
accept or reject any and/or all AUGUST 29, 2007. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
bids. THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIR-


- 1984 CADILLAC
1G6AW4787E9056335
- 1993 TOYOTA
1NXAE09E8PZ079937
- 2004 TOYOTA
2T1KR32E94C310488
- 2002 MITSUBISHI
JA4LS21H92J008144


Personal Representative:
Donald B. DeWitt
360 S. Indiana Ave.
Englewood, FL 34223
Attorney for Personal Rep.
Robert A. Dickinson
FL Bar No. 161468
460 S. Indiana Ave.


UIT IN AIND FOR SARASOTA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RICHARD A. SMITH,
Deceased.
File No: 2007-CP-8268-SC


OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries are accepted from funeral homes and crematories only. There is no charge for publishing an abbreviated death
notice once. Full obituaries, notices of services and repeat death notices will be subject to charges based on their length.
Obituaries should be e-mailed to lkennedy@venicegondolier.com and must include a phone number. There is an addition-
al charge for faxed or hand-delivered obituaries, and for photos. The Venice Gondolier Sun publishes on Sundays,
Wednesday and Fridays. Obituary deadlines are noon for faxes and 2 p.m. for e-mails the day before publication. For more
information, call (941) 207-1110.


POLICE BEAT

County seeking
metal thieves
Copper and aluminum are
hot commodities this sum-
mer, so hot that someone has
heisted them at Sarasota
County Utilities sites more
than 20 times this year.
The thefts have cost utili-
ties ratepayers more than
$40,000 in replacement costs
and prompted the installa-
tion of surveillance cameras.
Now, county officials want
the public's help in identify-
ing the thieves.
"The loss of aluminum lids
at lift stations costs $1,800 in
utilities revenues per theft,
and it results in a possible
safety hazard until the theft is
discovered and the missing
materials replaced," said Fred
Sherrod, manager of instru-
mentation technology for
Sarasota County.
Sherrod said that in all the
instances, the thieves used
bolt cutters to remove pad-
locks into closed sites, carting
off pounds of copper wiring
and aluminum lift station lids
weighing 50 pounds each.
According to Sherrod, the
lids protect wells as deep as
30 feet that contain raw
sewage.
"Someone who fell in
would plummet over two sto-
ries before hitting the
sewage," he said.
"The loss of wire from a
transformer vault costs
ratepayers up to $5,000 per
incident, and could result in a
sewage spill and additional
safety risks if someone wan-
ders into an open vault," he


Candidate
packets available
Packets for candidates for
Venice mayor and city council
are available now at the city
clerk's office at Venice City
Hall, 401 W. Venice Ave.
Candidates must be regis-
tered to vote in the city for 12
consecutive months prior to
the qualifying date.
To receive a packet, candi-


added. "These vaults contain
areas of extremely high volt-
age that could be deadly to
anyone who wanders in past
an unlocked gate. That makes
it a matter of public safety."
Sherrod has compared
high-resolution photographs
of the stolen pieces with
inventory at scrap metal deal-
ers throughout the region and
ruled out the possibility that
the.stolen metal is being pur-
chased locally.
Instead, Sherrod believes
the thieves may be transport-
ing the copper and alu-
minum lids to an illegal scrap
metal dealer somewhere else
in the state.. He hopes that
surveillance cameras that
have been installed at lift sta-
tions and transformer vaults
throughout the county will
lead to arrests.
Residents who have infor-
mation about the thefts
should contact the Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office and
refer to case number 07-
70580.

Venice Police
Department arrests
Alvin C. Reinhardt Jr., 31,
1600 blockW. Neponsit Drive,
Venice. Charge: attempted
burglary. Bond: $10,000.

Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office arrests
Robert Denney, 18, 600
block Bradenton Road, Ven-
ice. Charges: battery on a law
enforcement officer, firefight-
er or emergency medical care
provider, resisting arrest with
violence. Bond: $2,500.


dates must make an appoint-
ment for a one-hour meeting
before the qualifying date to
review the required docu-
ments, between 8 a.m. and 4
p.m., Monday through Friday,
by calling 486-2626, Ext. 2010.
The qualifying period is
from 8 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 4,
until noon, Friday, Sept. 7.
The election takes place on
Nov. 6.


Stephanie L Johnson, 26,
600 block South McCall Road,
Englewood. Charges: ob-
structing or opposing an officer
without violence, possession of
cannabis less than 20 grams,
driving while license suspend-
ed or revoked. Bond: $1,120.
William Monda, 52, 2100
block West Crest Drive,
Englewood. Charges: con-
tempt open container.
Bond: $5,000.
Dillon B. Welch, 21, 700
block Nectar Road, Venice.
Charges: probation violation
- leaving the scene of an
accident. Bond: $500.
Timothy T. Kane, 24, 3000
block Argyle Road, Venice.
Charges: violation of parole
- possession of a controlled
substance, violation of parole
- burglary of unoccupied
structure or conveyance.
Bond: no listing.
Byron Belser, 46, 200
Cavallini Drive, Nokomis.
Charge: battery domestic.
Bond: no listing.
Rosewitha M. Roberts, 55,


S1


2900 block Nocturne Road,
Venice. Charges: trespass
(three counts). Bond: $50,000.
Michelle Caldwell, 27,
1000 block Lillian St., Venice.
Charge: probation violation
- reckless driving. Bond:
$1,500.
Shawna Hewett, 39, 1000
block Iowa Ave., Englewood.
Charge: probation violation
- possession and use of nar-
cotic equipment. Bond:
$2,500.
Mark A. Squires, 43, 900
block Citrus Road, Venice.
Charges: possession of
cannabis less than 20 grams,
DUI. Bond: $620.

Florida Department of
Corrections arrests
Joshua J. Diesi, 22, 5900
block Regent Road, Venice.
Charges: probation violation
- grand theft, felony battery.
Bond: no listing.

Criminal registration
Matthew M. Lackey, 33,
100 block Broadway Ave.


A.G. EDWARDS.
FULLY INVESTED IN OUR CLIENTS.


YOU CAN'T RIDE OFF INTO
THE SUNSET IF YOUR NEST EGG
WON'T CARRY YOU.


We're big believers in a long-term retirement
strategy based on objective financial advice.
And in having a financial consultant who can
help you every step of the way. To see whether your
nest egg could benefit from such Midwestern
horse sense, call us today.


Englewood
699 S. Indiana Avenue
Englewood, FL
941-474-3271


Venice North -
700 US 41 N. Bypass
Venice, FL
941-488-6751


Venice South
4242 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL
941-408-8797


0ii06 A,.U.Edwairts & So,,itic. I,- *Nlem,,trSIPC


Englewood, FL 34223
PUBLISH: AUGUST 29, 2007 (941) 474-7600 NOTICE TO CREDITORS
PUBLISH: August 29, Septem- The administration of the estate of
ber 5, 2007 RICHARD A. SMITH, File Num-
ber 2007-CP-8268-SC is pend-
NOTICETO CREDITORS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR ing in the Circuit Court for SARA-
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA SOTA County, Florida, Probate Oivi-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR PROBATE DIVISION sion, the address of which is P.O.
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA Box 3079, Sarasota, Florida
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: 34230-3079. The names and
JOHN R. NELSON, addresses of the Personal Repre-
IN RE: ESTATE OF Deceased tentative and the Personal Repre-
EDWARD MARSICO, sentative's attorney are set forth
Deceased. File No. 2007-CP-0453-NC below,
All creditors of the decedent and
File Nor2007.-CP-9436-NC NOTICE TO CREDITORS omer o'e,..i:_, r-;~,{ ;i,,T ,or
ETOCREDIN R. NELSO'. d ', eiie. ,rncija-j.n TO..or,
Tne aMm,,:t'anon si me e.il.le -A ru *i .o e def t.I was April 16. irr.ei n. : unioar iniile .:i- ,.,i or,
EDWARD MARSICO. .eceaed 2007, File Number 2007-CP- ruTi ..:.py oi tri ,,or..r .
whose date of death was June 1, 8453-NC; is pending in the Circuit served must file their claims with
2007, is pending in the Circuit Court for Sarasota County, Flori- this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
Court for SARASOTA County, Flori- da, Probate Division, the address 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
da, Probate Division, the address of of which is P.O. Box 3079, Sara- THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
which is Post Office Box 3079, sota, FL 34230-3079. The THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
Sarasota, Florida 34230. The names and addresses of the per- AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
names and addresses of the Per- sonal representative and the per- OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
sonal Representative and the Per- sonal representative's attorney are THEM.
sonal Representative's attorney are set forth below. All other creditors of the decedent
set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and and persons having claims or
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent's
other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured, con.
demands against decedent's estate estate, including unmatured, con- tingent, or unliquidated claims,
on whom a copy of this notice is esfat8, inorclqid atued, i on-utienth or aeiqridated claims,
required to be served must ile their ingent, or unliqidated claims, on must file their claims with this court
claims with this court WITHIN THE whom a copy of this notice is WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER served must tile their claims with THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBU- this court WITHIN THE LATER OF CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER. THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS The date of the first publication
NOTICE ON THEM. AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE of this notice is AUGUST 29,
All other creditors of the decedent OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON 2007.
and other persons having claims or THEM.
demands against decedent's estate All other creditors of the decedent Personal Representative:
must file their claims with this court and other persons having claims or GERALDINE SMITH
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE demands against decedent's 226 Como Drive
DATE OF THE RRST PUBUCA- estate, including unmatured, con- Venice, FL 34285
TION OF THIS NOTICE. tingent or unliquidated claims, must
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED file their claims with this court A. BRENT McPEEK, ESQ.
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE 3986 S. Tamlami Trail
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- Venice, Florida 34293
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE TION OF THIS NOTICE. (941) 492-3400
WILL BE FOREVER. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED Attorney for Petitioner
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Florida Bar No.: 0003905
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PUBLISH: AUGUST 29, SEPT-
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, EMBER 5, 2007
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
IS BARRED. DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH OTHER NOTICES
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA- IS BARRED.
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS The date of first publication of this
AUGUST 22, 2007. Notice is AUGUST 22, 2007 IN THE CIRCUIT COFlT OF


Personal Representative:
RONALD J. STAGUANO
3200 Pacific Avenue
Wildwood, NJ 08260
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE C. HALL, ESQ.
Flbrida Bar No. 199524
1314 East Venice Ave, Ste E
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941) 480-0999
PUBLISH: August 22, 29, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SUSAN PARKER MOWREY,
Deceased.
File No: 2007-CP-9017-SC
Division: Probate


Personal Representative:
JOHN MASTERS
206 Fairway Dr
Hampstead, NC 38443
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Paul A. Moran, P.A.
Attorney -
Florida Bar No. 320137
46 N. Washington Blvd
Suite 25A
Sarasota, FL 34236
Telephone: (941)-955-1717
PUBLISH: August 22, 29, 2007
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: The Estate of:
PETR SLABYHOUDEK,
Deceased,


THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR THE
COUNTY OF SARASOTA,
STATE OF FLORIDA
IN RE:
Forfeiture of:
1997 DODGE INTREPID (RED)
VIN: 2B3HD46FOVH675376
Case No: 2007-CA-005146-SC
Division: H
Judge: Honorable Robert B.
Bennett, Jr.

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS
TO ANY AND ALL PERSONS WHO
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE FOL-
LOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY:
1997 DODGE INTREPID (RED)
VIN: 2B3HD46FOVH675376


NOTICE TO CREDITORS File No. 2007-CP-004704-NC NOTICE IS given pursuant to Sec-
The administration of the Estate of tions 932.701 through 932.707,
SUSAN PARKER MOWREY, NOTICE TO CREDITORS Florida Statutes (2005), that the
deceased, File No. 2007-CP- The administration of the estate of Petitioner, FLORIDA DEPART-
9017-SC, is pending in the Circuit PETR SLABYHOUDEK, MENT OF HIGHWAY SAFETY
Court for SARASOTA County, Flori deceased, whose date of death MOTOR VEHICLES, through its
da, Probate Division, the address of was on or about April 13, 2007 division, The lorida Highway
which is P.O. Box 3079, Saraso- pending in the Circuit Court for the Patrol, seized the above-described
ta, FL 34230-3079. The estate Twelfth Judicial Circuit in and for property on or about April 25,
is testate and the date of the dece- Sarasota County, Florida, Probate 2007, In Sarasota County,
dent's Will and any Codicils are Division; the address of which is Florida, and is holding the proper-
2000 Main Street, Sarasota, ty pending the outcome of forfeit
Rorida 34237. The names and ture proceedings. All persons or
BI addresses of the personal repre- entities who have a legal interest in
sentative and the personal repre- the subject property may request a
S sentative's attorney are set forth hearing concerning the seized
below, property by contacting Sabrina
All creditors of the decedent and Redd, Assistant Attorney General,
"'Im- other persons having claims or OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENER.
Demands against decedent's ALt., 501 East Kennedy Boulevard,
estate, on whom a copy of this Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33602-
notice is required to be served, 5237. A Petition for Forfeiture has
must file their claims with this court been filed in the above-styled
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 Court. On MAY 15, 2007, the
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF trial court entered an Order Finding
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF Probable Cause. If there is no
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS response by Claimants, Petitioner
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE will seek a Final Order Of Forfeiture.
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. PUBLISH:
All other creditors of the decedent AUGUST 29, 2007
d and other persons having claims or SEPTEMBER 5, 2007
demands against decedent's estate


CITY NOTES


-Air,


WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007


6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN OBITUARIES








VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


%Alr%[CQr-i~.Ax/Allr,' 90IA 'A7 tWWWVIhI~ICMFGO3MDOL~IER.COAM V~I~UT U.~ UIVVV. l*


ETHANOL from Page 1A
regulatory action.
Along with its potential
economic benefits, ethanol
now assumes a political role,
in that it's something both the
Crist and Rubio camps not
to mention the Democratic
minority in both houses -
can agree upon.
Ethanol production tech-
nology still needs plenty of
research. But there seems to
be a consensus that ethanol
has a huge upside potential,
even though much work will
be needed to determine
which production methods
are best for Florida.
On the border
The buzzword here is "bio-
mass," meaning anything
green and growing that can
be ground up, fermented into
a mash and then distilled into
alcohol.
A large share of the nation's
ethanol production comes
from corn. After many years
of depressed prices, the Mid-
west is experiencing a corn
boom as ethanol plants buy
the crop for feedstock.
While this has been great
for Midwestern farmers, it's
become a problem for the
rest of the country at least
in the short run, until corn
acreage can be increased.
Ethanol plants are buying
corn that otherwise would
have become inexpensive
livestock feed one of the
reasons why milk prices are at
record levels.
"When you start making fuel
compete with foodstuffs, you're
bordering on a problem," said
Rep. Paige Kreegel, R-Punta
Gorda, the new chair of the
House Energy Committee.


