Title: Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00386
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Alternate Title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Publication Date: July 15, 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028295
Volume ID: VID00386
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
alephbibnum - 002730652
issn - 1536-1063
lccn - 2001229429
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Full Text





* VENICE *





011 0 er


LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER


75 CENTS VOLUME 62 NUMBER 50


AN EDITION OF THE SUN


. . FLORIDA'S


SUNDAY-TUESDAY EDITION, JULY 15-17,2007


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NO. *********AUTO**ALL FOR ADC 320
NO. iUNv OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
3AINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


.NICEGONDOLIER.COM


THIS
EDITION
OURTOWN 1B













The Lions share
Sixty years of giving.
back to the commu-
nity.


THIS SECTION SA
Outing butts
This group's efforts
won't go up in
smoke.

DEATHS |4A
Alice L. Brossard
Colin D. Miller
Herbert F.Powell


COUPONS
Kingfish Cafe....................... 9B
Tip Top Nails............... 11.....1 B
Twin Palms Chiropractic....12B


Shortage of fire rangers may hurt Florida


BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN
NORTH PORT ASSISTANT EDITOR

Donald Hughes remem-
bers being on a bulldozer, fac-
ing down the 30-foot flames
of an angry forest fire.
It's times like that, he said,
when he loves his job.
Hughes is a senior fire
ranger in the Division of
Forestry, under the Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services.
He works out of the
Myakka River District serving
five counties: Manatee, De-
Soto, Hardee,- Sarasota and
Charlotte. Except for a short
stint when he worked for the
DeSoto County, making cap-
tain, he's been in Forestry
most of his career.
After 29 years, he.still loves
his job. That's what keeps him
working at Forestry.
It sure isn't the pay after
29 years, Hughes will retire on
only $36,000 a year.
State pay and benefits
have not kept pace with the
offers for city, county and fed-
eral firefighters.
"We got left behind,"
Hughes said.
Frank House is a senior fire
ranger out of the Punta Gorda
Forestry Station. He's logged
27 years of service for the divi-
sion.


SUN PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN
Division of Forestry Fire Ranger Lee Rowland fights wildfires,
with a bulldozer. Starting pay for rangers is lower than for most
other city, county and federal firefighters. Rangers sometimes
leave for better-paying jobs after gaining a few years of experi-
ence.


"The pay's been lousy as
long as I've been here," he
said. "I'm not here just for the
money. The main reason I've
stayed is I really like the job."
Both House and Hughes
have found something more
rewarding than financial gain
in their work. Hughes espe-
cially likes working outdoors,
and also appreciates the
occasional opportunity to
fight really big forest fires out
west through mutual-aid
pacts.
"We get U.S. Forestry pay
for those fires, and that's real -
ly good," he said.
In contrast, House said,
state rangers barely make
enough to live on.
"We have a couple of
young guys," he said. "They're
living at home with their par-
ents. If they're single or
divorced, it's hard to live on a
single income.
"There's one young guy, he
has a low rent, but he said
when that lease is up and he
has to move, he doesn't know
where he'll go."
In some areas, Forestry has
set up used FEMA trailers for
young rangers to rent
because locally, there is virtu-
ally no other housing they
can afford. The young rangers
also don't have much to look
forward to for promotions:


once they move from
"ranger" to "senior ranger," no
higher levels are available.
It's no wonder that several
recently have moved on to
jobs where the pay is better.
Many novice fire rangers stay
with Forestry only long
enough to learn the trade and
get firsthand experience from
seasoned rangers like Hughes
and House.
Getting burned
The Division of Forestry
employs 507 fire rangers,
including 125 senior rangers.
But recently it reported a
statewide shortage of 29
rangers.
David Core, operations
chief for the Florida Division
of Forestry, said it takes 18
months for a new fire ranger
to be trained and gain
enough experience to be
working on his own. At first, a
mentor works with him in the
field.
"The state spends $83,066
for the first 18 months," Core
said. That includes $43,443
for salary and benefits, and
the balance covers the cost of
Basic Fire Control Training.
"It's a 600-hour course,"
Core said, "and it includes 40
hours of structure-fire train-

Please see HURT, 5A


More parking in store


The Venice Planning Commission will consider
parking lots and more at its July 17 meeting.


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR

Parking lots are high on the
list of agenda items for the
Venice Planning Commission
at its Tuesday, July 17 meet-
ing.
Venice Regional Medical
Center has two proposals up
for consideration.
One is approval of a site
plan for a planned 1.2-acre
parking lot.
It already demolished the
oldYork Building to create the
lot that will provide 87 spaces
for its employees.
"The York Building was in
such bad repair, it would
never be used for a patient
care area," said George
Sorbino, director of plant
operations atVRMC.
Client comments on the
lack of parking played a role
in VRMC's decision to create
more parking space.
Specifically, there was a
need for "faster parking,"
Sorbino said.
"It will free up the existing
parking garage and make pre-
mier parking available to our
customers," Sorbino said.
"We wanted to get out of
their way to give them the
best seats."
VRMC is also asking for a
special exemption to add
another 0.27-acre parcel at
525 Riviera St., currently
zoned Residential Single-
Family 3, to expand the lot.
The second lot accounts
for 26 of the parking spaces
created.
Employees will access the
parking lot from Nokomis
Avenue. Riviera Street will be
one-way and will only allow
vehicles to exit, according to
the site plan narrative.

Good morning, Gondolier
Sun subscriber,
WILLIAM GRAF
,"


Sorbino said the new park-
ing lot, if approved, should be
complete sometime in
October.
Rialto's sign
Also on the agenda is a
request to renovate the Rialto
Shopping Center sign in its
parking lot
It's considered a noncqn-
forming sign in that it doesn't
meet current architectural,
style, illumination or height
requirements, and thus needs
the planning commission
sign off on any improve-
ments.
It's located in the Venetian
Urban Design overlay district,
which restricts ground sign
height to 9 feet.
Lindsay Group, owner of
the shopping center,'wants to
modernize the sign with a
Venetian theme, but keep it
near its current 20-foot
height.
Owners intend to perform
facade renovation to the
entire shopping center within
the next year, according to
planning and zoning docu-
ments submitted to the city.
Pinebrook Center
Owners of the proposed
Pinebrook Center on Pine-
brook Road just south of the
Pinebrook Rehabilitation and
Nursing Center, have submit-
ted a site development plan
for the planning commis-
sion's approval.
It calls for the construction
of four office buildings and
associated parking lots on
2.39 acres.
Each office building will
accommodate two office
suites, according to planning

Please see STORE, 4A


Red-eared turtles now Florida outlaws


BY STEVE REILLY
.STAFF WRITER

For decades, at least since
the 1950s; pet shops sold
small, green red-eared slider
turtles, which many children
would keep in a plastic turtle
bowl with its plastic palm tree
setting atop the plastic bowl's
island.
But that tradition came to
an end July 1 in Florida.
Effective that day, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission put into effect a
. statewide ban on the sale of
red-eared slider turtles -
nicknamed "pet shop turtles."
However, anyone who al-
ready has a red-eared slider
may keep it, under the new
rule.
"This: exemption was in-
cluded to allow owners of red-
eared sliders to keep their tur-
tles and discourage them
from releasing this normative
species into the wild," said
Scott Hardin, FWC exotic
species coordinator. "We
want to encourage people to
Please see RED, SA


w. 4'


SUN PHOTO BY SARAH COWARD, scoward@sun-herald.com
A pet shop staple for generations of children, green red-eared slider turtles are no longer for
sale in the state of Florida.


County amends 'no mow' in fertilizer ordinance


Faced with intense reaction, the Sarasota County
Commission changed language in the "no-mow"
zone section of its amended fertilizer ordinance
this week to make the practice voluntary and
tabled further discussion until August.


BY STEVEN J. SMITH
STAFFWRITER

"No-mow" is no more.
Inundated with hundreds
of e-mails and a chamber full
of residents eager to weigh in
on the subject, the Sarasota
County Commission averted
further conflict this week by
changing the "no-mow zone"


, section of its amended pro-
posed fertilizer ordinance.
The new language would
make the practice voluntary.
After hours of discussion,
the commissioners decided
to table the entire matter until
Aug. 27, when other revisions
to the ordinance might be
addressed. Those included:
Enforcement


OUR TOWN SECTION


DEAR ABBY '
CROSSWORD
GREEN SHEET
PETS
SENIOR SCENE


Training exemptions for
landscape professionals
already versed in so-called
best management practices
A 2-percent cap on phos-
phorus content
A 50-percent cap oh
slow-release nitrogen
However, the unblinking


Thaxton Staub


ALSO IN THIS EDTON
CLASSIFIED
COMICS
COUPONS
TV BOOK
USA WEEKEND


eye of the spotlight and the
assembled citizenry at the
Robert L. Anderson building
- glared mainly on the
offending "no-mow" section
of the ordinance, whichread:
"A 6-foot no-mow zone
shall be established from the
water's edge of any pond,
stream, water course, lake or
canal, or any designated wet-
land...."
That brought out the
crowds.
"There are so many other
good things in the ordinance
that I feel it's critical we go for-
ward with as much public

Please see MOW, 4A


7 05252 10075 o


- -a


BOB VEDDER 6A OBITUARIES 4A
CD & MORTGAGE RATES 9A OPINION 6A
LEGALS 9A SOUTH COUNTY RECORD BA
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LOTTO 2A WEATHER 2A


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A








WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2007


2A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN ALMANAC


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"Copyrighted Material

USyndCatednCotein

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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JOE WEISS opened a cafe at Miami Beach in 1913 and in
1921 a friend introduced Joe to the local stone crabs.
Weiss cooked the crabs and served them with french fries,
cole slaw and mayonnaise. The recipe was an immediate
hit and became a gourmet meal at Joe's, the cafe destined
to become the legendary Joe's Stone Crab Restaurant.


,Land conservation program renewal expected


lBY GERALDA. ROGOVIN
CORRESPONDENT


- Amendment of a Sarasota
:County ordinance authorizing
,continuation of the Environ-
'mentally Sensitive Lands
Oversight Committee, expect-
ed to be approved later this
Month by the county commis-
,sioners, comes at a time of
:"watchful waiting," in the
words of its chair, Jono Miller.
, "The 4-1 vote of citizens in
support t of the program sent a
'Clear signal that it is highly
vaued," he said.
S- Public referendums in 1999


and 2005 endorsed ESLOC as
a means to fulfill the county's
comprehensive plan man-
date to protect natural areas
against development.
The county's current bud-
get woes were initiated by the
state Legislature. It required
all Florida cities and counties
to roll back their 2008 budgets
to 2007 levels, then reduce
them further. Sarasota County
has to cut an additional 7 per-
cent.
In a letter to county em-
ployees last April, Adminis-
trator Jim Ley warned of pos-
sible budget reductions. He


rm m m m - B. m-m-m --

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I MRi /D / 5175 S.R. 776, Venice, FL 34293
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LOOK FOR THE
". NEXT VENICE
--- CITY COUNCIL
AGENDA


IN THE VENICE
GONDOLIER ON SUNDAY
JULY 22ND, 2007
s '


estimated then that $28 mil-
lion would have to be cut.
Earlier this month, faced
with the prospect of a "super
exemption" of 75 percent on
homesteaded properties, he
suggested that the county
could incur a $20 million
deficit.
Offset
The possible impact on the
environmentally sensitive
lands program and the coun-
ty's quality of life by budget
reductions is evident, accord-
ing to Brooke Elias, ESLOC's
coordinator.


She said that 57 parcels of
land, ranging in size from
less than a quarter acre to
3,600 acres have been pur-
chased by the program since
1999. The most recent buy,
in June, was 62 acres on the
Myakka River pines protec-
tion site.
Those 57, totalling more
than 16,000 acres, were
bought at a net cost of about
$77 million at about 92 per-
cent of their appraised values.
The gross cost was just more
than $100 million, but was
offset by $23.7 million in part-
nerships and grants.


