<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sports
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Obituaries
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Our Town
 Section B: Coffee Break
 Section B: Venice Venue
 Section B: Well-Being
 Section B: Fresh Air
 Section B: Senior Scene
 Section B continued
 Section B: Travel
 Section B: Green Sheet
 Section B continued
 Section B: Photo Album
 Sun Coast Homes














Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00069
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Portion of title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) 58 cm. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Creation Date: June 19, 2005
Publication Date: 2001-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
oclc - 47264140
notis - ANK8420
lccn - 2001229429
System ID: UF00028295:00069
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
    Section A: Main: Sports
        page A 8
        page A 9
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 13
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 14
    Section A: Main: Obituaries
        page A 15
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 16
    Section B: Our Town
        page B 1
    Section B: Coffee Break
        page B 2
    Section B: Venice Venue
        page B 3
    Section B: Well-Being
        page B 4
    Section B: Fresh Air
        page B 5
    Section B: Senior Scene
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
    Section B: Travel
        page B 8
    Section B: Green Sheet
        page B 9
    Section B continued
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
        page B 13
    Section B: Photo Album
        page B 14
    Sun Coast Homes
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
Full Text



NOW ON WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY



SVENICE S


O000002752? 122805 02
u n r .- y i r
205II OPRI to


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U?11'


LOCAL NEWS COVER

,0(iS .,':- ,-NUMBER 46 AN EDITION OF THE SUN


""ILLE FL 32611
TO COVER 'LOrL 2b-1w1nr.WSPAPER


SUNDAY-TUESDAY EDITION, JUNE 19-21, 2005' -*


Banned



from the



island?


(Council directs staff to draft a new
law outlawing skattcbhnards from
being uscd in downtown Vcnice.


Resident


input put


to work


this week


I. to '.I:. land-use


BS J


BY JJ. ANDREWS

Ati, r one' :11. h
S'.'.: in member thinks
S,, .;., .' i should be
i,).- ~.: F 0m.ost
.. ., ,....1 .. 1
.' ; .. on a new
[.i," i .j .'.,. ,' .. r
S,, .member Rick
; th e ,
downwontnwn



S. 1 1 .
I h I I ', Il

--.c0 j ;u ',, l


io.Ir. ........





.v.
iOt .UU, ,'
,-e olun c i1 '
', i f ,, -,
1' ,, ..1 l ,' 7 ,,



S- da id,,h a "

'I ,5 ..'k




under







S* .- I 1
*. t-.4 n,, /.' '.








!7 7 b '; 7 "


THIS SECTION
GaMor aider

"-jr.d- w:.

DEATHS TSA


A ,. ,


COUPONS


INSERT
9.: : I ;: -, :


." is, just don't
have an t
T* said i an interview,
* : .... his comments
i .- . m eet=
,.. skaters and bicyq
.- ..... b e tr ;
-. this law, which .
Those .,: fh skate-
b" ","'. by ,',''- would
have ..
1 a
S. ,,' the
A)-f p t o n
d L v. .;'ond
on
and .landw
S third
o ffteie-. Tor-
[ c y
E se
atire

dis-




.e.. along U 41
.a'k alon Business.
a .kt and ,aW
:-'. .. .: t .-

..,'"review an
'" ordinance
being used in
Indiana city and
ed here


A *, *.and a




* and


Pictured in thebac~qrow.9d are Ihc- 1C)w7 and3flJ ros of kakibO,;'ds 1h3fcoyld bri1.' fiiz
to Use on V'eni~i--;. isnd asV Tcjv:miSurfand bAnetE'imrp-loyrE? ic- .e 1 lap a t6r'esrfoicts5a*


iuirf board.
Back to stereotypes
v:- .. -,i, ".!.:. A 11-
.. is an avid skate"
,. was .- -. .to'
dnks : -
that are
S and -.


.- Dawn
Lambert said. a
'han

-the
~. ,. : ,. _ind


:. ,. .h ""' 1" !. :' ,:.,
2" ~- "

Norm ... who ',



.do not
use new skate .
ago,' ,- and
Sarasota County each
picked in '.. toward
. I '.was .the
S: -. asked for a
.. :


"If you or I cannot
down-
town O ', .',




"._X.' _, : ". .,,. t ',_'in his
- h .I- -. ,,







'board banhcame as.,
o ,, 'by




.-* SK.ATE)OA S 7A


-. each

lunch in.

Sday session

identified


'. ,' 2 i ', !
ods

rm mu nI
is

',*

year and de
niles .a fa
of
.. .e
met
needs '
more than
and


ATA GLANCE~










Go-






teQ


SiX


I,, .:


Trestle next to Dona Bay Bridge will be raised


STAFF WRITER

The :. .-. ::, across
': ., Creek r,. raised
to ." '- '.: .. safe
operation, to ..
-,, States Coast .
..tobe:: :high
I** ,.J', .".0' D*':C : .. .:i- .
when -
Chief
L... T said .. are
not going to .:- :..
inches or -,. like -..
be areason-
. .-.. : to use
Te. new i.J.; L-i be
raised to just more -than 12
feet above mean water.
U.S. 41 '...- pro-

said the i: is
I: .-: are over .e
waters.
'.:' issue :- ..,.. ",
D -'. :-: we are the


P OTO COURTESY OF JIM CHRSTMAN
This aged ,al;roa.J t.estre spanning '-akt- Cre 3..Le to be raised when the new Dona
Bay. Bridge is built.,


* ~. e.
not so sure .i.-


Sarasota County Jim :-:r..:- ..;-. "There is
General -:, of :'or the ?,h L- p..: -"


must be held' .. the deci-
sion ... : about .,.,'
the trestle.
The devil is in the detaiik
"7: '. .:.", .,-.. : m ake
alterations to the .'.' it


The .:.: 7 ':. ..;-.:. ,

and formidable ..
the Coast .-.-..i has to
exercise .. Order to : it
could ..- the county to
t '.:. .,: a brand s *;;,'-
nmi : their e# .:. ,"
_: ".' said.
.; translates into -.
and extra costs, i.;..
: -vironmen-
The short answer .piL.:-;
to be :- ...:. every-
Snose.
see BRIDGE,7A


LINDA HICKMAN
-4:~


......... ................ ... _OURTOWN.S..ETION _______. ALSO IN THIS EDmO_ _
"j -, '. ".. .... .:
"= -r; E ': 7 :-- + .: --t;-'::- ; '-.:"".. .. .. = .. "
I ,,.
_. : _.' .. ;a & '.,.a ..,I, -. -


k


%
J
o
4


7A


~t ;







2A .E'ul.- EGONDOLIER SUN. .




Watch out! Alligator season is here again


A close e~(::o ~tt with an 8-foot gator in North
Port provides -tree lessons in how to get along
with Florida's_ most famous reptiles.


BY GEORGE MCGINN
!;'. : I, -I


You wouldn't LIi- the
stupid things people do when
it comes to JIT C.'.' : said
Win Sell, : .: p:. -. animal
control ,:..';, .I
The longtime animal con-
trol officer remembers when
he was driving iL '.... the
.',bL-, pjr' J-- lot and saw a
man f .,1..:' a 2-,y in
front of a drainage '" -
water retention .; ,- Inside
the ,,-~- was a 12 f,.-.
asked what J -'. were

He -- : the man
answered, '. .- my son
the .':-... 7:. that why

The next :: warning
signs went up around that
retention -" r .
., the person didn't
.-.1:'. is he was .T r. .' his
son to r,," -'' as a '-.- -
,. said.
Brazen -or stupid
-,-r .. .- ,May and '' C. ,
alligators will become abun-
dant, .,-;i -,'
'.- I be n, ;- and
soon there -I i thousands
sm all ..,,L r r,,, n
around all over ... .,
he said.
Male .*i,. i,. will be
more brazen,or' :. ;'*j dur-
:- the mating season, and
female gators will become
m ore territorial,.: ,',.. .. ....
their nest and babies, -
said.


S, this ',r:,-. school is
out, the weather is hot and
m ore ,-, -;. ,,i [, i..1 .ij
dren, will be enjoying out-
J -, Cc hi : 1 ,: ';
* -;. i 1 :. an d i.. ', n:._
areas swimming hoil, r I-
J., water, .-, said.
I ,. is the time when a
resident has a greater chance
" -- .. ', rir'- a *"- he
said.
Eating machines
-- who has had many
*.. ... with .,!- :'' : while
.. : p and in his capaci-
ty as an animal control offi-
cer, said residents need to


S~ .. .. .. :.'. ., ,

SUN MIPHOO BY GEORGE
North Port Animal Control Officer .'- ti the no on his. *' so
did, this 8-foot gator opened his n oi') spun around, bit down on the ,*.. ,-. .
drag Sell along the side rf th. road, using its "'death r,-.il .iri. i other I.... '
in controlling the atllMg,t or


exercise basic common sense
when they encounter an alli-
"I nthem
said. .' in their envi-
ronment. You have to remem-
ber, these creatures are
dinosaurs, i. but an
eating machine. Even the
cute little ones can do serious
harm .,f n 1: :.- "
Sell said .-"., r-. can be
.dT-.... b


GATOR SAFETY



"Leave a. e

tors -


the 'ii.


between a handi


quickly .. to
humans, when
:.. ; involved.
"' you feed an it
wilt lose its .
he .: .. -that .
an .: aw,
.. :. try
S. -. .. with a
.b.'. ... '2 n .:.bject.
,,,. ,.,r, o m < ,


and a hand out.


wl
water


areas, '
hours.
.* L and
from water known to hav



brain is no .
a, it only le
know you .:
' .... said

A gator's bite'
Sell said an i. ,:,
chew or .i '.
S:when a .'.
T .


You have to
remember, these


creatures
dinosaurs
but an eat
machine."



animal co


The ,
the
a
before it can .


are
nothing
ting


- Win Sell,
North Port's,
ntrol officer


must
!wmu


them
h .,


S. the gator twists
What it has t h .. the
S istehle a
sod has to, -,
said. the gator
its in
like .
it. -. a lot bacteria in
the mouth that can cause a
S' serious .
said when a i
S-. .., I it its > and
will bite down when some.
MCNN 1 its mouth.
nashe .. .. I !' see a
S.ito in the water with ..
aided .. .- Gators are
i feeders.
-.-- i its mouth
until '.. touched
es its ... *:i,, As soon as
hen .! ',i 1. touches it,
.r. n ..: '.. said,
i Sell l those '
.. on bank carry a ... !. 4
tennis i .them .
S .., ,- ; ,; ,, .,,' A

.i. 'i ..... the ten-
nis bal into their T '. I1 i
that -! some tune
tr .., to -out .there i, 11 thC
tsbi gator iesto i, i
hurt ha"


t bites
it
a hold
-


S. said second
- . I .
out H ; .. ... .1
son who ..,


7ier~aid om.


North Port police i.ic.' Fr.! .L, >and Chris Morales keep the injured 8-foot, 4-inch ,h3y.i
tor's mouth shut as North Port Animal Control Officer Win Sell prepares to tape it closed.




S ., M1Q tAEL, J, WOLPMANN, MD, FACOG, FA.S
-:CERTIFIED ~ 1:....- ..W, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS

; i. AL EXAMS ~ BLADDER CONTROL PROBLEMS ~ MENOPAUSE
AbVANCED LAPAROSCOPY ~ LASER SURGERY ~ PELVIC PAIN
Pri .:.: PROLAPSE ~ MENSTRUAL DISORDERS ~ SECOND O'-i. 3NS.

