Title: Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00113
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Uniform Title: Venice gondolier sun
Alternate Title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Publication Date: September 30, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028295
Volume ID: VID00113
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
alephbibnum - 002730652
issn - 1536-1063
lccn - 2001229429
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Full Text


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LOCAL NEWS L.OVmxt TO COViM pa FLORIDA'S NO. I WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

50 CENTS VOLUME 60 NUMBER 90 AN EDITION OF THE SUN FRIDAY-SATURDAY EDITION, SEPT. 30-OCT. 1, 2005 PUBLISHED WEDNESDAY, FRIDAYAND SUNDAY


THIS
EDITION
li SEO I12A


VHA hires developer for new complex


The city's only public housing moves
toward replacing its 35-year-old complex
with nearly three times as many units.


Smart kids
VHS's National Honor
Society has some new
members.


BYJJ.ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR

The tumblers keep falling
into place to unlock the fund-
ing door at Grove Terrace
Apartments, the area's only
public housing complex.
The Venice Housing Au-
thority Board approved hir-
ing Picerne Affordable De-
velopment on Wednesday as
co-developers in VHA's effort
to tear down and rebuild the
apartments on North Grove
Street. The board's goal is to
replace the 50 units, built 35
years ago, with up tO 144
townhouse-st-le units on
VHA's 6.6 acres of land.
In order to pay for this,
VHAwill apply next February
for Low-Income Housing Tax


Credit financing. Hiring a
co-developer was the next
step in meeting application
requirements.
VHA Executive Director
Peter Lopez is aware that
Grove Terrace could wind up
being the first bit of major
redevelopment in an area
that's been targeted for re-
construction for many years.
Many of Grove Terrace's
neighbors the city drink-
ing water plant, fire station
and a pair of concrete plants
- are slated for relocation.
However, only a deal for the
concrete plants has been
signed, and it may take until
late 2007 just to move the
plants, let alone rebuild.
The new low-income and
workforce housing complex


could be done by the end of
2007, if VHA is awarded
Low-Income Housing Tax
Credit financing.
"Our final product is going
to be a positive on other
developments," Lopez said.
"I think it would be a cata-
lyst for (industrial district
redevelopment).
"Our final product will fit
well with future develop-
ments. And most importantly,
it would provide housing
that's in town and close to
everything."
Scaled back'
The redevelopment pro-
ject is only for VHA's 6.6
acres of land along North
Grove Street that's split by
Hatchett Creek Bridge and
has U.S. 41 Bypass along its
eastern property line.
Not too long ago, VHA was
Please see VHA, 6A


We still remember


THISSECTON 10A
Digging it
The South County Family
YMtA is ready for a new
home.


The big one
A-showdown with
Manatee will decide
the Indians' fate.. -
ezz, I" ~l


SUN PHOT9 E'A JEFF TAVARES, jtavareis,.q\enicegondolier.com
These 3100 United States flags line the front property of USA Storage on U.S. 41 in Venice.
The business places 3100 flags every September in rememberance of the victims of the
terrorist attacks in New York in September of 2001.



Homeowners squawk about leaky pipes


BY TOMMY MCINTYRE
STAFF WRITER


QtURiMli iIB:-

Car talk
Venice is a great
place for lovers of old
automobiles.


People are not quite ready
to take to the streets over
pinhole leaks in their plumb-
ing, but some are getting
there.
'Almost every resident on
my street has had'to repipe
their home at a cost of thou-
sands of dollars," Nikki Rice
said. "It's an epidemic."'
Rice's house is on Glen
Oak Road in Venice Gardens.
"I have. 4 big patch spot
in the middle of my dining
room floor where it was dug
up to stop the leak until the


house was repiped," Rice
said. "The county should at
least (offer a) rebate to these
homeowners."
Like Rice, scores of other
homeowners have been hit
by copper pipe corrosion,
which eats away their
plumbing and their bank
accounts.
Depending on the size of
the home, the extent of the
damage, and the contractor,
replumbing an entire house
can cost $6,000 or more.
Many homeowners try re-
pairing their leaks by having
their slabs dug up and using
the band-aid approach, liter-


ally a piece of rubber held
fast over the pinhole with a
radiator hose clamp. Plumb-
ers charge at least $300 do it.
Then, if the homeowner is
handy, he or she can mix
concrete, patch the hole
and replace the tile or carpet.
If you hire somebody to do
it, expect to pay another
several hundred dollars.
But while you may have
stopped that particular leak,
CPC is hard at work on the
rest of your pipes. Pretty
soon you'll be digging
through the slab in another
Please see PIPES, 6A


SUN P-'MHOT bO JJ. ANDUKEWS
The Venice Housing Authority Board approved hiring Picerne
Affordable Development on Wednesday in the redevelopment
of Grove Terrace Apartments, the city's only public housing
complex. VHA will be applying next February for tax-credit
funding to pay for the multi-million dollar project.


Sarasota County


approves water


supply deal


BY GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER


A four-county pact makes
meeting water demands the
top priority of the Peace River
water-supply authority.
The problem is, the envi-
ronment doesn't even get an
honorable mention, accord-
ing to Sarasoia County Com-,
missioner Jon I haxton.
But, despite that concern,
Thaxton voted along with
the rest of the commission to
approve the pact in Sarasota
Wednesday.
Thaxton called the deal
"a leap of faith."
"It's not the water contract
we hoped for," he said. "It's
just the best we can get at
this time."
The deal calls for the Peace
River Nlanasota Regional
Water Supply Authority to
launch a $123 million water-
plant expansion project. The
project would increase the
capacity of the Peace River
water plant from 18 million
gallons per day to 32.7 mgd,
and expand its reservoir from
600 million gallons to 6 bil-
lion.
Manatee and DeSoto
counties have approved the
contract, and Charlotte
County commissioners were
to vote on it Thursday after-
noon.
Where's the green?
Thaxton pointed out the


contract obligates the au-
thority to "absolutely and
unequivocally ... develop
and provide adequate po-
table water" to all four coun-,
ties and North Port.
The contract provides no
verbiage, however, to ensure
the water isn't withdrawn at
the expense of the environ-
ment.
"I mean, the environ-
ment's not mentioned any-
where in this contract,"
Thaxton said.
Assistant Sarasota County
Administrator David Bullock
pointed out that the environ-
ment is protected to some
extent by the permitting
process of the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District.
'"To me, that's the prob-
lem," said Thaxton. "We're
entering into an agreement
with partners that may not
share our philosophy."
The authority consists of
'Charlotte, Sarasota, DeSoto
and Manatee counties. The
city of North Port is also part
of the deal.
Four deals
The deal consists of four
separate agreements. The
key agreement is the master
water-supply contract, which
allocates the additional ca-
pacity and the costs.
The other agreements:
Please see WATER, 6A


MGIM 1I18A
Walter P. Cortley
Richard E. Day
Geraldine W.
Perry


Red-light cameras may be installed despite warning


Barbara H. R.
Thorstenson
Milton J.
VanderStel


Air Now................................ 9A
Cafe Venice 10B
East Venice Golf Club............. 9A
Great Clips for Hair................. 3A


Florida lawmakers have consistently rejected
the installation of red light cameras. Attorney
General Charlie Crist says they can't be
used to issue traffic citations.


BYJACKGURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

A red-light surveillance
camera company may soon


install two in 'Sarasota
County, despite the fact that
Florida Attorney General
Charlie Crist has warned they
cannot be used to issue traffic


citations when vehicles are
caught breaking the law on
film.
"I have been told by our
purchasing department we
will have a request for pro-

posals out on Friday," said
Don Galloway, the county's
traffic operations manager.
"What we want to do is have
the cameras photograph red-
light runners over a three-


month period."
Owners of vehicles
caught violating the law
will be mailed letters that
fully explain when and were
the infractions occurred.
Pictures that clearly show
license tags will be attached,
along with admonitions to
be more careful when they
approach intersections in
the future.


"The county commission
wants to collect data that
demonstrates how bad this
problem actually is," Gallo-
way said. "It may provide
more ammunition for our
lobbyists to use when they
take this matter up with the
Florida Legislature again
next spring."
Please see CAMERAS, 7A


Good morning, Gon
Sun subscriber
HELEN KOCHM


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Killer bees in Florida creating concern


BY ROBERT BOWDEN
STAFF WRITER


The dreaded Africanized
bees more commonly
known as killer bees are in
Florida and we better learn to
live with them, the state says.
It's a fear realized for both
the public and beekeepers
after years of watching the
killer bees' deadly migration
in the United States.
"It has become clear that
the Africanized honey bee
population has grown and will
continue to grow in Florida
due to its numerous pathways
into the state and the lack of
effective eradication products
or techniques," said Charles
Bronson, commissioner of
agriculture.
His department, he said, is
"developing the tools to pro-
tect the beekeeping industry
and educate the public on
how to learn to live with this
potentially dangerous insect."
Foreigners
Until this summer, Florida
had not admitted the pres-
ence of killer bees, although 30
swarms have been identified
in the past 22 years.
Killer bees aren't native to
this continent, or this part of
the world. A scientific experi-
ment gone awry allowed them
to escape into Brazilian jtm-
gles in 1957 and the bees
migrated through South and
Central America into the
United States. Some 'also
entered from cargo ships and
in 1990 the first of the feared
bees was found in Texas.
The bees moved west and
now ,populate all of the
Southwest, including cities


such as Los Angeles and Las
Vegas. They've killed at least 15
people in Texas, five in
Arizona. The actual number is
unknown.
They were first found in
Florida near Tampa in 2002.
They've since been captured
near the ports of Tampa,
Jacksonville and Miami. Those
captures went unpublicized.
But recent attacks might
have forced the state to admit
the killer bees are here.
They're official
In May, near LaBelle in
Hendry County, a horse in a
field was swarmed and stung
to death by killer bees.
On July 2, a man riding his
tractor in western Palm Beach
County was attacked by
"thousands and thousands of
bees" and stung severely.
"The swarm was literally
the size of a building," David
Owens said from his hospital
bed. He survived the attack.
In this hemisphere, the
deadly bees have swarmed
and killed an estimated 1,000
people and 100,000 cattle.
They have killed numerous
pet dogs, potbelly pigs, geese
and a 400-pound llama.
They are equipped to take
over and dominate any bee,
population they encounter,
including Florida's docile -
and essential European
honey bees that are kept by
the beekeeping industry to
pollinate fruit and vegetable
flowers.
Changes
The presence of
Africanized bees is likely, to
change the state's bee balance
in ways no one will like.


Bronson said farm workers
now "co-exist peacefully" with
European honey bees in
colonies as close as 20 feet
from them. But killer bees are
vastly more territorial. Experts
say they will fly a quarter-mile
to attack a human if angered.
And they don't attack singular-
ly, but in full colony swarms.
As a consequence, Bronson
said hives with these bees
"would need to be placed as
far away from farm workers as
1,000 feet."
"The department is work-
ing closely with .the beekeep-
ing industry to address .how
.pollination practices will need
to be modified due to the
increase in Africanized honey
bees," Bronson said.
Looks are deceiving
Killer bees look similar to
gentler honey bees, but their
personalities are vastly differ-
ent. European honey bees, the
backbone of Florida's bee-
keeping industry with 250,000
managed colonies, are not
easily disturbed.
African bees are easily dis-
turbed. They hate even the
sound of a lawn mower or.
field tractor. They will fly in
huge numbers to attack a per-
son or animal. Any attacking
African bee emits an odor that
becomes a magnet to the
swarm.
Killer bees will hover above
a person who leaps into a
pond to escape the swarming
attack. And they will seek out
the nostrils, mouth, eyes and
ear holes for specific attack.
Eradication is a last resort
measure, the state said.
'Adapting to the
Africanized honey bee is the


most logical approach,"
Bronson said.
"We feel that education is
one of our most effective tools
for dealing with a potentially
more defensive hybridized
honey bee," said Jerry Hayes,
with the state's Department of
Plant Industry. "Honey bees
are critical to agriculture ...
and must be protected."
Fighting back
A week after the reports of
attacks on the horse and a
man were known, the state
issued an advisory: 'At some
point," the state wrote, "the
aggressive behavior of these
bees will become more com-
mon. Interaction between
(the bees) and people and ani-
mals will likely happen."
The threat posed by killer
bees is enough for the state to
initiate training of first respon-
ders in how to handle swarm-
ing killer bee attacks.
Protective clothing will be a
must.
What is happening now,
Bronson said, is the
Africanized bees. are taking
over feral colonies and some
managed colonies. Once they
move in, they produce a,
hybrid with dominant killer
bee traits.
The hybrids are on record
as killers, too.
The migration of killer bees
to Florida is a potential eco-
nomic blow to Florida's bee-
keepers, who collectively pro-
vide 17 million pounds of
honey each year to the com-
mercial market, worth about
$13 million. The Africanized
bees produce' only one-fifth,
the honey of a European
colony. And they have killed


COURTESY PHOTO
A killer bee hive hangs from a tree branch in front of a building.


beekeepers elsewhere in the
U.S. The first California fatali-
ty from killer bees was a bee-
keeper.
They also scare people,
who might not want colonies
anywhere near residential
areas.
Worst case
Worsening; matters for
beekeepers is a ;decade-longi
colony decimation by a mite
called the varroa destructor.
Killer bees seem to be acquir-
ing resistance to that mite in
ways not shared by European
bees, the state said. When the
mite kills off gentle feral
colonies, the killer bees move
in.
When virgin queen bees
with Africanized bee fathers
emerge, they destroy une-


merged siblings the
European ones. Since
Africans emerge a day earlier,
they have a clear advantage to
dominate the colony.
It's a biological advantage,
skewing the number of wild
colonies in favor of those
headed by Africanized
queens," said an Arizona
researcher who has seen the
shifting bee balance there.
, "This is the worst-case sce-
nario we were talking: about
20 years ago," retired USDA
researcher -Gerald Loper said
of the killer bee migration.
"People would go to Brazil to
see these bees- and say. 'We
don't want them here.'- Well,
the'V're here."
bou can e-mailRobert
Bowden at bob@sun-
herald.com.


VENICE



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FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


2A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


.. .-I .." --







VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


FRIDAY. SFPT. 30. 2005


Locals returning from




a mission of mercy


BY ROGER BUTTON
BUSINEWS! COLUMNIST

"It is worse than Hurricane
Charley: alot of devastation, the
casinos are closed and there is
just nowhere to eat," said Mike
Miller by cell phone as he and
five colleagues began the return
journey of their mission of
mercy to Mississippi this week.
Along with Miller, presi-
dent of Waterford Compa-
nies, were fellow Vehice-
Nokomis Rotarian Tommy
Taylor and colleagues-Jim
Coleman, Dennis Akdrian,
Gene Newton, lohn Straw
and David Tidwell.
About 12 months, ago
Taylor acquired what most
people regard as the biggest
barbecue cooker they have
ever seen. Resembling an old-
fashioned locomotive on
wheels, it was used for the
first time at the Venice-
Nokomis Rotary Club Art
Festival to cook hundreds of
chicken pieces and ribs in


minutes.
A few days ago the men
decided they could use it to
cook meals for Hurricane
Katrina volunteers and vic-
tims.
Monday evening around
dusk they gathered at their
staging area, the Jacaranda I-
75 interchange, to set about
preparing for the journey to
the stricken Mississippi area.
The team loaded supplies
into their large motor home's
refrigerator and filled coolers
with ice.
Bidding farewell to family
and colleagues, they set- off on
their journey toward Biloxi.
Having read of the bad condi-
tions they might experience
when they entered the flood-
and wind-damaged hurri-
cane zone, the decision was
made to stop overnight in
Tallahassee for rest and prob-
ably their final, hot showers
for a few days. Early next
morning they began the final
sector of their journey, which


took most of the day.
Arriving at around 4 p.m.
at their destination near
Biloxi Police Headquarters,
they began setting up their
equipment at a medical
emergency base operated by
volunteer firemen, police and
emergency personnel from
all over the country.
"We served over 1,500
meals of ribs, chicken pieces,
hot dogs and hamburgers, all
cooked on Taylor's giant
portable barbecue," reported
Miller.
It was a coordinated plan
arranged with other volun-
teer food provider teams who
traveled from California,
South Carolina and Georgia
to feed the emergency work-
ers.
As they beganr their return
journey late Wednesday
evening, Miller reported they
were stopping to rest in
Tallahassee overnight and
planned to be back in Venice
around noon on Thursday.


Praise the roof


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Ways you can help victims of Katrina


Dine out; help out
:Restaurantsi across the
country are banding togeth-
er to participate in Dine for
America Day, a nationwide
fundraising event to support
the American Red Cross
Relief Fund and help those
affected by Hurricane
*Katrina., Dine-out day is
Wednesday, Oct. 5.
SParticipating restaurants
in the Venice area include
Bogey's, the Crow's Nest and
Beef O'Brady's, all of which
will be donating 10 percent
of the day's sales and
accepting donations on site;
Peach's; Chili's, which will be
donating 100 percent of the
day's profits; and Outback,
which will be donating 100
percent of the day's profits,
with 25 percent of that going.
to Dine for America.
Campaign
launched for food banks
America's Second Harvest
- The Nation's Food Bank
Network, the nation's largest
hunger-relief organization,
is championing a historic
effort to raise money for
food -banks to service
Katrina victims.
All Faiths Food Bank and
208 additional America's
Second Harvest Network
members are calling on
local donors to support a
nationwide organizational
campaign to raise funds for
sister food banks directly
affected by Hurricane
Katrina as well as the region-
al food banks in nearby
states seeing tremendous
flows of evacuees from
impacted areas.
To make a financial dona-
tion that will directly assist
America's Second Harvest
Network members in affected

% IJ-


areas, visit secondharvest.org
or call (800) 344-8070. A
financial donation to All
Faiths Food Bank may also be
designated for Hurricane
Katrina victims and 100 per-
cent of that donation will go
to the relief effort.
FVC seeking volunteers
Friendship Volunteer Cen-
ter, associated with the Senior
Friendship Centers, has an
immediate need for individu-
als who' can work with relief
organizations in the affected
areas of Louisiana, Missis-
sippi and Alabama for two-
week time frames in the near'
future. Host organizations
will arrange for your travel
and lodging needs. These
agencies are providing food
and referral services to, those
in need.
Call the Friendship Volun-
teer Center at 953-5965 to
learn more about how you
can help. These volunteers do
.not need specialized training
and will be trained 'on specific
assignments on site.
Catholic Charities
looking for assistance
Catholic Charities is ask-
ing for assistance from the
10-county Diocese of Venice
in Southwest Florida to help
Hurricane Katrina victims in
Mississippi. The organiza-
tion's president, Peter
Routsis-Arroyo, is in Biloxi
directing relief and distribu-
tion centers there.
"In response to the
absolute necessity for aid
and no structure to distrib'-
ute it, Catholic Charities in
all seven dioceses of Florida
have decided to adopt the
Diocese of Biloxi and offer
guidance and manpower,"'
Rouftsis-Arroyo said.


Catholic Charities is look-
ing for people willing to
house displaced Hurricane
Katrina victims. In conjunc-
tion with Catholic Charities
USA, Operation Home Away
from Home has been initiat-
ed to compile a list of ,area
residential or rental proper-
ties available for refugees.
Those who are willing to
support this cause can con-
tact their local Catholic
Charities office at 379-5119.
To ensure the safety of
those who are resettled as
well as those who offer shel-
ter, Catholic Charities will
handle the intake, process-
ing and case management.
Catholic Charities is accept-
ing contributions, of gift
cards to area stores for food,
gas, clothing and phone ser-
vice for-relocated families so
they can purchase much-
needed items.
Any organization, group
or individual wishing to
transport donated goods to
the relief centers in Biloxi
can contact Routsis-Arroyo
via cell phone at 468-6440.
No clothing is being accept-
ed at this time.
'Catholic schools in .the
Diocese of Venice are taking
displaced students. For
more information on school
openings, contact the dio-
cese at 484-9543.
Catholic Charities also is
collecting money that will
be sent to agencies in
Louisiana, Mississippi and
Alabama.
Anyone wanting 'to
donate can send a check to
the 2005 Hurricane Relief
Fund, Diocese of Venice, PO.
Box 2116, Venice, Florida
34284 or donate with a cred-
it card by visiting catholic-
charitiesusa.org.


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SUN PHOTO BY JEFF TAVARES, jtavares@venicegondolier.com
Workers from Charles Roy Roofing Company remove the old roof on Epiphany Catholic
Church in Venice. The re-roofing project is expected to take three months.