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LITTLE KNOWN FAMOUS FLORIDIANS
BY JOE "FASTHORSE" HARRILL


July 13.......453
July 12.......684 U
July 11 .......462
July 10.......973
July 9.........649


July 13.........1-13-16-19-25
July 12....... 17-25-30-33-35
July 11...........3-9-15-30-35
July 10.........7-10-14-30-32
July 9.............1-2-7-11-27
Payoff for July 12
2 5-digit winners:..$111,423.92
264 4-digit winners:..........$136
8,123 3-digit winners: .........$12
2 digit winners......Quick Pick ticket


July
July
July
July
July


13.....8168
12.....1236
11 .....3147
10.....4294
9.......8208


July 13...............11-29-38-40
MegaBall............................5...
July 10.................9-24-25-27
MegaBall............................8...
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for July 10
1 4 of 4 + MB........$1.3 million
7 4 of 4.......................$1,420
84 3 of 4 + MB..............$259
1,511 3 of 4.....................$43
2,295 2 of 4 + MB........$19.50


I0LTT


July 11 ......7-19-29-30-36-50
July 7.......16-26-32-41-46-49
July 4.......12-31-34-37-48-52
June 30.......4-6-21-38-45-531
June 27 ....8-13-14-32-43-48
June 23 ......4-8-21-22-44-49


Payoff for July 11
0 6-digit winners:............... $-
54 5-digit winners: ........$7,433
4,561 4-digit winners: ..$71.50
95,308 3-digit winners: ..$4.50
Drawings occur Wednesdays, Sat6rdays


The estimated jackpot is $20 million

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Scratching the itch

Forget relaxing in the ham-
mock. Mosquitoes will spoil
your pleasure.
They seem to be every-
where now, taking wing after
the Summer Rainy Season
officially began June 21. Mos-
quitoes never really leave
Florida, but they do take a pro- -
creation break until rains
make reproduction irresistible
Then they descend on
unprotected skin.
Only the females "bite,"
and they're filling with blood
that they need to produce off-
spring. They leave us with
blotches of itch-causing liq TROPICAL BOB
uid. That's not a fair trade-off,
ladies. WEATHER COMMENTS
Time to break out the Avon
Skin-So-Soft.



Floida Ltter


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


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No LOVN lost over tobacco


Funds may be available for local tobacco prevention
efforts.


BY GREG GILES
NEWS EDITOR
The Laurel-Osprey-Venice-
Nokomis Community Health
Action Team wants to get
tough on tobacco.
They brought in tobacco
prevention specialist Crystal
Bruce, from the Sarasota
County Health Department,
to their LOVN CHAT meeting
on July 13 to hear what the
county is doing, and talk
about how to partner to pre-
vent tobacco addiction.
"Access to tobacco ... we
have some real work we can
do in this area," Bruce said.
Prevention programs
developed from the state
tobacco excise tax were so
successful in recent years, she
said, the state actually
decreased its financial com-
mitment and placed some of
it back in its general fund, she
said.
But that changed this year
with the development of the
Florida Tobacco Prevention
and Control Program, funded
by $58 million in federal and
state funds.
More SWAT
Bruce wants to see some
of the recently freed-up
tobacco excise funds poured
back into prevention pro-
grams like high school SWAT
clubs- Students Working
Against Tobacco.
The program was initiated
years ago, but fizzled recently,
she said. Sarasota High is the
only high school in Sarasota
County that currently has an
active SWAT program, she
said.
Her mission is to see three
Sarasota County high schools
with the program in the next
year.
CHAT members wanted to


know what individual schools
were doing to prevent tobac-
co use.
"Kids who smoke begin as
early as the age of 12," noted
CHAT member Barbara
Kochmit.
"That's why prevention
programs in elementary
schools are so important. If
kids can make it to the age of
21 without ever smoking, they
probably never will."
It's an issue for individual
schools, she said.
"Some principals are out
there telling parents they can't
smoke in their cars when they
drop off or pick up their chil-
dren. Others don't do any-
thing," Kochmit said.
And there's no consistent
smoking policy at area
schools.
Some are smoke-free cam-
puses, while others allow staff
to smoke.
"What kind of message are
kids learning?" she said.
Frontlines
Bruce agreed. She's pro-
moting prevention programs
on many levels, including
"Read My Lips" theater pro-
gram in the schools, the QUIT
telephone counseling service,
beach bans against smoking
and smoke-free work places.
"I want exposure in South
County in the worst way,"
Bruce --said.
Her message for LOVN
CHAT members: There's
money available for local com-
munity efforts at tobacco pre-
vention.
"Most of the money is
going out to bid. That's very
interesting," she _1, "It's the"
first time. Your organizations
could get some of that money
if there is a tobacco preven-
tion element."
It was a glimmer of hope


for many of the professionals
who attended the LOVN
CHAT meeting. They repre-
sent organizations that have
received letters from city and
county donors recently
putting them on notice that
times are hard and funding
may not be available next fis-
cal year.
Making cents
Bruce also encouraged
LOVN CHAT members to pay
attention to state and nation-
al efforts to fight tobacco
addiction.
"Tobacco is a gateway
addiction," Bruce said. "It's
the first thing most kids face.
And it's the hardest addiction
to kick."
She sees the larger battle
on two fronts: raising the state
tobacco excise tax and elimi-
nating a provision negotiated
with the tobacco industry that
prohibits municipalities from
taxing tobacco.
"Nationally, the average
state tobacco excise tax is
$1.07 per pack of cigarettes. In
Florida, it's 34 cents," she said.
"We can raise it at the state
level very easily."
"One of the most profound
correlations (to usage) is cost.
As cost goes up, usage goes
down. It's almost a direct cor-
relation."
The other battlefront, says
Bruce, is the nationally negoti-
ated provision called "pre-
emption."
"That provision says we
don't have the power as a city
to levy a tobacco tax. That can
be overturned. Allow munici-
palities the power to levy a
tobacco tax. If you want a to
make an impact at the policy
level, this is one," Bruce said.
For more information on
Sio 1onty's tobacco preven-
tion efforts; call the Sarasota
County Health Department at
861-2876 or visit www.sarasota-
health.org.
ggiles@venicegondolier.com


FLOODS ARE LIKE HIGHWAYS.

THEY RUN THROUGH ALL 50 STATES.

Floods are America's most common natural disaster, so everyone is at risk.
In fact, I in 4 flood claims are filed in low-to-moderate risk areas.

Don't risk your home, call me for flood insurance today.


ROBERTS INSURANCE GROUP
211 S Nokomis Avenue, Venice
(941) 485-5686


Direct Phone Numbers:
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000
Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220 Classified 207-1200
Editorial/Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified/Advertising Fax 485-3036 d ^
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100 Bureau
Community Web Site http://www.venicegondolier.com
DayStar Communications 207-7800
Publisher: Robert A. Vedder Editor: Bob Mudge IL
President: DerekDunn-Rankin N,,.,.W,,pp.


NATIONAL FLOOD
INSURANCE PaROGRAM


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Home Delivery ------------- ---------------- CTOMER
wed DFri. & Sun. tate SUBSCRIBE TODAY! SERI CE POLICYa
eVENvspaper designated Enclosed is a check for and mail to the address below, attn.Circulation. Ifyoudo not recei a
SNokomis, Englewood Name a., please call t
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ql tIflAV HLY V15. 2007 WVRnNVENICEGONDOLIER.COM


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4A VFNICF CONflOI ER SUN WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2007


State asked to partner in bayou cleanup


'Copyrighted Material


_ Syndicated Contieit.

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Available from Commerca News Provides
Available from Commercial News Providers '*


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MOW from page A


support for this as possible,"
said County Commissioner
Jon Thaxton.
"When you have a provi-
sion like this that is so easily
misunderstood and
threatening to such a large
percentage of the popula-
tion I think it undermines
the initiative the board
intended in the first place."
The language was then"
changed from no-mow zone
to low-maintenance zone -
meaning fertilizing, water-
ing and mowing ought to be
reduced in that 6-foot area
- and 'the zone was desig-
nated as voluntary for all
existing homes. New devel-
opments, however, would
be required to establish 6-
foot, low-maintenance
zones.
The good thing
If the commissioners ex-


Venice Police
Department arrests
ScottR. Bezanson, 55, 100
block Base Ave., Venice.
Charge: driving while license
suspended or revoked. Bond:
$250.
Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office arrests
Keith W. Stolte, 29, 2100
block Park Road, Venice.
Charges: uttering forged bills,
checks, drafts or notes (four
counts). Bond: $4,000.
Gregory B. Bergeron, 44,
400 block North Albee Farm


pected the crowd to disperse
upon hearing this news,
they were very much mis-
taken. Most of the 40-odd
residents who signed speak-
er cards remained in the
chamber to underscore
their position.
Bill Earl was one of them.
A retired land-use lawyer,
Earl is a board member of
Citizens For Sensible
Growth in Sarasota County.
He said it was important
that commissioners focus
on setting strict standards of
low-maintenance zones in
new developments.
"You're taking the right
path," Earl said. "But in new
developments, that's where
you can have the most bang
for your preventive buck."
Progress on actual adop-
tion of 'the ordinance
bogged down when it-
became obvious questions


Road, Nokomis. Charge: dri-
ving while license perma-
nently revoked. Bond: $1,000.
David R. Whitney, 46, no
address listed, Nokomis.
Charge: petit theft. Bond:
$120.
Jeffrey D. Burrell, 45, 9000
block South Tamiami Trail,
Venice. Charge: selling prod-
uct in violation of Drug
Cosmetic Act. Bond: $120.
Michelle A. Lariviere, 36,
400 block Shadylawn Ave.,
Nokomis. Charges: aggravat-
ed domestic battery, domes-
tic battery. Bond: No listing.


Fire department seeking history
The Venice Fire Department is looking for its history.
Anyone having photos, stories or memorabilia related to
EMS and fire service in Venice over the years is asked to con-
tact Lt. Tony Fitzgerald at offshoreangel@gmail.com or leave
a message for him at 480-3030.


Welcoming

Eric Swope


~ijJ~


- me


STORE from page lA


about enforcement, training
exemptions and caps on
phosphorus and slow-
release nitrogen required
further discussion.
The public hearing -
without public input, this
time will resume Aug. 27,
tacked on to a budget work-
shop.
County Commissioner
Shannon Staub said she
believed a firm decision
would be made then,
because she and her fellow
commissioners wanted to
see the ordinance put into
effect in time for next year's
rainy season.
"The good thing with an
ordinance like this is you can
always come back and
amend it if something's really
out of whack," Staub said.

ssmith@sun-herald.com


and zoning documents sub-
mitted.
Two buildings will front on
Pinebrook, and two will be to
the rear toward Sleepy Hollow
Road.
An estimated 96 parking
spaces will be located be-
tween the buildings to help


mitigate impacts to sur-
rounding residential neigh-
borhoods to the west and
south, states a site narrative.
Venice Planning Com-
mission will meet at 1:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, July 17 in council
chambers.
ggiles@venicegondolier.com


CITY NOTE


State funds for
Myakka River Park
Through the Department
of Environmental Pro-
tection's Florida Recreation
Development Assistance
Program, $400,000 will go to
Sarasota County to assist
two Venice park projects:
Myakka River Park,
Phase I the money will be
used for a bike trail, nonmo-
torized boat launch, rest-
rooms and parking.


Myakka River Park,
Phase II the funds will be
used for picnic pavilions, a
multi-purpose trail, parking
and security lighting.
Over the last nine years,
Florida has invested more
than $200 million to
improve local park facilities
through this grant program,
funding more than 1,500
projects statewide.
For more information
visit, floridastateparks.org.


LEMON BAY FUNERAL HOMES
and Cremation Services

The Staff of Lemon Bay Funeral Homes thank the families
for the trust and confidence they placed in us by
allowing us to serve them during the month of June.


Mary Jean Anderson
Hiram Black
Ralph M.Cole, Jr.
George Day
Dennis Downey
Katherine Dubois
Velma Elliott
Louisa Fanning
Diane Gallo


Curtis Gratz
Birdie Hagans


Immaculata Melo
Vera Morris


Margaret Salco-Hancock Charles Mosser


William F. Howe, Jr
Edwin Johnson
Wilma Johnson
James Keefer
Imogene Kennedy
Charles Mann


Jason Raph
Lillian Schweitzer
Graham Scott
Kathleen Virginia Swank
Tyyne Talso
Michael Weishap


Our commitment is to honor a life lived and to serve
our clients families with honor and respect.

2 Buchans Landing Englewood 1935 Tamiami Trail S. Venice
(941) 474-5575 (941) 493-4900
wwwlemonbayfh .corn
Let our experts take care of all your pre-planning needs.


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We welcome that experience as
he joins the largest group of
funeral and cremation service
professionals in the area.
Eric can be reached by telephone
at 488-2291 or by email at
eric @ farleyfuneralhome.com.


