• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sports
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Obituaries
 Section B: Our Town
 Section B: Coffee Break
 Section B: Venice Venue
 Section B: Milestones
 Section B: Class Acts
 Section B: Pets
 Section B: South News
 Section B continued
 Section B: In Shape
 Section B continued
 Section B: Around Town
 Let’s Go!














Title: Venice gondolier sun.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00109
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun.
Uniform Title: Venice gondolier sun
Alternate Title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Venice Gondolier Sun,
Publication Date: September 21, 2005
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers. -- Venice (Fla.)
Newspapers. -- Sarasota County (Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
General Note: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028295
Volume ID: VID00109
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
notis - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
issn - 1536-1063

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
    Section A: Main: Sports
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 11
        page A 12
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 13
    Section A: Main: Obituaries
        page A 14
    Section B: Our Town
        page B 1
    Section B: Coffee Break
        page B 2
    Section B: Venice Venue
        page B 3
    Section B: Milestones
        page B 4
    Section B: Class Acts
        page B 5
    Section B: Pets
        page B 6
    Section B: South News
        page B 7
        page B 8
    Section B continued
        page B 9
    Section B: In Shape
        page B 10
    Section B continued
        page B 11
    Section B: Around Town
        page B 12
    Let’s Go!
        page B 13
        page B 14
        page B 15
        page B 16
        page B 17
        page B 18
        page B 19
        page B 20
Full Text




NOW ON WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY



q VENICE "





JonlO ier


410e
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UHIU OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
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GAIS'!I~-F L"2611


LOCAL MEWS COVER TO COVER J FLORIDAS NO. I WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

50CENTS VOLUME 60 NUMBER 86 AN EDITION OF THE SUN WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY EDITION, SEPT. 21-22, 2005 PUBLISHED WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY


THIS SECTION 2A


Royal Capri density denied by planning board


Venice Planning Commission sides with neigh-
boring Waterford residents, despite calling them


- m
Dipping

aline
Two brothers' annual
rendezvous with
local fish.


"the rudest crowd ever."

BY JJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR

More than 230 residents
left Venice City Hall happy
after planning commission
agreed that Royal Capri De-
velopment shouldn't be al-
lowed to build a development
as dense as they want.
Commission members
sided with the challengers de-
spite being visibly frustrated
with the people from Water-
ford Homeowners Associ-
ation and even calling them
the "rudest crowd ever."
By a 6-0 vote, planning
commission denied Royal
Capri's application to amend


its future land use designa-
tion from allowing a maxi-
mum of 4.9 units per acre to a
maximum of 13 units per
acre. The request along
with a dozen other compre-
hensive plan land use
changes will go to city
council for final approval or
denial.
The capacity crowd spoke
at length about how the 40
acres of mostly undeveloped
land would be out of charac-
ter with Waterford Homes,
which borders the Royal
Capri southern and eastern
property lines.
"My neighbors and I are
not asking for anything spe-


cial," resident Dick Rock said.
"We're just asking you to keep
it zoned the way it was before
being annexed into the city."
'Rude crowd'
Planning commission
members appeared frustrat-
ed with the capacity crowd as
it applauded for nearly every
speaker. Chair John Osmulski
repeatedly told the crowd to
be quiet, and he was booed
for going out of order on the
agenda and pushing the two
most controversial issues to
the end of the meeting.
"We listened to you, now
you can listen to us," Os-
mulski said at one point while
trying to quiet the crowd.
At the end of the meeting,
planning commission mem-
ber Jim Myers criticized the
Please see DENIED, 6A


SUN PHOTO BYJJ. ANDREWS
Waterford Homes resident Jane Brodt, left, ias one of the
more than 230 people who showed up to oppose Royal Capri
Development's application for a more dense development.
Planning commission denied the request 6-0.


Polly want a biscotti?


THIS SECTION| 8A
In the swing
All fairways and greens
for the Lady Indians.

FA'N


OUR TOWN 11B
Fest of
the best
Euro Express can
help you get your
schunkel on.

1


Champion, a cockatiel, sits on the shoulder of his owner at a local coffee shop.



Tower No. 3 changes approved


By J.J. Andrews
ASSISTANT EDITOR


LIT 3GO)~ I 8

Island Queen
This cruise shows how
the other 1 percent lives.

DTAWS 116A


Shirley Brasheais
Thomas Couser
Lane services
F. Rov Haley
Jack Rutlan


Vincent Salamino
Katherine
Schackert
Richard Scherch
Patricia Vartanian


Air Now ....... .................. 2B
British Open Pub ................4L6
Buddy's Pizza .. ................... 6LG
Cafe Venice.. ...... ........... 11LG
Denny s......... ..... .. .15LG
Durango............ ............... 4LG
Jon's Water Mart...... ..........6B
Presiige Auto........................9A
Splish Splash ..................6LG
Thai Bistro ........................... 7LG


Good morning, Gondolier
Sun subscriber,
GREG MILLER


Venice Planning Commis-
sion has recommended ap-
proval for Phase III of the
Waterfront on Venice Island
project by Waterford Com-
panies;
Only a pair of residents
spoke up at the special excep-
tion hearing Tuesday. The
controversial issues were all
settled in 2001, allowing for
up to 105 feet in total height


and residences within the
Commercial, General zoning
district.
Tuesday's special excep-
tion was for setbacks and
parking space widths at the
parking garage. Resident con-
cerns were with requiring
developers to keep the green
space along the Intracoastal
Waterway and bike path.
"What's to say, down the
road, the land next to the
building couldn't be changed
into a waterfront restaurant


or something?" one resident
asked.
Venice Planning and Zon-
ing Director Tom Slaughter
said the site plan commits the
area as open space and said
there is not enough space.
Attorney Jeff Boone, who
represents Waterford Com-
panies, added that future city
.council's would never ap-
prove such a proposal, any-
way.
As of now, however, there
has been no offer of putting in


writing that the green space
along the bike path would
remain.
What was approved
The special exception
granted reduces side yard set-
backs for a garage from 5 feet
to 3 feet, 6 inches; reduces the
width of parking spaces from
10 feet to 9 feet; and reduces
the number of parking spots
from 196 to 188. The parking
Please see TOWER, 6A


Mark Cook guilty verdict upheld


BY TOMMY MCINTYRE
STAFF WRITER


Unless he can make a suc-
cessful appeal to the Florida
Supreme Court, convicted
child molester Mark Cook
likely will spend the rest of his
life in prison.
The Second District Court
of Appeal issued a ruling last
week upholding Cook's May


CITY NOTES
LEGALS
LET 'EM HAVE IT
LOTTO
OBITUARIES


2003 conviction on two.
counts of capital sexual bat-
tery on a former student. He
was sentenced to two 25-year
terms, to be served consecu-
tively. He is presently serving
his time at Polk Correctional
Institution in Central Florida.
"You don't know how
many people told us we didn't
have a chance (to convict),
but we never gave up," said


Sarasota Sheriffs Sgt. Chris
Iorio, lead investigator in the
Cook case. "There is no doubt
in my mind we convicted a
guilty man."
No apology
Cook, the former (Venice)
Garden Elementary School
principal, steadfastly main-
tained his innocence through-
out the trial, and even in pris-


on.
"He never had the guts to
say to the community or the
victims that he was sorry,"
Iorio said.
lorio said he never really
doubted that the appellate
court would uphold the con-
viction.
"No, I didn't," he said, "but
Please see COOK, 6A


Lease


dispute


settled;


VIP to


move

BY TOMMY MCINTYRE
STAFF WRITER

The Venice Island Pub and
its landlord, The Venice Com-
pany, have reached an agree-
ment ending their nearly
three-year litigation.
"They gave Tony (VIP
owner Tony Tundo) an offer
he couldn't refuse," VIP attor-
ney Robert Harrison said.
"But I can't tell you what the
offer is because there is a con-
fidentiality agreement."
Because of the secrecy sur-
rounding the settlement, it is
unclear whether Tundo, 41,
forfeited rent monies that
TVC refused to accept for
more than a year.
Harrison said both parties
signed off on the agreement
last week
Louis Ursini, TVC's Sara-
sota attorney, would not com-
ment on the settlement.
Harrison said the VIP was
moving from its location at
100 W. Venice Ave. and is no
longer operating from its
familiar second-story sur-
roundings at the comer of
U.S. 41 Business and West
Venice Avenue.
"The pub will continue to
serve the community at a
new, more convenient and
larger location," Harrison
said.
Harrison would not elabo-
rate. ".
Tundo had sent a letter to
TVC several months ago exer-
cising his option to stay at the
100 W. Venice Ave. location for
another two years.
Wanted him out
TVC has wanted to evict
Tundo for at least two of the
three years he has been at that
location.
TVC took Tundo to court
claiming he did not have a
valid lease because his name
was not on the document.
Please see LEASE, 6A


OUR TOWN SECTION LES GO61 SECTION ALSO IN THIS EDmON
SA OPINION 11A CLASS ACTS SB LOCAL PHOTOS 12B DAYTRIP 8LG CLASSIFIED
6A POLICE BEAT 14A CROSSWORD 9B MILESTONES 4B JOE GIORGIANNI 2LG AMERICAN PROFILE
12A SCHOOL BOARD UPDATE ..4A COFFEE BREAK 2B PETS 6B MOVIES 10LG
5A SPORTS 8A DAVE BARRY I]B SOUTH NEWS 7B OPERA HIGHLIGHTS 4LG
14A WEATHER 5A IN SHAPE 10B VENUE 3B '"
... ." .. .,_ '4A _-S .







WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


l_1ouid you, could you fancy a fish fry

If you didn't know better, .. 'f.*.i'.- - f
you would think they lived ,.'
here. After all, Bartow broth- ..
ers Ralph and Clarence Meeks .."
have been vacationing in the .
area for more than 20 years. -.,
And every year it's the same. '
plan: Fish all day, feast all -.
night. "We do it just to have
fun," says Ralph, carefully -
baiting a hook as he eyeballs a
3-foot snook swimming .
under the dock. Brother
Clarence filets mullet and-
tosses scraps to birds. "Some
people don't like the taste of
mullet, but I do," Clarence .
smiles. "We catch a lot of
them and have a big fish fry."


A snowy egret looking for handouts lands next to Bartow resident Clarence Meeks, who filets a
catch of mullet on Manasota Key.


The aged hands of Ralph Meeks baits a tiny hook
while fishing with his brother on Manasota Key.
The brothers, both retired transportation workers
from Bartow, have been vacationing in the area for
more than 20 years.


Ralph Meeks takes care han-
dling the sharp fin of a pin
fish. "They make good bait,"
he says, eyeing a snook swim-
ming under the dock.


Ralph Meeks shows his catch of pin fish, each caught with bait-
ed hook. "They're pretty smart the way they eat the bait right
off the hook," Meeks says.


SUN PHOTOS BY JONATHAN FREDIN


Ralph Meeks casts a line in the Intracoastal Waterway while fishing with his brother, Clarence.


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WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005 vl- , ,





Trimble: Changing inside and out at VRMC


STAFF REPORT

Melody Trimble, chief ex-
ecutive officer of Venice
Regional Medical Center,
recently took the time to
answer some questions about
what is under way or being
planned for the hospital.
Q. From the outside, it cer-
tainly appears you are mak-
ing a lot of changes at the
hospital. What remodeling
are you doing?
A. Certainly the most visi-
ble change we are making is
to the exterior of the hospital
building. We have sealed the
building, are replacing 25 roofs
and are well into adding the
stucco and new paint Work on
that project should be com-
pleted by early next year.
We are also almost finished
upgrading our 3 North nurs-
ing unit to provide a far more
comfortable environment for
our patients. We have install-
ed individual digital televi-
sions and have ordered new
furniture for those rooms.
Once that is completed, we
will begin on the 4 North unit
and continue through the
hospital until we have up-
graded all of the patient
accommodations.
Q. Any other changes
patients will notice?
A. One of the most exciting
projects is beginning in the
next few weeks with the aes-
thetic improvements to our
second-floor Transitional
Care Unit. Once the improve-
ments are complete, we will
proceed with conversion of
the unit to acute care medical-
surgical unit. These all-private
rooms will provide the best
location for our growing Joint
Replacement and Orthope-
dics program.
Using these beds for
acute-care patients will allow
us to move them out of the
emergency care center more
quickly. Some of our long-
time physicians, including
Dr. Michael Jacquith and Dr.
Bryan Smith, feel this is one of
the best improvements we can
make for our patients.
Q. What is TCU and who
will provide those services in
the future?
' A. TCU is a skilled nursing
unit for patients needing ad-
ditional assistance in order
to return to self-sufficiency.
When we evaluated our
options for opening more


beds to acute care, we learned
that a number of other facili-
ties offering the same short-
term, specialty-care beds had
excess capacity, which will
assure resources for individu-
als who need this type of care.
Q. You mentioned expand-
ing services. What is planned?
A. We have had seven
months to evaluate the hospi-
tal's resources and the com-
munity's needs related to
health care. Working closely
with officials from SCOPE,
who were responsible for the
countywide evaluation of
health-care needs through the
Community Health Improve-
ment Project, it is clear that
the top disease categories are
psychoses, heart disease, can-
cer and stroke.
We have a strong open-
heart program and services
for cancer and stroke care.
However, with psychiatric care
ranking as one of the top
diagnoses in Sarasota County,
we are pursuing the return of
geriatric psychiatric services
to the Venice hospital.
At our HealthPark outpa-
tient facility, we are installing
a new state-of-the-art, 64-slice
CT scanner. There are cur-
rently only four in Florida.
Also at HealthPark, consistent
with the county health needs
assessment, we will be en-
hancing our wound healing
program for the diabetic and
cardiac patient by adding two
hyperbaric chambers. We are
also planning to launch a
sleep disorders clinic at the
HealthPark facility.
Emergency care services
was reconfigured for the initi-
ation of a "Fast Track" service
on Aug. 1, which allows for
expedited treatment for pa-
tients with less-urgent care
needs. When those patients
come to the emergency care
center, a nurse will evaluate -
triage whether their illness
or injury allows them to be
treated in our Fast Track area.
Those that will benefit from
the service will be escorted
to the six-bed unit to be eval-
uated and treated.
It is important to under-
stand that Fast Track is not
walk-in care where an individ-
ual can access the services
directly. The nurse who eval-
uates their illness or injury
will be able to determine
their appropriateness for Fast
Track.


Since the service began in
August, time spent in Fast
Track has averaged less than
one hour for these patients.
At the same time, the average
length of stay for more urgent
patients has been reduced
significantly.
Q. Any services you decid-
ed not to provide?
A. We will continually re-
evaluate the health-care
needs of our communities
and plan our services accord-
ingly. There will be times
that we expand and others
where we cannot justify
adding certain services.
For instance, we evaluated
establishing a comprehensive
rehabilitation program. In
discussions with the state
agency, however, we, learned
that they have determined
there is no current need in
our district.
Just so the community
knows, we also re-evaluated
offering obstetrical services
in Venice to see if the pop-
ulation had grown enough to
support a quality program.
However, our study showed
that we would still be below
the 500-birth level that is
needed to assure the highest
level of competency.
Q. What about quality ini-
tiatives?
A. We compile a great deal
of information about our
outcomes. For instance, the
Venice Regional Heart Center
program has outcomes that
exceed the national norms,
and our orthopedics program
has also been recognized
each of the past three years
for excellence in joint re-
placement.
I have been very impress-
ed by the quality of the phy-
sicians in Venice and sur-
rounding areas. The com-
munity is very fortunate to
have them.
The Center for Medicare
and Medicaid Services, in
conjunction with the Joint
Commission on Accredita-
tion of Health Care Organ-
izations, recently established
national quality improve-
ment goals that measure all
hospitals on how they han-


CARE





Cal
BilKel

fo r


SUN PHOTO BY BOB MUDGE
Venice Regional Medical Center is showing its new colors, as exterior renovations progress
along the eastern facade of the facility.


die patients with, pneu-
monia, heart failure, heart
attacks and surgical infec-
tion. Hospital participation
is mandatory.
I am very pleased to tell
you that, while we have
ranked high nationally and
in the state of Florida since
the beginning of this initia-
tive, the latest outcomes data,
released in March show
Venice Regional Medical
Center with the highest over-
all rating in Sarasota County.
While there are entities who,
pay for evaluation of their
services or who have the
number and/or volume of
services to be ranked in other
studies, CMS is the one
organization where the play-
ing field is level for all hospi-
tals across the country,
whether they are in major
metropolitan areas or in
smaller communities.
As you know, we have a
population that is more ad-
vanced in age, which means
they are at increased risk for
heart disease and stroke. We


are working with the Joint
Commission to achieve the
Certified Stroke Center des-
ignation so that we can be
recognized for having one of
the highest standards of care
for stroke patients. The hos-
pital's track record is very
good and our quality depart-
ment is pulling together the
data so we can file for this
designation by the end of
the year.
Q. Anything else you think
the community should
know?
A. I want the community
to know that we are invest-
ing almost $9 million for
these enhancements be-
cause we are dedicated to
providing a comforting en-
vironment and the highest
quality of care for our pa-
tients.
Staff is also important in
accomplishing those goals.
Our recruiting efforts have
been very successful, with 51
new staff members in our
last orientation. We launched
a "recruiting 30 nurses in 30


days" campaign during Sep-
tember and have added 18
full-time plus a number of
part-time, pool and seasonal
nurses already. .
We have also started a
Creating A Respectful En-
vironment team and some
new customer satisfaction
initiatives. I am a member of
the CAR.E. team along with
others in senior leadership
who visit patients during
their stay to find out how
effective we were in meeting
their care expectations. I find
the visits very rewarding.
Also share with your
readers how very pleased we
are to be in this community.
It is an absolutely wonderful
place to be and we all con-
sider ourselves privileged to
be able to care for our neigh-
bors, our friends and the
greater community.
Oh, I almost forgot, the
high school also has an ex-
cellent girls volleyball pro-
gram! (Tinder's daughter
plays on the VHS girls varsity
volleyball team.)


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Direct Phone Numbers:
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000
Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220 Classified 207-1200
Editorial/Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified/Advertising Fax 485-3036
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100
Community Web Site http://www.venicegondolier.com
I DayStar Communications 207-7800
Publisher: Robert A. Vedder Editor: Bob Mudge
President: Derek Dunn-Rankin


VENICE S
Goindolier Sun
1 NcEmWuscovINTOCa tM ROWJ8WO.sWEEKLY wws

USPS (221-700) ISSN (1536-1063)
The VENICE GONDOLIER SUN, an edition of The Sun, is published
every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday by The Sun.
200 East Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285.
Periodicals Postage paid at Venice, Florida and additional mailing centers.


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4A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21,2005


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SUN PHOTO BY JJ. ANDREWS
City Manager Marty Black, right, signs the new labor deal as AFSCME president Ralph
Hamann, center, and vice president Tim Merritt watch. Representatives from the city of
Venice and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Local
1718, signed the new labor agreement Tuesday that will keep workers under contract
until Sept. 30, 2008. Nearly every city worker who isn't a firefighter, police officer or man-
ager is represented by AFSCME, which was the first union in Sarasota County to negotiate
a sliding scale for health insurance contributions by workers.




Senice High to get



p with reforms


County, school employees sign


off on $13.5 million package


Most of the increase in salaries is tied
to a longer school day, but it's contingent
upon a continued 1-mill education tax.


BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER


Teachers will receive signif-
icantly higher raises for the
2005-06 school year under the
contract ratified by school
employees late Tuesday after-
noon and approved by the
Sarasota County School Board
last night.
The negotiated agreement
with Sarasota Classified/
Teachers Association guaran-
tees an across-the-board 4.25
percent salary increase (iden-
tical to the last two years) for
both teachers and classified
staff.
An additional 7.1 percent
increase becomes effective
Jan. 2, 2006, for teachers who
will work an extra 30 minutes
each day. The increase in pay,
is contingent upon voter ap-
proval of the 2006 referen-
dum.
"We look at this in two
parts," said Scott Lempe, exec-
utive director of human re-
sources. "The 4.25 represents
essentially a cost of living
increase. The 7.1 percent in-
crease is more pay for more
work."
"What's driving our de-
sign," Lempe said, "is a desire
to close the achievement gap
by having more time for
teachers to spend with stu-
dents in order to improve
their performance."
The agreement also pro-
vides additional changes to
the salary schedule, including


built-in longevity increases
for many employees (1 per-
cent annually) and for those
employees who improved
their education (4 percent for
roughly every 30 credits
earned).
Each percent increase in
salary costs the district an
estimated $2 million.
The package totals $13.5
million, or 3.5 percent of the
district's overall $375 million
operating budget, according
to Al Weidner, budget director
for Sarasota County schools.
Until now, Sarasota County,
with its seven-hour duty day,
had one of the shortest in the
state. The newly approved 7.5-
hour school day places Sara-
sota County at the middle
point. Classified employees
already work a longer day
and don't qualify for the addi-
tional pay.
"It's a very fair settlement,"
said Barry Dubin, executive
director of SC/TA. "By my cal-
culations, teachers could earn
13.7 percent more pay. That's a
significant increase. It's really
(unheard of) these days.
"Obviously some people
don't want to work the longer
day. But most support it, and
the district is compensating
you for the longer day. It's an
appropriate tradeoff," Dubin
said.
Tied to referendum
The extended day pay is
contingent on the 1-mill edu-
cation tax referendum being


re-approved by the voters in
March of 2006. Should the tax
referendum fail to pass, the
work day will revert back to
seven hours in the 2006-07
school year and the 7.1 per-
cent salary adjustment will
be eliminated.
For the remainder of the
2005-06 school year the extra
duty time will be used to as-
sist teachers in obtaining
ESOL, reading, gifted or other
required endorsements or
certifications, Dubin said. In
future years, much of the
extra time will be spent on
instruction, he said.
Under the agreement, the
duty day for teacher aides
and paraprofessional aides is
scheduled to increase by a
half hour in the beginning of
the 2006-07 school year. This
would represent an increase
of 7.1 percent of their work
day and pay as well.
The district and employee
union were unable to agree
on a minor change in the
salary schedule designed to
increase pay for beginning
teachers only. The district
sought to drop the first step
on the salary schedule, effec-
tively raising pay by $500 for
first time, teachers, but SC/TA
objected to the special treat-
ment.
"We don't know why the
district wanted to single out
instructional personnel," Du-
bin said. "It would have cost
the district only $30,000 to
do the same for the classified
salary schedule. But the dis-
trict didn't agree."
You can e-mail Greg Giles
at: ggiles@venicegondolier.
com.


School district signs contract with education
reform institute to ensure key changes


in five county schools.

BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER

Venice High is one of five
area schools targeted by the
school district for self im-
provement under a contract
approved by the Sarasota
County School Board last
night with the Institute for
Research and Reform in Edu-
cation.
Lori White, associate su-
perintendent for instructional
support services, said the
district needs additional help
with implementing reforms
and that "external pressure
and support" would benefit
the selected schools.
IRRE will provide technical
assistance and training to
Sarasota County central office
staff, as well as Sarasota,
Booker, North Port, Riverview
and Venice high schools to
plan and assist the district
with implementing compre-
hensive high school reform.
The Pennsylvania-based
nonprofit corporation sup-


ports the First Things First
initiative that aims to raise
academic performance with-
out remediation. The FTF
framework helps educators
and school administrators
focus on research-based data
collection tools and reports
that conform to requirements
of No Child Left Behind.
Specifically, IRRE will provide
technical support to identified
schools on how to prepare
for high stakes assessments
using peer observation and
instructional coaching.
IRRE also helps schools
effectively implement or im-
prove already existing Small
Learning Communities and
Family Advocate Systems.
Both are currently utilized by
area schools.
The initiative requires a
school to hire a full or part-
time school improvement
facilitator. IRRE supported
schools are usually required to
adopt block schedules of at
least 80 minutes in core sub-
ject areas and provide addi-


tional instructional time.
Total cost for the reform
assistance contract is $1.2
million over a three-year
period, backdated to March
1, 2005. Payments for year
one are $273,952, due upon
signing, and the same amount
due January 1, 2006, for plan-
ning.
While the contract is only
now being approved, the dis-
trict has been working with
IRRE staff since April of last
school year when. it provided
an orientation on using re-
search-based tools. Titled
"Measuring What Matters,"
IRRE staff introduced new
methods to monitor student
progress, share individual
academic and behavior pro-
filbs in family conferences
and one-on-one discussions
with students.
A summer institute in July
with IRRE staff was held to
train key district educators on
protocols to implement the
FTF framework.
IRRE, organized in 1996,
last year served 67 schools
throughout Illinois, Kansas,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Mis-
souri and Texas, in mostly
economically disadvantaged,
minority communities.


First complete


release of FCAT today


STAFF REPORT


Gov. Jeb Bush will hold a
press conference in Tallahas-
see today announcing the
first complete release, of a
Florida Comprehensive As-
sessment Test.
Florida will release the
2004 Grade 10 reading and
mathematics tests, which
were actual tests taken by
students and are no longer
in use. The released tests
provide hands-on experi-
ence with the FCAT and


serve as an additional
resource to parents, educa-
tors and students.
Parents and others can
use the tests to provide more
examples of FCAT passages
and questions, and to review
the test length and difficulty
of questions. Parents are
warned not to use the releas-
ed tests to drill students
for next year as the questions
and content will be differ-
ent.
The released tests, are for-
matted like an actual test.


Some of the test questions
were removed for future uses.
The test is posted online
to the Department of Edu-
cation Web site at fldoe.org as
a PDF file. It is not an online
test, but may be downloaded,
printed and taken just like a
regular FCAT.
Bush will be joined by
Education Commissioner
John L. Winn, Florida's Teach-
er of the Year Sam Bennett
and Florida educators who
participated in the FCAT de-
velopment process.


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4A~ VENICE GONDOLIER SUN







VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


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CITY NOTES

Venice rejects
wharf application
City staff has rejected Ven-
ice Fisherman's Wharf owner
John Konecnik's application
for a nine-story condomini-
um tower next to Hatchett
Creek Bridge because the
paperwork was incomplete,
according to City Manager
Marty Black.
Despite all of the detailed
design drawings, Konecnik's
team of lawyers and archi-
tects failed to file the actual
rezoning application needed
to allow residential build-
ings.
"They refiled last week and
they didn't address many of
the basic requirements," Black
said. "We can't guess what the
property owner wants."
The 3.4-acre lot along the
northwest comer of U.S. 41
Business and Intracoastal
Waterway is zoned Com-
mercial, Intensive, which does
not allow residential uses.
Konecnik hopes to obtain
Commercial, General zoning
to allow for up to 105 feet in
height, residential units and
all of the wharf's commercial
businesses. An application
for CG zoning had been on
hold for several years and
was allowed to expire, accord-
ing to Black.
Existing zoning of CI would
allow for Konecnik to build a
boat storage facility, which
the wharf owner said he'll do if
his residential proposal is
denied by city council.
Emergency response
The city's sewage and,
drinking water departments
need to react with the same
sense of urgency when a bro-
ken pipe is reportedas fire-
fighters do when someone
reports a fire, according to
City Manager Marty Black.
This is the new policy di-
rection after complaints on
how the Venice Utilities De-


THE WEATHER


apartment handled a major
sewage line break last Friday
on Ridgewood Avenue, be-
tween U.S. 41 Bypass and Bay
Indies Boulevard.
"When someone gets the
call, there shouldn't be any
paperwork going on in the
office. ... They need to re-
spond much like you would
to a fire," Utilities Manager
Chris Sharek said Tuesday.
Workers were alerted to
the busted 8-inch sewage
line, but it took at least 40
minutes to shut off the flow
of raw sewage as equipment
was assembled and workers
mobilized. An estimated 4,000
gallons of raw sewage spilled
into Hatchett Creek during
that 40 minutes.
Sharek and other utility
managers are working on re-
sponse times to prevent that
long a delay from happening
again.
This is the second time in
two months management re-
sponse to broken sewage
lines has been called into
question. Workers repairing a
broken line July 2 next to
Patches Restaurant allowed
water to flow freely into
stormwater pipes for nearly
36 hours.
It was almost a day later
when they realized the water
"might" have been contami-
nated with sewage, but no
tests were ever done. Those
stormwater pipes also empty
into Hatchett Creek.
Repair workers are now to
"assume" the water is con-
taminated at all line breaks
until documented testing
states otherwise, according to
Black's new policy.
Sharek and other utilities
department managers will
present a comprehensive up-
date to Venice City Council at
its next meeting, Tuesday,
Sept. 27.
Compiled byAssistat
Editor, J. Andrews.


I VEICEOUTOO


Wednesday
High 88, Low 75
Cloudy and gusty
with some rain.

Thursday
High 90, Low 75
Partly cloudy and
breezy with scattered
rain.
Friday
High 90, Low 75
Partly cloudy with
scattered rain.

Saturday
High 90, Low 74
Partly cloudy with
scattered rain.-


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
(Including Sarasota and Charlotte counties)
Northeast winds at 30 to 60 knots.
Seas 4 to 6 feet, rough chop.
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
Northeast winds at 5 to 15 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet, moderate chop.


High Tuesday 90
Low Tuesday 75
Rainfall
Total this week 0.00 in.
Total this year 32.52 in.
Normal YTD 31.63 in.
Rainfall totals are for a 24-hour
period ending at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturdayas recorded at the
offidal weather station in
Venice.


or







0" 0


Below
normal
for
Sept.



Sept.
rain
0.02"


7:27 p.m.
7:19 a.m.

10:36 p.m.
12:00 p.m.


DATE
WED 21
THU 22
FRI 23
SAT 24


HIGH HIGH LOW
A.M. P.M. A.M.
1:52 3:54 9:35
2:19 5:12 10:30
2:50 ----- 11:33
- 3:29 ----- -----
*STRONG TIDE
a-A.M. p P.M.


LOW
P.M.
8:40
8:42
12:50


FLORIDA LOTlERY


Sept. 19.....244
Sept. 18 .....046
Sept. 17 .....607
Sept. 16 .....266
Sept. 15.....656


Sept. 19.
Sept. 18.
Sept. 17.
Sept. 16.
Sept. 15.


.. 4-12-17-19-25
.. 3-5-25-28-29
.. 7-10-19-26-35
.. 1-8-10-14-36
.. 3-12-19-31-33


Payoff for Sept. 18
2 5-digit winners.........$82,940.34
201 4-digit winners ...........$133
7,126 3-digit winners........$10.50
2-digit winners ......... Quick Pick ticket


Sept. 19...8828
, Sept. 18 ...2179
w- Sept. 17 ...3237
* Sept. 16 ...6652
Sept. 15...5228


Sept. 16 ...............9-13-15-24
M ega Ball ..............................6
Sept. 13 ...................15-22-37-42
Mega Ball 12
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for Sept. 16
0 4 of 4 + MB $-
14 4 of 4.......................... $771
80 3 of 4 + MB.............$295.50
2,038 3 of 4..................$34.50
2,350 2 of 4 + MB..........$20.50


L TTO


Sept. 17. 10-42-45-47-52-53
Sept. 14... 3-6-11-15-39-51
Sept. 10. 7-20-40-41-43-47
Sept.07.. 1-15-21-40-46-49
Sept. 03.. 9-11-18-27-40-51
Aug. 31.. 3-13-14-'19-23-53


Payoff for Sept. 17
0 6-digit winners.................. $ -
53 5-digit winners......$7,178.50
3,069 4-digit winners........$100.50
69,603 3-digit winners...........$6
Drawing occurs Wednesdays, Saturdays


Estimated jackpot $9 million


SARASOTA COUNTY BRIEFS


Neighborhood grant
program workshops

The next cycle of grant
orientation workshops to
teach the application proc-
ess for the Sarasota County
Neighborhood Grant Pro-
gram will start Saturday,
Oct. 15.
The workshops are open
to representatives of neigh-
borhood associations, home-
owner associations and in-
formal groups of neighbors
who wish to use the match-
ing grant program to fulfill
needs in their communities
that preserve character and
value, enhance safety, build
neighborhood leadership or
improve environmental and


physical health.
Neighborhood groups can
match the county grant funds
with cash, volunteer hours,
direct donations by neigh-
bors, other grant sources, or
by donations -of materials
and services. A maximum of
$200,000 is available twice
per year, and selected neigh-
borhoods may receive up to
$12,000 during each grant
cycle.
The deadline to apply for
funding during the current
grant cycle is Feb. 13, 2006.
A representative of a
neighborhood group must
take, the workshop to apply
for the grant program. Space
is limited and reservations
are required.


For more information, call
the Sarasota County Call
Center at 861-5000 or. send
an e-mail to neighbor@scgov.
net.
Assistance available
for Katrina victims
Volunteer assistants are
available to meet with people
who have been displaced
from Hurricane Katrina to
connect them with agencies
providing shelter, food, cloth-
ing, medical care, transpor-
tation and job placement
assistance and other needed
services.
This service is offered
from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily,
Monday through Friday, at
the Sarasota County Health


and Human Services Cen-
ter, 2200 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. No appointments
are needed.
The Sarasota County In-
ternally Displaced Persons
Workgroup, initiated this ef-
fort in direct response to
needs of the increasing num-
ber of displaced persons
from Hurricane Katrina who
are now in our community.
The volunteer assistants
include members of the
Medical Reserve Corps of
Sarasota County, Friendship
Volunteer Center, Sarasota
County Government and the
Florida Conference of the
United Methodist Church.
For more information, call
861-2955.