Red Cross still sending off volunteers


BYJACKGURNEY
PELICAN PRESS


My three-week stint as an
American Red Cross volun-
teer is over now, but there are
still more than 100 Sarasota
County residents providing
post-disaster assistance to
families that either fled before
- or were evacuated after -
Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf
Coast.
One of them is my younger
son Todd, who was deployed
to Gulfport, Miss., where he
loads trucks for.the organiza-
tion and drives food to shel-
ters and open air kitchens in
small communities. He says
that hundreds of people line
up at every stop for meals.
We try to talk daily,
although it is tricky because
phone service has not been
fully restored. Out conversa-
tions are often prematurely
cut off and sometimes it takes
up to a dozen calls to get
through. What he reports
about the conditions for local
residents is grim.
"Hurricane Charley mostly
destroyed mobile home
parks, tore roofs off houses
when it hit Punta Gorda and
other communities in.
Southwest Florida last year,"
he said, "but Katrina wrecked


almost everything near the
coast. It looks like a bomb was
dropped here."
The 18-wheel truck Todd
drives along the coast every
day stops in small towns such
as Long Beach, Pass
Christian, and what little
remains of Waveland, Bay
Saint Louis and Picayune, all
of which were inundated by
tidal flood waters.
"Whenever we cross a
bridge to reach one of these
areas," he said, "the first thing
we notice is a bad smell from
all-the chemicals, fuel 'and
human waste in the water. It's
filthy and looks awful. I don't
know how they are going to
get it cleaned up."
The Red Cross isn't the
only nongovernmental
agency providing post-disas-
ter relief. Volunteers from the
Southern Baptist Convention
wear distinctive yellow shirts
and man the kitchens at shel-
ters and feeding centers
where the trucks off-load
food supplies.
"These are very nice and
dedicated people," Todd said.
"It's hot here. We have to con-
stantly drink water so as not
to get dehydrated. They put in
long days at their outdoor
kitchens to serve meals for
thousands of people. What


they do is impressive."
To date, the Southwest
Florida Red Cross Chapter
has deployed more than 150
volunteers since Katrina
came ashore as a Category 4
hurricane Aug. 29. Many are
still serving in Alabama,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas,
and in cities such as Atlanta
where the evacuees went.
"We still need more people
who are willing to go," said
Kevin Lindberg, the chapter's
executive director. "A large
number work to feed and
shelter, but wre also need
nurses and mental health
counselors. We ask our volun-
teers to commit for at least
two weeks."
Red Cross officials at the
organization's national head-
quarters in Washington, D.C.,
determine where volunteers
are deployed. Local chapters
provide introductory training
classes and help make travel
arrangements..
"Our local response has
been phenomenal for a chap-
ter this size," said Lindberg.
The Southwest Florida Red
Cross Chapter is located at
2001 Cantu Court off
Cattleman Road in northern
Sarasota County. Volunteers
can contact the facility by
calling 379-9300.


Sarasota County Although most homes
for sale are resales, one out of four
homebuyers purchases a new home. Which is
better: Existing or new? The right answer of
course, is up to you. Both resales and new
homes offer advantages. Existing homes are
less expensive on average, and are generally.
close to, and enjoy the warmth and
surroundings of established neighborhoods
often with mature landscaping.
New homes, on the other hand, offer
innovative use of space, greater energy
efficiency and choices of options and
upgrades. Everything is new and modem.
Most people consider both new and existing
homes before they decide to purchase.


A new, special insider report entitled "New
Homes 10 Tips To Save You Time and
Money" has just been released which
identifies 10 invaluable tips to save you time
and money when purchasing a brand new
home. Also revealed are little-known buyer
advantages that most builders may not tell
you.
To learn more about what you should be
aware of before you visit your first model
home call for a free report today.
To hear a brief recorded message
about how to order your free copy of this
report, call 1-866-214-7091 and enter ID#
7010. You can call anytime, 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week.


Tbb hmmayq,4,,R ,44,Amd,,,,44R.04.


Direct Phone Numbers: RiHome Delivery --------------- CUSTOMER
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Publisher: Robert A. Vedder* Editor: Bob Mudge 200 EastVenice Avenue,Venice,Florida 34285. 52 wks. $62.45 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Venice Gondolier Sun, 6 a.m.- 5p.m.
esidentDerek D -Raki Periodicals Postage paid at Venice, Florida and additional mailing centers. Single Copy Circulation Deprtment, 200 E. Venice Ave., Venice FL 34285. Sat. 8a.m. 11 a.m.
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$ SAVE MONEY $
WHEN BUYING NEW CONSTRUCTION


_ I


.r,








FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


4A IVFNICE GONDOLIER SUN


Finance director may finally be hired


The city remains in 'negotiations,' but its top
choice appears to be the veteran director for the
city of New Smyrna Beach.


BYJJ.ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR


Just about everyone dreams
of winning the lottery, walking
into work the next day and quit-
ting.
Few people think about what
that would do to his or her boss.
One of the city's top candi-
dates for finance director, Bill
Poling, knows what that's like.
Five years ago, the entire staff at
New Smyrna Beach's finance
department except him -
won the Florida Lottery and quit
within a couple of weeks.
Poling listed that on his
Venice application for em-
ployment as his greatest
achievement during his more
than two decades in the
finance profession.


"I had to replace every-
body," Poling
wrote on his
application.
"It was a great
opportunity
to rebuild an
entire depart-
ment."
Venice isn't
looking for Poling
someone toPoling
rebuild its
finance department; -it just
needs someone to lead it
after being without a full-
time director for more than
14 months.
The city's longtime director
Mike McPhail retired in June
2004, and then his replace-
ment, James Olson, quit with-
out notice after only five


Bridge plan may have

slipped through crack


Winter traffic gridlock
is normal at the
Midnight Pass Road
intersection with
Stickney Point Road. A
communications
breakdown may force
relief to be delayed
until the 2007 winter
season.

BYJACKGURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

Traffic officials concede they
may have missed a chance to
reduce the number of Stickney
Point Bridge openings this win-
ter, and possibly relieve the
severity of Siesta Key gridlock
that occurs at the choked
Midnight Pass Road intersec-
tion.
U.S. Coast Guard Seventh
District Bridge Chief Barry
Dragon said Monday he had
not received a written request
from county officials to reduce
the number of bridge openings
to once every30 minutes during
the busy tourist season.
"I talked with somebody
from Sarasota County and
explained we're doing this in
Manatee County for two of
their bridges to Anna Maria
Island," he said. "It takes 120
days to make the changes,
and I hate to think a letter was
sent that got lost in the mail."
Short of limiting the.num-
ber of cars on Siesta Key, there
is no solution to winter sea-
son traffic gridlock at the
intersection. But the Coast
Guard appears willing to help
county traffic officials reduce
it.
"I'm trying to remember
whether I corresponded with
the Coast Guard by e-mail or
writing," said Don Galloway,
the county's traffic operations
manager. "He (Dragon) asked
me to do three things, and
one of them has been diffi-
cult. Quite frankly, I think that
is where we're at."
What the Coast Guard
asked for was: 1) a month of
logs that reflect how often the
bridge opens and closes; 2)
level of service traffic counts
at the busy intersection; and
3) step-by-step information
about how to open and close
the bridge.
One of the problems coun-
ty traffic officials have
encountered is that traffic
moves so slowly through the
awkward intersection, the
actual number of cars doesn't
rise to a level that would


cause Coast Guard officials to
rubber stamp a bridge open-
ing change.
Even if the county could
respond to Coast Guard offi-
cials this week, a 120-day
delay to advertise the bridge
opening changes for marin-
ers would extend through the
end of January. Since that is
unlikely to happen, it appears
the changes may have to be
put off for a year.
The bridge is owned by the
Florida Department of Trans-
portation, but its operation is
contracted out to a private
company. It is manned 24
hours a day, and opens on
demand not more than once
every 15 minutes for boat
traffic through the Intra-
coastal Waterway.
Two things compound
traffic congestion -at the
Midnight Pass Road intersec-
tion with Stickney Point Road
during the busy winter sea-
son: 1) more automobile traf-
fic; and 2) more recreational
boat traffic. The combination
results in gridlock.
Last March the county
commission asked traffic offi-
cials to recommend "any-
thing that might influence"
southbound Midnight Pass
Road traffic, which backs up
for a mile or more at the
Stickney Point Road left-turn
arrow and has no place to go.
Galloway initially responded,
"You can only stuff so many
pounds in a 5-pound bag."
Having butted heads with the
Coast Guard before, he initially
didn't hold out much hope for
fewer bridge openings. A con-
versation with Dragon changed
his mind.
"He's amenable to working
with us and asked for three
things," Galloway said. "I
don't know what's possible,
but if the Coast Guard would
limit bridge openings to every
30 minutes from about
Thanksgiving to May it would
suit our purposes."
Last spring Dragon told the
Pelican Press, "Sometimes
we'll consider bridge open-
ings on the hour and half-
hour. It can help motorists
time their trips on and off a
barrier island so they don't get
caught. We're trying to bal-
ance boaters' needs with
.transportation needs."
Absent 30-minute sched-
uled bridge openings, the
county has few other avail-
able options. It previously
experimented with turning
off the Midnight Pass Road
traffic signal at Stickney Point
Road and having off-duty
sheriff's deputies direct traf-
fic.


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weeks on the job.
Pretty close
Mayor Dean Calamaras,
who is in charge of finding
charter officer replacements,
will not commit to calling
Poling the city's top candidate
for the job.
However, e-mail traffic and
passing conversations at
Venice City Hall seem to indi-
cate that. City council mem-
bers interviewed the top three
candidates, and Poling was
the only one to attend a coun-
cil meeting.
"We're getting pretty close,"
Calamaras said. "We're negoti-
ating. We're not ready to make
any kind of an announcement
yet. As early as next week, we
should have something, but
there's nothing really solid."
Poling was shortlisted in
the spring, but then removed
his name because of "personal
reasons."


The mayor and others
blamed the salary scale as
the reason why few candi-
dates applied during the pre-
vious two searches, after
Olson quit unexpectedly.
Advertisements listed the job
as paying $90,000 year this
time around, rather than
$75,000.
Poling has worked for the
city of New Smyrna Beach
since 1985, and was promoted
to his current spot as finance
director in 1988..
He manages a $40 million
operating budget and has a
staff of five people.
Poling graduated from
Southeast High School in
Bradenton and received his
accounting degree from
Trevecca University in
Nashville in 1981.

You can e-mail].J. Andrews
at: jandrews@
venicegondoliercom.


CIY NOVTE


111 remember this'
Venice City Council mem-
ber Fred Hammett apparently
is still angry with City
Attorney Bob Anderson's over
his handling ofVillage On The
Isle's request for bond financ-
ing help, and will get his "pay-
back" during charter officer
evaluations.
The pri-
vate compa-
ny passed on
usingVenice's
services to
obtain a $35
million bond
for capital
improve- a
ments and Hammet
refinancing
because of "the significant
cost quoted," according to
VOTI.
Hammett thinks the
$185,000 in legal fees
Anderson wanted to charge
VOTI was excessive and is un-
happy the city lost out in the
$35,000 a year in fees it could
have collected. According to
Hammett, Sarasota, County
attorneys will provide the
same work for about $50,000
in legal fees.
Anderson blamed much of
the high fees on VOTI's poor
credit rating and said a por-
tion would have wound up as
junk bonds.
During the debate at Tues-
day's council meeting, Ham-
mett was among those who
questioned if Anderson was


aiming for personal profit at
the city's expense.
"I am told that all of the
'junk bonds' are already sold,,
and the majority, if not all, of
the rest of the offering is com-
mitted. ... I am waiting for the
'payback' and next year's eval-
uations," Hammett wrote in
an e-mail to City Manager
Marty Black on Wednesday.
Council actions
Here's a roundup of Venice
City Council actions from this
week's meeting.
Petition requirements -
Council member John Sim-
monds withdrew his motion
to hire consultants to dis-
prove petition drives from
local residents after criticism
from his fellow council mem-
bers. Simmonds wanted to
hire a company to verify and
eliminate names on petitions,
like the most recent one with
3,000 names demanding 35-
feet height restrictions. He
said his goal was to weed out
names that didn't deserve
attention, while Vice Mayor
John Moore said that "every
name should be given the
same weight."
Pier parking lot -
Council approved a $35,000
contract with TGW Engine-
ering for Phase I, North Pier,
parking lot improvements.
Towing law Council
approved an ordinance giving
Venice police the legal right to
tow vehicles in public areas.


Commission sinks sea


wall variance petition


BY SHELLY JANKE
STAFF WRITER

Several Manasota Key resi-
dents will have to find an alter-
native to building a 1,952-foot
seawall to protect their homes
from a constantly receding
sand bluff.
Sarasota County Commis-
sioners voted 4-1 Tuesday to
deny the petitioners the
chance to apply for state per-
mitting and begin the three-
year-long process of installing
a steel wall in front of their
properties.
Commissioner David Mills
was the lone dissenting vote.
More than 100 e-mail let-
ters from neighbors indicated
they opposed it by a 3-to-1
margin.
The bluff line
on the north-
ern portion of
the key has
receded 120
feet in the
past 54 years.
One home
sits only 7 feet
from the
Mercier bluff.
The wall
would have stretched from
Manasota Key Road addresses
8000 to 8080 and 8130 to 8200.
Originally 17iproperty own-
ers petitioned the commission
to consider a coastal setback
variance, but property owners
at 8210 and 8090 backed out of
the petition before Tuesday's
hearing.
William Merrill, attorney
for the petitioners, told the
commission that the sea wall
constructed on Casey Key
could serve as a model for the
proposed Manasota Key sea
wall.
"Our plan is an innovative
hybrid approach used suc-
cessfully on the Casey Key
project," Merrill said.
Merrill said a feasible alter-
native to building the wall, a
beach renourishment project,
would take too much time.
Best option
The proposed structure has
been'in the planning stages
for 2-1/2 years. It became a
second option for the proper-
ty owners when neighbors
who don't live along the shore-
line opposed financial partici-
pation in a costly beach
restoration project.
Natural resources officials
for the county reported that
most of the threatened
homes are located on lots


more than 300 feet deep and
could be moved away from
the shoreline. Engineers for
the owners argued it would
be prohibitively expensive,
as it would require new foun-
dation work.
But oppo-
nents of the
proposed sea
wall argued
that it would
interrupt the
c .o a s tal
processes,
affect sea tur-
Staub tle nesting
and neigh-
boring prop-
erties and create a need for
further coastal armoring.
Richard Boote, an attorney
representing property owners
opposed to the sea wall, ques-
tioned the "success" of the
Casey Key project and called
the exposure of that sea wall
"an eyesore."
Commissioner Shannon
Staub said that a sea wall was
not the best solution for pro-
tecting homes on Manasota
Key.
"I think there are some
alternative ways to protect
those homes," Staub said.
Boote said .the ;commis-
sioners did the right thing in
denying the variance.:
"I'm pleased with, the
result," Boote said. "I think
commissioners Thaxton,
Staub and Patterson recog-
nized that given county.
coastal code requirements, it
would have been illegal to
approve the sea wall vari-
ance."
Comes and goes
Jim and Joan Jennewein,
Manasota Key property own-
ers, said they weren't too con-
cerned with the slowly disap-
pearing sand bluff.
"It's Mother 'Nature," Joan
said. "It comes and it goes."
Jim said he was happy with
the commission's decision.
"It's a great day," Jim said. -
Mercier said it's important
that the property owners work
together from here on out.
"Forgive the pun," Mercier ~
said, "but an island divided
cannot sand. The bay people
have to work with the gulf-
front people."

Pelican Press staff writer
Jack Gurney contributed to
this story.
You can e-mail Shelly
Janke at sjanke@
sun-herald.com.


Health Happenings October 2005


Cardiac Club VENICE REGIONAL
Monday, October 10 MEDICAL CENTER
Venice Regional Medical Center, Auditorium A, 540 The Rialto
5:30 pm Blood pressure checks
6:00 pm Interventional cardiologist Susan Bratschi, M.D., will present a program on heart attack (acute MI). The ,
hospital's gated north lot at the corner of Palermo Place will be closed for the month of October. Please use the Valet
Parking at the hospital's main entrance. Refreshments will be served and registration is required by calling 486-
6057. Space is limited.

The Orthopedic Connection
Monday, October 24
Venice Regional Medical Center, The Auditoriums, 540 The Rialto
6:00-7:00 pm Pharmacist Matt Dieter, Pharm D, will present a program on Prescription and Nonprescription Drug
Therapies for Joint Pain. The hospital's gated north lot at the corner of Palermo Place will be closed for the month of
October. Please use the Valet Parking at the hospital's main entrance. Refreshments will be served and registration
is required by calling 486-6057.

SUPORG oPSAND b9 4TOAL 9 DOGAM


Man to Man/Side by Side
Support Groups
2:00 pm Monday, Oct. 3
no registration needed


Multiple Sclerosis Support Group
7:00 pm Tuesday, Oct. 4
no registration needed

Manasota Lighthouse for the Blind
Low Vision Support Group
1:00 p.m. Tuesdays, Oct. 11 and 25
no registration needed

Venice Aglow Support Group
6:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 11
no registration needed

National Alliance for the Mentally III
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5
no registration needed

Joint Pain Seminar
10:00 am. Wednesday, Oct. 12
Register by calling 486-6057


Live Wires Stroke Club
2:00 pm Wednesday, Oct.12
no registration needed

Ostomy Support Group
1:30 pm Wednesday, Oct. 19
no registration needed

Woman to Woman Breast Cancer
Support Group
,3:30 pm Wednesday, Oct. 19
no registration needed

Lions Vision Screening
7:30 am. Thursday, Oct. 6
Preregistration and financial
screening required by
calling 492-3931

Diabetes Lecture
1:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6
Diabetes and Neuropathy
Dr. Louis Giannone, DPM
no registration needed


Sjogren's Syndrome Support Group
4:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct.,27
no registration needed

Free Blood Pressure and
Blood Sugar Screenings
8:30-10:30 am. Every Thursday
Please fast prior to testing.
Free Continental Breakfast served.
Venice HealthPark 1201 Jacaranda
Blvd. (corner of Center).
Check in at front desk

Amputee Support Group
9:30 am. Every Friday
no registration needed



meeings .dl e u 'e s hld

Venice Heal.h- r


I s LV_ -N-.-, -


I








VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


FRIDAY, SEPT. 30. 2005


Bridge work




may mean




long detour


BY GAVIN OFF
STAFF WRITER

Charlotte County com-
missioners awarded a bid
Tuesday to repair the 40-
year-old bridge connecting
Manasota Key to the main-
land.
Work on Beach Road's Tom
Adams Bridge will likely begin
in January, said project man-
ager Chuck Koons. He said
repairs could close the bridge
to vehicular traffic for five
weeks.
Commissioners awarded
the $2.6 million bid to Coastal
Marine Construction of Ven-
ice at the board's morning
meeting. The project is phase
one of a multiphased, $8.6
million project.
The contract stipulates the
bridge must remain open to
boat traffic on the Intracoast-
al Waterway and can be
closed to motorists only after
April 1.:
Limiting the closings to
after April 1 will keep the
bridge operational during the
area's busy winter season.
"Any disruption in traffic at
that point in time really ties
up traffic," Koons said.
B.J. Galberaith, a member
of Manasota Key's advisory
committee and Municipal
Service Benefit Unit commit-
tee, said both groups are
working on plans to imple-
ment a ferry system for resi-
dent! while the bridge is
closed.
One possible route, Gal-
beraith said, would transfer
riders from the bait shop at
the base of the bridge to the
area around Chadwick Park
on the key.
No vehicles would be
allowed on the ferry, forcing
residents to park their cars at
a Beach Road lot and hitch a
ride to and from the
Chadwick Park drop-off
point.
Galberaith said riding the
ferry could save south Mana-
sota Key residents a 16-mile,


45-minute detour to Manaso-
ta Beach Road on the north
side of the island.
"We have a lot of people
who work full-time in the Port
Charlotte area," Galberaith
said. "It's not only a distance
problem, it's a time problem."
Galberaith said only those
who use the ferry would be
charged.
Emergency coverage
Englewood Fire Chief Mike
Bonakoske, meanwhile, said
he's planning a meeting with
Charlotte County Fire/EMS
Chief Dennis DiDio about
stationing emergency per-
sonnel on the island while the
bridge in inoperable.
Bonakoske said that's been
done in similar situations.
The first phase of bridge
repairs includes reinforcing
the bridge's support pilings,
replacing its metal deck and
repairing its concrete ap-,
proach slabs, Koons said.
The work will likely last
nine months, ending about
this time next year.
"It's a lot of really necessary
work that has to be done,"
Koons said. "We're starting to
see some serious deteriora-
tion in the structural compo-
nents."
Phase two, the project's
most expensive phase, will
add a new generator, upgrade
the bridge's electrical controls
and build a new tender house
across from the current one
and higher off the road, giving
the operator a better view of
approaching traffic.
Koons said the upgrades
would mirror the new Circus
Bridge connecting the main-
land to the southern end of
Venice island.
Phase three would add
lighting and decorations to
the bridge..
,The final two phases, how-
ever, have yet to be approved.
"Obviously, the budget will
be a big part of it," Koons said.
You can e-mail Gavin Off
at goff@sun-herald.com.