F HOMES AND CREMATORY


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Phone: 941-488-2291


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Phone: 941-426-2880


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MILLER,' COLIN
DAVID
passed away on Monday, July 9,
2007 at the M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center, Orlando, following a long
and courageous struggle with
melanoma. He was employed at
Siemens for nearly five years, after
graduating from the University of
Central Florida with a degree in
finance. Outside work, his life was
centered around friends and
family. At age 28, his life was full
of promise. He lived each day in
the moment and was passionate
about sports, especially soccer,
both on and off the field. Other
interests included travel, scuba
diving and hiking. Colin made a
lasting impression on those about
him and we all will miss him
deeply and are truly better for the
time he walked with us. His last
words of comfort to us were "I
have Jesus in my heart". He is
survived by his father and
stepmother, David and Barbara
Miller of Orlando; mother and
stepfather, Carol and Richard
Heineman of Venice; sister,
Rebecca Miller Pagan of Venice
and brother, Alec Miller of
Orlando; grandmother, Christine
Cole Hunter of Atlanta, GA;
stepsisters, Becca Lindsay, Jenni
Lindsay, and Stephanie Lindsay of
Louisville, KY; stepbrothers, Phil
Heineman of OrL:r^n'. and Rick
Heineman of Northport; stepsister,
Amy Heineman of Northport; and
many other family members
including aunts, uncles, and
cousins. He had a special place in
his heart for nephew Gabriel and
for "Uncle Ted" (Ted Strickland of
Columbus, OH). A private
ceremony to celebrate his life is
planned. In lieu of flowers, the
family suggest memorial
contributions be made to the M.D.
Anderson Cancer of Orlando,
* Research Fund.
307361


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WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM SUNDAY, JULY 15,2007


4-Pt VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


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Q


OBITUARIES
Alice L. Brossard
Alice L. Brossard of Venice
diedWednesday, July 11, 2007.
She was 74.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Ray of Venice; a daugh-
ter, Chantal Hamilton of
Palmetto; three sons, Mike of
Bradenton, Denis of Venice
and John R. III of Naples;
three brothers; four sisters;
and seven grandchildren.
Services: Services will be pri-
vate. Ewing Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to TideWell
Hospice and Palliative Care, 5955
Rand Blvd., Sarasota 34238.
Herbert F. Powell
Herbert E Powell, 85,
of Peoria, Ill., formerly
of Venice, died Wed-
nesday, July 11, 2007.
He was 85.
He was born March 1,
1922, in Chicago, MIl. He was a
World War II Army Air Corps
veteran, serving as a B-24
pilot in Italy. He worked for 35
years at Allstate Insurance,
retiring in 1985. He was a vol-
unteer fireman and the first
chief of the fire prevention
district in Itasca, Ill. He was a
member of The' Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church in Sa-
rasota.
Survivors include his wife of
63 years, Shirley of Peoria; two
sons, Tim of Mesa, Ariz., and
Terry of Morton, Ill.; and four
grandchildren.
Services: No local services are
planned. Online condolences
may be sent to the family at
www.knappjohnson.com.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to The Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church,
5659 Honore Ave., Sarasota
34233.


Ip


I






3 U IN L./A%, JL) TtV :3, ZUfl/ vvwvvFv.vcNjI%.r%3u n ufjLAiIFK; M ENIE ONDiE 5


HURT from page 1A


ing."
But, Hughes said, "every-
thing you learn in class goes
out the window the first time
you're in a real fire. Your ears
get burned a few times before
you learn. School starts when
you get out of school."
Core said starting pay for a
Forestry fire ranger is $24,500.
The highest-paid state fire
rangers can earn $30,098.
After three years, a ranger
might look to move into the
senior level, and at that grade
the average pay is $34,073.
The highest-paid senior fire
ranger in Florida makes
$44,366.
Core said a "competitive
area differential" also applies
in some areas, based on the
job turnover rate.
Statewide, there is about a
6.5 percent turnover rate
among fire rangers, meaning
someone left to take another
job (but excluding retirement,
or reassignment to another
district). When the turnover
rate reaches a certain level,
the CAD may apply, so that
starting pay for a ranger
increases to $26,555. (The
Myakka River District is not in
a CAD Zone, Core said.)
In a box
Denise.Rains, public infor-


mation officer for the U.S.
Forest Service in Tallahassee,
said starting pay for federal
fire rangers is $28,862, and
each year they get a standard
step raise, topping out at
$37,519.
Rangers can then move
into more advanced positions
such as supervision or plan-
ning, bringing salary expecta-
tions as high as $46,478. She
also said federal fire rangers
are paid overtime when
working on fires, whereas
state rangers are not.
Counties and cities typi-
cally pay better salaries than
Forestry, and raises are bigger
and come more frequently.
The median salary for a
Sarasota County firefighter is
around $35,000, according to
swz.salary.com.
Hillsborough County fire-
fighters/EMTs start at
$30,185, and in Clearwater
starting pay is $35,323, ac-
cording to fireacademy.org.
The median salary for a typi-
cal firefighter in the United
States is $38,451, according to
swz.salary.com. Those num-
bers look good, compared to
Ranger pay.
"Turnover is an issue," said
Jay Bailey, a former Forestry
fire ranger.
He's now a Fire Mitigation
Burn Supervisor for Sarasota
County. He admitted one


attraction for his new county
position was the higher
salary.
Phil Czechorowski, presi-
dent of the Florida State Fire
Service Association IAFF
Local S-20, confirmed that,
statewide, there is a pay dis-
crepancy.
"Years ago, $24,600 was
competitive," he said. "Now
it's not."
He said Forestry has 34
vacancies to fill.
"They don't get overtime
pay at the state, and they
don't get regular raises other
than a small amount for cost-
of-living," he said. "So they
move on to cities and coun-
ties where pay and benefits
are better."
He said that of a full com-
plement of about 500 rangers,
maybe 100 to 200 are "red-
hats," or new trainees. That
leaves maybe 300 experi-
enced rangers, which he feels
is barely enough. ,
"We got ourselves in a box
and we don't know how to get
out," Czechorowski said.
Moving fuel
Fire rangers spend only 40
percent of their time actually
dealing with fires, including
conducting prescribed burns
in state forests. But the range
of duties is much broader
than what they're trained for.


"Sometimes I'm a carpen-
ter, sometimes I do landscap-
ing, sometimes I'm a
mechanic," Hughes said.
Rangers do vehicle repairs.
They build docks and fences,
bridges and trails. They mow
the grass. They construct
kiosks.
After hurricanes, fire
rangers help clear roads, run
chainsaw crews or deliver
food and water. They also
double in other agriculture
jobs.
Hughes, for example, re-
called working on Mediter-
ranean fruit-fly eradication.
Rangers have also done battle
with grasshoppers, rats and
citrus canker.
But their most important
role remains firefighting.
"We're out there where
nobody sees us," Hughes
said. "When you see the pic-
tures in the paper, it's always
those guys with the firetrucks.
But we're out there too far in
for the news to get to. We're
just on that bulldozer we're
facing a wall of fire 40-,.
maybe up to 75-foot flames.
You've got no hose to back
you up, just the dozer and
your judgment. All we do is
move fuel around."
Every time they work a
wildfire, they are risking their
lives.
"Fires aren't always pre-


dictable," he said. "You can
get out there and the fire
turns, and the best you can do
is hunker down on the floor in
the cab of your machine and
turn up the climate control
and wait to be rescued."
It's only recently that the
state has been replacing
older, open machines with
new ones with climate-con-
trolled cabs. Hughes said it
can make the difference in
survival.
Fire rangers also have to be
on call periodically. When it's
your turn, Hughes said, you
have to be available from 5 to
11 p.m.
"After that, it's a coin toss,"
he said.
For the time you're on call,
you are paid $1 an hour, or $3
an hour for weekends or holi-
days.
"But if you actually get
called for a fire, then you don't
get that dollar," he said.
As for overtime pay, the
state rarely authorizes it
unless there's a declared dis-
aster, or the state is getting
federal assistance.
' "During Hurricane
Charley," Hughes said, "I
worked 44 hours straight, and
no OT."
Red hatters
Hughes said the "red hats"
have to stick close to a more


seasoned veteran.
"Those red hats have their
classroom learning, but it's no
substitute for experience," he
said.
After years of working for-
est fires, Hughes said, "I can
stand outside and feel the
weather, feel the wind change
and feel the humidity going
down, and I know. The new
guys, they aren't aware of any
of that. It takes years."
What worries men like
Hughes and House is the loss
of senior, seasoned rangers
like themselves, with no one
to replace them.
Hughes knows of several
senior rangers expected to
retire in the next few years.
Each has more than 25. years
of fighting fires.
"That's almost 200 years of
experience," he said.
Experienced rangers give a
lot of on-the-job training to
the new hires. But as veterans
like Hughes and House retire,
and younger rangers seek
better-paying jobs in cities
and counties, or the U.S.
Forest Service, who will that
leave in the field?
And how safe will
Floridians feel when the
ranks of capable Senior
Rangers thin, and there are
few "red hats" waiting in the
wings?
shoffman@sun-herald.com


RED from page A


protect our native turtles.-
Red-eared slider turtles inter-
breed with Florida's native
yellow-bellied sliders."
The red-eared' turtle is
native to the Mississippi
drainage system, but popula-
tions of the red-eared sliders
have established themselves
in Palm Beach and Miami-
Dade counties.
Even though the sale of the
turtles has been going on for
50 years or more, Hardin said
several herpetologists, scien-


tists specializing in the study
of turtles, petitioned the
wildlife commission for the
ban. The scientists discovered
red-eared slider turtles breed-
ing with yellow-bellied slid-
ers, which are native in north-
ern Florida as far south as
Gainesville.
Dealers were allowed to
apply for permits to import
red-eared sliders to ship out
of state or sell to permitted
turtle dealers or breeders in
Florida, but imported red-


eared sliders may not be sold
as pets in this state. FWC will
issue permits to qualified
research institutions and
exhibitors to possess red-
eared sliders.
Like the iguanas
Several years ago, the
Federal Drug Commission
did limit the sale of small tur-
tles under 4 inches to those
who say they want the turtles
for "educational or scientific
research." The FDA called for


the restriction because the
turtles can carry diseases.
AA Pets and Mike's
Aquarium and Pet Shop were
well prepared for the ban.
While they no longer have
red-eared sliders for sale, they
do sell map and other vari-
eties of turtles.
Hillary Duke at Mike's
Aquarium said it's been a
while since the distributors
have carried the red-eared
sliders. Tom Johnson, the
owner of AA Pets, said he and


other pet shops and dealers
have been preparing for the
ban for more than a year.
"There's still a lot of other
turtles," Duke said.
As with any other exotic
reptile or amphibian or fish,
he said the ultimate responsi-
bility falls on the owner.
"It all comes back to the
people they're the ones
turning them loose," he said.
"We try to educate the people
when they buy these (turtles).
That's a long-term animal;


they live 75 years. If you're not
willing to care for them, then
don't buy them."
Now in his 50s, Duke said,
"(Red-eared sliders) have
been popular since we were
kids. So many have been
turned loose and now, it's like
the iguanas on Boca Grande."

reilly@sun-herald.com


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VENICE GONDCUER SUN 5A


SUNDAY. JULY 15.2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM






PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1010
FAX: (941) 484-8460
6A
SUNDAY
JULY 15, 2007


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
* bmudge@venicegondolier.com


OUR VIEW



Buchanan trying to stir things up in D.C.


Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-District 13, is
frustrated at how things work in
Washington. He says it is 90 percent
politics and that the major issues facing our
country are not being addressed.
He is frustrated that the government
brings in trillions of dollars and can't balance
the budget. So he has introduced some leg-
islation aimed at doing just that.
Seems like a good idea. Households have
to balance their budgets, or go bankrupt.
Businesses have to balance their budgets, or
go out of business.
City and county governments have to bal-
ance their budget. State government has to
balance its budget. But to Buchanan's dis-
may, the federal government can't balance
its budget.