SNEW PATIENTS WELCOME 48 -5700 VENICE & ENGLEWOOD
:,m4.s-.t- WWW.BAYSIDEGYN.COM OFFICES
------ ----


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$300,000

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United Way of South County
Serving the People of Venice,
Englewood, North Port, Nokomis,
Osprey and Laurel


Cam


AG Edwards Smith
Bank One South
Bank of Venice Sun Ti
Boone, Boone, Boone Target
Koda & Frook TJX C
Bradway and Assoc. Venice
Caldwell Trust Wach(
Colonial Bank Wal-Mv
Crane Environmental .Water
Crow's Nest / Bogey's SRQ C
.First National Bank SRQ C
FPL SRQ S
Harbor Chase SRQ S
Jacaranda Trace SRQ T
MCC SRQO
Merrill Lynch City o
Northern Trust City o
Publix
Raymond James
Robert's Nationwide Insurance
Sarasota Herald Tribune


paigns
Barney
Trust
rust

companies
e Gondolier Sun
ovia Bank
lart
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Comm.
schools
heriff
Tax Asr.
Tax Coll.
f Venice
f N. Port


CONTACT
United Way of South Sarasota County, Inc.
7810 S. Tamiami Trail, #A4, Venice, FL 34293
Ph: (941) 408-0595 Fax: (941) 408-8795
Email: uw.ssc@verizon.net


-. ,. ;' -', ;
-. t C .. .1_4 -,I'th.ixu. i n lbctvVcu, qu, 311ft r iii f: Rf f_
". X hi- a r ,,, ri U,. ~e e!' .'it~r-.Oi d ".p 'a1s '
a ,-'I r ,t rL V 0 f.)p a a i + ,,

i i't .- --'.',ai.h af r.'. I')L u .iLid tAh ajei C .a i';. y'aL. .- '.' a'.' ..I rt'-

(..Jl ont ,0 it ,in. fJ uur j.tJ rn-, ti 'atc d. .. .

SAWGRASS
._ ',' 4.A. .. ;':," ; r.t-' .: .'.,I A ht ... .. ,,., r:.-" pr' .,, t .' 90 ',i t;.


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THE LAKES OF JACARANDA
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r... & sitespriced from the mid $300's.
Hurry, this community is close to everything Venice has to offers
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CEDAR RIDGE
Only 6 lots remain in this secluded enclave of homes developed to preserve the beauty of nature.
Design .:.. own estate on .. ..- multi-acre home sites ;,:.f: :.';. the ,' s.
River Road 1,r ...3.iL ,..fCenter Rd. West of 1-75. Venice FL '941. 493-5956


E Better Business Bureau of West Florida
- ..- = Venice f. : : : : Chamber of Commerce
S m "Best of Venice 2004" Readers' Choice Award

!, 1 '"-- Decorated Models available.
_ _, __: _^_ Call (941) 493-2600 for a model nearest you,


VENICE 1 r~rA ix



SOUTH~






...... ... : ..........






SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005



Surrender letter



sent to Casey Key



Assodation board

The county drops any consideration of an
amendment to a conservation district necessary
to save the tiki bar at the Casey Key Fish House.


- It wasn't a matt
whether Sarasota C
would back off a propo
tinker with the North
Key Conservation Dis
but when and the a
face was smartly exe
just eight days after b
island residents gavw
command .
- On May 24, the c(
commission unanim
agreed it wouldn't touc
35-year-old regulation:
have a popular Blaci
Point Road tiki bar, 1
purposely omitted
never" in a car
'couched letter of retrea
, "My feeling is we s
send a letter to the Case
Association that state
will not dissolve the d
(s a matter of policy,"
missioner Shannon
said. "I think it has w
;for a long time, and this
has brought out new
who are looking afte
key."
Commissioner


er of
county
>sal to
Casey
strict,
ibout-
cuted
carrier


Patterson, who asked the
county attorney's office to
research the old district doc-
ument and see if it could be
amended, agreed with Staub.
"\Vell, I'm sorry I ever
brought this up in the first
place," she said. '"All we did
was vote to get some infor-
mation."


e the Hands off
On Feb. 15, the commis-
ounty sion sought to head off a
ously court fight with Casey Key
ch the Fish House owner Jim Von
ns to Hubertz over his closed tiki
kburn bar when it voted 4-1 to have
but it attorneys examine the
the Florida Legislature's enabling
efully legislation and determine
it. whether it could be locally
should amended.
eyKey Armed with legal advice
es we that said they could, what the
district commission asked for was a
com- "general agreement" with
Staub Casey Key residents before
worked changing the unique set of
issue regulations that prohibit any
faces more multi-family and com-
;r the mercial development on the
island.
Nora They didn't get it.


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


Reflecting


On May 16, the Casey Key
Association circulated a let-
ter to the commissioners
that promised "petition dri-
ves," an ."advertising cam-
paign" and "proactive legal
steps" if they attempted to
either dissolve or amend any
portion of the district regula-
tions.
While state lawmakers
gave Sarasota County the
authority to abolish the dis-
trict and adopt an ordinance
assuming its obligations and
liabilities, there is clearly no


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941-749-1593


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247 S. Tanmiami Tr.
Venice, FL 34285
941-486-4.500


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160 Pointe Loop Dr
Venice, FL 34293
". 941-492-2701


FINANCIAL STRENGTH IN LOCAL HANDS
/


political will among the com-
missioners to further stir up
affluent Casey Key residents.
On April 26, the commis-
sioners initially waved a white
flag of truce and signaled no
efforts would be made to
amend the district with an









ll l Mo
Dr.l Mascola,DO United l



PF







i 1211 Jaca


overlay zone that would allow
county zoning officials to
bless the outdoor bar previ-
ously operated by Von
Hubertz next to his restau-
rant.
County building officials
have no problem with the









st Insurance Accepted. Includi
Health Care. BC/BS. Cigna & .



IIMARY CAI

OF VENICE

492-2212



randa Blvd., Venice H


restaurant at 801 Blackburn
Point Road, which is back in
full operation after a fire dam-
aged it last spring, but the tiki
bar opened long after the spe-
cial district was adopted and
violates its prohibition on
new businesses.










medicare Dr.Holguin,IMD



RE







[ealthPark


Does your dad forget
to take his
medications?

Does he skip meals?

If his condition interferes
with his ability
to perform daily tasks,
he needs care.

Park Place programs
range from our
Senior Day Program,
to Assisted Living.

Call today
for a tour
i and information.


Assisted Living Senior Day Program Short-Term Stays


I I, lV


PARK PLACE OF VENICE
200 Nassau Street North, Venice
(941) 485-2404
I sit us online: iviu,.,lssistedtenioI.coin


Direct Phone Numbers:
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000
Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220 Classified 207-1200
Editorial/(Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified/Advertising Fax 485-3036
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100
Community Web Site http://www.venicegondolier.com
DayStar Communications 207-7800
S Publisher: Robert A. Vedder Editor: Bob Mudge
President: Derek Dunn-Rankin


Gondolier Sun
LOCALMWWSCOvERTOCOV RA xwsiNWo.IWE VYMWsWAPEX

USPS (221-700) ISSN (1536-1063)
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every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday by The Sun.
200 East Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285.
Periodicals Postage paid at Venice, Florida and additional mailing centers.


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BYJACKGURNEY
PELICAN PRESS


SUN PHOTO BY JEFF TAVARES, jtavares@venicegondolier.com
A nearby window provides a distorted view of one of the construction trailers for the Waterfront condominium project on
East Tampa Avenue.


46
YEARS
Compass;onat
Senior Care


."This is the man who taught me to ride *a bike,

walked me down the aisle and helped plan my future."

How do I te.11 him he can't live safely in his own home?


I ,






SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


4A VENICE GONDOLA N


County encouraged to join expressway authority


Collier and Lee counties already have been given
green light to build toll lanes in the 1-75 corridor.


BYJACK GURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

Public works officials
believe Sarasota County
should carefully weigh the
benefits of membership in a
new Southwest Florida
Expressway Authority, even
though the prospect of con-
structing high-speed
Interstate-75 toll lanes through
the community is remote.
On May 23, a report that
recommends more research
was circulated to commission-
ers, who must now determine


whether they want to hook up
with the two counties -
Collier and Lee that lobbied
for the Authority.
'An outcome may be that
involvement is desirable
because it is better to be inside.
than outside when discussions
with regional implications are
occurring," suggested Alan
Wheeler, the county's public
works executive director.
A three-year effort by State
Rep. Mike Davis, R.-Naples,
and State Sen. Burt Saunders,
R.-Naples, finally persuaded
Florida lawmakers to autho-


rize the state's ninth express-
way authority for the limited
purpose of creating four toll
lanes in the middle of 1-75.
The two Southwest Florida
counties have been given 12
years to hire staff, enter into
contracts, set tolls and clear
their project with federal and
state highway officials, who at
some point would assume
responsibility for the express-
way within the state's road sys-
tem.
Gaining lanes
Charlotte County has indi-
cated it may pursue a seat on
the Authority, while Sarasota
County has shown little or no
interest while the measure


worked its way through the
legislative process. But now
that it has passed, local offi-
cials have taken notice.
"The first steps would
include discussions with Lee,
Collier and Charlotte repre-
sentatives about modifying
the new law to definitively
include Charlotte and
Sarasota counties," Wheeler
stated in his May 23 report to
the commissioners.
As described in the legisla-
tion, the four-lane project
would extend north from
Naples to the Southwest
Florida International Airport
in Fort Myers, and give
motorists the option of either
driving for free on existing


lanes or paying to drive on
limited-access express lanes.
An eight-member board
will govern the Authority's
decisions. Gov. Jeb Bush will
appoint one permanent resi-
dent from Collier and Lee
counties, and the commis-
sions in each county will
appoint one permanent resi-
dent and one commissioner.
They will be joined by the
Southwest Florida Regional
Planning Council executive
director and the Florida
Department of.
Transportation District 1 sec-
retary. The Authority's gov-
erning board would expand if
Charlotte and Sarasota coun-;
ties participate.


The federal government
has provided 1-75 with si:6
lanes through Manatee-
County and portions of
Sarasota County, but the
highway tapers down to four
lanes in southern Sarasotas
and most of Charlotte, Leer
and Collier counties. A plan tol,
add fifth and sixth lanes is inm
the works. '
Sarasota County is there
northernmost member of the
Southwest Florida Regional
Planning Council, which will
play a key role in the
Authority. But the Sarasota(
County Commission has dis- i
cussed pulling out of the)
agency. Joining the Authorityl
could influence that decision


Commissioners opt for mangrove


education rather than local enforcement


BYJACKGURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

Mangrove protection along
local shorelines has slipped
down the list of Sarasota
County environmental priori-
ties because it would reported-
ly take additional expense and
staff time to enforce a weak set
of regulations adopted by state
lawmakers.
On June 8 the county com-
mission-wrapped up an inter-
mittent three-year debate
about whether to assume
responsibility for enforcing the
state's 1996 Mangrove
Trimming and PreservationAct
and chose, instead, to pursue a
local education program.
Commissioners Nora
Patterson and Jon -Thaxton
voiced some objections to the
decision, but voted with the
majority in support of natural,


resources staff officials who
also recommended a further
exploration of enforcement
options with state authorities.
"I will be eager to see if the
state responds to us," Natural
Resources General Manager
Eric Sutton told the commis-
sioners. "We have been their
eyes, ears and first responders
on mangrove incidents.."
Thaxton didn't hold out
much hope.
"This is a good first step,
but frankly, I don't think it gets
us much," Thaxton said.
"People pay millions for
water views. ... They prefer
views more than preserving
the environment."
Patterson appeared to agree.
"I'll support this because I
don't have a lot of choice," she
said. "But I don't feel encour-
aged we'll make a lot of
progress."


Rampant compliance
Sutton bolstered his case for
public education with results
from two staff studies that indi-
cate most mangrove trimming
in Sarasota County conforms
to state regulations, and it
would require an additional
employee to police the random
violations.
A staff report estimated
there are annually about 1,000
"mangrove trimming events"
in the county, and more than
90 percent of them conform
with state regulations.
Commissioner Shannon
Staub said the statistics do not
support additional staff time
and money.
"I'm optimistic education
through homeowners' organi-
zations will work," she said. "It
worked to reduce lighting and
protect sea turtles. 1 think there
will always be violators."'


Down 86 percent
Four types of mangroves -
black, red, white and green
buttonwoods grow along
the edges of bays, streams and
canals. They filter nutrients
from upland runoff, produce
leaf litter that feeds fish and
provide habitat for birds and
marine life.
Experts have determined
that seawalls, dredging pro-
jects, invasive plants and inap-
propriate cutting have reduced
Florida's natural mangrove
habitat by about 86 percent
since the 1940s.
The state currently collects
about $38,000 a year in permit
fees and fines from Sarasota
County landowners. When
county officials proposed to
take over the state's duties in
2002, they suggested doubling
that figure to pay for a new
enforcement officer.