FLORIDA LOTTERY


I -VENCEOUTOO


do


- '6'%,\


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
(Including Sarasota and Charlotte counties)
East winds at 5 to 10 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet, smooth chop.

Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
East winds at 6 to 10 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet, light chop.


High Thursday 89
Low Thursday 75
Rainfall
Total this week 0.09 in.
Total this year 32.61 in.
Normal YTD 31.85 in.
Rainfall totals are for a 24-hour
period ending at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday as recorded at the
official weather station in
Venice.


Friday
High 90, Low 73
Partly cloudy with
scattered rain.

Saturday
High 89, Low 73
A few more clouds,
breezy, with rain.

Sunday
High 89, Low 73
Some clouds, breezy
with scattered rain.

Monday
High 89, Low 73
Partly cloudy with
. scattered rain.


Below




Sept.
rain
0.11"


7:22 p.m.
7:17 a.m.

4:50 a.m.
6:02 p.m.


DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


DATE
FRI 30
SAT 1
SUN 2
MON 3


HIGH
A.M.
10:59
12:02
12:06
12:14


HIGH
P.M.
11:40a
12:19
1:00


*STRONG TIDE
a- A.M. p-P.M.


Sept. 28..........354 ^ um- Sept. 28.......2171
Sept. 27..........656 = Sept. 27.......1394
Sept. 26..........761 J Sept. 26....... 2725
Sept. 25..........938 A Sept. 25.......2186
Sept. 24.......... 031 Sept. 24.......3159


Se 28..................6-9-11-26-32
Sept. 27.... ........2-7-13-29-31
Sept. 26 ............2-24-28-30-36
Sept. 25..................6-9-31-33-35
Sept. 24...............2-7-24-29-35
Payoff for Sept. 27
3 5-digit winner...............$66,458
249 4-digit winners.........$129
8,591 3-digit winners.............$10
2-digit winners......... Quick Pick ticket


Sept. 27.........12-19-23-24
Mega Ball ...............6....6
Sept. 23.........28-35-14-13
Mega Ball ....................1
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for Sept. 27
1 4 of 4 + MB.................$500,000
13 4 of 4... .................. $693.50
72 3 of 4 + MB $274
1,625 3 of 4............. ...... $36
2,009 2 of 4 + MB..... .... $20


LOTT


Sept. 28....17-18-25-36-39-45
Sept. 24......9-11-18-27-38-39
Sept. 21 ....16-30-35-38-44-53
Sept. 17....10'-42-45-47-52-53
Sept. 14.........3-6-11-15-39-51
Sept. 10......7-20-40-41-43-47


Payoff for Sept. 24
2 6-digit winners .............$ 6 million
123 5-digit winners.....$3,666.50
6,397 4-digit winners..............$57
118,218 3-digit winners..........$4
Drawing occurs Wednesdays, Saturdays


Estimated jackpot $3 million


Dailey takes city position in Punta Gorda


BY STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER


City Manager Howard Kunik
decided to hire Kathleen M.
Dailey as his assistant city man-
ager.
Dailey held the position of
deputy city manager in Venice
for more than 10 years.
"She is excited at the pros-
pect ofworkingwithin our orga-
nization and helping restore
/reshape Punta Gorda following
the impact of Hurricane
Charley," Kunik wrote in a
memorandum to the city coun-
cilWednesday.
Dailey is scheduled to start
Oct. 31 for an annual salary of
$86,650.
"Her desire to work in this
community has been strong
enough that she is willing to
accept considerably less
compensation than what she


receives in her current post,"
Kunik told council members.
Since June 2004, Dailey, 41,
has served as the assistant
city manager of Oakland Park,
a suburb of Fort Lauderdale
with a population of 31,000.
Before that, she served as
town manager for Ocean
Ridge, an affluent oceanfront
community in Palm Beach
County, July 2002-June 2004,
and as an assistant city man-
ager for Boca Raton, Sept-
ember 2000-July 2002.
Coming back
But Dailey is no stranger to
Southwest Florida.
From October 1989 to
August 2000, she served as a
deputy city manager in
Venice and occasionally filled
in as acting city manager. On
her resume, Dailey described
her duties as handling resi-


dents' complaints, serving as
,a member of the manage-
ment team for collective bar-
gaining and serving as an ex
officio member of Venice city
advisory boards.
Merle Graser, Venice
mayor 1993-1998, knew
Dailey and said she served
Venice well.
"(Dailey) was very well
known and visible in the
community, and I would give
her a high ranking," Graser
said. "I am always glad to see.
young people move on, but I
am glad to see she's back."
Like Graser, Venice Gondo-
lier Sun publisher Bob Vedder
knew Dailey and' said he
thinks she will serve Punta
Gorda and its residents well.
"She was a great assistant
city manager; she's easy to
work with and personable,"
Vedder said.


Now that she has worked
for several Florida cities, he
said he also thinks Dailey
should prove well versed in
the state laws and regulations
municipalities face.
Dailey is looking forward
to her return to Florida's
southwestern coast.
"Even when I was a deputy
city manager in Venice, I
spent quite a bit of time in
Punta Gorda," she said Wed-
nesday.
When asked about her
decision, Dailey said she's
been impressed with Punta
Gorda residents and their
efforts since Hurricane Charl-
ey hit a year ago.
"The way the (Punta
Gorda) community has pul-
led together is just admi-
rable," Dailey said.
You can e-mail Steve Reilly
at reilly@sun-herald.com.


Insurer seeks damages for Robert L. Anderson roof
-Insrersees da rRQ rt


STAFF REPORT

Sarasota County commis-
sioners approved a proration
agreement Tuesday authoriz-
ing the county's property
insurance carrier to sue those
responsible for the Robert L.
Anderson Building roof col-
lapse in March 2004.


Crum & Forster Insurance
Company intends to try to
recover payments made to
the county totaling $1.4 mil-
lion from the collapse and
resulting damage. The coun-
ty paid a $100,000 deductible.
Neither the county nor
Crum & Forster has identified
the responsible party.


According to the proration
agreement, the county will
receive the first $100,000 (the
deductible) from any recov-
ery, minus 7 percent. of the
costs and expenses incurred
in securing that recovery.
Commissioner David Mills
questioned the 7 percent
deduction.


"That's $7,000," Mills said.
"That seems like a lot."
L.A.M. Management Inc.
was the general contractor for
the county office building's
renovation in 2001. George
Palermo Architect Inc. was
the architect for the 2001 ren-
ovation and also the original
construction in 1988.


Name nf dno


. WOMEN'S SERTOMA CLUB OF VENICE
SUN FIESTA 2005

"DOGGIE DOINGS""
Sunday, October 23 @ 2:00 p.m.
ENTRY FORM


(PRINT)


(PRINT)


Owner's name


Owner's signature
Address
City. State Zip Phone ( )
To download an application go to sunfiesta.net


Put a check mark in front of your
choice of "Doings" for your dog.
Do not choose more than two (2).
Ribbons will be awarded.
___ Best Dressed
-___Cutest
____Longest Hair
__-_Looks Most Like His Owner
(All dogs must be on a leash)


, kV'.N


Judging will be by THE GREATER (
VENICE FLORIDA DOG CLUB.
INDEMNITY AGREEMENT: For, and in consideration of permission
to participate in the 2005 Sun Fiesta "Doggie Doings" contest in
downtown Venice on October 23, 2005, the undersigned hereby agrees
to assume the risk, and hereby releases and agrees to indemnify the
Women's Sertoma Club of Venice and the Greater Venice Florida Dog
Club and any others organizing or assisting in the contest from any and
all losses or claims arising out of the undersigned's participation in the
"Doggie Doings" contest.

Owner's signature Date_

1. Complete the entry form.
2. Mail entry form to: Sun Fiesta, c/o Sheila Kaufer, 1004 Auburn
Lakes Circle, Venice, FL 34292. If you have any questions, please call
Sheila at (941) 486-8851 or Pat at 488-6233. You may also e-mail
Sheila at hskauferl@verizon.net
3. Pre-registration is recommended. Late entries accepted until
1:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 23.
Sp e VENICEb n REIMAX GULF
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6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN FRIDAY, SEPT. 3(, 2005


WATER from page 1A


call for Sarasota County
to "ive back to Charlotte
County 2 mgd in surplus allo-
cation.
establish a common rate
for authority water for all cus-
tomers for the first time.
designate DeSoto County
as a "sole source provider
customer." The county agrees
not to develop its own water
supplies and relies solely on
the authority; in exchange,
the authority agrees unequiv-
ocally to meet the county's
water needs.
create a "reserve water
pool" where counties can
store their surplus water. If
another customer needs the
reserve water, the donor
county would get a prorated
share of the proceeds.
The parties have at least
two strong incentives to sign
the deal. The first is that a
real estate boom throughout
the region is projected to
push demand for water be-
yond the supply as early as
next year, if additional
sources aren't developed fast.
The expansion project
won't be completed until
2008-09. However, the au-
thority has also adopted a
"gap plan" to bring addi-
tional sources online to
stave off shortages until
then. Those sources include
tapping both Shell Creek in
Punta Gorda and the


Myakkahatchee Creek in
North Port.
The other incentive comes
in the form of an $80 million
grant from the 16-county
water-management district.
The grant will be offered only
if the project serves as a re-
gional water supply.
Sarasota County would
pay $54.3 million, or 62 per-
cent, of the project's cost
and receive 9.75 mgd in ad-
ditional water, according to
George McFarland, a utility
finance specialist for the
county.
At least two commission-
ers questioned Thaxton's call
for the contract to include
environmental protections.
Commissioner Shannon
Staub called the contract "a
business agreement ... to get
hard infrastructure going."
"I'm sorry the word 'envi-
ronment' doesn't appear in
this business document," she
added.
Commissioner David Mills
warned that talk about envi-
ronmental concerns could
cause bonding sources to
balk.
"Whenever we talk about
the environment, we need
to know what we're talking
about and not cause people
to fear," Mills said.
Commissioner Nora Pat-
terson questioned what
happens if the authority is


unable to meet its obligation
to supply DeSoto Countywith
as much water as it needs.
County staffers cited there
is nothing in the contract that
would address such a failure.
"It's almost assuming it
could never happen," Patter-
son pointed out.
'One less straw"
But commissioner Paul
Mercier argued that DeSoto's
decision to become a "sole-
source provider-customer"
poses benefits for the region.
"There's one less straw in
the water," he said.
Thaxton, however, point-
ed out the authority will be
obligated to supply the water
without any consideration of
cost or environmental im-
pacts.
"I'm just fearful that (De-
Soto County's) appetite is
going to be a little out of
control," he said.
County staffers had to
engage in "knock-down,
drag-out" negotiations dur-
ing some 41 meetings with
the other parties to hammer
out the deal, said Staub. She
lauded them for their hard
work.
"It's about building trust,"
she added. "It's hard for all the
members to build that trust."
You can e-mail Greg
Martin atgmartin@
sun-herald.com.


VHA from page 1A


attempting to obtain local
resident Don O'Connell's 5
acres of property along its
northwest property line. That
partnership has since fallen
through because of- VHA
going after LIHTC funding,
which, has stringent restric-
tions.
One of those is that none
of the properties can be sold,
and at least 50 units must go
to the poorest of tenants.
"I didn't want my property
to be used for low-income
housing," O'Connell said.
"My goal was for more work-
force housing, something
that would be truly mixed-
income housing, make it a
high-end development. ...
What he's putting in there, I
think people will still view
as subsidized housing."
Lopez admits that he is a
fan of O'Connell's idea, but
such an extensive redevel-
opment project would take
too long to make a reality.
The current complex is
falling apart. VHA will event-
ually spend more than
$300,000 just to correct
numerous city building vio-
lations in its 50 units.
Then there are chronic
problems like termites, in-
sects, poor building design
and a never-ending waiting
list of people- many of
them elderly who need a
place to stay.
Venice needs a better
facility and more living units,
and going for tax credits is
the best way to complete
that job by late 2007 or early
2008, Lopez said.


O'Connell does offer his
support for Lopez's plan.
O'Connell has been involved
as an owner in the local rental
property business for more
than 30 years, and the re-
tired judge also was VHA's
attorney in the 1970s.
"If they get the right peo-
ple and do this right, they
can pull it off," O'Connell
said. "But if they don't, the
stigma will still be there. ...
I'm going to be monitoring
this closely. I want to see
where the road goes, to see
how they develop it to diffuse
the stigma of public housing."
Getting the money
If funding is approved,
Lopez intends to mix resi-
dents of the complex. Fifty
units would be for the lowest
income residents, in order
to meet guidelines, but the
remaining units would all be
reserved for people who
make less than Sarasota
County's median income,
about $42,000 a year.
A balance of incomes and
nice architectural design is
how one erases the stigma
of "low-income housing,",
Lopez said.
Trident Housing Corp. out
of Jacksonville will work
through next February's filing
deadline to compile VHA's
tax credit financing applica-
tion. Kristen Packard, head
of Trident Housing, helped
obtain financing for 312
units at Riley Chase in North
Port and 264 units at .Noah's
Landing in Naples.
,VHA's co-developer, Pi-


cerne out of Altamonte
Springs, Fla., will work to
piece together the concept
plan for what would be built
and the estimated cost,
which are requirements of
the application.
Lopez envisions multiple
buildings with parking un-
derneath, a community cen-
ter, green space and 50-50
split between elderly and
family housing. Over the next
several months, architects
will let Lopez know how
much of that is realistic.
One challenge will be.city
and resident approval. Voters
have been loud in their sup-
port of affordable housing,
but even louder in opposition
of buildings taller than 35
feet and any high-density
developments.
The proposed 144 units
,would exceed the city's maxi-
mtum building density of 18
units per acre. Current densi-
ty at Grove Terrace is about
7.6 units per acre; 144 units
would put it at 21.8 units per
acre.
Lopez is willing to lower
that to 120 units, which is
within the city's maximum
density.
"Both we and the devel-
oper have to think about
what we could create, and
can we get it into a comfort-
able environment for those
who live here," Lopez said.
"That will play a significant
role in what we decide."

You can e-mailJ.J.
Andrews at: jandrews@
venicegondoliercom.


SUN'PHOTO BY JEFF TAVARES, jtavares@venicegondolier.com
Homeowner Bruce Barton has had holes dug in his foundation in order to repair leaky cooper
pipes.


PIPES from page 1A

part of the house. tive amount of time and CPC. The procedure is Lom-
probably taxpayer money to parable in cost to replirimb-
Life of its own find out what we and ing, according to com any
Indeed, the leaky pipe the county already knew. It's officials, but can be done in
problem is so widespread as the water. one day. Existing pipes do
to have taken on a life of its "Funny, the county and not have to be replaced nor
own. new construction (are) still do concrete slabs have to be
The three articles on CPC piping houses the same way. dugmup.: .,
published in November 2004 As usual the homeowners DuraFlo's solution is highly
generated more e-mail and pick up the tab." touted by industry experts.
phone calls than any article < A .
uphton tathtime. One solution Another solution? .
And, late Tuesday after- Some industry experts say John Coil, who now lives
noon, even before a CPC the corrosion is caused by in Country Club Estates in
story ran in the Wednesday, water that is "too clean," and Venice, said he had leaky
Sept. 28 Venice Gondolier eats away at copper and copper, pipes back horie in
Sun, a homeowner called the causes tiny holes in the Indiana. .
reporter and said he "had metal. They said the Clean He said there is asi'mple
heard" the paper was going Air Act of 1972 forced the solution.
to publish a leaky pipe story Environmental Protection "You insert a plastic ad-
and he wanted to talk. Agency to remove some of apter between the: copper
He wanted to say his boss the impurities in water that and the galvanized,:pipe,"
told him that some homes in formed a natural barrier to Coil said. "That blocks the
the South Bay subdivision corrosion in pipes. electrolysis set up between
were experiencing pinhole Interestingly, people who the copper and the gbalya-
leaks in their plumbing. have well water said they nized pipe."
Homeowner Jean Walker have not experienced CPC. Coil said he is surprised
wrote:. The DuraFlo Company that no one has stumbled on
"As a single mother of two out of Los Angeles has de- to his idea.
this expense is a real hard- veloped a method of blowing Ibu can e-mail Tomnhi ,
ship. It's too bad they (re- a noncorrosive liner into McIntyre at: tmcintyre@
searchers) spent an exhaus- pipes that protects against venicegondolier.com.


SARASOTA COUNTY BRIEFS


October is'Energy
Awareness Month'
The Sarasota County
Board of Commissioners has
proclaimed October 2005 as
Energy Awareness Month in
Sarasota County. The procla-
mation was issued at the
board's meeting Wednesday
at the Robert L. Anderson
Administration Center, 4000
South Tamiami Trail, Venice.
As part .of the county's
participation in National
Energy Awareness Month
and the national ENERGY
STAR Change a Light, Change
the World campaign, the
Anderson Center was also
the site today of Sarasota
County Government's first
distribution of free compact
fluorescent light bulbs.
An estimated 500 citizens
received the free 15-watt
long-lasting bulbs, which


provide the same amount of
light as standard 60-watt in-
candescent bulbs. People
who picked up the free CFL
bulbs signed a "Change a
Light" pledge to use them to
reduce energy consumption
in their homes and offices.
In the proclamation, the
commission recapped Sara-
sota County Government's
commitment to encouraging
high-performance green
building design and con-
struction for the public "and
private sector, through such
county facilities as the North
Sarasota Public Library and
the Twin Lakes Park Green
Office Complex. Both facili-
ties received LEED Gold cer-
tification this year from the
U.S. Green Building Council.
The board also noted the
county's relationship with
the U.S. Department of Ener-


gy as a Rebuild America Com-
munity Partner since 1998,
and its partnership witi the
U.S. Environmental Prbtec-
tion Agency (USEPA) #s an
ENERGY STAR partner since
1994.
Additional free CFL light
bulb distribution (one !bulb
per household, while supplies
last) will take place on Oct. 8
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the
North Sarasota Public Library,
2801 Newtown Blvd.. Sara-
sota, and from 1 to 4 p.mn at
the Florida. House Leafning
Center, 4600 South Beheva
Road, Sarasota.
For more information and
directions to these facilities,
contact the Sarasota County,
Call Center at 1941) 861-5000
and ask about the Change a
Light, Change the World
free CFL light bulb distiibu-
tion.


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CAMERAS from page 1A


Clear 'no'
Crist is the Republican
Party's front-runner to suc-
ceed Gov. Jeb Bush next fall.
He waded into the red-light
surveillance camera issue in
mid-July with a legal opinion
that clearly indicates commu-,
nities cannot use them to
issue traffic citations.
It was directed to Pem-
broke Pines, a southeast
Florida city, and states:
"Legislative changes are nec-
essary before local govern-
ments may issue traffic cita-
tions and penalize drivers
who fail to obey red-light
indications on traffic signal
devices."
County Administrator Jim
Ley has suggested the auto-
mated cameras could be
installed at the Lockwood
Ridge Road intersection with
17th Street in Sarasota and
the Pinebrook Road inter-
section with Venice Avenue'
in Venice, both of which he
described as dangerous.
In 1999, when the county
experimented with a surveil-
lance camera to determine
if red-light runners posed a
safety threat, it counted
more than 70 infractions
every day from cars traveling
in just one direction through
the busy Lockwood Road/
17th Street intersection.
Traffic officials have re-
ported that surveillance
cameras could be purchased
from vendors and installed for
between $50,000 and $80,000
apiece. They have estimated it
would cost about $2,000 a
month to process film collect-
ed from each of them.
But some state lawmak-
ers believe communities
would abuse the right to use
cameras and raise excessive
revenue, while others have
voiced concerns about priva-
cy issues if local law enforce-


Nokomis

bridge closing

for replacement

The Boat Ramp Bridge
leading to the Nokomis Beach
Park-boat ramp will close for
three months beginning
Monday, Oct. 3, while a new
bridge is constructed.
The approximately 50-
year-old, short-span bridge is
deteriorating, and is at the
end of its design life. The
new bridge is designed to
provide safe and reliable
access to the park and boat
ramp for the next 75 years.
Cone & Graham Inc. of
Tampa, which is replacing
eight similar short-span
bridges on Siesta Key, was
awarded the $916,733.06 con-
tract to replace the bridge,
which is commonly used by
fishermen and boaters.
The capital-improvement
project includes the replace-
ment of seawalls under the
bridge, the installation of a
new 5-foot-wide sidewalk on
the south side of the bridge,
and improvements in the
aesthetics of the bridge.
Funding is from the infra-
structure surtax (1-cent sales
tax).
The new bridge will be
several feet longer, around
28 feet, arid slightly wider to
accommodate a sidewalk.
The existing vertical naviga-
tional clearance for boats
will remain the same.
During the around-the-
clock closure, the bridge will
be closed to all vehicular and
pedestrian traffic. Marine
traffic also may be affected
at times, with temporary clo-
sures of the canal adjacent
to and underneath the
bridge. The contract calls for
substantial completion of the
bridge by Jan. 1.
Signs notifying users about
the closure will be posted on
the roads leading to the bridge.
During the closure, boaters
will have at least three boat
ramp alternatives in the area:
to the north at Blackburn


Point Park, 800 Blackburn
Point Road, Osprey; and to
the south in Venice at Higel
Park, 1330 Tarpon Center
Drive, and Marina Boat
Ramp, 215 E. Venice Ave.
For more information,
contact the Sarasota County
CaliCenter at (941) 861-5000.


ment officials are cleared to
use them for other than traf-
fic-related purposes.
Fewer injuries
Just how serious the threat
posed by red-light runners
may be flushed out by the
county's pilot project. In
2003, the Florida Depart-
ment of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles determined
they caused 3 percent of fatal


crashes, a total of 109 state-
wide for the year.
The Federal Highway Ad-
ministration, an advocate of
their use, concedes that sur-
veillance cameras do not
lead to a decrease 'in the

number of overall vehicular
crashes, but contends they
reduce the number of serious
crashes that result in injuries.
There is a hint of hypocrisy
in the state's position against


red-light surveillance cam-
eras. As Pembroke Pines
Mayor Frank Ortis has re-
peatedly pointed out, auto-
mated cameras are used to
catch and fine drivers who
fail to pay state turnpike
tolls.
Cameras are now used
for traffic enforcement in 20
states, Washington, D.C., and
Canada. Tickets are mailed
to the owners of vehicles


captured on film. The next
big city to install them will
be Cleveland, Ohio, even
though a majority of resi-
dents oppose them.
According to the Cleve-
land Plain Dealer, Mayor
Jane Campbell will order
their installation sometime
after Nov. 15, a week after
she expects to be re-elected
to a second term. Her pri-
mary motivation is reported-


ly to close a $3.6 million
shortfall in the city's annual
budget.
Under Cleveland's new
five-year contract with
Dallas-based ACS, a com-
puter program will issue
tickets for up to $200 to the
owners of vehicles that run
red lights and annually gen-
erate an estimated $21 mil-
lion in new revenue for the
city.