He says it actually can and can do it with-
out new taxes. He says we don't need new
taxes what we need in Washington is far
less spending.
He can't believe that the federal govern-
ment brings in billions of dollars in new rev-
enues each year and can't balance its bud-
get. We like the way he thinks.
If only there were many more Buchanans
talking about, heaven forbid, balancing the
federal budget. He says that lawmakers
should put partisan politics aside when it
comes to the major issues facing our coun-
try. We like that idea, too.
Somehow it always takes a 2-by-4
between the eyes for Washington lawmakers
to work together to solve a problem. An
example of that is the cooperation shown


after the terrorists Sept. 11 attacks on our
country.
We like the fact that he is working on
transportation and veterans issues, both
important to Southwest Florida as we con-
tinue to grow and additional military veter-
ans locate here. The new veterans nursing
home in Charlotte County fills a tremendous
need for our area and the new veterans
cemetery planned for Sarasota County will
do the same.
The widening of U.S. 17 from Punta
Gorda all the way to Hardee County must be
a priority, Buchanan says. We agree again. It
is crucial to economic development for that
area.
Health care issues in our country must be
faced up to and worked out with, again, no


partisan politics, but with a real spirit of
cooperation. Another good thought.
There is a very powerful force that can be
unleased on Washington to get the lawmak-
ers' attention it's called American voters.
Voters have an opportunity in 2008 to send
another strong message to Washington -
get to work on our major problems by work-
ing together or we are going to hire a new
batch of lawmakers that will. And we can do
it.
For now, we hope Buchanan and others
like him will continue to press for change
in the way Washington works. The phrase,
"of the people, by the people, for the peo-
ple" might say it best. Representing the
people means just that representing the
people.


The future of service clubs


BOB VEDDER
PUBLISHER

Does anyone remember
the Optimist Club that used
to be in Venice, or maybe the
Sunrise Kiwanis Club or the
Mid-County Kiwanis Club
that started in Osprey years
ago?
These are a few of the casu-
alties of declining member-
ship in service clubs around
the area and the country.
'My dad (you may know
him as "By") has been a
Kiwanian for about 65 years.
His club used to be one of the
largest in the country, with
250 members, but now is
more like 170, mostly retirees.
So why is this happening?
The local community foun-
dation identified this prob-
lem, as have many re-
searchers all over the country
America is becoming less
connected, not as social. They
don't build many houses with
porches and people don't sit
on them anyway. People don't
visit their neighbors, go bowl-
ing or do as much volunteer-
ing as they once did.
One of the affects on ser-
vice clubs has been declining
membership. Where there
were three Kiwanis Clubs in
Venice, there are now two and
those are smaller than they
were once.
,There are many reasons
why clubs decline. Most of
these volunteer organizations
have a cause or.causes they
try to serve. In Kiwanis
nationally, for instance, it has
been reducing iodine defi-
ciency, which it has played a
huge role in eradicating
worldwide. However, an
awful lot of young people try-
ing to make a difference in
their community have a hard
time identifying with some-
thing like this. So sometimes
the mission may not connect.
The Venice-Nokomis
Rotary Club sponsors the
Rotary Futures Program at
Venice High School, which
has assisted thousands of
local students and communi-
ty members. This is easier to
get excited about.
The Sertoma Club of
Venice has a local speech clin-
ic mostly for prekindergarten
kids. This shows tangible local
results and may be why that
club has a large membership.
The Lions have attacked
vision problems, which is a
huge issue in a community
with an average age of 69. It
has supported many local
projects, particularly through
the libraries. Women's Ser-


toma usually benefits wom-
en, especially with a lot in
scholarships.
Sometimes the decline has
to do with the fact that every
year there is a new president
and board, and once in a
while the decisions they make
are controversial, driving
away members. It usually is
around fundraising.
I can remember the morn-
ing Kiwanis maybe 20 years
ago had a president who
mandated something that
each club member had to do
for the annual expo. That and
some other poor judgments
upset so many members that
a lot left the club; some even
started a new one. It contin-
ues to happen to this day.
Mandates are not popular or
constructive.
But the big reason that
clubs are declining is that
they have not kept up with
the times.
They are sometimes very
formal. (my dad's club last
time I was there was like that);
not much fun; in some cases
don't have a great mission;
and in others there's just
nothing to make people feel
like they have gained any-
thing from the experience.
A few of the clubs in Venice
seem to be pretty vibrant,
which comes, I think, from
three things.
They have fun besides
laughs at the meeting, they
have enjoyable social outings
of varying descriptions.
They have a mission that
benefits something meaning-
ful in their community and
they stay active doing many
worthwhile things that make
a difference.
They avoid being too for-
mal, have decent meals (if
they are that kind of club) and
make it interesting for
younger people.
Networking can be impor-
tant, especially when estab-
lishing a business, but usually
should not be a formal part of
the club.
Leadership is critical, and
we have some really good
presidents to prove that. Of
the ones I've heard just
recently installed are Bob
Mudge, our editor, who is tak-
ing over Venice-Nokomis
Rotary; Russ Snyder who is
recycling into president of the
Sunrise Rotary, once called
the South Venice Rotary Club;
Janis Pawn, head of the
Sertoma Club of Venice; and
Cheryl Tacy, head of the
Women's Sertoma Club.
They and many others
have a challenge to try to
overcome those forces that
are pulling at or breaking up
these clubs.

Bumper sticker (appropri-
ate after Charlie Christ's pre-
sentation this week): Global
warming is so uncool.
Robert A Vedder writes a
twice-weekly column in this
paper.


Read Bob Vedder every Wednesday and
Sunday in the Venice Gondolier Sun..


6o'Var~/~~ S~UAJ


LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


Message. is clear without charrettes


Editor:
It was a pleasant surprise for us out-of-towners who read
the Venice Gondolier Sun via the Internet to learn that the
planned airport charrette will likely take place after Sept. 1.
Thank you for this Internet service.
I question whether a charrette is even necessary.
Eliminating it would save taxpayers about $260,000.
From FDOT officials, I understand that the airport does not
currently meet FAA or FDOT design standards; and, in the
interest of safety, the state and federal government emphasize
the need to bring all public airports up to these standards
whenever possible. Does the "whenever possible" phrase allow
the airport any exceptions, even temporarily? How much inter-
action between FAA and the city or Airport Advisory Board has
taken place?
The Land Use Study, which was significant enough in scale
and scope to be broken out of the Master Plan update, was
funded at 50 percent by the FDOT since it deals primarily with
economic development, not aviation. I understand that most
of the decisions about land development of the airport are
local government decisions.
By now council should conclude that a significant percent of
Venice residents- reject large-scale commercial development
(the commerce park recommended in the land use part of the
study). It appears that a majority of us would favor modest
development of the old circus grounds.
One more thought: Since the revised consultant reports
have not yet been received, publicized or reviewed by all of us
over reasonable time periods, how can charrette dates be set
* now?


Firefighters do a
job we can't

Editor:
My ex-husband was a fire-
fighter and he was far from
lazy and overpaid (I had a job
also and on his days off he
had another job). These men
and women were not just
given these jobs they
earned them, both mentally
and physically.
You seem to think all they
do is sit around and wait for a
call. Wrong. They are training
all the time, taking classes to
better themselves to be able


to help us.
Thank God for
them, because
wouldn't be able tc
My ex told me
lie in bed at night
like having one f
ground and one
waiting for that cal
tal part is hard
because when th(
go to work, they dc
they'll be back. Ph
far from being lazy
their gear on and
hose, then bli
through it-- you
able to do it. Then


fire to save a life.
How dare you cut these
people down. It's a good thing
they don't have the attitude
you have, because if you have
to make a call to save your
house, they could just say"ah,
we're lazy, so let's just take our
lazy butt's time to get there."
These firefighters deserve a
big pat on the back, not a slap
in the face. Who knows it
might be your life they have to
save.
To all firefighters, thank
you all for the work you do
and putting your lives on the
line for us.

Teresa Daugherty
Englewood

Must provide
power to the people

Editor:
One thing that nobody
seems to be discussing is our
electric grid system in this
country. Focus seems to be on


conservation on one hand
Rita Kutie and keeping our oil supply
By e-mail coming on the other hand.
In the middle is the heart
of it all the electric grid sys-
tem which is in desperate
people like need of overhauling. Every
everyone year there are more and more
o handle it. blackouts and brownouts and
when they the demand for electricity
it's almost keeps increasing.
oot on the Terrorists are certainly a
ear open concern should there be an
1. The men- attack on a power facility, but
on them there is so much demand on
ey leave to the system by Americans we
don't know if could face a total failure of the
lysically, it's system at some point. I have
. Just put all already lived through black-
hold a fire outs. If the system fails, we
ast water will at that point have defeat-
wouldn't be ed ourselves. A failure to the
walk into a grid system in the United


States would put us out of
business.
Our candidates diddle over
whether Libby should have
been pardoned or not when
there are major issues to dis-
cuss. The grid system is not
political; a failure will take us
all down.
Protecting the environ-
ment needs to be done but
our source of energy to run
our nation needs to be tended
to very soon.

Ronald Salvi
North Port
Make performance
center a reality

Editor:
I support the local music
and arts groups' efforts to
begin a feasibility plan for a
performing arts center to be
built with the Venice High
School on Venice island.
Under the leadership of
Frank Codella, local retired
architect, important connec-
tions and steps toward a feasi-
bility plan have been investi-
gated and discussed. As past
president of the Venice
Symphony board, I will work
toward the realization of a
music center for Venice and
South Sarasota audiences.
Together, with the concert
band, choral groups, the
Opera Guild and city and
county officials, we can make
this dream come true.

Janet Aronson
Venice


Call Let 'em have it at
207-1111





VENICE GONDOLIER SUI 7A




SUNDAYJM, JULY 15, ZLVU/ V cwL~uuv ln-vv


LET 'EM HAVE IT! HOW MUCH MONEY DO YOU
THINK THE PROPERTY TAX ROLLBACK WILL
SAVE YOU THIS YEAR? CALL US AT 207-1111.


The green, green


grass of the bridges

Spray them. What's the deal with the greenest grass in
Venice that's growing up at the bridges, all the bridges? Is it pos-
sible that I could go buy RoundUp and spray the bridges to
keep it clean? It's terrible. Come on, city of Venice. Keep these
nice, new bridges looking nice. Get rid of those grassy weeds.


Market able? I was just
wondering if there was still a
farmers market downtown in
the parking lot when it is,
and if it's every week? Maybe
you could print it in the
paper.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The farmers
market is still held every Saturday
morning in the northeast corner of
Centennial Park.
Baby talk. I just read the
South County Record. It looks
like you have marriages,
divorces, transfers and every-
thing else. Obviously no
babies were born in South
County. I think that's sad. If
you can't print the births
unless you print the abor-
tions, print both. I'd like to
know what's going on. I've
seen births printed before,
but all of a sudden for a
month or so, I haven't seen
any births in the paper. Let
the people know what's going
on.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The items in
the South County Record come
from the files of the Sarasota
County Clerk of Court, whose
office does not keep any statistics
on births (or abortions) in the
county. The hospitals in the county
used to provide the names of new
parents but stopped doing so sev-
eral years ago, citing privacy laws
and security concerns.
Bring your own. I can't
imagine people who have
been supplied with a park for
dogs and everything com-.
plaining about plastic bags.
Why don't they bring their
own? There's plenty of plastic
bags from shopping or the
plastic bags that paper's come
in. We don't supply disposable
diapers for babies that go into
children's parks. Why the heck
should we supply plastic bags
for dogs? After all, that's the
least they can do. They've got
a park and a nice place to take
their dogs. The least they
could do would be to bring
their own plastic bags.
Rubber stamp. Ed Martin
certainly hit the nail on the
head concerning the the
Venice City Council and the
Venice Planning Commis-
sion. I have spoken a couple
of times before the Venice
Planning Commission in
opposition to developers'
plans asking for special
exceptions. The. commission
didn't ask me questions, make
any explanations to me or
discuss any of my concerns;
and, as usual, they unani-
mously approved the plan.
And also as usual, the city
council rubber stamped their
approval. Earlier, I was happy
when I learned the city coun-
cil would have final say on the
commission's recommenda-
tions, but I learned that the
council approves what the
commission recommends. In
my opinion, the planning
commission and city council,
with their pr6-development


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attitude, are a detrimental
force to the type of communi-
ty that most of the citizens of
Venice want. Both groups
need to be replaced with peo-
ple who don't cater to 'the
good old boys and the devel-
opers.
Up to code. Let's keep in
mind the American flag code,
which requires that the
American flag be hung free
and not tied or bound up or
used as bunting. Also, it is not
to be used as decoration,
especially on anything that's
going to be thrown away, like
a tablecloth or a paper plate,
napkin or paper cups. I see
this merchandise everywhere
and it is not in accordance
with U.S. code. Please point
out to your local merchants
that they're violating the U.S.
code. Also, I've seen flags
taped to all sorts of merchan-
dise, like children's Goldfish
crackers at one store and on
washers and dryers at anoth-
er store. Again, this is a viola-
tion of the code. Please point
this out to our local mer-
chants. Let's show respect to
our flag.
Poorly endowed. Ameri-
cans were endowed by their
creator with certain inalien-.
able rights, not unalienable
rights. You got it wrong both
places where you spoke of it
on the Opinion page.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Go read the
Declaration of Independence, then
let us know who got it wrong.
Political move. You know,
we couldn't wait to get these
part-time residents out of
here and give us our city back
with a little bit more freedom
on the road. Now our honor-
able mayor wants to wait
until they come back before
they can make decisions for
us. I think it's more a political
move by our honorable
mayor. That's all it seems to
me because there are suffi-
cient numbers of people
here with interest and mak-
ing comments on the differ-
ent plans that are being
proposed. They're not mak-
ing decisions, they're just
making comments, and I
think that's the way it
should be.