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We want to help.


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Boys' & Girls' Swimwear

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Newborns' Novelty
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Girls' Dresses

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Misses' Knit Tops

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Men's Denim Shorts

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Ladies' Handbags

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Ladies' Shoes & Sandals

$20 orig. $80
Traditional Dresses
for misses, petites and women

$22 orig. $88
Better Knit Tops
for misses, petites & women

$49.50 orig. $198
Better Career Jackets
for misses, petites and women

Selected styles. Selection
varies by store. Home at Port
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6A~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~~ VEIEGNOIRSNWDNSASP.2,20


TOWER from page 1lA

garage will be where the old
Amoco gas station now sits.
The second floor at the
parking garage would be stor-
age compartments and the
clubhouse for residents living
at Waterfront.
As for the third condo-
minium tower, it will be nine
stories and 105 feet tall. The
first floor will be parking and


the next eight stories com-
prise the 34 residential units.
Outside appearance of the
third tower will be identical to
the other two already fin-
ished. Final density of the
Waterfront project will be
15.2 dwelling units per acre,
according to the staff report.
None of what planning
commission decided Tuesday
applies to the Commercial,
Mixed Use District that is in


front of city council. All areas
affected by the CMU proposal
are in Phase IV of the Water -
front project.
Members will resume the
public hearing at the Oct. 11
council meeting. Once the
CMU is approved or denied,
Miller then must have his
zoning application voted on.
You can e-maillJ.
Andrews at: jandrews
@venicegondoliercom.


This former gas station will be
turned into a parking garage,
clubhouse and storage area
for residents at Waterfront on
Venice island. Site plans and a
special exception for Phase III
was approved by planning
commission Tuesday.




PHOTO COURTESY THE CITY OF VENICE


LEASE from page lA


However, a lease in the name
of Tundo's parent company,
Advanced Multimedia Tech-
nologies Inc., to operate at
that location until 2007, was
signed in September 2002.
Over the months, Sarasota
County Judge Emanuel Lo-
Galbo Jr. consistently ruled in


Tundo's favor, saying essen-
tially that ifTVC wanted to get
relief under the Land-
lord/Tenant Act, it would
have to admit there was a
lease. Accepting Tundo's rent
checks would have meant it
recognized a valid lease
agreement existed.


Laundry list
Exactly why TVC wanted
Tundo out was never clearly
articulated by either side
despite a laundry list of com-
plaints.
Among other allegations,
the original eviction notice
claimed that:


Serious complaints about
Tundo were made to the
Venice police and fire depart-
ments.
Tundo made threats
against the building owner
and the owner's contractor.
Other tenants com-
plained about Tundo.


Tundo damaged the
building.
Tundo allowed customers
to become intoxicated, which
created potential liability to
TVC and other building ten-
ants.
There were numerous,
violations of city codes and


ordinances.
Harrison said at the time
that TVC was trying to slander
Tundo through the media. He
charged the dispute off to a
"personality conflict."
You can e-mail Tommy
McIntyre at: tmcintyre
@venicegondoliercom.


COOK from page 1A


then you never know."
Iorio said he went to the
appellate court Web site daily
to check on whether the
opinion had been rendered.

Hardest case
Iorio has helped put scores
of sex offenders behind bars
in his years as an investigator,
but the Cook case stands out.
"It was probably the hardest
case," he said, "because of the
length of time between when
the crime was committed and
when we went to court."
The victim against whom
Cook committed the crime


DENIED from page 1A

crowd.
"In all my years, I have
never been at a meeting that
was as rude as that one
there," Myers said. "They
ought to be ashamed of
themselves."
Attorney Jeff Boone spoke
to commission members
afterward and blamed the
rude crowd on one person in
the audience. Boone wouldn't
say the person's name, but
one could easily assume he
meant fellow land-use attor-
ney Dan Lobeck.
Almost all of the Waterford
residents tossed their support
behind the Sorrento Ranches
Homeowners Association as
that group along with
Lobeck as its attorney- chal-
lenged nearbyVilla Lago's
request to be changed to low
density residential.


did not come forward with
criminal charges until 2002,
when he was in his 30s.
Cook, 53, was charged with
molesting three students
under 12 years old in 1977,
1978 and 1981. He was arrest-
ed Feb. 19, 2002.
While the trial involved
charges relating to only one of
the victims, two other victims
were allowed to testify in the
trial.
Cook was tried and con-
victed regarding only the one
victim.
After his conviction, Cook
entered a no-contest plea on


Lobeck argued that devel-
opers annexed into the city in
order to avoid compatibility
restrictions in Sarasota Coun-
ty.
"I'm here to suggest the
Boone train be derailed," said
Lobeck, which drew a long
round of applause.
The big difference be-
tween the two requests, how-
ever, is how Villa Lago's appli-
cation matches up with what
the county already had plan-
ned, but Royal Capri's request
would've actually made it
more dense. The denied
Royal Capri plan was for the
city's moderate density (6-13
units per acre), and Villa
Lago's approved was for low
density (less than five units an
acre).
Boone said he must con-
sult with his client on their


the other charges (the two
victims who testified).

Perplexed
Derek Byrd, Cook's trial
attorney, was perplexed by
the appellate ruling.
"It's an unusual opinion,"
Byrd said. "He (Cook) raised a
number of appellate issues
and they ruled on only one."
Byrd said the whole 27-
page appellate ruling ad-
dressed whether the dis-
missal of a disciplinary com-
plaint in the 1980s in which
one of the witnesses testified'
meant that person couldn't


options for the 40-acre Royal
Capri site.

Other amendments
Here's the rest of the future
land.use amendments, all of
which were recommended
for approval by planning
commission.
City council will have final
approval on all these:
Rinker Materials of Flor-
ida Nearly 10 acres on the
north side of Gene Green
Road, 900 feet east of Knights
Trail Road; change future use
from "rural" to "industrial."
In-Island Development'
- About 1.8 acres at 437
Nokomis Ave.; change future
use from "office, professional
and institutional" to "medi-
um density residential" at 14-
18 units per acre.
Nokomis Groves/Kem-


testify in Cook's criminal trial.
The Sarasota County Sher-
iff's Office, Sarasota County
School District and the state
attorney's office investigated
allegations in 1984 that Cook
was involved in sexual and
drug activity with children
under 16 years old.
No criminal charges were
ever filed against Cook in that
incident. However, he was
suspended as Garden princi-
pal during the investigation
and reinstated when it ended.
The Second DCA ruled
that there was no error in
allowing the testimony.


erer Sixty acres on Knights
Trail Road, north of Laurel
Interstate Business Center
and Caribbean Bay Club;
change future use from
"rural" at 1 unit per 5 acres to
"medium density residential"
at 14-18 units per acre.
Knights Trail Excavating
Nearly 79 acres on Knights
Trail Road, north of Laurel
Interstate Business Center
and Caribbean Bay Club;
change future use from
"rural" at 1 unit per 5 acres to
"medium density residential"
at 14-18 units per acre.
San Lino Twenty acres
at the southeast corner of
.Auburn Road and Venice
Avenue; change future use
from "medium density resi-
dential" at 5-9.9 units an acre
to "moderate density residen-
tial" at 6-13 units an acre.


Byrd said one of the legiti-
mate appealable issues was
the William's Rule, the intro-
duction of multiple victims in
the one trial.
However, the appellate
court only peripherally ad-
dressed the Williams issue in
its ruling.
Allowing all three victims
to testify in one trial "is what
doomed Mark Cook," Byrd
said after the trial.

Nothing to lose
Byrd said Cook was offered
15 years in prison prior to trial
but refused. He said Cook


Stephenson Property -
About 0.71 acres at the corner
of Guild and Fairway Drive;
change future use from
"moderate density residen-
tial" at 2-4.9 units an acre to
"medium density residential"
at 14-18 units an acre.
Country Club Con-
dominiums About 1.13
acres at the corner of Guild,
Fairway and Golf drives;
change future use from "low
density residential" at less
than 2 units an acre to "medi-
um density residential" at 14-
18 units per acre.
Villa Lago About 46
acres at on Pinebrook Road,
just south of Laurel Road;
change future use from
"moderate density residen-
tial" at 2-4.9 units an acre to
"low density residential" at
less than 5 units an acre.


would have served roughly
five years and had he taken
the deal, could have been eli-
gible for release within the
next two years.
Byrd said he expects Cook
will try to take his case to the
Florida Supreme Court.
"It's not that easy getting
the high court to hear a case,"
Byrd said, "but I expect he will
try what's he got to lose?"
Cook's appellate attorney,
Benedict Kuehne of Miami,
did not return phone calls.
You can e-mail Tommy
McIntyre at: tmcintyre
@venicegondolier.com.


VICA About 399 acres
at at 2662 Border Road
extending north to Laurel
Road; change future use
from "major employment
center" to "moderate density
residential" at 6-13 units per
acre.
APAC, Venice Minerals,
Miami Valley Ready Mix and
CEMEX-- Nearly 279 acres in
t the northeast quadrant of the
city, north of' Laurel and
Knights Trail, via access Gene
Green Road; change future
use from "rural" to "industri-
al, commercial."
Fiore Di Venezia Five
acres on East Venice Avenue,
west of Auburn Road; change
future use from "medium
density residential" at 5-9.9
units an acre to "moderate
density residential" to six-13
units per acre.


NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO:
2005-DR-8691-SC
MARTHA GIURIA,
Petitioner
and
ANGEL V. GIURIA,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE


TO: CHRISTIAN ALLEN RIDDLE TO: ANGEL V. GIURIA
1795 Birch Drive UNKNOWN
Venice, FL 34293
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that
has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of
you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
your written defenses, if any, to it on MARTHA GIURIA, Whose
on KRISTIN M. RIDDLE whose address is 1606 Falls of Venice
address is 1037 Rosedale Rd, Cir., Venice, FL 34292-3991 on
Venice, FL 34293 on or before or before October 17, 2005, and
October 24, 2005, and file the file the original with the clerk of this
original with the clerk of this Court Court at 4000 S. Tamiami Trail,
at 4000 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice, Venice, Florida 34293, before
Florida 34293, before service on service on Petitioner or immediate-
Petitioner or immediately there- ly thereafter. If you fail to do so, a
after. If you fail to do so, a default default may be entered against you
may be entered against you for the for the relief demanded in the peti-
relief demanded in the petition, ion.


Copies of all court documents in
this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of Circuit
Court's office. You may 'review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of Circuit
Court's office notified of your cur-
rent address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.


Copies of all court documents in
this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of Circuit
Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of Circuit
Court's office notified .of your cur-
rent address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
'Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in sanc-
tons, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.


Dated September 15, 2005. Dated September 7, 2005.


KAREN E. RUSHING
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: P. Frank
Deputy Clerk
PUBLISHED:
SEPTEMBER 21, 2005
SEPTEMBER 28, 2005
OCTOBER 5, 2005
OCTOBER 12, 2005


KAREN E. RUSHING
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Amy Thomas
Deputy Clerk
PUBLISHED:
SEPTEMBER 14, 2005
SEPTEMBER 21, 2005
SEPTEMBER 28, 2005
OCTOBER 5, 2005


NOTICE OF ACTION


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
nrCnCMT' nAT F nF nFATU


NOTICE TO CREDITORS IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR this notice is September 11,
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA 2005.
PROBATE DIVISION Attorney for Personal Repre-
File No.: 2005 CP 7'764NC sentative:
Division: PROBATE David A. Dunkin
IN RE: ESTATE OF Attorney for Shirley Weidhuner
BARBARA LORAINE COLVIN Florida Bar No. 136726
Deceased. 170 W. Dearborn Street
NOTICE TO'CREDITORS Englewood, Florida 34223-
The administration of the 3290
estate of Barbara Loraine Telephone: (941) 474-7753
Colvin, deceased, whose date Personal Representative:
of death was March 6, 2005, Shirley Weidhuner
and whose Social Security 1131 Gladstone Blvd.
Number is 304-38-6087, is Englewopd, Florida 34223
pending in the Circuit Court Publish: September 14, 21,
for Sarasota County, Florida, 2005
Probate Division, the address 113573. 1512794
of which is Sarasota County
Circuit Court, P.O. Box 3079, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
Sarasota, Florida 34230- SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
3079. The names and PROBATE DIVISION
addresses of the personal rep- IN RE: ESTATE OF
resentative and the'personal ROBERT M. BOWMAN, '
representative's attorney are Deceased.
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent File No. 2005-CP-8083-SC
and other persons having NOTICE TO CREDITORS
claims or demands against The administration of the estate of
decedent's estate on whom a ROBERT M. BOWMAN,
copy of this notice is required deceased, whose date of death
to be served must file their was April 8, 2005; and whose
claims with this court WITHIN Social Security Number is 271-36-
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS 9000 is pending in the Circuit
AFTER THE TIME OF THE Court for Sarasota County, Flori-
da, Probate Division; the address
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS of which is 4000 South Tamlami,
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER Trail, Venice, Florida 34293.
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A The names and addresses of the
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON personal representative and the
THEM. personal representative's attorney
All other creditors of the are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
decedent and other persons other persons having claims or
having claims or demands demands against decedent's
against decedent's estate estate, on whom a copy of this
must file their claims with this notice is required to be served,
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS must file their claims with this court
AFTER THE DATE OF THE WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
FIRST PUBLIC ON TH MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
NOTICE. THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH- AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 THEM.
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE All other creditors of the decedent
SW F R and other persons having claims or
CODE WILL BE FOREVER demands against decedent's estate
BARRED. must file their claims with this court
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
'The date of first publication of this
notice is September 21, 2005.
Personal Representative:
VINCENT BOWMAN
707 Patton Circle, No. 16
Winterville, North Carolina
28590
Mark W. Mazzeo
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Florida Bar No. 119350
4140 Woodmere Park Blvd.
Suite 4
Venice, Florida 34293
Telephone: (941) 408-8555
Fax: (941) 408-8556
PUBLISH: September 21, 28,
2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
R. BLISS FULLER,
Deceased.
File No. 2005-CP-8574-SC
Division: Probate


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE. OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE,
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.,
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS SEP-
TEMBER 21, 2005.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


OTHER NOTICES


three (3) months of the date of the IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
first publication of this notice or, as THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
to any creditors or persons served CIRCUIT
with a copy of this notice, the cred- IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF
itor or person served must file their SARASOTA, STATE OF FLORIDA
claim no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of service on the IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
creditor. 1996 Ford Thunderbird
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS VIN 1FALP6248TH162613
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV- Case No.: 2005.CA-2396-NC
ER BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI- NOTICE OF ACTION
CATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
EDTEMBER 21 200nn5


Personal Representative:
RANDALL C. CONCELLO, ESQ.


Personal Representatives: P.O. Box 243
Julie A. Packard Sarasota, FL 34230
601 Sennebec Road
Union, Maine 04862 Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Craig A. Fuller RANDALL C. CONCELLO, ESQ.
631 Snnebec Road P. 0. BOX 243
Union, Maine 04862 Sarasota, Florida 34230
Tele: 941-955-1591


Skip Berg ax: 941-351-2259
Attorney for Julie A. Packard FBN 0126661
and Craig A. Fuller PUBLISH: September 21. 28,
Florida Bar No. 0135988 2005
SKIP BERG, P.A.
Berg & Douglass NOTICE OF SALE
1872 Tamiami Trail South, NOTICE OF SALE
Suite D'.
Venice, FL 34293 NOTICE OF SALE
Telephone: (941)-493-0871
PUBLISH: September 21, 28, Park Isles Mini-Storage,
641 North Tamiami Trail
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Nokomis, Florida 34275
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
rCIRCUIlIT IN ANFODR


TO: Link Olibrisse a/k/a
Eddie Remon Middleton
5766 Brooklyn Avenue
Sarasota, FL 34234
Link Olibrisse a/k/a
Eddie Remon Middleton
2512 24th Street
Sarasota, FL 34234
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to forfeit your interest in the follow-
ing property in Sarasota County,
Florida has been filed, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on Peti-
tioner's attorney, Gerald D.
Siebens, Assistant Attorney Gener-
al, OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GEN-
ERAL, 501 East Kennedy Blvd.,
Ste. 1100, Tampa, Florida 33602,
if you wish to contest this forfeiture
action on or before October 6,
2005, and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before ser-
vice on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter otherwise a
default will be entered against you
Mrlh -~f H-H- i.tIepe-fi


NOTICE TO CREDITORS ant -or the rlif UIdemande in
The administration of the estate o SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA Name of Tenant: tion.e. emdnu 111
The administration of the estate of PROBATE DIVISION Mr. Seth Muir `ion.
R. BLISS FULLER, deceased, PROBATE DIVISION MrO. 1034Seth Muirn
whose date of death was MARCH P.O. Box 1034 Dated: August 18, 2005
13, 2005; is pending in the Circuit IN RE: ESTATE OF Nokomis, Florida 34275
Court for Sarasota County, Florida PATRICK ARTHUR GORDON- PUBLISH:
Probate Division; the address of SOMERS, General description of goods: AUGUST 31, 2005
which is P.O. Box 3079, Saraso- Deceased, Contents of storage unit CN- SEPTEMBER 7, 2005
ta, FL 34230-3079. The names 37 consisting of Miscella-SEPTEMBER 14, 2005
and addresses of the personal rep- File No. 2005-CP-8955-NC 37neous Furniture and Personal SEPTEMBER 21, 2005
resentatives and the personal rep-Effect
resentatives' attorney are set forth NOTICE TO CREDITORS Effects.
below. The administration of the Testate
All creditors of the decedent and Estate of PATRICK ARTHUR Time: 3:30 pm C ll .4'j
other person, who have claims or GORDON-SOMERS, Deceased, Date: Wed, October 19, 2005
demands against decedent's File Number 2005-CP-8955- To be sold as total unit for one
estate, on whom a copy of th;s NC, is pending in the Circuit Court bid price: S Ui
notice is required to be served, for Sarasota County, Florida, the M
must file their claims with this court address of which is 2000 Main .
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE Street, Sarasota, Florida SaleJb. Sur
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE 34237. The names and addresses Sarasota Auction at
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF' of the Personal Representative and Unit CN-37
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) the Personal Representative's attor- 641 N. Tamiami Trail
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER- ney are set forth below. Nokomis, FL 34275 be
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED
NOTICE ON THEM. THAT: PUBLISH tmBr 21
All other creditors of the decedent All creditors of the decedent and PUBLISH: September 21, sa
and other persons who have claims other persons having claims or 28, 2005 -8
or demands against the decedent's demands against the decedent's 48.-o4
estate, must file their claims with estate are required to and must file la ified = Sal4es 8.. -4..
this court WITHIN THREE (3) their claims) with this Court within lassieii ,,,ales


fing
will
ever
the
ime!
256
r
848


WAY,











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NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO:
2005-DR-9037-SC
KRISTIN M. RIDDLE,
Petitioner
and
CHRISTIAN ALLEN RIDDLE,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE


vvu

I ES.


6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


1 the peti-


I


,






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


lite Gold And
ver are High!


DAYS ONLY


Don't
Miss Out.
On This.
Event!!


nt


Ios Id
11 COIN COI COLLECTION


nna IJia
! .,' I I ,-


on the dollar
Also Buying:
Indian Pennies
Buffalo Nickels
Proof Sets
R Mint Sets
Commemoratives
Large Pennies


$1.................$....130& up
$2 1/2 Gold......$130 &up
$3 Gold............$500 & up
$5 Gold.......$..13000 up
$10 Gold..........$21000 &up
$20 Gold..........$4250 & up


1794 to 1
$100'"
1878 to 1!

$20'0 &u


II& PCGS and NGC Coins 1921 to1
I Foreign Gold Coins
Blue Book Large Collections 10ooo n
Collectibles Carson City Dollars Vp & U
1/2 Pennies CARSON C
3 Ct Pieces OT3 E Dollars in th
20 Ct Pieces i w.sww Government Hol


Biglug
10K 14K,18K,22K 24K
Old Wedding Bands Class things,
Broken Chain, Old Gold Watches
White Gold Unmarked Gold
Industrial Gold, Dental Gold
Old Mountings
B7uying
Pl atvIinumI
Platinum Wire, Thermalcuple
Industrial, Jewelry, Crucibl es


oiamonJU
1/4ct. to 10ct. Diamond wanted
Rounds, Ovals, Emerald, Pears,
Marquise, Old Cut Diamonds,
Antique Jewelry, Necklaces, Pins
Cocktail Rings, P atinum, Emeralds,
a. Sapphires, Rubies, Earrings
Wanted
I Engagement Rings
S We Buy
SAll Resaleable Jewelry


Osse il Tavl o ou Hmeo- Bnk
11 II for IME-oE


'1


r aor
rs



904 Silver Certificates
Red $2, Red $5
UP Hawaii, Large Bills
National Currency
UP Confederate
Bring All Old Paper



ie $5o00o, .0000 0, B5,00000
Riders $ sob00o Bills Wanted



Flatware Sets





Tea Sets. Bowls
Jewelry., Antique


Buying Rolex and
Buying All Rolex Watches I


* 18K Presidential
* Submariner
* Two Tone
* Daytona
* Old Rolexes
Men's & Ladies


Bring All Wrist Watches
$or Our Offer


Benrus
Bulova
Elgin
Gruen
Hamilton
Illinois


Omega


Le Coultre


Universal Longines
Vacheron Movado
Audemars Patek-Philippe
Brelling Internalional
Cartier


Pocket Watches
Buying Almost
All Watches
Waltham
Elgin
Hamilton
Illinois
Rockford
o., South Bend
~: Bring in all
SPcket Watches
for our offer


Iii od PiTe s1


Tues., Sept. 20th
Port Charlotte


1/4 CT...100.00...to........400.00 10:00 4:00
1/2 CT...300.00.. .to....1,000.00 Holiday Inn
3/4 CT .500,00...to... .1,500.00 Express
1 CT...1,000.00.. .to....4,000.00 24440 Sandhill Blvd.
2 CT...2,000.00.. .to...10,000.00 Port Charlotte, FL
3 CT...3,000.00.. .to...15,000.00 Exit 170 off 1-75
5 CT...5,000.00.. .to...25,000.00 Just off Kings Highway
We Need All Resaleable Jewelry, Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires, 4 1
Pearls, Diamond Bracelets, Diamond Watches, Earrings, Diamond y4- 7 "64 0 5
Pins, Old Diamonds, Tiffany, We Buy Van Cleef, Pink Gold or
Your Jewelry for your offer! Ossie's Cell 863-409-2125


Wed. and Thurs.
Sept. 21
and Sept. 22
Venice
10:00 4:00
Best Western
400 Commercial Ct.
Venice, FL 34292
Exit 193 off 1-75
Jacaranda Blvd.


ra941-480-9898 se


or
863-409-2125


I,"
~. d


Buyers


- -- I --


if-


- I ~ -I


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IL-


_ I L -- -YI 1


I -I I I I Irl--~-l-Il


n(F n


ITIA-1100:AA% Mo%'&o%4o%








Venice Gondolier Sun



8A
WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 21,2005


SPORTS BRIEFS

Lady Indians

bop Bayshore
The Venice High varsityvol-
leyball team made quick work
of Bayshore Tuesday night,
winning 25-7, 25-16, 25-9 in
Bradenton.
Dana "Doomsday" Dumas
had 12 kills and six blocks.
Natalie Gaudreau had 10 kills.
Casey Taylor had eight kills
and three aces. Marla Cooke
had four kills and three aces.
Venice (8-2 overall, 6-0 in
district) will play host to Fort
Myers-Evangelical Christian
at 7 p.m. Thursday. Evan-
gelical is one of the top teams
in the state in 2A.
Scorpions sting Gators
The Scorpions 10-and-
under AAU baseball team
won two more games to
improve their record to 4-0.
The Scorpions defeated the
Gulf Coast Gators twice, 10-6
and 11-0.
In the first game, Dalton
Tritschler had two hits and
two RBIs. Chris Boldin had a
pair of hits. Joey Buncik was
the winning pitcher.
In the second game, Chris
Boldin fired four no-hit
frames. Hunter Douglas re-
lieved. Charlie Jerla had two
hits and three RBIs. Mike
Brown had a double. The
Scorps turned two double
plays.
The Scorpions play at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the
Englewood Sports Complex
against the Sarasota Moc-
casins.
VMS drops first
The Venice Middle School
volleyball team lost to Laurel-'
Nokomis Monday 25-14,
25-22. Julie Cessna had good
attacks for VMS. Cynthia
Melendez had some solid
serves in the second game.
Kelsey McNamee and Au-
tumn Duyn had good all-
around games. VMS (3-1)
plays Brookside Wednesday.
Faulkner Hitting Camp
The Faulkner Hitting Camp
will be unfolding over the
next several weeks at the
Venice High complex.
Ages 7-11 will meet on
Monday, Sept. 12, 19, 26
and Oct. 3, 10, 24. Ages 12
and up wil meet on Tues-
days, Sept. 13, 20, 27 and Oct.
4, 11, 25. The times are 5:30-
7:30 p.m. The cost is $25
each night.
For more information,
contact Craig Faulkner at
412-3611.


SENIOR SOFTBALL
STANDINGS
FINAL WEDNESDAY SILVER
W L GB
Peluso Air 4 0 -
Builders Specialties 3 2 1
Critter Landscaping 3 2 1
WGACA Trainers 2 2 2
Tu Be Computers 2 2 2
Rugs As Art 1 3 3
Palmer Ranch Travel 1 5 4
RESULTS, SEPT. 14
Critter Landscaping 13, Palmer Ranch
Travel 6
Peluso Air 22, Rugs As Art 1
Tu Be Computers 9, Builders Specialties
6
Builders Specialties 13, WGACA
Trainers 3


CONTACT US
CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
lewis@venicegondolier.com


Lady Indian golfers are riding high


Team is off to perfect 8-0 record with mix
of talented freshmen and couple of holdovers.


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


Girls golf has been one of
the most unheralded sports
at Venice High over the past
10 years.
The Lady Indians have
struggled for numbers and
the talent pool just hasn't
been very deep.
But that began to slowly
change the past few years,
and with the addition of a
couple of hotshot freshmen,
the VHS girls are suddenly
one of the best in the area.
The Lady Indians' 8-0
start in dual matches will
back that up.
Going back four years,
scores between 220-230
among four players were the
norm. Now, the Lady Indians
are consistently in the 160s.
Venice, co-coached by
Mission Valley Country Club
pro Shari Lindsey and Larry
Sandburg, already had a solid
foundation with senior
Lindsay Hinshaw and junior
Megan Clipse. Add in young-
sters like sisters Casey and
Katie Kennedy and Crystal
Smith, and the recipe for
success was complete.
Smith is a 14-year-old
freshman, but she is well
beyond her years golf-wise.
She has been playing since
she was 9 years old. She
golfs year-round, playing
with the Florida Junior Tour,
the Greater Tampa Bay
Junior Golf Association and
another East Coast tour.
"I'm happy," said Smith,
who consistently shoots in
the mid 30s over nine holes.
"My game is improving just


by practicing every day. I'm
better at playing in the heat.
My driving and putting is
better. Coach Shari (Lindsey)
has taught me a lot. It's things
I've never focused on before."
Being part of a team also
is refreshing for Smith.
"We all get along," she
said. "We're like sisters."
Another freshman who has
made a big impact this year is
Casey Kennedy. The 14-year-
old is averaging in the upper
30s.
Her sister, sophomore
Katie, has been shooting in
the mid 40s.
They both started playing
golf when they were 8 years
old.
Katie admits that Casey is
the more serious golfer of the
two.
"I haven't won first place
because I usually play with
Casey," Katie said. "I did beat
her yesterday."
Casey's game keeps im-
proving match by match.
"We're dedicated," Casey
said. "We practice all the time.
I like the competition, being
out here in good weather. My
putting and driving are com-
ing along."
Casey said that the girls
team is almost as good as
the boys.
"We played them last year
and they won by three
strokes," she said.
Katie's game isn't far be-
hind Casey's.
"I like the competition -
myself against the other play-
ers," she said. "Playing with
the team makes it fun. The
other players help cool you
down if you're having a


SUN PHOTO BY CLAUDE LEWIS
The Venice High girls golfers, shown here during Tuesday's practice at their home course -
Mission Valley Country Club are off to an 8-0 start and are looking to finish the season
unbeaten.


tough time."
Katie has two goals each
match.
"No three putts and no
lost balls," she said.
Clipse is in her third year
on the Lady Indians golf
team. She is now a junior
who consistently scores in
the low 40s.
"My game is much better,"
said Clipse, who has retained
former VHS girls coach Keith
Kralis as her personal coach.
"I used to score in the high
40s. I've added more dis-
tance and there's major
improvement in my putting.


We putt 30 minutes before
and after practice. Coach
Lindsey has helped me with
my short game.".
Clipse now anxiously
awaits match days.
"It's like night and day,"
she said. "Winning gives you
more and more confidence."
Hinshaw has been on var-
sity four years. Her scores
once soared in the upper
50s. She. has shaved more
than 10 strokes off that.
"Everything's more con-
sistent driving, 'chipping,
putting," she said. "I've never
been on a team like this.


The two freshmen came up.
They're really good. They've
brought our spirits up and
have picked everyone up."
The Venice girls will play
against Lemon Bay Wednes-
day afternoon at Mission
' Valley and on Thursday travel
to Manatee Golf and Country
Club to take on Manatee.
The Lady Her-icanes, with
standout Maria Ronderos,
will be a tough match.
"We've beaten Riverview
and Manatee," Hinshaw said.
"They've been our top com-
petition. I think wve can beat
them again."


Whatever the call, Danski ready for line duty


BY NATE COWAN
CORRESPONDENT

In John-Peacock's 5-3 de-
fense, stopping opposing of-
fenses starts with the T
(tackle)-N (nose guard)-T
(tackle).
No, we're not talking about
dynamite, but these three
positions blow plays up.
In the middle of the boom
plays senior nose guard Mike
Danski. Danski dominated
the line of scrimmage in the
Kickoff Classic at Lemon Bay,
constantly getting double-
teamed.
Peacock named him De-
fensive Player of the Week for
his performance against
Lakeland.
This past Friday night
against Charlotte High, Dan-
ski found himself making
blocks instead of defeating
them. With right tackle and
Division 1 prospect Dusty
Poinsett sidelined with an
ankle injury, Danski was
pressed into two-way action.
"With Dusty out, someone
had to step up and I knew I


had to do whatever it took to
help my team," said Danski,
a 6-3, 290-pounder who
wears No. 68.
He also earned the praise
of his teammates and coach-
es.
"Mike Danski played a
great game. He hadn't taken
a snap on offense all season
and learned this whole of-
fense in one week and be-
cause we rely on running
the football, the linemen
have a lot on their shoulders.
I was impressed with how
he handled the extra respon-
sibilities," said offensive line
coach Jeremy Brown.
Left guard Brad Ackles
appreciated Danski's willing-
ness to move to his side of
the ball.
"The last time Mike play-
ed offense was before he
came to Venice," Ackles said.
"He played really well and
helped our team win a big
district game when we need-
ed him."
Danski transferred to Ven-
ice from Riverview High
School before his junior sea-


son. While at Riverview, he
played offensive line for his
father Mike Sr., and was
named Lineman of the Year
as a freshman.
Mike Sr. coached football
in Michigan for 17 years and
at Riverview for four more
before becoming another
football dad. He also played
quarterback at a small col-
lege in Kansas.
"Debbie (Mike's mom) and
I can't sit in the stands any-
more," Senior said. "We live
anddie with each play, and
we get too excited."
Debbie Danski is the
quintessential football mom.
"Fridays I watch Mike,"
she said. "Saturdays are for
college football, and Sundays
are for the NFL. The Patriots
are my team."
With Poinsett listed as
questionable, Danski is pre-
paring himself for double
duty again this week against
Booker.
"Booker is another big
game for us," he said. "They
have a good defense, they're
fast, and they're physical. It's


homecoming week. so there
will be a lot of alumni here
and we want to show them
that the Venice attitude is
still there."
VENICE HIGH
VARSITY FOOTBALL
2005 SCHEDULE
AUG. 19 at Lemon Bay W 35-19
26 at Lakeland L 7-35


SEPT. 2
9
16
23
30
OCT. 7
14
21
28


RIVERVIEW L 19-20
at Monsignor Pace L 14-34
CHARLOTTE W 20-13
BOOKER 7:30 p.m.
at Manatee 7:30 p.m.
at Sarasota 7:30 p.m.
PORT CHARLOTTE7:30 p.m.
at L. Ranch 7:30 p.m.
Open


NOV 4 NAPLES 7:30 p.r
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
(through 4 games)
RUSHING


Tony Charles 70 627 8.9
Kiki Merzius 37 163 4.4
Matt Wickwire 27 81 3.0
Jimmy Laurie 10 51 5.1
Paul Costanzo 20 40 2.0
PASSING
C-A-I YDS. TD
Matt Wickwire 26-46-1 346 0


Aaron Tate
RECEIVING
Kiki Merzius
Paul Costanzo
Austin Carter
Tony Charles
llya Vasilevskiy
Chris Hayes
Joe Estep
Bruce Masse


0-2-1 0 0


SCORING
TD EX
Matt Wickwire 4 0
Tony Charles 3 2
Kiki Merzius 1 0
Austin Dudley 1 0
Ben Shipps 0 4
CLASS 5A DISTRICT 11


Venice


Manatee
m. Pt. Charlotte
Charlotte
Lakewood Ranch


DISTRICT
WL
1 0
1 0
0 0
.0 1
0 1


RESULTS, SEPT. 16
Venice 20, Charlotte 13
Manatee 52, Lakewood Ranch 19
Port Charlotte 22, DeSoto 21
FRIDAY, SEPT. 23
Booker at Venice, 7:30 p.m.
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Fort Myers, 7:30 p.m.
Manatee at Sarasota, 7:30 p.m.
L. Ranch at Riverview, 7:30 p.m.
Please see FOOTBALL, 9A


Allen glad to be a Commodore


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


The timing is right for Brad,
Allen.
He's playing football at
Vanderbilt and the Com-
modores, perennial losers in
the SEC, are
winning.
That 's
enough to
make Lionel
Ritchie and
Mike Voigt
smile.
Allen, a
former Ven-
ice High Allen
football
standout oh both offense


and defense, was a redshirt
at Vanderbilt last year, but
impressed coaches with his
performance on the practice
field.
Allen had an excellent
spring camp and has seen
game action for the Com-
modores this summer. He is
backup to senior tight end
Dustin Dunning and is play-
ing on special teams.
Making it even more fun
is the fact that Vandy is off
to a 3-0 start the best start
since 1984. The 'Dores have
defeated Wake Forest, Ark-
ansas and Ole Miss and
could be 4-0 with Richmond
coming to -Nashville this
Saturday.