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


Senior crusades against viatical sales


BY GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER

When Gov. Jeb Bush signed
a bill Thursday to stiffen
penalties for con artists who
sell fraudulent "viatical"
investments, 68-year-old Port
Charlotte retiree John
Romanus and his wife, Alice,
were among the VIPs stand-
ing by his side.
-For Romanus, the bill rep-
resents a major breakthrough
in a seven-year crusade.
A viatical is an instrument
that allows investors to buy
interests in the life insurance
policies of terminally ill peo-
ple. The term comes from a
Latin word for giving travelers
or soldiers money before they
set out on a long journey.
.The people who sell their
policies are known as "via-
t6rs." They receive a payment
that represents a discount off
the full amount of their policy
based on their life expectan-
cy
,The viatical services
provider becomes responsi-
ble for paying the premiums
of the policy. The provider
then sells interests in the pol-
icy to investors.
The investors get a return
that pays off after the person
dies.
Swindled
The crusade started the
day Romanus realized he had
been swindled out of $25,000
on what was supposed to be a
risk-free investment.
The couple later found out
the company that sold them
the interest in the life insur-
afice policy had hired a doc-
t6r who falsified reports, for
people who weren't actually
close to death. So, the
Ramanuses never got their
money.


The rip-off was particular-
ly painful because Romanus
and his wife ran an income
tax accounting firm. Alice
Romanus, as a federal
enrolled agent, had the cre-
dentials "to teach IRS agents
the law," her husband said.
But, he said he and his wife
were thrilled to be invited to
the bill-signing ceremony,
which was held at the
Harborside Event Center just
prior to the governor's
monthly cabinet meeting.
Half done
The bill, HB 1437 spon-
sored by state Rep. Dudley
Goodlette, R.-Naples, and
Sen. Rudy Garcia, R.-Hialeah,
defines viatical investments
as "securities" and places reg-
ulatory authority over the
viatical industry with the
Office of Financial Regulation
instead of the Office of
Insurance Regulation.
The move beefs up state
requirements, rules of con-
duct and prohibited prac-
tices.
The governor's meeting
was held in Fort Myers as part
of Bush's program to bring
state government to the peo-
ple.
"Oh, I loved it," Romanus
said. "My job's half done, so
most of the public will be pro-
tected now."
"Now all I have to do is get
my case into court and get
criminal charges filed," he
added.
Seized
Romanus, a disabled U.S.
Army veteran, has worked
since 1998 to get civil dam-
ages and criminal prosecu-
tion ofhis financial planher,
Herman E. "Skip" Jaehne of
Venice, and the viatical ser-
vices provider Mutual


Benefits Corp., which had
offices throughout South
Florida.
On May 4, the federal
Securities and Exchange
Commission seized MBC
pending a securities fraud
investigation.
Jaehne, who connected
Romanus with MBC, could
not be reached at his Venice
residence for comment.
The Florida Department of
Insurance fined Jaehne
$1,000 and placed him on
probation for six months in
2001 for improper advertising
of viatical investments.
However, Jaehne is currently
licensed in the state to sell
variable annuities, according
to Bob Lotane, spokesman for


the Department of Financial
Services.
Put off
Romanus invested $25,000
in 1997 and was supposed to
receive a 12-percent profit
after 18 months. He said he
realized he'd been had after
the 18-month period came
and went.
"I was put off and put off
and put off," he said.
Romanus said he filed the
first complaint against Jaehne
and MBC. The complaint
sparked a state investigation.
He also provided information
on Jaehne's history of com-
plaints to the Florida
Department of Insurance.
"I brought him down,"


Romanus said. "I've been
stopping him from doing
everything he was doing."
Romanus is also one of 140
people who sued MBC. He
said he was negotiating a set-
tlement when the SEC seized
the company's assets.
Now, he expects to collect
"10 cents on the dollar," he
said.
.Stonewalled
Meanwhile, State Treasurer
Tom Gallagher was waging
his own battle against MBC
and other alleged unscrupu-
lous viatical providers. He
tried to get the Legislature to
shift the oversight of the
industry to the state's securi-
ties regulation office.


ATA GLANCE
Port Charlotte retiree John
Romanus has worked since
1998 to get civil damages and
criminal prosecution of his
financial planner, Herman E.
"Skip" Jaehne of Venice, and
the viatical services provider
Mutual Benefits Corp.
Romanus lost $25,000 on
what was supposed to be a
risk-free investment.


"We got stonewalled after
MBC hired some high-priced
legal talent" to lobby against
that measure; Lotane said.
In fact, in 2004, MBC's lob-
byists succeeded in getting
legislators to pass a law
specifically calling for over-
sight to be provided solely by
the office of insurance,
Lotane said.
The bill signed Thursday
reversed that legislation.


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6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


G VENICE

I "-- ..... )N th

Recognized as. Florida s

#1 WEEKLY

NEWSPAPER





1st Place Environmental Writing
1st Place Editorial, Page
1st Place~ Sports Stoey
1st Place- Spiorts Photo
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Call 207-1300 tody atsus "+e


SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


Florida's #1 WeeX, '4pspe
VENICE

on/olier tin






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


*SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


SKATEBOARDS from page 1A


the intersection of Miami
Avenue and U.S. 41
Business.
Like many downtown
businesses, V-Town gets
plenty of walk-up or more
appropriately, skate-up cus-
tomers. Area riders know if
they blow out their board, V-
Town is the place to go and
get it fixed.
"Oh yeah, it'd hurt busi-
ness for sure," V-Town
employee Mike Klapatch
said.
Both employees and
skaters at the shop said most
respect pedestrians, public
property and watch out for
cars.
So often, people just
assume the worst.
V-Town employee Alex
Magliacane said the Venice
YMCA skate park is nice, but
it lacks character and many
of the structures to recreate
the challenges of "street"
skateboarding.
Magliacane also finds it
hard to believe the basic
equipment selected cost
$200,000, which leads to
many skaters preferring
downtown or some other city
area.
"It's like someone who
fishes at the beach every
day," Magliacane said. "And
then all of a sudden, they say,
'Hey, we're going to build you
a freshwater pond to fish out
of.'
"It's not the same. You
want some bass or a big salt-
water fish?"


"I've personally seen kids shoot
their skateboards out from under


them and hit cars, shoo
Miami street and almost
-Cot



One downtown supporter
According to Tacy, many
of the complaints are from
downtown shop owners and
customers. One of the major
complaint areas is the park-
ing lot next to the post office,
where Tacy who uses a
wheelchair said he's expe-
rienced problems.
Tacy also is concerned
about what will happen once
one of Venice's senior citi-
zens, who cannot dodge
some out-of-control skate-
boarder, is struck.
"Skateboarders and senior
citizens are really not that
compatible," Tacy said.
There is at least one
downtown business that
would hate to see the skate-
boarder ban Geraldi's
Pizza on Tampa Avenue.
Owner Dennis Sullivan,
who has a pair of teenage
children and teen workers,
said ideas like anti-skate-
boarding laws are what give
the city its reputation as
being anti-youth.
Instead of being afraid of
skaters, talk to them and
you'll find out they're actual-


t across
st hit people."
uncil member
Rick Tacy


4,,


ly good company and fun to
watch.
Sullivan learned that after
he hired a worker who's a
skateboarder.
And almost every time,
Sullivan remembers what it
was like to be that age when
he sees them doing some
crazy trick.
"Where is the crime?"
Sullivan said. "So what, now
you have to make it a crime?
Skateboarders are fine. They
come in here, eat our pizza.
It's not a problem."

You can e-mail].].
Andrews at: jandrews@
venicegondolier.com.


WORKSHOP from page lA


document that's a listing of
rules and minimal expecta-
tions instead of how to beau-
tify and improve the city.
"It's not only not a user-
friendly guide, it's not a policy
or guide that's easily under-
stood," Slaughter said. "It's
exhausting just to read. It's
turned into a big, old docu-
ment."
City staff launched the
Envision Venice )process to
not only gather public input,
but to also show residents
how their opinions can be
applied to crafting land-use
and community policies.
In order to accomplish
this, Slaughter and compre-
hensive planner Kathie
Ebaugh need at least eight
hours.
They decided on the
extended lunch-time slot
hoping it would work best
into people's schedules, spec-
ulating that an entire day or
two night workshops going
until 10 p.m. would be more
difficult for people to attend.
"What we're evaluating


here are the tools that we
have and whether or not
they're affective," Ebaugh
said.
Quality, not quantity
A person can attend either
day. However,
to gain the full
impact,
Slaughter
believes resi-
dents need to
attend the
Monday ses-
sionr to under-
stand how
existing rules Slaughter
apply to the
eight critical needs and dis-
cuss new philosophies in
shaping comprehensive
plans.
With all of that knowledge
in place, residents and city
staff can spend Tuesday
focusing on how to apply that
to Venice's needs.
"I'm a visual person, a
planner," Slaughter said.
"When I explain things, I
immediately reach for my


board and a pen. ... (The
design workshop) is to take
those ideas and to draw them,
map them, create them."
Both Slaughter and
Ebaugh want to build Venice's
comprehensive plan around
qualitative policies appear-
ance, walkabililty, livability -
rather than current quantita-
tive polices that only have
numbers like minimum set-
backs, specific tree planting
requirements and parking
space widths.
Slaughter thinks this is
what the public wants also.
Next week starts setting the
wheels in motion to turn
community desires into pub-
lic policies.
'A lot of times, I don't think
people are against growth,"
Slaughter said. "They're really
against bad designs, ugly
buildings. ... The public
wants to know what you're
going to do."

You can e-mail lJ.
Andrews at: jandrews@
venicegondolier.com.


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BRIDGE from page A
"If they were to alter the
trestle to provide horizontal
and vertical clearance that
corresponds to the new 41
bridge, it will satisfy the Coast
Guard and the boating com-
munity," Christman said.
RTB is a grass-roots organi-
zation representing water-
front residents in Nokomis.
Oh, no we don't!
Sarasota County officials
don't believe they have to do
what the USCG says, that is,
make the trestle height con-
form to the new Dona Bay
Bridge height, according to
one correspondence from
David Salentine, a spokesman
for the Venice Nokomis
Waterways Improvements
Association, a waterfront and
homeowners group.
Six months ago, the county
purchased the roughly 12
miles of proposed Rails-To-
Trails corridor that stretches
from the Venice Train Depot
to Clark Road.
Salentine said the county
was given up to a $150,000
discount off the purchase of
the rail corridor to raise the
trestle as stated in the closing
statement.
"And, they were told prior
to the purchase that raising
the trestle on Shakett Creek
had to be done," Salentine
said. "Staff now feels they
don't have to raise the trestle
and can keep the money (dis-
count) and do with it as they
please."
However, the county's
Harriott debunks that state-
ment.
"Staff is right now working
on a study to determine the
costs, options and environ-
mental impact (of raising the
trestle)," he said.
Salentine also said the
county claimed to have an
unnamed mystery source in
Washington that supposedly
told them they don't have to
listen to the USCG lower ech-
elon.
Salentine said his group
did some investigating.
"That is just not true, there
is no one in Washington who
told them that," Salentine
said. "No one."

You can e-mail Tommy
McIntyre at: tmcintyre@
venicegondolier.com.