Along with his Port Char-
lotte medical practice, Kree-
gel is a citrus grower with 55
acres of groves. Citrus peels
have been touted as a possi-
ble feedstock for ethanol
manufacturing. But Kreegel
noted they already get put to
good use, by being ground up
as animal feed.
Still, citrus waste is defi-
nitely on the short list of
products that could supply
Florida ethanol plants.
In recent published ac-
counts, Winter Haven-based
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture chemist BillWidmer pre-
dicted the state's citrus indus-
try produces enough waste to
manufacture 60 million gal-
lons of ethanol a year.
Amenities
Another crop that's on the
short list is sugar cane. Cur-
rently, much of the cane
waste called "bagasse" is
burned, producing some of
the energy needed to run
sugar-processing plants.
Mary Duryea, associate
dean and chair of UF-IFAS's
selection committee, said the
biggest issue in launching an
ethanol demonstration plant
was finding a private-sector
partner. The 2007 Legislature
appropriated $20 million for
the demonstration project,
expecting the university
would be able to find a pri-
vate host plant to cover part
of its infrastructure expenses.
The UF committee has
picked the Florida Crystals
Corp. sugar plant in South
Bay as its primary site, and
the Buckeye Corp. wood pulp
plant in Perry as its alternate.
"We would be hooking into
their steam and electricity ...
Florida Crystal and Bulckeye


both have amenities that we
need. We just can't start on a
bare piece of ground we
need an operating plant,"
Duryea said.
Several other private sector
partners will be recruited -
including an engineering firm
to design the plant, and likely
some other company to han-
dle daily operations. The uni-
versity would get the data
from the project, while a pri-
vate partner would be able to
market the ethanol.
The long run
A forestry researcher be-
fore going into university
administration, Duryea said
the ultimate frontier for eth-
anol production would be
processing feedstock that
otherwise would have little
economic value.
For example, Duryea said
she could envision someday
harvesting invasive tree spe-
cies for example, Brazilian
pepper, Australian pine and
melaleuca that currently
either get processed into
mulch or burned.
Theoretically, any kind of
biomass could be made into
ethanol. But not all plants are
equally valuable. Corn is a
useful feedstock because of
its high sugar content.
Don Markley, chief operat-
ing officer ofLosonoco, a Fort
Lauderdale-based biofuel
producer, said his firm is cur-
rently working on a joint ven-
ture that would involve pro-
cessing municipal yard waste
into ethanol.
Losonoco has also been
working on a deal in Polk
County that would involve
reopening and expanding an
old comnethanol plant. But
this will involve importing


feedstock from out of state.
Significantly, Markley said
this is the only corn produc-
tion Losonoco is considering.
Markley said he agreed the
industry's objective should be
to use feedstock that wouldn't
have any other economic
value. The problem here is
corn ethanol is relatively easy
and inexpensive to produce.
Converting the cellulose in,
for example, wood pulp to
ethanol is "more capital-
intensive," Markley noted.
However, over the long
run, the technology expense
should be more than bal-
anced by the fact that feed-
stock will be available basical-
ly for the cost of transporta-
tion to the plant.
Moon shot
So, the ethanol industry is
a wide-open frontier open
to publicly funded projects
like UF-IFAS's large commer-
cial deals like Losonoco's, and
even old-fashioned inventors
like McDowell.
"Because of our climate,
we believe that Florida could
be the national leader if
not the world leader in
low-carbon fuels," said Jerry
Karnas, Sarasota-based state
director for. Environmental
Defense, and a member of
the environmental advisory
panel appointed by Crist ear-
lier this month.
"What Gov. Crist has called
for is a moon shot," Karnas
said. "Just like when JFK
called for America to go to the
moon, we had no idea how to
get there. But he set out a
bold, ambitious goal that
stuck, and captured people's
imaginations. And other peo-
ple made it happen."
bfliss@sun-herald.com


RENTAL from Page 1A
council members Tuesday to
determine if there is any
potential conflict of interest
in the short-term rental ap-
peal.
Anderson asked each if
they knew any of the individ-
uals or limited liability com-
panies that engage in short-
term rentals in Venice's resi-
dential neighborhoods; if'
they have any business deal-
ing with litigants; or own or
have members of their family
who own residential rental
property located in the city of
Venice.
A "yes" to any of the ques-


CARTER from Page 1A
reforms were implemented.
"It is worth noting that (at
least) five positions are all
involved with development.
These salary raises are an out-
rage. With the climate of
today's economy increases of
this magnitude are irrespon-
sible."
He's especially miffed at
some of the more noticeable
changes, like losing the print-
ed city newsletter, which will
still be available by e-mail,
and cutting the city hall
receptionist in favor of an
automated telephone system.
"Many of our citizens are
not computer literate or just
don't have computers," he.
said, referring to the newslet-
ter.
"At the end of September
the city hall receptionist will
be but a memory. We will


tions doesn't mean there's a
conflict, just that more ques-
tioning would be required,
Anderson said.
Bill Willson acknowledged
months ago his company
insures some of the properties.
Council member Vicki
Taylor said she may know
some of the property owners.
Willson, Taylor and Mayor
. Fred Hammett said they all
own rental properties.
Council Members John
Moore and Rick Tacy were
absent, and will be queried
and their answers made pub-
lic at the next city council
meeting, Anderson said.
ggiles@venicegondolier.com


have a new automated phone
menu to look forward to
when next we attempt to
reach an individual down-
town.
"Can anyone explain why
administrators deserve inflat-
ed salary hikes while they
reduce our services?" Carter
asked.
"This city needs responsi-
ble leadership and a willing-
ness to listen to concerned
citizens. We should be looking
at saving and compensating
those jobs that truly service
the community."
Carter moved to Venice five
years ago from Siesta Key via
New Jersey.
"This is the last pristine
place in Florida. We should
strive to preserve all of it."

ggiles@venicegondolier.com


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WEDNESDAY, AUU. 29, ZUUI WWW.Vtrlil%,r-UUrILJVLlr-ri.%,UIWI


I









PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
8A
WEDNESDAY
AUG. 29,2007


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
phone: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
bmudge @ venicegondolier.com


OUR VIEW




Fix 'no-fault' law or it's your fault


Property insurance and tax reform have
grabbed most of the attention this
year, but in the background another
pocketbook issue that will affect almost
every Florida resident is coming to a head.
If you own a car in Florida, you most like-
ly have personal injury protection insur-
ance. As of Oct. 1, that will no longer be the
case.
Without a special legislative session,
Florida "no-fault" insurance law, which
requires motorists to carry the $10,000 PIP
insurance, will expire with nothing to take its
place but higher health insurance premi-.
ums, costly and length legal battles with
uninsured drivers and mounting costs for
Florida hospitals already struggling to treat
the uninsured or underinsured.
About 4 million of Florida's 13 million
motorists already carry the lowest amount
of coverage legally allowed, the PIP policy.
Another 1 million carry no car insurance at


all.
When the law expires, we can reasonably
assume the number of uninsured motorists
on Florida's roadways will explode. The acci-
dents nearly 270,000 in 2006 won't end,
just the insurance coverage for more than
230,000 injured drivers and passengers.
Gov. Charlie Crist, who showed the will-
ingness to stand up to the insurance lobby
before the music from his inauguration even
died down, has taken a hands-off approach
to the no-fault issue. He will call a special
session only if House and Senate leaders can
work out a compromise proposal.
No such compromise is likely. The
Legislature has had four years since the
"sunset" provision was added to the no-fault
law to revamp the program. While there are
proposals in both houses, the gap between
them guarantees no compromise measure
will emerge.
As one legislator suggested, the two hous-


es and the special interests who have their
ears are playing a game of chicken. Unfor-
tunately, it will be Florida's motorists whose
goose will get cooked.
Vehicle insurers argue that the law's expi-
ration will allow them to reduce rates, be-
tween 15 to 17 percent. But, just as the state's
hospital lobby has argued, insurers already
have begun asking the state for rate increas-
es to cover customers injured in wrecks.
Last year, PIP policies covered $278 mil-
lion in accident-related medical care. With
20 percent of Floridians carrying no health
care insurance, we agree with the hospitals
that caring for accidents victims with no
means to pay will be another straw on the
sway-backed camel that is Florida's broken
health insurance system.
So what will happen when PIP dies of
neglect?
For starters, it's all about fault. Law en-
forcement officers will now have to deter-


mine fault in all vehicle accidents. Once that
is determined, the at-fault party's insurance
company must cover the costs associated
with all parties in the wreck. But if the at-
fault driver carries no insurance, it guaran-
tees lengthy and costly legal battles and the
possibility of delayed treatment for injured
motorists.
Insurance companies will gladly sell
motorists new coverage and it may be a
good choice for some, but making coverage
mandatory not only allowed insurers to
spread out their risk, it gave them a captive
market of customers.
We know the no-fault law was rife with
fraud. But having no law will be worse than
a bad law.
We don't do away with crime laws be-
cause crooks break them; we crack down on
offenders. We urge Crist to call a special ses-
sion to force the Legislature to defuse this
ticking time bomb.


Tell them to stop


BOB VEDDER
COLUMNIST

The city of Venice has
pledged $7 ,million from fu-
ture 1-cent sales tax funds for
a performing arts hall, the
amount to be added to what
the school district plans to
spend on a new Venice High
School.
The large, state-of-the-art
auditorium on the VHS cam-
pus would be used by the
likes of the Venice Symphony,
the Gondolier Barbershop-
pers, the Key Chorale, the
famous Bill Millner concert
band, the opera, traveling
theaters, the infamous local'
band the Cryin' Shames and
maybe the kitchen band from
Country Club Estates.
Those who have been to
the 1,000-seat theater in
North Port marvel at how nice
it is, and I certainly will sec-
ond that emotion.
It will take a lot of effort
and cooperation to make this
work for all the groups I men-
tioned above. Even the Venice
Little Theatre might want to
use it, with a chance to sell
1,000 seats instead of 450,
especially for the name acts it
gets once in a while.
The thing I am having
trouble with is, the school dis-
trict continues to explore
other school sites even
though the city, the high
school's own School Advisory
Committee and the school
board have recommended
rebuilding at Venice High.
I'd guess that all the pro-
posed sites they are consider-
ing are not in the city. That
would make it impossible for
Venice to spend the money. It
is not good for the taxpayers
to vote to renew the 1-cent
surtax for something that
won't happen.
The committee to get a
performing arts center might
want to jump on board this
train. Likely the 1-cent sales
tax will come up for a vote this
November, a year ahead of
when it needs to. The wisdom
there is to do it before the
January property tax vote and
before everyone gets turned
off from voting on taxes.
Still, the climate is not
good, and rushing votes is not
usually sound. That explains,
however, why the county has
pushed to get every munici-
pality's list so early.
So, let's say the school dis-
trict opts for another piece of
property. The county won't
have the performing arts


venue oh its list so won't be
able to contribute. The dis-
trict will have to foot the
entire bill and lose the $7 mil-
lion. It then may say "no
thanks" and we'll end up with
no joint venture.
City council should send
the school district a little note
to stop playing around and
vote to have the school stay
where it is. That $7 million is
important to the November
vote in South County.
Then the next vote by the
school board should be to
take the recommendation of
the oversight committee that
suggested borrowing some
$180 million to get the dis-
trict's schools to where they
need to be.
Wouldn't it be funny, and
show some real chutzpah, if a
school board member would
make a motion to cease the
search, vote the money and
commit to the current Venice
site?
Of course, the school
board did that once, so I'm
unsure why. this is proceed-
ing.

By's Crack: The most
popular dish in Washing-
ton restaurants today is
Poulet a la budget. It was
inspired by all those politi-
cians who promised to bal-
ance the budget and then
turned chicken.

The city of Venice has
decided the best way to make
more cuts is to do away with a
receptionist and go automat-
ed, so that we all go stark rav-
ing mad trying to talk, to the
people we want.
Those systems are awful;
we have refused. to stoop to
that level of nonservice. Of
course, council gave 10-per-
cent increases to Lori Steltzer
and Marty Black, which
would have been enough to
keep a person.
I find it tough for top man-
agement to get increases
while cutting positions, al-
though both of these people
are very worthy. I think Marty
is highly sought after and we
certainly don't want to lose
him.

There is a book out, "Flip-
ping Houses for Dummies" -
one of those quick reads to
teach people how to make
lots of fast cash or become
real smart.
Venice was one of the three
places named as a great place
to do this. We were listed
behind Phoenix and Wash-
ington, D.C. (Hate being
lumped in with D.C.)
They must have written
this when flipping was in;
now it is closer to flopping.
Actually, prices have fallen -

Please see VEDDER, 9A


W~~IFR
Am-.N lt


LETTERS FROM OUR READERS



Learn a lesson from Naples


Editor:
Having lived in Naples, Fla., I think I have some input that
should be heard.
I moved to Marco Island in 1990 and then to Naples in 1991.
I am a pilot and kept my plane at Naples Airport, which is
about the same size as Venice, and was also a military training
field.
At first, complaints were few and far between. As Naples
grew with the real estate explosion, the nouveau- came like
locusts, and the noise complaints grew exponentially.
They came in their corporate jets to their monster homes, or
to the luxury hotels going up as fast as they could build them.
They did spend money. But their business came at a cost to the
locals.
On Monday mornings, there was a considerable line of jets
waiting to get on the runway; use your imagination as to the
noise level. The question is, do we want this for Venice island?
Surely a few developers will benefit but at the loss of that
never, never, ever replaceable open space land.
How about a park for scouts, church groups, whatever?
Leave it alone; let the animals have a home and let us enjoy
some greenery.