Allen wears No. 83 and is
listed at 6-4, 240 pounds.
After Dunning graduates,
Allen appears ready to step
up and shine.

The Hampton University
football team is 3-0 and
ranked No. 10 in the latest
NCAA 1-AA poll.
The Pirates are coming off
a 31-14 victory over North
Carolima A&T. Venice High
grad Ardell Daniels rushed
for 61 yards on 17 attempts.
He also caught two passes
good for 15 yards.
On the season, Daniels has
186 yards on 48 carries and

Please see ALLEN, 9A


VENICE HIGH

SCHOOL'S


SPORTS PUB2Y
652 E. Venice Ave. 488-9156
www.bogeys-venice.com


Athlete of

the Week
Tony Charles has rushed for more than 100 yards in
three of Venice High's four football games to date.
He has 527 yards on the ground and he caught a big
pass in a late rally against Charlotte. Charles also
plays safety on the gridiron.-In the spring, he runs
track and field.


Food & Fun "7


Tony Charles


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Hand Tossed PIZZA FLCollege Football
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15 Draft Beers- Full Bar *Monday Football-QB1


*19 TV's- 5'x8' Giant
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NTN Trivia Texas Hold'em


Outside Patio
NOW OPEN


OVERALL
WL
1 3
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3 1
1 3
0 3


r~dGwairvi










WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


Vikings deflated by Sun Devils


STAFF REPORT


The Sarasota Sun Devils
are suddenly a Pop Warner
Peace River Conference Di-
vision 2 power.
The Sun Devils came to


Letson Stadium Saturday and
raided the Venice Vikings,
winning all five tackle games.
Four of them were shut-
outs.
SARASOTA 24, KINGS 0 -
The Sun Devils owned this


Steve Balsinger (20) and Jarrod Hewitt (5) try to chase down a
Sun Devil during Saturday's Mitey Mite game.


Mitey Mite division game.
Defensive highlights for the
Kings included six tackles
by Cody Hanna and three
apiece by Billy Bryant and
Jake Stubbs.
SARASOTA 35, KNIGHTS
13 The Knights were out-
gunned in this Junior Pee
Wee division contest. The
Knights did score a couple
of touchdowns. Dom Fanti
scored on a five-yard run.
He also ran in the conver-
sion to make it 21-7. Later in
the game, Jordan Keyso
threw his third touchdown
pass of the season. Scottie
Pieper was on the receiving
end.
SARASOTA 19, LANCERS 0
- Another shutout for the
Sun Devils. The top tacklers
for the Lancers were Nate
Dubik, Josh Calhoun and
Mark Gaona. The defense
-held the Sun Devils scoreless
in the second half. Calhoun
also punted well.
SARASOTA 6, CRUSADERS
0 The Crusaders battled
hard in this Junior Midget di-


Austin Sachkar drags down the Sun Devils ballcarrier.


vision game, but came up
empty. Tanner Hagen led
three impressive drives into
Sun Devils territory, but
penalties hurt. The Sun Devils
scored on a long run on the
third play from scrimmage.
Otherwise, the Crusader de-
fense played well. Bruce Holt
had seven tackles. Kye Rogers
had five tackles. Kyle Ridley
recovered a fumble. Other
big hitters included Cody
Sallis, Jordan Keefe and Dino
Fanti.


SARASOTA 12, WARRIORS
0 The Warriors were
blanked in this Midget divi-
sion showdown. Sarasota
scored two early TDs. The
Warriors offense was led by
Michael Green, who rushed
for 72 yards. Maurice Bryant
rushed for 38 yards.
TINY MITES ColbyWard
had a 50-yard run for the
Norsemen. Great blocking
efforts by James Purdy and
Jared Bailey. The defensive
effort was led by Devin Hill,


SUN PHOTOS BY JEREMY ROTTGEN


Tanner Weiss and Derek Kipp.
GOLF FUND RAISER -
The Vikings held their annual
scramble Sunday at Lake
Venice. The top 3 teams from
the tournament First
place: Bill Lakeman, Scott
Lakeman, Wayne Biel, Jerry
Oberdino; Second Place: Jay
Thinnes, Jesse Martin, Pat
Sams, Nick Flerlage; Third
Place: Bill Wallace, Juan
Inglesias, Carlos Solanzo,
Brad Brictzin. Kyle Moore
had a hole in one.


FOOTBALL from page8A


JUNIOR VARSITY
FOOTBALL (1-2)
AUG. 25 RIVERVIEW


SEPT. 1
8
15
22
29


at Manatee
at Port Charlotte
at L. Ranch
at Charlotte
SOUTHEAST


OCT. 13 BOOKER
20 SARASOTA
FRESHMAN FOOTBALL (1-
AUG. 24 at Riverview
31 MANATEE
SEPT. 14 L. RANCH
21 CHARLOTTE
29 at Southeast


OCT. 5
12
19


PORT CHARLOTTE
at Booker
at Sarasota


PPD.
L 6-20
W34-6
I 0-14


7 p.m. *
7 pM.m. .L- ,
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
-2)
L 0-20
L 0-26
W 24-0
7 p.m. Kings runner Austin Sachkar strains to get around a Sarasota
7 p.m. Sun Devil defender.


7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.


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eight pass receptions for 27
yards. He is second on the
team in both departments.
Daniels rushed for more
than 1,000 yards last year at
Hampton.
Hampton will play Morgan
State this Saturday at the
Meadowlands. It is billed as
the New York Urban League
Classic.
* *
Tre Smith got back into the
swing of things this past
Saturday. The former VHS
standout and Auburn junior
scored on a six-yard run in the
third quarter of the Tigers 63-


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LANDSCAPING & GARDENING '
Now that three hurricanes have passed and if the creeks don't rise, we
can get to our annual clean up time. This means prepare our plants for the winter
months.
One of the biggest problems we've had this year is fungus. Besides fungus,
we've had lots of insects in the yards. These are some of the answers to your
questions. 1. If you think you have Fungus, bring in sample of the grass in
question, we can look over the grass and tell you if you have fungus. 2.
Yellowing in the yard could mean several things. Fertilizer could be gone and you
might need to use a Fertilome product, either Winterize for your lawn or use
Fertilome 16-4-8 with soil sulfur and iron.This will being that troublesome grass
around. 3. We have several ways to go there. If you're not sure what's
wrong, bring in some of the soil and let us look to see what is wrong.
Duke Garden Center is full service garden center. We do
landscaping, and repotting of your favorite plants. We have a fine
supply of pottery, glazed as well as clay. I
A Now is the time to cut back your Hibiscus, Crape Myrtle, winter hardy WINNER
r shrubs, and bougainvillea. Palms should have already trimmed back.
August is the month for that. Don't forget to fertilize your plants to
keep them healthy for winter.Weed-n-Feed when the weather
cools down some, maybe another week or so. .
Summer Hours: '
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday thru Saturday.
Duke Garden Center
" I Service Is Our #1 Priority
,Lynn Johnson 601 US 41 By Pass So. 488-7141 L


3 lambasting of Ball State.
Smith gained 52 yards on
seven carries.
* *
The Tater is on the loose in
Dodge City, Kansas.
Gerald
Tate, a former
Venice High
quarterback,
is e wreaking
havoc playing
with the
Dodge City
Community
College foot-
ball team. Tate
Through
the Conquistadors' first four
games of the season, Tate
leads the team in all-purpose
yardage with 113 per game.
Listed at 5-9 and weighing


180 pounds and wearing No.
3, Tate is the Conqos leading
receiver with 25 catches good
for 295 yards (11.8 yards). He
has carried the ball 12 times
for 35 yards. Tater has re-
turned four punts for36 yards
(9 yards per carry) and four
kickoffs for 88 yards (22 yards
per).
Dodge City fell to 2-2 with
a 28-7 loss to Coffeyville,
ranked third in the country in
the most recent JUCO poll.
This Saturday is homecoming
against Garden City.
There is another .Venice
connection at Dodge City, as
former Indian Jared Powers is
the new offensive line coach.
Tate's younger brother,
Aaron, is a quarterback on
the current Venice High team.


Are You Ready


For Some

Football

WIN $25 EACH WEEK!

GAMES OF SEPT. 23-25 2005


F

0

0

T

B

A

L


L


RULES: The Venice Gondolier will pay to the
entry which most correctly identifies the 10 game
winners. In case of a tie, the cash award will be
given to the entrant with the correctly chosen
team in the tie breaker game. If they are still tied,
it then goes to the closest to the total points
scored in the tie breaker game listed without
going over total points.. The prize money will be
divided if after the use of the tiebreaker a tie still
exists. All entries must be in the hands of the
Venice Gondolier by Friday, NOON (SHARP)
of each week of the contest following the
Wednesday publication date. Circle one game
from each ad. Games listed at bottom of ADS.
One entry per. person. Sun Coast Media Group
employees and their relatives are not eligible.
Send or bring entries to Venice Gondolier Sun,
Venice, FL 34285 or FAX at 485-3036.


Winner Will Be Announced Next Week
ENTRY FORM
Circle One For Each Game
Booker @ Venice
Penn State @ Northwestern
Tennessee @ LSU
Georgia Tech @ Virginia Tech
Colorado @ Miami
Boston College @ Clemson
Bucs @ Packers
Jaquars @ Jets
Panthers @ Dolphins
Bengals @Bears

Tie Breaker:
Patriots @ Steelers
Total Points
Please fill out:


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s^tES snI sO muE. S 2233 S. Tamlami Trail, Venice 12693 S.TamlamlTral, North Port


Last Week Winner
Mike Bowden, Nokomis, 10 Correct


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'ALLEN fro* paqe. 8


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 200


04,







WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


1 OA VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


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BAER'S PLAZA 4200 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte Just North of Kings Highway
'Offer is subject to credit approval by Monogram Credit Card Bank of Georgia. Payment of sales'tax upon purchase. 25% down payment required on special order merchandise, Applies to any purchase made on a MCCBG consumer, creditcard account. Minimum purchase of $400, maximum purchase $25.000, No finances charges assessed or
the promotional purchase amount (excluding optional insurance charges) if you pay this amount in full by the payment due date as shown on your 15th billing statement. Ifyou do not, finance char ges will be assessed on the promoldnrial purchase amount from the date of delivery Minimum monthly payments are required during the promotional
period. If minimum monthly payments are not paid when due, all special promotional terms may be terminated. Standard account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends, to your promotion purchases Variable APR is 21.98% as of 6/16/03. Fixed APR of 24.75% applies if payment is more than 30 days past due.
(In PR, fixed APR is 22.98%) Minimum finance charge is $1, If applicable, Prior sales excluded. "Retail Or Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Pricing. Baer's Never Sells At Retail Or Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Pricing. Excludes Rugs And Bed Linens. "On In-Stock Items. Ask Store Personnel For Details. Design License #1BC000503


I









EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
11A
WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 21,2005


OUR VIEW



The only safe place is where the hurricane isn't


un. i
Of all the many lessons that pound-
ed ashore with Hurricane Katrina, that
is the first and foremost. Ghstly as the loss of
life is and, horribly, the toll likely will con-
tinue to grow- many thousands more sure-
ly !would have died if most residents of
coastal Louisiana and Mississippi had not
headed official orders to gol
Residents of hurricaneiprone areas are
apt to become jaded, especially if the storms
they fled in the past changed course and
spared their particular patch of coastline.
Elected officials, mindful of their unwilling-
ness to leave, may hesitate to issue mandato-
ry orders.


Katrina's lesson: Get over it.
Abandoning one's home is a wrench -
compounded by the tedium of sitting in a 50-
mile traffic jam, the frustration of searching
from town to town for a motel room.,
But how trivial those trials look today in
contrast to the experience of 55-year-old Joy
Schovest, who found herself dodging floating
cars after a 25-foot storm surge tore apart the
Quiet Water Beach apartments in Biloxi,
Miss, ,
"It was terrifying," she said. "We had to
push (the cars) away."
She was lucky. As many as 30 people
reportedly were swept to their deaths when
the building collapsed.


Who knows .why they chose to stay?
Schovest wouldn't say. Those of us who are
safe and dry can have nothing but pity for the
shell-shocked victims peering out through
their shattered windows or being plucked by
helicopter from their rooftop islands. We
pray that when the water recedes, it will not
reveal bodies now submerged.
Some of those who stayed, perhaps, were
hobbled by the lack of a car or of money.
What a pity that they did not seek refuge in
official shelters, as an estimated 10,000 did in
the New Orleans Superdome.
Life for those refugees is no picnic, but
they are extremely fortunate in comparison
with their friends and neighbors who


crouched in attics or on rooftops with water
rising all around.
Along with the outpouring of charity and
the almost unimaginable task of rebuilding
must come hard questions about the ade-
quacy of everything from hurricane forecast-
ing to building codes to evacuation and
emergency planning to levee maintenance.
It may be that human failures have com-
pounded this tragedy; if so, those failures
must be identified and corrected.
But this much is already clear: When
nature really gets her back up, she is capable
of overwhelming every precaution, every
plan, every protective measure save one.
Run. For your lives, run.


Which Venice



do we save?


JOHN RYAN
GUEST COLUMNIST


The Aug. 31 edition of the
Gondolier Sun contained a
column entitled "We need to
keep Venice Venice."
I just wanted to say that, as
a life-long resident of Venice
and the Venice area, I couldn't
agree more. My only problem
is deciding which Venice
should be kept Venice.
I certainly can't give per-
sonal input-as to. the Yenice
that John Nolen originally
designed, but from photos of
the time it seemed like a nice
enough place as it was. The
dirt roads would have been a
challenge in the rainy season,
but perhaps we should have
kept Venice Venice then.
Or perhaps the Venice of
the Army Air Corps days.
Nothing was more fun than
having an active base right on
the beach. Today's airport
sounds would hardly be
noticed compared with the
military aircraft and even
rocket launches we enjoyed
back in the '40s and '50s. In
fact, one of the rockets even
landed near Riviera Street.
Perhaps we should have kept
Venice Venice then.
What about the Venice of
the KMI days? It would have
been nice to maintain a grow-
ing and popular military
academy in downtown Venice
- if only it hadn't been for
that dam Vietnam War caus-
ing it to lose enrollment and
go out of business. Maybe we
could have kept Venice Venice
then, in the '60s when our
sleepy little town had a popu-
lation of less than 5,000.
Then, there were always
the Ringling Bros. days. A
great attraction pulled out of
Venice because the -railroad
tracks could no longer sup-
port its train's usage. The
Venice of the early '90s was
still nice. Perhaps we should
have kept Venice Venice then.
What about the Venice
without the Intracoastal
Waterway? Or the Venice with
a sewer plant on the beach?
Or the Venice without renour-
ished beaches and with only
one public beach?
Or what about Venice with-
out reverse psmosis, reclaim-
ed water or the many services
our city now provides at a rea-
sonable cost?
You see, for years Venice


had very little to offer. No the-
ater, no library, no communi-
ty center, no YMCA, no ser-
vice clubs, no hospital, no art
center, no community foun-
dation, no ... well, you get the
point.
Venice has changed over
time and, in fact, most of the
people in this room today
would not even be here if we
\had "kept Venice Venice" back
when.
But it doesn't work that
way.
Hundreds of people dis-
covered Venice because of
their involvement with Venice,
from the past: the former
Army soldiers and pilots who
came back, the kids from KMI
who thought this was a neat
place to settle down and the
entertainers and circus leg-
ends who stayed here when
their winter headquarters
-moved on. : -' -
Their extended families
and friends- from up North
visited and liked it too and
became part of our commu-
nity. I'm guessing most folks
here have told someone up
North that they should move
here when they retire.
Everyone takes a snapshot
of Venice when they move
here and few have any real
idea of where Venice came
from.
Venice, like other great
towns before it, is a work in
progress. The secret to "keep-
ing Venice Venice" is allowing
it -no, make that by guiding
it to greater things.
Venice is a community, not
a place.
Venice is Venice because of
the great decisions made by
its leadership in the past.
In order for Venice to be
Venice, it must adapt where
necessary to meet today's
reality and tomorrow's chal-
lenges, and not just cling to
yesterday's memories.
This does not mean we do
not preserve what is good.
Our downtown is beautiful
and truly is the area that is
conjured up in one's mind
when we say "quaint Venice."
That part should never
change, if we can prevent it.
But look around at what
needs our new population
has. We must provide the
opportunities and amenities
for them to continue to invest
in our area. Our youth needs
reasons to stay, and in order
to do that we must keep Ven-
ice Venice by being progres-
sive..
John Ryan, president and
CEO of the Venice Area
Chamber of Commerce, made
this presentation to Venice
City Council on Sept. 13
regarding the proposed
Commercial, Mixed-use
Zoning Ordinance.


LETTERS WELCOME: Send your letters to the Venice Gondolier
Sun, 200 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34285. You can also fax signed,
letters to 484-8460 or e-mail them to bmudge@venicegondolier.
com. For more information, call 207-1000.


LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


We're not listening to planet Earth


Editor:
Thank you for your continuing coverage of environmental
issues, including Jack Gurney's informative articles.
It's hard to take in all the changes that have occurred here in
the last few months.
When I settled here three years ago, I swam in the gulf each
day, awed by the abundance of fish jumping and anglers on the
shore pulling them in. Now all that has changed.
Turned away from the beach by red tide, I and other die-
hard beach goers swim in chlorinated pools or not at all.
Occasionally, I walk on the beach and see many fewer birds
and people than I'd seen in previous years.
The one time I swam this summer, I could not see one living
thing in the water. Hurricane Katrina's passage up the gulf
brought hordes of surfers and birds to the beach. Do we
need such catastrophic events to enliven our beaches? .
Even if the red tide, the dead zone and all related events are
completely natural, isn't it time all of us became more attentive
to the care of our "home" this beautiful planet that houses
and shelters us and that now appears to be much more fragile
than we thought?
These days, I am mindful of what Thomas Berry, the
Catholic monk, wrote some years ago: "What is needed on our
part is the capacity for listening to what the Earth is telling us
.... There is need for a great courtesy toward the Earth."

Frances Knight Palmeri
Nokomis


No sincerity in
Bush's apology

Editor:
"I will take the responsibil-
ity for the slow response of
the government." (I believe
"the" government was used in
lieu of "our"-government, as
that would leave the oratory
of the equation; and after all,
he doesn't read or watch the
news. Or so he says.)
I believe this is the same
guy who previously said "in
America, we do not abandon
our fellows in their hour of
need" (except the poor).
Another compassionate
quote: "I have a solemn duty
to protect the American peo-
ple" (except the poor).
When he stole that first
election, thanks to, Florida, I
told my brother that he will
start a war, as that other arro-


gant Texan did in the early
'60s to take care of his corpo-
rate buddies. At least the
other Texan took responsibili-
ty for that horrible, useless
slaughter of Americans.
Did you notice that in the
twist of the "blame game" the
word "responsibility" was
used to put the "blame" on his
irresponsible appointees for
their lack of response; never
anything about the "Nero
played while Rome burned"
scenario of guitar entertain-
ing and fundraising dinners
Monday through Friday, and
a "tsk, tsk, tsk" photo op, as a
total lack of sincerity on his
part.
A quote from a great presi-
dent: "The buck stops here!"
And he was sincere.
Jack Aland
Venice


God doesn't pun
us with hurricane
Editor:
Some people b
created us in his ir
believe we create
ours. Clearly, Donm
created her own
God in her own i
attributed all of hi
faults to him, ii
deep-seated host
need to control.
Ms. Martonfi fei
asters and catast
punishments from
that we deserve the
asters destroy us
nately and withoi
reason. So, what
mon sense tell us?
strophes happen ji
they happen.
Further, religious
one thing, but ha
and a need for r
quite another. Tr
based on love, co
and respect for the
free will, none ofw
dent in Ms. Mart
tude.
It appears she
"faith" to channel h
al neuroses. I wis
and suggest she sei
ing.


Keep money out
of Louisiana's ha
Editor:
There are many
have concerning a
ing the Katrina dis
as:


lish evacuate the people without
es transportation?
Why didn't the mayor use
believe God his three-day notice to stock
eieve G the Superdome with food,
nage; some water and port-a-potties?
a Martonfi Why did the president
version of have to call the governor and
m and suggest she call in the
ergesonald National Guard?
r personal Why did the Louisiana
including a state officials lie to Michael
Chertoff about the conditions
els that dis- in New Orleans?
xophes are Why was the levee board
n Godes andre of New Orleans allowed to
em. Yet dis- spend its money purchasing a
indiscrimi- casino and a private plane?
Why did it take until
ut logic omr Wednesday and the presi-
doesThat cata- dent's visit, for the governor to
ist because ask for military assistance.
(Everyone realizes due to
us fervor is posse cornitatus, the presi-
tred, anger dent cannot just send; the
S are governor must ask first.)
evengeare The president declared the
e faith is, region a disaster area 36
impassion, hours before the hurricane
hconceptof made landfall, clearing the
tonfi's atti- way for federal help. FEMA is
designed to work with local
uses her and state agencies, but in this
case incompetence on the
ier person- local and state level is beyond
h her well belief.
ek counsel- The corruption level of
Louisiana politicos is historic
CeliaAlvyn and has not abated since
Venice Huey Long. There are hun-.
dreds of millions of dollars
being raised for this disaster,
but another disaster would be
nds if any of it were given to state
officials.


questions I
actions dur-
3aster, such


Why did the president
have to call the mayor to ask
him to issue a mandatory
evacuation?
Why didn't the mayor use
the 300-plus school buses to


Carolyn Henington
North Port
Height opponents
must keep fighting
Editor:
Many thanks to all theVen-

Please see LETTERS, 12A


I '








ILAtVEINI 'EM H E SH L H IY FE EE I TR N


LET'EM HAVE 1 SHOULD THE CITY OF VENICE REQUIRE THAT GREEN SPACE IN
DEVELOPMENTS BE OPEN TO ALL CITY RESIDENTS? CALL US AT 2071111.


Is Herb VTL president for life?


Guess what? Remember a few months back when Herb
Levine was telling anyone who would listen that he was not
going to be a candidate for re-election as president of the
Venice Taxpayers League? Well, the election took place and
guess what? Herb Levine is still the president of the league. No
doubt his hand-picked board of directors would not allow any-
one else to be president.


Doesn't belong. I have a
comment for the people, usu-
ally men, who proudly and
loudly blow their nose in
restaurants. The word is,
please don't. It's nasty, it does-
n't belong in a restaurant. It
belongs in the hallway or the
restroom, not around dozens
of people who are eating fine
food.
Ask how. Our city officials
must ask themselves how can
certain people move toVenice
and immediately try to tell
city council how the city
should be run.
Amazing. In his Gondolier
Sun column on Sept. 7, Ed
Martin made a big pitch that
Venice should pattern itself
after Santa Barbara, Calif.
What he didn't mention is
that Santa Barbara has a pop-
ulation of 100,000 people
while the population of Ven-
ice is 20,000. Ed Martin never
ceases to amaze me, as his
columns get longer and long-
er, yet he never says anything
constructive.
Against building. I'm call-
ing from Newberg, N.Y. I own
property on the island of
Venice at Bella Costa and I am
definitely against any build-
ing being constructed over
35-feet. Thank you for your
consideration.
Better spent. I think 10 mil-
lion current Florida home-
owners are being hit with a
$30 surcharge on our water
bills over the next two years.
That's because of the bill initi-
ated by Rep. Donna Clarke
that uses $300 million of state
funds over the next two years
to encourage regional water
supply authorities. This will
help ensure adequate water
supply for growth over the
next two decades. Florida res-
idents could certainly better
use that $300 million to pay
for needed medical care and
education. Understandably,
board members of Swiftmud
are thrilled. Of course, most of
the board members come
from growth-related busi-
nesses and are appointed by
Jeb Bush. How could the bill
have been better financed?
Through a 20-year bond issue
paid off by state impact fees
on all new construction. Rep.
Clarke has gotten a good pat
on the back for spending tax-
payers' money.
Assistant editor? In Sun-
day's edition on Aug. 28, on


page 12A, column two, the
next to last paragraph Mr.
Andrews, what were you
thinking? Have went? An
assistant editor? Mister, you
should stick to photos. Got ya!
Signed, the grammar police.
No need. Do we really need
another hotel in Venice? Even
a condo disguised as a hotel?
The island has 169 hotel
rooms available. Within walk-
ing distance of the island are
an additional 443 'hotel
rooms. With the hotels on the
1-75 exits, we have 83 rooms
at the Best Western, and the
new La Quinta. Add 137
rooms nearby at the Ramada
Inn in Osprey. That's 832 hotel
rooms, and the hundreds of
motel rooms on Casey Key,
not counting any of the mom-
and-pop hotels north of
Venice. So if you look at this,
we have more than 1,000
hotel rooms available to the
little town of Venice and we
do not need another hotel.
Thanks, Lamond. I would
like to make a comment
about Michael Lamond's arti-
cle about playing in your
.underwear. I. just wanted to
say thank you that was a
very nice tribute to yourself
and to a very dear friend of a
lot of people in Venice from
the Venice Bass Anglers, Rich
DelPizzo. And we just wanted
to say thank you and keep up
the good work. He kind of
smiles down on us when
we're fishing and I'm sure a lot
of the other fishermen too.
Thanks for the great article.
Just a trailer. Question:
When is a doublewide trailer in
a trailer park not a doublewide
trailer? Answer: When the trail-
er park is called estates and
they are asking $359,000 for it
Give us a break.
Reality check. As a result of
Katrina, this country is about
to find out the true price to be
paid for electing an incompe-
tent president and adminis-
tration on the basis of morali-
ty issues rather than practical
issues. Prayers won't help now
and neither will the Bush ad-
ministration. It's time for a re-
ality check. Our military
should be brought home im-
mediately to deal with the
problems at hand and let the
Middle East worry about their
own.
What a waste. Is this for
real $5,400,000, all the im-
pact fees collected by the city


GIVE US A CALL
The Let'em Have It line allows readers to sound off on issues of
local interest Opinions expressed here are solely those of the
callers and do not necessarily represent the views of this newspa-
per. Opinions or comments that are personal attacks on people;
attacks on or commercials for businesses; political endorsements;
or otherwise unfit for publication will not be printed. If you would
like to participate, call the line at 207-1111. Call no more than
once a week. Please keep your comments brief. The line is avail-
able all hours. Caller identification is not required.


MONTGOMERY'S


ofVenice, to be used to correct
a road problem in an area of
Venice that was supposed to
lower taxes? The entire Laurel
Road and 1-75 interchange
did not have to be part of our
city. However, those in control
at that time stated it was
needed to sustain our city
economy and to help lower
our taxes. How do our city
commissioners have the right
to use money gained by taxes,
impact fees or any other way
without being part of the bud-
get and approved by taxpay-
ers? Apparently, the same way
that the $4,500 each palm
trees were purchased along
Business 41. What a waste of
money when that $5,400,000
for the improvement our
interchange could be used to
improved the city like fix-
ing the church that was dam-
aged over on the east side, by
Patches Restaurant, by city
employees who failed to use
proper precautions. Our city
board is rampant with power
and disregard of taxpayers.
Investigate. This is regard-
ing the parking lot proposed
for the city. I think we should
investigate other cities that
have built parking garages
and have torn them down be-
cause no one used them and
they weren't used to their
capacity.
No say. Apparently our may-
or and our city manager have
elected to dissolve the city.
council after the owners of the
Landmarkwere kind enough to
at least offer their property as a
potential parking site for the
future of downtown Venice.
Interestingly enough, the
mayor claims it was too much
money, but the mayor's the one
that was behind the million
dollar parking lot on Barcelona
and The Esplanade, which I
think can park about 15 cars
out there so people can go
swimming. Oh and Marty
Black, who claims there's not
enough money for anything,
for anybody, was just the recip-
ient of a nice, big fat juicy raise.
Meanwhile, he's fighting police
like he's paying them out of his
own pocket. So I guess the citi-
zens and the council don't get
to discuss or have anything to
say about it. In the future, just
run everything past Marty and
the mayor.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The price tag
for the beach parking lot was less
than $1 million, with a substantial
portion of the proceeds coming
from the state of Florida. Black's
raise was proposed and adopted
by city council.


Venice: In transition, but still paradise


JIM WOODS
GUEST COLUMNIST


I have read some very criti-
cal columns in the local
newspapers (both Venice and
Sarasota) over the last few
months. The writers generally
want to halt or severely limit
new projects in this area.
They have been very critical
of many things built, renovat-
ed or annexed over the last 20
years or so.
Since many of the writers
have recently moved to this
area, it appears they nowwish
to preserve what attracted
them to Venice, perhaps un-
aware that Venice has not
been standing still for the last
20 years.
My wife and I moved to
this area in 1984 when we
owned a commercial busi-
ness in the Venice-Sarasota.
area. Venice was a charming
town then, and I feel the
growth and development
since that time has preserved
our quaint downtown charm
and increased the vitality and
viability of Venice as a family
community.
I have talked to many peo-
ple who have lived here more
than 20 years and have asked
them to fill in the gaps in our
knowledge of the changes
Venice has experienced over
that period. The list has more
than 40 significant items,
most of which are visible. A
few are:
VABI's Venetian Waterway
Park
Business 41 expansion
and landscaping with very'
attractive palm trees
New bridges at North and
South ends of Business 41
Beach nourishment and
renourishment
City hall on West Venice


Avenue
Venice Little Theatre and
downtown business renova-
tions
Sale of Venice Hospital
and renovation
$200 million community
foundation begun from sale
of hospital
Renovated and expanded
Venice Community Center
Kids fountain in Centen-
nial Park
New Venice Elementary
School
Retirement centers for
senior citizens, and Senior
Friendship Center
Waterford's Waterfront
condominiums
Annexation of Laurel
Road area east of 1-75
Expanded Venice Art
Center and Venice Public Li-
brary
New Venice Area Cham-
ber of Commerce Building
Venice Train Depot reno-
vated with Gunther Gebel-
Williams statue
Unprecedented home
and condo growth and devel-
opment east of U.S. 41 By-
pass
The large majority of the
Venice citizens (full- and part-
time) and visitors are attract-
ed by our weather, quaint
downtown, small town am-
biance, the Gulf of Mexico
and the beaches, and the
"walk-ability" of the down-
town area and surrounding
neighborhoods. John Nolen
would be proud to see his
1920s plan for Venice so well
followed, with the parks,
green belts and trees intact.
We lived in Venice for a
brief period of time in 1990,
before our careers took us
elsewhere. We lived on Venice
Beach in one of the "high-
rise" condominiums con-
structed in the 1960s. This ex-
perience locked-in our desire
to return to Venice as our
choice location to retire.
'We are proud to be full-
time residents and feel truly
blessed to have been able to
return to Venice in 1999. As
my wife so aptly puts it, "They
are going to have to take us
out of here feet first."