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IVENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


i~


.









Venice Gondolier Sun




SPORTS


FRIDAY
SEPT. 30,2005


CONTACT US
CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
lewis@venicegondolier.com


A very important district game


CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


Halbert already

is in the house

If Venice High is looking for
in-house people to coach its -
teams, then the girls basket-
ball job should be a no-brain- ...
er. Gary Halbert is the lone
holdover assistant. He had a
very impressive string of years
coaching the Sarasota High
girls, including two state run-
nerup teams. If Venice wants a
winner, then it shouldn't shave
"Hair" from its list.

Looking at the latest state .. '. :
football rankings, we notice ;:. ... .." .'
Port Charlotte received some .
votes and are ranked 13th in Tight end ya silevskiy catcl
Class 5A., Tight end Ilya Vasilevskiy catc
Seems some folks out there by a Booker High School defend
are impressed by the Pirates 4- Venice travels to Manat
1 record. My question to those
voters are who has Port Class 5A District 11
Charlotte beaten? Let's see -
Bayshore, DeSotb, North Port BY CLAUDE LEWIS
and Lemon Bay. SPORTS EDITOR
Nothing against the work
Ray Hixson and his staff have They don't get any bigger
put in, but you have to beat than this. At least this year,
ranked teams to get ranked. anyway.
If Venice had the same
schedule, the Indians could
easily be 4-1 instead of 1-4. M anate

The Venice Vikings semi-
pro football organization has
stepped up its preseason BY CLAUDE LEWIS
workout schedule. SPORTS EDITOR
Players now are condition-
ing at Wellfield on Tuesday, The Hurricanes didn't win
Thursday and Sunday even- it all, but 2000 was indeed a
ings. memorable year for Manatee
Part-owner Joe D'Angelo High football.
reports that the early response On the field, the Red and
has been impressive. White made it all the way to
"We have a lot more players the region final, where they
out than we have had in the fell to Venice, 24-21, in a most
past," he said. "We still invite memorable affair at Powell-
people to come out if they're Davis Stadium.
interested in playing." Following that game, long-
The season doesn't begin time coach Joe Kinnan
until the end of January. stepped off the field.
D'Angelo is trying to secure He was battling cancer and
scrimmage games in October, simply needed to take some
November and December. time off.
* Kinnan had coached ,21
It seems a hornet's nest has years in Bradenton, building
been stirred by my Sunday Manatee into a state power.
column when I mentioned He had compiled a remark-
former VHS football coach able 192-51 record.
Andy Siegal. I stated that he They even named the sta-
deserved some credit for help- dium after him.
ing build the foundation that
eventually led to the 2000 state Lady In di
championship season. Lady India
Siegal did help erase nega-
tive attitudes while he was
here. A winless program BY GARY BROWN
turned to victories. He did STAFF WRITER
coach some of the players
who starred on the 2000 team. Mistakes are a part of any
In no way did my column sport.
aim to detract from the hard When a team commits lots
work and progress that cur- of them, it's likely to lose.
rent coach Nick Coleman and When it doesn't commit
his staff made in 1999 and many, it probably will win.
2000 They set up the weight That was the way it was in the
program, work ethic and strat- Charlotte-Venice volleyball
egy that made the title all pos- match Tuesday night in Punta
sible. Gorda.
Coleman took the Indians Venice, 10-2 and ranked
to the state semifinals in 2002
and to the region finals in ,
2003. His record speaks for .:. ;;- .
itself.



STATE VOLLEYBALL POLL
CLASS 5A ,, : -, ', .
1.Tar, paPlar, 13-1) 110 '. .. .,/ ,'. K
2. West Boca t5-2) 96 W' ..' .. ,-** ,. g
3. St. Thomas Aquinas U10-2) 88
4. Venice 110-2) 74 ,
5 Lawton Chlles (12-21 59 *' ',. ..';' s-.
6. Gaine ville 92l 51 '
7, Lake Gibson (15-1) 50 ".-
8. Martin County 1 7-4) 20 ,.' .. ,
9. Fort Myers (12-31 19 '... , "
10. Sebastian R ier 113-1) 12 :. : ;- ... .
OTHERS RECEIVING VOTES- 'r.., .. : ..
East Lake (1 1-5)9
Tallahassee Lincoln 12-2)1 4.
Tallahassee Leon 19.2) 3,
Orange Park (14-01
2, Ga;nesville Eastside (10-3) 2.
Barron Collier l 1-2) 2,
Palm Harbor Universily 1.15-1.1 1,
Niceville (8-1) 1.
Venice High's freshman Eric D(
Tuesday. Venice matched up a


hes a pass as he is brought down
ider in last Friday's game.

ee to see who's on top in


Venice High's varsity foot-
ball team may only have a
record of 1-4, but that 1 is very
important.
The Indians are 1-0 in
Class 5A District 11. They will


play their second district
game Friday night at
Manatee, which is also 1-0.
The two are tied for first
place in the five-school dis-
trict. Port Charlotte is 0-0 in
district play and hosts 0-1
Lakewood Ranch Friday.
Charlotte is 0-1 in district
play.
The winner of Friday's
Venice-Manatee will be in
good shape for a playoff
berth.
The top two teams in each
district qualify for regional
playoffs. The district winner is
guaranteed a home game and
the runnerup hits the road for
its regional opener.
"It's an important game for
both sides," Venice coach
Nick Coleman said. "The win-
ner will be in the driver's
seat."
Manatee features a run-
ning back senior Chris
McNear who rushed for
233 yards and four touch-
downs last week against
Sarasota. He is 5-11, 180
pounds.
"He's athletic and he's a big
back," noticed Coleman.
McNear has rushed for
more than 100 yards in every
game except against Booker.
Manatee coach Joe Kinnan
said McNear will most likely
go the JUCO route.
"They do a good job.run-


SUN PHOTO BY JEFF TAVARES, JTAVARES@VENICEGONDOLIER.COM
Venice High School's wide receiver Austin Carter goes towards
the ball attempting to make a catch in VHS' loss to Booker
High School this past Friday.


ning the ball and mixing it
up," Coleman said. They'll
throw slants and go post."
Manatee has thrown the
ball less than Venice has this
season. The Indians are not
known as a throwing team.
However, opponents have
had success throwing against
Venice this season. Booker lit
up the Indians for 248 passing
yards last week.
Manatee is also blessed
with a big offensive line.
"They're a solid team,"
Coleman said. "They've dom-
inated their last two oppo-
nents (Lakewood Ranch and
Sarasota). The biggest things I


e's Kinnan glad to be back


Five years later, and
Kinnan has resurfaced as the
Manatee mentor. The cancer
is in remission and following
last week's 40-19 rout of previ-
ously unbeaten Sarasota, the
Hurricanes are on the up.
And once again, Kinnan
will coach Manatee in a game
of mammoth proportions
against Venice. The
Hurricanes play host to the
Indians at 7!30 p.m. Friday
night.
Both teams are 1-0 in Class
5A District 11 play. Plain and
simple, the winner will be in
the driver's seat for the district
title.
Kinnan admits he wasn't a
very good fan for four years.
"Once you're a coach, it's in
your blood," he said. "I went
to most of the home games. It
wasn't easy sitting up there. I
watched football on TV I was


a Monday morning quarter-
back."
Kinnan helped Charlie
Wells by doing some adminis-
trative-type work with the
PAL.
"It wasn't hands on," he
said. "It's not like coaching."
Now back in the flow,
Kinnan feels his Hurricanes
are about to hit stride.
. "We had a lot of work," he
said. "We had a new staff, a
new system both offensively
and defensively. We were
evaluating players, seeing
who should play where. None
of these kids were in school
when I was there in 2000. We
were four to six weeks behind
where I was used to being at
the time."
Offensive linemen moved
to defense and vice versa.
Other players were bounced
around. Finally, Kinnan and


ns beat Charlotte again


fourth in the Class 5A state
poll, played virtually flawless-
ly and took a 25-19, 25-16, 25-
14 victory over the host
Tarpons (10-4). Even though
the teams are Class 5A-
District 11 rivals, the match
didn't officially count in the
district standings because the
seedings for the tournament
have already been set.
"The difference tonight
from the first match (Venice
topped the Tarpons in five


games earlier this season)
was that they didn't make
many errors this time,"
Charlotte coach Nanci Daniel
said about the Indians. "In the
first match, we got a lot of
points off their serving errors.
That didn't happen tonight."
That, plus some strong
frontline play, was enough
for the Indians to win the
contest. Natalie Gaudreau
Please see CHARLOTTE 9A


IL


SUN PHOTOS BY JEFF TAVARES, jtavares@venicegondo
)bitsch lines up a putt at Jacaranda West Country Club on
against North Port and Lemon Bay.


his players feel settled.
Now comes what promises
to be a heavyweight slugfest
against Venice.
"Coach (Nick) Coleman
does a fine job and he runs a
fine program," Kinnan said.
"Venice has played a very
brutal schedule. They've
played people very well three
quarters. They've lost their
games in the fourth quarter."
Friday night is Manatee's
first home game since Aug.
26. It is also Manatee's
Homecoming.
Manatee is 2-2 overall. The
Hurricanes, lost to Southeast
and Booker and have beaten
Sarasota and Lakewood
Ranch. The Ranch win was in
district.
Like Venice, Manatee also
plays a tough non-district
slate with Kathleen and
Chaminade upcoming.


noticed about them is that
they eliminated their
turnovers against Sarasota."
Manatee turned the ball
over six times in a 31-0 loss to
Booker early in the season.
Venice has been stung by
crucial turnovers this season.
Ill-timed fumbles and inter-
ceptions have set up oppo-
nents with deciding drives
late in games.
Venice is led by the 1-2
running punch of Tony
Charles and Kiki Merzius.
Quarterback Matt Wickwire
hit tight end -Ilya Vasilevskiy
for his second TD pass of the
season last Friday.


VENICE HIGH,
VARSITY FOOTBALL
2005 SCHEDULE


AUG. 19
26
SEPT. 2-
9
16
23
30
OCT 7
14
21
28
NOV. 4


at Lemon Bay
at Lakeland
RIVERVIEW
at M. Pace
CHARLOTTE
BOOKER
at Manatee
at Sarasota
P. CHARLOTTE
at L Ranch
Oper
NAPLES


CLASS 5A DISTRICT 1
DISTRICT
W L
Venice I 0
Manatee 1 0
Pt. Charlotte 0 0
CharlotI e 0 1
Lakewvcod Ranch 0 1


W 35-19
L 7-35
L 19 20
L 1,4-34
W 20-13
L 14-43
7:30 p nm.
7.30 p m
7-30 p m
7:30 p.m.
7-30 pm.
1
OVERALL
W L
1 4
2 2
4 1
1 4
0 4


RESULTS, SEPT. 23
Booker 43, Venice 14
Port Charlotte 18. Lemon Bay 0
Fort M'ers 28. Charlotte 7
Manatee 40, Sarasota i9
Riven.iew 37, Lakewood Ranch 14
CLASS SA DISTRICT 1 I
SCHEDULE, SEPT. 30
Venice at Manatee. 7.30 p.m
Lakewood Ranch at Port Charlotte,
7:3,0 p.m


Lady Indians to play the best


CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


The Venice High varsity
volleyball team will compete
with some of the best teams
in Florida and then some in
the Berkeley Premier
Tournament, which will take
place Friday and Saturday at
the University of Tampa.
Venice, ranked No. 4 in
Class 5A, will open against the


fourth-ranked team in the
nation at 3 p.m. Friday. Winter
Park, which is No. 1 in 6A, fea-
tures Callie Rivers, the daugh-
ter of former NBA great Doc
Rivers.
Venice's second match in.
pool play will be at 6:20 p.m.
against Palm Harbor
University. The final pool
game will be at 8 a.m.
Saturday against Jacksonville-
Please see BEST, 9A


Dobitcsh low man for golfers


STAFF REPORT


Six strokes can mean a lot to
a high school golf team.
On Tuesday, the Venice High
boys shot a 150 and defeated
two opponents at Jacaranda
West
On Wednesday, the Indians
were up at 156, which spelled
two losses and a tie at Mission
Valley.
Lakewood Ranch (174)
burned up the course for a 147.
Naples (11-4) was second at 155.
Venice (11-7-1) and Charlotte
(7-9) each were at 156.
The low scorer for Venice was
Chris Dobitsch at 36. Jeremy
Hubai was next at 39. Eric
Dobitsch shot a 40. Bill Stevens
liercom shot a41.
Tying for low score at 34 were
Byron White of Lakewood


Ranch and Carson Weinard of
Naples.
The Venice boys will play in
two 18-hole tournaments in
three days. On Saturday, the
Indians are at the Lakewood
Ranch Invitational. Then on
Monday, there's the Donald
Ross Invitational.
The two events will lelp get
the team ready for the Oct 10
district tournament at Lake
Venice Golf Club.

The Venice boys junior varsi-
ty defeated St Stephens, 171-
216, Wednesday at Lake Venice.
The Indians are now 4-1.
Josh Ehrlich was low man for
Venice with a 41. Patrick
Sherman and Eric Beiling each
shot 43s. Brian Dean was at 44.
Mike Felix shot a 52 and David
Panfilwas at 54.














FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


I Caddyshack best golf movie ever


-"4-, -


PHOTO COURTESY OF JACK HUDSON
The Center for Sight 75-plus senior softball team recently returned from Texas as SPA champi-
ons. The locally based team won all six games in the national competition. Front from left are
Walt Provost, Ed Schultz, Ray Rogers, Jack Hudson, Fred Howard, Hugh Brotherton, Walt
Wacha, Bob Fuhrman; and back row Al Murray, Lowell Metheny, Ed Eyles, Chuck Ritchie and
Jose Merced.


Center for Sight victorious in tournament


Iwas talking with a friend the
other day about ideas for future
columns and the subject of the
"greatest golf movie ever" came
up. Now I'll be the first to admit
that I'm not a movie buff, how-
ever, I have seen quite afew golf-
related movies.
My friend was saying that his
favorite was "Dead Solid
Perfect" starring Randy Quaid.
The movie was released in 1988.
Its the story of a down on his
luck pro golfer. This seems to be
a popular premise and was also
the subject matter for "Tin Cup."
There have been many
movies about golf. Some serious,
and some light hearted.
Another film that comes to
mind is "Happy Gilmore," as
well as the already mentioned
films above.
There are also plenty of
serious films on the game, but
we'll leave that for another
column. My personal favorite
is the all time classic
"Caddyshack." The casting
was- phenomenal with
Rodney Dangerfield and Bill
Murray stealing the show. I'd


THE ZONE

be willing to bet' that more
lines from "Caddyshack" are
spoken aloud by players than
any other film.
The characters were also
spot on with Ted Knight as
Judge Smails, Chevy Chase as
TyWebb and loads of bit play-
ers who got thE funny lines.
The movie doesn't get enough
credit as far as I'm concerned
for just knocking the stereo-
typical golfer and country
club attitude right out of the
park.
Racist and religious atti-
tudes, good ole boys and, of


course, the obnoxious out-
sider were among the themes
of the movie.
"Caddyshack" also had its
share of sex, which most golf
courses these days are devoid
of. I'll never forget seeing
Lacey Underall get out of that
pool. By the way I was only
sixteen when "Caddyshack"
was released. Hmmmmm
Lacey. But I digress again. Of
all the characters in the movie
my absolute fave had to be
that little gopher. The way he
had Carl chasing him
reminds me of the plaintiff.
But like a true survivor, the
gopher prevails in the end.
The longer 1 sit here writ-
ing this the more hilarious
stuff I recall about the movie.
Spaulding, the spoiled
nephew of Judge Smails,
Danny Noonan, Doctor
Beeper and the incomparable
Rodney Dangerfield as Al
Czervik. Of course this is my
opinion and yours may be
different. But this is my col-
umn and I'll write what I
want. See ya.


CHARLOTTE frompage 8


STAFF REPORT

The Center for Sight senior
softball team was victorious
in : the SPA ., National
Tournament- played in Plano,
Texas, going a perfect 6-0 in
the 75 Major Division.
There were five -teams in
the bracket. Three. teams
withdrew from the event
because of Hurricane Rita.
The championship game
was a close one with Center
for Sight pulling out a 5-3 vic-
tory over the Texas Lone Stars.
Lowell Metheny was the win-


ning pitcher.
Center for Sight cruised in
is opener, 21-2, over Colorado
Scrap Iron. Jose Merced and
Hugh Brotherton led the
attack with four hits apiece.
Next up were the Red River
Rangers. CFS built a 14-1 lead
after two frames and coasted.
Bob Fuhrman and Walt
Provost had four hits each.
CFS then pounded
Louisville, Ky., 19-4. Chuck
Ritchie, Ed Eyles, Merced and
Provost paced the offensive
attack.
The fourth game saw CFS


withstand a challenge from
Texas Classic, 11-9. Ed
Schultz made a great defen-
sive play in the seventh
inning to insure the win.
In the rematch, CFS dou-
bled up Classic, 22-11, as
Schultz had two triples and a
home run. The locals came
back from an 8-1 deficit.
The tourney MVP was left
fielder Fred Howard.
Shortstop Ray Rogers earned
top defense. Merced was
named top offensive player.
Jack Hudson accepted
Manager of the Year honors.


had 11 kills and three blocks
to lead Venice. She had five of
her kills and one block in the
first game. Dana Dumas had
six service points for the win-
ners in that game.
Charlotte's Kat Godina had
five kills in the first game to
help keep the Tarpons close.
Kati Frohlich added two kills.
Charlotte cut the Indian lead
to 20-18, but the visitors fin-
ished with a rush for the win.
In the second game,
Charlotte stayed close to the


Indians, trailing just 15-13,
But Venice put on a spurt with
Dumas getting four service
points to take a 21-14 edge
and held on for the win.
Godina had three kills, while
Frohlich and Kari Foley each
had two for the Tarpons.
Brittany Fleming had four
service points, including an
ace, for Charlotte.
The third game was tied
at 8-8 before the Indians
pulled away for the victory.
Godina finished with 10 kills


for the Tarpons. Casey
Taylor had three kills for the
Indians.
"We played a methodical
game tonight," Indian coach
Brian Wheatley said. "We just
played one point at a time and
tried not to get involved with the
crowd atmosphere."
Venice will participate in
the Berkeley Prep Tourna-
ment Friday and Saturday,
opening with defending
State Class 6A champion
Winter Park.