More abuse besides
dog fighting

Editor:
Michael Vick is not alone.
More animal abuse exists
unnoticed. Another dog fight-
er had 25 kittens scheduled to
be used to teach pit bulls the
taste of blood. This is where
"free" kittens end up.
Free is not an option. One
just has to check out the Web
sites for animal rescue orga-
nizations attempting to save
as many from shelters being
killed daily.
Horses are kept pregnant
to acquire their urine from
mares to produce "Premarin"
for hormone replacement for
women going through meno-
pause, and then the offspring


are killed.
The cosmetic indi
beauty industry- ad
the problem, as mos
ucts are labeled "No
testing."
An abuse that i
ignored is 4 million-5
animals in this nation
killed because human
spay or neuter the
Abandonment, anoth
of abuse, is people ju
ing their pets behi
garbage, when in rea
people abandoning ti
the real trash.
News stations have
the killing of a healthy
the air to show Americ
fear in its eyes, the tre
the sadness, as the be
human hand "kills'


because there are not enough
homes, no children and fami-
lies for them.
Viewers found it to be an
atrocity. In reality, the real
atrocity is that humans who
do not spay and neuter their
pets are responsible for their
killings.
Vick and others are solely
responsible for their behavior.
They need to be prosecuted
to the fullest extent of the law.
That's a real "touchdown" for
mankind.

Helene A. Gomulka
Englewood

Airport changes would
be heart-breaking


Editor:.
Jim Rich Venice area residents need
Nokomis to be very concerned about
the Venice Airport runways
being improved to designa-
ustry tion C-II. If they are, it will
[dressed have dreadful ramifications
st prod- because FAA requires C-II
animal runways to have additional
runway protection zones at
s most both ends of each runway.
million If RPZs are required, it will
that are seriously impact many of
s do not Venice's favorite destinations.
ir pets. It will impact the golf course,
ler form and also Service Club Park;
ist leav- Harbor Drive to Caspersen
nd like Beach (Harbor Drive will have
ality the to be tunneled under the run-
hem are way); and a section of beauti-
ful Venetian Waterway Park
e shown (again a tunnel); and 24
dog on homes will be razed.
cans the The current 24 homeown-
mbling, ers, many with children, will
betraying find their home values depre-
" them ciated, maybe even unsal-


able. A large segment of Ven-
ice will become less desirable.
What will happen to the
birds and wildlife when all the
trees, shrubs and fields are
gone? Much of the environ-
ment will be irreparably dam-
aged.
If the FAA mandates these
RPZ zones, Venice will be
changed forever.
I have lived on the island
for 35 years and am heartbro-
ken.

Margaret C. Miller
Venice

NASA's study
was not so hot
Editor:
A recent writer stated that
the years 1998 and 2002-2005
were the five warmest years
on record, according. to a
NASA study. The writer added
that during these years at-
mospheric carbon dioxide in-
creased, causing global
warming.
The problem with this con-
clusion is that NASA now
admits that its study was
flawed. The corrected data
now show that 1934 was the
warmest year on record and
that the five warmest years
occurred before World War II.
What an inconvenient truth!
How is global warming
now going to be rationalized
since the carbon dioxide level
in the atmosphere in 1934
was at a much reduced level
compared to the present?

Rene A. Kuypers
Venice










WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


Come on, and take


a (nearly) free ride


BY M.C. COOLIDGE
GUEST COLUMNIST

At 50 cents a ride about
a third of what folks pay in
other parts of the country -
Sarasota County's bus fares
have long offered local folks
one of the few good deals they
get in this ever-more-expen-
sive town.
Now, the county wants to
raise the fare from 50 to 75
cents to offset $750,000 from
its looming budget crunch,
and it has invited the commu-
nity to comment at three.
upcoming weekday meetings
to be held from 4 to 6 p.m.
Most working folks punch
out around 5:15 p.m. If they
are bus riders, that means get-
ting from their cubicle chair
or from under the chassis of
the car they're working on, or
away from the dust-bunnied
households they clean for, in
time to walk to the nearest
bus stop, wait, then ride a cir-
cuitous route on a frequently
stopping bus in rush-hour
traffic, to arrive before the
meeting ends at 6 p.m. all
in less than 45 minutes.
Not exactly making it easy
for bus-riding worker-bees to
voice their concerns.
When the county an-
nounced its proposed fare
increase, it was careful to
specify it would affect every-
one, including persons with
disabilities and the elderly.
Should it maybe have men-
tioned that the single biggest
block of potential bus users -
roughly 2,500 county employ-
ees will continue to be
given a free ride?
According to its Web site,
Sarasota County employees
can ride the bus for free, any-
time, anywhere. Not just to go
back and forth to work, but to
go to the movies, the Farmer's
Market, the beach, wherever..
I'm 'ot% saving courmy
employee'I don't deserve a
free ride; heck, I'd like one too.
And the 25 cent increase,
that's chump change, right?
But 50 cents roundtrip,300
days a year? I'm here to tell
you that for some of us, an
extra $150 bucks is all that
stands between affording a
medical prescription or new
pair of glasses ... or not.











LAMINATEI


How about a program
where each county employee
who doesn't use the free pass
could donate it via a lottery
system to some needy citizen
who surely would? There'd be
some administrative over-
head, but I'll bet it would help
fill at least some of the half-
empty buses rattling around
town.
Or, why not keep the feel-


According to its
Web site, Sarasota
County employees
can ride the bus
for free, anytime,
anywhere.

good 50 cent fare for everyone
and sell advertising instead?
In Raleigh, N.C., businesses
shell out $1,250 a month for
huge vinyl wrap ads plastered
onto public buses. If Sarasota
sold advertising on just 50
buses, there's $750,000 right
there.
I hate to think of even more
advertising in my field of
vision. But if it means contin-
uing to be able to provide
cheap transportation to those
who need and deserve it the
most the environmentally
responsible, disabled, elderly,
or the simply poor folks who
can't afford a car then I'll
happily sit in my ancient
Camry, or on the back of my
bike, and stare at advertising
as big as a bus ... just as long
as all county residents not
just county employees can
take a (nearly) free ride.

pelicanrealitychick@
yahoo.com.


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LET 'EM HAVE IT: .Wlf1(HANELS TO WM Oilf(WN1 AREA TIW Fs' I D LEAD TO RIDE THE BUS MORE OFTFN?
CALL US AT 207-111.


These motor homes aren't motoring


How long? I'm calling about the signs marking the beach
parking lots. I have a question: I have seen motor homes pull
up to those parking lots and stay for a while. Is there a time limit
for how long they can stay there or a length limit of the vehicle?
We do have room for a few people to come and do that. That's
my concern, as well as the noise from the airport. It's really out-
rageous. I moved here about 10 years ago and it was just a little
airport with little airplanes. Well, now there's big private jets in
and out and helicopters. The noise factor is awful, not to men-
tion the filth from the fumes. It's gone from heaven to hellish.
Are they really keeping track of this noise? I live right across the
street from it.


Canned. I called in before
about ant bites and who takes
care of the fire ants on the
Venetian Waterway Park be-
tween the Senior Friendship
Center and Shamrock Park. But
tonight, I just went out there
and they have turned around
one of the park benches. I
picked up 11 beer bottles and
several cans of Budweiser beer
and a bunch of cigarette butts.
Honestly, I take my puppy dogs
out there every single day and I
think someone needs to be
monitoring this area. I heard a
bunch of people out there last
night. I thought they were just
walking. I didn't know they
were out there partying. Had I
known, I would have called our
local police department. I'm
being a nasty individual. If peo-
ple want to go out there and
party, that's OK, but at least pick
up your mess. Don't leave it
behind for me, who walks her
dog every day out there, to pick
it up. It's just not fair. Does any-
one have any common sense
to take your trash home with
you? Enjoy the parkway, don't
destroy it. And, I'd still like to
know about the ants.
Stuck. I think you should
stop putting your advertise-
ment stickers on the front page.
This morning on the firefighters
story, right slap dab in the mid-
dle is an advertising sticker for
Pit Stop. I thinkyou should stop
this because it happens all the


time.
One way. The signs and
markings at the main Venice
Beach on the island need to be
greatly improved, on the right-
hand side of the parking lot.
Locals and snowbirds seem to
ignore, or maybe they don't see,
the one-way signs or the ar-
rows on the pavement, and
there's going to be an accident
or a pedestrian is going to be
hit. So, I hope someone will fix
it. It's also just plain annoying
when the rest of us are obeying
the rules. We have some of
these folks just blatantly ignor-
ing them.
Pitch out. I hope there isn't
anyone out there anymore
that doesn't know why our
prescription costs are as high
as they are. We know by this
time that we are all paying for
continuous TV advertising of
these prescription pitches. If
you only knew the exact cost
of all this TV advertising,
you'd all fall over in a faint. It
used to be that the pharma-
ceutical companies solely
pitched the physicians the
key word here is "solely." They
still do this because it is the
physician who prescribes the
prescriptions that are being
advertised on TV, not the
patient who is being fed these
advertisements. So we are the
ones paying for the greed and
have no power to do anything
about it. Just try it sometime.


The lobby for these pharma-
ceutical companies is what
we are paying for. I happen to
be a gal interested in sports.
The sports channels have the
greatest number of ads for the
drugs that are supposed to
prevent all these guys having
to urinate so many times dur-
ing the night or during sport-
ing events. And because so
many men can't perform,
we're having to listen to the
drug pitches for that as well. I
am so tired of listening to
these commercials that my
mute button is worn out. I
hope we don't have to listen to
these disgusting commercials
anymore. How many of you
women out there can't say
you don't agree with me?
Gimme shelter. The city of
Venice backs the performing
arts center when the new high
school gets built. Nice to have a
performing arts center some-
where, but whatever happen to
the plans for an emergency
shelter on the island of Venice?
Public safety should be a prior-
ity when spending taxpayers'
dollars, regardless ofthe source.
We can build a performing arts
center on the campus, just



VEDDER from Page 8A
dramatically, in some cases -
and it is a good time to buy.

Today's Ism (on a sign in
Perkins): A balanced diet is a
cookie in each hand.
******
The Indians football and
volleyball teams look great.
Hope you get a chance to see
them. The football team's first
big test is Friday at Riverview.
****** i
You are invited to a historic
house painting at 8 a.m. Sat-


make sure the campus build-
ings are structurally sound to
serve as emergency shelters. As
we all know, the community
center was a fiasco from the
get-go as far as the shelter was
concerned. City staff publicly
stated that it wasn't planned for
such use until outcry from one
of the members of the planning
commission and from the pub-
lic in general reminded city
council that its very own
newsletter stated it was to be
built for emergency purposes.
That got cleared up, and then
city council felt it would
promise a second emergency
shelter when the school board
built the newly constructed
grade school on the island.
That was one of the selling
points when the school board
favored the grade school on the
island. As we know, that didn't
happen. Now we have an
opportunity to do something
with the new high school plans
and all city council wants to
support is a performing arts
center. Whatever happened to
some of their prior concerns?
Do they have selective memo-
ry? It just seems like politics at
its worst. A few city council
members, not all, are super
dancers when it comes to
issues.


urday. The 1896 Lord Family
house behind city hall is
going to get painted, and a lot
of people are showing up -
probably for the refresh-
ments. The city manager,
Council Member Bill Willson,
many service club members
and others will be there.
Put on your painting duds
and head on down for the
fun.
Robert A Vedder writes a
twice-weekly column in this
paper


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29,2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM










Venice Gondolier Sun





SPORTS


CONTACT US
TRIPP-MILLER
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
tmiller@venicegondolier.com


YMCA Triathlon a success


BY PAMELA STAIK
STAFF WRITER


Despite the threat of thun-
dering skies, 228 people
charged the Gulf water on
Englewood Beach. July 21 at
the ninth annual Englewood
Family YMCA Triathlon.
Beginning at 7:30 a.m. with
the first wave of competitors,
participants swam 1/4 mile,
transitioned into a 14-mile
bike race toward Manasota
Beach Road, and then ran 3
miles toward the finish line,
which was set up north of the
refreshment pavilion.
The first wave consisted of
males 39 and under; which
was followed by wave two,
males age 40 and over; wave
three, females 39 and under;
and finally wave four, with
females 40 and over and all
relay teams.
Overall male winner Kiko
Cintron crossed the finish line


with a time of 57 minutes, 53
seconds.
"It feels good to be fin-
ished," said Cintron, 35, a
physical therapist in Talla-
hassee.
Cintron said he has been
participating in triathlons
since he 16 years old.
Joining in his win were his
wife, Brigid, his 2-year-old
daughter, Bryn, and his par-
ents-in-law.
Within minutes, female
overall winner Melissa Reif-
schneider, 36, of Venice cross-
ed the line with a time of 1
hour, 3 minutes and 8 sec-
onds.
As more athletes complet-
ed the race, musician Jimi
Banks played reggae and
tropical rock on his guitar.
Banks, who has played gui-
tar for 37 years, said he has
been playing music at the
triathlon for years.
Sandy King, who partici-


I A 1..2 $ J ,


SUN PHOTO BY KATHY WYNN kwynn@sun-herald.com
Thirty-six-year-old Melissa Reifschneider from Venice crosses the
finish line as the first female at the Englewood Family YMCA
Triathlon.


pated in the event alongside
her fiance, Jim Reilly, said she
was excited about the race.
While the two trained at
the YMCA, the process has
been a real family affair.
Jill Bowen, King's daughter,
said she was originally going
to complete the running por-
tion of the race for her moth-
er, but due to an injury, her
soon-to-be stepbrother, Tay-
lor Reilly, stepped in. How-
ever, Reilly's daughter, Juliet,
and Bowen served as aides
during the transition period.
"It was hard," King said
after finishing the biking sec-
tion of the race. "But we fin-
ished it."
According to Eva Scherer,
the wellness director at the
Englewood YMCA and the
race director, the triathlon
was a success.
"It's an awesome race and
it's an amazing feeling (to par-
ticipate)," she said. "Like


earning an education degree,
it's one positive thing that you
can do for yourself that no
one can take away from you."
She said the triathlon helps
raise money for the YMCA.
The money is divided be-
tween the youth wellness pro-
gram and scholarships that
can help families who can't
afford the YMCA's day care,
after care, or children's ser-
vices.
Athletes were provided
with water and nutrition bars,
care of Sweetbay Supermark-
ets. Bananas and oranges
were provided by the Lock
and Key Restaurant and Pub.
The YMCA also bought Gator-
ade for the event.
The event was part of the
Southwest Florida YMCA Tri-
athlon Series. The Venice tri-
athlon will be Sept. 1 and the
Siesta Key race is scheduled
for Oct. 7.
pstaik@sun-herald.com


Venice has two new hall of famers


PHOTO COURTESY OF TOMMY LONGHI
Nick Longhi and Tyler Atwell of Venice are two of the newest members of the Youth Baseball Hall of Fame
in Cooperstown, N.Y.'