The Commercial, Mixed-
Use District ordinance being
considered by city council
provides a unique develop-
ment opportunity that can
continue to enhance the Ven-
ice area while preserving ex-
isting areas we feel define the
Venice experience.
This ordinance requires
thoughtful deliberation by
city staff of any proposed
development, including such
issues as height, traffic flow,
benefit to the city and archi-
tectural impact.
The vast majority of the
audience attending city
council's first reading of this
proposed ordinance on Sept.
13 was in favor of the CMU
district.
Why such a strong show of
support? I believe it reflects
the quality of the citizenry of
Venice and their elected offi-
cials.
For the most part our citi-
zens grew up elsewhere, have
led successful lives and have
retired to Venice. We have a
strong work ethic, are tolerant
of others, enjoy our commu-
nity and our lifestyle and have
found dozens of ways to give
back to our community
through service clubs, non-
profit boards and volun-
teerism.
We realize growth is in-
evitable, but have the confi-
dence in our city staff, and
especially our elected city
council members, that they
will protect and preserve as
we develop and grow.
Not an easy task, but I
believe our present city coun-
cil is up to it. We have well-
informed, conscientious, in-
telligent, articulate and caring
council members who take
their jobs very seriously and
know the impact of the deci-
sions, they must render on
these issues.
For them and for us, Venice
is paradise in transition, but
still paradise.
Jim Woods, Ph.D., is the
former campus executive offi-
cer ofMCC Venice Campus
and the former president of
the Hospital Foundation of
Venice Hospital.


Ltl II RS frompage11A


ice citizens who attended the
city council meeting in protest
of a developer's plan to erect
buildings 80 feet tall on Venice
Island. Even now, our senses
are assaulted by two existing
condos recently completed,
with another one on the way.
Council did not expect the
capacity crowd that filled the
chambers, or the controversy,


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Center For Sight

announces the arrival of
Joshua W. Kim, M.D., Glaucoma Specialist

Center For Sight is pleased to announce that Joshua W. Kim,
M.D., has joined our team, with an exclusive focus on glaucoma care.
He is now accepting new patients in our Center For Sight Sarasota,
Venice, North Port, and Englewood locations.
Dr. Kim is a fellowship trained glaucoma specialist. He earned
his medical degree at Tufts University, and carried out his
intership and presidency at the Univer-
sity of Washington. He then completed
his fellowship at the esteemed New
York Eye & Ear Infirmary. He brings
the latest advances in diagnosis and
treatment of glLaucomna to our patients
Dr Kim p share Center For Sight's
conm-ntment to pro- hiding pahens wth
an unsurpassed level of care \Ve are
delighted to hae thish Ighly sought Josrua W. Kim. MD
after z.pecialIiht join our team D,ractor al ilurucum r

To schedule an appointment,
or for more information,
please call Center For Sight at 925-2020.


CENTER FOR SIGHT
YOUR CLEAR CHOICE


and postponed their vote until
Oct 11. Please do not lose in-
terest, and make it a point to at-
tend the rescheduled meeting.
If everyone reading this let-
ter attends, a clear, loud mes-
sage will be sent to all council
members that residents of


this beautiful city do not ap-
prove of buildings more than
35 feet tall. Council must also
be reminded they serve the
citizens, not developers.

Rita Sakowicz
Venice


Tarmam Trail, Sarasota 1360 E. Venice Ave., Venice
w vnw.centertorsighrt.net


2601 S. I


WEDNESDAY, SEPr. 21, 2005


12A VENICE GONDOLA N


I







VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 13A


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


Some counties still holding out for paper ballots


Sarasota County paid $4.7 million for ES&S touch-
screen machines without paper ballots. The
Nebraska company now produces a model that
scans paper ballots and meets federal standards.


BYJACK GURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

Volusia County on Florida's
east coast and Leon County
- Tallahassee may tem-
porarily violate federal and
state deadlines for the pur-
chase of electronic voting
machines that meet disabled
access guidelines until certi-
fied new equipment that pro-
vides paper ballots for manu-
al recounts becomes avail-
able.
Sarasota County spent $4.7
million to meet its disabled
access obligations in 2001
with the purchase of 1,615
Elections Systems and Soft-
ware iVoltronic touch-screen
machines that don't provide
paper ballots for manual
recounts.
June 23, the Omaha, Neb.,


company announced it has
been cleared by federal elec-
tions authorities to sell a new
product called the
AutoMARK, an electronic vot-
ing machine that scans bal-
lots and accommodates all
voters, including the disabled
and visually impaired.
Unlike the touch-screen
iVoltronic machines, which
do not provide a paper ballot
for manual recounts, the
AutoMARK machine optically
scans ballots in a way that
provides the privacy, accessi-
bility and paper verification
many voters' organizations
have called for.
While Florida elections
officials have not certified the
new ES&S AutoMARK ma-
chines, counties that held out
on new equipment purchases
because they want ballot


paper trails that can confirm
computer results will push to
have them cleared.
Discrepancies
Inexplicably, the only
state-certified touch-screen
machines that currently meet
disabled accessible standards
are the ES&S iVoltronic ma-
chines, which Miami-Dade
County has threatened to
scrap because of operational
problems and the absence of
a paper ballot.
Sarasota County has $4.7
million invested in the equip-
ment, while Miami-Dade ex-
pended $24.5 million to place
them in more than 700 voting
precincts. In late May, Miami-
Dade Elections Supervisor
Lester Sola concluded an
analysis of the machines with
a recommendation they be
replaced.
The analysis was conduct-
ed after last autumn's Nov. 2
general election revealed the
number of voters recorded by
election workers didn't match
the number of ballots cast at


260 of 749 polling places. In
some cases, the discrepancies
number in
the hundreds.
Humane
error
chinesar asota o
County.Elec-
tions Super-
visor Kathy
Dent attrib-e
uted the Mi- Dent-
ami-Dade
discrepanciess to human error
and described the controver-
sy over ES&S iVoltronic ma-
chines as symptomatic of an
very political environment
in the South Florida commu-
nity. guidelines.
Dent has steadfast idetua-
fended the county's decision
to buy ES&S iVoltronic touch-
screen machines rather than
optical-scanning equipment
that processes paper ballots.
One of her justifications has
been they meet the federal
and state disabled-accessibil-
ity guidelines.
The Volusia County situa-


tion heated up when council
member Art Giles accused
Elections Supervisor Ann
McFall of threatening to sue
him and go after both his per-
sonal finances and "your
wife's personal finances" be-
cause he voted against touch-
screen machines.
In a July 2 Daytona Beach
News Journal story, McFall
described the altercation as
an "unfortunate misunder-
standing" and said Giles had
misheardd" her in a conversa-
tion that took place one day
after the county council voted
not to buy touch-screen
equipment.
Florida Secretary of State
Glenda Hood is responsible
for the statewide elections
process.
According to the Miami
Herald, she has determined
the issue of reconciling signa-
ture totals and machine dis-
crepancies at voting precincts
is a local matter.
Dent has estimated the
Sarasota County ES&S touch-
screen equipment has a life



cycle that could extend to
about 2012.
"Maybe then new technol-
ogy will convince us to
change," she said. "But until
then, we can't just go to Office
Depot and buy printers that
attach to our machines."



A &WV 4


Bays management plan project approved by BOCC


STAFF REPORT

The Sarasota County
Board of Commissioners has
approved a one-year project
that combines engineering,
environmental sciences and
watershed planning for the
Dona and Roberts Bay Water-
shed.
This complex project rep-
resents the first phase of a
multiyear regional approach
to develop alternate water
supplies, enhance flood pro-
tection and restore bay health
to levels capable of sustaining
healthy marine life.
County commissioners are
enthusiastic about the scope
of the project. According to
County Commissioner Jon
Thaxton, it, is rare that the
commission has an opportu-


nity to launch a program with
such broad potential.,
"At the same time, we have
the ability to restore wetlands,
protect endangered' species,
explore an alternative water
source and improve the
health of the bay," he said.
Implementation of this
plan will provide a model in
watershed management,
building on state, regional
and federal interagency coor-
dination and public stake-
holder involvement. Among
other agencies, Southwest
Florida Water Management
District will be a partner, as its
water planning goals are
closely aligned with those of
Sarasota County.
Too fresh
Water chemistry in the


bays has been altered over the
years through
development,
drainage and
channeliza-
tion. In the
case of Dona
and Roberts
bays, this al-
teration has
resulted in ex-
cessive fresh Thaxton
water being
introduced into brackish bay
waters.'
To sustain healthy fish,
oyster and seagrass popu-
lations, the bays require a
certain mix of fresh and salt
waters. In recent years, that


mix has trended toward too
great a saturation of fresh
water, resulting in declin-
ing populations of marine
life.
As human activity changes
the water chemistry, we also
change the ability of those
species to survive and thrive.
The long-term project will
design an approach to restor-
ing the balance to more his-
toric levels.
The Dona and Roberts Bay
watershed contains nine
named lakes and ponds and
17 named rivers, streams and
canals.
It spans 97.5 square miles
from the Venice Inlet through


Sarasota County north into
Manatee County and east to
the Myakka River.
Sarasota County has ac-
quired lands strategically lo-
cated within the Dona and
Roberts Bay Watershed as
part of a community-based
vision for managing its water-
sheds.
County engineers and sci-
entists have begun monitor-
ing freshwater flows to, and
natural system and water
quality indicators in, the tidal
portions of the bays.
Commissioners agreed
that the project they approv-
ed is another positive step in
that direction.


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OBITUARIES


14A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


Shirley W. Brashears
Shirley W. Brashears of
Venice died Friday, Sept. 16,
2005.
She was born in Clifton
Forge, Va., and moved to the
area in 1971 from District
Heights, Md. She was a grad-
uate nurse of Chesapeake &
Ohio Hospital and was regis-
tered in Maryland and
Virginia. She also served as
branch librarian at Prince
Georges County, Md., for 16
years.
She was a member and
past board member of the
local chapter of NAR.EE., a
life member of the Order of
Eastern Star in Washington,
D.C., a past board member of
Widowed Persons Service of
Venice and a member of the
Unity Church of Venice.
Survivors include a son,
James of Midlothian, Va.; two
grandsons; and several nieces
and nephews.
Services: A graveside service
will be Wednesday, Sept. 21, at
11 a.m. at Gulf Pines Memorial
Park, Englewood. Ewing Funeral
Home is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Thomas Couser
SThomas "Scotty"
Couser of Columbus,
Ohio, formerly of Ven-
ice, died Monday,
Sept. 12,2005. He was 86.


He was born June 10, 1919,
in Kirkintilloch, Scotland. He
served as a paratrooper in the
U.S. Army during World War
II in the 503 Airborne
Division. He was retired from
the U.S. Post Office.
He was a member of the
American Legion and a life-
time member ofVFW and the
Elks.
Survivors include his wife
of 65 years, Catherine; two
daughters, Patricia Kallay and
Regina Britt; a son, Thomas;
four grandchildren; two step-
grandchildren; and one great-
granddaughter.
Services: Memorial services will
be Friday, Sept. 23, at 7 p.m. in
the chapel at Atria Woodside
Village, Columbus, Ohio.
Lane services
A memorial service
for James B. Lane of
Nokomis, who died
Friday, Aug. 19, 2005,
will be held Monday, Sept. 26,
at 11 a.m. at the Florida
National Cemetery in Bush-
nell.
F. Roy Haley
E Roy Haley of St.
Petersburg, formerly
of Venice, died Satur-
day, Sept. 17, 2005. He
was 87.
He was born June 22, 1918,
in Gladwyne, Pa., and moved


to Venice in 1985 from Chal-
font, Pa. He moved to St.
Petersburg in 2000.
He was a World War II U.S.
Navy veteran and worked as a
controller of the international
division for the Budd Com-
pany in Troy, Mich. He was an
Episcopalian.
Survivors include his wife
of 64 years, Ruth; a daughter,
Kathryn Lacher of St. Peters-
burg; a brother, Conrad of
Narberth, Pa.; two grandchil-
dren; and two great-grand-
children.
Services: Inurnment will take
place at Bay Pines National
Cemetery in St. Petersburg.
Lemon Bay Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to a favorite
charity.
JackV. Ruttan
Jack V Ruttan of Venice
died Monday, Sept. 19, 2005.
He was 88.
He was born March 8,
1917, in Highland Park, Mich.,
and moved to Venice in 1968.
from Royal Oak, Mich. He was
a supervisor for General
Motors Corporation, retiring
after 39 years. He was a mem-
ber of South Venice Baptist
Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Dorothy ofVenice; a son, Jack
Jr. of Lansing, Mich.; a broth-


er, George of Zolfo Springs;
and numerous grandchildren
and great-grandchildren.
Services: Visitation will be
Thursday, Sept. 22, 3-4 p.m., at
Farley Funeral Home, with a
memorial service at 4 p.m.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to South
Venice Baptist Church, 3167
Englewood Road, Venice, 34293.
Vincent P. Salamino
Vincent P Salamino
of Venice died Mon-
day, Sept. 19, 2005. He
was 82.
He was born Aug. 12, 1923,
in New York City and moved
to the area in 1987 from Long
Island, N.Y.
He worked for the South
Huntington School District in
Long Island for 20 years, and
was a 20-year veteran of the
U.S. Army, having served in
World War II.
He was a member of the
American Legion.
Survivors include a son,
Gary of Venice; a daughter,
Carol Skog of Venice; two
brothers, Charles of Las
Vegas, Nev., and Alfonse of
Venice; and two grandsons.
Services: Visitation will be
Sunday, Sept. 25, 2-4 p.m. at
Lemon Bay Funeral Home, with
services to follow. Inurnment
will take place at Gulf Pines
Memorial Park, Englewood.


Katherine R. Schackert
Katherine R. Schackert of
Venice died Saturday, Sept.
18, 2005. She was 94.
She was born Oct. 23, 1910,
in Baltimore, Md., and moved
to the area in 1975 from there.
She was a clothing examiner
for L. Greif & Bros. Men's
Clothing in Baltimore, retir-
ing after more than 30 years.
Survivors include many
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Services: Visitation will be
Thursday, Sept. 22, 10-11 a.m. at
Ewing Funeral Home.
Entombment will be private in
Gulf Pines Memorial Park,
Englewood.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238.
Richard 0. Scherch
Richard Otto Scherch of
Sarasota died Friday, Sept. 16,
2005. He was 78.
He was born Nov. 21, 1926,
in Baltimore, Md., and moved
to Venice in 1981 from
Paramus, N.J. He was a minis-
ter and pastor of Emmanuel
Lutheran Church, retiring in
1993 after 12 years as senior
pastor. He did interim work in
the/ ministry throughout the
United States. He was a past
member of the Venice-
Nokomis Rotary Club.
/Survivors include his wife


of 54 years, Janice of Sarasota;
two sons, Richard of Fort
Myers, and Jeremy of Spring-
hill, Tenn.; two daughters,
Leslie Durst of Indianapolis,
Ind., and Lisa Albert of Ros-
coe, Il.; two brothers, John of
Pennsylvania and Robert of
Baltimore, Md.; 12 grandchil-
dren; and a great-grand-
daughter.
Services: Memorial services will
be held at a later date. Farley
Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to
Emmanuel Lutheran Church,
730 South Tamiami Trail, Venice,
34285.
Patricia A. Vartanian
Patricia A. Vartanian of
Venice died Friday, Sept. 16,
2005. She was 83. 1
She was born Jan. 14, 1922,
in Detroit, Mich., and moved
to the area in 1980 from Li-
vonia, Mich.
She was a graduate of
Michigan State University
and worked as an analytical
chemist.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 43 years, Mike; and
one granddaughter. I
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to American
Red Cross, Hurricane Katrina
Relief, 2001 Cantu Court,
Sarasota, 34232.


Lunsford Act fix could save time and money


BY BARRY MILLMAN
STAFF WRITER


An unanticipated hole in a
new child-protection law that
has cost Florida schools and
their contractors untold
amounts of unnecessary time
and money will soon be
plugged, courtesy of the
state's legislative leadership
and its top law enforcement
agency.
Under the comprehensive
legislation, popularly called
the Jessica Lunsford Act, any
employee or contractor doing
business on school property
when students are present
must undergo a substantive


fingerprint and background
check.
However, without any pro-
vision or formal mechanism
in the law for sharing the
results of those checks, many
employers and individuals
who routinely perform, their
duties in multiple districts -
including construction con-
tractors and workers, athletic
coaches, referees and per-
forming artists have been
forced to undergo and pay for
checks on themselves over
and over again.
In many Florida districts,
the deluge of contractors
needing security checks has
prompted the hiring of an


additional employee just to
handle the traffic.
While nobody has been
able to calculate the total cost
of the redundant testing to
large contractors who must
have all their on-site workers
tested, or the statewide cost
to school districts forced to
hire additional staff, all par-
ties agree the time and
money needlessly expended
is too high.
To the Web
On Thursday, however,
Florida House Speaker Allan
Bense and Senate President
Tom Lee jointly moved to
resolve the problem, at least


temporarily, by directing
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement Commissioner
Guy Tunnell to launch a Web
site that will serve as a cen-
tralized clearinghouse for
security checks performed by
every district in the state.
Once it is up and running,
the secure FDLE-developed
Web site will enable school
officials and contractors alike
to save time and money,
allowing contractors to un-
dergo a single check that will
be instantly available to all of
the state's school districts,
while easing the flood of
background checks requiring
additional staff by eliminat-


ing redundant checks.
'Some districts have been
doing a good job of commu-
nication, sharing their results
with other districts," said
Towson Fraser, a spokesman
for Bense. "Others haven't
been doing that so well. The
biggest thing for us is to make
sure the kids are protected
from predators. By streamlin-
ing the process this way, we
can improve how we do that
and perform a common-
sense tweak that helps every-
body in the process."

You can e-mail Barry
Millman at: bmillman
@sun-herald.com.


County commission starts red-light cameras initiative


STAFF REPORT


The Sarasota County
Board of Commissioners has
passed a resolution calling for
the creation of a grass-roots
coalition to support the use of
red light cameras at selected
intersections.
The resolution, called
"Green Light for Red Light-
Cameras," urges all 67 Florida
counties and 410 municipali-
ties to create a coalition to ask
the state Legislature to pass a
measure enabling local gov-
ernments to install red-light
cameras that could be used to
issue traffic citations.
Nationally, the annual
monetary effect of crashes is
estimated at approximately
$14 billion. Also the Federal
Highway Administration pro-
motes red-light cameras as a
strategy to reduce red-light
running and the resulting loss


POLICE BEAT
National Day of
Remembrance


Parents Of Murdered Chil-
dren has announced the sev-
enth annual National Day of \
Remembrance for Murder
Victims sponsored by POMC,
Mothers Against Drunk Driv-
ing and Sarasota County
Sheriff's Victims Assistance.
Sunday, Sept. 25, there will
be a vigil and a program hon-
oring those who have died by
murder in our area. Survivors
Jan Scott, Mary Bradley Weeks
and Roy Brown will be speak-
ing. There will also be a video
presentation of local victims.
The vigil will be held at 7:30
p.m. at the Sarasota County
Judicial Building, 2002 Ring-
ling Blvd., Sarasota. The rain-
out location is the North
United Methodist Church,.
4726 North Tamiami Trial,


installation of red-light cam-
eras."
Sarasota County recently
participated in the National
Stop on Red Week and
launched an "I Stop on Red"
community campaign, dis-
tributing information cards
and bumper stickers through
local schools, libraries and


law enforcement agencies.
County officials hope this
outreach will increase aware-
ness of the impact on the
community of red-light run-
ning and lead to positive
behavioral change.
Sarasota County TV 19 also
produced an "I Stop on Red"
30-second public service


of life and injuries.
The resolu-
tion urges the
Florida Legis-
lature to
change state
law, allowing
red-light
cameras at
intersections
to help pre-
vent further Mercier
deaths and
injuries due to red-light run-
ning.
"Red-light running is ag-
gressive driving, and using
technology to help with en-
forcement is just one way to
improve public safety," said
commission chair Paul Mer-
cier. "Sarasota County is lead-
ing the way through the
'Green Light for Red-Light
Cameras' resolution in asking
the Legislature to take action
and go forward with allowing


Sarasota.
For more information,
contact Sherry Mitchell, 952-
0936; MADD, 342-4242; or
373-7366.


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announcement that is airing
on the government access
station and other local com-
mercial stations.
More information on
"Green Light for Red-Light
Cameras" and "I Stop on Red"
may be found on the Sarasota
County Web site at: scgov
.net/stoponred.


I I


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DINNER &
A SHOW
$5.00 per person will include
all of your favorite songs
from yesteryear and a
scrumptious meal!
September 23rd
@ 3:30 PM
Tribute to Ray Charles
Reservations A Must

Friday Sept. 30th
11 to 4 PM
Chef Jon's Fairwell to
Summer Concert &
BBQ, Donations go to
Hurricane Katrina
Relief Fund.
Call for schedules &
Reservations


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WEDNESDAY,
SEPT.21, 2005


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
-(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com

RECIPES AND MORE 2B


Venice Gondolier Sun





OUR


STICKING TO THE RUNNING ROUTINE 10B


SECTION,


CELEBRATING THE BEACH RENOURISHMENT 120


I Celebrating an early Oktoberfest


KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR


Season shifts

into high gear

on the 24th

This afternoon, Cliff Roles'
guest on Talk of the Suncoast,
WIBQ, 1220 AM, will be Sara-
sota County Administrator
Jim Ley. Tomorrow, Roles will
interview Leanne McIntire,
the executive producer of The
Education Channel. The show
airs daily from 2-3 p.m. and
always features interesting
folks and news from the
Suncoast. Have a listen.

If you haven't caught a per-
formance of "The Johnny
Mercer Show" at the Venice
Little Theatre, do it now. Its
.stars, Ricky Ritzel and Leslie
Anderson were recently voted
the Best Caberet Duo in New
York City, where VLT's Allan
Kollar found them earlier this.
year. Tickets are $20 per per-
son and available at the VLT
box office. Call 488-1115.

An exhibit of works by
fused-glass artist Liana Mart-
in and painter Ed Williams
will open with a reception
from 5 to 6 p.m., today, Wed-
nesday, Sept. 21, at the.Man-
atee Community College
Venice Fine Art Gallery, 8000
South Tamiami Trail. The
*:reception is free and open to
the public. Refreshments will
be served.
Martin, founder of the
Suncoast Glass Guild and the
owner of Firebug Designs
Studio in Venice, uses both
torch and kiln to create her
work.
Williams will show paint-
ings that were inspired by
.Florida's Miccosukee Indians
and their traditions.
The exhibit, located in the
library foyer, continues
through Oct. 8. Gallery hours
are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday
through Thursday and 8 a.m-
4 p.m. on Friday. For more
information, call 408-1476.

VIP Travel will host a wine
and cheese party on Friday,
Sept. 23, from 2-4 p.m. at the
Epiphany Hall. 224 West
Harbor Drive, Rooms B and C.
The event is for anyone inter-
ested in joining members of
the Epiphany Council of
:Catholic Women on the coun-
cil's seven-day cruise to Ber-
muda and Nassau aboard the
Costa Magica April 28-May 5.
For more information, call
484-0812.

Katrina victims need all
kinds of help and it seems
that there are at least that
many ways to help. The latest
to cross my desk is a deal
.offered by Doctors Kozma,
,Goldsmith and Adams of the
Chiropractic and Acupunc-
ture Center of Sarasota. New
.patients who schedule an
appointment through Sept.
.30 and bring a minimum $30
donation to the American Red
Cross Disaster Relief Fund
will receive a consulta-
tion/health history, orthope-
dic/neurological exam, initial
X-rays (if necessary) and a
written report of findings (val-
ued up to $175). For more
information, call 924-9892.
The center is at 4010 Sawyer
Road, Sarasota.

The FSU/Asolo Conserv-
atory for Actor Training and
Florida State University, and
the Asolo LateNight Series
present the inaugural FSU/
Asolo 10-Minute Play Fest-
Please see COOL, lOB


John Gunther and
Nancy Seibert are
Euro Express.

BY JEREMY ROTTGEN
STAFF WRITER

Beer, pretzels, schnitzel,
schunkeling and last but not
least, leiderhosen.
Schunkeling is what it's
called when you hook arms
with your neighbor and sway
back and forth. It's something
Euro Express demands of
their audience when they
play classics like "Edelweiss"
to crowds during Oktober-
fest.
"We're going to schunkel
so hard that it makes the per-,
son at the end of the table fall
off," said musician John
Gunther to an Oktoberfest
crowd.
After Oktoberfest activities
it's hard to: imagine some-
body not falling down, but
Euro Express is the kind of
band that will bring people
back up to their feet.
Apparently it's not unusual
for Oktoberfest to get started
early.
"We play a variety of
music," says accordion player
and keyboardist Nancy Sei-
bert. "So we're available for a
lot of occasions."
Seibert has been playing in
and around Venice for the
past four years. She just
teamed up with John Gunth-
er this year.
"I think a lot of people here
in America travel over to
Europe and have gone to
Munich," Seibert said. "They
like to keep some of the fun of
the Oktoberfest party."
Playing tunes for Oktober-
fest is just something that
comes natural to Gunther.
"I was born and raised in
Chicago," he said. "My family
is German. I've been hiing in
a German world all my life."
They've got skills
A culturally rich back'-
ground gave both Seibert and
Gunther the' appropriate
skills to perform German
music.
According to duo's Web
site, Seibert is the mainstay of
Euro Express. She is a profes-
sional musician who plays
accordion as well as key-
boards, and is also a
singer/songwriter. Nancy has
been playing in Indianapolis
and Florida for the past 30
years. She has played with
various kinds of polka bands,
including playing the Polka-
bration at the Mohegan Sun
in Michigan and at the Polka
Hall of Fame in Cleveland.
She has played around Venice
as a solo act with her accor-
dion and keyboard. She's also
performed with the Indian-
apolis symphony in combi-


nation with Lucciano
Pavarotti.
"I play on the weekends
here," she said. "I'm not from
Germany, but my ancestry is
German and Polish. I was in a
German band when I was 15
and in another German band
in Indianapolis when I was
18, so I've been playing Ger-
man music all my life."
John Gunther plays
drums, performs lead vocals
and yodeling. Gunther is the
timekeeper of Euro Express.
He is a professional musician
and has been playing music
in Chicago and Florida.
The name of the duo came
from its versatility. In terms of
styles, they can play pretty
much anything whether it be
German, Polish or Slovakian.
"We're covering the whole
European market," Gunther
said.
Gunther has also been
playing music for more than
30 ears.
:'This is what I know. This
is what I love to do and I'm
very happy to have teamed
up with Nancy," he said.
Gunther has also plays a
set of bells, jingling and jan-
gling in tune along with
Seibert, which is an impres-
sive display. Gunther said a
friend gave him set of bells
one day and he started listen-
ing to tapes.
"I just taught myself," he
said. "Same with yodeling. It's
not something that every-
body can do. It's something
that if you're fortunate
enough to be able to do I
guess I'm just one of those
fortunate ones that are able
to do it."
Seibert enjoys playing the
music she does and she has
the background for it. She
was a music teacher, but she
said the accordion is a chal-
lenging instrument to play.
"There quite a European
population around this area,
Englewood, Fort Myers, Cape
Coral and even Sarasota.
We're looking forward to
playing stuff to different
nationalities."
Euro Express is also work-
ing on a song for an major
European beer company.
History
According to Oktoberfest
Stasse in La Crosse, Wis.,
Oktoberfest started in 1810,
when Princess Therese was
married to the Bavarian
Crown Prince Ludwig, the'
festival began as a wedding
celebration. In a meadow
adjacent to Munich, as part of
the wedding entertainment,
a horse race was staged for
40,000 enthusiasts from all
over Bavaria. The purpose of
the celebration was two-fold:
First, to give thanks to the
Lord for the past year's crops
and other blessings. Second,
to share in the joy of the occa-
N -i i-&


S-UI4 PHOTOS B" JEPEM, ROTGEH


Nancy Seibert can sing, play the accordion or play the keyboards.


John Gunther plays "Edelweiss" by ringing different toned bells.


sion with the family in the
spirit of true love.
Such was the success of
the party given after the wed-
ding that the meadow was
named the Theresien-Wiese
in honor of the princess. Even
today, the meadow retains its
name and is kept as a large
open clearing within the
heart of a city grown far
beyond it.
Today, the festival comes
alive at noon on opening
when, as the clock of St. Paul's


Seibert has been playing the accordion since she was 12 years


Euro Express started earlier this year when Nancy Seibert and John Gunther combined their
musical abilities.


Church in Munich strikes
noon, the burgermeister
enters one of the beer tents
and taps the first, cask and
quaffs the first stein during a
12 canon salute. One of the
highlights of the fest is the
Trachtenfest parade, one in
which thousands of partici-
pants from all over Germany
dress in their native costume.
Bands, floats and decorat-,
ed beer wagons drawn by
beautiful horses wind their
way through the downtown
streets and out to the Wies'n,'
short for festival grounds.


While Munich remains the
original home for Oktober-
fest, La Crosse, Wis., has be-
come the home of Oktober-
fest, USA.
Locally, Oktoberfest has
become quite a tradition with
different festivals taking place
all along the sun coast. You
can see Euro Express at the
Brauhaus Venice Oktoberfest
Sept. 23-25. Friday and Sat-
urdays, 5-9 p.m. and Sun-
days, noon-4 p.m., at 1766
South Tamiami Trail in Ven-
ice. Call 485-1522 or visit
euroexpress.us.


P- ZX.







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B R E AK~ WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


Venice views


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"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"













Help the little goblins


SUN FILE GRAPHIC
South Venice Civic Association seeks volunteers and dona-
tions for its children's Halloween party taking place Sunday,
Oct. 30, 1-3 p.m. at 720 Alligator Drive in Venice. To volunteer,
call Sally Hagan at 492-9058.


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PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTHUR LAW


A Cattle Egret in breeding plumage takes a stroll on Bermuda Isles Circle in Chestnut Creek.


|The SamSeltzers &Charlotte Sun Great Gas Giveaway.

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CONTACT US
DEBBIE SHULMAN
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1106
dshulman@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




VENICE VENUE LOCAL
SCE NE


3B
WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 21, 2005


WEDNESDAY,
SEPT.21
MCC reception
An exhibit of works by fused-
glass artist Liana Martin and
painter Ed Williams opens
with a reception 5-6 p.m. at
the Manatee Community
College (MCC) Venice Fine
Art Gallery, 8000 South
Tamiami Trail. The reception
is free and open to the public.
Refreshments will be served.
The exhibit continues
through Oct. 8, 8 a.m.-9 p.m.
Monday through Thursday
and 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday. Call
408-1476.
College information
Eckerd College's Program for
Experienced Learners holds
a free information session at
5:30 p.m. at the Sarasota
Center, 2050 Oak St. RSVP to
957-3397 or visit eckerd.edu/
pel.
Fun and games
* Get up a game at 6.p.m. at
the American Legion No-Vel
Post 159, 145 E. Venice Ave.
Call 488-1157.
* The second annual Crib-
bage Group meets weekly
Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. at
The End Zone Sports Grille,
Eason Plaza, 2411 South
McCall Road in Englewood.
Seven different games play-
ed. $5 donation for prizes; no
muggins apply. Call "Boston
Bob" Waltzer at 276-1511.

Serenity Gardens, Brickyard
Plaza, 530 South U.S, 41
Bypass, Venice. Call 486-3577,
donations accepted.
* Guided meditation with
Veronica, 6-7 p.m., Wednes-
days. A gentle way to learn
to ease into meditation for
stress reduction.
* Compassionate Conmuni-
cation: Learn to speak hon-
estly and compassionately
with all your relationships,
7-9 p.m. Led by Mercedes
Frace.
Sorority event
The Sarasota-Manatee Chi
Omega Alumnae Association
holds its monthly VLunch
Bunch at 11:30 a.m. at the,
Hillview Grill, 1920 Hillview
St., Sarasota. Call Virginia at
371-5106.
Blood pressure clinic
Sunrise Home Care offers a
free blood pressure clinic,
Wednesday, 10 a.m.-noon at
530 U.S. 41 Bypass, Suite 6A
in Venice, in the Brickyard
Plaza. The clinic is run by
Norman Shewman, BSN, RN,
and Lisa Conway, RN: Call
486-9604.
Jewelry class
Melissa Searle leads a free
jewelry-making workshop at
1 p.m. at Lemon Tree Gallery,
420 W. Dearborn St., Engle-
wood. Purchase gemstones
and materials on site, starting
at $15. For more information,
call Jill at 474-5700.
Paralegal dinner
Southwest Florida Paralegal
Association Inc. holds its
monthly dinner meeting 6-
8:30 p.m., at the Sarasota
Yacht Club, 1100 John Ring-
ling Blvd. Daniel Lobeck,
Esq., discusses Controlling
Growth: The Future of Land
Use Regulation. Visit swflori-
daparalegals.com or call
Vicky at 364-2489.

Military luncheons
* Sarasota-Manatee Council,
Navy League of the United
States, meets at 6 p.m. at the
Bird Key Yacht Club, 301 Bird
Key Drive. Speaker is VADM
David L. Brewer, Com-
manding Officer of the Mil-
itary Sealift Command. Din-
ner is $26 and the public is
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Larry at 741-9630.
* The First Marines Division
Association, Southwest Flor-
ida Chapter, meets for a noon
lunch at the Family Table
Restaurant, 14132 South


Tamiami Trail in North Port.
All Marines and spouses wel-
come. For more information,
call Fred at (941) 255-1828.