Debunking the myths of drug importation


GRACE-MARIE TURNER
GUEST COLUMNIST

Washington lawmakers in
both the House and Senate
have introduced measures to
allow Americans to import
prescription drugs from other
countries.
Pundits and politicians on
both sides of the aisle contin-
ue to debate the measures.
Opponents warn of the dan-
gers of drug importation,
while advocates promise
lower drug prices.
With these competing
assertions, it's time to distin-
guish the myths from the
facts.
Myth No. 1: Drugs import-
ed from Canada and Europe
are just as safe as those pur-
chased in the United States.
Although consumers may
think that imported drugs
come from Canada, Britain or
other Western European
nations, it's impossible to
definitively verify an impoft-
ed drug's country of origin.
In the European Union,
products pass freely from one
member nation to another -
through a system called "par-
allel trade." Consequently,
drugs sold in England may
actually have originated in a
country with less rigorous
safety standards, such as
Cyprus or Latvia.
Further, each time a drug
passes from one country to
the next, it can be opened,
possibly inspected, and then
repackaged leading to mis-
takes, possible contamina-
tion and even substitution of
counterfeit drugs.
Myth No. 2: If a drug is
imported from Canada or
Europe, it won't be a counter-
feit.
Because drugs are con-
stantly opened and repack-
aged in the European parallel
trade system, significant
opportunities exist for coun-
terfeiters to introduce their
fake products into the legiti-
mate supply chain. And
because counterfeiting al-
ready is a widespread prob-
lem, it makes little sense to
open new opportunities for
these drugs to enter the sup-
ply chain.
The World Health Or-
ganization currently esti-
mates that 10 percent of the


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global drug supply is counter-
feit. According to the Food
and Drug Administration,
that number can be as high as
50 percent in some countries.
And by 2010, trade in
counterfeit drugs is expected
to reach $75 billion more
than one-quarter of the
amount that the United
States spent on prescription
drugs last year. Coun-
terfeiting clearly is a concern
for American consumers, and
allowing imported drugs into
the United States will only
exacerbate the problem.
Myth No. 3: Importation
will make prescription drugs
cheaper.
Despite the assertions of
many politicians, there is no
evidence that importation
will save American con-
sumers any money. The non-
partisan Congressional Budget
Office has estimated that drug
importation will lead to saving
of 1 percent over 10 years on
drug spending at best.
In fact, a recent London
School of Economics study
showed that foreign resellers
would reap most of the bene-
fits from importation, not
American consumers. In
other words, the theoretically
lower drug prices would be
cancelled out by the middle-
man's markup.
Myth No. 4: Foreign drugs
are cheaper than American
drugs.
I Consumers in foreign
countries do pay less for


some brand-name drugs, but
that's because their govern-
ments have instituted price
controls on medicines.
Price controls may sound
like a good idea, but they
always come with serious
unintended consequences,
including restricted supplies,
rationing and inhibiting
research on new medicines.
In most countries with
price controls, new drugs
generally aren't available until
they've been on the market
for several years. And even
then, the drugs may be
rationed, forcing patients to
wait for the drugs they need
- and patients are some-
times denied the new treat-
ments entirely.
Price controls are not the
answer either imposing
them directly in the United
States or importing them
from abroad.
U.S. consumers have
many options. Generic drugs
are far cheaper in America
than anywhere else in the
world, and generics account
for more than 53 percent of
prescriptions filled in the
United States.
Further, the new Medicare
prescription drug benefit is
saving seniors an average of
$1,200 a year on medicines.
And virtually all of the phar-
maceutical companies have
programs to help consumers
with low and moderate
incomes to obtain their drugs
at little or no costs.


American consumers have
no need to risk taking import-
ed drugs that could be conta-
minated, counterfeit, or
unsafe.
Myth No. 5: Importation of
prescription drugs is simply a
free-trade issue. How can a
person support free trade and
oppose the free flow of drug
products across borders?
For a free market to work,
businesses must have the
right to negotiate the sale of
their products.
The proposed importation
legislation, however, includes
a "forced sale" provision that
would require American
pharmaceutical companies
to sell nearly unlimited quan-
tities of their products to for-
eign distributors at prices
mandated by foreign govern-
ments.
In effect, forced sale just
gives a windfall to foreign
resellers while penalizing
American drug companies
and their shareholders. And it
would dry up research on
tomorrow's drugs. Such a sys-
tem is a far cry from free trade.
Fact: Importation will do
little more than import for-
eign price controls while
exposing American con-
sumers to unnecessary and
dangerous risks.

Grace-Marie Turner is
president of the Galen
Institute, a nonprofit research
organization. She can be
reached at turner@galen.org.


Hurrcan



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Venice Gondolier Sun





SOUTH COUNTY RECORD


8A
SUNDAY
JULY 15,2007


Saa .t Cutysal lam, uy -


SaastaCuny.arigeJuy -


Josh Graber v. Mike
Kissinger and Tom
Welchman and Jeff and Kelly
and Lauro: between
$2,501.01-$5,000
Simon Reyes Sosa v.
Charles Whittaker: between
$2,501.01-$5,000
Community National


Ralph B. Church v. Gina
R. Church
Mary C. Courts v. David
A. Courts
Steven M. Shinsky v.
Linda R. Shinsky
Erin Anderson v. James
Conley
H.J. Himmel v. N.


Bank of Sarasota County v.
Robert C Mann: between
$100-$500
Capital One Bank A
Corporation v. Christina L
Roarty: between $2,501.01-
$5000
LVNV Funding LLC v.
Theresa N Jones: between


Zacarelli
Shelly R. Haskett v.
Thomas R. Haskett
Celeste Watson v. Glenn
Watson
Ronald N. Vaughn v.
Sandra K. Vaughn
1 Joseph M. Vanstone v.
Jalissa A. Henley


$2,501.01-$5000
GE Money Bank A
Corporation F/K/A GE
Capital v. Vladimir Barko:
between $2,501.01-$5000
Midland Funding LLC v.
DonnaW Russ: between
$2,501.01-$5000


Irina Leus v. Oleg Leus
Joseph E. Venuti v.
Marcia E Venuti
Leslie K. Thomas v. Anita
R. Thomas
Diane M. Miner v. Gary
N. Miner


James M. Morrow and
Samantha Joann Everett
Joseph G. Benevento
and Susan L. English
James M. Boyle and
Natalie E. Hinshaw
Joshua B. Ferrill and
Kristin M. Garcia
Jack V Neely and Phyllis
L. Phelps
Gennadiy Polyashov and
Zoryana Grebinnik
Thomas M. White and
Deborah S. Zawacki
Bruce E Grover and
Shaun C. Stansberry
Timothy J. Porch and
Tamara L. Elliott
Andre Ameal and


Melissa C. Castro
Eloy M. Trevino and
Nicole L. Hamlin
David M. Simmler and
Kathleen O'Neil
Jack A. Raub and Ariana
L. Hollis
Kent L. Brush and Yona
Hanks
Kevin S. Pickett and Nika
C. Gianopulos
J.C. Carter and Marcia R.
Shotwell
Lawrence J. Luncan and
Cynthia J. Mitchell
Diego Felipe and Kelsey
L. Weber
Patrick J. Van Deusen
and Courtney Sierra Lynn


Miles
Jason R. Beal and
Amanda M. Molzahn
John D. Roberts and
Jennifer L. Daloia
George E. Boughner and
Kerry G. Theriault
Manfred A. Pailer and
Livia R. Duller
Marcel Anthony DeMaio
and Mary A. Goldrick
Frank Ryles and
Antonina Degtyareva
Brian E. McNeil and
Jamie L. Krevas
Brett M. Beckhorn and
Tanya S. Alexander
Roberto Fierros and
Jessica L. Reilly


I arsoa 0outymotggefoecou res, uly 6 1


Venice
19786 Cobblestone Cir,
Stonewalk
3 Bed/ 2 Bath -Backflow
Preventor
Owner: MH Properties
LLC
333 S Tamiami TRI Ste
101 Galleria Plaza
Not listed
Owner: GPSC LTD
2636 Sapphire Rd, South
Venice
Storage Shed 10 x 4
Owner: Tim and Lynn
Tressler
1757 Dagon Rd, Venice
Gardens
Mansard Style Pool
Enclosure on existing deck
Owner: Bea Cornelius
1088 Panda Rd South
Venice
12 x 14 addition (den &
exercise rm)
Owner: William J
Comstock
4173 S Tamiami Trl
Venice Village Shoppes
Install 2" gas Line from
gas meter to standby gener-
ator
Owner: Publix #384
3336 Orange Rd South
Venice
Install comp roof screen
lanai
Owner: Cathy Glen
720 Tamiami Trl
Remodel exisitngVet
Clinic
Owner: Katleen A Brown
20324 Pezzana Dr
Venetian Falls
SFR 3 Bed/2Bath
Owner: Cantex Homes.
20343 Pezzana Dr
Venetian Falls
SFR 3 Bed/2Bath


Sarasota County property tra nsfers, July62-6.1


Venice.
* Adeline R and Edward J
Wysocki Trust to John R and
Kathryn A Wysocki: UN 162
Mission Lakes of Venice
* Nancy Niederauter and
Marie Beth Dibert to Alison a
Wilmartin and Marie Beth
Dibert and Nancy Nieder-
auer: UN 123 Estancias of
Capri Isles.
* Ernest A and Arlene C Duff
to Ernest A and Arlene C Duff
Trust: Lt 10 South GulfView
* Jimmy H Linn to Jimmy H
and Mary A Linn Trust: UN
166 Venice Bay Adult Park
* Stanley E and Eileen Jones to
John and Barbara Whelan: Lt
121 Pelican Pointe Golf and
Country Club
* Thomas J Bockenstedt and
Celeste E Holloway to Mary
Ann Cerasoli Trust: UN 9 St
Andrews at Plantations
* Surenda and Christine G
Mahajan to Deborah A
Kromish: Lt 145 Islandwalk
* Donald L and Pamela L
Smith to Matthew and
Vanessa Houston: Lt 39 Lake
of the Woods
* Kathryn M Lane to Kathryn
M Lane Family Trust: Lt 924
Venice Gardens
* Byrd Buildings Inc to
Stevens Benjamin: UN E
Venice Business Suites
Alma J Potter to Alma J Potter
Trust: Lt 60 Waterford
* Linda Strange and Charles


and Helen M Zanzie Trust to
Linda Strange: Lt 13 Pine-
brook South
* Argos LLC to Maureen E
Whiting: UN 101 San Marco
Sharon E and Donald G
Redmond Trust to Sharon E
and Donald G Redmond: Lt
Lakes of Jacaranda
* Mark K Doehring and Dana
Renee Pitts to Steven M and
Karen A Sear Trust: UN
Macarthur Beach
* Nicholas R and Judith M
Delninno to Nicholas R and
Judith M Delninno Trust: Lt
45 Venetian Falls
* James L and Patricia L Bruce
to Joseph A and Mary A
Metacarpa: UN 1020 Fairway
at the Plantation
* Wachovia Bank Southtrust
Bank to K2M Jacaranda LLC:
UN II Venice Center
* Thomas C and Jean L Larson
to Jean L Larson Trust: UN 72
Augusta Villas at the
Plantation
* Carol J Good to Forest L and
Robin E Headley: Lt 31026
Venice Gardens
* Gary C and Marietta Van
Nozzi to AndrewW and Diana
K Roessler: Lt 22 Venetian
Golf and River Club
* Richard A and Maureen E
Lucas to Brian Cloyd: Lt 613
Lakes of Jacaranda
* Geneva M Burga to William
A Burga Trust: Lt 67 Pelican
Pointe Golf and Country Club