BY TRIPP MILLER
SPORTS EDITOR

The last-place Tampa Bay
Devil Rays may want to look
south for a little help: Really
little help.
Nick Longhi and Tyler At-
well, of the Southwest Florida
Yarddawgs are not future hall
of famers, they are already in
it.
The two 12-year-old boys,
both of Venice, were recently
inducted into the Youth
Baseball Hall of Fame as part
of the class of 2007 during the
96-team Cooperstown Dreams
Park National Invitational
Tournament in Cooperstown,
N.Y. The Yarddawgs finished
20th out of all 96 teams repre-
senting 31 states.
Longhi batted .545 for the
tournament. In one game, he
hit a 2-run and a 3-run home
run. In another he sent one
sailing for a grand-slam.
"Nick hit it over the score-
board and out in to the


street," said father Tommy
Longhi. "It was a shot."
Atwell was just as impres-
sive, allowing just one run in
four games pitched. And at
that level, even the pitchers
can hit. He batted .503 during
the regular season and also
jacked a home run for the
Yarddawgs in the tourna-
ment. Each of the boys auto-
graphed a baseball for display
in the Youth Baseball Hall of
Fame.
The tournament at Coop-
erstown Dreams Park is simi-
lar to the more popular Little
League World Series, Longhi
said. Participants are housed
in barracks for the entire
week and contact with par-
ents is strictly forbidden. Any
time a player leaves his bar-
racks, he must be accompa-
nied by a coach or an umpire.
A conversation between a
player and his parents during
a game results in a suspen-
sion. This way, the partici-
pants can interact with each


other on their own.
"They meet a lot of new
friends," Longhi said. "They
got to do pin trading and the
Yarddawgs actually had the
No. 1 pin for a while. They
were able to get about six or
seven pins for each Yard-
dawgs pin."
The park is completely en-
closed by a 10-foot, plywood
wall to prevent distractions.
According to the park's Web
site, the mission of the park
and the tournament is to
"promote a high caliber of
play" and to create an oppor-
tunity for players 12 and un-
der to "experience the purity
of baseball the way it was
meant to be played."
"They are great people, a
great family," Longhi said of
those who put on the tourna-
ment. "It's a dream. Not only a
kid's dream, it's a parent's
dream."

miller@
venicegondolier.com


BRIEFS


P.E. for homeschoolers
The Home School Acad-
emy of Life and Learning, in
partnership with the Venice
YMCA, presents a new physi-
cal education program begin-
ning Sept. 6 at the YMCA.
Open to students 5 to 13 years
old, the program will be held,
every other Thursday 10:30
a.m.-12:15 p.m.
The program, led by the
YMCA recreation staff, aims
to give students the opportu-
nity to engage in physical
education activities with an
emphasis on fun, positive self
esteem and enjoyable social-
ization with other home-
school students.
Students will participate in
physical fitness activities
including games and sports,
as well as swimming and rock
climbing.
Also available in the pro-
gram are Spanish and art
classes. Students can add
those classes to their sched-
ules as part of the Enrichment
Co-op Program.
For more information,
contact Teresa Rowland at
426-5246 or evgrowland@
juno.com; or Maria Gerber at
488-7052 or maria.gerber@
verizon.net.
YMCA Jam Night
YMCA Jam Night for mid-
dle school and high school
students is Saturday, Sept. 22,
6-9 p.m. in the Venice YMCA
gymnasium.
Activities include a three-
on-three basketball tourna-
ment with prizes (middle
school and high school divi-
sions), a 3-point shootout,
and open-gym, pick-up
games.
Also, enjoy fresh, new hip
hop music, X-Box 360 (in-
cluding Madden '08) and a
concession stand with food
and drinks for sale (all pro-


VENICE HIGH


VENICE HIGH

SCHOOL'S


ca

r
g


652 E. Venice Ave. 488-9156
www.bogeys-venice.com


ceeds to benefit future events
and prizes). Cost to attend is
$2 for YMCA members, $5 for
nonmembers.
To find out more about this
and other YMCA Sports
events, call 492-9622, Ext. 131,
or e-mail sports@veniceym
ca.org.
Junior Indians
Kids Club
The Venice YMCA presents
the new "Junior Indians" Kids
Club, open to students
kindergarten through eighth
grade. The cost is $30 for a
year-long membership. i
Club features include invi-
tations to free special events
and parties at the YMCA with
Venice High School athletes
and teams, autograph sign-
ings and picture days, free raf-
fles at select home games, a
monthly newsletter with ath-
lete profiles and team sched-
ules, e-mail updates about
upcoming events, and a
"Junior Indians" Kids Club
shirt.
For information on how to
join, call YMCA Sports at 492-
9622, ext. 131, or e-mail
sports@veniceymca.org.
Courtside Junior Tennis
The fall sessions of after-
school tennis clinics have
begun at Courtside Tennis
Club. Boys and girls ages 6-16
will learn or improve their
skills in a safe, positive atmos-
phere.
.For more information, call
Jim Dempsey, tennis director,
at 485-2000.
Openings on
Falcons team
The Venice Falcons under
14 girls competitive soccer
team has openings for play-
ers. The starting goalkeeper
position is open as well as
field players. Anyone interest-


ed should contact Mike
Lasorso, 492-1396, for a try-
out. Fall club ball is a good
opportunity for middle
schoolers to get ready for
spring season.
YMCA birthday parties
Venice YMCA sports-
themed birthday parties
include 45 minutes of sports
activities, games, competi-
tions and prizes and an addi-
tional 45 minutes in the party
room for food and presents.
The birthday boy or girl also
gets a sports-themed shirt:
Choose frorti (sports
themes including soccer,
baseball, football and basket-
ball, or choose a multi-sport
theme with activities from
various sports. Days and
times available are Saturdays
2-3:45 p.m. and Sundays 1:30-
3:15 p.m.
Parties are available for
children age 5-13. Cost is $100
for YMCA members, $130 for
nonmembers (for up to 12
children; $5 for each addi-
tional child). Add 45 minutes
of swim time for an addition-
al $50.
To book your party, or for
more information, call YMCA
Sports at 492-9622, Ext. 131,
or e-mail sports@veniceym
ca.org.
Fall soccer registration
The Venice Youth Soccer
Association is holding regis-
tration for the Fall Develop-
mental League, which runs
Oct. 6 to Dec. 15. The $110 fee
includes 10 games and a uni-
form. Registration will be held
9 a.m.-noon Friday and
Saturday, Sept. 7 and 8, at the
Garbrandt Soccer Complex
off Pinebrook Road. Regis-
tration can also be completed
online Aug. 25 to Sept. 9
at venicesoccer.org. Group
training starts Sept. 22.


Athlete of the Week


Venice High School senior running back Jimmie Laurie
carried the football well in the Indians' 41-13 win over
Cardinal Mooney High School Friday night. Venice
acked up a whopping 330 yards rushing, with Laurie
getting most of the carries.


Jimmie Laurie


Food d Fun
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garlic parm Cajun
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College Football Kickoff
Call for our
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10A
WEDNESDAY
AUG. 29,2007








WVFflNFvflAY AUGa29 2007 www.VEICGODOIE.CM EIC-GNDLIR UNh


Cable show rekindles missing vote debate


Former CBS news anchor Dan Rather is featured
on the investigative show. One of its initial sub-
jects was the Florida Congressional District 13
* race.


BY JACK GURNEY
PELICAN PRESS


When Lee County had a
"calibration issue" with the
touch-screens on its 1,800
ES&S iVotronic voting ma-
chines in 2003 and became
concerned the problem could
jeopardize election results, it
shipped them all back to the
factory for free replacements.
"It was like a recall the
automobile manufacturers
do," said Lee County Elec-
tions Supervisor Sharon
Harrington. "Our technicians
were doing standard mainte-
nance and noticed several
pieces wouldn't stay calibrat-
ed. ES&S paid for all the ship-
ping. It cost us nothing."
The Lee County ekperi-
ence with ES&S screens may
have nothing to with what
happened in Sarasota County
on the night of Nov. 7, 2006,
when 18,000 votes may have
fallen through the cracks in
the Congressional race
between Democrat Christine
Jennings and Republican
Vern Buchanan.
But an investigative report
by former CBS anchorman
Dan Rather on cable channel
HDNet identified a "calibra-
tion issue" with touch-screen
voting equipment as the fac-
tor that could have led to the
still unresolved Sarasota
County controversy.
Buchanan was finally
declared the winner by 369
votes after a local recount and
state inspection of Sarasota
County's equipment, but
Congress has directed its
Government Accountability
Office investigators to take
another look at what hap-
pened.
An Aug. 13 news release
that promoted "Rather
Reports"', identified Gene
SHinspeteria.Lee County tech-
nician, as an expert who
believes the "calibration
issue" on misaligned screen
displays could result in votes
being recorded for the wrong
candidates.
The Pelican Press reached
Hinspeter at his Lee County
office. He reported having
received no calls from the
GAO investigators and
referred all questions to
Harrington.
"I've been told by my
supervisor not to talk about
anything, anymore," he said.
When Harrington was
,asked how many ES&S
machines were experiencing
a "calibration issue" in 2003,
she initially replied "several
pieces." But at the newspa-
per's request, she checked
* with Hinspeter and called
back to say the number was
"about 320."
Moot point
According to the "Rather
Reports" press release, some
of the components installed
in ES&S iVotronic machines
were manufactured in a
Philippines factory where
working conditions were sub-
standard and performance
testing was minimal.





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Whether a "calibration
issue" had anything to do
with what happened in the
Jennings-Buchanan race is
debatable. Sarasota County
Elections Supervisor Kathy
Dent doesn't think it did.
"In 2002, ES&S did preven-
tive maintenance on our
machines and replaced all the
screens," she said.
Since then, she said about
25 machines have been sent
back to the ES&S factory
because of calibration prob-
lems her technicians couldn't
resolve.
"It's been a few at a time,"
she said. "Sometimes, we
couldn't calibrate them after
they were transported."
Speculation about what
may have happened with
Sarasota County's equipment
is fading because it is all
locked away in a warehouse
and will never be used again.
The county will use Diebold
optical scanning equipment
for future elections.


When the congressional
investigation is concluded, all
1,615 of the ES&S machines
will be shipped to the Florida
Division of Elections for dis-
posal.
Until then, they will
remain under lock and key for
the GAO to examine if it
decides to take a closer look at
their operating systems.
Harrington said they won't
find anything.
"What happened in
Sarasota County was related to
ballot design," she said. "We
had an 18,000 undervote on
Nov. 7, 2006,
too, when we
put the attor-
ney general's
race under the
g governor 's
race on one
screen."
The incident
didn't cause a
Dent political furor
because the
race wasn't close.
"We should have done a
better job of highlighting
the attorney general's race,"
she said. "It's a moot point
now because everyone in
Florida is going to vote on
optical scanners in the
future."


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SEMINARS/LECTURES

LOCATION: Venice Regional Medical
Center Auditoriums, Venice.
Wednesday, September 5
Heart Healthy Nutrition Class
8:15 a.m., 9:30 a.m. & 12:00 p.m.
Speaker: Rachel Chambers, Clinical,
Dietitian
Register by calling 483-7354

Monday, September 10
Cardiac Club
5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening
"6:00 p.m. Program
Speaker: Rachel Chambers, Clinical
Dietitian
Topic: "Biggest Losers: What We Know
About Successful WEIGHT LOSS!?"
Register by calling 486-6057

Wednesday, September 19
"Lose Weight" Hypnotic Session
5:30 p.m.
Presented by: Rena Greenberg, Director of
Wellness Seminars, Inc.
Attend the first 45 minutes of the seminar at
no charge or obligation to see if the program
is for you. The cost, $69, is payable after
the fee orientation period. Save $10 by
registering online at easywillpower, com.

LOCATION: Lions Club Room at Venice
HealthPark, 1283 Jacaranda Boulevard,
Venice.
Thursday, September 6
Monthly Diabetes Lecture
1:00-2:00 p.m.
No registration necessary.

LOCATION: South County YMCA,
701 Center Road, Venice.
Thursday, September 13
"Living With Allergies"
7:00 p.m.
Speaker: Linda Carson, RRT, RPFT
Register by calling 492-9622 ext. 145



SUPPORT GROUPS/!

MEETINGS
....... .... ............ ............. ..... ......
LOCATIONs Lions Club Room at Venice
HealthPark, 1283 Jacaranda Blvd., Venice
No registration necessary.

Tuesday, September 4 7:00 p.m.
MS Support Group
Wednesday, September 5 7:00 p.m.
National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of
Sarasota County
Friday, September 7, 14, 21, 28
9:30 a.m. until 12 noon.
Amputee Support Group
A roundtable support session.
Monday, September 10 2:00 p.m.
Man-to-Man Support Group
A support group sponsored by the American
Cancer Society for men with prostate cancer.
Tuesday, September 11 6:30 p.m.
Venice Aglow
Outreach group open to all women.
Wednesday, September 12 2:00 p.m.
Live Wires Stroke Club
Sponsored by the Stroke Division of the
American Heart Association.
Wednesday, September 19 1:30 p.m.


Ostomy Support Group
Sponsored by the United Ostomy Association
5 Chapter of the American Cancer Society


~september


Is Prostate C-a ncer

Awareness W e&^^
. .......




Early detection is your best defense.
............... ...... .....

A according to the American Cancer Sociey, one man in six will get prostate cancer
in his lifetime. In fact, after skin cancer, it is the most common cancer diagnosis
in men. While a cancer diagnosis can be frightening, with earlier detection and better
treatment options, survival rates for prostate cancer have dramatically improved.
"It used to be, 20 to 25 years ago, that most prdstate cancer was advanced by the time
it was diagnosed and the cure rate wasn't that great," said urologist Robert Ross, Jr.,
M.D. "But, since the advent of the blood PSA test we can diagnose and treat the disease
much earlier."
Early detection is the best defense against prostate cancer, so it is important to
understand the warning signs, risk factors 'arid screening guidelines.
WMning Signs .
The prostate gland, which is p r of the male reproductive and tirinary systems, is a
small gland found deep in the pelvis, between the bladder and the penis. Prostate cancer
is generally slow growing and may not cause symptoms for years. Any prostate changes
shouildbe discussed with your doctor.' Changes to watch for include:


Weak, interrupted urine flow or
ina.bility-to urinate
Difficulty starting or stopping
urine flow
The need to urinate frequently,
especially at night
Blood in the urine or semen
Pain or burning during urination
or ejaculation
Continued pain in the lower back,
pelvis or upper thighs
Experiencing these symptoms doesn't
necessarily mean you have prostate
cancer. They could be caused by other
health problems so it is important to see
a doctor.
Risk Factors
While researchers do not completely
understand why one person develops
cancer and another does not, they have
identified the following factors that may
increase a man's susceptibility to the
disease:
The most common risk factor is age.
In the United States, prostate cancer
occurs more frequently in men age
55 and older.
A personal family history of prostate
cancer.
African-American men have the
highest occurrence of the disease -
the risk is twice as high as it is for
Caucasian men.