Medical meeting
The Venice Area Ostomy
Association meets at 1:30
p.m., in the Venice Regional
Medical Center Health Park at
Jacaranda and Center Road in
Venice, Suite 1283. Ostomy
nurse Ann Brough conducts
the meeting. Call 484-0607.
Politicos
* The National Organization
for Women Venice/North Port
Chapter meets at 7 p.m. in the
conference room of Venice
Public Library, 300 S. Nokomnis
Ave. Everyone welcome. Call
485-7260.
e* A New Public Vision for the
Democrats is the topic, 1:30-
3 p.m. at the Fruitville Library
meeting room, 100 Coburn
Road, Sarasota. This free event
is part of a free monthly dis-
cussion series hosted by die
Democratic Club of Sarasota.
The public is welcome.
* Sarasota County Commis-
sioner Shannon Staub speaks
on sustainability. issues at
the Sarasota Republican Club
dinner at the Sarasota Yacht
Club, 1100 John Ringling Blvd.
Social at 6 p.m., dinner at 7
p.m'. Call Nancy at 371-1191.
For membership information,
contact Patrick at 484-7188
or patjaehne@comcast.net.
Jazz,
Scott Blum and Friends per-
form when Marie Selby Bo-
tanical Gardens opens at 6
p.m. at 811 S. Palm Ave..
Sarasota, Wednesdays for
Selby Sunsets. Listen to live
jazz, watch the sunset over the
bay and enjoy the gardens
after hours. Admission is $6.
Call 366-5731 or visit selby.org.

THURSDAY,
SEPT. 22
Marquee
* See "In America" part of
the Cannes in' Venice Film
Festival, 5 p.m. at Jacaranda
Public Library, 4143 Wood-
mere Park Blvd., Venice.
* See "NewMoon" (1940), star-
ring Jeanette MacDonald and
Nelson Eddy, part of the 10th,
annual film festival at 6 p.m.
at Venice: Public Library, 300
S. Nokomis Ave.
Club events
* The Laurel Lions Club meets
at 7 p.m. at the Sandra Sims
Terry Community Center, 509
Collins Road in Laurel. New
members welcome. Call 483-
3338 or e-mail laurelcivic@
aoLcom.
* The Rotary Club of Venice-
Nokomis meets for lunch
Thursday at noon at Grace
United Methodist Church, 400
E. Field Ave., Venice, at the
corner of Field and Avenida
del Circo. Call 484-9339.
'Book club
The Bookshop Book Club
Meeting discusses "Oh My
Stars" by Lorna Landvik at 7
p.m. at 241 W. Venice Ave.,
Venice. The featured book
can be purchased at The.
Bookshop at a 10 percent,
discount. Call 488-1307.
Jamming


SUN FILE GRAPHIC
Bluegrass Jam,. 7 p.m., Bee
Ridge Park, Wilkinson at Lock-,
wood Ridge Road, Sarasota.
Call Floyd Knight at 955-5293.
Thursday bingo
* 11 a.m. Senior Friendship
Center, 2350 Scenic Drive. Call
493-3065.
* Noon, The Jewish Commun-v
ity Center of Venice, 600
Auburn Road, nonsmoking.
Hard cards available for sight-
impaired players. Doors open
at 10 a.m. Lunch available.
Call 493-7558.
* Senior Friendship Center
Cafe, 2350 Scenic Drive,
Venice, holds bingo at 11 a.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays;


BEST BETS
THE LOCAL SCENE SEPT. 21 SEPT. 22


Connie Deming, Carlos Smith, MaryAnn Nigh, and Pru
and Bill Comeau had a great time helping at the Gotta
Dance luau recently. Gotta Dance, based in Nokomis,
offers several dancing events each week.

Dancing
* Bay Indies holds its first dance of the fall season Wednesday,
Sept. 21, at 7:30 p.m. at 950 Ridgewood Ave., Venice. Music
provided by Harmony. Tickets are $7 for residents and 59 for
nonresidents, sold at the door. BYOB. Snacks and setups
provided. Doors open at 7 p.m. Singles welcome.
* Lola Miller leads line dance lessons Wednesdays at Venice
United Church of Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd. Beginners lessons,
5:30-6:30 p.m.; intermediate, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost- $4. Call Miller
at 493-9665.
* Beginning line dance classes take place at Jacaranda Trace,
Wednesday, 7:15-8:45 p.m. S4 per class. Led by Jackie Wheeler.
Call 493-2776.
* Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays Center, 303 South Tamiami Trail in
Nokomis, holds ballroom dancing every Wednesday and Friday.
Group lesson 7-8 p.m.; open dancing until 10 p.m. S7, snacks
included. Call 486-0326.
- Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays Center, 303 South Tamiami Trail in
Nokomis, holds beginners dance night Thursdays, 7:30.-9 p.m.
Learn steps all evening with teachers to help. $5, snacks
included. Call 486-0326.

Fly-boys
The Venice Aviation Society's fall kick-off meeting features Fred
Watts, Venice Municipal Airport manager, with an airport status
report Wednesday, Sept. 21, at 7:30p.m. at Venice City Council
Chambers, City Hall, 401 W. Venice Ave.

Fishing seminar


Capt. Jeremy Fowler of Gulfcart Charters discusses Offsho
Fishing for Kings, Grouper, Tuna and Snapper at a free ser
Thursday, Sept. 22, at 7 p.m. at Boater's World in Bird Bay
in Venice. The public is welcome. Call 412-0310.


lunch at noon with 24-hour
advance reservations., Dona-
tion: $3. Call 584-0090 or 584-
0031.
Gardening sessions
A certified Master Gardener
from the University of Florida/
Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences-Sarasota
County Extension offers gar-
dening tips and answers at
Jacaranda Public Library, 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice,
Thursday, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

The Women's Resource Center
of Sarasota County, 806 Pine-
brook Road, Venice, 485-9724
*Yoga, 10-11:30 a.m. and 5:30-
7 p.m. Gentle, appropriate for
beginners. Please bring a mat.
Men welcome. Fee: $8.
SBuilding Self-Esteem, 6-7:30
p.m. Led by Phyllis K. Jensen,
Psy.D. Fee: $5.
Senior activities
The Senior Friendship Center,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
offers Quilting, 9-11:30 a.m.
and Shell Crafts, 1-3 p.m. Call
584-0052.
Men's barbershop
The Lemon Bay Chord Com-
pany, the Englewood Chapter
(P-038) of the Barbershop
Harmony Society, meets
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at
Christ Lutheran Church, 701
N. Indiana Ave. Call 43-,6417.
Bowled over
Florida Wheelers Bowling
Association welcomes wheel-
chair- and standup bowlers,
Thursday at 3 p.m. at AMF
Venice Lanes, 1100 South U.S.
Bypass. No experience neces-
sary. Call Leon Thompson at
475-1369.
Embroiderers meet
Sarasota Chapter, Embroid-
erers' Guild of America Inc.,
Night Needlers, holds ,a
monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m.
the fourth Thursday of the
month at Fruitville Library,
100 Coburn St., Sarasota. Call
351-7011 or visit sunregion-
ega.org..


FRIDAY,.
SEPT. 23
Club entertainment
The Venice Elks Club
live music in. the
Friday, 7-10 p.m. a
Venice Ave. Memb
guests welcome.


Ire
ninar


waters of the Gulf of Mexico
from Turtle Beach county
park to Point of Rocks, 8:30-
11:30 a.m. Snorkel among the
fish, mollusks and other crit-
ters of the gulf. Bring snorkel
equipment and sunscreen;
kayak equipment provided.
$20 for ALS members, $25 for
nonmembers. Call John at
966-7308.
Pasta
Lotsa Pasta is available 4:30-
7:30 p.m. Friday at the Italian
American Club of Venice, 1375
Ringling Blvd. Cost is $7. Take
out available. For more infor-
mation, call 486-1492.
Sorority event
The Sarasota-Manatee Chi
Omega Alumnae Association
meets for a potluck dinner at
6:30 p.m. at the home of Patty
Sturtevant. Bring a dish,
favorite beverage and beach
chair. Dress is informal. RSVP
to Patty at 346-0262.
Benefit concert
Trinity Charities Inc. hosts an
Italian dinner and piano con-
cert at 6:30 p.m. at 7225 North
Lockwood Ridge Road in
Sarasota. Proceeds benefit
HIV/AIDS service organiza-
tions through The Smart Ride,-
a 165-mile bike ride from
Miami to Key West that bene-
fits six Florida HIV/AIDS
organizations. Tickets are $20;
call 355-0847 or visit trinitym-
cc.com.
Euchre
VFW Post 8118 hosts Euchre
every Friday at 1 p.m. at 832 E.
Venice Ave. Open to all play-
ers, not just VFW members.
Music man
Singer-songwriter Carey
Chaney performs Fridays at
noon at the Blue Parrot Cafe
in Venice at the Brickyard
Plaza, 530 South *U.S. 41
Bypass. Visit careychaney.
com.


Plaza The Women's Resource Center
of Sarasota County, 806 Pine-
brook Road, Venice, 485-9724
Building Self-Esteem, Fri-
days, 10-11:30 a.m. Led by
S -.Mary Frost, Rapid Behaioral
Change Trainer. Fee: $5.
Caregivers' Support Group,
Friday, 1:30-3 p.m. Led by
it David Williams, LCSW, in
presents cooperation with JFCS and
ougesentSenior Solutions. Donation:
Lounge: $5. $
at 119 E. $5.
>ers and, Dancing


Health care forum
The Future of Health Care, a
community health-care for-
um featuring national consul-
tant and health-care futurist
Leanne Kaiser Carlson, takes
place noon-1:30 p.m., Thurs-
day, Sept. 29, at Plantation
Golf & Country Club, 500
Rockley Blvd., Venice. Regis-
tration at 11:30 a.m. Cost: $35.
RSVP by Sept. 23 to Jessica at
861-2987.
Museum event
The John and Mable Ringling
Museum of Art 'hosts a
Spotlight Series: "A Way of
Seeing: Dutch Art in the 17th
Century," 9:30-11:30 a.m. in
the Museum of Art lobby; 5401
Bay Shore Road, Sarasota.
Tickets are $12 for members,
$15 for nonmembers. Call
358-3180.

Senior Friendship Center, 2350
Scenic Drive, Venice, 584-0052
* Balance movement class,
Fridays. 9 a.m. Balance
Matters Falls Prevention rec-
ommended. Call 556-3223.
* Low-vision bridge, Fridays,
9:30 a.m.
* Duplicate bridge, Fridays, 1
p.m.
Kayak, snorkel


SUN FILE GRAPHIC
The American Littoral Society,
Southeast Region, invites you
to kayak on the near-shore


Learn Latin and ballroom
dancing Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-
noon at Senior Friendship
Center, 2350 Scenic Drive,
Venice. Cost: $1. For more
information, call 584-0075.



SEPT. 24
Fine art benefit
The newly formed Commun-
ity Foundation at Venice Golf
& Country Club holds a Fine
Art Auction to benefit Love-
land Center and Loveland
Legacy, taking place at 250
Venice Golf Club Drive, 6-8
p.m. Tickets are $40 and
include wine, champagne and
tasty food. A "quick draw" fea-
tures five talented artists who
will create fine art "on the
spot" for auction. Call Susan at
Loveland at 493-0016, Ext. 203.
Guitarlperformance
In celebration of Hispanic
Heritage Month, Chilean
acoustical guitarist Claudio
Baltierra performs with fellow
musicians at 1 p.m. at Jaca-
randa Public Library, 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd. in Ven-
ice. Registration required for
this free event; call 861-1270.
Market
Visit the Venice Farmer's
Market every Saturday, 8 a.m.-
noon, downtown in Centen-
nial Park, at the corner of
Tampa and Nokomis avenues.
Call 484-3801.

Car wash benefits
* The Chorus Department of
Venice High School holds its
first car wash, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.,
at Willette's Automotive, 405


South Tamiami Trail. The
event supports the Treble
Chorus, Mixed Chorus and Le
Voci de Venezia. Call Pam at
412-0427.
* Eager Beaver Car Wash in
South Venice is participating
in the Wash U.SA benefit for
the Make-A-Wish Founda-
tion. Rain date is Oct. 1. Visit
washesforwishes.org or call
(888) WASH-USA.
Pet adoptions

/a 6.


PHOTO COURTESY OF SHS
Two-year-old Spike is a male
pit bull/labrador retriever
mix. His owner had surgery
and can no longer take care
of him. Spike is housebroken,
crate trained, knows com-
mands, and has lived with
other dogs and seniors. He
knows "bedtime" and rushes
to his crate to get a treat
before going to sleep. Spike
is waiting to meet you and
impress you with his nice
personality.

Suncoast Humane Society
will have loving cats and dogs
like Spike available for adop-
tion, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday,
Sept. 24, at Paw Prints retail
store in the Rialto Shopping
Plaza, 668 South Tamiami
Trail in Venice. The store also
holds a customer-apprecia-
tion sale, giving 51 percent off
donated merchandise. Call
480-9811 or visit humane.org.
Goodwill celebration
The grand opening of the
Goodwill GoodNeighbor
Center at 1752 South Tamiami
Trail in Venice takes place 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Meet LOVIN CHAT
supporters and enjoy free
food, face painting, games,
clowns, music and more. Call
493-5077.
Bird walk .
The Vdriice-Area Audubon
Society hosts a, free guided
bird walk with Charlie Sam-
ple, 7:30 a.m. at Shamrock
Park, 4100W. Shamrock Blvd.,
Venice. Meet in the parking
area. All are welcome. Call
496-8984.
Healthy mind
Peter O'Rourke leads Healthy
Mind, Healthy Body Work-
shop Aromatherapy and
Stress, noon-2:30 p.m., at
Serenity Gardens in Brickyard
Plaza, 530 South U.S. 41
Bypass in Venice. RSVP to
486-3577.
DA.V. dinner
The Disabled American
Veterans, 600 Colonia Lane,
Nokomis, holds a prime rib
dinner by Tony for $8, 5-7
p.m., and music by Bandana 8
p.m.-midnight. All are wel-
come. For more information,
call 492-6692 or 488-4500.
Youth art
Nanette Hopkins leads a
Youth Art Mosaics Workshop
for ages 5 and older, 10 a.m.-
noon, at Englewood Art Cen-
ter, 350 South McCall Road.
Cost is $10. Call 474-5548.
Rock'n' roll party
The Venice-Nokomis Elks
hold a 50s rock 'n' roll party at
119 E. Venice Ave. in Venice.
6-7 p.m. dinner 50s style, fea-
turing hamburgers, fries and
milkshakes; 7-10 p.m. music
by Ziggy. Dress up: Prizes for
best costume, as well as jitter-
bug and limbo contests.
Tickets are $10 at the lodge.
RSVP to 486-1854.
Family concert
Local musical group Out of
the Box performs a lullaby
concert at 2 p.m., at Venice
Public Library, 300 S. Noko-
mis Ave. The free concert is
designed to introduce chil-
dren and families to various
types of music while provid-
ing an opportunity to encour-
Please see VENUE, 4B








MII.FSTONES


4B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21,2005


MILITARY NEWS


Marine assists in Dubai
Marine Corps Lance Cpl.
Jordan P Newton, son of Kimn
Croft of Lafayette, La., and
Timothy G. Newton of Ven-
ice, and fellow Marines and
sailors took part in a com-
munity relations project
during a port visit to Dubai,
United Arab Emirates, while
on a scheduled deployment
in support of the Global War
on Terrorism while assigned
to the 26th Marine Expe-
ditionary Unit (MEU) home-
based at Camp Lejeune, N.C.
Volunteers worked at City
of Hope, a women's shelter in
Jumeirah. They painted hall-
ways and performed general
repair work, while some of
the servicemembers played
with the children staying at


the home.
MEUs are built around a
reinforced infantry battalion,
a combat service support ele-
ment, a reinforced helicopter
squadron and a command
element. With its comple-
ment of fully integrated air
and ground forces, Newton's
unit is ready to conduct real-
world operations including
amphibious, helicopter and
boat raids, tactical recovery
of aircraft and personnel,
noncombatant evacuation
operations and humanitarian
assistance operations.
Newton joined the Ma-
rine Corps in November 2001.
Venice grad completes
security ops
Navy Petty Officer 3rd


Class Patrick J. Meyers, a
2003 graduate of Venice
High School, and his fellow
shipmates completed Mar-
itime Security Operations
(MSO) while on a scheduled
deployment in support of
the Global War on Terrorism
while assigned to the am-
phibious assault ship USS
Kearsarge homeported in
Norfolk, Va.
Marines and sailors of the
USS Kearsarge Expeditionary
Strike Group conducted MSO
in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea,
Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman
and Indian Ocean.
MSO sets the conditions
for security and stability in
the maritime environment,
as well as complements the
counter-terrorism and secu-


rity efforts of regional nations.
MSO denies international
terrorists use of the maritime
environment as a venue for
attack or to transport person-
nel, weapons or other ma-
terials.
USS Kearsarge supports
amphibious assault opera-
tions using Landing Craft Air
Cushions, which are special-
ly-designed Hovercraft that
travel above land and sea sur-
faces to deliver vehicles and
equipment. The ship also has
conventional landing craft
and helicopters embarked,
and is equipped with med-
ical facilities staffed by Navy
doctors, dentists, nurses and
corpsmen.
Meyers joined the Navy
in July 2003.


STUDENT HONORS


65TH ANNIVERSARY

Drehouse


* Ashley Ren6e Bodi received
a bachelor of science degree
from the Mississippi Uni-
versity for Women during the
summer 2005 semester.
* Michael Luttkus of Venice
received a bachelor of science
degree in organizational
management from Argosy
University-Sarasota during
the summer 2005 semester.
* Juniata College graduate


Leslie Vogt, of Venice, was
one of the 1,000 U.S. stu-
dents selected to receive a
Fulbright Scholarship for,
study or research abroad.
Recipients are selected on
the basis of academic or pro-
fessional achievement and
leadership potential. Vogt
received the Fulbright
Scholarship to study chem-
istry at the University of


Augsburg in Augsburg, Ger-
many. She graduated in 2005
.Summa Cum Laude with a
bachelor of science degree in
physical chemistry with an
emphasis in chemistry. While
at Juniata, Vogt received the
Barry M. Goldwater scholar-
ship for the study of science,
presented research at nation-
al and international chem-
istry conferences, and was


inducted into the chemistry,
physics, leadership and Ju-
niata honor societies. After
studying in Germany, Vogt
plans to attend graduate
school to earn a Ph.D. in
chemistry. She is the daugh-
ter of Christopher and
Christine Vogt and is a 2001
graduate of Blue Valley
North High School in Over-
land Park, Kan.


Mr. and Mrs. Robert (Bob
and Ferol) Drehouse of South
Venice celebrated their 65th
wedding anniversary on
Wednesday, Sept. 14,2005.
They were married Sept.
14, 1940, in New Hampton,
Iowa.
The couple are the parents
of Bobbie (Mrs. Les) Cool-
beth. They have two grand-
children and two great grand-


daughters.
Mr. and Mrs. Drehouse
both retired from the Pasa-
dena, Calif., post office.
They celebrated their an-
niversary Sunday, Sept. 11,
2005, with 20 family mem-
bers and close friends at a
surprise party in the home
of their granddaughter,
Toni Grinaldi, in Lutz,
Fla.


VENUE frmpq-36


age growth and learning
through music. Children
must be accompanied by a
parent or caregiver. Register
at the youth desk or call
861-1348.
SHARE
Self Help and Resource Ex-
change volunteer and food
program has grocery pickup
for June and registration for
July at the following sites.
Frozen meats, fresh produce
and other staples are offered
for $18 in cash or food
stamps. Two hours of volun-
teer service is required.


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4227So,.TamiamTniT (US 41)Tel (941) 924-7114


* Christ United Methodist
Church, 1475 Center Road,
Venice, 9:30-11 a.m., 497-
1659 or 480-0236.
* Epiphany Cathedral, Parish
Hall, 310 Sarasota St., Venice,
9:30-11 a.m., 484-3505.
* Trinity Presbyterian Church,
4365 State Road 776, Venice,
9-10:30 a.m., 493-1057.
* Gulf Coast Chapel Church
of God, 602 Albee Farm
Road, Nokomis, 9:30-11 a.m.,
484-3767.
Democratic Club
The Venice Area Democratic
Club meets to hear Joe


Barbetta, vice-chair of the
Sarasota County Planning
Commission, at Naar Hall,
United Church of Christ
campus, 620 Shamrock Blvd.,
Venice. Social at 12:30 p.m.,
speaker at 1 p.m. Refresh-
ments served. Call 484-9354
or visit venicedemocrats.org.
Storm aid
* Residents of Venice East
hold a yard sale to benefit
the American Red Cross re-
lief fund for hurricane vic-
tims at 540 Bellaire Drive in
Venice; pickups also avail-
able. Hot dogs and drinks


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IMPROVES THE AIR QUALITY IN YOUR HOME!
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Seduces air conditoning and heating costs with blower fan
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* Electrostatlc filters and s.nlizling program available,


supplied. To volunteer or
make a donation, call Tara
Weddle at 234-6421 or Patty
Weddle at 234-7200.
* The teen organization
Backpacks of Hope holds a
collection site at AMF Venice
Lanes, 1100 U.S. 41 Bypass,
Sept. 24 and 25, 10 a.m.-
4 p.m. They are collecting
for The Salvation Army and
The Sarasota Food Bank/
America's Second Harvest,
toiletries, baby items, canned
food, handheld can openers,
toys, backpacks with school
supplies and books recom-
mended. Backpacks should


be marked Adult, Senior,
Child or Infant, and include
size and gender with a note of
hope. Backpacks will be taken
to local displaced survivors of
Hurricane Katrina. Visit back-
packsofhope.com.
Dance
* A West African dance class
takes place 1-2:30 p.m. at the
Sarasota Berlin YMCA at 1075
S. Euclid Ave. All ages wel-
come; cost: $5. Call 373-7812.
* The German-American
Social Club of Sarasota holds
its first dance of the season,
7-11 p.m.,, at the Knights of


Columbus Hall, 4880 Fruit-
ville Road, Sarasota. Music by
Europa. RSVP to Brigitte at
371-7786.
Cracker at the Crocker
Come out noon-5 p.m. for
blues and folk music, danc-
ing, auctions and family fun
at the Crocker Memorial
Church and the Bidwell-
Wood House in downtown
Sarasota's Rosemary District,
849 and 881 Florida Ave.
Admission is $10; proceeds
help move and restore these

Please see VENUE, 8B


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CONTACT US
LAURA FEHL
CLASS ACTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1109
Ifehl@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




CLASS ACTS


Students become teachers for a day at VCS


STAFF REPORT


The eighth graders at
Venice Christian School re-
cently presented their Simple
Machines Fair to the first,
third, fourth and fifth graders.
Students had the opportu-
nity to become a teacher for
the day as they became a spe-


cialist on a simple machine
they created or demonstrat-
ed.
The children were impres-
sed and had a terrific hands-
on experience.
Some of the presentations
included Sam Pinkerton's use
of a rotary eggbeater to dem-
onstrate the wheel and axle,


and Chrissie Siracuse and
Kelly Taylor's PowerPoint pre-
sentation on levers and pul-
leys.
Nick Fuller's combination
machine, scooped up candy
for the younger students as
they exited the fair. It was a
great day of excitement and
innovation for all.


FOR YOUR
CALENDAR


Golf tournament
Cardinal Mooney High
School is hosting its Annual
Fall Golf Tournament Satur-
day, Oct. 29, at Bent Tree
Country Club, 4700 Bent Tree
Blvd., Sarasota. The touma-
ment begins at 8:30 a.m. with
a shotgun start. Sister Lucia
Haas will be challenging golf-
ers to a closest-to-the-pin
contest, and there will be
plenty of top-notch prizes.
The $150 registration fee in-
cludes lunch, range balls and
an awards lunch. All proceeds
from the event benefit the
school's athletic and academ-
ic programs. To register, and
for sponsorship opportuni-
ties, call the Office of Ad-
vancement at 379-2647, or e-
mail jkonke@cmhs-sarasota.
org.

Gondolier Classifieds
work for you.


Bob Evans offers free

hand-washing reminders


STAFF REPORT


Many health experts agree
that one of the best ways to
prevent illness and protect
health is by using proper
hand-washing techniques.
Bob Evans Farms is hoping
to reinforce this idea by of-
fering free hand-washing re-
minders to schools, daycare
centers, fitness centers and
other organizations and busi-
nesses.
During September's Na-
tional Food Safety Education
Month, Bob Evans will dis-
tribute vinyl hand washing
clings that adhere to rest


room mirrors, and remind the
public of the need to wash
hands with warm, soapy wa-
ter for 20 seconds to remove
bacteria.
The clings display a verse
of the children's classic song
"Old MacDonald had a
Farm" along with a reminder
to sing the song while wash-
ing hands in order to wash
for the proper length of
time.
The clings are available
free of charge by visiting the
'our company" section of
the Bob Evans Web site at
bobevans.com, or by calling
(800) 272-7675, Ext. 2550.


WHAT'S FOR LUNCH?


Wednesday. Shepherd's pie
with roll, corn dog, 1905 salad,
tomato wedges, spinach, fresh
fruit cup, applesauce, grape
juice and milk


PHOTO COURTESY OF VENICE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
Kelly Taylor presented levers and pulleys with a hands-on demonstration.


Thursday Nachos with chili
and cheese, baked potato with
chili and cheese and roll, turkey
salad stuffed' tomato, corn,
steamed broccoli, mixed fruit,
watermelon, apple juice and
milk.


Friday. Chicken nuggets with
biscuit, fish sticks, tuna salad
platter, green beans, oven fries,
grapes, pears, orange juice and
milk.
Monday Pizza, turkey roll-
up, veggie pita delight, mixed


veggies, sliced tomatoes, apple,
peaches, orange juice and milk.
Tuesday: Taco, burrito,
chef's salad, refried beans, let-
tuce and tomato, banana,
pineapple, grape juice and'
milk.


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6B
WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 21,2005


Pet-friendly shelters are available


- C O

CHUCK JOHNSTON
GUEST nlIMST


The images of New Or-
leans residents who refused
to leave flooded homes be-
cause they didn't want to
leave their pets underscores
what emergency manage-
ment workers know about
people and pets. Pets aren't
like family members. Pets are
family members.
During the 2004 hurricane
season, Sarasota County
opened pet-friendly shelters
to accommodate residents
with pets who had no place
else to go. Now we have nine
pet-friendly shelters among
our 19 shelters countywide.


We open shelters in tiers, as
they are needed. Three of the
four shelters in the first tier
accept pets. One of the three
second-tier shelters accepts
pets. Five in the last shelter
tier accept pets. Our accep-
tance of pets is limited to
dogs and cats, which are kept
in their cages and separate
from the people. However,
owners are more than wel-
come to visit and check on
them.
In your personal hurricane
preparedness plan, consider
public shelters as places of
last resort. Even the best shel-
ters aren't comfortable by
most people's standards.
Taking shelter at the home of
a friend or family member is
much preferred. In your plan,
be sure to consider your pet's
needs, even if you don't plan
to evacuate. The preparations
are nearly the same.
If you plan to evacuate to a
Sarasota County shelter with
your dog or cat (pets may not
be dropped off) the animal
must be in a durable, secure
cage or carrier you provide,


have current vaccination
information, needed medica-
tions, and food and water
supplies. You are also respon-
sible for your pet's "comfort
breaks" and sanitation.
You can prepare now to
help ensure your pet's safety
during a hurricane or other
disaster. Update your pet's
vaccinations and have tags
and/or proof of vaccinations.
Assemble a pet kit that is
readily accessible and stored
in sturdy containers that can
be carried easily (duffel bags,
covered trash containers, etc.)
Your pet disaster supplies
kit should include:
I.D. tag (rabies tag should
be on animal), leash, I.D. on
all belongings, water and
food bowls, carrier or cage,
medication, food for seven
days
Medications (two-week
supply)
Medical records (stored in
a waterproof container)
A pet first aid kit
Sturdy leashes, harnesses
Carriers to transport pets
safely and ensure that yours


can't escape
Current photo for your
pets in case they get lost
Enough dry food for sever-
al days
Potable water, about the
same amount as people need.
Bowls
Pet beds and toys, if easily
transportable
The county's Web site,
scgov.net, has the complete
list of shelters and their
addresses, along with other
valuable hurricane-prepared-
ness information. Select
Hurricane Preparation from
the Find Information list on
the right panel.
All of us in Emergency
Services appreciate the pro-
found bond between pet
owners and their pets.
We urge you to include
pet preparedness in your
hurricane planning to help
protect them when disaster
strikes.

Chuck Johnston is
Sarasota County's Interim
Emergency Management
Director.


PETS


Adopt-a-pet







AA













PHOTO COURTESY OF SUNCQAST HUMANE SOCIETY
Fletcher is a young, neutered, male hound mix. He was
found as a stray in North Port. Fletcher is a real mix: He has
the body of a hound, the coloring of a Doberman and the
personality of a pup. He's not fond of cats, but he loves
humans. This young fellow seems to be housebroken (no
guarantees) and knows the "sit" command. If you are look-
ing for a friendly, lovable young dog to adopt, Fletcher will
be a great choice for your newest family member. Come
meet Fletcher at Suncoast Humane Society, 6781 San Casa
Drive in Englewood, or call 474-7884.


ARC mobile clinic
The Animal Rescue Co-
alition mobile clinic offers
low- or no-cost spays and
neuters for pets of income-
eligible families at sites
throughout Sarasota County.
Appointments required by
calling 957-1955, Ext. 5.
Pelican Man
back in business
Pelican Man's Bird Sanc-
tuary, 1708 Ken Thompson
Parkway, Sarasota, is now able
to care for sick or injured
birds, and is accepting volun-
teer help in a variety of capac-
ities. Entrance fees to visit the
sanctuary are $6 for adults
and $4 for children younger
than 12. To find out how you
can help, call 388-4444.
Pet adoptions


Jasper is a stunning cat with
elegant lines. This 5-year-old
neutered male is friendly, lov-
ing, mellow and gentle. He is
an exceptionally sweet kitty.
Jasper is a lap cat and special
in every way.

Suncoast Humane Society
will have loving dogs and cats
like Jasper available for adop-
tion, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday,
Sept. 24, at Paw Prints retail
store in the Rialto Shopping
Plaza, 668 South Tamiami
Trail in Venice. The store also
will hold a customer-appreci-
ation sale that day, giving 51
percent off donated mer-
chandise. Call 480-9811 or
visit humane.org.
Paws for a Cause


Mandy the dog and The
Humane Society of Sarasota
County invite you to join the
annual Paws for a Cause
walkathon, including its first
Cyber Walk at hssc.org. Visit
stops along the way, land-
marks, business or residence
- a $5 donation moves your
pet from one stop to the next.
The race lasts Oct. 1-Nov. 1,
when prizes will be awarded
to the "top dogs." Make your
home or business a stop on
the cyber route for just $50, or
link your Web page for a $25
donation. To join in, visit
hssc.org. Call 955-4131, Ext.
104.
Doggie Tales
* Venice Public Library, 300 S.
Nokomis Ave., holds Doggie
Tales Monday, Sept. 26, 3:30-
4:15 p.m., and the fourth
Monday of the month
through May 2006. Call 861-
1330.
* Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W.
Dearborn St., Englewood,
holds Doggie Tales family
nights at 6:30 p.m. the third

I~ TT~l-IflNf


Monday of each month. Kids
of all ages can improve their
reading skills by sharing sto-
ries with certified pet therapy
dogs. Call 861-5000 and ask
about the Doggie Tales pro-
grams at Elsie Quirk.
Dog club
The Greater Venice Florida
Dog Club meets at 7:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday of each
month (Sept. 27) at the South
Venice Community Center,
720 Alligator Drive. To learn
more, visit venicedogclub
.org.
Animal workshop
The Humane Society .of
Sarasota County presents
Using Animals in the Class-
room, a workshop for teach-
ers, Saturday, Oct. 8, nibori-4
p.m. at HSSC's Education
Center, 2331 15th St., Sara-
sota. Activities include animal
care, sample curricula for all
grade levels, Humane Edu-
cation and values and more.
Four hours of in-service cred-
it approved by Sarasota and


Manatee County school
boards. No charge to partici-
pants. Registration required
by calling Kate or Dee at 955-
4131 or e-mail education
@hssc.org.
Furfun
The Humane Society of
Sarasota County holds the
Fur Fun Club for kids ages 7-
12 to learn about animals
through dog walking, cat cud-
dling, animal-themed arts
and crafts, and animal-care
lessons and games. The pro-
gram meets four Fridays, 4-
5:30 p.m., Oct. 21-Nov. 11, in
the Education Center at 2331
15th St., Sarasota. The cost is
$25 per child per four-week
session. Registration is ongo-
ing. Call Kate or Dee at
955-4131. -
No more homeless pets
The New No More Home-
less Pets Conference takes
place Oct. 21-23 in Boston,
Mass., at the Sheraton Fern-
croft Resort. Humane profes-
sionals and individuals are


invited to talk to experts who
understand your needs, and
learn how to save the animals
in your community. Learn
more and sign up at best-
friends.org.
Cat's Meow gala
St. Francis Animal Rescue
(SFAR) hosts its fifth annual
Cat's Meow Gala on Saturday,
Oct. 22 at 6-p.m. at Pelican
Point Golf and Country Club
in Venice. Evening highlights
include a delicious buffet din-
ner, music and dancing and a
silent auction. Tickets are $50;
table sponsorship of eight is
$375. Tickets available at the
Adoption Center, 1925 South
Tamiami Trail, and The
Cattery Thrift Store, 1651
South Tamiami Trail, both in
Venice. CallU485-8082 or visit
stfrancisar.org for a mail-in
RSVP form.