Elks Soccer Shoot
The Elks Soccer Shoot will
take place at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday at Garbrandt Soccer
Complex off Pinebrook Road.
The event, sponsored by
Venice-Nokomis Lodge 1854,
is for boys and girls ages 13
and under. The winners will
move on to district competi-
tion-Oct. 9.
Shark's Tooth
Golf Tournament
The Venice High School
Foundation will host its
annual Shark's Tooth Golf
Tournament on Saturday,
Oct. 22. The tourney will be
held at Mission valley
Country Club. A shotgun start
will be at 1 p.m. There will be
separate flights for four-per-
son and mixed couples.
Dinner will be served after
play. The entry fee is $65 or


$75 after Oct. 20. Call Andy
Britton (408-8008) or Marty
Tarala (486-8686).
Faulkner Hitting Club
The Faulkner Hitting Club
will be unfolding over the
next several weeks at the
Venice High complex.
Ages 7-11 will meet on
Monday, Oct. 3, 10, 24. Ages
12 and up will meet on
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 11, 25. The
times are 5:30-7:30 p.m. The
, cost is $25 each night.
Contact Craig Faulkner at
412-3611.
VHS softball
golf tournament
The third annual Venice
High Softball Golf Tourna-
ment will take place on
Saturday, Oct. 15, with the
rain date Saturday, Oct. 22.
The shotgun start will be at


ive where you like. Love where you play.
Memberships
Now Available!
New, Larger Greens
Re-designed Golf Course
Active Social Program

() JACARANDA WEST
. (941) 493-5010S COUNTRY CLUB
Call for a personal tour. 1901 Jacaranda Boulevard in \enict


8:30 a.m.
It will be a four-man
scramble at Lake Venice Golf
Club. The cost is $60. It
includes 18 holes with cart,
continental breakfast, barbe-
cue lunch, beer and soft
drinks, range balls, raffle
prizes and cash awards.
Hole sponsorship is avail-
able for $50.
Mail checks to Venice High
Softball Boosters, PO. Box
774, Venice, 34284.


BEST from page 8

Bolles. There are 16 teams in Hough at USF as the Lady Bulls play West
the tourney, including Geor- Former VHS volleyball Virginia in a 2 p.m. start.
gia, Kentucky and Nevada in standout Lisa Hough will be Hough is a freshman starter
the event, at the USF "Corral" Saturday for the WVU Mountaineers.


,, U r i-- -._
" '* "' ," -^-,-,
, ,;-r';" ;'/
.- ,-


i1~R"4%


E ARE OPEN

NOT SOLD.
Drop By For Our Fall Special
"The Best Rates In Townh
I SPECIAL OCTOBER RATES
J 18 Holes Riding 2 for $22.00
|w. No Tee Times Required Exp. 10/31/05
107 Vie E Drv:e
Venice, FL3,292*493-000


VENICE CHRISTMAS
BOAT PARADE OF LIGHTS

SAT. DEC. 3, 2005, 6PM


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CHARLOTTE page









FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


1 OA VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Venice YMCA celebrates new construction


STAFF REPORT

The community is invited
to the South County Family
YMCA, Venice Branch, 701
Center Road, on Wednesday,
Oct. 5, at 11 a.m. for a ground-
breaking ceremony to cele-
brate the start of construction
on a new 55,000-square-foot
facility.
For more than 35 years, the
Venice YMCA has been serv-
ing children and families in
the community, and it is the
largest licensed child-care
provider in the area.
In 2004, the South County
Family YMCA provided more
than $350,000 in scholarship
assistance to families in need


for a variety of programs such
as pre-school, afterschool care,
summer camp, youth sports
and family memberships.
"The Venice YMCA is a
community hub: a safe, nur-
turing environment for kids,
families, and people of all ages
to come and enjoy," said Ken
Modzele wki, president and
CEO oM South County
Family 1w. "The new facili-
ty will not only allow us to'
expand our own programs
and services; it will also pro-
vide additional space for other
community organizations
such as Big Brothers, Big
Sisters, the American Cancer
Society, and the Sertoma
Speech Clinic."


The new 55,000-square-
foot facility will be built on the
Venice YMCA's 17-acre cam-
pus on Center Road, and is
scheduled for completion in
Fall 2006.
Plans include a new men-
toring center; new speech
clinic; cancer assistance pro-
gram; state-of-the-art fitness
center; whirlpool, sauna,
steam, and massage rooms;
aerobic and specialty workout
rooms; racquetball courts
with viewing area; lounge and
concession area; classrooms;
on-site childcare; and admin-
istrative offices.
For more information, con-
tact Modzelewski at 207-9622
or ken@veniceymca.org.


or kn~vnicemca or. PHTO COURTS F SUTH OUNY FAILYYMC


Diversity exhibit welcomes

submissions from the public


Brush-up Sarasota County day set for Oct. 22


STAFF REPORT

Embracing our Dif-
ferences: What it Means to
You?, an exhibit created by
the Sarasota-Manatee Arch
Family Holocaust Education
Center and the Florida Holo-
caust Museum, addresses
how diversity enriches our
lives, makes aware the need
for individuals to respect dif-
ferences in others' thoughts
and beliefs, and seeks to
actively reject prejudice and
hatred in order to enhance
our own freedom.
You are invited to submit a
simple quotation that will


accompany each work of art.
Share your thoughts, ideas,
personal experiences, or
hopes in 50 words or less. Be
creative, you may write a
poem or a one word quote.
The deadline for submis-
sion is Nov. 8. The quotes and
the art will be on display dur--
ing the entire month of April
2005 along Ba\front Park.
A submission forni and
directions canr be found at.
EmbracinigOurDifferences..
org.
You may direct questions'
to EmOurDifference.s@aol.
com or contact them at 928-
0567.


STAFF REPORT


The 14th annual Brush-Up
Sarasota County Day will be
held throughout Sarasota
County on Saturday, Oct. 22.
The community serice pro-
ject is being coordinated by
the Friendship Volunteer
Center and will involve 300)
volunteers who will paint as
many as 25 homes.
Homes are currently being
solicited for this project.
There is an application
process for inclusion in this
program, which includes the
following criteria:


* home must be owner-occu-
pied; owner must furnish
proof of ownership
* owner must show a need for
this service (elderly. infirm.
illness, physical limitations,
single parent, etc.), and;
* limited income
Homeowners selected will
have their honfe pressure-
cleaned before painting and
they will be allowed to choose
colors limited choices for
both the house and its trim.
However, if the pressure-
cleaning personnel deter-
mine pressure cleaning could
compromise the structure of


the house, the house will be
dropped from the project.
Teams also provide senices
such as home repairs, land-
scaping, tree trimming, brush
clearing, etc.
Applications for Brush-:
up Sarasota aredue by Oct. 1
and may be obtained by
writing: Tom Giles, Brush-
up coordinator, c/o
Friendship Volunteer
Center, 1750 17th St., Suite
B-i, Sarasota, 34234.
The Friendship volunteerr
Center is a program of Senior
Friendship Centers and pro-
vides volunteer placement for


more than 455 community
agencies; 2,800 volunteers
were placed in 2004.
Senior Friendship Centers
Inc. established in 1973, is a
nonprofit organization dedi-
cated to helping older adults
live %with dignity and inde-,
pendence in Sarasota,
DeSoto, Charlotte, Lee and
Collier counties. Funded in
part by state and federal
agencies, and support from
private foundations and indi-
vidual contribution, Senior
Friendship Centers serves
more than 10,000 older adults
annually.


LEGAL OTICES


NOTICE OF ACTION

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR SARASOTA
COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN RE
THE PETITION OF
-HE CITY OF SARASOTA.
FLORIDA
Case No. 2005-CA 005601-NC
Division "A"

FOR THE FORFEITURE OF:
SIX THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED
NINETY-FIVE DOLLARS
iS6.595.00) IN U.S. CURREN-
CY AND ONE (1) 1981 FORD F-
100 PICK UP TRUCK.
VIN TCFIOE33BNA54251
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
OR ENTITIES HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT.
TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIB-
ED.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action pursuant to the Florida
Contraband Forfeiture Act has
been filed by PETITIONER, on
the following property in Sara
sota County. Florida Six thou-
sand F.ve Hundred Ninety-Five
ana r no, 100 Dollars
(S6.595.001 In U.S Currency:
and one 111 1981 Ford F-100
Pick Up Truck. VIN P
TCFIOE33BNA54251: and you
are re qujred to serve a copy of
your written defenses. if any, to
it on Mark D. Singer, Esq.. PETI-
TIONER'S attorney, whose
address is 1 So School
Avenue, Suite 700, Sarasota,
Florida 34237.-on or before this
31st day of October 2005. and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before Service
on PETITIONER S ATTORNEY or
immediately thereafter: other.
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief


NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS OTHER NOTICES


(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
...I .;,r, l ,,, n._l.i; i. :l II,. lr..;. iln.Ia,'
'-:It I. -'i'J Ii Irr,'| r CilnrTni w lr,
Ir ,.,, r WITHIN THREE 13)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRS: PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ,
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO .FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733 702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE.
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (21
YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECE-
DENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
SEPTEMBER 30. 2005.
Personal Representative:
Linda A Severy
611 Coppeiline Dnce
Cnapel lill NC 27516
Attorney for Personal ,,
Representative.
Boone. Boone. Boone. Kods &
Frook. PA
P.O. Box 1596
O01 IAvenida Del Circo
Venice, Fl 34284
1941)488-6716
STEPHEN K. BOONE, ,ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 0371068
PUBLISH: September 30,
October 7, 2005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION


IN RE: ESTATE
EVELYN C. AR
Deceased
File No. 20(


Personal Representative: Deceased. Ab,.-d :- t..:it;d pr.:icr and ;.I
PATRICIA A SANTOS Ili ,ii,... r:oi,,il pr.,nr i'..'"
O1101 Bihopnood Court File No. 2005-CP-008922-SC 1.1; ir... ...1.:..,i i..i.riur a.-
Venice, FL 34293 Division: PROBATE .,: ...;, An i.er ,.i:,. .. 1r-w.. :
Attorney for Personal NOTICE TO CREDITORS i..,:c .r,:,oert, ,Ta ', ;i T n hear-
Representative: The .al,-,''" n r i' i i, I "qr1.1 I .li,: .:' ,, ,:, cI, r,,' . ,operty
Annene Z.P Ross BARBARA ANN HOULE. ., .:..,nii.:1.in ,, -oberi C'..r: Assis-
Attorney for PATRICIA A. '" ,, ,'I hO J t 01 .,1 11" l t o rr.., ',...,i r ffl OF
SANTOS --.: January 19. 2005 .. (-1 i 4 ,Vi '5in TH[-f;tL, .501
Florida Bar No. 0141259 '' n: l. r.: .r.:uii ..:.,urt .lor Sara.o- East Kennedy. Boulevard, Suite
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. tL '3". r. F'r .,- Fr,:,)[ P I ,. "-' 1100, Ti,.i Fl. ? ?i0)2-5242. A
Suite 351 sion, the address of which is P.O. Petition I.r f,., i.iursi has been
Venice, Florida 34285 Box 3079, Sarasota, FL 34230- .- ,,, n,. il,,:,. :,: ,:,u, Tr,,e
(941) 480-1948 .3079. The names and addresses .r,d ,,. ui or, -" r,., .ius, :i A:rI
PUBLISH: September 23, 30, of the p:'r :.co r..-.,.eI ,,- ',,, ;'-,,i'.. -,-, l,-, ,,,, '. r '. it F...i...h
2005 the per!,..i ri r:,e i a" w : "in.:.r 1O' P F.r,tt- Cause. If there is no
ney are set torn below. response by claimants, the
All creditors of decedent and other DEPARTMENT will seek a Final
S demands against decedent's esta- Order Of Forfeiture.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR teon whom a copy of this notice,
SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA must file their claims with this court PUBLISH: September 30, Octo-
PROBATE DIVISION WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE ber 7, 2005
PROBATE DIVISION (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
i,] F'_TATE '', f THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)1 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AD
CRESCENZO A CHIERCHIA. DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER- FOR THE TWELFIH
a k a JIM CHIERCHIA. E VICE OF A COPY OF THIS JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Deceased. : NOTICE ON THEM. IN AND FOR SARASOTA
,ll1 i,:,l,, ., ,,r- a ir,1 i,, ,.r,,-,J ',,i COUNTY FLORIDA
File No 2005-CP-008310 NC .,, ,:, r- ,: ,:i,,.
,r .j. a",i ,n'.. Er, ,1j,.1,-,r : THOMAS ELLIS AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS :C,,i ,T,u hi, ir.,, (1ir: .-,-,I JEANEnE ELLIS.
The ,7... ri,,:,r .:. .:.I ir. e: : ...:,u WITHIN THREE (31 PLAINTIFFS
CRESCENZO A. CHIERCHIA. MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
a/k,a JIM CHIERCHIA. THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF Case No: 2005 A008824NC
,J-.:a .l i,.r,.:,:e~ .1,3ii'.- ,'i -,ir. THIS NOTICE
..: August 1, 2005...r.,-,: ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED VS.
F,:,,,i C.,u.r,, Ilusnt--r 151-10- WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
4722. ,. lr,,, ii ,,, r,, ,,:, FORTH IN SECTION 733 702 OF SCOTT MICHAEL PETZ.
.:,, i ,:,r SARASOTA .u,'r, ,. THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE SKOT M. PETZ. a single man.
..J I-,,t., [.,,.,.,,, Ir, Ie nile::,:i WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. BANC ONE FtilANCIAL
which is P.O. Box 3079, Saraso- NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME SERVICES. INC.
ta. FL 34230-3079 Tht. .jm, PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE. LIEBEL C WILLIAMS.
--j ,i, C Cr ,.Ju' r ANY CLAM FILED TWO 121 KEITH C AND SANDRAJ
e'~ l, i l,- r..ri, pe YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECE- WHITLOCK.
sentative's attorney are set forth DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS WILLIAM LIEBEL.
below. BARRED. STEVE E. LIEBEL
bTHE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC. VERONICA AND ERICK
All creditors of the decedent and CATION OF THIS NOTICE IS BARFIELD.
ohr .I..erso hae indecedlt and September 23. 2005 THE BOARD OF COUNTY
OMSIFIS C0UNY


E OF dem.ia d:.J ;,,: i ,J,: ed.-ri ; :- i
R M S T R O N G ., ,,,r- "" . ,ip In' ro ll. .'
i-.'ul-,1 I-,,e .ered m u .r hil ir.eIo r
.li : .n i r,,:... :,,uri WITHIN THE
05-CP-008902 NC LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
Division: Probate THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30


demanded in the complani NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Dated September 26. 2005. EVELYN C ARMSTRONG.
KAREN E RUSHING. 1 20-, 200 .
CLERK-OF THE CIRCUIT irr. ',r.,:, ,ui i.,:,r SARASOTA
COURT-SARASOTA ,,,',r, ir-,,, ,,i- ",',,
P.O. Box 3079 ,r, n,,1r.. : ,i ...,,-r, ,: P.O. Box
Sarasota. FLoriaa 34230 3079 Sarasota. Florida 34230-
3079. Tr, ijr.t ran.1 i.j.Hre .:
By Darlene Scheel A, r, i,- .r.,,:,i .. : di,i-. '",,]
Deputy Clerk ir, c -rr,ni -,l ,, in.,
PUBLISH: All .:rt61,.i,r ,,i ire ,. e.-', aa,,
SEPTEMBER 30. 2005 .r ,,: i ,- .an':or
OCTOBER 7. 2005 .
'*i' ir. ,t h I" .' :,' r t.'id iT ,J l I rII. J'.ir
NOTICE TO CREDITORS i'n' ..i..,:.::.,.r WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
PROBATE DIVISION DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
IN RE; ESTATE OF NOTICE ON THEM.
JOHN E. ANSTENSEN, All other creditors of the decedent
Deceased. and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
File No. 2005-CP-9266-SC estate must file their claims with
Division: PROBATE this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
j NOTICE TO CREDITORS PUBLICATION OF A COPY OF
The administration of the estate of THIS NOTICE.
JOHN E. ANSTENSEN, ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
deceased, whose date of death WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
was March 29, 2005, is pending FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
in the Circuit Court for Sarasota THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
County, Florida, Probate Division, WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
the address of which is P.O. Box NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
3079, Sarasota, FL 34230- PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
3079. The names and addresses ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
of the personal representative and YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
the personal representative's attor- DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
ney are set forth below. IS BARRED. '
All creditors of decedent and other THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
demands against decedent's esta- TION OF THIS NOTICE IS SEP-
teon whom a copy of this notice, TEMBER 23, 2005.
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE


UM"ATER"HK IE1 M liMO UI" F
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM
All ,l1h i ,: hli -.j. ,: I1" I ,l.,. _. cd ir


WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWiTHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE.
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO 121
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED
Th, 'J .I, r -i r Ic. .Iu jl,: 1.r <,. ,t tlr
i,: SEPTEMBER 30, 2005.
t Personal Representative:
JAMES CHURCH
13516 Via Santa Catalina
Sylmar, CA 91342
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JEAN M. FINKS, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 843776
126 E. Olympia Avenue
Suite 408
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Telephone: (941)-575-5140
PUBLISH: September 30, Octo-
ber 7, 2005

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE; ESTATE OF
BARARA ANN HOULE,


Personal Representative
DARYL A HOULE. SR.
420 North State Street
Concord, NH 03301
Attorney for Personal
Representative:,
Boone, Boone, Boone, Koda &
Frook, P.A.
P.O. Box 1596
1001 Avenida Del Circb
Venice, Fl 34284
(941) 488-6716 .
Margaret S. Frook, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 115800
PUBLISH: September 23, 30,
2005


OTHER NOTICES


COMMISSIONERS OF
SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA,
CODE ENFORCEMENT SPECIAL
MASTER OF SARASOTA
COUNT', FLORIDA
UNKNOWN SPOUSEISI OF ANY
ABOVE NAMED PARTY.
UNKNOWN TENANT #1 AND
UNKNOWN TENANT 12.
DEFENDANTS
OUIET TITLE PETITION

rO MF NOW THE PETITIONEPS
THI L.,.i I- LI: ,1 ,L FiJ! iC Il Ti-
E- IL i l, j l:: 'Ui-) I : f : ,'i1. I- u l ':
1 r, lnlr :,.- v o,,1 nlvl TI-n,: t,,'h l,,),', I ,r
I j, ..If .
F : as f:1


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF I T',, 1'5.li I,.I 1
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL ''., .u.,', I, i *l, r, lr .-. I i,.
CIRCUIT 1 i alaIs.
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF Tr ir. rl tor .-1,,,.,"
SARASOTA, STATE OF FLORIDA -:u'. I.- ,r.r, h.,. -,
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF legal description is LOT 13 AND'
1991 BUICK CENTURY LOT 15, BLOCK E, GREER'S ADDI-
SPECIAL SEDAN TION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
VIN3AL54NM5604190 PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
VIN: 3G4AL54N2M5604190 PLAT BOOK 1, : Ai 199W I THE
Cae No.: 2005-CA-3833-NC PUBLIC RECORDS OF SARASOTA
Case No.: 2005-CA-3833-NC COUNTY, FLORIDA. The mailing
address of the property is 412
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE Howell Place, Sarasota, Florida
PROCEEDINGS 34232. The parcel ID number is
0044-10-0055.
TO: ANY ANY ANDALL PERSONS WHO 3. The petitioners are the owners
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE FOL -
CLOIMNG ERESONAL R of the real estate known as Lot 13
LOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY: and Lot 15 having acquired title
1991 BUICK CENTURY through tax deeds as well as quit
1991 BUICK CENTURY claim deeds from the prior owners.
SPECIAL SEDAN 4. The petitioners are considering
VIN: G4AL54N2M560419 the sale of the real estate to anoth-
NOT I givn pr to er person and wish to transfer a
NOTICE IS given pursuant to Fla warrantable title to the purchasers
Stat. 932.704(6)(a) and Chapter and obtain title insurance on the
50, that the STATE OF FLORIDA, property but are unable to do so
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAY SAFE- without this Court entering an order
TY AND MOTOR VEHICLES Quieting Title in the Petitioners.
(DEPARTMENT), through its Divi- 5. The Plaintiff's would show the
sion, The Florida Highway Patrol, Court that they have Title by,right
on or about 28th day of March, of Tax Deed and therefore pursuant
2005, in the County of Saraso- to F.S. 65.081 are not required to
ta, State of Florida, seized the