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8A
SUNDAY
JUNE 19, 2005


CONTACT US
CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
lewis@venicegondolier.com


SPORTS BRIEFS
Crew rowing camp
Learn to row with Sarasota
Crew at Historic Spanish
Point in Osprey. An introduc-
tion to rowing camp will be
held for rising seventh
through 10th graders. There
will be two sessions June
20-July 1 and July 11-22. Each
will run 8:30 a.m.-noon. The
cost per session is $200 (plus
$50 Historic Spanish Point
membership). Call Jill at 966-
5214, Ext. 260.
Faulkner Catching Camp
The inaugural Craig
Faulkner Catching Camp will
take place July 25-28 at the
Venice High Complex. This
camp will teach the finer
points of the art of catching.
Faulkner is a former VHS
catcher who went on to excel
at LSU and in the Baltimore
Orioles chain. He is currently
head baseball coach at VHS.
There will be two sessions
- one for ages 7-11 and
another for ages 12-18. The 7-
11 year olds will report from 9
a.m. to 11 a.m. each day. The
12-18 year olds will report
from 12:30-2:30 p.m. The cost
is $90.
Any catchers who want to
improve their game should
call Faulkner at 412-3611.
Free fishing seminars
Boater's World Marine
Center located in Bird Bay
Plaza on the Bypass is pre-
senting free fishing seminars
June 23 and 30.
The June 23 seminar fea-
tures Jesse Beye of the Mud
Slinger. He will talk about
back country fishing. The
June 30 seminar will have Jack
Hartman of Luckey Dawg
Charters discussing summer
fishing.
Each will start at 7 p.m.
For more information, call
412-0310.
Tsunami
scramble
The Marine Corps
Reserves and Toys for Tots will
hold its third annual golf ben-
efit July 9 at BentTree Country
Club in Sarasota.
The cost per person for the
scramble is $75. It includes
lunch, beverages and a cart.
There will be prizes for hole in
one, closest to the pin, putting
and longest drive.
The shotgun start will be at
8:30 a.m. Registration will be
at 7:30 a.m.
Proceeds will benefit
tsunami victims in Thailand
and India.
To enter, call Ray McGuire
(485-6005) or Top Harrison
(485-9045).
Jerla, Lightner
are all stars
Two names were mistak-
enly left off the Venice Little
League All-Star list published
in Friday's Gondolier Sun.
Charlie Jerla and Colton
Lightner also are on the
American 9-10 year old roster.
SENIOR SOFTBALL
STANDINGS
WEDNESDAY SILVER
SPRING SEASON
W L GB
Builders Specialties........5 1 -
Rugs As Art........................4 2 1
Tu Be Computers............4 3 1.5
Palmer Ranch Travel......3 3 2
Peluso Air................. ......3 4 2.5
Critter Landscaping........2 5 3.5
WCAGA Trainers..............2 5 3.5

RESULTS, JUNE15
Palmer Ranch Travel 11, Critter
Landscape 4
Rugs as Art 17, Peluso Air 7
Palmer Ranch Travel 6, Builders
Specialties 2
WCAGA Trainers 10, Tu Be
Computers 8

WEDNESDAY GOLD
W LGB
Torch Tip ............................4 1 -
Hap's Honda......................3 2 1


Total Athlete ................. 2 3 2
Custom Homes................ 1 4 3

RESULTS, JUNE 8
Custom Homes 17, Hap's Honda
16
American Torch Tip 22, Total
Athlete 12


Babe's Hardware king of the county


Venice Little League team goes 6-0 to capture
prestigious Sarasota County Cup.


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


The first three innings,
Josh McNatt didn't allow a hit.
Although Derek Frye got to
the big right-hander for a solo
home in the bottom of the
fourth, things were still look-
ing up for the Sarasota
Pirates.
But holding down Babe's
Hardware for an entire game
is another story. Like that old
cigar commercial, sooner or
later, the Bambinos are gonna
getcha.
Babe's rode a seven-run
fifth inning rally and the
strong pitching of seldom
used Michael Iorio to an 8-3
victory over the Pirates in
Saturday's County Cup final
at Twin Lakes Park.
It is the second straight
year a Venice Little League
team has won County Cup.
Last year, .Kiwanis took the
title.
Babe's finished the 30-
team tournament with a per-
fect record of 6-0. The Pirates
lost their opener and then
won eight straight in the


SUN PHOTO BY JEREMY ROTTGEN
Babe's Hardware pitcher
Derek Frye fires a ball to a
Sarasota Mariner batter dur-
ing Thursday's County Cup
game at Twin Lakes Park.
losers' bracket before falling
Saturday.
Babe's was in a bit of a
pickle coming into the show-
down against the Pirates. The
Bambinos had pitched aces
Frye and Clay Burton in every
game leading up to the cham-
pionship. Neither was eligible


Babe's Hardware pitcher Michael lorio, left, runs to greet first
baseman Matt Strickland after the final out was recorded in
Saturday's County Cup championship game.


Players Clay Burton, left, and Derek Frye, right, give Babe's Hardware coach Frank lorio a bath
after clinching the County Cup championship Saturday at Twin Lakes Park in Sarasota.


to throw Saturday. Manager
Jeff Lightner went to short-
stop lorio, a tough cookie as
leadoff batter and at short-
stop.
lorio responded with a
gutsy effort against a hot-hit-
ting Pirates team, scattering
seven hits and striking out
three,
The Venice bats could
muster nothing against
McNatt until the fourth
inning. Frye socked a two-out
solo home run to right field to
cut the Pirates lead to 2-1.
Babe's wanted more right
then. Burton was hit by a
pitch and Matt Strickland sin-
gled. But McNatt was able to
get the final out to keep his
team up by a run.
The Bambinos worked
their magic big time in the
fifth. All seven runs were
scored with two outs.
Jeff Blackburn started it off
with a ground rule,double to
left. Iorio singled to put run-
ners on first and third. Colton
Lightner followed with a
sharp hit off the shortstop's
glove allowing Blackburn to
come across with the tying
run.


McNatt intentionally
walked Frye to load the bases.
Then came a key at bat by
Burton. The count was full
when Burton checked his
swing on a low pitch. It was
ruled ball four, forcing lorio
home with the go-ahead runi
The Pirates sent McNatt to
third and brought in Nolan
Smolarz. The result was the
same. Strickland drew anoth-
er bases-loaded walk to make
it 4-2. Mason Bo followed
with a soft grounder to third.
McNatt didn't throw the ball
anywhere. Frye came home,
and it was 5-2. Then there was
a wild pitch allowing Burton
to score the sixth run. Joey
Cavallaro followed with a big
two-run single to make it 8-2.
And the Babe's fans were
dancing at Twin Lakes.
The County Cup victory
recaptured Babe's regular sea-
son form. The Bambinos
were 17-1 during the regular
season but had a disappoint-
ing City Cup Tournament.
Babe's had another big
game Friday night in the win-
ners' bracket final against the
Sarasota Devil Rays.
Like in Saturday's game,


Babe's fellbehind early by a 2-
0 count. The Bambinos bat-
tled back with rallies in the
third and fourth frames.
Babe's scored three time in
the third to take a 3-2 lead.
Iorio led off with a double to
left-center. He scored when
Frye's grounder to short was
thrown away. Burton singled
up the middle to plate Frye
with the tying run. Mason Bo
had an infield single in the
hole between short and third.
The throw to first was wild,
allowing Burton to score the
go-aheadrun.
A four-run fourth inning
put the Bambinos in charge
at 7-2.
Jared Zech singled and
Iorio' reached on an error.
"Biggie" Frye then unloaded a
three-run home run onto the
batting cage screen in left.
Burton followed with a
triple. He scored on a single
by Strickland.
Burton pitched a whale of
a game. He struck out the side
in the fourth. The Devil Rays
threatened in the bottom of
the sixth, but Burton fanned
the final two batters with run-
ners in scoring position.


Three to join VHS Hall of Fame Thursday


Maize, Adrian and
Maas left mark on
Venice sports scene.
BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR

The Venice Sports Hall of
Fame will induct three new
members into its select group
this coming Thursday night at
Bogey's Restaurant and
Sports Pub.
This will be the third
induction ceremony for the
Hall, which had its inaugural
banquet in June of 2003.
This is also the smallest
group going into the Hall.
There were five inductees the
first year and seven last year.
This year, there are three -


Sheryl Maize, RalphAdrian Sr.
and the late Milt Maas. '
The new group brings the
total number of Hall
inductees to 15. Plaques of
each member are mounted
on a "Wall of Fame" at
Bogey's, which is located on
East Venice Avenue.
Tickets are still available
for Thursday's ceremony and
banquet. The cost is $60 per
person. The proceedings will
begin at 6:30 p.m.
Maize will become just the
second female inducted into
the Venice Sports Hall of
Fame. The 37-year-old had an
outstanding golf career, at
Venice High, winning the
individual state champi-
onship in her senior year in
'1986. She accepted a full


scholarship at the University
of Miami, where she starred
for one of the
top women's
golf programs
in the nation.
After grad-
uating from
Miami, Maize
played pro-
fessional golf
until a shoul-
der injury in Adrian
1994 forced
her to retire from full-time
competition.,
Maize became a LPGA
teaching pro and coached at
the college level at Augsburg
College in Minnesota and
Memphis University.
Adrian has been involved
with the Venice sports scene


for decades. He attended
Venice-Nokomis High, play-
ing baseball'
and basket-
ball. Adrian is
credited with
helping start-
ing up youth '
football in the
area and was
president
when the
V i k ibngs Maas
became affili-
ated with Pop Warner. He
announced Pop Warner and
Venice High, football for a
number of years. Adrian was
also a Little League coach in
Venice.
Maas becomes the third
Hall of Famer to be selected
posthumously he passed


away in 2002. He was instru-
mental in starting up youth
girls fastpitch softball in
Venice. Maas was active as
coach, umpire at board mem-
ber of Miss Venice Fastpitch.
Later, Maas became involved
With the Venice High girls vol-
leyball program. He had
daughters play for the Lady
Indians. He acted an an assis-
tant coach up to when he
passed away.
Folks interested in wit-
nessing the latest induction
ceremony and having dinner
at Bogey's Thursday evening
should call Mark Costanzo at
488-9156.
All money raised at the
banquet goes towards the
Rotary Futures Program at
Venice High.


I SUMMER SPORTS

SPOTLIGHT lam


Frank Iorio guided Babe's Hardware to a first place finish in the Venice
Little League Majors American League and has the team still alive in the
County Cup. He will also be a manager of the American 11-1 All-Stars
this year. His wife Diane is very active in the league. Sons Joey and
Michael are heady ball players and excel in a lot of sports. Daughter
Lisamarie is a track standout for Venice High. The lorios are an All-
American sports family.


We will be
CLOSING at 3 pm on
Thursday June 23
for the Venice Sports
Hall of Fame Banquet

652 E. Venice Ave. 488-9156


Frank lorio


VENICE SPORTS HALL OF FAME
To honor the contributors to Venice sSportsLeoacy
2CC3 Inductees
Ialph Adrian Sr.
Sheryl Maize Milt Maas
CeremOny & IBanquet
June 23, 2CC1 6:3C pm @ [ctevy's
$S5.DC Per person-to IEeneflt cotary futures
available at Iotary futures Office at VH$S cr 19caey's


_ __~ I~







VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


SUNDAY. JUNE 19. 2005


Some of the world's finest golf lies


I have lied to play golf. I
admit it. I'd bet that half or
more of the readers out there
have, too. Have you ever told
a whopper? I have and it's a
horrible feeling when you get
caught. I don't mean cheating
at golf when I say this. Golf is
a gentleman's game and
should be played accordingly.
I mean the lies that golfers
use to get out on the course.
You know, a phantom doc-
tor's appointment, a root
canal when you already have
dentures, etc.
When a person is bitten by
the golf bug, it can be an emo-
tionally traumatic experi-
ence. It's almost like the first
time you ever fall in love. You
can be sitting there at work
busily motoring along when
suddenly it hits you.
Mmmmm, golf. You look out-
side and see the sun shining
and you just gotta go. And if
you can't go, you'll sit sulking
for the rest of the day wishing
you were and fantasizing
about all the great shots you
would have made.
But the reality is always dif-
ferent. I had a starter mar-
riage. The one you screw up
before you get it right. My ex-
wife was, to put it politely, not


Kids' Summer beach runs
School is out for summer.
What can kids do with all that
free time? Sarasota County
Parks and Recreation has an
answer -Kids Summer
Beach Runs. Beach runs are


Michael Lamond
THE ZONE

a fan of the game. I believe
she saw golf as a rival for her
affections and was as jealous
of golf as she would have
been of another woman. Let
me tell you, I had to come up
with some lulus. I was hooked
on golf and somebody had to
go. By the way, golf won.
I am reminded of a time
long, long ago at a game far,
far away. Actually it was at
Riverwood Golf & Country
Club. They used to have, and
still might, a Sunday morning
game. You needed to be there
by 8 a.m. I really, really, really
wanted to play. 'My ex-wife


offered at two locations,
Siesta Beach Pavilion, 948
Beach Road, Siesta Key, and
Venice Beach Pier, 1600
Harbor Dr.
The Siesta Beach Runs are
held every Tuesday at 6:30


stood her ground. I plotted
an escape plan. When I got up
on Sunday morning, I gave no
clue of my impending break-
out. I simply told her that I
was going to get the paper
and didn't come back. I had
no idea what the ramifica-
tions would be, but I soon
found out.
God bless golf pros. When
my ex wife figured out where I
was, she showed up at the pro
shop and was less amused
than I had hoped. The pro
behind the desk was a fellow
named Ron Green, who has
been around quite awhile. He
had seen this before, I'm sure.
Ron told me as I made the
turn that my ex had been in
and she was en fuego (on fire
to our non Spanish speaking
friends). Ron assured her he
would let me know she had
come by. He did. I kept on
playing. I didn't particularly
care, I was playing golf and
that's what mattered most at
the time. I did, however, pay
for it when I got home. But it
was worth it. What can I say?
I'm an addict after all. See ya.