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n the Pink
Women's Sertoma Club of Venice is happy to invite you
to participate in the 2005 Sun Fiesta Parade on
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22nd
The parade has been a part of Vehice's downtown activities for the
part 30 years. This year's theme is "h dtie Pink." Women's Sertoma
welcomes all area schools, organizations, churches and service
clubs to participate in this parade. As always the parade will begin
at the west end of Venice Avenue. Instructions and parade map will
be provided at a later date. Return application and $25 entry fee
made out to Women's Sertoma Club of Venice. The entry fee is *
waived for non-profit organizations. Mail to Beth Martin, 1202
Lexington Drive, Venice, FL 34292. 'ou may fax to.485-9773.
APPLICATION
Name of Org.
Contact Person


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SOUTH NEWS


Who's not cooking


at the monastery?


This may be partially due to
the facts that: 1) I'm a profes-
sional dieter; 2) I can't com-
prehend why anyone would
bother cooking when eating a
banana is so much easier; and
3) I've recently discovered
energy drinks.
Or maybe the truth is that
there are very few foods I real-
ly like. I mean really like. Such
as plum pudding. But by
some strange law one only is
served or makes this at Christ-
mas time. And you'll never
find it on a restaurant menu.
(That's true except in England
at Christmas time.) But any-
way, that's a rather short list of
favorite foods.
There is also the time ele-
ment. To make an eight-
course meal with lime shor-
bert (which menus always list,
as it must be more elegant
than sherbert or perhaps they
just can't spell) takes longer
than making toast. True, I've
never timed the two. But I've
been often heard to ask,
"When will they invent a pill
so we don't have to eat?"
Lucky for me I'm on a diet
again. The dieting is needed
due to a long interruption in
.my 10-mile walks on the
treadmill. (I recently discov-
ered that I can eat raw carrots
while on the treadmill.) It
must be difficult to diet if
you're interested in eating.
There may be a book here.
Not an "I Hate to Cook" book
but a "Why Bother to Cook,
What to Eat Book." One hun-
dred percent recipe free. Un-
less, of course, making instant
coffee is considered a recipe.
Brother Craig can be con-
tacted through his communi-
ty's Web site at monksofado
ration.org.


BY GEORGE MCGINN
STAFF WRITER


A mixup may put a halt to
North Port getting an Apple-
bee's restaurant.
On Wednesday, the Tami-
ami Trail Appearance Review
Board denied Applebee's
application without any dis-
cussion, other than the colors
were "inappropriate."
Tracy Kirkland, of Inter-
plan LLC, appeared before
the board to present render-
ings for approval. The plans
and drawings for the new
Applebee's were already re-
viewed and approved by city
staff. Applebee's plans to build
a restaurant on one of the
outparcels next to the future
sites of Wal-Mart and Home
Depot.
However, this was the first
time the TTARB had seen the
plans. It's also the first time
Kirkland was made aware of
the Mediterranean architec-
tural style mandated by the
city for the U.S. 41 corridor.
"The colors are inappro-
priate," said Linda Marks, vice
chair of the board. "It does not
meet our standards. If you did
due diligence, you would
have known these questions
existed. I cannot approve this
plan based on the informa-
tion presented."
Marks continued, "I don't
know why we are sitting here
discussing this."
Board member Steven
Bailey said he would like to
hear Kirkland respond to the
five points that Senior Plan-
ner Nancy Wagner had given
in her report.
Again, Marks interrupted
and said, "If they did due dili-
gence, they should have
known they shouldn't be here
today."
Board member Harold


Recently I was reading my
mother's copy of "The I Hate
to Cook Book" by Peg Brack-
en. It is illustrated here and
there by Mr. Hilary Knight,
who illustrated actress, singer
and writer Kay Thompson's
books on Eloise, the little girl
who lives at the Plaza Hotel in
Manhattan. There were four
Eloise books, but I digress.
The cookbook is very help-
ful if you hate to cook and
very funny even if you do not.
It is recommended by Jean
Kerr of "Please Don't Eat the
Daisies" fame. And it brings
back memories. Not of cook-
ing of when 144-page
paperback books cost only 50
cents. The year was 1960.
Now don't get me wrong.
(People always do.) I don't
hate to cook. Who could mind
opening a container 'and
microwaving the contents?
That's cooking, isn't it?
Actually I am, contrary to
what Brother John says, a very
good cook. It's just one of
those twists of fate that I'm
not our community's cook.
Ever since I was a child my
mother (an excellent cook
and baker) taught me much
about cooking. She let me
help her cook. And we watch-
ed Julia Child together so
often I thought she was my
aunt. But that's not the point.
I see no reason for cooking.


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elects officers -m-mm mm- -


STAFF REPORT


Venice 8/40 Salon 772 of Le
Boutique des Huit Chapeau et
Quarante Femmes (8/40)
recently elected officers for
2005-1006. Betty Ryder was
reelected Le Petit Chapeau.
Serving with her will be Lillian
Marlatt, Le Demi Chapeau
Premier, and Le Demi Chap-
eau Deuxieme Ruby Parnau.
Pat Mares is L'Archiviste,
Arlene Springer is L'Aumo-
nier, Betty Klotz is Concierge,
Verna Jacobs is La Caissier,
Dottie Rice is Le Secretaire,
and Mary Ann Wilson is Le
Surindante.
The Salon sponsors a child
each year to asthma camp,
the cost of which is $500.
During the summer, the salon'
raises monies to assist chil-
dren suffering from cystic
fibrosis, lung and other respi-
ratory ailments.
Fund-raisers for 2006 in-
clude a Chinese auction
Saturday, Jan. 14; ladies., fash-
ion show with Laurie's dress
shop Wednesday, Jan. 25; and
a pancake breakfast the sec-
ond Sunday of each month,
starting Nov. 13, 8 a.m.-noon
at the new American Legion
building on East Venice
Avenue.

I ,CD ,





"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


I 0-


FR-ED HIND


SINCE .




FRED HIND A51ID, ALA ALLIED, LIC:# 788


Muxlow asked about colors,
and again, Marks cut in and
said, "They don't match.
Nothing matches."
Kirkland said her staff
asked "a barrage of questions"
related to the plans, including
architectural designs.
She explained that with a
known franchise such as Ap-
plebee's, she receives a "pro-
totype" design drawn before
she is even involved.
"We do a full-site investiga-
tion report," Kirkland said.
"We talk to planning, zoning,
fire, building, stormwater,
traffic. We speak to every ele-
ment with all the agencies
that require reviews or per-
mits."
No guidelines
Somewhere along the line,
Kirkland never received the
U.S. 41 architectural guide-
lines.
After Kirkland said she
never got the document,
Marks again said everything is
inappropriate.
"If Applebee's did due dili-
gence, and you covered every
step, they would not be here,"
Marks said. "The colors, the
signs,' are inappropriate."
Board member Richard
Gross said he. could not be-
lieve the city reviewed and
approved the drawings.
Wagner said she would like
to recommend the board
amend the city's code.
, "For a long time, I thought
they (applicants) should sub-
mit for appearance first, then
for building," Wagner said,
explaining this would avoid
the problems the board has.
experienced with.unprepared
applicants.
Time and money could be
saved by having the applicant
come to the appearance


SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
Strict design codes issued by the city of North Port led to the
rejection without discussion of a proposed Applebee's restau-
rant.


review board first, Wagner
said.
But it wasn't until after the
board voted to deny the
application that it started to
soften up on the applicant.
"I will do anything in my
power as a member of the
board to get an Applebee's
here," Gross said, explaining
the board has an ordinance it
must follow.
Gross said he understood
the need for a major corpora-
tion to maintain its identity
and trademark.
"I'm not against anything
that identifies you at night-
time," Gross said.
Muxlow said he didn't
think Kirkland would have to
redesign the building or
spend a lot of money on the


changes.
He told Kirkland she need-
ed to change the colors and
get rid of the lines. Also, he
recommended she alter the
roof edge.
Marks pulled out a ren-
dering of one of the last
plans to be approved, and
the board reviewed that with
Kirkland.
"It is a disappointment to
be here with the amount of
time and expense to my
client, for me to be here
unnecessarily," Kirkland said,
adding she would not. waste
anyone's time if this project'.
was not going "to fly."
You can e-mail George
McGinn at: gmcginn
@sun-herald.com.


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two historic buildings. Call
365-5204 or visit hsosc.com.
Medical Reserve
An orientation program for
participants on the Sarasota
County Medical Reserve
Corps takes place 9-11 a.m.,
at the Sarasota County Health
and Human Services Center,
second-floor auditorium,
2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
To serve in medical or non-
medical roles that supple-
ment Emergency Medical
Services, hospital and health
department staff, register
with Pat at 861-2717.


ARC mobile clinic
The Animal Rescue Coalition
mobile clinic offers low- or
no-cost spays and neuters
for pets of income-eligible
families at sites in Sarasota
County. Appointments re-
quired; call 957-1955, Ext. 5.
Florida House classes
Sarasota County Extension
offers free classes Tuesdays at
the Florida House Learning
Center at the corner of Proc-
tor and Beneva Roads in
Sarasota. 'Registration re-
quired; call 316-1200. Sept.
27: 2-3:30 p.m., Container
Gardening (held outdoors);
Oct. 11: 2-3:30 p.m., Sus-
tainable Solutions; Oct. 25:
2-3 p.m., Mosquitoes; Nov. 8:
2-3 p.m., Butterfly Gardening
(held outdoors); Nov. 22: 2-3
p.m., Organic Foods; Dec:.- 6:
2-3 p.m., Innovative Trends
in Home Decorating.
Dance classes
The Tolmans teach couples-
only dance classes in Venice
and Englewood. For more
information, call 627-1696.
* Sept. 28, six-week course,
Englewood Sports Complex,
1300 South River Road.
Advanced intermediate at
5:30 p.m., basic at 6:30 p.m.,
intermediate at 7:30 p.m. $24
per person.
* Oct. 4, six-week course,
Venice Community Center,
326 S. Nokomis Ave. Basic
ballroom at 9 a.m., interme-
diate at 10 a.m., advanced at
11 a.m. $24 per person.


* Oct. 17, eight-week course,
Venice YMCA Youth Center,
701 Center Road. Latin-Salsa
at 6:30 p.m., basic swing at
7:30 p.m., advanced swing
at 8:30 p.m. $32 per person.
Theater
The Players Theatre, 838
North Tamiami Trail in Sara-
sota, opens its 76th Broad-
way Musical Season with
"Grease," running Sept. 29-
Oct. 9. The show opens Sept.
29 at 7:30 p.m. and runs
nightly at 8 p.m. except Sun-
day and Monday. Matinees
are Oct. 2, 8 and 9 at 2 p.m.
Tickets are $21; $11 for stu-
dents. Call 365-2494.
Lunch card party
The Even Keels, South Venice
Yacht Club, holds a luncheon
card party at noon, Friday,
Sept. 30, at 4425 Yacht Club
Drive. Tickets: $6. RSVP by
Sept. 27 by calling 497-6873
or 483-1956.
Medicare seminar
The Medicare Prescription
Drug Program (Medicare Part
D) begins enrollment Nov.
15. Heritage Health Care
Center, 1026 Albee Farm
Road in Venice offers a free
seminar, 2-4 p.m., Thursday,
Sept. 29. Refreshments
served. Register by calling
484-0425.
Exhibit
The Florida Suncoast Water-
color Society starts the season
with its annual Juried Open
Aqueous Show at the Long-
boat Key Center for the Arts,
6860 Longboat Drive South.
Reception and awards, held
5-7 p.m., Friday, Sept. 30. Call
Joan at (352) 796-4994.
Make-A-Wish
The ninth annual Bird Bay
Golf Tournament to benefit
the children of Make-A-Wish
Foundation of Sarasota/
Tampa Bay Inc. takes place
Saturday, Oct. 1, at 10 a.m. at
the Bird Bay Executive Golf
Club, 602 Bird Bay Drive in
Venice. Tickets are $50. For
more information, call Robby
Robertson at 485-9333.
Ladies lunch
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Call your Sun
advertising representative
or
contact Mary Lou @ 941-206-1252
:.maryloudr@sun-herald.com


Ladies Group luncheon takes
place 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 1, at Troyer's
Dutch Heritage, 3713 Bahia
Vista, Sarasota. RSVP to
Carroll at 359-6846 TTY or
carrollhowardl@att.net.
Regatta
The 28th annual Crow's Nest
regatta events, including
three sailing events, takes
place Oct. 1, 5 and 8. Racers
include the Venice Women's
Sailing Squadron, The Bitter
Ends. The entry fee of $100
benefits Venice youth activi-
ties through The Commun-
ity Foundation of Sarasota
County. Entrants and par-
ticipants will receive awards
and be invited to the post-
race party. The public is in-
vited to view the races. For
entry information, call Dave
Strum at 484-7661.
Hospice training
Hospice of Southwest Flor-
ida's volunteer training in
Venice will be held Saturdays,
Oct. 1 and 8, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at
the Venice Staff Center, 220
Wexford Blvd. in Plantation
Golf & Country Club. To
register, call Linda Pierce at
441-2003.
Senior expo
Venice United Church of
Christ hosts a free Senior
Resource Expo, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 1, at Naar Hall,
620 Shamrock Blvd. More
than 20 local exhibitors will
be on hand for demonstra-
tions, refreshments, exhibits,
raffles and more.
NYC retirees
The New York City Municipal
Retirees of Florida hold their
first meeting of the season
on Saturday, Oct. 1, at Vin-
cenzo's Restaurant, 385 North
U.S. 41 Bypass in Venice.
Business meeting at 11 a.m.,
followed by a full luncheon.
Spouses welcome. A speaker
from Miracle Ear discusses
hearing-aid problems. Call
Robert Merrill, president, at
966-1036, or visit nycmrof-
florida.itgo.com.
Familyfun
The John & Mable Ringling
Museum of Art holds a


Handz-On Family Program,
Sunday in October, 1-3 p.m.
in the Museum of Art lobby
at 5401 Bay Shore Road in
Sarasota. This interactive arts
program for children ages
6-12 and their adult partner
takes place Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23
and 30, and includes a hunt
for plants and animals in the
galleries and origami. One
adult may bring up to three
children. Free with museum
admission.. Registration re-
quired. For more informa-
tion, call Janine at 359-5762 or
e-mail jpackard@ringling.org.
Orchestra
South Florida and Bishop
Planetarium present The
Sarasota POPS Orchestra
featuring the Sarasota Brass
Quintet in Startoberfest, 5:30
p.m., Sunday, Oct. 2. Tickets
are $15 or $40 for the series
of three concerts the first
Sunday of October, Novem-
ber and December, in down-
town Bradenton, 201 10th St.
West. Call (941) 746-4131, Ext.
14 for reservations, or visit
sarasotapops.org or south-
floridamuseum.org.
New York Connection
The Women's Resource Cen-
fer of Sarasota County holds
a get-together with New
Yorkers, 2 p.m., Wednesday,
Oct. 5, at 806 Pinebrook Road
in Venice. Enjoy catching up
at this free event. RSVP to
485-9724.
Watercolor class
Carolyn Merenda leads Fun
with Watercolor paint-alongs
for adults of all skill levels,
Wednesday, 2:30-4:30 p.m.,
Oct. 5-26 at the Nokomis
Community Center, 234 East
Nippino Trail. Cost, is $60 plus
supplies. Register at first
class; supply list available at
the center. For more informa-
tion, call Merenda at 366-
2866.
Legal support dinner
The Sarasota-Manatee Asso-
ciation of Legal Support
Specialists holds its monthly
dinner meeting at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 6, at Hillview
Grill, 1920 Hillview St., Sara-
sota. Denise Roberts, execu-
tive director of The Family


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Law Connection, speaks on
Plunged into Poverty: Effects
of Parental Breakup on Chil-
dren. All are welcome. RSVP
to Lisa at 376-2336 or Ifolis
@corporateattorneyservices.
org. -
Democratic lunch
Scott Maddox, candidate for
governor, speaks on A Vision
for Florida at the Democratic
Club of Sarasota lunch meet-
ing Saturday, Oct. 8, at the
Meadows Country Club, 3101
Longmeadow, Sarasota. So-
cial at 11:30 a.m., lunch at
noon. Cost is $17. RSVP by
Oct. 5 to 379-9233 or reserve
@sarasotadems.com.
Forty Carrots fund-raiser
Sarasota's first Wine, Women
& Shoes fund-raiser takes
place Oct. 5 and 6 to benefit
Forty Carrots Family Center.
Events include a benefit lun-
cheon;, wine tasting and class,
and winemaker dinners. For
tickets, call 365-7716 or visit
fortycarrots.org.,
Paralegal seminar
Southwest Florida Paralegal
Association holds its 2005
seminar Saturday, Oct. 8, at
Lakewood Ranch Holiday
Inn, 6231 Lake Osprey Drive
in Sarasota. The topic is
Sarasota County's 2050 Plan
- Developing Sarasota, a
Look at the Future. RSVP to
782-4400.
Republican lunch
The Republican Club of
Longboat Key honors veter-
ans and members of the
armed forces at its meeting
Thursday, Oct. 13, at the
Longboat Key Cluhib. Major
General Gene Deegan, U.S.
Marine Corps (Ret.) speaks on
the impact of the media on
fighting men and women.
Cost is $22. RSVP by Oct. 10
to Ruth at 383-5349 or
Barbara at 925-7052.


Underwriters lunch
The Gulf Coast Association
of Health Underwriters holds
a lunch meeting 11:30 a.m.-
1 p.m., Monday, Oct. 10, at the
Dutch Heritage Restaurant,
3713 Bahia Vista St., Sarasota.
Cost is $12, $14 .at the door.
Free CE class for members,
1-3 p.m., The Evolution of
Complimentary Health Care
(nonmembers, $15). RSVP to
Donna at 378-4117 or visit
gulfcoastunderwriters.com.
J.O.Y. cruise
The Salvation Army J.O.Y.
(Just Older Youth) Fellowship,
sets sail for the Bahamas, Oct.
10-14. For dates and costs,
call LaVerne at 484-6227, Ext.
23, or e-mail rlp8357@hot-.
mail.com.
Children First classes
* Just for Dads, Oct. 11-Dec. 5,
6-8:30 p.m., Loveland Center,
157 South Havana Road in
Venice. Be the best dad you
can be. Course and materials
are free. Register by calling
Vince at 953-3877, Ext. 127.
* Partners for Life, Oct. 13-
Nov. 17, 6-8 p.m., Loveland
Center, 157 South Havana
Road in Venice. A six-week
course for couples based on
the Prevention and Relation-
ship Enhancement Program.
Register by calling Vince at
953-3877, Ext. 127.
Dance benefit
Venice's Starz Choice Dance
Academy Company B holds
its eight annual golf tourna-
ment Saturday, Oct. 15, at
Myakka Pines- Golf Course,
2550 South River Road in
Englewood. The 1 p.m. shot-
gun start, four-person scram-
ble, includes dinner, drinks,
awards and prizes. Tickers are
$60 per player; $100 for hole
sponsorship. Proceeds bene-
fit the Company B Dancers.
Call Starz Choice at 485-7450
or Tom Rhodus at 486-1153.


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Q 1 As South, vulnerable, you hold:
*J87 VJ 104 The bidding has proceeded:
SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST
10 Pass 14 Pass
What do you bid now?
A Two bids come to mind one
no trump and two diamonds. Despite
the quality of the suit, we do not like
rebidding a five-card minor holding a
balanced minimum. We opt for one
no trump, even though your heart
stopper is at best tenuous.
Q 2 East-West vulnerable, as South
you hold:
*AQ7642 v8 097 4KQ87
The bidding has proceeded:
SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST
14 Pass 2* Pass
What do you bid now?
A If you play that a bid of three
spades by you now would be pre-
emptive, by all means make it. If you
play that it would be invitational,
make it all the same. If partner
accepts and raises to four spades,
you might even make it.
Q 3 As South, vulnerable, you
hold:
SA9652 AK75 O AKQ2 4 Void
The bidding has proceeded;
NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST
3NT* Pass ?
* long, solid minor suit, no outside ace
or king
What do you bid now?
A This is simply a matter of arith-
metic. You have six tricks and part-.
ner has promised seven. Bid a grand'
slam,but make sure you bid it in
clubs after all, this is the one and
only chance you have to declare a
grand slam with a void in the trump
suit. At 7 NT, you might not have an
entry to partner's hand.
Q 4 Both vulnerable, as South you
hold:


4 Q7 V KJ762 o AQ83 494
The bidding has proceeded:
NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST
10 Pass 1~ Pass
14 Pass ?
What do you bid now?
A If you play fourth suit forcing,
this is the time to trot it out bid
two clubs. If not, jump to three dia-
monds to create the game force.
Q 5 Neither vulnerable, As South
you hold:
A 10763 v95 oA983 4.92
The bidding has proceeded:
NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST
1 Pass 14 Pass
24 Pass ?
What action do you take?
A Your two aces are undervalued in
the point count and you have some
distributional assets and a fifth trump
into the bargain. If you play help-suit
game tries, bid three diamonds. If
not, invite by raising to three spades.
Q 6 Vulnerable, as South you hold:
4Q7 oKQ1072 o J7632 4. 7
The bidding has proceeded:
NORTH EAST SOUTH WEST
1A Pass 1NT Pass
24. Pass ?
What do you bid now?
A While there are some who might
consider taking a preference to two
spades, we don't see the need for
such drastic action when we hold a
good five-card major. Bid two hearts.
You have already limited your hand
with your initial response, so partner
won't go wild.
(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspa-
per or to Tribune Media Services Inc.,
2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo,
NY 14207. E-mail responses may be
sent to gorenbridge@aol.com.)



.






Venice Gondolier Sun



10B
WEDNESDAY i
SEPT. 21,2005


CONTACT US
JJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR
(941) 207-1103
jandrews@venicegondolier.com


Keeping step with my girlfriend's father


J.J. Andrews
BACK OF THE PACK

A long day and then some
at work, followed by running
the vacuum cleaner, tossing a
load in the washing machine,
scrubbing down the bath-
room, balancing my check-
book and then a little quality
time with the girlfriend over
dinner.
Boy, that's a full day. Did I


mention we also need to
throw in a 12-mile run at 5
a.m. and meet your girl-
friend's father who's visit-
ing from out of state for the
first time during a friend's
wedding rehearsal dinner in
Tampa?
That was last Friday for
me.,
Our friend's wedding went
off without a hitch, the apart-
ment was cleaned for inspec-
tion and my girlfriend's father
did not shoot me.
She says he liked me; how-
ever, I strongly suspect it's
because he couldn't bring his
.hunting rifle with him on the
airplane.
The 12-mile run did wind
up being something I regret-
ted.
Training routine
One of the best parts of a


marathon training plan is the
routine. My body knows what
to expect on certain days at
certain times, and I crave this
-predictability in a daily life
that is dominated by the
insane and unexpected.
Bridge runs are on Mon-
day mornings, tempo runs
with the Venice Running
Group are Wednesdays and
Friday, and then I do a solo
12-mile or longer run during
the weekend.
But for some nutty reason,
I decided to run 12 instead of
4.5 miles Friday. A couple
members of our regular
morning run had to squeeze
in their long run a day early
because of their busy family
lives.
So I said I'd run with them,
without ever thinking about
my full Friday, where the
alarm went off at 4 a.m. and


my head hit the pillow that
night at 1 a.m.
Traditionally, a long show-
er, manly size breakfast and a
short nap follow my weekend
long runs; By going out on a
work day, however, I had to
hop in the shower, inhale a
bowl of cereal and rush out
the door in okder to make it to
work.
Friday was anything but
routine, and my schedule
reminded me of that with
tweaks and twitches as I
rushed around in stress-out
mode.
Planned spontaneity
In reality, the long morning
run actually may have helped
me better deal with a stressful
day. The sense of balance and
focus that only seems to
come following a good work-
out was with me as I rushed


out the door to work.
What if I hadn't run at all
Friday morning, instead opt-
ing for a pot of coffee and a
half dozen Krispy Kreme
doughnuts? It's scary to think
what could've happened..
The Monday morning
quarterback in me simply
wishes I'd have stuck with the
traditional run of 4.5 miles
rather than doing a lap
around Venice island. In all
seriousness, I enjoyed my
intense, prework distance run
and might turn that into a
weekly routine.
As for meeting my girl-
friend's father, the suffocating
silence and forced dinner
conversation of Friday night
improved throughout his
three-day stay.
By Sunday night, he was
even trying tp associate with
my running hobby. Turns out


that he like my girlfriend
- also thinks training for a
marathon is nuts.
However, he suggested I
visit him in Northern New
Mexico and see if I can outrun
the bears and mountain lions
he enjoys hunting while
roaming through the moun-
tains.
Let's review this scenario
before answering: Alone in
the woods with wild animals
and the well-armed father
who still views my girlfriend
as, "Daddy's little girl."
I said I'd think about that.

Back of the Pack is a week-
ly running column appear-
ing every Saturday. Send
running-related e-mails to
Assistant EditorJ.J. Andrews
at: jandrews@venicegondo-
lier.com.


FITNESS ,MELS


Race calendar
Here's a roundup of area
road running and triathlon
races:
Saturday, Sept. 24 -
Ringling Bridge 5K Run bene-
fits the Bari Brooks Teen
Center at Sarasota Family
YMCA. The event is spon-
sored by Sarasota County
Parks and Recreation. The
race starts at 7:30 a.m. and
registration, costs $15 in
advance and $20 after the
early deadline. Go to manaso-
tatrackclub.org for details or
call Jessie at 952-9533, Ext.
113.
Sunday, Sept. 25 At its
new location in Fort Lauder-
dale Beach, Fla., is .the 2005
Multirace.com Triathlon Ser-
ies Sprint Triathlon. Go online
to multirace.com to register


or e-mail info@multirace
.com.
Sunday, Oct. 2 Siesta
Key YMCA SharksTriathlon
challenges participants to
swim 1,000 meters, bike 13
miles and run 3.1 miles. Start
time is at 7 a.m. at the Siesta
Key Beach pavilion. For more
information, call 737-4455, e-
mail SharksTri@cs.com or
register online at Active.com.
The 21st Annual Triathlon
benefits the Sarasota Sharks
Swim Team. Entries limited to
the first 1,000.
Sunday, Oct. 9 The
Fourth Annual Latin Classic
Half Marathon at Lakewood
Ranch High School is at 7 a. in.
Sunday, Oct. 9. Proceeds ben-
efit the Gulf Coast. Latin
Chamber of Commerce
scholarship fund.


The 13.1-mile race is on a
certified course through
Lakewood Ranch in Braden-
ton. Entries postmarked by
Sept. 30 cost $30, and
includes a pre-race pasta
party at D'aritino's Pasta &
Pizza, 7230 East 52nd Place,
Bradenton. After Sept. 30,1
cost is $40 per runner.
Organizers also are still look-
ing for volunteers to help
work the race. Go online to
latinchamber.org to find out
how to register or volunteer.
You also can e-mail race con-
sultant Ron West at westr
o@comcast.net or call him at
346-0415.
Venice morning runs
Area joggers are invited out
to morning training runs in
Venice. These runs start


promptly at 6 a.m. Wednes-
day and Friday mornings, so
arrive a few minutes early.
Runners meet on the
island at the main parking lot,
called Centennial Park, along
West Venice Avenue in down-
town Venice near the public
restrooms. Joggers of all abili-
ties and ages 'are encouraged
to participate in these runs,
which are over by 7 a.m.
Distances and pace vary
based on a person's ability.
E-mail jandrews@venice-
gondolier.com or call 207-
1103.
Triathlon Club workouts
The South County Family
YMCA inVenice is sponsoring
the Southwest Florida Tri-
athlon Club for area athletes.
Club .events, training ses-


sions, seminars and coaching
are available through the
club.
Here's a listing of upcom-
ing events:
6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
21 Manasota Key group
ride from South Venice, every
Wednesday. Group meets at
RBC Bank on southbound
U.S. 41 for a 34-mile group
ride at moderate to fast pace.
E-mail Marco at oc3ram
@comast.net for details.
6 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 22
- Track- workout every
Thursday at the Special
Olympics Track and Field
Center in Venice. Contact
Heather. Butcher at hbtri
sports@aol.com for more
information. '
7:30 a.m. Sunday, Sept.
25 Group bike/run combo


starting at the Port Charlotte
YMCA parking lot. Easy to
moderate pace, with about a
30-mile bike ride and 15-30
minute run. Please contact
Marco at; oc3ram@comast
.net in advance to confirm
attendance. Go online to get
thisinfo.com/clubswft/,.
Morning walkabout
Venice Area Beautification
Inc., South CountyYMCA and
the Venice Area Chamber of
Commerce meets at 8 a.m.
Saturday, weather permit-
ting, at the Gulf Coast Com-
munity Foundation of Venice
parking lot at the juncture of
Golf and Guild drives.
Routes vary, but will be pri-
marily on the Venetian Water-
way Park. Walk at your own
pace; everyone is welcome.


COOL from page 108


ival and Student Film
Screening. Best described -as
a "happening," the festival is a
unique and creative collabo-
ration between FSU's writers
and filmmakers and the FSU/
Asolo Conservatory actors
and faculty, as they present
the Sarasota premiere of their
original short plays and films.
The event \will be Friday, Sept.
23, at 7 (10-minute play festi-
val) and 9 p.m. (student film
screening) and Saturday, Sept.
24, at 8 p.m. (encore film
screening). This not-so-late-
night happening is a free
event sponsored by the A.iolo
LateNight Series.
Over the summer of 2005,
,the award-winning, top-rank-
ed FSU Film School worked
with a number of Asolo
Conservatory actors on a
series of six-minute films. The
Conservatory actors traveled
to Tallahassee for several two-
day shoots throughout the
summer, and were featured in
nine, short films.
These films were first
shown to an audience of 600
people at a screening in
Tallahassee in August. The
goal was to bring a similar
event to Sarasota where direc-
tors, film school faculty and
Conservatory actors and fac-
ulty will come together as a
next step in furthering the
relationship between FSU's
Tallahassee campus, the pres-
tigious film school, and the
Conservatory.
The 10-Minute Play Fest-
ival and Student Film Screen-
ing will take place in the Jane
B. Cook Theatre at 5555 North
Tamiami Trail in Sarasota. No
reservations are needed; first-
come, first-seated. Contact
the Asolo Theatre Festival box
office at 351-8000 for, more
information. For more infor-
mation on the Asolo Theatre
Company, the Conservatory
for Actor Training and the
coming season of shows in
the Mertz and Cook theaters
visit asolo.org. The FSU
Center for the Performing
Arts at 5555 North Tamiami


'Tr Sarasota, is home'ofthe
Asolo Theatre Company, the
FSU/Asolo Conservatory for
Actor -Training and Sarasota
Ballet- of Florida.

On Saturday, Sept. 24, at 11
a.m., Crowley Museum &
Nature Center will present
Cracker Kitchen for Kids, a
funim hands-on workshop for
children. Led by Jan Mc-
Cormick of History Out of the
Box, children will learn about
the food that the pioneers ate
and how it was prepared. The
workshop will also include
pioneer folklore and games.
The cost is $10 per child and
regular $5 admission for
accompanying adults. Regis-
tration is required; call (941)
322-1000.
Crowley Museum & Nature
Center is a not-for-profiti
nature and pioneer history
center located on 190 acres of


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COOL from page 1B


The Selby Gallery at the
Ringling School of Art will
hold a reception.this evening,
Sept. 23, from 5 to 7 p.m. to
open Part I of the school's
annual faculty show. Part I
will feature the work of faculty
members associated with the
departments of fine arts,
computer animation, interior
design and the CORE pro-
gram. The show will continue
through Oct. 8 at the gallery,
which is on Martin Luther
King Jr. Way, one-half block
east of U.S. 41 in Sarasota.
Part II will open with
another reception, from 5 to 7
p.m. on Friday, Oct. 14, in the
Keating Lobby Gallery. Part II
will showcase the compelling
and innovative work of faculty
members from illustration,
graphic and interactive com-
munication, photography
and digital imaging depart-
ments and the liberal arts
program.
The Keating Lobby Gallery
is open Monday through
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30
-p.m. The Selby Gallery is open
Monday-Saturday from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.. with extended
hours on Tuesday until 7 p.m.
Both shows and receptions
are free and open to the pub-
lic.
For more information, call
(941) 359-7563 or visit ring
ling.edu/selbygallery.