Screening Guidelines
The American Cancer Society recommends that all men age 50 and older talk to their
doctor about being screened for prostate cancer each year. Men at higher risk (according
to the factors listed above) should consider being tested earlier, at about age 40.
What is involved in a prostate screening?
"We use a three-legged method to diagnose prostate cancer," said Dr. Ross. Screening
tests include a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, a digital rectal examination
(DRE) and, if necessary, a transrecral ultrasound.
"PSA's are not perfect," Dr. Ross said. "There are false negatives and false positives, but,
as of today, it is the best screening tool we have. Likewise, no one enjoys a rectal exam,
but the benefits of early detection make being tested worth it."
For those who are diagnosed with prostate cancer, hope is available. Emphasis on
screening has made early detection more prevalent and advanced treatment options have
improved survival rates. By understanding the risks, signs and symptoms and following
the recommended screening guidelines you can give yourself the upper hand against
the disease.


FREE PROSTATE

CANCER SCREENING

Venice Regional Medical Center is
offering a free prostate cancer screening for
men over the age of 50 and younger men
with a family history of the disease. This
. screening is performed in two phases. You
must participate in Phase 1 to be eligible to
participate in Phase 2.
Phase 1: September 19
Starting at 3:30 p.m.
PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen)
P Blood Test
Phase 2: September 26
Starting at 5:30 p.m.
SDRE (Digital Rectal Exam)
Reservations are required.
Callfor available time slots 486-6925.
Because this is a free service, those who
are currently under the care of a urologist or
have been diagnosed with carcinoma of the
prostate are not eligible for the screening.


ENROLLED IN

| MED-KEY YET?
.. .. ... . . . . .
If you're not a Venice Regional. Medical
Center Meld-Key member yet, there's "no
time-like-the present-to sign up for this-free--
service, which gives you priority access to
VRMC and many other valuable benefits.
Signing up for the service and obtaining
your Med-Key membership card is simple.
Then, come to VRMC for care at the
emergency center, main hospital, Venice
HealthPark or clinical labs, and your
card will be swiped through a reader that
automatically brings up your admission
information. Once you verify your personal
and insurance information, you are on your
way to getting the services you need-fast.
Evenifyou never use thehospital's services,
you can show your card for discounts
at dozens of area merchants. For a list of
participatingmerchants and downloadable.
application form, visit the hospital's website,
% www.veniccregional.com.


FREE SCREENINGS


LOCATION: Lions Club Room at Venice
HeahhPark, 1283 Jacaranda Blvd., Venice
Thursday, September 6
7:30 a.m. (Monthly)
Venice Lions Club Vision Screening
Free screenings for income qualified
individuals.
Pre-registration is required by calling
486-6065.

LOCATION: HealthPark, Main Lobby,
1201 Jacaranda Blvd., Venice
Thursday, September 6
8:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m.
Blood Pressure and Blood Sugar
Screenings
Home Health Services will provide
screenings. Please fast beginning the night
before testing. Refreshments provided.

LOCATION: Lioni Club Room at Venice
HealthPark, 1283 J.acairndj Blvd., Venice
Thursday, September 13, 20, 27
8:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m.
Blood Pressure and Blood
Sugar Screenings
Home Health Services will provide
, screenings. Please fast beginning the night
before testing. Refrichmenrs provided


- .2' *.SO M 1' FNC, =77, EDC L EN E


.1


v






WEDNESDAY,
AUG. 29, 2007


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com
www.venicegondolier.com
PEEK-A-BOO 3B


Venice Gondolier Sun





OUR THWM
IT BOGGLES THE MIND 4B


CAREER TRACKS IN THE SAND 7B


ONE POTATO,


TWO POTATO,


THERE


POTATO.


OR


SUN PHOTOS BY JAN FINDLEY


A collection of "Mr. Potato Heads" is the result of one class's efforts.


BY JAN FINDLEY
CORRESPONDENT
Any professional sculptor
will tell you that he or she
doesn't create the image -
the.sculptor simply removes
the extraneous material and
frees the image within. The
artistic psyche sees ,the
process in that way.
That's the way it is
regardless of the medium:
Marble. Stone. Wood. Sweet
potato.
Sweet potato?
YesA.I kid you not.
Ask Rudv Witte, who lives
in Englewood East. He'll tell
you all about it. He's a wood
carver who has discovered
the sculptural potential of
sweet potatoes and who
recently gave a lesson in the
art of sweet potato sculpting
to the wood carvers at the
Seniork Friendship Centers in
Venice.
Using wood-carving tools,
Witte explained and demon-


strated the how-to-do-its of
the medium of sweet pota-
toes.
Spuds galore
"First, you get a good-size
sweet potato and place it in
your left hand, with the
pointed end angled north,"
he said.
"Then, using a Magic
Marker, you draw a simple
outline of the face to guide
your cuts."
Then you start to remove
those parts of the sweet pota-
to that are blocking the emer-
gence of art within. Try not to
cut yourself as you work.
Those wood-carving tools are
sharp.
"You can eat the pieces you
cut out," Witte said, by way of
offering an extra incentive to
the carvers.
"I'll never look at a sweet
potato again in quite the
same way," one of the wopd-
carvers said.
The final appearance of


the piece depends on where
and how deep the cuts are
made.
"You never know exactly
what you're going to end up
with," Witte said.
The 10 men and two
women carvers present dug
in and, a couple hours later,
showed off the results of their
labors a dozen sweet pota-
to busts of manly characters
who might serve as proto-
types for knights in King
Arthur's court or mighty
Viking warriors.
That was step one.
Step two involves mount-
ing the sculpture on a base.
Step three involves pat-
ience: You set the carved
sweet potato on top .the
refrigerator and leave it to
dry for three to four weeks.
During this time, the mois-
ture evaporates, and what
you have left is fiber and
your final piece of sculp-
ture.
It takes time for the sweet


The carver is working on the last steps in the creation of his character; he is starting to make cuts that
will become the character's beard.


potato sculptures to attain
their final form about
three to four weeks. As the
potatoes dry and shrivel, the
sculptures take on a life of
their own, acquiring some
extra wrinkles and other
indicators of the human
aging process.
Wood carving groups
The Senior Friendship
Centers sponsors wood carv-
ing groups in Venice and


Englewood. The Venice group
meets at 9 a.m. Tuesday in
Room J at the Venice Com-
munity Center, 326 S. No-
komis Ave.
The Englewood wood
carvers meet at 9 a.m. Friday
at Community Presbyterian
Church, 405 South McCall
Road.
For more information on
the Senior Friendship Centers
and its programs, call 493-
3065.


"Mr. Personality" begins to
emerge with brow, nose and eye
sockets removed from the potato
and the band for a cap in evi-
dence.


Rudy Witte makes the first cut for John deep cuts for the brows and around the nose area.


Rudy Witte of Englewood East joined the Friendship Centers
Woodcarvers last week to guide them through the challenge of carv-
ing a recognizable character from a sweet potato.


A finished sweet potato man is
mounted on a base and left to
acquire his distinguishing char-
acteristics of aging.


Study philosophy painlessly in the theater


KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Season ticket packages are
for sale at the Venice Little
Theatre, Florida Studio
Theatre, the Asolo Theatre
Company, the Historic Asolo
Theater, Lemon Bay Theatre,
the Backlot Theatre, the


Sarasota Golden Apple, The
Players, the Van Wezel
'Performing Arts Hall and the
Philharmonic Center for the
Arts in Naples.
That is not every venue in
the Cultural Coast area but
enough to keep most people
busy for a good bit of the
coming season, especially
when you consider that VLT
has two stages, FST has three
venues, the Asolo has two
stages and its Conservatory
for Actor Training and the big
performing arts halls have a
variety of packages ranging
from concerts to Broadway
shows.
The VLT's Mainstage sea-
son begins Oct. 2 with "A
Streetcar named Desire" and


includes "Little Shop of
Horrors" and "My Fair Lady."
Its Stage II season will include
"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well
and Living in Paris" and two
Florida premieres: "The
Pillowman," by Martin
McDonough, March 13-30
and "By the Bog of Cats," by
Marina Carr, April 10-27. For
tickets and more details on
Mainstage and Stage II sea-
sons, call 488-1115.
FST will announce its sea-,
son offerings in September,
but given its three small
venues, regular subscribers
have been renewing for next
year for at least a month. For
tickets or more information,
call 366-9000.
The Asolo Repertory


Company will open with '"A
Tale of Two Cities" Oct. 13,
and its season will include the
Pulitzer Prize-winning and
four-time Tony winner
"Doubt," opening Dec. 14,
and a hit new Australian play,
"The Blonde, the Brunette,
and the Vengeful Redhead,"
which is scheduled to open
sometime in January.
There will be a musical in
May and, March 28-May 3,,
"Equus" by Peter Shaffer, said
to be one of the best-loved
plays of the second half of the
20th century. The repertory
company also will perform
two plays in the Jane B. Cook
Theater at the Florida State
University Center for the
Performing Arts: the thriller


"Misery" and "Lady," a new
play by Craig Wright.
The conservatory season
will begin with "Murder by
Poe" Oct. 31 and end with the
German farce "The Under-
pants," adapted by Steve
Martin. For tickets or more
information about either the
rep or conservatory seasons,
call 381-8000.
For offerings at the
Historic Asolo Theater at the
John and Mable Ringling
Museum of Art, call 360-
7399.
Kicking off the Sarasota
area theater season, the
Sarasota Golden Apple
Dinner Theatre opens Sept.
25 with "Laughter on the 23rd
Floor," followed by "Can Can"


Nov. 28, "Evita" Jan. 8, "Funny
Girl" March 18, "Chicago"
May 13 and "The Musical of
Musicals" July 8. For tickets,
which include a buffet meal,
call 366-5454 or (800) 652-
0920.
Sarasota's community the-
ater, The Players, will present
"Fame," "Jekyll & Hyde,"
"42nd Street," "Candide,"
Grand Hotel" and "Hair." For
tickets, call 365-2494.
For information on the
many diverse offerings at the
Van Wezel, call 953-3368, and
for the Philharmonic Center,
call (239) 597-1900 or (800)
955-8771.

kcool@venicegondolier.com










2B VEFNICEF GONDOLIER SUN


YOUR TOWN


OVER EAC~


WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007


BY TED RANK
STAFF ESCRITOR


Hang on to your sanity,
ladies and gentlemen. It's
time for News from
Ecineville.
Times are tough. The
economy is flat.
Everyone knows that. It's
not news.
Not breaking news any-
way.
What is news is that
someone, is finally doing
something about it.
Former Ecineville Mayor
and Chamber of Commerce
President Gil Jenkinmenson
has had enough of these
bad times and is ready to do
whatever it takes to turn
things around.
And Jenkinmenson isn't
fooling around.
"If the Ecineville and
Richarora .County, econ-
omies do not improve by
Thanksgiving, I am going to
have myself buried up to
my neck in sand in a box in
front of city hall. Then I will.
direct my lovely wife of 59
years, Glenda, to release
hundreds of red ants, a
dozen rats and one scorpi-
on into the box, where they
will ... well I think you can
figure out the rest," said
Jenkinmenson in a inter-
view last Friday with the
Ecineville Sun, which
Jenkinmenson had request-
ed.
We ran the story on
Sunday.
What's happened next is,
we would like to say, bizarre.
But in a world filled with
Paris Hilton, reality shows


that get away with violating
child labor laws and
President Jorge Busha
comparing his Iraq war with
Vietnam to make a point
that things are going well, I
fear nothing will ever be
bizarre again.
Seems our sister paper
the Ettolrahc Sunshine
News Gazette Tribune ran
our story in their Monday
edition and it was picked up
by the wire services.
We didn't actually see the
story in the Tibet Times, but
Buck Barooh, a longtime
friend of Ecineville Sun
Publisher Bob Reddev,
called from Tibet where he
was vacationing to say he'd
seen the Jenkinmenson
story all the way over there
in Tibet.
It's those damn satellites.
Someone hits enter and
some guy in Tibet knows
about what's going on in
Ecineville.
To say Jenkinmenson is
now a folk hero is an under-
statement.
Business leaders, politi-
cians, Madison Avenue
marketing gurus, and the
owner of a 6-Ten conve-
nience store in Brussels,
Kan., have praised Jenkin-
menson for his bravery,
courage and commitment
to continuing capitalism
and the pursuit of perpetu-
ating plentiful profits.
Jenkinmenson's face is
everywhere: newspapers,
TV, radio. (Radio? How can
his face be on ... never
mind, just keep reading.)
To show you how out of
control this is, of course we


have, "Tonight on CNN
Larry speaks with Gil
Jenkinmenson. Will he real-
ly do it?" Larry King, CNN, 9
p.m.
Only Certain States
Insurance Company has
told The Fix is In Foxy News
Network that if "poor Gil is
forced to carry out his threat
and be eaten alive, OCSIC
will pay Glenda $50,000 a
year for the rest of her life."
The "Save Gil" campaign
was started on the Internet
and as of press time,
$17,980,342.92 has been put
into a fund to stimulate the
Ecineville economy and
save poor, poor, poor, poor,
poor Gil.
Gil has said he was
pleased by the response and
if the "Save Gil" campaign
could reach a total of
$100,000,000, he, Gil, would
be willing to take just the
small stipend of 10 percent
in order to cover the
expenses he has already
incurred and agree to not be
killed by ants, rats and a
scorpion.
Expenses?
Anyway, what an un-
selfish act from an all-
around good guy, Gil
Jenkinmenson.
Well, this is Ted "I'm a
reporter, I'm a reporter"
Rank reporting. I'll see you
next issue with more news
from Ecineville. Until then,
remember, if you're smart
enough, or they're dumb
enough, you too can make a
fast $10 million here in
Ecineville.

trank@venicegondolier.com


Feel the cool breeze


BY MONTY ANDREWS
GUEST CONTRIBUTOR


Air movement helps keep
you comfortable during the
hot summer months. Ceiling
fans can play an important
role. They allow you to save
energy by raising your ther-.
mostat to 78 degrees. If yof
are leaving for a few hours, set
the thermostat at 82 degrees


And now ... The News


from Ecineville


A rock is covered with some leaves and rainwater after a recent storm.