* Del D and Rose Scodellaro
to Del D and John D and
Nadine M Scodellaro and
Linda S Alvey and Nancy S
Elliott: UN 166 Ironwoods
Villas
* Patty and Marion Gillaspy to
Patty and Marion Gillaspy: Lt
1492 South Venice
* Kay R and Bernard A
McCluskey to Joseph D and
Krista A Nemeth: Lt 3874
South Venice
* Donald Sweeney Dec of
Trust Elizabeth Stanis Trust to
John Duncan Sweeney and
Trevor McKendrick: UN 21
Bird Bay
* William T Corrigan to
William T Corrigan Trust: Lt
309 Venetia
* Paul J and Deborah L Haton
to Allen A and Barbara
Younghanse: Lt 1649 Venice
Gardens
* Bruce J and Brenda A
Roningen to Bruce J and
Brenda A Roningen Trust: Lt
1029 Villagewalk
* William Herman to Alan M
and Beverly Huizenga: Lt
33230 Venice Gardens
* Elizabeth A and Rudolph
Lein to William D and
Christine L Certain and Mark
Martell: Lt 1838 Venice
Gardens
* Kimball Hill Homes Florida
Inc to Jason M Kirkpatrick
and Alicia M Glassman: Lt
4239 Ventura Village


Owner: Cantex Homes
5186 Layton Dr Ventura
Village
Not listed
Owner: Kimball Hill
Homes, Inc
4389 Lenox Blvd Ventura
Village
S/F paired villa
Owner: Kimball Hill
Homes, Inc
5156 Layton Dr Ventura
Village
SFR 3 bed/2 bath
Owner: Kimball Hill
Homes, Inc
1367 Maseno Dr
Venetian Falls
Gable style pool enclosure
on existing deck
Owner: Centex Homes w
FI Division
1371 Maseno Dr
Venetian Falls
Gable style pool enclosure
on existing deck
Owner: Centex Homes w
Fl Division
12096 Granite Woods
Loop Stoneybrook at Venice
Swimming poop, spa &
patio
Owner: John Bielanski
1047 Kenisco Rd South
Venice
Shed 10 x 10
Owner: E D Qualls
491 Circlewood Dr
Install (8) windows
Owner: Joyce E Martineau
4135 Hemingway Dr
Replacing extetior doors
Owner: Albert L Fitzgerald
2798 Kennedy Dr North
Venice Farms
Concrete swimming pool,
deck and safety barrier
Owner: Craig and Betty Jo
Faulkner


Ocelot Rd South Venice
Government Landscaping
Owner: Blayne C Prassel Jr
822 Country Club Cir
Jacaranda Country Club
Remove and replace win-
dows
Owner: Roy W Francis
5864 Marigold Rd
Change out 3 ton 13 seer
A/C system
Owner: Linda K Davis
3799 Cadbury Circle
Woodmere at Jacaranda
Installing car port
Owner: Jacarnda Trace
LTD
2988 Lobelia Rd South
Venice
Replace existing garage
door
Owner: Ann A Anderson
1775 Forest Rd Venice
Gardens
Replace existing garage
door
Owner: John P Yonkunas
1027 Sunrise Rd
Replace existing garage
door
Owner: Keersa Rabey
1291 Cambridge Dr
Change out 3 ton 14 seer
A/C system
Owner: Earl B Toy
107Woodingham Dr
Chestnut Creek
Repipe
Owner: F R Ringfelt
1082 Hudson Rd
Replace garage door 16 x 7
Owner: Andrew Morris
912 Beckley Dr
Chestnut Creek
Replace garage door 16 x 7
Owner: Harold Johnson
1042 Everest Rd South
Venice


Countrywide Home
Loans v. Steven M. Bowker,
et al.
Central Mortgage
Company v. Ralph J. Keres,
Janet Keres, Stearns Landing,
etal.
WM Specialty Mortgage
v. Bradley Buckmiller,
Victoria Pearson-Buckmiller,
etal.
The Bank of NewYork v.
Lisa M. Eagles, BrianW.
Eagles, et al.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust v. Grimilda Cartagena,
Jesse Campos, et al.
CitiGroup Global
Mortgage Realty Group v.
Faryaad A. Ameer, et al.
Accredited Home
Lenders v. Jesse J. Brown,
Wendy L. Brown, et al.
Countrywide Home
Loans v. Nancy L. Roberts, et
al.
CitiMortgage v. Lee J.
Granger, Tina E Granger, et
al.


HSBC Bank USA v. Ivan
Velez, Rosalba Jimenez, et al.
American Home
Mortgage Services v. Rebecca
Peterson, Douglas D.
Peterson, et al.
*Wells Fargo Bank v. Terry
Powell, Linda Powell, et al.
Allied Mortgage &
Financial Corp. v. Frances T.
Sexton, et al.
Indymac Bank v. Omer
A. Kenworthy, et al.
HSBC Bank v.
Christopher Romero, Ginger
Mistriel, et al.
Aurora Loan Services v.
Robert Goberman,
Stephanie Goberman, et al.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust v. MaryAnn Jacobs, et al.
The Bank of NewYork
Trust Company v. James D.
Claydon, Cherie L. Claydon,
et al.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust v. Robert Velasquez,
Suzanne M. Velasquez, et al.
Countrywide Home


Loans v. Jennifer Cohen,
Rhonda D. Franco, et al.
Aurora Loan Services v.
Angela Nisbet, et al.
US Bank National
Association v. Barbara K.
Smith, et al.
Decision One Mortgage
Company v. Kenneth Decker,
et al.
US Bank National
Association v. Lorena B.
Noda, Luis Cabrera
Dominguez, et al.
IndyMac Bank v. Linda
A. Decicco Nichols, et al.
Wells Fargo Bank v.
Sharon D. Acker, et al.
US Bank National
Association v. Michael D.
Braswell, et al.
Aurora Loan Services v.
Artem A. Naguibine, Galina
V Naguibine, et al.
The Cadle Company v.
Larry C. Blanton
Countrywide Home
Loans v. Eleanor M. Jokinen,
et al.


Let Gondolier Sun Classifieds work for you.


County Calendar
Acute Care System Task Force of the Substance Abuse
and Mental Health Stakeholders' Consortium
July 17, 9 a.m., Room 226, Sarasota County Health
Department, 2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
SCall 941-861-2578
Bicycle/Pedestrian/Trail Advisory Committee July 17
5:30 p.m., Training Room, First Floor, Administration Center,
1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-0891
Bicycle/Pedestrian/Trail Advisory Mapping Sub-
Committee July 17,4 p.m., Press Room, First Floor,
Administration Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 941-861-0891
Building Code Board of Adjustments and Appeals
July 17, 3 p.m., Second Floor Conference Room, Building A,
1301 Cattlemen Road, Sarasota. Call 941-861-6637
Coastal Advisory Committee July 18, 3 p.m.,
Commission Chamber, First Floor, Administration Center,
1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-6230
Community Alliance Aging Services Strategic Planning
Work Group July 17, 3 p.m., Second Floor Conference
Room, The Center for Healthy Aging, Campus of Senior
Friendship Centers, 1900 Brother Geenen Way, Sarasota,
Call 941-861-2564
Community Alliance Health Strategic Planning
Work Group (in conjunction with the Health System
Collaboration Committee)- July 16, 9a.m., Gulf Coast
Community Foundation of Venice, 601 Tamiami Trail South,
Venice. Call 941-861-2877
Community Alliance Steering Committee -July 16,
1:30 p.m., Conference Rooms A/B, School Board of
Sarasota County, Brown Awning Building, The Landings,
1980 Landings Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-2877
General Contractors Licensing & Examining Board
July 19,4 p.m., Planning & Development Services, Building'
D, Conference Room A/B, 1301 Cattlemen Road, Sarasota.
Call 941-861-6126
Integrated Pest Management Advisory Board July 16,
3:30 p.m., Green Building Conference Room, Twin Lakes
Park, 6700 Clark Road, Sarasota. Call 941-861-9849
Planning Commission Public Hearing- July 19, 6:30 p.m.,
Commission Chamber, First Floor, Administration Center,
1660 Ringling Blvd. Sarasota. Call 941-861-5153
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Stakeholders'
Consortium July 20, 9 a.m., Auditorium, Second Floor,
Sarasota County Health Department, 2200 Ringling Blvd,
Sarasota. Call 941-861-2578
Tourism & Economic Development Board (TEDB)
July 18, 3:30 p.m., Training Room, First Floor, Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call 941-861-7362
Advisory Board Vacancy
APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: Open Until Filled
Advisory Board: General Contractors Licensing and
Examining Board
Information: Planning and Development Services, Betsy
Bollinger, 941-861-6126



Sarasoovneta 94181.5000 CounTV19
scgov net | 941.861.5000 I TV19


APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: July 27,2007
Advisory Board: Integrated Pest Management
Information: Cooperative Extension Services, Fred Santana,
941-861-9849 or Patricia Wilken, 941-861-9722
APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: Open Until Filled
Advisory Board: Keep Sarasota County Beautiful Advisory
Board (KSCBAB)
Information: Environmental Services, Sandra Washington,
941-861-6733
APPLICATION CLOSING DATE: Open Until Filled
Advisory Board: Mechanical Contractors Licensing and
Examining Board
Information: Planning and Development Services, Betsy
Bollinger, 941-861-6126
Prep work on The Legacy
Trail is under way
Preparation work for construction of The
Legacy Trail began July 9 on a 4.5-mile section
from Laurel Road north to Bay Street. Major
construction is expected to begin on this section by
the end of July.
"No trespassing" signs are already in place along
the entire corridor and will be strictly enforced in
areas of active construction. The entire corridor
is expected to be closed within two months and
remain closed until the project is complete in
March 2008.
The $14.7 million rails-to-trails construction project
includes the paving of about 10.6 miles of the
trail and replacing or repairing six small trestles
along the corridor, which is mostly funded by the
infrastructure surtax (penny sales tax) and general
fund revenues. The paved area will be about 12
feet wide. Work also includes the establishment
of five trail heads at existing parks or other county
facilities and two new trail connections.
For more information about The Legacy Trail,
contact the Sarasota County Call Center at
941-861-5000 and ask for the Road Program
Construction office.
County receives award for
Roadmap to Sustainability
Sarasota County received a national Outstanding
Achievement in Innovation award for its Roadmap
to Sustainability during its Transforming Local
Government conference. The group recognizes
innovations that successfully and creatively
address important public service dilemmas and
positively impact communities.
The Roadmap to Sustainability report details
Sarasota County's approach to expanding its
sustainability focus throughout its processes,
programs and services, as well as into the
community through public partnerships. Find out
more about the Roadmap to Sustainability at
scgov.net.

Sarasota County
b This listing is published weekly by Sarasola County
Government. Board of County Commission agendas are
available at wvw.scgov net; to subscribe to the agenda via
e mail, go to scgov.netweekycalendar

2006


Soul ii ~ v. -Juy 26


SaraotaCouty bildng ermtJue2-29







CiNUY JULYAVii V 10(7SRSI urirfrIffIIF AMVNCEGNDVE SN


AREA INTEREST RATES

BanksPhone Mone 6-month CD 1-year CD 5-year CD
Rate / Yield MIn. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep. Rate/ Yield Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Mn. Dep.
Farm Bureau Bank Call Local Agent - -/- -/ "


Florida Community Bank (941) 624-4225 5.25 / 5.38 $99K- 5.15 / 5.22 $1 K* 5.30 / 5.30 $1 K' 5.40 / 5.40 $1 K*


Insignia Bank (941) 366-7100 4.88 / 5.00 $25K 4.88 /5.00 $1K 4.97 / 5.10 $1K 5.12 / 5.25 $1 K


MetLife Bank (941) 366-0687 x116 -/- -/- -/- -


Peninsula Bank (941) 474-7734 2.50 / 2.53 $50K 4.50 / 4.59 $1K 4.75 / 4.85 $1K 4.25 / 4.33 $1K


People's Community Bank (941) 584-6161 / 5.08 / 5.20 $1K 5.22/5.35 $1K 5.13 / 5.25 $1K


State Farm Bank Call Local Agent 1.64 / 1.65 $1K 4.88 / 5.00 $500 4.88 / 5.00 $500 4.88 / 5.00 $500


The Bank of Commerce (941) 373-0522 4.40 / 4.50 $50K 5.12 / 5.25 $1K 5.12 / 5.25 $1K 5.02 / 5.15 $1K

Brokers

Edward Jones, Venice (941) 485-6556 4.49 / 4.59 $2.5K 5.10 /5.10 $5K 5.20 / 5.20 $5K 5.30 /5.30 $5K