There are probably no tick-
ets left as you read this but
don't let that stop you from
calling to inquire about the
Fine Art Experience at the
Venice Golf & Country Club
to benefit Loveland Legacy.
The event will be from 6 to 8
'p.m. Saturday evening at the
clubhouse. Tickets are $40 per
person and covers hors
d'oeuvres, wine and cham-
pagne plus the chance to
meet area artists and authors
and benefit Loveland Legacy
with their purchases.
One of the best opportuni-
Sties of the evening even win
be the chance to purchase a
"Quick Draw" item done at
the event by one of five partic-
ipating Quick Draw artists.
These five original works will
'be signed and auctioned off
that night with 100 percent of
the proceeds benefiting
Loveland Legacy.
Just in case there might be
one or two tickets left, call
Susan Olson at Loveland
Center, 493-0016, Ext. 203.

You can e-mail Kim Cool
at: kcool
@venicegondoliercom.

Recycle this newspaper


1 1..... ....


.' U :.,..
* . : .' ": .








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Taste the Passion.

C, "', ,' ,' ". .



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(Between'Albee -arm Rd. & Bird Bay Dr.) (Corner of Jacaranda a
o (941) 485-2912 (941) 497-2602


Sweetbay Supermarketss', produce is our passion. That's why out
vest Market Is filled with the freshest, most abundant choices
und. Pick from 20 types of tomatoes, a variety of wild mushrooms,
py carrots, juicy olives, delicious chilies, and many more tantalizing


vegetables. Plus endless exotic fruits. All at really sweet prices.
Our friendly, expert associates are always there to help. .
So enjoy a fresh, new experience today.

www.SweetbaySupermarket.com


Venice 5855 Placida Rd., Englewood
and Center) (Corner of Placida Rd. and Rotonda Blvd.)
(941) 697-8644


4.

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1951 S. McCall Rd. #300, Englewood
(Corner of S. McCall Rd. & Pine St.)
(941) 475-9590.


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11 B


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


o Q e


-.1=


.1






Venice Gondolier Sun


WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 21, 2005


FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST


Everything

is just beachy

Venice residents and
friends gathered at the newly
renourished Venice Beach to
celebrate the completion of a
project that brought 290,000
cubic yards of sand lost by
four hurricanes in 2004.
"The beach looks fantas-
tic."
"Well done," Deputy Com-
mander of the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Jackson-
ville District Eric Stor, told the
group.
Remarks by other digni-
taries at the event echoes
similar sentiments. Venice
Vice Mayor John Moore
thanked everyone connected
with the project, especially
CityEngineer NancyWoodley,
who made sure grants and
forms were submitted in a
timely manner.
John commended Public
Information Officer Pam
Johnson for her outstanding
work in organizing the Beach
Party. John represented Ven-
ice Mayor Dean Calamaras
who could not attend the
event as he was recovering
from surgery.
"Thank you for keeping
our city on the gulf the beauti-
ful city it was 25 years ago
when I moved here," State
Tourist Committee chair and
District Representative
Nancy Detert told the group.
LaMont Couch represent-
ed Katherine Harris. Stacey
Smith spoke on behalf of
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson.
Mark Sickles, Corporate and
Government Relations with
Weeks Marine Inc. talked
about the beautiful Venice
Beach.
After the remarks, digni-
taries and citizens dumped
small buckets of sand on the
beach rather than the tradi-
tional ribbon cutting.
In spite of the hint of red
tide in the air, people stayed
on to enjoy snacks served by
Boy Scout Troop 1001. Pam
Johnson attended to every'
detail even making sure the
cookies came in the shapes of
lobsters, fish and palm trees.
Special thanks to the creative
bakers at Publix.
The event brought together
people from the community
who appreciate the glory of
living on the beach. Karen and
lay Aiello, Fred Hammet, Bill
Willson,Vicki Taylor, Phil and
Dorothy Korwek and Janet
Weiss were among the guests.
Dorothy Korwek took along
one of the pails used for the
sand spill for the Venice
Archives. Dorothy always
makes sure historical events
are well documented.
Police Explorers Ben Lang-
nes, Caleb Pennell, Therese
Lynn, David Sand, Adam
DeMauro, Calvin Hudson and
Kasara Lyn Richard made sure
parking at the event was order-
ly and well managed.

The special person of this
week is City Engineer Nancy
Woodley. This nice lady made
sure the Venice Beach renour-
ishment happened. Publicly
and privately people in the
know praised Nancy for her
dedication and service to this
project.
"Nancy is the beach re-
nourishment," someone said
at the reception.
Thank goodness we have
dedicated city employees who
know how to lead by getting
hold of a project and taking
responsibility for making it
happen.
Nancy is one of the Venice
city employees who helps
make Venice special.


Larry and Mary Miller and Venice Vice Mayor John Moore help
celebrate the Venice Beach renourishment.


SLiN PHOTOS 6 FP'A4J VALEJCIC
Pam and Cliff Truitt and Marty and Mary Black appreciate the beauty of the new renourished
Venice Beach.


County Commissioner Shannon Staub, Rob Struckman and
Warren Gnegy wait for the festivities to begin at the beach
renourishment party.


-, District Representative Nancy Detert always makes time for
events in Venice that acknowledge its beauty. Nancy is one of
the greatest cheerleaders Venice residents have in Tallahassee.


Bev Barish and Bary Remmen join other community members.
in celebrating Venice Beach. '


From left Tom Mattmuller, Rich Lanigan, Oscar Guinart and Bill Masters wait to present the
colors for the beach renourishment party at Venice Beach.


Venice Public Information
Officer, Pam Johnson plates
.cookies at the beach renour-
ishment party. Pam organized
the event, which went off like
a charm.


Roger and Arlene Dooley spend time at Venice Beach. The
couple has lived in Venice for 24 years. Roger enjoys his Venice Boy Scout Troop 1001 member John Thompson helps
retirement and often refers to the beach as his office. serve cheese and grapes at the beach renourishment party.





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16 | LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


CRUISE from page9
back to Miami and died here in
1939."
Before he lost his money he
built a monument to another
developer who also had both
good and bad times in Florida
- Henry Flagler, the railroad
magnate who built the ill-fated
railroad to Key West. A hurri-
cane took out much of the line
shortly after it was completed.
Over the years, the names of
the millionaires have changed,
but, judging by the homes
seeia on the Island Queen tour,
there is no shortage of them in
Miami and Miami Beach.
The first house pointed out
on the cruise was a white
house used in the film,
"Scarface," starring Al Pacino.
Right next door, with a bright
orange roof, is the home of TV
and movie star Rosie O'Don-
nell. Nearby is the home of
recording star Gloria Estefan, a
name heard over and over
again all over the Miami area
because of the popularity of
her music and her restaurants.
Just past her home, we
glimpsed an empty lot. A new
house was being built next
door and we were told the
empty lot could be purchased
for $6.8 million.
Just beyond that was a
handsome house that had an
incredible sandcastle near the
water. The house looked very


A giant guitar adorns the roof
of the second largest Hard
Rock Cafe in the U.S. the
one in Miami.


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


MOVIE REVIEW 10


Cmise by the homes of
mis rLifse' on screen




Miam i s millionaires. -


Narrators aboard the Island Queen sightseeing boat said this house belonging to Shaquille O'Neal cost $20 million. A nearby empty
lot was priced at $6.5 million.


familiar. It should have as it
was used in the film, "Cocoon."
The Island Queen continued
around a bend and the guide
pointed out the home of
.Shaquille O'Neal, which he
purchased for $20 million. A
few houses away we .saw the
house built by Eddie Fisher.
and Elizabeth Taylor after he
left Debbie Reynolds to con-
sole Mike Todd's lonely widow.
No price was quoted for the
largest piece of real estate on
the tour, the property owned
by a Dr. Phillip Cross, but the
imported palm trees that
edged his property may have
cost as much as some of his
neighboring mansions.
Too soon it seemed we were
cruising back into port after
our leisurely cruise, which left
me wanting to pull out the old
family movies and see which
houses were on my father's
films taken so long ago.
After disembarking we
ambled through some of the
shops at the Bayside Market-
place and treated ourselves to
frosty mango coolers before
heading back to the Hotel
Clinton in South Beach. On the
way we pulled into one of the


neighborhoods we had passed
on the cruise boat, checking
out the fronts of the homes we
had seen from the back.
If you are looking for more
adventure than stately homes
might offer, the cruise line also
offers evening dance cruises
on Friday, Saturday and Sun-
day nights, the Bayside Blaster
speedboat ride through Bis-
cayne Bay or a ride on the
Gondola Natalia, a 30-foot
Venetian-style gondola, hand-
crafted from Walnut and red
mahogany and Coast Guard
certified for up to 20 passen-
gers.
Prices for the Island Queen
cruises through Biscayne Bay
are $7-$12 per person for chil-
dren ages 4-12 and adults or
$6-$10 per person for the
dance cruises. Snacks and
drinks are available for pur-
chase on board.
Bayside Blaster prices are
$7-$14 per person for children
and adults. That boat departs
from the same pier each
Saturday and Sunday at 12:30,
2:30, 4:30, 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
The Gondola Natalia can be
rented for $122 per hour, with-
out meals and for. $196-$364


per hour, with meals for one-
four passengers. Departures of
the Gondola Natalia from
another dock may incur an
additional fee for delivery and
dockage.


Private charters are avail-
able for any of the boats.
For more information, visit
islandqueencruises.com or
call (800) 910-5119 or (305)
379-5119.


FOOD3 3
Eating out
healthy

OPERA |4
Sarasota

Opera
season

highlights


THRMIS I 5
Sheikra opens

at Busch
:Gardens



Johnny
Mercer

show at VLT



GIORGIANNI 12
QUICK TAKES 110


SUN PHOTOS BY KIM COOL
The Miami Children's Museum is at 980 MacArthur Causeway,
just across the road from Parrot Island.






2 1 LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21,2005


What wrong with a little tongue wagging?


JOE GIORGIANNI
COLUMNIST


Recently, I was stopped at a
traffic light when a car pulled
up beside me to wait for the
same light. In the back seat of
the car was a child of perhaps
4 or 5 years. A cute little girl
with long flowing hair tied in
a tight ponytail cascading
down over the back of her car
seat. Her eyes were fixed
straight ahead and she had
her thumb 'deeply implanted
in her mouth, eagerly sucking
as if her very survival depend-
ed on whatever nourishment
might be within.
Snugly held in her other arm





www.saniiB.netimemorv
C6/ a_' /r',a o,6 ,o r'a/, .
BROUGHT TO YOU BY:




A division of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.,
i publishers of the Sun Herald Newspapers ,


was a tired looking Teddy bear
with one eye and a bandana
tied around its neck.
As I watched this child, I
imagined her running through
a field of play, giggling happy.
In fact, I envisioned her looking
much like my own grandkidds as
they sit in their safety harnesses
and car seats.
Suddenly, the child turned,
and while looking straight at
me, pulled the thumb from her
mouth and stuck her tongue
out. I smiled and waved, as if
to deride her childish act.
Then, she did it again and
again. That's when I thought
what the heck, two can play
that game, so I stuck my
tongue out, but with the add-
ed emphasis" of a PFLTTTT,
which is a huge raspberry
with enough spit to make a
window look like it's going
through a car wash.
Now by this time, the light
had turned green, but I was still
engrossed with the kid and the
tongue language. She had by
now dropped the Teddy bear
and while pulling down the


lower part of her eyes with one
hand she was pushing up her
nose with the other, all while
sticking her tongue out.
The incessant horn blowing
pretty much indicated that
the cars behind me were now
being more than cavil in their
displeasure with my not mov-
ing. But, I was absolutely ad-
amant about not letting the
kid out perform me with ugly
faces or tongue wagging.
That's when I stuck my index
fingers in both nostrils while
crossing my eyes.
Now unbeknownst to me
at the time, a police car with
a very burly driver was imme-
diately behind the car with
the kid in it. And, since the
light had changed from red to
green to red and back again,
the officer obviously thought
something was wrong with
my car. After turning on the
emergency red and blue lights
that adorned his car, he ap-
proached me from behind. As
he bent over to look into
the window to ask if I was
having trouble, I gave anoth-


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er huge PFLTTTT with my
tongue, while crossing my.
eyes and sticking my fingers
in my ears.
The policeman, although
just doing his job, and except
for that part of the expector-
ant that hit him on the mouth
and chin, was quite lucky that
his sun glasses caught most of
the moisture from my effort.
Slowly, he stood erect, and
asked me to exit my car.
I can tell you that handcuffs
are not nice jewelry, nor are
.they comfortable to wear, and
I have no idea when my trial
comes up. But I can tell you
that if I ever see that little girl


again I'm going to give her a
piece of my mind. After all,-
she started it and I had every
right to defend myself,
whether the judge thinks so
or not. After all, in a state
where citizens are allowed to
carry guns and permitted to
use them if provoked, a little
nose picking and tongue
wagging might even be worth
a merit badge, regardless
who was on the receiving
end. And if the judge doesn't
like it, all I can say is PFLTTTT.
Joe Giorgianni is a humor
columnist who lives in
Nokomis. He can be reached
at: photojoel01@comcast.net.


7


L ORo 24-HOUR
.L6 TICKETING
,zoo"


Berenstain Bears
On Stage!
Stories such as New

Oct. 8, 10:30 AM
oll d ^kn


Doobie Brothers
Include hits like
WhatA Folk Believes
& Taking It to The
Streets
Oct. 12, 8 PM


Bjom Again: The
ABBA Experience
ABBA's best his like
Waterloo, Pancing
Queen, Mamma Mia
Oct. 25, 8 PM


Broadway Junior
On Tour!*
Featuring Meredith
Wilson's The Music
Man & Into the Woods
Oct. 24, 7 PM


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN LET'S GO| 15



NO W PL YING Please call theaters for Friday listings

MURDOCK 1:05 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 9:45 p.m. 9:25 p.m. 1:30 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:00 p.m.
REGAL TOWNCENTER 16 10:05 p.m. The Cave (PG-13, 97 min.) Must Love Dogs (PG-13, 98 min.) Just Like Heaven (PG-13, 95 min.)
Port Charlotte Town Center The Man (PG-13, 84 min.) 4:15 p.m., 10:25 p.m. 05p.m.,:10 pm., 6:50 p.m., 9:40 p.m. 2:00 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
(941) 623-01111:45 p.m., 4:20p.m., 7:55 p.m., Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Red'Eye (PG-13, 85 min.) Lord of War (R, 122 min.)
(941) 62-0111 .0:20 p.m. (PG, 106,min.) 12.00 p.m., 2:35 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 8:00 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
The4Year~OidVi i (',11min.) 'March of the Penguins (G, 84 min.) 12:45 p.mi.,6:45 p.m. p.m, 10:10 p.m. Red Eye (PG-13, 85 min.)
1The ,40-YearOd virgin (7 16 m, 9 1:35 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:40 p.m. The Constant Gardener (R, 129 min.) The Skeleton Key (PG-13, 104 min.) 2:30 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 8:00 p.m.
h B m 0m m.) Red Eye (PG-13, 85 min.) 1:00 p.m., 4:00 p,m., 7:15 p.m., 12:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m. The Transporter 2 (PG-13, 88 min.)
The Brothers Grimm (PG-13 120 min.) 1:55 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:20p.m. The Transporter 2 (PG-13, 88 min.) 2:10 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
10p.m., 4:25 pm., 7:10P. M.p.m., 10:30 p.m. Cronicas (R, 108 min.) 12:05 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:05
10:10The Cave (p.m The Skeleton Key (PG-13, 104 min.) 12:20 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7:00 p.m., p.m., 9:30 p.m. BURNS COURT
The Cave (PG-13, 97 in.) 1:50 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:30 p.m. Underclassman (PG-13, 95 min.) 506 Burns Lane
r6:55 p.m., 9th45 pocolate Factory 10:10 p.m. Cry Wolf (PG-13,90 min.) 12:30 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:05 p.m., 7:55 (941) 995-3456
(PG, 106 min.) Sky High (PG, 98 min.) 12:00 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 5:00 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
1:25 p.m. 1:00 p.m., 3:55 p.m. p.m., 10:05 p.m. An Unfinished Life (PG-13,107 min.) The Beautiful Country (R, 125 min.)
1The Constant Gardener (R, 1225 p.m. The Transporter 2 (PG-13, 88 min.) The Exorcism of Emily Rose 12:10 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 5:15 p.m., 8:00 5:00 p.m.
05e Constant Gardener10 p, 75 p.m.(R, 129 m.) 2:00 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:00 p.m., (PG-13,114 min.) p.m., 10:30 p.m. Broken Flowers (R, 105 min.)
105 p.m. 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:00 p.m. 12:30 p.m., 1:10 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4:30 Venom (R, 85 min.) 12:50 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 5:40 p.m., -* '
Cry Wolf (P-13, 90 m.) Wedding Crashers (R, 113 min.) p.m., 7:10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 12:35 p.m., 3:00 p.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:35 8:10 p.m.
Cry Wolf (PG-13, 90 min.) 1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 10:20 p.m. p.m., 9:55 p.m. Junebug (R, 107 min.)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:25 p.m. Four Brothers (R, 108 min.) Wedding Crashers (R, 113 min.) 2:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
10:25The Exorp.cism of Emily Rose 12:25 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 6:55 p.m., 1:15 p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:45 p.m., March of the Penguins (G, 84 min.)
T(1, o1r14m m y RoseOT 9:35 p.m. 10:30 p.m. 1:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 8:20 p.m.
(PG-13, 114 min.) SARASOTA Just Like Heaven (PG-13, 95 min.) Murderball (R, 85 min.)
1:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:05 p.m., HOLLYWOOD 20 11:55 a.m., 12:25 p.m., 2:15 p.m., 2:45 AMC Theatres Sarasota East 12:30 p.m.
10:Four00 p.ers min.) 1993 Main St. p.m., 4:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 8027 Beneva Road Us Highway 41,
Four4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m.Brothers (R, 10:05 p.m. (941) 954-5768 7:50 p.m., 9:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. (941) 924-1383
4:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:05 p.m. Lord of War (R 122 min)

Just Like Heaven (PG-13, 95 p.m., 4:35 The 40-Year-Old Virgin (R, 116 min.) 12:40 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7:00 p.m., The 40-Year-Old Virgin (R, 116 min.)
., :10 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 12:15 p.m., 3:20 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 9:50 p.m. 2:20 p.m., 5:00 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Editor's Note: Movie times are provided
p.m., 10:00 p.m. The Man (PG-13,84 min.) The Exorcism of Emily Rose by individual theaters. Show times are ,
0:2Lord of War (R, 122 .) The Brothers Grimm (PG-13, 120 min.) 12:50 p.m., 3:55 p.m., 7:05 p.m., (PG-13, 114 min.) subject to change without notice.
Lord of War (RS hosts guided birding and natur, 122e walks at Celery minFields




SAS hosts guided birding and nature walks at Celery Fields


STAFF REPORT


The Sarasota Audubon So-
ciety, in cooperation with
Sarasota County, hosts guided
birding and nature walks at
the Celery Fields the second
Saturday of the month, Oc-
tober through April. Each
month's walk will feature a
different Audubon leader. On
some walks, county personnel
with expertise in varied topics
such as biology and engineer-
ing will accompany trip lead-


ers.
The purpose of the walks
is to acquaint the community
with the unique habitat of the
Celery Fields, which serves as
a nesting area, feeding ground,
or migratory stop for more
than 180 bird species docu-
mented in the area. The 8 a.m.
walks are free and open to the
public.
The Celery Fields were
used as a farming area for cel-
ery and other vegetables be-
ginning in the mid-1920s. The


--S Ists


David Sanborn & Bill) Idol The Full Monty BREAK! The Urban
Chris Botti join us for a post- "One of the most Funk Spectacular*
Great night of show Halloween entertaining and You don't have to be a
Jazz! '80s Bash: contest exhilaration productions teen to appreciate the
Oct. 27, 8 PM & live music you'll ever see!" USA energy of this show!
Oct. 31,.8 PM Today Adult content, Nov. 3, 8 PM
wee PmoIpat soome nudity post-show curtain call
Nov. 1, 3,& 8 PM
SofMidilne brighthouse .a a
THE CAFE IN THE GRAND FOYER OPENS 2 HOURS PRIOR TO MOST EVENING PERFORMANCE,
EL CHARGE-IT LINE: 953-3368TOLL-FREE 1-800-826-9303
VANEL Service fee for phone orders. PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE
777 N Tamiami Trail, Sarasota On-line ticketing at VANWEZEL.ORG
PERFORMING ARTS HALL Box Office Hours: Monday-Saturday 9-4:30, Sunday 1-5
SIf Available, $10 SludenutTeacher Rushlickels may be purchased Iheday of the performance. Croups of 20 or more receivea 10% discount on most show.


'FREEBoarding &~Buffeti
(With your Players Card from ANY CASINO including ours. void Sat. 6pm ruises)



FREE SLOT TOKENS* C fo
(*Buy $10 in SLOT TOKENS & Get $10 FREE! void Fri. & Sat. 6pm Cruises)
*1. Present this coupon at Ticket Office with your Players Card from
N / "any casino, including ours & recieve free boarding and a free buffet
^l \ (void LABOR DAY 9/5/05 & Sat 6pm cruises).
OR
I **2. Present this coupon with boarding pass purchase & get $10 in free
Sslot tokens when you buy $10 in slot tokens. (void LABOR DAY 9/5/
I 305 & Fri. & Sat. 6pm cruises).
V: 44 1 -.. ......- One coupon per person per cruise. Offer may be cancelled at any time
|2 (88 373-3521 without notice. This coupon may not be combined with any other
8 8 30w ugg.et coupon, promo or offer. Photo ID required upon check-in. 21 or older
ResePVations Suggested to board. Expires 9/30/05 VG
m am aagmmealRig mmai D u gm gam'i mm imgmme mm m mG im imm mm ieli


NOT VALID W/ANY OTHER OFFER. Not valid on holidays.
No take out. Venice location only. Expires 9/30/05


*WAS


farms were sold off as private
units and continued to pro-
duce celery until the property
was acquired by Sarasota
County in 1995. There was no
record of wildlife before de-
velopment, but one can as-
sume that it was abundant.
During its farm stage, the
area was good for birding,
probably many more species
than now. The present Celery
Fields is still a work in process.
Primarily a flood mitigation
zone, the Sarasota Audubon


Society is working with the
county as it restores more
than 80 acres of the Celery
Fields into an even more
wildlife-friendly wetland area.
The Sarasota Audubon So-
ciety (SAS) is a chapter of the
National Audubon Society.
The group is active in its pub-
lic, conservation related edu-
cation campaign during the
months of October through
April. SAS's program includes
monthly meetings featuring
speakers who present environ-


mental topics, weekly trips to
local natural areas, annual
overnight and international
birding trips and road clean-
up activities adjacent to the
Celery Fields.
The monthly Celery Fields,
walks convene at the gazebo
adjacent to the .Celery Fields
on the north side of Palmer
Boulevard in Sarasota.
For more information and
dates, contact Mark Leggett at
925-7220 or visit sarasota-
audubon.org.


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WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


141 LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Venice Gondolier Sun


Johnny Mercer show at VLT:'Too Marvelous for Words'


BY SANDY COPPERMAN
GUEST WRITER

Ricky Retzel and Leslie An-
derson, who received the Man-
hattan Area Cabaret Award for
2005, performed a polished
and professional revue of four
decades of songs by Johnny
Mercer, to open the Venice
Little Theatre Cabaret series.
Retzel dressed in a sporty
tan suit and tie, and Anderson
in' dress, also gave the audi-
ence a taste of sophisticated
Manhattan cabaret entertain-
ment, in their two-hour, two-
set pleasing rendition of such
standards as "Too Marvelous
for Words," "Moon B ver" and
"Days of Wine and Roses."
Mercer is sometimes refer-
red to as '"America's greatest
lyricist." He performed on
stage, radio and the movies,
wrote Broadway shows, and
collaborated with Hollywood's
top composers to write songs
for Hollywood films. He is con-
sidered one of America's top 10
songwriters.
While singing, Retzel played
his baby grand piano in a taste-
ful jazz mode. Anderson chim-
ed in at strategic moments
with sometimes elegant,
sdo ietimes comedic trombone
solos.
The show was interspersed
with comic bits, entertaining
small talk and footnotes about


PLANS from page


opera house complex. The
opera continues with its work
under the guidance of the
architects Killis Almond and
Associates in conjunction with
Abel Garcia, Architects.
The Opera House is home
to the 46-year-old interna-
tionally acclaimed Sarasota
Opera. Since the opera's move
to downtown Sarasota in
1983, the area has become a
cornerstone of the arts com-
munity. The opera has per-
formed to packed houses for
many years.
The Sarasota Opera house
was built in 1926. The opera
now employs a seasonal staff
of more than 250 and gener-
ates an estimated $24 million
in economic activity annual-
ly.
Reviewed in five languages,
Sarasota Opera draws audi-


Johnny Mercer's musical bibli-
ography, which only served to
enhance the highlight of the
show, Mercer's unique and
poetic lyrics.
Most people in the theater
appeared to be of the ages that
could easily recall the music of
the era. Since Mercer's songs
span the period back from the
mid-1930s to the early 1970s,
there are many who have
never heard most of his hits.
This is a great opportunity to
listen to some of America's
greatest pop music, little of
which is heard today.
In the first set, the duo sang
Mercer's music of the '30s
Depression era and the '40s
World War II period, which
brought romance and hope to
Americans: "Satin Doll," "You
Must Have Been a Beautiful
Baby," "Something's Gotta
Give," 'Autumn Leaves" (sung
with sensitivity by Anderson),
and "I Thought About You."
In between the standards,
the audience enjoyed some.
lesser-known but equally bril-
liant comedic lyrics such as "I
Fought Every Step of the Way,"
"BonVivant" and "Arthur Mur-
ray Taught Me Dancing in a
Hurry."
The second set began with
more lighthearted entertain-
ment. Anderson sang and
danced "Strip Polka (Show
Your Linen Miss Richardson),"


"Legalize My Name" and "Past
My Prime." Ritzel's salty "Fra-
zier (the Sensuous Lion)" had
the audience members smil-
ing.
They followed with a medley
of Mercer hit songs that could
only suggest the tip of the ice-
berg for the wealth of his music,
including "'Anyplace I Hang My
Hat is Home," "One For My
Baby," "Fools Rush In," "Blues in
the Night," and "I Wanna Be
Around." If that were not
enough, they picked up the
tempo with "Goody, Goody,"
"Jeepers Creepers," "Come Rain
* or Come Shine" and "Glow
Worm." Nostalgia with "I'm An
Old Cow Hand" and "On the
Atchison, Topeka and the Santa
Fe" was followed by the spirited
"Hooray For Hollywood."
The show's direction was by
Jim .Luzar; the skillful lighting
was byAlise Hart; Dorian Boyd
provided good sound and
stage management was by
Nancy Hoover.
The show's finale featured a

beautiful version of "Dream"
and one song which might
have typified Mercer's ap-
proach to his music, "Hit the
Road to Dreamland." This
show by Ritzel and Anderson
was a deftly woven work of
charm and magic.
The show" plays 8 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, 2
p.m. Sunday, until Sept. 25.


LIFE from pagel10


Jennifer Lopez is Sue Jean, an
abused woman on the run from
a boyfriend who beats her up.
She has her 11-year-old daugh-
ter (Becca Gardner) in tow. And
she can't get far enough away
from Iowa to suit her.
Her car breaks down, and
the money runs out. They have
to take refuge with a man Jean
hasn't spoken to in years her
ex-father-in-law, Einar. You'd
think he'd be delighted to get to
know a granddaughter he did-
n't know he had.
But Einar is a bitter old
wreck living-in a ruin of a
ranch. He's been unpleasant -
ever since his son, Jean's hus-
band, died. He blames her for
the death. And naming the girl
after her rodeo-cowboy dad,
Griff,.didn't help.
Jean, who grew up there, is
damaged goods, and certainly
more "sophisticated" than
poor Sheriff Curtis (Josh Lu-
cas) remembers, as she puts
the moves on him.
The story's arc is the same as


a dozen other "abused woman
on the run" dramas. But Lopez,
who covered similar ground in
the abused-female revenge
fantasy "Enough," is at home
with the material and gives a
warm and uncluttered perfor-
mance. There must have been
more "wr6ng" with this char-
. acter at some stage in the
script, but she's sanitized a bit
for the movie. Pity. And al-
though Lopez doesn't seem to
fret as much over appearance
' in this, she could still use let-it-
all-hang-out lessons from co-
star Camryn Manheim, as the
owner of the diner where Jean.
goes to work.
But the script, for all its
attempted adorable moments,
lacks warmth or emotion. We
should feel what the characters
feel for the son/husband/fa-
ther who isn't there, for the
lives lost or, as the title sug-
gests, left "unfinished."
And we don't. That makes
whatever ending is cobbled to-
gether, and several abrupt
mid-section moments, feel
more contrived than organic.


kS1600S.HarboIrDi ve, Venie(mkdbnthglf)


ences not only from around
Florida but from across
America and the world.
The 2006 season opens Feb.


4 with Puccini's "La Boheme,"
followed by "The Marriage of
Figaro," Verdi's "I masnadieri,"
and "Die Fledermaus."


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DINING
NIGHT LIFE
ENTERTAINMENT!


MUSIC
MOVIES
AND MORE!


LET'S GO 13
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


How to eat healthy



when dining out


STAFF REPORT

With choices like fettuccini
alfredo, chocolate decadence
and a big, juicy cheeseburger
on many restaurant menus,
eating out healthy can seem
like -an impossible feat. Rest
assured, dieticians say you can
turn that next bite into a
healthier alternative at fast-
food, buffet or sit-down restau-
rants.
In fact, eating out can be an
opportunity for you to eat even
healthier by taking advantage
of prepared fruits and vegeta-
bles the healthy foods you
might bypass at home because
of their lengthy prep time and
short shelf life, said Mara
Vitolins, a nutritionist at Wake
Forest University Baptist
Medical Center in Winston-
Salem, N.C. Not to mention,
many fast-food restaurants are
beginning to offer healthier
options, such as salads, baked
potatoes, fruit bowls and bot-
tled water.
In any case, the first lesson
to eating out healthy, dietitians
say, is distinguishing the good-
for-you foods from the high-
fat, salty foods that add pounds

and cause your body to retain
water. Sometimes it's easy if
restaurants note their healthy
meals on their menus with'a
star or other symbol. But with-
out those indications, what
should you do? Here are a few
tips:
Watch for higher-fat items
on the menu with words like
"buttered," "escalloped," -"au
gratin," "fried" or "cream-
based." Instead, look for
healthier options, indicated by,
terms like "grilled," "broiled,"
"steamed," "poached," "roast-
ed" or "broth-based."
Plan ahead for what you
will order so you won't be
tempted by fatty foods once


you're there, said registered
dietitian Suzanne Henson, a
coordinator of. University of
Alabama -at Birmingham's
EatRight Weight Management
Program.
Take advantage of menus
on the Internet, such as
wfubmc. edu/nutrition/FF
MainEhtm, which lists the
caloric and fat contents of
foods from leading fast-food
restaurants. You can also find
many restaurant menus online
or get them faxed to you in
advance so you can peruse the
* options carefully before you
order. You might even want to
eat a small meal in advance to
avoid eating too much at the
restaurant.