OTHER NOTICES OTHER NOTICES OTHER NOTICES OTH
':.I.... L:.i.-.ilip. .. i -:. i ;-: .. latches or estoppel. 3:: ::-i .u i :u r r IL r., L i ,si e,.r.
i:: Tin Tb. I .)' ,Ia'e '":,'u 12. The Petitioners would show .- .: ::,, ,.m-:.il.i, .. f," (.-el
,, et. e an :r, -,i :,: ;.-.,T p .. the Court that the interests of iai-.l I.... TI:,I 1 ''9'' rre.: Or i ri ]iJ'.
S .l,,c i l a,,,: I hn ,:,ri:,~~-., j ,, r ,e, W ILLIA M LIE B EL are inferio r to :.l . .iu, TI-,,,n] B | J ,w' ; .,:,;i Ir,, .,
ence herein, petitioners, were not attached to r. tni. F.:.:..rj :. 1 1a:.. 1 1 i11 in.'uld
6. The Plaintiff's would show the the real estate, j.':. :i ,. i, ti: r..u.. .r fi ..,.ia a,, : r.I. : I : o.Ir.,.l.r
court that they are in possession of property, were ri.,-:.,-.. .-,, vi,,,- u.:.j t., ri.,r I ir.T '!.l..:, ir, re~,i e:i
the property. guished as to this s-r, berr, by the "A,:i.. r .:., F.- u. l, '0 :.r.[. r,
T ,lh Fi'-ll.n,:.,ii. ....jl,1 !h .. i i j. ,j1 ,-,l : l ,..r .h,.,Id be "-,:,j,, i: lri, |uTI rl i;u,:r.ej i:
..:.,u rl 1:ltl .li.:I,,'I f,:r: ijrr III,,I,) j ,,. :,.. r,:,T n.,,r i /by the nX ..'i-Jc. ,,- II' 'lil,.l 1 deed
,. i,,, 1srl r,1 f l:l ,Ui Iif_-la remedy of Fil.h.: T.-r i.:.il '-.:.:,r: '.::,i'i:..i' Lunr h.,l r-,T,,-,',b Ir,
:l.,.m ,J I.: .' re I H' lh, ,,pro' i, I, ',', r, ,, Iurirn:.:,j,',-, ] ,I. I:.: 4 1 r T e,
.:. '.r...,: l. el-1 n i nr,. r.:. I The Petitioners would show I '. i. ',1 .. .. ,,I.- li e. t., 1:.-
Barfield on January 24, 2003 and the Court that the interests of Satisfaction and Release of Code
that he has no further interest in the STEVE E.. LIEBEL are inferior to ENi.:r,:.:,T,tl ..-.-, ,.. r..,:,:,r.-d t, Wrere.r :.r-r
property. The Quit Claim Deed is petitioners, were not attached to c',,:uTV., i',, i',= ub,.., ri,:.:',r,: ,, ri.,A-:i ire
attached hereto as exhibit 2 and r. -' -:i .: I. j:, ,.:. .-- = ,Li, I tr a i':r : u .,:-.i ,.,-"'r, Flor,: ,..., r. .iiue ,, ri
incorporated by reference herein. ;:.r , rr '. ,e el" :. i r 1 4 .'-i o ,n ,..r ,. tut h,':.,r1e'l L ''i
8. The Petitioner's would show the guished as to this property bythe li.: ,'.:r.i 'td,.:ur..r; ..r.:r,. jre .i i.:, i.:
Court that Veronica Barfield and tax deed sale or should, be rr. i..d hrrr-i. j,, ..:.. ,c...rr.-3 .,,:.i:,er ,ii ir
,Erick Barfield quit claimed their removed from tin: :.,...:.-rr t., li by reference herein,
interest in the property to Thomas legal remedy of latches or estop- 17. The Petitioners would show Bruce G.
EI,: i.,0 e-a., crr iil ir.e .h i,,.,, el., the Court that the interests of 0743925)
.:r- ... ir, r :,i,-i :':o :,, f .-Iu I The Pil-_h ,1,,,, .,...i Ih l.lH i d:H, H ..IL ,I f I IIu .: A j,e
ir, 4 ."l ,, a.-,'il,., .i ,,,:, the Court -r.l .ii-,.ia,,,l_.r. .1:: ,:,1 "',).l lpl4f,1, lT m, en, 7,lir,,4.r I a.tj4 ,';t^
Ilur r ,,r ir ; I r. lf.: r r.,'lrr, Tl h, VERONICA /r 'il f' EI ilblh,',,' .Er ,i I,'la ,.:5 r, ] :, w l. l r

. [E.iriii 3 5i '.i .:.. ii :..,r[ t.1, .,in i r.l ir. I ii n.iv, .. '..r property, were released or extih- (727) 536-1
r,,,,: r-,- apply to this property, were guished ras to this property by the
ir ,lh.,:, ,-r: ..:uI.) :rI,:., iI- released or extinguished as to this tax deed sale or should b, PUBLISH:
,:,ui i, I ,l -I,,: ...i ,.. '.: property by the tax deed sale or removed'from this ::.'.:,l-,rr 1:, ir- 2005
F,,,,,',:, .r,.::h-,. ,,' : ,a: ,'r,, should be removed from this prop- legal remedy of latches or estop-
,-ur: ,r.l .iir, i,., T_ i,.-._ ir ,. i.:, erty by the legal remedy of latches pel., .
a. 0,r.1.j.i-i W,,.:,, 1" i ih.hr I ,,1 I or estoppel., 18. The Petitioners would show .
irerwi,.,rc ba.-.: <," '. i'.',r.)i :.:, 15. The Petitioners would show the Court that the interests of
.... 1.1: i,.:. ii ..i'.. n,..- i the Court that the interests of THE UNKNOWN TENANT #1 are inferior
1.- iro, ir, BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION- to petitioner's, were not attached to
lu Thr, I- :,i ,:,, ,.. :,. ERS OF SARASOTA COUNTY, the real estate, .:. ....:. i ,:, ii,: ] A d ,
ir L .. :.u i ii i i iii : ,-,i FLORIDA in case number C9re 091. :0 ie t i ,:r ,i' A d
LiI'EL ': vi,'l,.: j,: ,...i...:,r I,:. dated November 29, 1999, case guished as to this property by the The C
-.=.hi,,.,,-,,i: ,,, ,:r*-. ., i number CMV2000-01874 dated tax deed sale or should be ITh6(
:li .i .'-:iil- ., -.,ide j...I., 11..; October 11, 2000 and case num- removed from this property by the
,'-r.:- ir,'- i. r ,. b:,''I ber N980413 dated March 1,
', 1r,. -J 3; .' this property by the I': r., ,i..,I,.1 j,,_.i r.,'.-i.,i
I d-:i : .le or should be ..: .i L', .:Irui,,t r...
r.-,.,,edo I.:r... his property by the -, -:"'- 'l .li-,.....i 14 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR CON
.iil r oini,-., .of latches or estop- .," ii, ,l ed Au',l CITY OF VENICE COMPREHENSIVE PL
,l I, 1, '",.' ~"'I ".n '?? 05.15CP. ORDINANCE NO. 2'
I I The i..i-,tioners would show respectively. See attached public
ir., i.r.url i,)t the interests of records attached hereto and incor- NOTICE i hereby given that the City C(
iFTHt 'Hll- SANDRA J. WHIT- porated by reference herein, Venice Florida* ill hold a public hearing bi
L.X .,'. -ilerior to petitioners, 16. The Petitioners would show or 5norlly thereafter on Ine Ilth day of Oct
.ri ..l attached to the real the Court that the interests of cil Crambers City Hall 401 West Venice A
l. il1,-: not apply to this proper- CODE ENFORCEMENT SPECIAL da Ihe purpose of inr hearing i to obtain
t, .vert. rI. ,:e,: or extinguished MASTER OF SARASOTA COUNTY, 'ollowing proposed Ordinance
: [. l.: ,IN : ,-/ by the tax deed FLORIDA in case number 99-219
:.l .: bn :.ijhi I.e removed from which were recorded as lien Ar nOniRMArCEc O TEC (ITV Ec NICEI.I I


this property by the legal remedy of

CITY OF VENICE
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF VENICE PLAN-
NING COMMISSION WILL HOLDA PUBLIC HEARING ON TUES-
DAY, OCTOBER 18, 2005 AT 1:30 P.M., IN CirY HALL COUNCIL
CHAMBERS, 401 WEST VENICE AVENUE, VENICE, FLORIDA TO
CONSIDER REZONE PETITION NO. 05-8RZ.
To rezone the property as follows:'
FROM: County OUE-1
TO: Planned Industrial Development (PID)
or lo such other Zoning District as the City Council of Venice,
Florida, s.hall deem appropriate.
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY-
9.9 acres
Gene Green Road, East of Knights Trail Rbad
Parcel No: 0365-00-2001
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Venice
Planning Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting will need a record of the proceedings and, for such
purpose, may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
All Interested parties are invited to appear and be heard. Plans
and/or details are available for public inspection at the Planning
& Zoning Department, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, FL
34285. Written comments filed with the Planning Commission
(c/o Planning.& Zoning Department at the above address) will
be heard and considered. This public hearing may be contin-
ued from time to time.

IF YOU ARE DISABLED AND NEED ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CON-
TACT THE PLANNING & ZONING DEPARTMENT AT LEAST 24
HOURS PRIOR TO THE MEETING. (486-2626, EXT. 2043)

PUBLISH: SEPTEMBER 30, 2005


HER NOTICES

j, :i iulches orestop-
Tir, iFtitioners would
,.,ur Irji Iht, i%- "-ir ,',f
nTtrr ljT i n n, ..- ,.i ,'.:.r
r : not attached to
are di, not apply to this
-,re ,clased or extin-
Silrh.: property by the
;i is or should be
:ir.. .: property by the
:, ,:,. imiches or estop-

ire Crii.r.,-, r .o :u
i' ,,jt[ [," .'li 1' .:.r .,
le I.:. ITI 1.j .:.,,,E ,,i .
r i rt. : : s .-
' Lr ,T,., : ,. :

Kaufmann, J.D. (FBN
iulT'.i,.1 .1 L' P.A.


6696 Facsimile

September 23, 30,


vertise in
Classified!



NSIDERATION OF
AN AMENDMENT
005-44
council of the City of
'ginning at L:30 p.m
tober. 2005 in Coun
Avenue. Venice. Flon
public input upon the

FL1 ORIDA AMENDING


THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FOR THE CITY OF VENICE DESIGNATING 91 AUBURN ROAD, THE
VENICE SHRINE CLUB AS INSTITUTIONAL/PROFESSIONAL";
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Purpose of Orainance' To amend the Future Land Use Map for
property as foliocs

The 5" acre property more particularly described as:
Tract.1 of the unrecorded plat of KENT ACRES, more particu-
larly described as follows The East 337 feet of the North 726
feel of that part of Section 9. Townsh;p 39 South. Range 19
EaEr, Sarasota County. Florida. lyng South of the existing right-
of-cay or Venice Avenue East. less the East 33 feet thereof shall
be designated as institutionall. .'Professional'

A second public hearing upon this matter will be held at 1 30
p.m or shortly thereafter on October 25. 2005. in Council
Chambers City Hall 401 West Venice Avenue. Venice. Florida
Tne City of Venice Cooe of Ordinances may be viewed online at
www.mulicode.com select "Online Library", select "Florida",
select "Venice Code of Ordinances .
This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section
166.041(3)(c) Florida Statutes. A complete draft of the pro-
posed Ordinance Is on file in the Office of the City Clerk for
inspection by the public between the hours of 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
This public hearing may be continued from time to time.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be respon-
sible for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evi-
lence at this meeting upon which any appeal is to be based.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. Writ-
ten comment filed with the City Clerk at the above address will
be heard and considered.

f you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the City
Clerk's office at least 24 hours prior to the meeting.
/s/Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk
PUBLISH: September 30, 2005


PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH COUNTY FAMILY YMCA


.


'






FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


Lpav1l' ly la Io 4k' 41,


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Join Us As We Continue Celebrating The Grand
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tOffer is subject to credit approval by Monogram Credit Card Bank of Georgia. Payment of sales tax upon purchase. 25% down payment required on special order merchandise. Applies to any purchase made on a MCCBG consumer credit card account. Minimum purchase of $400, maximum purchase $25,000. No finances charges assessed
on the promotional purchase amount (excluding optional insurance charges) if you pay this amount in full by the payment due date as shown on your 15th billing statement. If you do not, finance char ges will be assessed on the promotional purchase amount from the date of delivery. Minimum monthly payments are required during the
promotional period. If minimum monthly payments are not paid when due, all special promotional terms may be terminated. Standard account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends, to your promotion purchases. Variable APR Is 21.98% as of 6/16/03. Fixed APR of 24.75% applies If payment is more than 30 days
past due. (In PR, fixed APR is 22.98%) Minimum finance charge is.$1, if applicable. Prior sales excluded. "Retail Or Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Pricing. Baer's Never Sells At Retail Or Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Pricing. Excludes Rugs And Bed Linens Plus Fair
Traded Items Marked At Our Lowest Price Possible "On In-Stock Items. Ask Store Personnel For Details. Design License #1BC000503


ii


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11A






FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


12A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Venice High students inducted into Honor Society


BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER


The names of 58 Venice
High students were added to
the National Honor Society
registry Thursday evening.
The NHS Induction ceremony
honored the students not only
for their scholastic achieve-
ment, but for their leadership
and service to the community,
as well as good character.
NHS members are required
to achieve an unweighted 3.5
Grade Point Average, or a 4.0
weighted GPA.
"That gets them in the
door. But it's the community
service that sets them apart,"
said Marilyn Ruthardt, NHS
advisor. Ruthardt teaches
Spanish at the high school
and has taught French and
Italian.
"It was a chance to recog-
nize these wonderful students
for their commitment to
excellence," said Candace
Millington, Venice High prin-
cipal. "They have set goals in
the areas of academic
achievement and community
service and achieved those
goals. They are role models
and leaders. We are very proud
of them. They are the best of
the best."


The Tortoise
Swim coach Danielle
Tanaka was chosen by NHS
members at the school to be
keynote speaker for the induc-
tion. A former Venice High
student and current VHS
teacher, Tanaka is a go-getter
who shared her own story of
overcoming hurdles while she
was a child growing up.
Diagnosed in second grade
with a severe learning disor-
der, Tanaka's parents were told
she may never be able to read.
Unwilling to accept that
outcome, her parents, Don
and Denise Fisher, moved
from Ohio when Danielle was
8 years old, and reenrolled her
in public school, conveniently
misplacing transcripts that
might have labeled their
daughter with a learning defi-
ciency.
Over the years, the Fishers
pushed their daughter in
many ways to overcome her'
reading difficulties through
rote memory tasks and made
games out of things like read-
ing street signs aloud. They
enrolled her in swim clubs
and challenged her to excel.
She earned the nickname
. 'The Tortoise' from her father
for her perseverance and abil-
ity to overcome and excel.


When Tanaka came home
one day after swim practice
(she was team captain) during
her senior year in high school,
she announced to her mother
that her peers chose her to be
student president of the
Venice High School National
Honor Society.
Only then, after her mother
burst into tears, did she first
hear of her learning disability.
Tanaka was one of the top
breaststrokes in the state
when she swam at VHS in the
late '80s. She earned a full
scholarship to UConn and
excelled four years for the
Huskies, where she studied
criminal justice. Tanaka went
on to become a seven-time
New England champion in the
breaststroke. Later she re-
turned to Venice as director of
the Rotary Futures Program
before accepting a position
teaching psychology and soci-
ology at Venice High.
"I had to work twice as hard
to do well," Tanaka said. "I got
additional tutoring at UConn,
used a note-taker at classes,
and rewrote my notes over
two or three times until I
learned it. When everyone
went out to have a good time,
I was in my room or at the
library studying." Tanaka said.


"It taught me that no mat-
ter what the obstacle, you can
succeed," Tanaka said. "It also
taught me the greatest
achievements were also the
hardest to work for. It's my
message for our students.
They can excel at anything
they put their mind to."
NHS
To maintain membership
in NHS, students are required
to maintain a 3.5 GPA and
participate in individual and
group service projects,
including performing 20
hours of community service
during this school year by
April 6, 2006. This is in addi-
tion to the 75 hours of com-
pleted community service
approved and accepted by the
Volunteer Connections
(Bright Futures) service pro-
grams already accepted by
NHS membership.
The National Honor
Society was founded in 1921
by the National Association
of Secondary' School Pri-
ncipals (NASSP) to create an
organization that would rec-
ognize and encourage acad-
emic achievement while
developing characteristics
essential to citizens in a
democracy.


INDUCTEES OF 2005 VENICE HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY


Alissa Arbuckle
Jennifer Leigh Brower
Janelle Burns
Mallory Burns
Meghan Cassin
Neil Alexander Collison
Kristina Corcoran
Angela Elise Dacey
Carmen Michael Delle Donne
Kara DelPuppa
Kimberly Dinh
Elizabeth Eng
Joseph Estep
Latimer Farr
Amber Rae Fitchenburg
Nicholas James Gissal


Ashley Ann Graf
Kelsey Greenfield
Juliana Lee Groff
Cecelia Hagan
Kyle Tagen
Natchez Hanson
Tara Hart
Hoan Huyn
Michael James
Molly Jansen
Genna Jones
Leslie Ann King
Marta Kowalik
Samantha LaMotte
Julie Ann McCay
Alexandra Mottern


Megan Murphy
Brett Nelson
Samantha Oakes
Amanda Pasik
Trevor Lawrence Pelletier
Victoria Ann Pinney
Elizabeth Pomiak
Matthew Remo
Daniel Guillermo Saavedra
Danielle Sanchez
John Wade Schifferli
Allison Seador
Lindsay Steinmetz
Katherine Nicole Stone
Taryn Taylor
Khang Tran


Carla V. Valor
Myers VanFossen
Michael Voss
Taylor West
Nicole Whalen
Kornwalee Wiangkham
Sarah Elizabeth Wilcox
Tim Wolfinger'
Lindsay Yarabek
Emily Jane Young
Samantha Young



National Honor Society
Sponsor: Mrs. Marilyn Ruthardt


SUN PHOTO BY JEFF TAVARES, jtavares@venicegondolier.com
Venice High School's Swim coach Danielle Tanaka was the
keynote speaker at Thursday night's National Honor Society
Induction ceremony. Tanaka gave an emotional speech
recounting her days as a student after being diagnosed with a
severe learning disorder.

Richard Bradway & Associates is pleased 10
announce the addition of Barbel "Bobbie"
Burton to our growing staff of associates.
Bobbie was born in Dusseldorf, Germany
but was raised in the San Francisco Bay
.. .I^K area. Upon moving to Venice 20 years ago,
Bobbie Burton worked for a large securities
firm and later for a national real estate
company. As a result of Bobbie's exposure
to the Venice area real estate market she
decided to become licensed in a profession
she has grown to admire. Bobbie's
background displays strong attention to
detail and a friendly, easy manner -- a
perfect personality for the enthusiasm and
commitment needed to find the house of
BARBEL "BOBBIE" your dreams. Bobbie can be reached by
BURTON calling her cellular, (941) 223-7187.

Office: 412-323 ARichard Bradway
Cell: 223-7187 &,
|.* U & Assoeiies. I-. Reahors.


MAUN'AENAINCE-FIREE LIVING]


I-WATERPROIN LIVIANG


,OS .&LAND


I ISL,~tANDOVNC


_[ S SF R E LIVNG'


[NEIGHBI.ORHsODeVrn









EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
13A
FRIDAY
SEPT.30,2005


OUR VIEW




The less we use, the less we really need


he supply.of fuel has changed dramati-
cally since World War II, when automo-
bile owners valued the letter stamped
to their windshields. Though the letter indi-
cated how much gasoline you could buy
each week, conservation was seen as a patri-
a otic act.
Now, 60 years later, there is a list of rea-
sons why fuel should be used sparingly.
Yes, we're fighting another war. But, also the
price of oil is becoming so expensive that
using it the way we have in the past doesn't
make economic sense not for our country
and not for our families.
And, because of Hurricanes Katrina and
Rita, the refineries aren't as available as they


were just a few months ago.
So, we turn again, as we did 60 years ago,
to conservation.;
Last week, Florida Power and Light did
something companies don't often do: It
asked its customers to use less of its product.
FP&L's plea is to reduce our use of energy for
the next few weeks. But once we get into a
new way of life, perhaps we can all do what
we should have been doing for several years.
We've long known that it would help con-
serve fuel if we'd just turn up the thermostat
a few degrees in the warm months. Now's the
time. Whatever you're used to, try living with
your home just a little warmer.
As long as your pets are OK, try turning off


your air conditioning when you're away from
home for an extended time.
Just a few years ago, there was a move to
turn off lights when they're not needed. Now
is the time to do that again. During the day,
use drapes, curtains, shades and blinds to
help keep your home cooler.
Will your clothes and dishes get just as
clean if you use cold water? Try it and see.
And wait until your dishwasher and clothes
washer are filled before you hit the "on"
button.
Try to consolidate your errands so that
you can make several trips in your car for the
price of one.
We know if you drive a consistent speed


on the highway, you won't use as much gaso-
line as you would when you make quick
starts and sudden stops.
We also know that we use more gasoline
when we drive faster. We're not sure what
"slower" means, but we all could probably
try it.
Carrying around some extra poundage in
the trunk of your car? Unload it. That might
include your golf clubs, too. .
We know our cars work more efficiently if
we have routine maintenance performed.
We just routinely have to think about it.
The best part: None of this is required, but
we'll all be better off if we can adjust our lives
just a little bit.