This service is provided by The National Financial News Services. Figures are current as of July 12, 2007
and are subject to change without notice. Call (610) 344-7380 if you are interested in participating in this
survey. N/A service is not available. No Quote figures were not quoted this week. *Other conditions apply


AREA MORTGAGE RATES

Financial 15-yr. fixed 30-yr. fixed Adjustable Financial 15-yr. fixed 30-yr. fixed Adjustable
t stitution Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Institution Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP
Points Points Points Points Points Points
A 2 Z Home Loans 6.125 30 6.375 30 6.000 30 1st Metropolitan Mtg. 6.250 30 6.500 30 No 30

941-629-3450 0 0 0 800-548-5988 0 0 Quote

AAA Mortgage 6.125 30 6.500 30 7.350 30 Golden Rule Mortgage 5.750 30 6.125 30 3.000 30

866-441-3619 0 0 0 FHA/VA 800-991-9922 1,75 1.63 1

Absolute Mortgage Co. 6.125 30 6.375 30 5.875 30 Heidelberg Capital Corp. 5.875 30 6.250 30 No 30

888-90-HOMES 0 .25 0 800-968-2240 1 1 Quote

Accountable Mortgage 6.375 30 6.625 30 6.000 30 Sovereign Mortgage 6.125 30 6.500 30 7.000 30

FHA/VA 800-840-8771 0 0 0 FHANA 800-996-7283 0 0 0

AmCap Funding Corp. 5.875 30 6.250 30 No 30 The Prime Financial Group 6.250 30 6.500 30 No 30

800-289-6516 1 1 Quote FHA/VA 941-228-4221 0 0 Quote

amortgagesearch.com No 30 No 30 No 30 Waterstone Mortgage 6.000 30 6.375 30 4.750 30

800-549-0090 Quote Quote Quote FHA/VA 941-815-5518 0 0 0

Borrower's Advantage 6.250 30 6.500 30 6.375 30

VA 888-510-4151 0 0 0
Rates provided by The National Financial News Services and are valid as of July 12, 2007 and are subject to change without notice. Quotes apply to single family, owner-occupied dwellings and are based on a
200,000 loan amount. Rates are inclusive of discount, origination, and brokerage tees. Contact lender directly for APR's N/A -program not offered. LIP Lockin Perinod (days) = Guarantee of rate during pro-
cessing period until closing. Consumers with questions call FL Banking hotline at (800) 848-3792. Lenders wishing to participate in this chart please call 800-939-6367.
Please visit http:/Aww.shoprate.com/charlottevenice.aspx for more rate information.


Bakrptie


The following have filed
petitions with the U.S.
Bankruptcy Court for the
Middle District in Tampa.
SARASOTA COUNTY
Cecelia A. Fyke, 180
Wading Bird Drive, Venice.
June 28. Chapter 13. 07-
05511.
David Mark Gelotte, 1667
Justica St., North Port. July 1.
Chapter 13. 07-05659.
JuanAndres Hidalgo, 4325
La Rosa Ave., North Port. July


6. Chapter 13. 07-05798.
John D. Lima, 4679 Lovett
Road, North Port. June 29.
Chapter 13. 07-05572.
Alan N. Heath, 1240
Waterside Lane, Venice. July 3.
Chapter 7. 07-05740.
Michael Kniceley Jr., 1935
Greenlawn Drive,
Englewood. June 28. Chapter
7.07-05509.
Frank Harrison Musgrove,
5184 S. Cranberry Blvd.,
North Port. July 6. Chapter 7.


ACCOUNTANT
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941-474-3271


Venice North
700 US 41 N. Bypass
Venice, FL
941-488-6751


Venice South
4242 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL
941-408-8797


02006 A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc. Member SIPC
Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Training magazine
is not affiliated with A.G. Edwards and does not endorse any product or
service that A.G. Edwards offers. [59i A, 170707


07-05800.
Jane Revette, 679 Alligator
Drive, Venice. June 28.
Chapter 7. 07-05502.
CatherineT. Schockweiler,
740 Leach St., Englewood.
July 5. Chapter 7. 07-05756.
Carla Velasquez, 2670
Denicke St., North Port. June
28. Chapter 7. 07-05499.
CHARLOTTE COUNTY


Jose R. Subero, 4209
Holbein St., Port Charlotte.
June 30. Chapter 13. 07-
05624.
Richard W. Werstein, 3319
Coquina Esplanade, Punta
Gorda. June 30. Chapter 13.
07-05622.
Annette Lynn Crouch,
12556 Oglesby Terrace, Port
Charlotte. June 28. Chapter 7.


Now through SEPTEMBER 29, 2007! Show your Florida

drivers license and receive 15% Off* everything you buy!
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203 W. Venice Ave., Downtown Venice
Summer Hours: Now open 7 days a week,
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07-05506.
Catherine Heart, 13603
Romford Ave., Port Charlotte.
June 29. Chapter 7. 07-05551.
Frederick Palumbo, 2660
Titania Road, Englewood.
June 28. Chapter 7. 07-05503.
Jill Carolyn Yearego, 1285
White Oak Trail, Port
Charlotte. June 28. Chapter 7.
07-05504.


DESOTO COUNTY
Thomas A. Jones, 4799
N.E. Cubitis Ave., Arcadia. July
3. Chapter 13. 07-05729.



Recycle this newspaper.


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Estate Planning to develop

the best program for your

overall financial health.
Andrew Penzell
Financial Consultant Please visit us at
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Call for Free Financial Review
(941) 486-9400
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. Suite 210 Venice, FL 34285
Securities offered through Sigma Financial Corp. Member NASD/SIPC


NOTICE OF AUCTION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS
713.78. 1. 1984 GMC P30 Tk Sil
1GDHP32M9E3502670. On
8/1/2007 at 9:00 a.m., Jim's
Auto Repair & Towing, 5693
Sarah Ave, Sarasota, FL
PUBLISH: JULY 15, 2007
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS
713.78 Vehicle @ North Collier
Collision, Inc. 16210 Old 41 S.
Bonita Springs. 1. 2000 Chev
Suburban Ut GId
3GNFK16T8YG191516
On 8/1/2007 at 9:00 am, 171
S. Jackson Rd, Venice, FL
34292.
PUBLISH: JULY 15, 2007
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS
713.78. Vehicle @ Pierson Auto
Parts, 284 S Center St, Pier-
son. 1. 1996 Chev Blazer Ut Pie
1GNCS18W6TK141886 On
08/01/2007 at 9:00 am at 171
S. Jackson Rd. Venice, 34292.
PUBLISH: JULY 15, 2007

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS
713.78. Vehicle @
Snell Performance, 2435 10th
Ave. NE, Naples.
1. 2001 Ford Taurus 4D whi
1FAFP55211G221330
On 7/31/07 at 9:00am at
171 S. Jackson Rd., Venice.
PUBLISH: July 15, 2007

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF,
SHIRLEY M. MOORE
Deceased.
File No. 2007-CP-006730-NC
Probate Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
SHIRLEY M. MOORE, deceased,
whose date of death was May 16,
2007; File Number 2007-CP-
006730-NC, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Sarasota County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is P.O. Box
3079 SARASOTA, FL 34230.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this


NOTICETO CREDITORS NOTICETO CREDITORS
notice is required to be served AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
must file their claims with this court OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 THEM.
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF All other creditors of the decedent
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF and other persons having claims or
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS demands against decedent's estate
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE must file their claims with this court
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
THEM. DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
All other creditors of the decedent TION OF THIS NOTICE.
and other persons having claims or ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
demands against decedent's estate IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
must file their claims with this court FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
TION OF THIS NOTICE. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH- PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. IS BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME The date of first publication of
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, this notice is JULY 15, 2007.
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE Personal Representative:
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH JOHN M. PATRICK
IS BARRED. 4628 Aldovin Ave.
The date of first publication of North Port, FL 34287
this notice is JULY 15, 2007.


H. Greg Lee
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Florida Bar No. 351301
H. GREG LEE, RA.
2014 Fourth Street
Sarasota, Florida 34237
Telephone: (941)-954-0067
PUBLISH: JULY 15, 22, 2007


OTHER NOTICES
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS
TO: All Persons or entities having
or claiming to have any right, title
or interest in the property:
$1,114.00 in U.S. Currency
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office seized the described proper-
ty on May 31, 2007 in Sarasota
County, Florida. A forfeiture com-
plaint has been filed in the Circuit
Court Twelfth Judicial Circuit, in and
for Sarasota County, Florida, being
Case No.2007-CA-8017-NC, for
the purpose of obtaining a final
order of forfeiture as to the above
described property upon producing
due proof that same was used in
violation of Florida laws dealing with
contraband, pursuant to the Florida
Contraband Forfeiture Act, Sec-
tions 932.701-707, Florida
Statutes.
KURT A. HOFFMAN, ESQUIRE
General Counsel
Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office
Post Office Box 4115
Sarasota, Florida 34230
Telephone (941) 861-4059
(941) 861-5800
PUBUSH: July 15, 22, 2007


Personal Representative:
PAMELA J. MOORE
7427 Carnoustie Drive
Sarasota, FL 34238
H. Greg Lee
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Florida Bar No. 351301
H. GREG LEE, P.A.
2014 Fourth Street
Sarasota, Florida 34237
Telephone: (941)-954-0067
PUBLISH: JULY 15, 22, 2007

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DMSION
IN RE: ESTATE OF,
WINIFRED B. PATRICK
Deceased.
File No. 2007-CP-007619-NC
Probate Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
WINIFRED B. PATRICK,
deceased, whose date of death
was February 13, 2007; File
Number 2007-CP-007619-NC,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Sarasota County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
P.O. Box 3079 SARASOTA, FL
34230. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


ri iKinAy 1111 Y 1 S 9007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM






Venice Gondolier Sun


10A
SUNDAY
JULY 15, 2007O R


CONTACT US
DEBBIE KIEWIET
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
dkiewiet@venicegondolier.com


Venice Nationals win one, lose two atsec


BY DEBBIE KIEWIET
SPORTS EDITOR

Down by four, the Venice
Nationals scored three runs
in the fifth and two in the bot-
tom of the last inning to
snatch a 7-6 win from Man-
atee Central in their first
game of the 9/10-year-old
Little League Sectional Tour-
nament in Fort Myers Friday
night.
A three-run home run by
Manatee Central pitcher
Derek Paparella gave
Manatee a first-inning lead.
Venice third baseman Jake
Grubbs connected with
Dominic Carlozzi for an out
at second, and Ben Reid
struck out two.
Paparella dropped the ball
to allow leadoff batter Mark
Arnold to first. Preston Hines
and Reid put Arnold in scor-
ing position, and he was
called safe at home with Zeke
Manthey at the plate. Hines
scored another first-inning


run for Venice on a Grubbs
single.
Reid struck out the first
Manatee batter in the second
inning. Krauss at first took the
throw from shortstop Arnold
for the next out, and Arnold
made the infield catch for the
third Manatee out in the sec-
ond.
The Venice defense held
strong in the next inning with
all three Manatee third-
inning outs at first.
Manatee's Paparella hit
another RBI home run in the
fourth before Reid struck out
the final batter, and Manatee
scored another run in the fifth
for a seemingly insurmount-
able 6-2 lead.
Fifth-inning rally
Venice rallied to score
three runs in the fifth to close
in on Manatee Central, 6-5.
Sinclair reached first on an
error and scored on a Reid
single. Arnold singled and
stole home, and Hines got in


SUN PHOTOS BY DEBBIE KIEWIET
With two Manatee Central runners on base, Mark Arnold made
the catch for the third out in the second inning in the Venice
Nationals'come-from-behind 7-6 win Friday night.


relieve him, and Krauss fin-
ished the game for Venice.
Loss to Golden Gate
The Venice Nationals'
Saturday morning game was
cut short by the 10-run mercy
rule, but not in their favor. An
eight-run third inning by the
Golden Gate Nationals con.-
tributed to a 12-2 loss for
Venice.
Golden Gate scored two
runs in the first inning anid
two more in the second
before Venice got on the
board in the third. John
Scofield scored on an Arnold
RBI double, and Arnold got
home on a sacrifice by Reid.
Hines threw 3-2/3 innings
with three strikeouts, and


tionals

'Krauss came in to finish thi
game for Venice.
Golden Gate lost its first
game to South Fort Myers 6-5
Friday night, which meant
the Venice Nationals still had
a chance to advance to State.
Each of the four teams in the
Sectional Tournament was
scheduled to play three
games, and the team with the
best record advances to the
State Tournament in Tal-
lahassee.
The Venice Nationals lost
their final game 6-5 in 10
innings to South Fort Myers
to end their hopes of advanc-
ing to state.

dldewiet@
venicegondolier.com


"We don't have any quitters on this team," Nationals Manager
Terry Tritschler said after Friday night's win.


on a Manthey sacrifice fly.
The determined Venice
defense dug in and held
Manatee scoreless in their
last at bat.
In the bottom of the last
irining, ,Venice loaded the.
bases with a Krauss single
and Sinclair and Arnold
reaching base on errors.
Krauss 'was forced out at


home as Hines took first, and
the next Venice batter struck
out.
With two outs and the
bases full, Sinclair raced for
the place with Manthey at bat
to tie the game 6-6. Arnold
scored the winning run on a
passed ball.
Reid struck out five in 5-
2/3 innings. Hines came in to


Alex Krauss finished out both the Friday night and Saturday
morning games for Venice Nationals. At third is Jake Grubbs..