SUN FILE PHOTO
Preparation and smart choices can keep dining out from putting a kink in your healthy-eating


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WINING & DINING


4 1 LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN LET'S GO 113


Highlights of Sarasota Opera's 47th season


The Fall Concert Season
Nov. 11 at 8 p.m. Up
Close, Informal, On Stage
Up Close, Informal, On
Stage is an intimate and inter-
active concert in which the
performers share the stage
with the audience. Adina
Aaron (soprano), Sarah Lam-
bert (mezzo-soprano), Israel
Lozano (tenor) and Todd
Thomas (baritone) with pianist
Greg Ritchey perform their
musical favorites and share
their insights and experiences.
The artists, along with Artistic
Director Victor DeRenzi and
Executive Director Susan
Danis, then join the audience
for a post-performance recep-
tion.
Nov. 17 and 19 at 8 p.m. -
Opera & Overtures
Opera & Overtures features
Maestro DeRenzi leading the
Florida West Coast Symphony
and soloists Adina Aaron,
Sarah Lambert, Israel Lozano
and Todd Thomas in some of
opera's greatest arias, duets,
ensembles and overtures.
Operatic favorites by Verdi,
Puccini, Wagner and others
will be performed.
Tickets for these events are
available at the box office, by
calling 366-8450, Ext. 1, or
online sarasotaopera.org.
Sarasota Youth Opera
The Sarasota Youth Opera
was founded under the direc-
tion of Artistic Director Victor
DeRenzi. It serves as a compre-
hensive training program
designed for young people,
ages 8-18. The program admits
all who apply, regardless of skill
level and provides an explo-
ration of the musical and the-
atrical aspects of opera. This
season the Sarasota Youth
Opera program presents Aaron
Copeland's opera "The Second
Hurricane."
Opera outreach programs
Year-round outreach and
educational programs are an
integral part of the mission of
Sarasota Opera. Throughout
the season singers perform in
area schools, hospitals, nursing
homes, retirement homes,
clubs and other organizations.
The OPERA-tion perfor-


mances introduce students to
an opera in the classroom
prior to their attending a per-
formance in the Opera House.
Winter Opera Festival
"La Boheme" Opera in
four acts (three intermissions)
by Giacomo Puccini, sung in
Italian with English supertitles.
Performances (13) are Feb. 4,7,
12 (matinee), 15, 19, 23, 26
(matinee); March 3, 10, 17, 19,
23, 25. Evening performances
begin at 8 p.m. Matinees begin
at 1:30 p.m.
Conducted by Victor De-
Renzi, "La Boheme" is consid-
ered to be the world's most
popular opera. The Sarasota
Opera will present a new pro-
duction of this old favorite,
designed to bring out the
romanticism of this master-
piece, which contains some of
the best known music ever
written for opera, including
soaring arias and love duets.
"La Boheme" tells the heart-
breaking story of the impover-


ished sweethearts Mimi and
Rodolfo as theyfallin love, sep-
arate and finally reunite. A pic-
ture of bohemian life set in
bustling 19th-century Paris,
this presentation will be a visu-
al and musical experience for
seasoned audience members
and first time operagoers.
The cast includes Stephanie
Sundine as Mimi and David P
Gordon as Musetta.
"The Marriage of Figaro"-
Opera in four acts (two inter-
missions) byWA. Mozart, sung
in Italian with English superti-
ties. Performances (10) are Feb.
11, 14, 16, 19 (matinee), 24,
March 1, 5, 11 (matinee), 18,25
(matinee) Evening perfor-
mances begin at 7:30 p.m.
Matinees begin at 1:30 p.m.
Celebrating the 250th anni-
versary of Mozart,,the Sarasota
Opera offers a new production
of his famous opera. "The
Marriage of Figaro" is based on
the revolutionary play by
French playwright
Beaumarchais. Mozart's great-


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est comedy boasts a first-rate
libretto by Lorenzo Da Ponte.
Continuing the story of The
"Barber of Seville," the opera
pits the ever-scheming Figaro
against his master, Count
Almaviva, as the servant tries
to protect his fiancee against
the nobleman's unwanted
advances. Words, music and
characters that are in turn
funny and emotional make
"The Marriage of Figaro" an
eternally compelling theatrical
creation. It will be conducted
by Anthony Barrese and fea-
tures Adrienne Danrich as the
Countess, Serna Benedetti as
Susanna and Constantinos
Yiannoudes as the Count.
"I masnadieri" ("The Rob-
bers") Opera in four acts
(two intermissions) by Giu-
seppe Verdi, sung in Italian
with English supertitles. Per-
formances (7) are Feb. 25, 28,
March 2, 5 (matinee), 8, 11, 18
(matinee). Evening perfor-
mances begin at 8 p.m. Mat-
inees begin at 1:30 p.m.


Verdi wrote "I masnadieri"
specifically for London. Its
1847 world premiere, attended
by Queen Victoria, starred the
legendary "Swedish nightin-
gale," Jenny Lind. Based on a
play by German dramatist
Friedrich von Schiller, this
opera recounts a chilling tale
of a divided family. Carlo, a
young nobleman exiled
through the deceit of his hate-
ful brother, leads a shameful
life as a robber and ultimately
kills the person he loves most.
An outstanding overture, fine
arias and rousing choruses fill
this new production that con-
tinues both Sarasota Opera's
ongoing Verdi Cycle and
Masterworks Revival Series. It
will be conducted by DeRenzi,
the opera's artistic director and
the man who set the opera's
goalto perform all of the Verdi
operas in consecutive seasons.
"I masnadieri" features Todd
Geer as Carlo and Asako


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m 5
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i-4

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RON WHITE
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$39.75. Ticketmaster: (813) 287-8844.


FLORIDA ORCHESTRA:
OPENING NIGHT!
Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center Morsani Hall,
Tampa, 7:30 p.m. Tickets, $22.50 and $50.50.
Ticketmaster: (813) 287-8844.


* RUTH ECKERD HALL,
1111 McMullen-Booth Road,
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* SARASOTA OPERA, 61 N.
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11


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Frda,, 3i i pm


& QUEENSRYCHE
30 pm Bartbara E. Manrn Ferorm,,ng Arts
S Hall or311 Fo M erl Ti,:i,er'. ,, 1 541 5'36 E,.
o hlce o1 i 9i m1-4 49


^GWAR
The Masquerade, Ybor City, 7 p.m. Tickets,
$17.50. Ticketmaster: (813) 287-8844.



SOULFLY
The Masquerade, Ybor City, 7 p.m. Tickets,
0 $18. Ticketmaster: (813) 287-8844.


MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS
/ 255 Beach Drive, N.E., St. Petersburg. 10 a.r
U I 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday.
$8; $7 seniors (65+); $4 students; free for ag
1 6 and under. (727) 896-2667.


:19


ROLLING STONES
St Pete Times Forum, Tampa, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets $160 and $400. Ticketmaster:
(813) 287-8844.


SNEIL DIAMOND
"" St Pete Times Forum, Tampa, 8 p.m. Ticke
$42.50 and $75. Ticketmaster: (813) 287-88
,.-v


* TAMPA BAY PERFORMING
ARTS CENTER, 1010 North
Maclnnes Place, Tampa,
(800)1 955-1045;
tampacenter.com

* TECO ARENA, 11000
Everblades Parkway, Estero;
948-7825.

* THEATRE WORKS, 1247 First
St., Sarasota; 952-9170


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IReganBooks)
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5. 'The Book of Sudoku by
Michael Mepham iOverlook Press)
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* TICKETMASTER. 334-3309;
ticketmaster.com

* VAN WEZEL PERFORMING
ARTS HALL, 777 North
Tamiami Trail, Sarasota; (941)
953-3368 or (800) 826-9303;
vanwezel.org

* VENICE LITTLE THEATRE,
140 W. Tampa Ave., Venice;
488-1115; venicestage.com


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121-tiT'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


YOUR 10-DAY

T H E


S21
Your Best Bet

GALLERY

OF FINE

ART
Humanities Hall, Edison
College, 8099 College Parkway
S.W., Fort Myers. 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m.- 3 p.m.
Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday.
(239) 489-9313.


026
Your Best Bet

VENICE

ART

CENTER
390 S. Nokomis Ave., Venice,
9 a.m.-4 p.m. 485-7136.


22
Your Best Bet

MUSEUM

OF FINE

ARTS
255 Beach Drive, N.E., St.
Petersburg. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m.
Sunday. $8; $7 seniors (65+); $4
students; free for ages 6 and
under. (727) 896-2667.


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Your Best Bet

IMPERIAL


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Your Best Bet

"SATCHMO:
THE LIFE AND
TIMES OF
LOUIS
ARMSTRONG"
Tampa Bay Performing Arts
Center, Jaeb Theater, 1010 North
Maclnnes Place, Tampa. (800)
955-1045.


28
Your Best Bet

BLUES


v24


Your Best Bet

RON

WHITE
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Barbara B.
Mann Performing Arts Hall,
8099 College Parkway
Southwest, Fort Myers. Tickets,
$38.75 at cellardoor.com or
(239) 481-4849.


129
I-
Your Best Bet

ALICE


SYMPHONY TRAVELER COOPER


ORCHESTRA:
40TH
SEASON
OPENER
Lakeland Center Youkey Theatre,
Lakeland, 7:30 p.m. Tickets, $15
and $30. Ticketmaster: (813)
287-8844.


* BARBARA B. MANN
PERFORMING ARTS HALL,
8099 College Parkway S.W., Fort
Myers; 1800) 440-7469;
bbmannpah.com
* BROADWAY PALM DINNER
THEATRE, 1380 Colonial Blvd.,
Fort Myers; (239) 278-4422
* CHARLOTTE COUNTY
MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM,


Jannus Landing, St. Petersburg,
7 p.m. Tickets, $25. Ticket
mAster: (813) 287-8844.


75 .Taylor St., Punta Gorda;
(800) 329-9988
* CHARLOTTE SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA, P.O. Box 495831,
Port Charlotte; 625-5996
* CHARLOTTE PERFORMING
ARTS CENTER, 701 Carmalita
St., Punta Gorda, 505-SHOW
. CULTURAL CENTER OF


Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater,
8 p.m. Tickets, $37.50 and
$42.50 Ticketmaster: (813) 287-
8844.


CHARLOTTE COUNTY, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte,
625-4175
* FLORIDA STUDIO THEATRE,
1241 N. Palm Ave., Sarasota;
366-9000
* FSU CENTER FOR THE
PERFORMING ARTS, 5-55
North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota;
351-8000


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


AHEAD




25
Your Best Bet

FLORIDA

MILITARY

HERITAGE

MUSEUM
Fishermen's Village, 1200 W.
Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda.
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-
Saturday; noon-6 p.m. Sunday.
Free admission. 575-9002.


W30
Your Best Bet

BALLROOM

DANCING
7-8 p.m. Group Class; 8-11 p.m.
Fabulous Dance. $10 per per-
son. The Dancesport Centre,
3109 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte. 624-4001. Monday-
Thursday, 3-10 p.m.; Fridays, 3-
11 p.m.


* GOLDEN APPLE DINNER .
THEATRE, 25 N. Pineapple Ave.,
Sarasota; 366-5454
* LEMON BAY PLAYHOUSE, 96
W. Dearborn St., Englewood;
(941) 475-6756
* MAHAFFEY THEATER FOR
THE PERFORMING ARTS, 400 S.
First St., St. Petersburg; (727)
892-5767; stpete.org


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


OPERA fro pr-.e 4


Tamura as Amalia.
"Die Fledermaus" Oper-
ena in three acts (two intermis-
sions) by Johann Strauss, Jr.,
performed in English with
English supertitles for sung
sections. Performances (nine)
are March 4, 7, 9, 12 (matinee),
15, 19 (matinee), 22, 24, 26
(matinee). Evening perfor-
mances begin at 8 p.m. Mat-
inees begin at 1:30 p.m.
In 2003, Sarasota Opera
audiences made this produc-
tion of the world's most popu-
lar operetta a sold-out success,
and the critics agreed. '"A bril-
liant new production ... elegant
costumes" said Christine
Gransier in L'Opera. Opera
News added, "Sarasota's 'Fled-
ermaus' was a fun, frothy con-
coction." Back by popular de-
mand, "Die Fledermaus" again
promises to seduce audiences
with its famous melodies and
winning comedy. As Rosalinda
tries to keep her'philandering
* husband faithful while practi-
cal jokes, long lost lovers and
mistaken identities swirl all
around, who can deny that
"Champagne is king?"
This production willbe con-
ducted by David Neely, with
Julie Makerov as Rosalinda,
Christina Bouras as Adele and
KelleyVan Horn as Orlovsky.
Sarasota Opera is sponsored
in part by the state of Florida,
Department of State, Division
Please see OPERA, 6
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WINING & DINING


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN LETS GO 15


Sheikra takes thrills to new heights


STAFF REPORT


America's only dive roller
coaster opened recently at
Busch Gardens. Sheikra is the
tallest, coaster in Florida, and
the tallest dive coaster in the
world.
"Through the years, Busch
Gardens Tampa Bay has set the
standard for thrill rides, and
I'm confident guests will agree
that the park has raised the bar
again with Sheikra," said Dan
Brown, executive vice presi-
dent and general manager of
Busch Gardens Tampa Bay.
Sheikra features a 200-foot,
90-degree vertical dive, and
reaches speeds of up to 70
mph.
The coaster also features an
Immelmann loop (a rolling
maneuver named for a World
War I flying ace), and a second
dive from 138 feet into an
underground tunnel. After
crossing half a mile of track,
the coaster makes a dazzling
water-feature finale.
Sheikra's cars feature stadi-
um-style seating to ensure
each rider has a clear view of
the 90-degree rush toward the
ground.
The enhanced ride experi-
ence simulates flight as 4 Gs of
force grips riders to their seats.
Sheikra serves as the center-
piece of Busch Gardens' newly


PHOTO COURTESY OF BUSCH GARDENS
Sheikra's initial drop is 200 feet at an angle of 90 degrees, making it the tallest and steepest dive
coaster in the world.


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61 LETS GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WINING & DINING


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN LET'S GO41


OPERA from page 5
of Cultural Affairs, the Florida
Arts Council and the National
Endowment for the Arts. Pro-
grams are supported in part by
an award the Tourist Devel-
opment Tax through the Board
of County Commissioners, the
Tourist Development Council
and the Sarasota County Arts
Council. Additional funding is
provided by the city of Sarasota
and the County of Sarasota.
For more information on
the opera, its coming season or
special programs, call 366-
8450, Ext. 1 or visit sarasota
opera.org.


Sarasota Opera continues its renovation plans


STAFF REPORT


The Sarasota Opera will
continue the renovations and
improvements planned for its
opera house separately from
the adjacent Plaza Verdi pro-
ject.
'"After a thorough evaluation
of the gains associated with a
joint project, we have chosen
to proceed on our improve-
ment and renovation project
independently," opera board
chair Ed Bavaria said. "We


thank the city for its willing-
ness to allow us to participate
in this process. But at the end
of the day, this is the best deci-
sion for the opera. We will con-
tinue to put on great opera in
downtown Sarasota and make
improvements to the wonder-
ful theater we have produced
in for so many years.
"We have put thousands of
hours and more than $200,000
into being a part of this
process. A lot ofworkwent into
being responsive to the needs


of the overall project. We did
our very best to actively partic-
ipate in the dynamic environ-
ment we have been a part of
over the past two years, work-
ing in good faith with the city
of Sarasota and developer Ersa
Grae. Our architectural plans
have gone through numerous
permutations in response to
the needs of our partners. We
have redesigned upcoming
seasons numerous- times to
meet the deadlines of the pro-
ject timeline. It is in the best


interest of our patrons, staff
and the community to pursue
our own plans at this time. We
still have an exciting renova-
tion ahead of us at the opera."
The opera's renovation
plans will continue with major
improvements to the public
areas of the opera house, seat-
ing, the orchestra pit and
scenery storage areas. Ad-
ditional upgrades will be made
to the other buildings in the

Please see PLANS, 14


HEALTHY frompage 3


the equivalent of a children's
meal at a fast-food restaurant
- small drink, small fries and
no double-layer hamburgers.
To control the portion size,
order a la carte, go for an appe-
tizer or ask for a children's
meal. Consider splitting your
entree with someone else, or
take some home with you for
your next meal.
Don't be tempted by the
freebies. The breadbasket or
basket of chips quickly can add
calories to your meal. Also,
beware of the continuous
refills of lemonade or soda:
These beverages are full of
empty calories that don't leave
you feeling full.
Avoid grazing at the buffet.
One approach: Consider the
salad the main course of your
meal and then try samples of
other foods, such as the soups
or meats.
Henson also suggests that
you create a healthy meal: Fill
half the plate with vegetables
and fruits; the bottom quarter
with starch, such as pasta,
bread or rice; and the other
quarter of your plate with pro-
tein, such as poultry, fish, pork
or beans.
Choose healthy protein
options such as lean meat, fish
or skinless chicken over fatty
red meats or fried chicken.
Order your sauce on the
side to control the amount
draped over your food. Avoid
creamy sauces and mayo-
based sauces that are high in
fat ketchup is a healthier
choice.
And if you can't do without
the sauce, use the fork method,
Henson recommends. Order


the sauce on the side, dip your
fork in the dressing or sauce
and then fork your greens or
food. "You will use far less, but
you will still get that wonderful
taste," Henson said.
Watch what you drink.
Research has shown that being
dehydrated makes you feel
hungry and may cause you to
overeat. Water is the best
option, and if you drink it
throughout your meal, it can
help you feel fuller, Vitolins


said.
If water is too plain for you,
go for low-fat milk or iced tea,
better options than sugary
sodas. If you do opt for the
soda, drink it in small servings
and water it down with a lot of
ice or water, or choose diet ver-
sions.
Ask for. low-calorie salad
dressings such as low-calorie
versions of French, Italian,
Russian or Dijon. Or just
squeeze a lemon over your


salad for flavor. Also, watch for
high-fat salad items like
cheese, croutons, cream dress-
ings like Caesar, chopped eggs
and bacon bits, according to
the American Heart Associ-
ation.
Make substitutions or
modifications to your meal.
Instead of the fries or escal-
loped potatoes, ask the wait-
staff to substitute a baked
potato or fruit bowl, or special
order fries with no salt. Still


hungry? Add volume to your
meal by asking for extra veg-
etables so you fill up on items
that are high in water and fiber
with fewer calories.
You don't have to skip the
desert tray. Rather, watch what
you take from that tray. Bypass
high-calorie desserts like pie,
cake and ice cream in favpr of
the fresh fruit or fruit sorbet.
After all, "all is fair in good
food and nutrition," 'Vitolins
said.


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QUICK from page 10
businessman Jeremiah (Andre
Benjamin), and hard rocking Jack
(Garrett Hedlund) reunite to
take the matter of her death into
their own hands. As they track
down the killer, they quickly real-
ize that their old ways of doing
business have new consequences.
In this character-driven action-
drama from acclaimed director
John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood,
2 Fast 2 Furious) and producer-
Lorenzo di Bonaventura
(Constantine), four brothers come
together to discover that they are
bound by ties thicker than blood.

JUNEBUG
A dealer in "outsider" art trav-
els from Chicago to North
Carolina to meet her new in-laws,
challenging the equilibrium of
this middle class Southern home.

JUST LIKE HEAVEN
A lonely architect (Ruffalo) falls
for the spirit of beautiful woman
who used to live in his new
apartment.

MARCH OF THE PENGUINS
Emperor penguins are docu-
mented during their treacherous
journey hundreds of miles across
the Antarctic ice. 1 hour,
24 minutes.

LORD OF WAR
An arms dealer confronts the
morality of his work as he is being
chased by an Interpol agent.

MAD HOT BALLROOM
The students of several New
York City elementary schools
learn ballroom dancing and
.compete in a city wide dance
competition.

THE MAN
Unassuming dental supply
salesman Andy Fidler becomes
the unwilling partner of street-
tough police officer Vann, thanks
to a case of mistaken identity. The
two make an unlikely pair as
Fidler keeps getting on Vann's
nerves as the cop sets out to dis-
cover who killed his previous part-
ner. 2 hours. .

MURDERBALL
Teams compete for a chance
to play quadriplegic rugby, also
known as "Murderball," in the
2004 Paralympic Games in
Athens, Greece. This documentary
follows two teams, the U.S. and
Canada, who have a bitter rivalry,
stemming from the Canadian
team's coach being previously


kicked off the U.S. team. Each
player has a history that leads to
them being wheelchair-bound,
but the main focus soon becomes
the extraordinary journey of
skilled athletes as they compete
for the gold medal.
1 hour, 26 minutes.

MUST LOVE DOGS
Must Love Dogs tells the story
of Sarah Nolan (Diane Lane), a
newly divorced woman cautiously
rediscovering romance with the
enthusiastic but often misguided
help of her well-meaning family.
As she braves a series of hilarious-
ly disastrous mismatches and first
dates, Sarah begins to trust her
own instincts again and learns
that it's never a good idea to give
up on love. 1 hour, 38 minutes.

RED EYE
Lisa is a woman on a night-
flight to Miami who fills her time
by chatting with the passenger
next to her. She soon discovers
his friendly demeanor is a facade
after he reveals his true motiva-
tion for travel is the assassination
of the Deputy of Homeland


Security. He demands Lisa help
him carry out his plan, or he will
see to it that her father is assassi-
nated with one phone call. As
precious time slips by, Lisa must
make a decision. 1 hour,
25 minutes.

THE SKELETON KEY
Caroline is a young woman
who takes a job helping an elderly
wife care for her invalid husband.
Disturbed by their odd behavior,
Caroline begins exploring their
. vast mansion, armed with a skele-
.ton key that unlocks every door in
the house. What she discovers in
the attic is terrifying.

SKY HIGH
Superheroes' son begins to
test his skills while growing up as
an uncertain kid at Sky High, an
elite high school and breeding
ground for tomorrow's heroes.
1 hour, 42 minutes.

THE TRANSPORTER 2
Frank Martin, aka The
Transporter, has retired from
Special Forces and moved to
Miami. His current job entails dri-


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ENTIRE

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ving a wealthy family with twin
boys. He grows attached to the
twins, who are abducted. Frank
then uses his skills to locate the
boys and figure out why they
were targets.

UNDERCLASSMAN
An illegal international car ring
is being run out of an elite private
school, which prompts a young
detective to take an undercover
assignment to break up the ille-
galities.

UNDISCOVERED
Brier, an aspiring model, falls
for struggling musician James
after a chance encounter. Having
achieved success in New York,.
Brier moves to Los Angeles in
hopes of launching an acting
career. She meets fellow actress
Clea in an acting class, and the
two begin a campaign to help
James launch his music career. As
the sparks between Brier and
James fly, James' career also takes
off, and the two find the pres-
sures of fame are more than they
bargained for.


AN UNFINISHED LIFE
A down on her luck woman,
desperate to provide care for her
daughter, moves in with her
father in-law. In time, they learn
to forgive each other and heal old
wounds.

VENOM
A pack of teenagers run for
their lives through the swamps of
Louisiana, as they are chased by
Mr. Jangles, a man possessed by
13 evil souls who is relentless in
his pursuit of new victims.

WEDDING CRASHERS
John and Jeremy are each _,
looking for the right woman a
different woman every night, that
is so they take advantage of
the romantic atmosphere of wed-
dings and sneak in to find their
one-time trysts. When John actu-
ally falls for an engaged woman
at one of their uninvited soirees,
his relationship with Jeremy
begins to suffer.


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.. .. ...g o 77 ., =' ,:-.- -. .


101 LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN LET'S GO 17


'The Man' sets off


just enough sparks


THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN
40-year-old Andy Stitzer (Steve
Carrell) has done quite a few
things in his life. He's got a cushy
job stamping invoices at an elec-
tronics superstore, a nice apart-
ment with a proud collection of
action figures and comic books,
good friends, a nice attitude. But
there's just one little thing he has-
n't quite gotten around to doing
yet something most people
have done by his age. Done a lot.
Andy's never, ever, ever had sex
- not even by accident. So is'
that such a big deal? 1 hour,
56 minutes.

THE BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY
The Beautiful Country follows
the story of Binh, a shy
Vietnamese man in his 20s who
embarks on a personal journey
with a young beautiful woman,
Ling, aboard a refugee ship to
America in search of a better life
and Binh's estranged American
father. 2 hours, 6 minutes.

BROKEN FLOWERS
The resolutely single Don has
just been dumped. Don yet again
resigqs himself to being alone.
Instead, he is compelled to reflect
on his past when he receives a
mysterious pink letter from an
anonymous former lover that
informs him he has a 19-year-old
son who may now be looking for
him. Don is urged to investigate
this "mystery" by his closest friend
and neighbor. Don embarks on a
cross-country trek in search of
clues from four former flames.
Unannounced visits to each of
these unique women hold new
surprises for Don as he haphaz-
ardly confronts his past and, con-
sequently, his present. 1 hour,
45 minutes.

THE BROTHERS GRIMM
Brothers Will and Jake Grimm
are con artists who go from vil-
lage to village pretending to
defeat mythical creatures threat-
ening the residents. When they
try to scam a village that has
been legitimately cursed, they
come face-to-face with the actual
creagtres they have pretended to
battle, and must find a way to
defeat them for real. The brothers
are based on the Brothers Grimm
who are famous for fairy tales
involving magical creatures.


F -wa rK 'B- r% *
PHOTO COURTESY OF MIRAMAX FILMS
An impoverished and abused mother, Jean Gilkyson (Jennifer Lopez), finds that the only
option left to her and her pre-teen daughter (Becca Gardner) is to move in with her father-in-
law (Robert Redford) to live on his Wyoming ranch, in "An Unfinished Life."



'An Unfinished Life'just



might be mournfully cute


BY ROGER MOORE
GUEST WRITER

"An Unfinished Life" just
might be the first movie ever
to wear the label "mournfully
cute."
A pall of grief and unre-
solved guilt hangs over this
ranch country drama set in
modern Wyoming. But the
Swedish sentimentalist Lasse
Hallstrom ("What's Eating
Gilbert Grape"), working
from a script with few sur-


THE CAVE
A group of hotshot cave
divers' trip becomes disastrous
when they become trapped in a
underground cave system. They
become the prey of demonic
creatures who have been living in
the caves for years.


prises, reaches for the treacle,
and too often finds it.
It's cute how Robert Red-
ford, playing Einar, a grizzled
old-rancher, dotes on his
crippled ranchhand Mitch,
played by Morgan Freeman.
It's cute how Einar mutters
to himself. Iris critters and
the ancient Mercury pickup
he spends half his rime work-
ing on.
There's a dangerous griz-
zly wandering the hills and
into town, but he rarely looks


CHARLIE AND THE
CHOCOLATE FACTORY
Acclaimed director Tim Burton
brings his vividly imaginative
style to the beloved Roald Dahl
novel Charlie and the Chocolate
Factory, about eccentric choco-
latier Willy Wonka (Johnny Depp)


anything but cute. lMitch was
mauled by him, but Mitch
insists that Einar let him live,
and that he feed him after
he's captured. Cute.
Halistrom's characters are
supposed to be walking
wounded. But Redford, who
is not willing to let himself
show his age the way Clint
Eastwood does, rarely misses
the chance to go for the
laugh.

Please see LIFE, 14


and Charlie (Freddie Highmore), a
good-hearted boy from a poor
family who lives in the shadow of
Wonka's extraordinary factory.
Long isolated from his own fami-
ly, Wonka launches a worldwide
contest to select an heir to his
candy empire. Five lucky children,


including Charlie, draw golden
tickets from Wonka chocolate
bars and win a guided tour of the
legendary candy-making facility
that no outsider has seen in 15
years. Dazzled by one amazing
sight after another, Charlie is
drawn into Wonka's fantastic
world in this astonishing and
enduring story. 1 hour,
46 minutes.

THE CONSTANT GARDENER
In a remote area of Northern
Kenya, the region's most dedicat-
ed activist, the passionate Tessa
Quayle, has been found brutally
murdered. Tessa's travelling com-
panion, a local doctor, appears to
have fled the scene, and the evi-
dence points to a crime of pas-
sion. Members of the British High
Commission assume that Tessa's
widower, their unambitious col-
league Justin Quayle, will leave
the matter to their discretion.
They could not be more wrong.
This career diplomat's equilibrium
has been exploded by the loss of
the woman he was deeply devot-
ed to. Haunted by remorse and
jarred by rumors of his wife's infi-
delities, Justin surprises himself
by plunging headlong into a dan-
gerous odyssey. 2 hours,
9 minutes.

CRY WOLF
High school kids create a ruse
involving a serial killer named
"The Wolf." It's a game that turns
terrifyingly real.

THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE
A 19-year-old girl is officially
recognized by the Roman
Catholic Church as possessed. A
priest is put on trial after the girl
dies. A bitter lawyer agrees to be
his defense attorney and during
the course of the trial, re-evalu-
ates her life. The story is told in
flashbacks that chronicle the girl's
battle with what she believes to
be possession juxtaposed with
the court proceedings.

FOUR BROTHERS
After their adoptive mother is
murdered during a grocery store
holdup, the Mercer brothers -
hotheaded Bobby (Mark
Wahlberg), hard-edged Angel
(Tyrese Gibson), family man and
Please see QUICK, 11


BY ROGER MOORE
GUEST WRITER


Buddy comedies are like
arranging a blind date. You can
do your homework before you
set them up, figure out their.
compatibilities to the nth
degree, and even give them lots
of money to go through with it.
That's no guarantee of suc-
cess.
Samuel L. Jackson and
Eugene Levy are the unlikeliest
of "buddies" in "The Man."
They don't click. There will
almost certainly not be a sec-
ond date. But they do set off
just enough sparks- to make us
see just why this unlikely pair-
ing was attempted in the first
place.
One's a cop. The other's a
dental supplies salesman.
Guess who plays what.
A mix-up at a gun deal, and
the dental dude (Levy, silly) is
cornered into helping the ATF
agent (Jackson) make a buy
and nab the thieves who killed
his partner.
The cop's, not the sales-
man's.
The buddies bicker, dicker,
and try to educate each other
in the ways of the world. Agent
Vann has one motto "Never
trust anyone." That may be
why his marriage. failed and
he's forever letting his little girl
down come visitation time.
Salesman Andy Fidler never
met a man "who didn't become
a friend, eventually." That will
be put to the test when he's
dealing with a sadistic Brit
gun-runner (Luke Goss of
"Blade II") on the mean streets
of Detroit.
Jackson spends the movie
sneering at Levy with either
disgust or dismay. He seems as
puzzled as we should at seeing
him in this sort of piffle at this
stage of his career.
Levy's acting has, over the
years, been reduced to brilliant
turns in Christopher Guest's
"Best in Show" and '"A Mighty
Wind" ensemble pieces, and
whatever he can get across
with his caterpillar eyebrows in
mainstream movies such as
"Bringing Down the House"
and 'American Pie."


But this works better than it
has any right to. The chattering
salesman and the curse-crazy
cop never click, but they have
their moments. As when Andy
tries to teach Vann how to cut
down on the cussing, to transi-
tion to "ffffff for cryin' out
loud." Or when Jackson goes
into one of his patented pro-
fane tirades. Or when- the
tables are briefly turned and
Levy has to pose as the street
tough with Jackson as his
emasculated sidekick.
Director Les Mayfield has
proven he can let chemistry
happen ("Encino Man"), but
that he cannot create it in the
camera ("Blue Streak"). With
an inane, aimless plot, too
much violence and too few
one-liners, he doesn't have a
new franchise here.
But here's a prediction.
Remember "Hard Ball," that
dreadful Keanu Reeves kiddie
baseball farce that America
flocked to post 9-11? It's entire-
ly possible that a Katrina-
soaked nation will turn out for
this just to get away from their
cable.
And as much pleasure as
Jackson and Levy have brought
us over the years, who'd
begrudge them one sloppy
sleeper hit?


TWIIOITl


.Broadway's salute
to the 1950's
world of youthful
shenanigans, rock
& roll and
romance.


"Copyrighted Material

SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


-E NW4o.at N "o -M 00 q- pm qam w-
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8j LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN WEDNESDAY, SEPT.21, 2005


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005

CRUISE from page 8


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN LET'S GO 9


almost next door to the sec-
ond-largest HardRock Cafe in
America the Miami Hard
Rock Cafe. Just across the
street from the mall's multi-
floor parking garage is the
American Airlines Arena, the
site of this year's MTV Awards.
The arena is the home of the
Miami Heat basketball team
and provided the stage for the
debut of Paul McCartney's
2005 United States Tour on
Sept. 16.
We sailed out of the harbor
past the HardRock, the Carn-
ival Cruise Lines dock at the
Port of Miami, past Dodge and
Loomis islands and the U.S.
Coast Guard Station along
Government Cut, a 40-foot
deep channel.
Narration in English and
Spanish let.us know where we
were at all times and with
enough notice that we could
take all the photos we wanted
of key sites. Among the things
pointed out were the giant
cranes used to unload contain-
er ships at the port. Our guide
said they cost some $6.5 nmil-
lion each. Also there was a
giant machine capable of X-
raying the contents of the con-
tainers, negating the need to
unload each and every one
while searching for certain


m 2~
It WiIA


The American Airlines Arena in Miami plays host to sporting events and concerts.


items that are not welcome at
the port.
As we passed the Coast'
Guaid station, we were told
about the orange-hued condo
building straight ahead. In-
diidual units could be had at


prices ranging upward from
$6.5 million. To starboard (at
right, facing forward) was
Fisher Island, another million-
aire compound, on another
manmade island. It seems that
in the 1920s while the Bro-


therhood of Locomotive En-
gineers was developingVenice,
a man named Karl Fisher was
creating 22 islands in Biscayne
Bay.
"He sold 16 of them to
Miami Beach in 1928 for $88


millionn" our guide said. "Then
he went to New York City and
invested that money in the
stock market. He lost it all the
next year in the crash, came

Please see CRUISE, 16


SUN PHOTO BY KIM COOL
This house was used in the film, "Scarface," starring Al Pacino. It is one of the first houses pointed out in the Homes of the Millionaires tour aboard the Island Queen.




Cruise to nowhere past the




homes of the somebodies


BY KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Some things never change.
A case in point is Miami's 1-
1/2-hour Island Queen Cruise,
which features close-up views
of the homes of the millionaires


who live along Biscayne Bay.
Back in the 1940s, while vis-
iting Miami, my parents took a
similar cruise, which my father
filmed in full color with his
Kodak movie camera. As a
youngster I watched those
films enough times that I came


to recognize many of the hous- sions are several new ."Mc- The biggest change must be
es. Mansions," one house that is the dock where the sightseeing
The millionaires are still part contemporary and part boats sail from on their cruises
there. The only difference is Federal in style, a few California to nowhere. The Island Queen
there are even more of them ranch houses dating to the sails out of Bayside Market-
today, and vacant lots have all 1950s and a few houses so place, a two-level shopping
but vanished. "modern" as to nearly defy mall in downtown Miami,


Between the original man- description.


Please see CRUISE, 9


The ferry heads to Fisher Island, one of the most expensive
places to live in Biscayne Bay and possibly in the world.


SUN PHOTOS BY KIM COOL
The Miami skyline provides an interesting background for sailboats moored in the harbor.


81I LET'S GO VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2005


"'


I I




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