Mike Lamond writes a
weekly golf column for the
Gondiolier Sun.


p.m. through Aug. 2. Venice
Beach Runs are held every
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.
through Aug. 3. Registration
begins at 5:30 p.m. at both
locations. The beach runs are
free one-mile runs.


A week offeeling like a kid again


L I
RAY SINIBALDI
SPORTS C'" Y'AINIlST
This past week I had the
pleasure of assisting Vernice
High baseball hitting coach
Jose Velez at his fifth annual
hitting and fielding clinic.
From Tuesday through
Friday, nearly 100 kids gath-
ered at the Venice High Base-
ball Complex to enjoy the
fruits of knowledge passed on
by the former Texas Ranger. ,:
For me, it was a labor of
love and what f came away
with is that when it comes to
baseball and kids, the more
things change, the more they
remain the same.
The week brought the
same collection of players
and parents that any Little
League season or all-star
tournament would bring.
There were some dads who
felt it necessary to coach from
the stands when their young-
ster stepped up to the plate.
This I really don't understand.
After all, this was a clinic, not
the world series. I am sure
that these dads are very well-
meaning, good-intended
folks who want to help their
little guy out.


However, I wish they could
see their kids expressions and
body language that we on the
field see when dad starts to
chirp from the stands. It puts
an enormous amount of
undue pressure where it sim-
ply is not needed.
There is nothing in all of
sports more difficult than hit-
ting a baseball and coaching
tips from the stands, in the
middle of an at bat, especially
to a kid, is nothing but
counter-productive. All that
having been said, again, the
week was actually a great
experience for virtually all
involved.
There were a number of
stories of hustle, heart, deter-
mination, great attitudes and
obvious love for the game.
Watching kids arrive a little
early to take a few cuts off a
tee, flip ground balls at each
other or simply have a long
toss was warming to my
heart.
My favorite story came
from the 10, 11 and 12-year-
old home run derby. The last
event of the week, this is
always fun for the kids as they
gather in the dugouts to
watch as one by one the play-
ers take their cuts.
There were only five total
home runs hit in the whole
contest. Steve hit one, Mike
took the lead with two and
Jake tied Mike in his next to
last swing. This precipitated a
playoff between Mike and
Jake.
All the kids gathered back in
the dugout as Mike and Jake


carried their chosen weapons
toward home plate. The crowd
was a buzz as they strapped on
their gloves, adjusted their hel-
mets and prepared to do bat-
tie. Originally given 10 swings
each, this championship
round would offer the com-
batants only six swings apiece.
Mike stepped in first. A
lefty swinger with a sweet
swing, he reminded me
where he liked his pitch as I
geared up to try to deliver.
Jake was in the on-deck circle
behind Mike and just as we
were about to begin, he
looked toward Mike and said,
"lets go Mike." I had to pause
because I got goose bumps.
Here were two kids about to
do battle and one was
encouraging his opponent.
Mike delivered with two
more dingers and then Jake
stepped in. Pressing a bit, he
just missed a couple of pitches
and after going 0-for-5, it was
over. I encouraged him to fin-
ish strong and he proceeded
to launch the longest blast of
the day.
So, thanks to all who came
out to play with us this week. I
hope you had fun. Despite my
aches and pains, this 52-year-
old body got to be a little kid
for the week and that is never a
bad thing.
Above all, thanks to Jake
and Mike, a gracious champi-
on and worthy challenger who
at their young and tender ages
already know in their hearts
the essence of competition. I'll
be watching and cheering for
you both.


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SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 20085


10A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Venice worth
at least $3 billion

The initial county property
appraiser's report is in, and
the land within Venice city
limits has topped $3 billion in
total taxable value for the first
time, according to City
Manager Marty Black.
These figures are used to
set up government operating
budgets across the county
based on estimated tax rev-
enue. Last year, Venice's value
came in at nearly $2.5 billion.
This will allow the city to
reduce millage rates by 1.5
percent and still collect more
tax revenue, covering cost
increases, Black said.
Venice City Council
pledged to lower millage rates
by 1.5 percent a year for a
decade, and this would be the
fourth consecutive year.
Skyrocketing land values
have allowed many govern-
ments to bring in more
money without raising tax
rates.
So while the percent of
taxes on a home or business
may decrease, the amount
actually paid has gone up
because so has its value.
Black doesn't want city
council or budget planners to
get used to this. He predicts
this trend will only last for
another three years and then
level off as many of the new
developments come on the
tax rolls.
When that happens, bud-
get time will get a bit tighter,
Black said.
"That's going to eventually
kick in, which is why we have
to watch our ongoing expen-
ditures," Black said.


City: Venice Housing
Authority must pay

City Manager Marty Black
has denied a request by
Venice Housing Authority to
waive the public housing
complex's payment-in-lieu-
of-taxes agreement, called
PILOT, which dates back to
1967 when VHA came into
existence.
Instead of paying property
taxes, VHA is required to pay
the city 10 percent of the rent
billed to residents minus city
utilities costs.
For the fiscal year ending
March 31, 2005, this amount
is $3,583, according to VHA.
The city was not paid last
year, either the first time
that has happened in at least
the past 10 years, according to
Venice Finance Department
records.
"Despite our desire to
assist in resolution of the
financial burden faced by
current management of the
Authority, we have not been
able to locate a mechanism
by which the city might
entirely waive the PILOT,"
Black wrote in his letter to
VHA Executive Director Peter
Lopez.
In his request to the city,
Lopez wrote that new man-
agement inherited a "signifi-
cant level of tenant delin-
quencies" and had to write off
$13,375 in rent as uncollec-
table during the 2004-05 fiscal
year.
The city is willing to set up
payment plans for VHA, Black
wrote.

Compiled by Assistant
Editor JJ. Andrews


~-1*


c~. ~ ~


I VENICE OUTLOO0


1*~ I
cii
ii
~i'l


01
l~r
dl



A '-' ~'
,ti

t I

5'


Sunday
High 90, Low 76
Mainly inland
afternoon storms.

Monday
High 90, Low 75
Mostly cloudy
with some rain.

Tuesday
High 90, Low 75
More clouds with
scattered rain.
Wednesday
High 91, Low 74
Partly cloudy
with afternoon rain.


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
(Including Sarasota and Charlotte counties)
Southwest winds at 5 to 10 knots.
,,,Seas 1 to 2 feet, light chop.
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
West winds at 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet, moderate chop.


High Saturday 91
Low Saturday 76
Rainfall
Total this week 0.00
Total this year 20.74
Normal YTD 13.32
Rainfall totals are for a 24-ho.ur
period ending at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday as recorded at the
official weather station in
Venice.


Above
normal
for
June





June
rain
09.92


Sunrise/set


Tonight's sunset
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonrise
Moonset


8:27 p.m.
6:36 a.m.

6:06 p.m.
4:47 a.m.


DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


DATE

SUN 19
MON 20
TUES 21
WED 22


HIGH
P.M.
9:26 a


LOW LOW
A.M. P.M.
3:31 6:04
-L ---- 6:55
------ 7:47
------ 8:39


*STRONG TIDE
a- A.M. p-P.M.


June 17......709
June 16......279
June 15......124
June 14......142
June 13......237


June 17 ......... 12-17-18-27-35
June 16 ......... 6-13-16-18-33
June 15 .........7-8-22-29-33
June 14 ......... 7-24-27-33-34
June 13 ......... 10-12-24-31-35

Payoff for June 16
1 5-digit winner.......$212,267.54
296 4-digit winners......$115.50
8,783 3-digit winners:......$10.50
2-digit winners...........Quick Pick ticket


June 18 .......................... Late
June 15 .... 2-20-22-30-31-51
June 11 ....... 2-7-9-12-20-23
June 8.... 17-21-22-40-43-45
June 4......9-11-16-22-44-52
June 1 .... 18-19-21-34-36-49


H ,*


June
June
June
June
June


17....1109
16....6663;.
15....4330;,
14....2435
13....7563`


June 17...........2-34-35-42 Ts
MegaBall................ 1 ;
June 1,4...........16-26-27-38 -
MegaBall.......................2...

Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings 'i
Payoff for June 14
04of4+ MB..................$-
9 4 of 4.......................... $1,103 .-;
50 3 of 4 + MB..........$435 '
1,190 3 of 4...... ..... $54.90
1,553 2 of 4 + MB.............$29
'-5


ii 0 0Tl


Payoff for June 15
0 6-digit winner.................. $-
46 5-digit winners....$5,730.50
2,550 4-digit winners:............$84'
55,587 3-digit winners:.......$5
Drawing occurs Wednesdays, Saturdays


Estimated jackpot $6 million


Mote: Venice Beach dear of red tide ,


STAFF REPORT


The red tide bloom that
has been affecting Sarasota
and Manatee counties has
moved north along the St.
Pete Beaches, according to
Mote Marine Laboratory's
most recent update.
Red tide cells were hot
found in water samples from
Venice south.


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Research Institute
reports low to medium con-
centrations of the red tide
organism from Clearwater
south to Sarasota.
Moderate to high concen-
trations have been observed in
Sarasota Bay by Mote Marine.
Dead fish and respiratory irri-
tation have been observed
throughout the area.


Conditions appear to be
improving in Sarasota County
However, it is important to
note that as atmospheric and
oceanic conditions change,
algal bloom conditions
change as well, making fore-
casting very difficult.
Please go to. floridama-
rine.org for the latest informa-
tion about closed shellfish
areas.


For additional information,
please check the environmenqr
tal updates section of the!
online site at mote.org, the
FWRI site or the Red Tide,
Alliance.site at RedTideOnline
.com. If you experience any
adverse health effects as :a
result of exposure to harmf df
algae, please report them t'
the red tide hot line at (888)!
232-8635.


H',nn~i. Diwililinu. Rr~ptct i I iiLr-. Fi- r 117 tier,ilti r ojmp~afl3- I rmm --
Imnial.Lf OINitUIIUL3111, I-- Lir led inI-[rr ro.irch jnlynJ3 .id planning prdDiaiNL-
i hj l~iki Iffild h i~principirn ihrat mLnvthird-gi mder 'iuld lull Pii.