Seniors in district champi

Venice's Seni9 Lithde Saturday, July 7, but ad-
League team, whtci finished vanced to thie District 16
District pool play''-,:: Fiday Championship Series by tak-
night, will face S~tri uir' l h re of their remain-
Schampionship dq 1~behadm;ing'gCame
ler at Twin Lakej Park in Tuesday night's gamewith
'Sarasota Mondqay nmght at North Port, which was left
6:30. ll.':.,:. unfinished when the lights
SV6eic'list to Sarasota in went out, ended in a win for
the first game of0polo. play Venice Saturday morning.


onship series

North Port suffered a second
loss to Venice Saturday in the
regularly scheduled game.
If Venice wins both games
with Sarasota Monday night,
they will advance to the
Sectional Tournament. If
they split, the tie breaker
would be played Tuesday
night.


VHS volleyball team to tour Alabama this week


BY DEBBIE KIEWIET
'SPORTS EDITOR


The Venice High School
Varsity volleyball team,
accompanied by Coach Brian
Wheatley, is flying to Birming-
ham, Ala., Tuesday for a five-
day trip. The Venice squad
will play some of the top
teams in the state before par-
ticipating ir the three-day
Auburn Team Camp July 18-
20.
"We usually go to the
SUniversity of. Tampa Team
Camp," Wheatley said, "but
with seven seniors on the
team this year, we decided to
do something different."
Many of the players, who
also play with the Venetian
SBay Volleyball Club, flew to
Dallas, Texas, and Omaha,
Neb., for tournaments this
year. They have also done
very well in various tourna-
ments around the state of
Florida, Wheatley said.
Ten freshmen and sopho-


more players attended the
Tampa Camp July 5-8 where
they won the junior varsity
division. Sophomore Kimmie
Hough was named camp
MVP
Playing in Europe
Nickie Halbert, a senior
this fall at Venice High School,
will leave for Croatia Friday,
July 20, to play in the Second
Annual European -Global
Challenge in Pula, Croatia.
Halbert is playing for the
Junior National High Per-
formance team from Florida.
Her coaches are Nick Cher-
onis from the University of
Florida and Chris Catanach
from the University of Tampa.
The team opens play in
Croatia versus a Bosnia
National team. They then
play the Bavarian High Per-
formance team from Ger-
many.
A two-time all-state player,
Halbert has been a varsity set-
ter for Venice High for three


years.
August tryouts
Tryouts for the freshman,
junior varsity and varsity
teams at Venice High School
will be held 8-10 a.m.
Monday, Aug. 6, and 4-6 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 7, at the VHS
gym. No experience is needed
to try out.
-Wheatley noted that play-
ers selected for the varsity
team the first day of tryouts
will start two-a-day practices
Aug. 7. Practice will continue
up until school starts.
Alumni game
The annual Alumni
Volleyball Game, which pits
Venice High School alumni
against the high school team,
will be held during the first
week of August: Any volley-
ball alumni interested in
playing should contact
Wheatley at 483-3242.
dkiewiet@
venicegondolier.com


New sports coordinator named at YMCA


FROM VENICE YMCA


Alicia Stritz was recently
named the new sports coor-
dinator at the Venice YMCA.
Stritz will be working with the
youth activities and recre-
ation director and the school
age/after school program
director to organize and run
sports and recreation pro-
grams at the YMCA with an
emphasis on youth sports
leagues, sports camps and


after-school intramural/clin-
ic programs.
A new program Stritz is
developing is a Junior Indians
Kid's Club for the 2007-08
school year for elementary
and middle school fans of the
hometown Venice Indians
athletic teams. More informa-
tion will be announced soon
on this new program.
Stritz brings a great deal of
experience and knowledge to
the YMCA in the area of youth


recreational programming. A
former basketball and volley-
ball player for Venice High
School and a former assistant
with the Venice High girls bas-
ketball team, she also has
more than 10 years of involve-
ment in YMCA sports at vari-
ous levels.
To contact Alicia Stritz for
information about YMCA
Youth Sports activities call
492-9622 Ext. 131 or e-mail
sports@veniceymca.org.


BRIEFS


Volleyball open gym
Open Gym Volleyball at the
Venice YMCA is offered Tues-
day and Thursday evenings in
July and August, 7-9 p.m. for
adults and high school level
players. Tuesday evenings are
for more experienced, com-
petitive players; Thursday
evenings have separate
courts available for experi-
enced players and less experi-
enced players interested in
recreational play.
Open gym nights are free
for the month of July. Cost for
August open gym is $3 per
player per night for nonmem-
bers; free forYMCA members.
For more information contact
YMCA Sports at 492-9622 Ext.
131 or sports@veniceymca.
org.
YMCA adult basketball
The Venice YMCA is now
taking registrations for the


Adult 35 and over Basketball
League. Players may sign up
as a team or individually as a
free agent to be placed on a
YMCA team.
Registration ends Thurs-
day, July 26, and the season
runs Monday and Wednesday
evenings, July 30-Sept. 10,
concluding with a playoff
tournament.
Team. cost is $350. Free-
agent cost is $45 for YMCA
members, $55 for non-mem-
bers with financial assistance
available for those in need. To
register contact YMCA Sports
at 492-9622 Ext. 131 or
sports@veniceymca.org.
YMCA soccer camp
The Venice YMCA is host-
ing a Youth Soccer Camp July
23-July 27, 9 a.m. to noon, for
players entering fourth
through ninth grades. The
camp will be held at the


Venice Middle School soccer
fields and led by Coach Daviql
Shacklett, coach of the Venice
YMCA National Champ-
ionship team and Venice High
School varsity soccer.
Players will learn soccer
skills including dribbling,
passing, footwork, shooting
on goal, and goal keeper
skills. A focus will be placed
on teamwork and positive self
esteem. Games and competir
tions for prizes will be held,
and a player jersey will bO
included.
Cost is $55 for YMCA
members, $75 for nonr
members with financial
assistance available for
those in need. Register in
person at the YMCA or
online at veniceymca.com.
For more information con-
tact YMCA Sports at 492T
9622 Ext. 131 or sports@
veniceymca.org.


GOLF RESULTS .


JACARANDA WEST
COUNTRY CLUB
Tuesday Women
July 10, Mutt & Jeff
plus One Blind Hole
Flight 1: Tie 1 st, Chris Evering,
Helen Medici. 33: 3rd, Millie Carollo,
34.5. :
Flight 2:Tie 1st Fried! Githens,
Mimi Christie, 36.5; 3rd, Marcia
Franson, 37.5,
Flight 3:1 st, Jerri Vinnenberg,
30.5; 2nd, Ruth King, 34; 3rd, Jean
Bickel, 35.

Jacaranda Jills
July 10, Tee To Fairway
Tie 1st, Ellen Harenberg, Sue
Kennedy, 2; 3rd, Cookie Sonnabend,
2.5.

Saturday Men
July 7, 1 BB 2
John Schultz, Bill Lather, -11; Bob
Thiers, Bob Bickel, -9; Jack
Lamoureux, Harry Githens, -8.

Firecracker Couples
Tournament
July 5, Holes 1-6, BB Ladies, BB
Men
Holes 7-12, 2 BB 4
Holes 13-18, Scramble
A Flight: 1st, Joe & Jean Renshaw,


Nick Albanese, Gail Pedersen, 101;
2nd, Don & Marilyn Dumas, Ray
Martinez, Missy Cerrito, 102; 3rd,
Doug & Bobbie Scott, Bud & Marty
Plageman, 105.
B Flight: 1 st, George & Sue
Kennedy, Carl & Laquitta Herren, 104;
2nd, Bob & Jean Bickel, Hank & Chris
Evering, 107; 3rd, Frank & Pat
Bochnowski, Ed & Rita Hock, 109.
Closest to Pin: #2 Bob Bickel, #8
Marty Starosta, #13 Joe Franson, #15
Gail Davey.

LAKE VENICE GOLF CLUB
Monday Group
July 9, Quota Points
Randy Pait, Jim Nestor, Jim
Middleton, Rich Nicholas, 1st, +4.
Bill White, Ron Longley, John
Dimlich, 2nd, -1.
Individuals: Jim Middleton, +5;
Neil Clauser, Noel Michals, Jim Nestor,
Bill White, +3.

Men's Quota Points
July 6
A: Gerry Chascin, +3; Moe
Marceau, -2; Noel Michals, -3.
B: Jim Middleton, +8; Wany Cox,
+4; Ralph Barry, +3.
C: Doug Roach, +6; Jack Pritchard,
+1; Jim Nestor, -1.
D: Rod Hines, +7; Henry Allain, +5;


Jon Crescenzo, +2.

MYAKKA PINES
GOLF CLUB
18-Hole Men
July 9, 3 BB of 4
Doug Malmberg, Steve Martin,
Bob O'Brien, Dick Hunt, 1st, -23.
Ken Wilson, Dick Henry, John
Morris, Chuck Corey, 2nd, -17.

Men's Shootout
July 6, Quota Points
Buck Walters, Joe Vukovich, Bob
O'Brien, +12.
Roy Rossetti, Jim Stevens, Ray
Lamb, Bob Fraser, +9.
Ed Scarlett, Rich Kay, Chas. Burke,_
Steve Martin, +7.

BIRD BAY EXECUTIVE
GOLF CLUB
July 9
Boys 10 & under: Hunter Rieth, 3&6
Tanner Holman, 36; Jeremy Perna, 39
Devon Srodes, 45; Trent Bell, 47; Josh
Bonynge, 46.
Boys 11-16: Benjamin Boulch, 31;
Mason Fox, 32; Colin Ewing, 34;
Vincent Franke, 36; Drew Lalor, 42;
LorenzoTabares, 42; Tyler Stahl, 45.
Girls 9-12: Loren Turnock, 44;
Kennedy McCarthy, 50; Summer
McCarthy, 57.










Volleyball mini-camp provides jumping off program


"Volleyball is a difficult sport
to practice on your own," said
Gary Halberti who coaches vol-
leyball at Venice Middle School
and is an assistant coach at the
high school. "We decided we
needed a jumping off program
to help prepare these young
kids for playing at the middle
school and high school level."
That was the idea behind
the Volleyball Mini-Camp that
was held at Venice High School
for the first time this summer.
Close to 50 girls turned out
for the camp which was held
Monday and Thursday eve-
nings, June 4-July 12, 5-7 p.m.
in the school gym.
"The little girls have really
had a good time with it this
summer." Halbert said.
Part of the success of the
camp, he said, can be attrib-
uted to the high school play-
ers that helped out at the


BY DEBBIE KIEWIET
SPORTS EDITOR


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camp. Counselors at the camp
this summer included seniors
Nickie Halbert and Kaylee
Ream, sophomore Jillian Allen,
and freshmen Brittany Bur-
rows and Kelsey McNamee.
Each session started out
with a warmup taking a
few laps around the gym and
peppering back and forth.
Then, for the first hour,
campers were divided into
age groups for drills that
focused on learning the basic
fundamentals of volleyball
like passing, serving and hit-
ting. The second hour was
reserved for fun games that
incorporated the skills the
girls were learning line
tag, queen of the court.
The championship tour-
nament and awards ceremo-
ny were held Thursday, the
final day of the camp. The
awards ceremony was han-
dled by the high school vol-
leyball girls who worked the
camp all summer.


SUN PHOTO BY DEBBIE KIEWIET
Wearing team shirts and camp t-shirts for their championship matches, are girls from kindergarten through eighth grade and
their high school counselors on the final night of this summer's Volleyball Mini-Camp at Venice High School.


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11A


SUNDAY, JULY 15,2007 WWW.VENICEGONDOLIER.COM


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