Hi.L.
Ms. Meteorologist here.
Weather continued to be a big story on
the planet Earth this week.
Wind and fire were are a deadly combi-
nation in Greece. h b a
The Caribbean was hit by a Category 5 ,s',',
hurricane named Dean. a e
Flooding in the Midwest continued this "l*'"
past week i'
Here in Florida it's high humidity, as.


Your Town Over Easy
is brought to you by
Editors Debbie Shulman,
Jeff Tavares and
other unnamed
co-conspirators.


/


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1190 E. Venice Ave.* 485-3336
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Thoennissen Benefit
Coach Larry Thoennissen Benefit
Texas Holdern All-In PokerTournament

Aug. 31, 2007 7prn, Heron Creek Country Club,
5301 Heron Creek Blvd, North Port

Ist Prize
42 inch HD LCD TV
2nd Prize Complete Patio Set
3rd Prize Stereo Surround Sound
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5th Prize DVD Player
6th Prize Sony PSP
7th & 8th Prize Rod & Reel Combo
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Tickets can be -purchased at
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2233 Tamiami Trail, Venice or
call (941) 493-7744 or
Scott at (941) 815-1529


until you return.
Turn fans off when leaving
a room or leaving home. They
waste energy if left on when
no one is present. Make sure
the blades are turning in a
counter clock-wise direction
during the summer. If used
during winter months reverse
fan to a clock-wise direction.
The Planet It's Worth
Saving


I FREE Estimates I


AVVUIEMS

lkylamillIVIllam I







Venice Gondolier Sun


CONTACT US VENICE VEN
(941) 207-1000
www.venicegondolier.comVI


WEDNESDAY,
AUG. 29
Beach runs
Sarasota County Parks and
Recreation and New Balance
Sarasota host Kids Summer
Beach Runs at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Venice Pier,
1600 Harbor Drive. Register at
5:30 p.m. Call 861-5000.
Club fun
* Disabled AmericanVeterans
serves lunch, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.,
at 600 Colonia Lane, No-
komis. Call 488-4500.
* The American Legion No-
Vel Post 159 serves lunch, 11
a.m.-2 p.m., at 1770 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.
* The Venice Nokomis Elks
offer lunch, 11:30-2:30 p.m. at
1021 Discovery Way, No-
komis. All are welcome. Call
486-1854.
* The Kiwanis Club of Venice
meets at noon at Vincenzo's,
385 North U.S. 41 Bypass. Call
484-6022.
Mobile animal clinic
Animal Rescue Coalition vis-
its Robarts Arena, 3000 Ring-
ling Blvd., Sarasota, offering
low- or no-cost spays and
neuters for pets of income-
eligible families. Appoint-
ments required. Call 957-
1955, Ext. 5.
Lou Gehrig night
The ALS Association Florida
Chapter sponsors Lou Gehrig
Night with the Ft. Myers
Miracle at 7:05 p.m. at
Hammond Stadium, 14400
Six Mile Cypress Parkway, Ft.
Myers, 33912. Tickets are
$5-$7; parking 'is $3. ALS
patients and a caregiver will
receive complimentary tick-
ets; please reserve in advance.
Baseball raffle prizes. All pro-
ceeds benefit The ALS
Association Florida Chapter.
Call (888) 257-1717, Ext. 121
or e-mail ddadlani@alsafl.
org.

Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0075,
seniorfriendship.com
* 8:15 a.m., Wednesday walk-
ers
* 9 a.m., senior aerobics
* 9:30 a.m., watercolor art
* 10 a.m.,-euchre
* 11 a.m., line dancing
* noon, $3 lunch for 60+ with
24-hour reservations, 584-
0031 or 584-0090
* 12:30 p.m., friendly bridge
* 1 p.m., dancing to music by
Joe and Dick Rivers
Health help
* Al-Anon and Alateen family
meetings take place Wed-
nesday: 10:30 a.m., Freedom
AFG, Church of the Nazarene,
1535 E. Venice Ave. (children
welcome); 7 p.m., Wednesday
Step Study, Grace United
Methodist Church, 400 E.
Field St. Call 426-7655 or visit
southfloridaal-anon.org.
* Judith Trojnar teaches a
class on classical homeopa-
thy, 6-7:30 p.m., at Serenity
Gardens, 602 E. Venice Ave.
Donations welcome. Second
classAug. 29. Call 486-3577.
Canoe tours
Oscar Scherer State Park
offers year-round, ranger-led
canoe tours of South Creek,
Wednesday. Register at 8:30
a.m., tour at 9 am. Canoe
rental fee and park fee. Call
483-5956.


THURSDAY,
AUG. 30


Video lecture,
Jacaranda Public Library pre-
sents Understanding the
Universe: An Introduction to
Astonomy video lecture
series, '2-4 p.m., at 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd. Call
861-1270.
Club fun
* The Venice Nokomis Elks
offer lunch, 11:30-2:30 p.m.,
Italian specials ($7) and
mote, 5-7:30 p.m., and trivia,
6-8 p.m., at 1021 Discovery


Tot fun

Nokomis Community Center offers
Tot/Parent Time, 10 a.m.-noon,
Wednesday at 234 East Nippino Trail.
Play time for preschoolers. Toys provided
or bring your own. Adults supervise their
children. Call 861-5000.


Depot tours
Trained docents from the Venice Area Historical
Society lead free Venice Train Depot tours 10
a.m.-noon, Wednesdays. Donations welcome. For
special arrangements for groups of 10 or more,
call 484-0769.


Way, Nokomis. Call 486-1854.
* The American. Legion No-
Vel Post 159 serves lunch, 11
a.m.-2 p.m., plus music by
Larry Williams, 5-8. p.m., at
1770 E. Venice Ave. Call 488-
1157.
* The Rotary Club of Venice-
Nokomis meets for lunch at
noon at Grace United
Methodist Church, 400 E.
Field Ave. Call 484-9339.
* Shriners, Masons and male
family members and friends
are invited to the Sahib
Shriners weekly men's lun-
cheon, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Sahib
Shriners, 600 North Beneva
Road, Sarasota. Hot or cold
lunch, $12.

Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0075,
seniorfriendship.com
* 9 a.m., senior aerobics;
woodcarving
* 9:30 a.m., canasta
* 10 a.m., line dancing
* noon, arts and crafts; $3
lunch for 60 + with 24-hour
reservations, 584-0031 or
584-0090
* 1 p.m., dance to music by
The Harriotts


* 3:30 p.m., Tai Chi
Support
* Al-Anon newcomer meet-
ings are held Thursdays: 10
a.m., Steps & Growth, The
Church of Christ, 4301 State
Road 776; 7 p.m., Peace
Pipe, Emmanuel Lutheran
Church, 790 South Tamiami
Trail, Room 101; and 8 p.m.,
On the Island, Emmanuel
Lutheran Church, 790 South
Tamiami Trail. Visit south
floridaal-anon.org or call
426-7655.
* The Wellness Community
offers free patient and family
support groups. for people
touched by cancer, 10-11:30
a.m., and 1-2:30 p.m., at 3900
Clark Road, Building P-3,
Sarasota. Interview necessary
before joining. Call Dr. John
Kleinbaum at 921-5539.
* Nar-Anon meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday in the lounge at St.
Mark's Episcopal Church, 508
Riviera St. Call Ray at 497-
6879.
* Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 7:30 p.m. in the cafe-
teria of Englewood Com-
munity Hospital, 700 Medical
Blvd. Call 426-7655.


Sew and sews
The Wearable Arts Group of the Gulf Coast/
Florida Chapter of the American Sewing Guild
meets 1-3 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 29, at the Gulf
Coast Community Foundation of Venice, 601
South Tamiami Trail. Topic: Soft Doll Name Tags
from Loralie Ladies. All are welcome. Contact
Martha at 480-1032 or mbellos@earthlink.net.


Thursday workouts
* A free hula exercise and dance class takes place
10-11 a.m., followed by a regular exercise class,
11 a.m.-noon, at Emmanuel Lutheran Church
Fellowship Hall, 800 South Tamiami Trail. Call
488-3009.
* Serenity Gardens offers yoga at 6 p.m. at 602 E.
Venice Ave. Call 486-3577.


FRIDAY,
AUG. 31
Kayak trip
Kayak at Sister Keys on
Longboat Key with the
American Littoral Society,
8:30-11:30 a.m. Bring sun-
screen, sturdy shoes and
water. Kayak equipment pro-
vided. Fee: $25. RSVP to John
at 966-7308.
Computer class
Jacaranda Public Library
offers an Ask Jack computer
class, 1:30-3:30 p.m., at 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd.
Registration required by call-
ing 861-1270.
Club fun
* The Venice Nokomis Elks
offers lunch, 11:30 a.m.-2:30
p.m., and an all-you-can-eat
fish fry ($8), 5-7:30 p.m., and
specials at 1021 Discovery
Way, Nokomis. Call 486-1854.
* Lotsa Pasta, 4:30-7:30 p.m.,
at the Italian American Club
of Venice, 1375 Ringling Blvd.
Cost is $8. Take out, too. Call
486-1492.


* The American Legion No-
Vel Unit 159 serves lunch, 11
a.m.-2 p.m., plus music by
Harmony, 7-10 p.m., at 1770
E. Venice Ave. Call 488-1157.
* Disabled AmericanVeterans
hosts music by Bandana, 8
p.m.-midnight, at 600 Colo-
nia Lane, Nokomis. All are
welcome. Call 488-4500.

Senior Friendship, Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0075,
seniorfriendship.com
* 8:30 a.m., Tai Chi
* 8:45 a.m., wake-up stretch
* 9 a.m., crochet class
* 9:30 a.m., balance class
* 10:30 a.m., ballroom danc-
ing
* noon, $3 lunch for 60+ with
24-hour reservations, 584-
0031 or 584-0090
* 1 p.m., music byThe Upbeat
Gang
* 1 p.m., duplicate bridge
Wellness
* Joan Harn teaches gentle
yoga focusing on breathing,
proper alignment and core
work, 10-11:30 a.m., Fri-
days, at Unity Church, 125
North Jackson Road. Cost:
$10. Walk-ins welcome.


BEST BETS
THE LOCAL SCENE


Nokomis Community Center,
234 East Nippino Trail. Cost:
$65 plus supplies. Call
Merenda at 366-2866.

Please see VENUE, 8B


3B
WEDNESDAY
AUG. 29, 2007


SUN FILE PHOTO


Call 485-8904.
* The Wellness Community
offers free Qigong classes for
cancer patients and their
caregivers, 10:30-11:30 a.m.,
Friday at 3900 Clark Road,
Building P-3, Sarasota. To reg-
ister, call 921-5539.
* A free respite care program
for caregivers and their loved
ones takes place 1:15-3 p.m.,
Friday, at St. Mark's Epi-
scopal Church, 508 Riviera.
Registration required. Call
Pam at 366-2224.
* Step in the Right Direction,
an Al-Anon newcomer meet-
ing, takes place at 7 p.m.,
Friday, at St. Mark's Epi-
scopal Church, 508 Riviera St.
Visit southfloridaal-anon.
org or call 426-7655. An
Alateen meeting takes place
at the same time in the
lounge at the church. Call Ray
at 497-6879.

RSVP
Nature events
* Hike Hickey Creek (east
of Fort Myers) with The
Manatee-Sarasota Sierra
Club, 8-10 a.m., Saturday,
Sept. 1. Two-mile leisurely
walk through oak and cab-
bage palm hammock border-
ing a cypress swamp. Bring
water, sunscreen and hat.
Limited to 15. RSVP to Joe at
(239) 265-8485 or frogand
butterfly@embarqmail.coim,
or Brigita at (239) 337-1857 or
bbgahr@earthlink.net.
* Kayak at Bird Key and South
Lido Park with the American
Littoral Society, 8:30-11:30
a.m.,'. Thursday, Sept. 6. See
bird and marine life. Bring
sunscreen, sturdy shoes- and
water. Equipment and train-
ing provided. Fee: $25. RSVP
to John at 966-7308.
* The American Littoral
Society leads a quiet-water
kayak trip, 8:30-11:30 a.m,
Wednesday, Sept. 12, qt
Stump Pass State Park on
Lemon Bay. Bring sunscreen,
sturdy shoes and water.
Equipment and training pro-
vided. Fee: $30. RSVP to John
at 966-7308.
* Kayak at Shell Key Preserve
in Pinellas County with the
American Littoral Society, 9
a.m.-1 p.m., Saturday, Sept.
15. See bird and marine life.
Bring sunscreen, sturdy
shoes, water and lunch.
Equipment and training pro-
vided. Fee: $35. RSVP to John
at 966-7308.
* Kayak on the near-shore
waters of the Gulf of Mexico
from Turtle Beach to Point of
Rocks,- 8:30-11:30 a.m;,
Wednesday, Sept. 19. The
American Littoral Society
leads this excursion. Bring
snorkel equipment and sun-
screen. Kayak equipment
provided. Fee: $25. RSVP to
John at 966-7308.
* Kayak on Little Sarasota to
Palmer Point with the
American Littoral Society,
6:30-9 p.m., Saturday, Sept.
22. Begin the paddle before
sunset and return in the
moonlight. See birds, fish, the
Neville Preserve and other
islands in the bay. Another
trip takes place 8:30-11:30
a.m., Sunday, Sept. 2. Bring
water, sunscreen and insect
repellent. Equipment and
training provided. Fee: $25.
RSVP to John at 966-7308.
YMCA triathlon
The 2007 Venice YMCA
triathlon will take place at
7:30 a.m., Sept. 1, at Sharky's
on the Pier, 1600 South
Harbor Drive. The event con-
sists of a 400-meter swim, a
10-mile bike ride and a 5K
run. Sharky's will host a post-
race breakfast for partici-
pants. To register, visit
active.com or call 492-4716.
Watercolor classes
Carolyn Merenda leads Fun
with Watercolor classes for
adults, 2:30-4:30 p.m., Wed-
nesdays, Sept. 5-26, at the






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Venice Gondolier Sun


ji


FEATURES EDITOR
KIM COOL
PHONE: (941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com
www.venicegondolier.com


DINING
TRAVEL
ENTERTAINMENT!