Health Park Surgery

is pleased to

announce the second

location for the

Orthopaedic Center

of Venice at 13815

Tamiami Trail in


North Port. Please

call their Venice office 941-485-3302

for appointments at www.orthovenice.com

either location. P


NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE OF AUCTION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION 2G1FP22SOS2134890
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will 4. 1996 Dodg, Ram 1500, Pk,
be auctioned for unpaid towing & Grn, 1B7HC16Z2TS618192
storage charges only, per FS 5. 1994 Ford, Escort, 2D, Grn,
713.78. Vehicle @ 1FARPl1JIRW164163
Jimmie's Firestone 6. 1993 Buic, Century, 4D, Blu,
Rt# 1, Box 3329-F 1G4AG55NOP6450686 .
Madison, FL 7. 1992 Chry, New Yorker, 4D,
1. 1996 Chev, Cavalier, 2D, Grn Mrn, IC3XV66L7ND734689
1G1JF12T4T7271132 8. 2004 Ford, Mustang, 2D, Cry,
S1978 Ford, F150, Pk, B 1FAFP42X54F177417
F 1978 Ford, F P, On 7/6/2005 at 9:00 am at
On 7/6/05 at 9:00 a.m. at Ven106ceorp, FL ra3tion Way,
106 Corporation Way, Venice Veic L 34285e @
PUBLISH: June 19, 2005 North Collier Collision, Inc.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION 16210 Old 41 S. Bonita Springs
The Following vehicle/vessel(s) will PUBLISH: June 19, 2005
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION.
713.78 The following vehicle/vessel(s) will
1. 1998. Chev, Malibu, 4D, GId, be auctioned for unpaid towing &
1G1NE52M5WY149639 storage charges only, per FS
2. 1998 Toyt, Camry, 4D, Tan; 713.78. Vehicle @
4T1BF28KXWU072491 Premier Finrance Adiuiler'. LLC
On 7/6/2005 at 9:00 AM at 106 C0i par aLon Way. Venice
106 Corporation Way, Venice, FL 1. 1997 Toyt, Tercel, 2D, Gm,
Vehicle at JT2AC52L5V0251189
Joe Nagy Towing On 7/6/2005 at 9:00 am at
3700 Mercantile Ave, Naples above address.
PUBLISH: June 19, 2005 PUBLISH: June 19, 2005
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicle/vessells) will NOTICE TO CREDITORS
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
713.78. Vehicle @ SARASOTA COUNTY,
Johnson's Towing FLORIDA
604 N. Tamiami Trail, PROBATE DIVISION
Nokomis, FL
1. 1980 Chev, Citation, 4D, Gry, IN RE: ESTATE OF
1X687AT137194 N RE: ESTATE OF
2. 1996 Ford, Taurus, 4D, BIk, JOHN DOHERTY,
1FALP52U4TG292260 Deceased.
On 7/6/2005 at 9:00 am at File No: 2005-CP-5264-SC
above address.Probate Division
PUBLISH: June 19, 2005 Probate Division
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Following vehicle/vessel(s) will The administration of the estate of
be auctioned for unpaid towing & JOHN DOHERTY, deceased,
storage charges only, per FS whose date of death was May 11,
713.78 2005, is pending in the Circuit
1. 1994 Merc, Grand Marquis, Court for Sarasota County, Flori-
4D, Whi, 2MELM75W3RX637520 da, Probate Division, the address
2. 1997 Ford, F150, Pk, Brn, of which is P.O. Box 3079, Sara-
IFTDF1729VKC15563 sota, Florida 34230-3079. The
3. 1995 Chev, Camaro, 2D, Whi,


NOTICE TO CREDITORS NC
names and addresses of the per- II
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below. SAI
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or C
demands against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this notice is MA
required to be served must file their a/k
claims with this court WITHIN THE MO
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER Plai
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 vs.
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS WIL
NOTICE ON THEM. JOi
All other creditors of the decedent ENC
and other persons having claims or Def
demands against decedents estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- TO:
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
ARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ase No. 2004-CA-11125-NC
RY-LOU MOULTON,
l/a MARY-LOU YOUMANS
)ULTON,
ntiff,


.LIAM H. HYDE,
AN G. HYDE;
GLEWOOD BANK; et al.,
endants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
Defendant, SUZANNE GORTON,
as Trustee of the George
Theodore Hyde Trust,


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
copy of your Answer to the Com-
plaint on STEPHEN H. KURVIN,
ESQ., 7 South Lime Avenue, Sara-
sota, FL 34237, on or before June
28, 2005. If you fail to do so,
Judgment by Default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICETO CREDITORS
demands against decedent's AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
estate, on whom a copy of this PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
notice, is required to be served ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
must file their claims with this Court WTHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER- PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,


THIS NOTICE shall be published VICE, OF A COPY OF THIS
once a week for four (4),consecu- NOTICE ON THEM..
tive weeks in THE VENICE GONDO- All other creditors of the decedent
LIER. and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
Dated this 25th day of May 2005, must file their claims with this court
at Sarasota, Florida. WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
KAREN E. RUSHING,


SARASOTA COUNTY
By: Margaret F. Horton
Clerk of Courtp
PUBLISH DATES:


WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET IAsY 29, o2005
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 IN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Corn- JUNE 5, 2005
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE plaint in an action to reform an JUNE 12, 2005
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. instrument and QUIET TITLE has JUNE 19, 2005
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME Been filed against you and all par- IN THE CIRCUIT C
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ties claiming interests by, through, SARASOTA CO
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) under or against Defendants, FLORID
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE including any unknown spouse, PROBATE DIV
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH heirs, personal representatives,
IS BARRED. devisees, grantees, creditors or IN RE: ESTATE OF
The date of first publication of this other claimants claiming by, ANNA M. STOVER,
notice is June 19, 2005. through, under of against Defen- Deceased.
dants who are not known to be
Personal Representatives: dead or alive and a prayer con- File No. 2005-CP
Mary D. Doherty tained within the Complaint
210 Park Blvd. N. demands that title be quieted in the NOTICE TO CRI
Unit 121 Plaintiffs to the following-described The administration of
Venice, Florida 34285 property: ANNa M STOVER


Dennis J. Tracy, Esq.
Attorney for Neil Simmons
Florida Bar No. 176558
Dulmer & Tracy, Chartered
229 Pensacola Road
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941)-485-7761
PUBLISH: June 19, 26, 2005

Seize the sales
with Classified!


Unit E-72, OF BAY OAKS, a
Condominium according to the
Declaration of -Condominium
recorded in Official Records
Book 1067, Page 620, and
amendments thereto, and as
per plat thereof, recorded in
Condominium Book 8, Page 30,
and amendments thereto of the
Public Records of Sarasota
County, Florida.
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a


OURT FOR
COUNTY,
DA
VISION


-004936-NC
EDITORS
the estate of
R decea-scd


whose date of death was April 20,
2005, and whose Social Security
Number is 144-30-9993, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Saraso-
ta County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is P.O.
Box 3079, Sarasota, Florida
34230-3079. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the'personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or


ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS JUNE


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


12, 2005. Representative:
Gregory C. Roberts
Personal Representative: Florida Bar No. 438782
Robert T. Klingbeil Klingbeil & Roberts, P.A.
c/o Klingbeil & Roberts, P.A. 341 Venice Avenue West
341 Venice Avenue West Venice, Florida 34285
Venice; Florida 34285 Telephone: (941)-485-2900


Attorney for Personal


;t
a
.5^
,a


PUBLISH: June 12, 19% 2005


CITY OF VENICE
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF VENICE 'PLAN
NING COMMISSION ACTING AS BOTH THE LOCAL PLANNING
AGENCY AND THE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATION C
MISSION AS PROVIDED UNDER SECTION 163.3174l4)(
FLORIDA STATUTES, WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON.T
DAY, JULY 19, 2005 AT 1:30 P,M. IN CITY HALL COUNIL
CHAMBERS, 401 WEST VENICE AVENUE, VENICE,, FLORIDA' T
CONSIDER LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE AMENDMENT PETITION
NO. 05-8AM.
AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF VENICE LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE RELATING TO SECTIONS 86-48 SUBDIVISION PLAT
APPROVAL, FEES AND CHARGES; AND 86-586 SCHEDULE OF
FEES AND CHARGES.
All interested parties are invited to appear and be heard. Pro-
posed standards and regulations are available for public inspec-
tion in the Planning and Zoning Department, 401 West Venice
Avenue, Venice, or online at www.venicegov.com. Written contm
ments filed with the Planning Commission, c/o Planning and
Zoning Department, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice FL 34285,
will be heard and considered. The public hearing may be con-
tinued from time to time as announced at the.aforementioned
hearing, as may be found necessary. *
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made.ol
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be respon-
sible for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evi-
dence at this meeting upon which any appeal is based.
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the
Planning and Zoning Department at least 24 hours prior to the
meeting (486-2626, extension 2043).
PUBLISH: JUNE 19, 2005


LEGAL NOTICES
__________________________-____- --


CITY OF VENICE ,
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF VENICE PLAN-
NING COMMISSION ACTING AS BOTH THE LOCAL PLANNING
AGENCY AND THE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATION COM-
MISSION AS PROVIDED UNDER SECTION 163.3174(4)|C),
FLORIDA STATUTES, WILL HOLD. A PUBLIC HEARING ON TUES-
DAY, JULY 19, 2005 AT 1:30 P.M. IN CITY HALL COUNCIL
CHAMBERS, 401 WEST VENICE AVENUE, VENICE, FLORIDA, TO
CONSIDER LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE AMENDMENT PETITION
NO. 05-5AM.
AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF VENICE LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE ADDING THE U.S. 41 VENICE URBAN DESIGN DISTRICT
OVERLAY.
All interested parties are invited to appear and .be heard. Pro-
posed standards and regulations are available for public inspec-
tion in the Planning and Zoning Department, 401 West Venice
Avenue, Venice, or online at www.venicegov.com. Written com-
ments filed with the Planning Commission, c/o Planning and
Zoning Department, 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice FL 34285,
will be heard and considered. The public hearing may be con-
tinued from time to time as announced at the aforementioned
hearing, as may be found necessary.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of
this meeting. Accordingly, any person who may seek to appeal
any decision involving the matters noticed herein will be respon-
sible for making a verbatim record of the testimony and evi-
dence at this meeting upon which any appeal is based..
If you are disabled and need assistance, please contact the
Planning and Zoning Department at least 24 hours prior to the
meeting (486-2626, extension 2043).
PUBLISH: JUNE 19, 2005


VN'

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'NORTH POIT'






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11A


New 50-acre county park to include a cow pasture


The agriculture feature will emphasize the history
of the parcel and the park's passive design, which
will include trails, picnic areas, shelters and a
historic structure scheduled to open next year.


BYJACK GURNEY
PELICAN PRESS


parked cars and lighted ball-
fields. I think it's a good idea
to keep the cows there."


When Sarasota County
political leaders zeroed in on
what a new 50-acre public
park at the busy intersection
of Bee Ridge Road and
Honore will look like, the dis-
cussion focused almost
exclusively on whether a half
dozen cows should be
4lowed to remain on the site.
"Is it in the community's
best interest to spend this
kind of
money ($6
million) for a
cow pasture,
when there
are less
expensive
places to do
it?" commis-
sioner David
Mills asked. Mills
"We need
playgrounds and ball fields.
Why are we doing it? Is this a
historic thing?"
-, The county commission
etidorsed a consultant's con-
cept for the park which
includes a 15-acre fenced
pasture for the cows after a
hack-and-forth debate about
the agriculture feature that
buffers Bee Ridge Road from
the other amenities.
"I've wanted both active
recreation areas and some
Massive open space where
people can get away from it
lI," commissioner Jon
Thaxton said.
'- "The neighbors did not
frargain for hundreds of


inemoor(
Golf


;Summer Rates
before 1 pm
$22 plus tax
S after 1 pm
$17 plus tax

Championship
SWest Course
18 Holes Par 71
S(6,425 yds)
S697-7006
i 80 Clubhouse Rd.
^ Rotonda W., FL

Rates subject to change


Calculated risk
In fact, the new park site
has remained a conspicuous
piece of the historic Bee Ridge
community because its previ-
ous owner the late Clyde
Wilson, a Sarasota attorney-
allowed cattle to graze on it
long after adjacent parcels
had been sold off for develop-
ments.
Wilson suffered from acute
respiratory problems later in
life, but it didn't stop him
from parking his car on the
.property just to enjoy the.
peace and quiet. His heirs
sold the property to the coun-
ty under unusual .circum-
stances.
County officials took a cal-
culated risk in signing the
purchase offer to buy the site
before obtaining a $2.4 mil-
lion grant commitment from
The Florida Communities
Trust, an agency of the
Florida Department of
Community Affairs.
They moved quickly
because a commercial devel-
oper was poised to acquire
the 50-acre parcel for a shop-
ping center.
County commissioners
agreed to waive normal pre-
cautionary steps and tie up
the parcel with a binding con-
tractual offer.