The good-buddy

system is alive and well


It took a hurricane to blow
the cover of our present-day
"spoils system."
Michael Brown, the head
of FEMA, was recommended
because he was a college
buddy, but he just didn't have
the experience or ability to
manage the preparations for
or the aftermath of such dev-
astation.
Our president has finally
got the message on this
,-appointment: Experience
counts. R. David Paulison, the
new appointee, has had ex-
perience dealing catastro-
phe. He was there for Hur-
ricane Andrew and the air-
liner crash in the Everglades.
He knows about communi-
cation, and cooperation.
But, unfortunately, our
spoils system goes deeper.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration was orne of the
most respected agencies
worldwide before Bush al-
lowed the pharmaceutical
companies and his pandering
to religious groups to influ-
ence it. Thus, science bows'
to Bush's and Rove's politics.
The New England Journal
of Medicine published a-
commentary. "A Sad Day for
Science at the FDA." It said
that "recent actions of the
FDA leadership have made a
mockery of the process of
evaluating scientific evi-
dence, squandered the pub-
lic trust and tarnished the
agency's image."
Scientists and the general
public have been disillu-
sioned by decisions on the
safety of painkillers like Vi-
oxx, regulations of heart
defibrillators and delays in
deciding whether to allow
over-the-counter sales of an
emergency contraceptive.
It's your health and the
leadership of the FDA has
certainly not been up to pro-
tecting it. Critics from both
parties agree on that. ,
The criticism became so
loud that FDA commissioner
Lester M. Crawford decided
to retire last week. But before
he resigned, he appointed
Dr. Norris Alderson as direc-
tor of the FDA's Office of
Women's Health.
Who is Norris? He is a
doctor who has spent the
majority of his career in the
office of veterinary medicine.
Now that says something
about the importance. of
women's health and creden-
tials versus politics. One
"spoiler" seems to appoint
more "spoilers" to the system.
But the outcry was imme-


diate. Within three days the
administration woke up, the
information on the nomina-
tion was withdrawn from the
FDA Web site and another
appointment was made.
Again, this past week the
Bush administration sought
to appoint a lawyer with little
immigration or customs ex-
perience to head the troubled
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement Agency.
The Republican chair at
the hearing put the brakes on
this latest nomination. Sen.
Susan Collins of Maine wants
to inquire further into the
qualifications of Julie L.
Myers. The spoil system has
gone too far for even some
Republicans.
The president can fill some
3,000 executive positions
without regard to civil service
rules. About 500 of those are
subject to Senate confirma-
tion. Sadly, even Senate con-
firmadon doesn't necessarily
prevent politics or cronyism.
So many of these political
appointees are in and out in a
couple of years acquiring
just enough experience to go
on to the private sector carry-
ing their influence, network-,,
ing or good-buddy system
with them. Many become
lobbyists armed with inside
information and contacts,
that make it easier to subvert
legislation that would benefit
the public.
We know that civil service
brings quality to, a position.
But David E. Lewis, assist-
ant professor of politics at
Princeton, proved it.
According to The New
York Times, he studied "614
federal programs managed
by 245 agencies. He looked
at how each program was
assessed under the scale the
Bush administration's Office
of Management and Budget
uses to determine how well a
program functions. Mr. Lewis
found that programs run by
political appointees 'get sys-
tematically lower manage-
ment grades than bureau
chiefs drawn from the Civil
Service.'"
Der. Spiegel writer George
Mascoloj pointed out that
"30 of the Republican Party's
biggest donors have been
rewarded with posts in sun-
drenched island nations like
Mauritius and the Bahamas
or in prestigious European
capitals."
Mascoloj pointed out that
the last retiring ambassador
to Germany could speak no
more than a few words of
German after three and a half
years.
The new ambassador to
Germany is Ohio ball-bearing
magnate William Timken,
who as a "Super Ranger" do-
nated more than $300,000 to
Bush's campaign and request-
ed this position.
Secretary of State Con-
doleezza Rice is probably
not too happy with some of
these appointments. It does-
n't make it any easier to re-
Please see COCCARO, 14A


Wb OI


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Available from Commercial News Providers'













LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Add parking, shuttle, not asphalt on island


Editor:
I live and work on the island and think the parking lot across
from the beach is the stupidest idea I've heard yet.
In past years the traffic clutter was the problem: now instead
of addressing it they want to accommodate it.
I'll solve both problems for you right now: Build your lot
under a bridge, or even off the island and defer the cost by
using a shuttle to take tourists to the beach,
Why do this? you ask:
1. Traffic will move more freely on the island.
2. Land costs further from beach are surely cheaper.
3. A shuttle would save gas and traffic congestion, and
would lower pollution .
4. Shuttle fares, though small, would defer the cost of this
lot.
I could go on, but I'll end with this: This is historic Venice,
not downtown Sarasota. And as one of its residents, I just don't
want to see this eyesore across from one of the country's most
beautiful beaches.
William Byars
Venice


That's not what
they said then

Editor:
In response to a recent
letter to the editor entitled
"Bush Has Things Backward":
the letter writer obviously
had his own agenda.
He reports that Mrs.
Sheehan was taken aback by
the president's complete lack
of knowledge about those
they were gathered at the
White House to honor. How-
ever, the meeting he so elo-
quently discusses as though
he were an eyewitness took
place with Mr. and Mrs.
Sheehan and 16 other fami-
lies at Fort Lewis in the state
of Washington, a long way
from the White House.
Shortly after the meeting,
her husband was quoted as
saying: "We have a lot of
respect for the office of,the
president, and I have a new
respect for him because he
was sincere and he didn't
have to take the time to meet
with us." Mrs. Sheehan was
quoted as saying after the


meeting: "I now k
sincere about wan
dom for the Iraqis.
also quoted as
know he's sorry
some pain for our 1
know he's a man off
At that time she
ed as having also tal
how meeting with
the families of 16.
a brief time made
whole again, and
reported to have s
was the gift the
gave us, the gift of h
of being together
quotes are from
Calif., the Sheehan
town newspaper.


Gaining condos,
losing charm
Editor:
Stop all the dev
that is taking plac
Mike Miller do
wants, but you s
Konecnik from buil
he wants to build. S
rotten is going on.


After living in Venice for 35 Now that 41 is being widened
years, this quiet litte town-is from State Road 681 to the 41
turning into '.towns like Fort split, where is all that addi-
Lafiderdale, Sarasot4, Miami tional traffic going to go?
- and Icould gag.with many 'How about all the season-
more. al' residents planning to go
This season when the elsewhere, sell their, Florida
snowbirds came I could holi homes because of outrageous
find a parking place inr.tlieh..'; es? How about' asking
parking lot or even oht the 'ilsiness owners on the island
avenue. So what do think is how they will survive poor
going to happen when all seasonal traffic in addition to
these monstrous buildings all the gridlock?
go up? Without a doubt growth
Venice is losing its charm. has caused our inflated real
estate prices, thus causing
Marie A. Sclafani these inflated real estate
Venice taxes.
Traffics bad now, We all need to give some
Serious thought to this bub-
with no fix in sight bleheaded idea of continuous


Editor:
know he's Just what is it that these
citing free- people don't get? A major
" She was sector of the populace dis-
saying: "I agrees with the mixed-use
and feels plans drawn up by Mike
loss. And I Miller et al.
faith." Don't they realize the
is report- island is currently experienc-
Iked about ing real gridlock and it's not
him and even season yet? Just try to
others for drive the island when the
them feel schools let out. Where in
she was God's name is all the addi-
aid: "That tional traffic going to go
president when more and more people
happiness, locate here? ,
r." These What about the water
Vacaville, supply? What about police
ns' home- protection, fire protection
and schools that these addi-
Ron Grant tional people will require?
Venice I don't know if anyone
thought about the hospital
located on the island. How
would it be if one of those
supporters or a family mem-
relopment ber is being transported to
e. You let the hospital and then gets
what he stopped among vehicles that
stop John can't go anywhere.
ding what What about if a' hurricane
Something hits how will all those
people get off the island?


growth.
David Shaw
Nokomis
Too much put on
party labels
Editor:
Am I the only one who
believes that a "good" Amer-
ican can be either a Democrat
or a Republican?
I am a registered Repub-
lican, but for those anxious to
criticize President Bush for
failing to secure the borders
- just because President
Clinton didn't do it is no
excuse. Nor is the loss of
Latino votes.
I was proud of the real
Democrats for not being
seen with the woman from
California at the entrance to
President Bush's Texas ranch.
Right now I would like to see
the Democratic Party rid it-
self of the low-life, otherwise
known as the far left.
I think we have a good man
right here in Florida in Bill
Nelson. Hillary'Isl1';prqbably :
better than Kerry,.tfid com-
Please see LETTERS, 14A







FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


14A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Dangerous hair. Some women's hairdos are dangerous. I
mean those that are combed forward over their face. You can
see only a small part of one or both of her eyes, so how can
she safely drive? Not able to see cars alongside, behind or
crossing in front of her, a bicycle, motorcycle, a child or
animal that might run out into traffic. We are not safe walking
or driving in parking lots or pushing carts in grocery stores
where these hairdos are. Is she not at fault because her
hairdo obstructed her vision? Hairdressers and TV ads should
not promote these dangerous hairdos and officers should be
giving tickets before more accidents result from them.


You need help. I have to
say I can't imagine what kind
of a person would call and
complain about Fran Va-
lencic's column. She's one of
the kindest, most caring, reli-
able, truest ladies we have
in our beautiful town and
surely always spreading the
good and great news of all
the good things that happen
in our community. To you
who called in this nasty
trash, it seems to me your
own little world needs a lot
of help.
Enough money? I have a
question about the recent
tragedy in New Orleans. I
heard President Bush on TV
say that we had enough
money to fight the war in
Iraq and take care of the
situation in New Orleans. If
that is true, why are we be-
ing asked to send money to
the Red Cross, to Bush and
Clinton, to Salvation Army,
and to a hundred other
places? I have made a dona-
tion because these people
are suffering so badly right
at this moment, but I still
would like the answer to the
question.
Be careful. I have lived in
Venice for 12 years and have
never met anyone that would
make me think that she
should go back where she
came from until today. At
Publix parking lot on the
island, she was going the
wrong way. And when I told
her, she called me a --
So be careful, she's out there
- driving the wrong way.
Secured. Through these
storms, the area over by Bay
Indies and Sandler's Ranch


always has motor homes and
things sitting there. They're
flying missiles; they're not
tied down. Maybe we need to
look at that, fix it so they're
tied. Those trailers and boats
are missiles that could be fly-
ing over into Bay Indies. The
city should encourage the
county to do something with
some zoning in that area.
That needs to be secured
before we get another storm.
Nokomis connection. Mr.
Hammitt and Mr. Tacy made
the same mention in the
paper this past week in re-
ference to the historical
archives not taking in things
from the other areas. One of
the subjects is Nokomis Vol-
unteer Fire Department had
stuff stored in there. Mr.
Hammitt and Mr. Tacy don't
realize years ago Nokomis
used to take care of all of
Golden Beach; the area be-
hind Epiphany, that was ser-
viced by Nokomis until about
1990. Also, Venice-Nokomis
High School was in Nokomis,
the original post office, 1888,
was down by Nokomis
Groves. There were a lot of
things Venice-Nokomis and
they don't understand the
connection there.
Beach project. We need to
come up with a way to charge
the people who are going to
benefit, especially the home-
owners along there. Maybe
a special district: The next
time maybe create a district
to help pay for the beach
project because this benefits
the condos down there and
not all the citizens in Venice.
A shame. About the world's
assistance to our Gulf Coast


GIVE US A CALL
The Let'em Have It line allows readers to sound off on issues of
local interest. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the
callers and do not necessarily represent the views of this news-
paper. Opinions or comments that are personal attacks on people;
attacks on or commercials for businesses; political endorsements;
or otherwise unfit for publication will not be printed. If you would
like to participate, call the line at 207-1111. Call no more than
once a week. Please keep your comments brief. The line is avail-
able all hours. Caller identification is not required.


COCCARO from page 13A
pair our country's foreign re-
lations.
The good-buddy system is
also alive and well on the
local level. How else can
one explain the mayor's
refusal to reappoint a very
knowledgeable member of
the planning commission,
replacing him with a retiring
buddy from city council?
To the victor belongs the


spoils. Unfortunately for the
citizens and the community,
the victor's responsibility for
our welfare is sometimes
lacking.
Thus, to the citizens be-
longs a poorer government.

Lorraine Coccaro writes a
regular column for this page.
She can be e-mailed at:
lorraine@coccaro.com.


crisis. Watching the O'Reilly
Factor the other night, he
was stating who gave what.
Anything is a help and any-
one giving anything is a nice,
positive gesture. There are
two things that bother me,
though. We have the Swedish-
Norweigian people who gave
nothing but cops, and the
Japanese who gave $1 million.
Now, these are two countries
that America is making rich
with trillions of dollars buying
their cars, electronics and
products, and this is all that
could be done? I think that's
a shame. That's what we get
for buying all these imported
items.
A travesty. I've had it with
Ed Martin's column. Wednes-
day's column is a travesty.
We're now quoting other col-
umnists who write about
wonderful communities be-
cause Ed has no basis in fact
to write about anything else
but to propagate his anti-
growth agenda. We're not
Santa Barbara, Calif., Wash-
ington, D.C., or Fairfax, Va.
We're Venice, Fla. Ed, get a
grip. Remarks about Wash-
ington, D.C., and the lack of
buildings over nine stories
are completely inaccurate.
There are buildings in areas
that are not allowed to be
taller than nine stories due to
the proximity to the capital
and to the White House. It's
not all over the District of
Columbia. And since you
lived in Fairfax, Va., for so
long Ed, why don't you write
a column about how much
your property taxes were up
in Fairfax versus what they
are down here and how
much they are now, since
you only seem to be interest-
ed in telling one side of the
story?
Get him out. That life-size
cut out of George Bush in
the second-floor window of
the Lord House on Granada
Avenue politicizes the non-
partisan project. It was pro-
bably put there to be funny,
but it demonstrates a flip-
pant attitude toward a mil-
lion-dollar effort. Get him out
of the window and put him
over in New Orleans where
he belongs.
Gay marriage. Here we go
again with the gay marriage
thing. OK, Arnold Schwarz-
enegger has two good movies
out of town and he thinks he
can go on making decisions
for other people. I say if he
doesn't believe in gay mar-
riage, then he should not
marry a man. I just think
that no one should get in the
way of two people getting
together. I wouldn't.
Railroad car? I thought
Ringling was going to donate
a railroad car to be used down
at the railroad depot. I'm curi-
ous who's going to maintain
it. It will have to be painted.
We got the statue; we need
the railroad car. Plus I believe
there's also a hand luggage
cart the county has. I don't
know why it hasn't been
brought down there.


Show me a few pennies or some sense


HERB LEVINE
GUEST COLUMNIST


A Gondolier Sun reporter
interviewed me for an article
he was doing on the lack of
public and particularly
VTL interest in the new
city budget. He quoted my
reply correctly, that with the
new CMU district being pro-
posed along with some other
growth issues, we have sim-
ply have not had the time to
pursue the budget.
I told him I was pretty
sure the West Venice Avenue
Business District isn't the
only place in Venice where
pork is prominent because
the systems that operate the
city have not been checked
by an unbiased outside con-
sultant for at least 30 years.
Nor has a real consulting
firm checked out every
employee in the city using all
of the tools necessary to
eliminate waste, especially
redundant effort.
Why doesn't the city
manager check out all the
systems and employees? The
answer is simple: He doesn't
have the tools or the time. It's
a full-time job of at least sev-
eral months for a whole crew
of industrial engineers.
I think the results would be
surprising and extremely
profitable for the city taxpay-
ers and embarrassing for the
city's present officials. Maybe
that's why it isn't being done.
Waste in the city budget is
not the problem. The real
problem is that past councils
and management didn't have
any desire to bring in real city
operational consultants.


LET 'EM HAVE IT! HOW HAS THE HIGH PRICE OF GASOLINE
AFFECTED YOU? CALL US AT 2071111.


Halt, and step away from the curlers


What they did want was
glowing reports to use as
medals. When a friendly con-
sultant gave them a glowing
report and a few suggestions
to save a million or so, they
proudly wore the medals
and ignored the suggestions.
And then the reporter in-
terviewed our mayor, who
gave out his usual "I hate the
taxpayers league" interview.
If the reporting was correct,
the mayor stated that it's
been more than a decade
since the VTL held council's
feet to the fire on spending.
Maybe he thinks that a
decade is two weeks or a few
months.
Who held the city's collec-
tive feet to the fire when our
city bought more than 100
Acer. computers without
monitors for $1,145 each
when anyone could have
bought a top-of-the-line
model for $500? The boat-
load of pork was given to a
local who since then has had
tons and tons of no-bid con-
sulting jobs with the city.
Did the mayor or council
complain? No. But the VTL
did.
Who complained about
the strange purchasing prac-
tices for Fourth of July fire-
works and the $7,000 check
sent to an empty lot in North
Port with a mailbox? Council
didn't complain. The VTL did
and held the mayor's feet to
the fire several years ago -or
quite a bit less than a decade.
Who else even wondered
about the $4,500 palm trees
and the strange method for
sending checks to the mid-
dleman in Sarasota? Council?
No: The VTL questioned the
price and procedures. No
one else did. Who questioned
$26,000 worth of consulting
charges billed to the city by
an employee of the city?
Council or the mayor? No,
the VTL did.
Who questioned lots and
lots of long-distance personal
calls on city cell phones
during company time and


LI- I ILK from page 13A
-*


mitted treason. Hillary did get
upset with Bill, not because
of having sex with the young
woman, but because he lied
to her.
I disagree with Bill O'Reilly
in stating President Bush
was 24 hours late in sending
troops to New Orleans. They
were there operating on Fri-
day and they came from all
over the United States. They
were human beings also and
had commitments to their
families.
If the mayor was unaware
of all those school buses, he
has a real problem. He is the
primary reason the poor
were not evacuated.
I don't think the troopers
were out checking for driver
licenses of bus drivers at that
time.
Is there anyone else out
there who agrees about good
Americans?
Monroe S. Bacon
Englewood


Rattan Wicker & Cane
751 US 41 ByPass S., Venice, FL 34285
Mon. Sat. 9-5 p.m. 941-484-3313 = W


Teaching a lesson
not on the FCAT
Editor:
In this world of stress and
strife we often are quick to
complain about even the
most minute things and
often forget to mention the
wonderful everyday occur-
rences that make us smile
and have hope.
The teachers and school
board are often in the news.
Let us share with you a won-
derful outreaching of love
and support to our family of
children, who recently lost
their mother in an auto ac-
cident.
The teachers at Laurel
Nokomis School have gone
"the extra mile": Not only did-
they attend the funeral to
lend support to the children,


Tom Perkins


As your financial
partner, I will listen to
your needs and help
design an investment
plan that is right for
you. Discover the path
to financial freedom
by contacting me
today.


they verbally made it knowrd
that if they need someone to>
talk with, they are there; if"
they need anything, they are' i
there. They even presented a"
gift certificate for any need"'
they may have.
It will be a wonderfulI'
memory for these children';:
as the years go by teachers,'
care!
Thank you to the teacher''
at Laurel Nokomis School.

The Richard Steele Family
Venice


Financial Advisor
RAYMOND JAMES

1314 E. Venice Ave., Suite A
Venice, FL 34285
941-412-1400 800-635-5870
Tom.Perkins@RaymondJames.com
www.raymondjames.com/tomperkins
You first. 26
2336c'


* WATERFRONT Condominium development
opportunity Seller indicates that up to 14 units
can be developed on this site without rezoning or
acquiring a special exceptions. Great, wide,
unobstructed views of Lemon Bay in Englewood,
FL. There is already a dock on site. Rare
opportunity, act fast! $4,995,000

* VENICE HEALTH PARK One of Venice's best
known medical locations. This office
condominium space is directly connected through
an interior door to a certified surgery center.
$1,050,000

CI Zoning on the Trail! 37,350 square feet with plenty of frontage. Many
commercial uses allowed in CI zoning including autQ sales. $999,500.


also at night time, city coun-:,
cil, the mayor or the city
manager? The VTL literally-
raised the roof on what was
happening in that depart-
ment.
When the city authorities
finally woke up and checked,
that department's Internet'
usage, they found enough
garbage to fill a barrel anid
they quickly punished the
offenders with very light taps
on the wrists. The cell-phond
offender was never made to
pay back the costs.
As I told the reporter, "The
budget is the end result of
efficiency or incompetence."
We pay council to thoroughly
check out the budget. Any-
one on council who cannot
do that job needs to be re-
placed.
We've had money wasted
in every way possible, fromni
costly investigations into a'
hissing propane tank that
turned out to have turned
itself on to taping audience
members at council meet-
ings to see who was finger-
flipping council.
In his interview, the mayor
claimed that two or three
members of council were
always members of the Ven:
ice "Tax" League around the_
time he was first elected to
council. I doubt that very'
much, because it's really an,
understatement: Most mem-
bers of our government were -
members of the "Tax League."
We were and still are mem-
bers of the Venice TaxPAYERS
League.
There really is another`
reason the mayor's state- .
ment is nonsense. Doesn't.
he remember that one can
get arrested at budget meet-
ings?
Maybe he doesn't remem.-'
ber that after I was painfully
removed from the room, he,
asked the audience a ques-
tion: "Does anyone else
want to come up here and
get arrested?"
Herb Levine is president o
the Venice Taxpayers League. ..