Getting older ain't fun


JOE GIORGIANNI
HUMOR COLUMNIST


On my most recent birth-
day, which was this past week,
I awoke thinking that I have
never been this old before. I
have reached the age when
anything can, and often does,
go wrong.
In fact, this has made me a
firm believer in Murphy's 50-
50-90 law. That's the one
where Murphy postulated
that if there is a 50-percent
chance that something will go
wrong, there is a 90-percent
probability that it will.
I never knew this guy
Murphy, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.
On this particular morn-
ing, the light of my life
informed me that a small leak
had developed in the roof
covering our back deck. No
big deal, I thought. Simply
grab the ladder I keep by the
side of the house, make the
climb to the area in question,
and make any necessary
repairs.
This should have been a
simple procedure, as I had
done it in years past with lit-
tle, if any, difficulty.
Now, I have no idea how, or
why, for that matter, my
extension ladder became so
heavy. It is the same one that I
had used for the past 25 years,
but for some reason it now
weighed at least twice what it
did the last time I used it.
I I'm guessing here; as I am
not a scientist, but it must
have something to do with
being outside all the time. But
I did manage to drag it to the
area where the leak had
appeared.
Next I had to stand it, the


ladder, up against the wall. I
suspect it was my grunting
and guttural sounds that
alerted a passing neighbor
that I might need help. Or, it
could have been that I was on
my knees with my head
caught between the top two
rungs on the blasted thing.
Whatever the case, I told
him that I was grateful for the
helping hand, but I could
have managed by myself. I
thought it was rude for him to
laugh out loud.
After finally getting the lad-
der in place, making the
climb to the top and discover-
ing where I thought the leak
was originating, I remem-
bered that I had nothing with
me to make a repair.
Making three trips to get
various items I thought nec-
essary I opened the gallon
can of sealant that had been
recommended by the nice
man at the paint store.
Now, I suppose I should
not have opened the can
while it was sitting on a
sloped roof, but I did. The
good news was that with pret-
ty much the entire roof now
covered with a white sealant,
The bad news was that I now
had pretty much an all-white
roof.
I should add that the white
sealant, although attractive
and designed to stop leaks, is
also. very slippery, especially
when liberally applied to
one's shoes while trying to
stand up on a sloping roof. It
was amazing how much
shorter the length of time was
to descend from the roof than
it was to make the climb up
the ladder.
I learned two things from
this experience: One, I will
never plant thorny bou-
gainvillea next to the house
again, although it did break
my fall; and second, I learned
that you have to be a totigh
SOB to get old.
Oh yeah, the doctor said my
arm should heal nicely but I
would probably limp for a
while.
photojoe@comcast.net


1"~ *r:


OUR TOWN 5B
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29,2007


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Family program
The Children & Families
Supervised Visitation Pro-
gram seeks volunteers to
monitor 'court-ordered, su-
pervised visitation between
noncusto dial parents and
their children.
The court mandates that
these visits be conducted
with an unbiased third party
present. Venice visits are con-
ducted Tuesdays, Wednes-
days andc Thursdays. Volun-
teers are asked to make a
commitment to observe and
document one two-hour visit ;.
each week.
Training is provided in
Venice. For details, call Carroll
Leis at 492-6491.


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A polttrfu lic' letter to waiting (tit)'


"Copyrighted Materia






Syndicated Content


Available from Gommercial News Providers"


S -


Musicians create a TV show for preschoolers r- and their parents


* *0 0


BY PETER LARSEN
GUEST WRITER

Frodo the hobbit, the
quirky genius behind Devo,
and a little green monster
with very long arms will take
over your TV today.
There is nothing wrong
with your television set. Do
not attempt to adjust the pic-
ture.
Just surrender to "Yo
Gabba Gabba!" and sing
along with the friendly mon-
ster as the chicken and the
cheese dance in a sea of grape
juice inside him:
There's a party in my
tummy.
So yummy! So yummy!
Oh, but now you look con-
fused.
So we'll rewind to where to
Nickelodeon's brand-new
show for preschoolers got its
start inside the Santa Ana
secret headquarters of a cos-
tume- and-mask-wearing
ska-surf-punk band known as
the Aquabats.
Christian Jacobs or MC
Bat Commander as the
Aquabats lead singer and
longtime friend Scott Schultz
had for years tried to develop
a TV show based on the band
and its made-up mythology
of good vs. evil, superheroes
and villains, monsters, robots
and aliens.
Despite having a deal at
one point with Buena Vista
Television, the Aquabats pro-
ject eventually stalled. Both
Jacobs and Schultz worked by
day as creative types at local
sportswear companies RVCA
and Quiksilver, played in their
bands by night Schultz's


group was called Majestic -
and, most importantly, start-
ed families.
"Our kids were 2 years old
and we were watching chil-
dren's TV with them," says
Schultz, 35, over lunch at a
soundstage where "Yo Gabba
Gabba!" is shot. "So naturally
we started thinking, 'What
about a kids' show?'"
"We wanted fun colors, live
action," he says.
Kids just want to have fun
"We're just trying to bring
back the fun," Schultz says,
describing how they used
their own kids he has two
with a third on the way,
Jacobs has three as inspira-
tion and pint-sized in-house
focus groups.
So they dreamt up a team
of friendly monsters (and one
friendly robot), wrote a hand-
ful of catchy indie-pop songs
and invited friends in the
local music, fashion and art
scenes to offer help.
Schultz had met Robert-
son, who sang in an electron-
ic band called the Ray
Makers, when their bands
played on the same bill one
night.
"Scott kept saying, 'I know
a guy who would be per-
fect!' Jacobs says. "So we
went up to Amoeba Records
where he worked, and from
the moment we met him, we
knew."
With DJ Lance, better sets
and costumes, and rapper Biz
Markie doing a segment
called "Biz's Beat of the Day,"
they eventually finished a
pilot episode for the show -
but what to do next?


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"We didn't really have good
contacts," Schultz says.
"So we put it up on the
Internet and it just went
crazy," Jacobs says of the clips
that quickly went viral on the
blogs and Web sites around
the world. "We had a million
unique visitors in a few days
- it just shut down our
servers."
Skateboard legend Tom
Hawk and Jacobs met as teen
actors in the '80s skateboard
film "Gleaming the Cube,"
becoming pals and making
their own TV shows.
"We used to film TV shows
in my living room," Hawk
says. "It was me, Christian
and (skateboarder-turned-
actor) Jason Lee, all doing a
fake talk show.
"This is great it's more
fun and the music's cool,"
Hawk says.
Yo Gabba Gabba!
When your project explo-
des online like "Yo Gabba
Gabba!" did, it doesn't take
long for the people you want
to find to find you.
'All of a sudden everybody
was talking about it," Schultz
says.
He had always said the
show would land at Nick-
elodeon, Jacobs says. '"And we
all laughed."
But in that first rush ofhey-
have-you-seen-this? "Yo Gab-
ba Gabba!" clips arrived in e-
mails to Brown Johnson,
Nickelodeon's executive vice
president and creative direc-
tor for preschool program-


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ming.
She booked a flight from
New York City to Los Angeles
for a breakfast meeting at the
Four Seasons Hotel with
Jacobs and Schultz.
"When I finally met them
in person, I guess I was sur-
prised by how quiet and con-
servative they werin'," she says.
"They're very direct and sweet
and a little bit reticent. And so
happy doing what they're
doing."
Johnson says .she liked
their style and vision: "I think
they wanted to create some-
thing that was both modem
and nostalgic and not very
cookie cutter at all,"' she says.
Doubts set in
The main doubt Nickel-
odeon needed settled before
signing the show was whether
Jacobs and Schultz who'd
done plenty of skateboard
and music videos -- could
handle a job as big, as a 20-
episode TV series.
They settled that ,question
when they signed as partners
with W!LDBRAIN (Note to all
you retired English teachers:
the exclamation mark is NOT
a typo) a production compa-
ny with a background in ani-
mation and children's TV
"They make me really
happy about the job that I
have," Johnson said o[f the "Yo
Gabba Gabba!" team.
"Hi, I'm Laila All, and I
want to show you my dance,"
says the daughter of boxer
Mohammed Ali, a boxer her-
self and a recent contestant


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Tel. (941) 497-7191


PHOTO COURTESY OF SESAME STREET LIVE
Elmo and friends will perform live in Clearwater on Nov. 2.Tickets
are on sale now by phone to the Ruth Eckherd Hall box office at
(727)-791-7400. Until then, watch a new TV show inspired by the
Sesame Street characters "Yo Gabba Gabbal"


on "DancingWith The Stars."
"It's called the dog! Put one
hand up! Put the other hand
up! And dig! And dig!"
After dancing and dig-
ging- with the monsters and
the robot, Ali says she didn't
hesitate when she was asked
to guest star on the show.
"It just looked like fun a
chance to be wild and have
fun with the kids," she says.
As for them, it's almost
hard to believe that what they
do every day now is consid-
ered their work.
"It's super fun here,"
Schultz says. "Not many
shows you can come to and


Visit our newly
remodeled & expanded
showroom!


just dance and play and have
fun like a kid.
"I guess we're lucky."

Distributed by McClatchy-
Tribune Information Services.


YO GABBA GABBA!
When: 10:30 a.m. week-
days
Where: Nickelodeon and
Noggin cable channels.





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6B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


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I











VHS Medical Academy picnics at the beach


BY SUSAN CAIRO
STAFF WRITER


The Medical Academy of
Venice High School got a
jump start on the school year
with a picnic Aug. 6 at the
North Jetty Park on Casey Key.
There were more than 125
students attending.
"We are growing by leaps
and bounds," said Brenda
Randazzese, Medical Acade-
my director.
Teachers took time from


Lyssa Neri, VHS sophomore,
takes part in the activities.


the activities to advise stu-
dents on how to earn credits
through a partnership with
Manatee Community Coll-
ege. Students can take dual-
enrollment courses while in
high school and earn college
credits free of charge.
"The academy gives stu-
dents an opportunity to find
out about a career in medi-
cine," Randazzese said.
VHS has state-of-the-art
technology available to pro-
vide students with a back-
ground for the workplace.
This includes the use of tech-
nologically advanced life-like
patient care simulator, class-
room utilization of modern
medical equipment and a
mobile laptop computer cart
for classroom use.
The VHS Medical Academy
is a four-year series of courses
designed to prepare students
in the field of patient care.
Upon successful completion
of the four-year academy stu-
dents will be able to: enter the
work force as a certified nurs-
ing assistant earned,by com-
pleting the program in high
school; pursue license practi-
cal nurse training at Sarasota
County Technical Institute; or
matriculate into one of MCC's
programs including regis-
tered nurse, radiography,
physical or. occupational
therapy assistant and, if de-
sired, prepare for a four-year
university.


Parents and students of the VHS Medical Academy enjoy the picnic
at Casey Key kicking off the academy's new year.


VHS Medical Academy has
developed partnerships with
local business and organiza-
tions to assist in student
learning in the medical field.
VHS staff
Students in the VHS
Medical Academywork with a
staff of teachers including a
registered nurse, and science,
math and English teachers.
These teachers collaborate to
provide students information
in the field of medicine.
Scholarships
The Academy also provides


students an opportunity to
qualify for scholarships. The
academy's curriculum meets
the Florida Bright Futures
Scholarships criteria. Students
may qualify for 75-100 percent
tuition for a Florida communi-
ty college or university.
To qualify, students must
maintain at least a 3.0 grade-
point average; reach a specified
level on the SAT or ACT stan-
dardized test; and do 75 hours
of volunteer community ser-
vice.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF VENICE HIGH SCHOOL
Stephanie Velasquez, left, and Autum Grieco, both freshmen at VHS
Medical Academy, enjoy the picnic at Casey Key.


CAREER PATHS
Careers available for stu-
dents in VHS Medical
Academy
athletic director
cardiovascular technician
diagnostic medical sonogra-
pher
dietitian
ER nurse
echocardiography technician


licensed practical nurse
massage therapist
medical tab technologist
certified nursing aide
optician
physician's assistant
paramedic
pediatric nurse
pharmacist
pharmacy technician
physician
registered nurse


scairo@venicegondolier.com


ANSWERS from P, SUDOKU


Eagle Scout
PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTY WISE
Martin Wise II, president of the
mens auxiliary, VFW, Post 8118,
Venice, presents Brent
Billington, of Boy Scout Troop
800, a $500 Eagle Scout scholar-
ship award.


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479512836


Recycle this newspaper.


It's not only a good deal.

Ss good deal bett


The
7 reasons
why people said they
tried the non-medical
care was to control pain,
because they heard it helps,
because it is safe, because it
helped someone they know, and
because their prescription
medication wasn't working. Study
after study has confirmed the success
of chiropractic for many types of spine
related health complaints. At TWIN
)PALMS CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH
CENTER, we recommend a continuing
schedule of regular chiropractic
checkups, which can help detect,
correct, and maintain optimum
spinal and nervous system function.
Please call 941.412.3800 to schedule
an appointment and let us help you
Lead a healthier life. We're located
at 1214-C Venice Ave. East. We
offer massage therapy and have 2
licensed massage therapists on staff.


See why Village On The Isle is the

Venice leader in retirement living value.

The engaging way of life you want the peace of mind you'll appreciate. At Village On
The Isle, you will have the worry free retirement lifestyle you've always imagined.., .for less
than you may think.
Because we're a not-for-profit community, you know that our fees go to enriching the
lives of our residents, instead of some CEO.
Exceptional amenities. The assurance of access to comprehensive health care, including
assisted living and long-term skilled care, to meet changing needs. All backed by twenty-
five years of proven stability and experience.
Find out more. CALL US TODAY TO JOIN US FOR LUNCH AND A TOUR.
AN-MMN & A


Dan Busch, DC
V W -J-U. -


Erene Romanski, DC

v 71r


I I ne patient ano any otner person responsible for payment nas a right to refuse to pay, cancel I
payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free,
discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment.


VILLAGEE ON THE ISLE.
l EVERkYDAY'S A NEW DAY


Celebrating 25 years as Venice's original andgon4
Continuing Care Retirement Community.