Moo
One prominent park fea-
ture will be the historic Dr.
C.B. Wilson house, which was
relocated from downtown
Sarasota and used for an edu-
cational center. The non-
profit Friends of Sarasota
County Parks raised $200,000
for the move and repairs.
The firm of Post, Buckley,
Schuh and Jernigan is being
paid $99,472 by the county to
design, engineer and obtain
permits for a plan that also
includes nature trails, a play-
ground, picnic shelter, educa-
tional kiosks, functional
windmill, rest rooms and
park benches.
Parking and bicycle racks
will be provided for recre-
ational hikers and bikers who
use the park to access a coun-
ty trail system that will
include the 12.4-mile former
rail corridor between State
Road 72 (Clark Road) and
Center Road in Venice.
While the county commis-
sion briefly
discussed the
potential
need for over-
s flow parking,
it returned to
whether cows
should be a
feature.
"If people
Patterson enjoy them,
I'm OK with
this,", commissioner Nora
Patterson said. "Maybe, at
some point, we could undo
the decision."
No bull
Parks Director John
McCarthy cautioned the


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commission not to abandon
the cows too quickly because
the $2.4 million site purchase
grant from the Florida
Communities Trust was
based on a county applica-
tion that included the agricul-
tural feature.
"I like what I see," commis-
sioner Shannon Staub said.
"People prefer to see grass,
and not just more and more
concrete for parking cars. If
the county hadn't purchased
this site, they'd be looking at


another strip mall or shop-
ping center."
Thaxton encouraged parks
officials to contact area 4-H
clubs about providing the
cows.
"I'd rather have us go that
way than to a private vendor,"
he said.
"The cows will provide a
security feature. Urban kids
who don't knowwhat they are
will think they're bulls and
stay away."
The conceptual plan will


come back to the commis-
sion for final
approval.
About $1
million has
been allocat-
ed in the
county's capi-
tal improve-
ment budget
for park
Thaxton development.
If the permits
come through on schedule,
site work will start next year.


cINDAY, IIINF 19 7005


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SUNDAY, JUNE 19,2005


1 )l \/ AFNC .nNlDnni IFR I IN


Turtle nests survive early storm


The early-season
storm inundated the
area with rain but
passed by too far out in
the gulf to pose a
significant threat to the
endangered animals.

STAFF REPORT

Damage to sea turtle nests
along the coast of Southwest
Florida from Tropical Storm
Arlene last weekend was mini-
mal, according to Mote
Marine Laboratory's Center
for Marine Mammal and Sea
Turtle Research.
"Many nests were washed
over by the storm, but they
weren't inundated," said Paula
Clark, a volunteer coordinator
of Mote's Sea Turtle Research
Program. "Sea turtle nests can
be washed over and still be
OK, but they cannot remain in
standing water."
The wet weather and waves
proved to be a bit of a setback
for turtles and coastal workers
on Manasota Key.
"In the last week or so with
all the rain and high tides, we
had nests washed over. That
happened to some even
before Arlene, and that hap-
pens every season anyway,"
said Wilma Katz, a leader of
the Coastal Wildlife Club on
'Manasota Key.
"Many sections of beach in
this area are prone to severe
erosion, and in those areas we
lost more beach during the
Arlene-associated weather. We
did move quite a few nests out
of harm's way too, anticipating
problems," she said.
The bad weather had an
impact on the club's volun-
teers and their ability to moni-
tor activity, Katz added.
"For us on Manasota Key,
the many days of rain with
thunder and lightning totally
destroyed our schedules. Day
after day, carefully made plans
to cover zones with new vol-
unteers and old were simply


PHOTO COURTESY OF WILMA KATZ
Karl and Linda Young, members of the Coastal Wildlife Club on Manasota-Key, look for signs of
sea turtle activity on the beach.


destroyed. Work with new vol-
unteers and sharing our expe-
rience with them was slowed
considerably," she said.
Still, sea turtle activity is
picking up along the Gulf
beaches as the season pro-
gresses.
Katz said the club's volun-
teers had documented 313
loggerhead sea turtle nests on
Manasota Key as of June 12.
The club covers an area
stretching from Stump Pass
Beach to Caspersen Beach in
Venice.
Mote staff, volunteers and
interns also monitor 30 miles
of beach each morning
throughout nesting season,
including the beaches of
Longboat Key, Lido Key, Siesta
Key, Casey Key and Venice.
Mote reported there have
there have been 195 nests and
208 false crawls reported in its
region so far.
The locations are: Venice
Beach. 14 nests,' 17 false
crawls; Casey Key, 35 nests, 44
false crawls; Siesta Key, 16


nests, 18 false crawls;
Longboat Key, 14 nests, nine
false crawls; and Lido Key, two
nests, no crawls.
Turtle nesting season along
Florida beaches ends Oct. 31.
Here are some do's and
don't that people can remem-
ber to help clear the way for
nesting turtles:
Do:
If you encounter a nest-
ing turtle, remain quiet and
observe from a distance.
Shield or turn off outdoor
lights that are visible on the
beach from May through
October.
Close drapes after dark
and put beach furniture far
back from the water.
Fill in holes that may
entrap hatchlings on their
way to the water.
Place trash in its proper
place.
Do not:
Approach nesting turtles


or hatchlings, make noise or
shine lights at turtles.
Use flashlights or fishing
lamps on the beach.
Encourage a turtle to
move while nesting or pickup
hatchlings that have
emerged.
Use fireworks on the
beach.
Sea turtles are protected
under federal law, and any
harassment or interference
with a sea turtle, living or
dead, is subject to penalty.
If you witness anyone dis-
turbing a turtle or find an
injured or disoriented hatch-
ling or adult, notify agents
with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission at (888) 404-
FWCC (3922), the local sher-
iff's department or Mote
Marine Laboratory's Sea
Turtle Program at 388-4331.
If you find a dead or injured
sea turtle, contact Mote's
Stranding Investigations
Program at 988-0212.


Dr s Davuis ~~l !!U 11l & ey r DIental He ltProfessional
Weeky Orl Helth opic


Not Ready for a Retirement Community-

We would like to talk with you...
Does this sound like you?.
"We are not ready," We
don't need it yet."

With over 20 years
experience in helping
seniors review their
retirement living goals,
Village On The Isle
understands how
weighing a move to a
retirement community
can feel overwhelming.
The time to plan is
right now.


Village On The Isle
is the only faith
based, not-for-profit
continuing care
retirement


c
0


community in all ..
f Venice.


Moving to a retirement community while you can
fully enjoy the lifestyle it offers can be one of the
Wisest decisions you will ever make.


we offer a full 1
range of services
and opportunities
to pursue your
current hobbies or
start new ones
while living in a
secure- .;
environment free
from the burdens of maintaining a home.

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to learn more about the lifestyle that awaits you at

Village On The Isle


CONTROLLING DENTAL FEARS
Controlling dental fears is important to all of us if we expect to have
attractive, healthy teeth which are free of pain. Fear leads to the
avoidance of treatment. This neglect will eventually cause problems.
The fact is that modern dental treatment is comfortable and painless.
But to know this, both physically and emotionally, it has to be
experienced. Routine examinations are the way to build up this
acceptance. They afford an opportunity to build up relationship with
your dentist and to get acquainted with the office environment and the
procedures. Complete and truthful explanations are the only way your
dentist can get and keep your trust.
People with dental anxiety are often ashamed of the condition of their.
teeth, and ashamed of their fear as well. Overcoming that fear and
getting proper dental treatment will improve your confidence. You'll feel
better about your teeth and about yourself as well.





* Dr. Charles Dr. Brent Dr. Caryn
R Drntil H ~ald Pr.iintil Davis Beyer Davis


1218E.VeniceAve.,Venice- www.vne ni.co 84 7


* Lubricate condenser motor so it will run cooler 4
* Hose condenser coil if needed, to reduce electric bill
* Check & clean base pan to inhibit rust, prolong life
* Note corrosion spots and apply lubricant protective film
* Wash & flush exterior unit (if accessible to water supply)
* Test operating pressures with special gauges. Refrigerant
added 1 lb. if needed for maximum cooling efficiency i
* Inspect condenser contractor points. Cleaned if necessary :H
* Spray evaporator coil to prevent mold & mildew growth i
* Clean drain pans & drain lines to prevent water overflow
* Check accumulators before freon leaks out
* Check safety float controls to avoid flooding
* Check capacitors for dangerous leaks and efficient operation
* Check freon condition in site glass if applicable
* Check relays for consistent operation
* Check reversing valves for rusting & trouble-free operation.
Maintains dependability



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Keep Sarasota


Beautiful honors


area volunteers


STAFF REPORT

On May 4, Keep Sarasota
Beautiful honored communi-
ty and corporate volunteers at
its 17th Annual Awards
Recognition Banquet at the
Municipal Auditorium, 801
North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota.
David Jones and Christina
Crane of Clear Channel's
Oldies 108 morning radio crew
served as masters of cere-
monies for the event, which
included music by McIntosh
Middle School band Clock
and a color guard by the
Sarasota High School JROTC.
County commissioner Paul
Mercier and Dr. Margaret
"Meg" Lowman, director of
environmental initiatives at
New College of Florida, were
keynote speakers.
Keep Sarasota Beautiful is a
countywide program and an
affiliate of Keep America
Beautiful Inc., a national, non-
profit, public education orga-
nization dedicated to improv-
ing waste handling practices
in American communities. Its
mission is to enhance and
promote public interest and
participation in the general
improvement of the environ-
ment throughout Sarasota
County.
The program relies heavily
on volunteer efforts and cor-
porate support in its cleanup
programs, education, recy-
cling, and other methods of
reducing solid waste.
During the evening, the fol-
lowing awards presented:
Adopt Program Award -
The Loveland Center Aktion
Club of Venice ,


Beautification Award (vol-
unteers) --Venice Trail Blazer
Volunteers and People for
Trees
Beautification awards
(businesses) Homewood
Suites Hilton and The Venice
Golf & County Club Inc.
.* Youth, Schools, Scouts
and Clubs Awards Booker
High School Environmental
Science Academy, Oak Park
School, The School in the Park
Community Cleanups
Newtown Front Porch
Community, Green Team 4H
Club, EcoLODGical
YouthBuild Sarasota
Community Gardens
Coalition Cranberry
Gardens Coalition
*The GuyHudson Award-
Donald Fleming
Volunteers of the Year -
Monty Andrews, Henry
Rodriquez
The Extra Mile Dorothy
Bombera
Land, Sea and Air
Preservation/ Nature
Resources The Science Lab
4H-Club of North Port, Gene
and Lorry Stover
Land, Sea & Air
Preservation/Parks and
Recreation Horse "n"
Around 4H Club
Special recognition was
given to: The Tarr Charitable
Family Foundation Inc.; The
Tillie, Jennie and Harold
Schwartz Foundation Inc.;
David S. Band of Abel, Band,
Russell, Collier, Pitchford and
Gordon, Chartered; and David
and Myma Band.
For more information on
Keep Sarasota Beautiful, call
Sarasota County at 861-5000.


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EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
13A
SUNDAY
JUNE 19,2005


OUR VIEW



Invite Manatee to leave water authority


t may be time for the Peace River/
Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority
to show Manatee County the door,
That suggestion may catch some off
guard, but it is a logical idea when you con-
sider the history and the future of the author-
ity and the delicate balance its members
must maintain to assure their customers
have enough water.
Right now, the authority is made up of
Sarasota County, Charlotte County, DeSoto
County and Manatee County. The great
majority of the water supply being tapped for
the entire four-county region is the Peace
River.
In recent negotiations on how to pay for


the expansion of the water plant on Kings
Highway which is owned by the authority
- one of the biggest issues was future
sources of water. Charlotte County represen-
tatives often feel a little picked on, since
everyone is taking water from their river and
the plant they once owned.
When the authority originated, Manatee
County was made a member mostly for polit-
ical reasons. Now, Manatee County .at the
time and still today supplies a good
amount of water to Sarasota County. But
Manatee, which is growing as fast as any
place, wants that water back and has put
Sarasota County on notice that over the next
few years it will withdraw that water under an


agreement both counties negotiated.
If Manatee County wants to stay in the
water authority, it should put Lake Manatee,
its main source of water, into the pot. In other
words, all authority members should benefit
from that source. If not, there is really no rea-
son for Manatee County to belong to the
authority.
North Port will one day be as big as the city
of Sarasota. North Port's demands for water
are set to explode. For that reason, we believe
North Port deserves a seat on the water
board.
Some oppose North Port's inclusion, if for
no other reason than the fact that allowing
the city to join would open the door to other


municipalities. Current members believe
allowing too many municipalities to join the
authority would swell the membership
beyond what makes for an efficient system.
"There is a concern that if you have 13 or
14 board members, it could be tough to make
a decision," Charlotte County Commissioner
Adam Cummings said.
At the same time, however, Cummings
said he is open to North Port joining the
authority and that in a recent workshop the
members made a commitment to consider-
ing the city for membership.
North Port in, Manatee County out. That
makes sense to us unless Manatee County
wants to share its water supply.