A.G. EDWARDS.
FULLY INVESTED IN OUR CLIENTS.



LOOKING FOR REGULAR INCOME?
CONSIDER BONDS.

By staggering your bond investments, you can receive
a monthly. interest check instead of on.e check every
six months. You'll get a regular income stream, which
makes your overall planning much easier. Call me to
find out more about monthly bond interest checks.

Investors should keep in mind that as interest rates
rise existing bond prices of already-outstanding fixed-
income securities tend to fall. Long-term bonds are
generally more exposed to interest rate risk than
short-term bonds.

Call John Holic or Kathryn Anderson
4242 S.Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL
941-408-8797

2004 A. G. Edwards & Sons, Inc.* Member SIPC


Ui. :l, I f 1,10 joi 'l










CONTACT US
BOB MUDGE
EDITOR
(941) 207-1101
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




BUSINESS MAT TEARS


V/


In league with


the Marines


PHOTO COURTESY OF MARINE CORPS LEAGUE
$weetbay Store Manager Mike Schwede and Publix Store Manager Jean Andreu accept certificates of appreciation from Top Harrison of the Marines Corps League thanking them for their
support of the league's visit to veterans at the Haley VA hospital in Tampa.


Guys, you're gonna feel at home here


:~ ~


ROGER BUTTON
BUSINEWS


"Men ignore their appear-
ance because they don't know
who to ask and where go,
believing a women's spa is for
sissies," said Carole Cefaratti,
owner of the new men's salon
Jerseys Grooming For Men,
303 South Tamiami Trail in
Four Bays Plaza, Nokomis.
Cefaratti, a skin-care edu-
catpr and certified aestheti-
ciapn who came to Punta
Gorda from New Jersey a year
agO, said male massage spas
are' very common up North,
but new to Florida.
baseball is the theme for
the Nokomis store, which is
fitted out with televisions for
clients to enjoy their favorite
gaines while waiting and hav-
ing haircuts. Jerseys' team of
fiv' provides haircutting,
manicures and pedicures,
anal while waiting customers
can have a chair massage
similar to that offered at air-
ports worldwide.
For the grand opening, 1-4
p.m. Saturday, there will be an
Italian buffet, giant subs and
betr...
.Open seven days a week,
the salon will be offering
early-morning specials for
seniors, and kids free haircuts
occasionally. Grab-and-go
low-carb snacks, power
drinks and nutritious candy
basis are available.
This is the flagship for
future plans, which include
bopning a chain or franchiis-
ing these salon spa stores
with various themes, includ-
in) baseball, football and
SCAR.
"We're not a Hooters, but a
professional service wanting
to 'be here for men," said
Cefaratti,, whose family has
been in the spa business for
several years.
Pr dential open house
ft's open house (Friday)
to iight with wine and cook-
ies for everyone, 4-7 p.m., at
the new Prudential Village
Realty, 1779 South Tamiami
Trail, just south of Lowe's new
store.
i'Eventually we plan to
haVe 80 realtors operating
frdin this new office, which
is our first venture into
Ve:ice," commented Dave
Powell, company business
partner.
Prudential started in 1980
and employs 180 agents oper-
ating in offices in Port Char-
lone, North Port, Punta Gorda


and Englewood. From the
Venice office they cover all of
the greater Venice area, han-
dling residential, commercial,
condominiums and vacant
land.
Pinebrook extension
The completion of the
Pinebrook Road extension to
Center Road appears to be
some distance away.
Sarasota County Land
Development Services Super-
visor Jim O'Donnell con-
firmed the contractor is mak-
ing a concentrated effort
toward completion and the
roadwork should be done in
30-40 days.
Steady trucking of materi-
als has been going on for the
past three to four weeks, and
curbs are being put in, fol-
lowed by the base and
asphalting.
"The big holdup is the sig-
nalization of the Center Road
junction. If it takes a little bit
longer, it is for safety," said
O'Donnell.
Traffic light components
have been ordered and Kim-
berly Horn has completed the
drawings, but an installation
date is not available.
Moved to Verizon
"We changed to Verizon
because it works very well in
this area," confirmed Kelly
Butler, owner of three cell-
phone stores, in Bradenton,
Sarasota and Venice.
Her store at 4137 Tamiami
Trail: South in the Venice
Village Shoppes was until
recently a Cingular agency.
Butler, originally from Toron-
to, has been in the industry 15
years and is looking to
expand south with more
stores.
Suncoast Doctors move
Thirty years ago Suncoast
Orthopedic Surgery &
Sports Medicine P.A.
opened on The Rialto a few
yards from what was then
Venice Hospital. Monday,
Oct. 3, it opens in its -new
location at 836 Sunset Lake
Blvd., Suite 205, Venice.
Six years ago Dr. Joseph
Noah joined, then acquired
the practice, and within 12
months Dr. Edmund Wat-
kowski became his partner.
Business grew and in recent
years they have operated
from two adjoining build-
ings.
A few months ago a deci-
sion was made to move the
practice to fast-expanding
eastern Venice, where they,
acquired property of similar
size but within one building.
"It's state of the art, with
the very latest digital X-ray
equipment, and we are trans-
ferring our records to new
sensitive-record equipment,
eventually doing away with
paper charts," said an excited
Diane Watson, office manag-
er.


The practice has satellite
offices in Englewood and
North Port, and the doctors
provide services to Venice Re-
gional Medical Center, Doc-
tors Hospital, Englewood
Hospital and North Port.
There are 15 employees,
including the doctors, and it
is hoped another doctor may
join in a year or so, according
to Watson.
Renovations resuming
Renovations on the former
Quik Chek strip center at the
comer of Miami and Noko-
mis avenues are scheduled to
recommence Oct. 1.
'All we want to do is to get
in there to get it done," said
owner Howard Burke of
Florida Sunshine Properties.
Plans were approved in
February 2004, but renova-
tions have been delayed by
difficulties in finding contrac-
tors. Howard estimates it will
be completed by Jan. 1, and
said he already has one ten-
ant who will open a store at
that time.
Tattooing and unusual art
In June 2004 August Moon
sold his business, the largest
tattoo store in Bear, Del.,
intending to retire in Noko-
mis. Recently he opened Mo-
on Design Studio at U.S. 41
Bypass with the intention to
combine 14 years' experience
as one of the nation's top tat-
tooists with his interests in
art.
"It's affordable art prints,
glassware, '60s rock band
prints and other sought-after
rock concert posters," said
Moon. "My tattooing service
is different, as I offer the ser-
vice only by appointment in
two private studios."
In 14 years he primarily
tattoos people in their 30s to
60s, but had one customer
who was 84.
Moon, a painter and artist,
wrote a book for the industry
on tattooing, was a scenic
artist for TV's "Unsolved
Mysteries" and has a' collec- *
tion of bizarre rock concert
posters from shock to the
Bible Belt.
Venice island investment
Florida Sunshine Proper-
ties is expanding again, with
the purchase of 258-264
South Tamiami Trail, Venice,
from Stosh & Slosh Inc. for
$945,000. Situated next to
Community National Bank
on U.S. 41 Business, the prop-
erty is occupied by three ten-
ants: Insurance Group of
Venice, Stosh & Slosh and the
Venice Pier Group.
"It makes an interesting
investment item in Venice,
which is a very unique little
town," commented owner
Howard Burke.
The transaction was han-
dled by Jim and Christine
Walter of Richardson Kleiber
Walter Walter Ptr.


SUN PHOTO BY CHRISTINA ELWELL.
Colby Allen is the new owner of Venice Auto Marine Inc., formerly Venice Auto Machine Inc.



VAMI under new ownership


CHRISTINA ELWELL
STAFF WRITER

Venice Auto Machine Inc.
became Venice Auto Marine
Inc. as new owner Colby
Allen took over the business.
VAMI has been in .business
in Venice since 1982, and
Allen was determined to
keep up the reputation of
the previous owners.
"I just changed the one
word in the title because
people know this place as
VAMI and I wanted to keep
it that way," Allen said.


Allen, a graduate of Ven-
ice High School, received his
associate's degree from MCC
and then moved to Houston,
Texas, to attend automotive
machinist's school. He has
five years' experience work-
ing in, Houston on car and
boat engines.
Allen recently came back
to Venice from Houston and
in March bought his first
business, VAMI.
VAMI is different from
and more specialized than
your average automotive
business.


"We're not an auto body
repair shop, just engines,"
Allen said.
VAMI may be part-specif-
ic, but it works on just about
any kind of vehicle.
Allen and his sole em-
ployee, Brian McNeil, work on
cars, boats, drag-race cars,
city trucks, restoration cars,
muscle cars and antiques.
"Anything that runs,"
Allen said of their workload.
VAMI is located just over
the Venice Avenue Bridge at
331 Camion St. For. more
information, call 484-2474.


Hospital sale triggers estate plan changes


STAFF REPORT

Donors who named Bon
Secours Venice Hospital
Foundation in their estate
plans will need to make revi-
sions because of 'the
February 2005 sale of Bon
Secours Venice Hospital.
The Bon Secours Venice
Hospital Foundation will no
longer exist after Dec.. 31, so
it is important that estate
planning documents be
reviewed.
In accordance with terms
agreed to when Bon Secours
Venice Hospital Foundation
was established, the majori-
ty of its assets reverted to
Gulf Coast Community
Foundation. of Venice upon
the sale of the hospital to a


for-profit corporation.
The $19.3 million in assets
has become a permanent en-
dowment, appropriately
named the Community
Health Endowment Fund,
which is designated for grants
to meet health-care needs in
the Venice area and sur-
rounding communities.
Donors who designated
Bon Secours Venice Hospital
Foundation or any former
name by which the organiza-
tion was known may now
name the Community Health
Endowment Fund instead,
which will preserve their
intent and ensure that health-
care needs in our community
can be addressed in perpetu-
ity.
Former names include The


Venice Health Facilities Foun-
dation, The Venice Health
Foundation, Venice Hospital
Foundation, and The Hos-
pital Foundation.
"We don't always know
what plans people have
made, so it is difficult to con-
tact them directly," said Beth
Harrison, vice president for
donor services at Gulf Coast
Community Foundation. "We
want to make donors and
their professional advisors
aware of the need to revise
documents if this applies to
them."
For more information on
the Community Health En-
dowment Fund and specific
terminology for use in be-
quest language, call GCCFV
Donor Services at 486-4600.


15A
FRIDAY
SEPT.30,2005









OBITUARIES


1 A \V/IIIF r.nlinn IFnR l INh


FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, 2005


Walter P. Cortley

Walter P Cortley of
Venice died Sunday,
Sept. 25, 2005. He was
81.
He was born March
31, 1924 in New York, N.Y. He
moved to Venice 10 years ago
from Albany, N.Y, where he
worked for 15 years as a civil
engineer for the state of New
York.
He was a U.S. Air Force vet-
eran of World War II and a
graduate of the Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute of Troy,
N.Y.
Survivors include two
daughters, Susan of Morris-
town, N.J., and Jacalyn of
Troy; a son, Jeffery of West-
field, N.J.; and three grand-
children.
Services: No services are sched-
uled at this time.


Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to the
American Red Cross Hurricane
Relief Fund, Southwest Florida
Chapter, 2001 Cantu Court,
Sarasota, 34232.
Richard E. Day
Richard E. Day of Venice
died Sept. 28, 2005. He was
96.
He was born Dec. 5, 1908,
in Beloit, Wis., and moved to
Venice in 1984 from Rockford,
Ill. He worked as a sports edi-
tor and in the insurance in-
dustry. He was a member of
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Ca-
tholic Church in Osprey.
Survivors include a daugh-
ter, Victoria Schaefer of Ven-
ice; a brother, E Mark of Rock-
ford, Ill.; three grandchildren;
and one great-grandson.
Services: A memorial mass will


be held Saturday, Oct. 1, at
10 a.m. in the Epiphany
Cathedral Santa Maria Chapel in
Venice. Interment will follow at
Venice Memorial Gardens. Farley
Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Our Lady
of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church
Building Fund, 838 South
Tamiami Trail, Osprey, 34229.
Geraldine W. Peny
Geraldine W Perry of Ven-
ice died Tuesday, Sept. 27,
2005. She was 68.
She was bomrnApril 7, 1937,
in Annandale, Va., and moved
to the area from there in 1996.
She was an executive sec-
retary and a volunteer at Sun-
coast Humane Society, at
Venice Hospital and Venice
Senior Friendship Center. She
was a member of Annandale


United Methodist Church.
Survivors include a son,
James of Orlando, Fla.; a bro-
ther, Dana Wellman of Gre-
eley, Colo.; and two grand-
children.
Services: A memorial service
will be held at noon, Sunday,
Oct. 2, at Plantation Golf&
Country Club in Venice. Burial
will take place in Annandale at
10 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 8. Toale
Brothers Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 220
Wexford Blvd., Venice, 34293.
Milton J.VanderStel
Milton J. VanderStel
of Nokomis died Wed-
nesday, Sept. 28, 2005.
He was 79.
He was born May 6, 1926,
in Newark, N.J., and moved to


Nokomis 32 years ago from
Sayerville, N.J. He attended
Upsala College in New Jersey
and worked as a banker. He
was a veteran of the Navy
during World War II. He was a
Mason.
Survivors include three
daughters, Susan Romanok of
Nokomis, Linda Novak of Os-
preyandNancyWines ofEuless,
Texas; a son, John of Nokomis;
and four grandchildren.
Services: Visitation will be
Saturday, Oct. 1, 2-3:30 p.m. at
Ewing Funeral Home, with a ser-
vice to follow at 3:30 p.m.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to a charity
of one's choice.
Barbara H. R. Thorstenson
Barbara Helen Robertson
Thorstenson of Venice died
Tuesday, Sept 27,2005. She was
92.


She was bom April 12, 1913,
in Moorhead, Minn., and
moved to Venice in 1983 from
Pelican Rapids, Minn.,
She graduated from Moor-
head State Teachers College and
taught children in the primary
grades in Galesburg, N.D., and
Pelican Rapids, Minn.
She was a founding member
of the Unitarian Universalist
Church ofVenice.
Survivors include two
daughters, Rita Chamberland
of Venice and Jean Garrity of
Missoula, Mont.; a son, Jon of
Chaska, Minn.; four grand-
children; and five great
grandchildren.
Services: Burial will be in
Moorhead, Minn.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238, or to a
hospice of choice.


POUCE BEAT
Bank robbed
Police are still looking for a
suspect who robbed the Bank
of America in Nokomis on
Tuesday, Sept. 27.
The man came into the
bank, located at 1120 North
Tamiami Trail, showed a knife
and demanded money. He
fled on foot with an undeter-
mined amount of money.
No one was injured.
The suspect is described as
white, about 5 feet 10 inches
tall, with a thin build. He was
last seen wearing a gray T-
shirt, gray shorts, another T-
shirt wrapped around his
head, and clear plastic gloves.
Anyone with information
about this case should con-
tact Detective Jon Allen at the
South Criminal Investigations
Bureau at 861-1719, or leave
information on the Crime
Stoppers Tip Line at 366-TIPS
(8477).
If you call Crime Stoppers,
give only the information, not
your name. Crime Stoppers is
designed for anonymous
callers.
Sarasota County
Sheriffs Office arrests
Donna M. Rodgers, 33,
1600 block West Neponsit
Drive, Venice. Charge: aggra-
vated assault with intent to
commit a felony, probation
violation/robbery with a


Police car chases van


through backyards


BY GEORGE MCGINN
STAFF WRITER


Surveillance cameras caught this image of a man robbing the
Nokomis Bank of America Tuesday.


firearm or deadly weapon.
Bond: no listing.
Brian Bonsai, 44, 400
block Terrapin Road, Venice.
Charge: contempt/battery.
Bond: no listing.
Frank P Dietrich Jr., 33,
5300 block Stephens Road,
Venice. Charge: contempt
/child support. Bond: $870.
Anthony Peluso, 42, 200
block Rutgers Road, Venice.
Charge: sale or delivery of
cocaine. Bond: $5,000.
David J. Stuetzer, 33, 100
block Glen Wood Ave.,
Osprey. Charge: driving
while license revoked -
habitual traffic offender.
Bond: $2,000.
Nicholas S. Easton, 22, 10
block Hasket Road, Nokomis.
Charge: probation viola-


tion/possession of a con-
trolled substance. Bond: no
listing.
Robert B. Rigby III, 30,
300 block Winfield Way,
Nokomis. Charges: obtain-
ing a controlled substance
by fraud seven counts,
attempting to obtain a con-
trolled substance by fraud
- three counts. Bond:
$10,000.
Roberta M. Young, 42,
5800 block Taylor Road,
Venice. Charges: possession
of cocaine, possession of drug
paraphernalia, driving while
license suspended or re-
voked. Bond: $1,370.
Doug G. McPeek, 36, 1000
block Elaine St., Venice.
Charge: DUI, no valid driver
license. Bond: $1,000.


A broken tail light on a
white van took police on a
bizarre chase Thursday night,
authorities said.
John J. Strong, 30, of 664
Sugarwood Terrace, Venice,
was arrested on multiple drug
and vehicle charges after
police attempted to stop him
because of the tail light,
according to a North Port
Police report.
According to the report:
Officer Joshua Shelton saw
a white van traveling on
Biscayne Drive with one of its
tail lights out. As Sheldon
attempted to pull Strong over,
Strong turned onto Hanchey
Street and into the side yard of
the corner house. Sheldon
chased Strong through three
back yards until the van
struck a fence. After striking
the fence, Strong's van hit a
boat on a trailer, which
stopped the van.
Strong got out of the van
and started running. Sheldon
ordered him to stop, but he
refused, and the chase con-
tinued on foot through the


Flu shots available to priority groups Oct. 1


back yards of homes on
Lyncrest Street.
Officer Michael Rogers
spotted Strong on Fabian
Road, and with help from offi-
cers William Eastwood and
Jeffery Pasler, caught Strong
trying to hidein some bushes.
When Strong, ,who was
handcuffed, was placed into
the police car, he resisted and
tried to flee. Rogers and
Eastwood took Strong to the
ground. Strong reportedly
said, "I'm sorry, that was stu-
pid," but said he couldn't go
back to jail.
Police checked the license
plate and learned it came
from a blue four-door Olds-
mobile. Officers said they
couldn't find any record in the
United States for the vehicle
identification number on the
van's dashboard.


Police also found that
Strong's license had been sus-
pended for the past 60
months. Strong is listed as a
habitual traffic offender.
Police found several
syringes on Strong, and a
search of his vehicle turned
up a methadone wafer and an
OxyCcntin pill.
Strong was arrested on two
counts of possession of a con-
trolled substance, possession
of drug paraphernalia, two
counts of resisting arrest with-
out violence, leaving the scene
of an accident, driving'with a
suspended license and driving
an unregistered vehicle.
Strong was released on
$6,240 bond.

You can e-mail George
McGinn at: gmcginn@sun-
herald.com.


ONLINE
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STAFF REPORT

Beginning Oct. 1, flu shots
will be given to people in the
following Centers for Disease
Control priority groups:
Persons ages 65 years and
older
Residents of long-term
care facilities
Persons with chronic
medical conditions
Children ages six to 23
months
Pregnant women
Health care personnel
who provide direct patient
care
Household contacts and
out-of-home caregivers of


children younger than six
months of age
More than 200 flu-shot
clinics for the public are
scheduled throughout Sara-
sota County beginning early
October.
The health department
will have free flu vaccine for
children in the CDC priority
groups beginning in early
October at the Ringling Blvd.,
Venice and North Port loca-
tions. Call ahead for days and
times of each location. The
phone number is 861-2784.
Parents must be present and
bring all prior shot records for
their child to receive a flu
shot.


Flu shots are available by
appointment and on a walk-
in basis at the Nokomis Walk-
in clinic, 621 South Tamiami
Trail, (941) 485-5645, and the
Sarasota Family Medical
Walk-In clinic, 6813 South
Tamiami Trail, 923-5861.
Flu shots by appointment
only are available at Optima
Health Services, (888) 663-
5865 or 921-9276 and at A
Familiar Face Home Health,
365-9474.
The cost for adult flu shots
is $25-$30, depending on the
provider.
Pneumonia shots will also
be available at a cost of $35-
$40, depending on the


provider.
In addition to vaccination,
the risk of contracting respi-
ratory infections can be
reduced by following a few
simple steps:
Clean hands often with
soap and water or an alcohol-
based hand cleanser.
Avoid touching your eyes,
nose or mouth.
Stay home when you are
sick and keep sick children
home.
Avoid close contact with
people who are ill, if possi-
ble.
Do not share eating uten-
sils, drinking glasses, towels
or other personal items.


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