941-486-5484
920 Tamiami Trail South, Venice, Florida 34285 www.villageontheisle.com


from Page 4B


"NWow accep:tine ISI "
admissions at Mark
Manor Assisted Living att
age On The :ell'


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7B


WFDNFqDAY.ALJG.29.2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM






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VENUE from page 3B


Labor Day party
The Sons of the American
Legion hosts a Labor Day cel-
ebration, 1-5 p.m., Monday,
Sept. 3, at The American
Legion No-Vel Post Unit 159,
1770 E. Venice Ave. Barbecue
chicken dinner with baked
beans, slaw and roll, free draft
beer, games and music for $8
donation. All are welcome.
Tickets available at the bar or
from SAL members. Call 492-
6697.
Women's sailing
The Venice Women's Sailing
Squadron hosts an open
house, 9 a.m.-noon, Wed-
nesday, Sept. 5, at the pram


shed next to Higel Marine
Park at 1330 Tarpon Center
Drive. Registration is being
accepted for an introduction
to small-boat sailing course,
mornings, Sept. 10-14. Call
Judy at 485-4143.
Dog training
The Greater Venice Florida
Dog Club Inc. hosts dog-
training classes starting
Tuesday, Sept. 11, at the
South Venice Civic Asso-
ciation, 720 Alligator Drive.
All training is done with posi-
tive reinforcement, not pun-
ishment. Puppy kinder-
garten: For ages 8 to 16 weeks
for four weeks: 6 p.m., Sept.


11 and 18, Oct. 2 and 9. Fee:
$65. Obedience: For six
weeks: 6:45 p.m., Sept. 11 and
18, Oct. 2, 9 and 16, Nov. 13.
Fee: $90. Conformation: For
four weeks: 7:30 p.m., Sept. 11
and 18, Oct. 2 and 9. Fee: $40.
Must present proof of current
immunizations. Reservations
and payment required in
advance. Class sizes are limit-
ed. Contact Pam Ruf at 485-
7155 or parhrr@comcast.net.
SPARCC coffee
The Auxiliary of Safe Place
and Rape Crisis Center hosts
its first open coffee of the sea-
son at 10 a.m., Wednesday,
Sept. 12, at Laurel Oak


Country Club, 2700 Gary
Player Blvd., Sarasota. Mem-
bers and guests are invited to
learn about SPARCC and its
services to victims of domes-
tic violence and sexual
assault, and to hear about the
auxiliary's plans for the sea-
son. Reservations are re-
quired. Call Cheryl at 379-
6763 or Djarlene at 954-0649.
Democratic luncheon
The Democratic Club of
Sarasota holds a luncheon
with speaker Waldo Proffitt
Saturday, Sept. 8, at the
Meadows Country Club, 3101
Longmeadow Road, Sarasota.
Social at 11:30 a.m., lunch at


noon. Cost: $20 for members,
$25 for nonmembers. RSVP
by Sept. 5 to 379-9233 or
reserve@sarasotadems.com.
Golf tournament
The third annual Ron Gordon
Charity Golf Tournament to
benefit the Humane Society
of Sarasota County takes
place Saturday, Sept. 8, at
Stonebrook Golf and Country
Club on Palmer Ranch,
Sarasota. Registration for the
tournament, which includes
a round of golf with cart, bev-
erages on the course and an
awards luncheon, is $75 per
player or $300 per team.
Sponsorship opportunities


are also available. Contact
Gordon at 266-0526 ot
nuts 4 golf@ verizon. net.
Checks, made payable to
SCRE Charity Fund, may be
mailed to Ron Gordon, 3315
Kenmore Drive, Sarasota, FL
34231.
Elks fundraiser
The Venice-Nokomis Elks
host a scholarship fundrais-
ing dinner Saturday, Sept. 15,
at 1021 Discovery Way,
Nokomis. Proceeds benefit
local students. Entertainment
and dancing by Ziggy
Entertainment. Members
and guests welcome. Call
486-1854.


Whatever You Need, Your-


Local Classifieds


/ Associate degree program / Choose day or evening classes
/ Job placement assistance available for graduates / Financial aid available to those who qualify
Hands on training and a comprehensive curriculum
prepare you for future culinary success.
Call toll free to speak with an Admissions Counselor

1.866.204.5523
R Sarasota Campus
a Admissions Hours: Mon Thurs 9am 8pm, Fri 9am 5pm, Sat 9am 2pm
wwwkesesarsoaclinryco


oa IAiuAn uAvenue wesL Ve ice, FionI'ia 420

941-486-8883


GVEICE 200 E Venice Ave.

G( fdolier Sun 941-207-1200


www.sun-herald.com/classifieds


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Looking for a new ride? Trying to sell your
old one? Try using your local Classifieds. We
have ads for a wide range of automobiles,
most of which are removed from the
Classified within two weeks due to successful
sales. Whether you're buying or selling an
automobile, scan your local Classifieds t


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WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29, 2007 WWW.VENICEGONDQLIER.COM M ILESTO N ES VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


PHOTO COURTESY OF GREG PIERCE


PHOTO COURTESY OF LOIS TROIANO


ENGAGEMENT

Campanale-McKeown


The engagement of
Michelle Campanale of
Worcester, Mass., to Mark
McKeown of Springlake
Heights, N.J., has been an-
nounced.
She is the daughter of Lois
Troiano of Venice, Fla. He is
the son of John P and Doris
McKeown of Springlake
Heights.
The bride-elect is a 1987
graduate of Holy Name High
School in Worcester and a
1992 graduate of Bentley
College in Waltham, Mass.
She majored in marketing


and is employed by Citi
Habitats of New York as a
licensed real estate salesper-
son.
The bridegroom-to-be is a
1989 graduate of St. Rose
High School in Belmar, N.J.,
and a 1993 graduate of
Providence College in Rhode
Island. He majored in finan-
cial analysis and is employed
by Lydian Asset Management
as a certified financial analyst
.in Westport, Conn.
The wedding will take
place Feb. 16, 2008, in
Manhattan, N.Y.


PHOTO COURTESY OF JACKIE MANTKOWSKI
ENGAGEMENT

Mantkowski-Illig


Mr. and Mrs. Mantkowski
of Venice, Fla., announce the
engagement of their daugh-
ter, Jacqueline Mantkowski to
Joshua Illig, both of Nunnelly,
Tenn. He is the son of Caryl
Brady of Tallahassee, Fla., and
Dr. Arthur Illig of Cape Cod,
Mass.
The bride-elect is a 2002
graduate of Venice High
School and a 2006 graduate of
the University of South
Florida in Sarasota. She
majored in English (profes-


sional and technical writing)
and has a minor in business.
She is employed by Crump
Insurance Services in
Nashville, Tenn., as an
account coordinator.
The bridegroom-to-be is a
2000 graduate of Venice High
School. He is employed by
Spencer Mill Woodworks in
Bon Aqua, Tenn., as a custom
woodworker.
The wedding will take
place May 3, 2008, in
Nashville.


The engagement of Angela
Lyn Rogers of Arlington, Va.,
to Greg Joseph George Pierce
of Alexandria, Va., has been
announced.
She is the daughter of
Barbara Goodlett of Moun-
tain Home, Ark., and Ken-
neth Rogers of Myrtle Beach,
S.C. He is the son of Deb-
orah Pierce of Sarasota, Fla.,
and Donald Pierce of Venice,
Fla.
The bride-elect graduated
in 1993 from Russellville High
School in Russellville, Ark., in
1997 from Arkansas Tech
University in Russellville,
Ark., and in 2001 from gradu-


ate school at the University of
Oklahoma in Norman. She
majored in political science
and is employed by the
Department of Defense.
The bridegroom-to-be
graduated in 1998 from
Venice High School in 2002
from The Florida State
University in Tallahassee
and in 2003 from graduate
school at The Florida State
University. He majored in
international affairs and is
employed by BCP Inter-
national as an international
affairs analyst.
The wedding will take
place Dec. 16 in Venice.


MILITARY HONORS


Air Force Tech. Sgt. Sandra
L. Downing has graduated
from the Weather Forecaster
Apprentice Course at Keesler
-Air Force Base, Biloxi, Miss.
The course is designed to
train students in the funda-
mentals of Air Force weather
forecasting operations. Fore-
casters are trained in weather
observing and analysis, tropi-
cal weather analysis and fore-
casting, weather satellite
imagery interpretation, Dop-
pler weather radar operation
and computer-generated
graphics, interpretation of
weather effects on electro-
optics weapons systems, and
automated weather distribu-
tion system operations.
Additionally, students are
trained to assist in preparing
weather forecasts, watches,
warnings, and advisories that
affect specific regional areas,
ranges, routes, local bases


and flight operations.
She is the daughter of Eric
A. and BeverlyA. Sidman, and
granddaughter of Ernest E
Sauer, all of Nortonj Kan.
Her husband, Jeffrey, is the .
son of John C. and Susan W.
Downing of Nokomis, Fla.
In 1992, she graduated from
Norton Community High
School, and received an asso-
ciate degree in 2000 from the
Community College of the Air
Force.
Air Force Airman George E.
Persico and
Air Force,
Airman
John T. Reed
have grad-
uated from
basic mili-
tary training
at Lackland
Air Force
Base, San Persico


Antonio,
Texas.
During the
six weeks of
training,, the
airmen stud-
ied the Air
,.: Force mission,
organization,
Reed and military
customs and
courtesies; performed drill
and ceremony marches, and


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DISCUSSION TOPICS
*The 124 Decisions that must be made when *Why insurance should not be used for
someone passes away. purchasing burial needs'
*The 4 Required items of burial. How to transfer your Out-of-State burial
Veterans "Benefits" -EXACTLY what the property to Florida.
Government does and does not provide. -After Care Services. ,
*Pre-Need vs. At Need purchase. Why you don't -Advanced Funeral Planning .-
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received physical training,
rifle marksmanship, field
training exercises and special
training in human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree through the Com-
munity College of the Air,


Force.
Persico's flight was award-
ed honor flight status.
Persico is the son of
George Persico Jr. of
Amsterdam, N.Y, and Ann-
Marie Persico of Venice, Fla.
He is a 2006 graduate of
Venice High School.


PACKAGE INCLUDES:

$3000 FREE PLAY
Plus $5 Meal Voucher &
Roundtrip Tranisportation


CRACKER BARREL
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Exit 193 From 1-75j
m0


MCDONALD'S
Sarasota
Cattleman Road
& Bee Ridge


Reed is the son of Todd
Reed of Venice and Sharon
Reed of Sarasota, Fla.
Reed is a 2006 graduate of
Riverview High School,
Sarasota.

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YOU PAY:
$ l ^&^ .* SERVICE FROM
$9100 Sarasota/
m250r Bradenton
SERVICE FROM
30 oU *Venice


DENNY'S
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Cortez Road
by Desoto Square Mall


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Bradenton
SR 64 & 1-75


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For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino


877.529.7653


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e COME OUT & PLAY.


If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT.
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ENGAGEMENT

Rogers-Pierce


BUS GUS


Call Escot Bus Lines at
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For More Information

PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES
Service from Venice/Sarasota/Bradenton Areas Tuesdays & Thursdays


WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29,2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM


MILESTONES VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9B







Venice Gondolier Sun


10B r :,
WEDNESDAY .
AUG. 29,2007


CONTACT US
FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST
franvalencic@comcast.net
www.venicegondolier.com


Summer music camp


FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST


Camp ends on

a high note

Gayle Heskitt smiled for
nearly an hour straight as she
watched more than 50 stu-
dents dazzle the audience at a
summer concert. Miss Gayle,
as the boys and girls called
her, took charge of the Venice
Symphony's summer music
camp for the 11th year.
The musicians, ages 5 to
17, fiddled and plinked and
blew their horns at a summer
concert at the Venice
Nokomis United Methodist
Church. As Gayle reminded
the audience, "Some of these
boys and girls have been play-
ing for just nine days."
The musicians performed
recognizable music such as
"London Bridge is Falling
-Nown," and robust pieces such
as "Sousa on Parade."
Teacher Jamie Marshall
played a trumpet duet with
Michelle Unger and proudly
told everyone that all musi-
cians started off like Michelle.
"They know a few notes and
play until they learn more" he
said.
He and Michelle showed
how they learn by saying the
notes first and then they play
the instrument. Michelle was
one of the youngest in the
group.
During the two weeks of
camp, Alyson King taught
music theory and made the
course enjoyable by teaching
students how to be conduc-
tors and to play without
instruments. It felt like every-
one should open their
umbrellas inside the church
when the boys and girls per-
formed rain melodies using
their hands and blocks. The
innovative number filled the
church with the pitter patter
of rain.
Marina Pope taught and
directed the woodwinds with
a special guest appearance by
bassoonist extraordinaire
Susan Gildemeister. .
The Jazz Band jammed and
Jamie Marshall encouraged the
group, including guitars played
by Campbell Bell, Tali Ursel
and Amanda Cattaneo.
Amanda and her sister, Camilla
Cattaneo, recently moved to
Venice from Italy.
PennyDuncddey and Randy
Gonzalez taught strings. The
teachers agreed their students
were hard-working and quick
to learn. Gayle Heskitt and
everyone involved with the
Venice Symphony summer
music camp deserves a bravo.
Special thanks to fans who
support Venice Symphony
and Friends of the Symphony
fundraisers all year to make
the camp possible.
One of our best
The special person of this
week is Jamie Marshall. This
terrific musician teaches at the
Venice Symphony summer
music camp each year. He loves
music and enjoys watching his
students improve and perform.
When he accompanied the
jazz band at the summer con-
cert, he had the same look of
enjoyment on his face he has
when he performs with the
Venice Symphony.
He admits to his students
that, like some of them, he
wanted to be a rock star when
he was their age.
Jamie Marshall is one of
the members of the Venice


Symphony who teach at the
summer camp and help make
life good for the young musi-
cians in Venice.


From left, Jacob Campbell, Kate Moran and Caleb Dunaway get ready to perform
at the Venice Symphony summer music camp concert.


Teacher Randy Gonzalez works w
SSymphony summer music camp.


SUN PHMU IU BY F-KAN VALENUL
vith the guitar students at the Venice


Cassie, left, and Maria Urmano perform a jazzy
trumpet duet at the Venice Symphony summer
music camp concert.


Teacher
Marina Pope
enjoyed her
woodwind
students at
the Venice
Symphony
summer
music camp.


Teacher Jamie Marshall makes
sure everyone in his Jazz Band
has their music at the Venice
Symphony music camp.


Sisters Amanda, right, and Camilla Cattaneo perform a duet on
the keyboard.


WANTTO SEE MORE PHOTOS?
Go to venicegondolier.com and click on We Spotted.


Gayle Heskitt, left, and her daughter Johanna Fichner join forces at the Venice Symphony
summer camp. Heskitt directed the two-week camp and Finchner sang and taught the
students about the role of the soloist.


Pianist Megan Priest talked to the Venice
Symphony summer camp students about being a
pianist.




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