Very proud!


BOB VEDDER
COLUMNIST


Last weekend was a big
one for Sun Coast Media
Group and the Gondolier Sun.
As you have already read, the
Gondolier Sun was honored'
for a record-tying seventh
time in a row as Florida's best
weekly newspaper. It was one
of our best ever showings: Of
our 15 awards, 13 were either
first or second place.
But before extolling the
virtues of a great staff, let me
tell you I was particularly
excited about the award our
principal owner, Derek Dunn-
Rankin, achieved: He was
inducted into the Florida
Journalism Hall of Fame.
There have been a lot of
great newspapermen who
have won this award. Al
Neuharth, the founder of USA
Today; John Knight, the pub-
lisher of the Miami Herald
and the person who built
Knight Ridder (the Bradenton
Herald is in that chain); and
Nelson Poynter, the famous
publisher of the St. Petersburg
Times, are just a few of those
already in the hall.
. Derek richly deserves this
honor. He has been arguably
the most influential member
of the FPA for the last two and
a half decades.
There are many reasons he
received the award. He has
always been at the forefront
of new technology. I remem-
ber that when I worked for the
Wall Street Journal handling
production, he was involved
with a group that was revolu-
tionizing the technology of
newspapers that were then
running on antiquated equip-
ment. It was fate that later
hooked me up with him.
Derek started an Internet
division before almost any
paper. Our Web sites garnered
first in the nation two years in
a row. We had an ISP with a
good deal of clients before
most people did.
He got employees to stop
smoking in our buildings
before there were laws ban-
ning it. He started a telephone
company, DayStar, that pro-
vides service to Venice,
Englewood, North Port,
Charlotte, Punta Gorda and
even Sarasota. He jumped on
this not long after deregula-
tion in 1996.
On the newspaper side, he
has always moved forward
and not in step with others.
He has always thought more
about the customer than the
bottom line.
It is an advantage that he
runs the only independent
daily in the state. He wanted a
TV book that was the best,
and ours has been given that
distinction many times. He


added many sections and fea-
tures, way above the norm.
The advertiser is very
important, too. For instance,
as a readership item for the
readers he had a list of
coupons placed on the front
page every day. He wants
people to know that there are
a lot of bargains in our papers.
You won't see that in- other
papers.
The Charlotte paper has
been among the fastest grow-
ing. While most newspapers
are losing circulation, the Sun
Coast Media Group papers
have steadily grown for the
last 15 years. It has a lot to do
with Derek's vision and com-
mitment to our communities.
He helped fashion a mis-
sion statement that showed
how important the commu-
nity is to us. He has lived that,
as he has made sure that we
have been very active in mak-
ing our communities the best
possible not always mak-
ing politicians happy along
the way.
To give you a sense of that
commitment in Port
Charlotte and Punta Gorda,
he (along with son David)
made some very bold moves
that cost us a lot but were
important to getting the com-
munity back on its feet after
Hurricane Charley.
For many weeks we deliv-
ered a newspaper to every
house whether a subscriber
lived there or not he just
wanted people to know what
was happening.
He set aside $1 million for
advertisers knocked out by
Charley so they could get a
jump start when they
reopened. The papers ran the
names of all businesses that
were open so people would
know it was still a working
community. That list got up to
five pages.
Maybe their most signifi-
cant effort after the hurricane
was to put together all. the
decision makers in a three-
county coalition to develop a
plan to get the money and
help needed not only to
restore the counties, but vast-
ly improve the three.
It was noble of them to
include Hardee County,
where we have no papers. It
was the right thing to do, and
that has been a credo Derek
has followed throughout his
career.
If that weren't enough, it
was a huge thrill to Bob
Mudge, our editor, and me to
receive 15 awards and the
first-in-state trophy on behalf
of our talented Gondolier Sun
staff. Each one of them was a
part of the winning combina-
tion. Former photo editor
George McGinn won three
photo awards, and Sports
Editor Claude Lewis took
three for writing. Tommy
Mcintyre, Kim Cool, J.J.
Andrews and Bob also won
awards. We have a talented
artist, Rob Broyles, who year
after year wins for beautiful
graphics he does for our
papers. As usual, cartoonist

Please see VEDDER, 14A


U "Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers'













LEERS FROM OUR READERS


Council will be heard on hospital later


Editor:
I believe there is a gross misunderstanding about the rela-
tionship of Venice City Council and the Venice Regional
Medical Center. While the perceived relationship is partner-
ship with or endorsement by council, there is no partnership
and there has been no endorsement.
During Sarasota Memorial Hospital's presentation about its
plans to build in or near the city, it was asked when it intends
to open a full-service hospital. The answer was clear: It has no
plans to open such a facility any time in the near future. When
asked about the next five or 10 years, there was no answers
Upon receiving this response, several council members
indicated they were not interested in helping Sarasota
Memorial open only high-profit-margin, ancillary services in
competition with our very able local hospital.
Your paper questioned why council members did not ask
VRMC staff about complaints over quality of service or alleged
maltreatment. From my standpoint, this was a presentation
about their future building, investment and facility plans. It did
not seem to me an appropriate time or setting in which to ask
about alleged poor service or maltreatment,
You cited the mayor's comments as the position of the coun-
cil. His comments reflect his personal feelings, to which he is
entitled, but not necessarily the feelings of council as a whole,
and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of the qual-
ity of the hospital's services.
Council members may very well express their feelings in this
regard at some future date, but chose not to Tuesday.
John Simmonds
City Council Member
Venice


The voice of
experience:
Jets can stall
Editor:
I saw a comment by James
Aronovsky in the Opinion
section. He's correct in one
area, but I'd like to submit a
comment.
I am a retired Navy pilot
with more than 4,000 flight
hours. I graduated from the
Navy's Test Pilot School in
December 1980.
While Mr. Aronovsky is
correct about piston or recip-
rocating engines not stalling, I
can say that gas turbine (jet)
engines stall.
Inside the jet engine are
rows of rotors and stators in


both the power section and
compressor. These act like
miniature wings as air moves
over them. These "wings"
can and do stall in the classic
manner of reverse flow of air
over the lifting surface.
Fighters such as the F-14
Tomcat had some problems
with launching missiles from
the belly stations while at a
high angle of attack or high G-
load: The exhaust of the mis-
sile would disturb the inlet air
to the engine, resulting in a
compressor stall or flame-
out.
Helicopters often use jet or
turbo-shaft engines to turn
the rotor blades. As the heli-
copter ingests salt spray, the


water content would vaporize
in the engine and the salt
would encrust the compres-
sor blades.
Over the course of several
hours this changes the shape
of those miniature wings in
the engine in the same man-
ner as ice on the wing of a
conventional wing. The result
is a reduced stall margin.
I lost two engines due to
compressor stalls in the H-2
even though we performed
the required engine "wash-
and-burnout" after extended
over-water flights.

Steve Bartek
Venice

Bush plan
undermines
Social Security.
Editor:
Our president's promotion
of a stock market account for
every American is another
opportunity for the rich to get
richer.
In order to have stocks one
must have a stockbroker, and
he will make money if the
stock goes up or down. There
is no assurance that the bank
or investment company will
be in existence when one
retires, and these accounts
would not keep up with infla-
tion.
Working people have the
opportunity to put money
into IRA accounts but these
can move from one broker to
another and be taken out
with a penalty if really need-
ed. Social Security is an insur-
ance plan and IRAs are
investment plans. These two
should not be confused or
mixed.
My husband died when
my children were 7, 9 and 10.
I received a Social Security


check until my youngest child
was 18, and they received
checks. I am sure that in the
very first year we as a family
received more than my hus-
band ever put in because in
those days salaries were low
and payments to Social
Security were low.
Our president's plan would
make us all poor, just as his
giving away our surplus has
undermined our whole finan-
cial system.
It is my belief that his
telling the country for the
whole time of his running for
office that things were bad
and that everyone needed a
tax refund is what caused the
recession, for which he gave
more tax cuts creating the
problem we have today: over-
whelming national debt.
Nancy H. Washbume
Venice

Banger Bobby and
the Venice tennis bunch
Editor:
Our informal group
(Cutter Bob, Belly Bob, Jesus
Gus, Greek Gus, Buxom
Betty, Mensa Joe, Wehrmacht
Rudi, Apartment Bill, Little
George, Silly George, Know-
it-all Nelly, Carl-the-Pro, Slim
Jane, Heartbeat Boris, Bi-
polar Pete, Cackling Cathy
and several others, most of
who are at least 80, though
some a mere 65-70) has
recently been joined by a 10-
year-old yes, 10 boy,
Banger Bobby.
Since school let out, this
modest lad has been hanging
around the public tennis
courts where mostly the
elderly play in the morning.
In a barely audible voice, he'll
ask if anyone wants to play. Or
Please see LETTERS, 14A






SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


14A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


LET 'EM HAVE IT! SHOULD SKATEBOARDING BE BANNED IN
DOWNTOWN VENICE? CALL US AT 2071111.


School priorities


are out of whack

Wrong goal. A recent Newsweek magazine identified the
best 100 high schools in the country. An astonishing 19 were
located in Florida. How can this be possible in a state whose
schools are consistently ranked in the bottom 25 percent of
states? And a state with one of the highest drop-out rates? The
answer may be misguided educational priorities. Our goal
should not be preparing a few for Harvard; it must be provid-
ing every student a quality education that makes them pro-
ductive citizens who don't go to jail.


Recycled. The bike races in
downtown Venice do
absolutely nothing for the
downtown businesses. That's
why Sarasota threw them out.
It does absolutely nothing but
hurt the businesses. When is
Venice going to wake up? Take
them out by Sharky's an let
them race to their heart's con-
tent.
Without walls. It was
proven in the last hurricane
season that floating .docks
were the first docks to break
loose. The docks broke loose,
then the boats broke lose, and
they all smashed up on the
shore. And those docks had
some retaining walls around
them, where this dock will
have no retaining wall it
will be right out in the middle
of the Intracoastal, an acci-
dent waiting to. happen. It
should be turned down.
Disappointed. I'm disap-
pointed with your new
columnist Joyce Hannah's
inaugural column concern-
ingRed Hats. While I'm prob-
ably 20-30 years too young to
be a Red Hat myself, I see no
reason for her to criticize our
seniors efforts to go out and
enjoy themselves. If Ms.
Hannah was trying to be
funny, she failed in her effort.
Disgraceful. I'm calling
about the article on the
Venice Little League..I think
it's disgraceful that a city that
can afford expensive palm
trees cannot affordto keep up
a ball park for our youth.
There's something wrong


with the sense of values of city
council. The city needs to fix
that ballpark and make it first
rate.
A list. Here are some ideas
that some will say are insane
but which have some appeal
to me. One, get out of Iraq.
Two, get out of Afghanistan.
Three, stay out of Israel's
business. Four, stay out of
Russia's business, Five, stay
out of everybody's business.
Six, place tariffs on imported
produce, fabrics, clothing,
automobiles and some elec-
tronics. Seven, loan funds to
GM until it can pay us back,
like we did with Chrysler 20
years ago. Eight, stop telling
us about Social Security
finances in 2040 and address
today's situation. Nine, bal-
ance the budget through fair
taxation.
All and nothing. I'm calling
in response to the person
who said they attend a church
that's open minded: A church
that accepts everything and
everyone stands for nothing.
And apparently the Bible isn't
worth the paper it's printed
on.
Fresh air. My red hat's off to
Joyce Hannah. She is a breath
of fresh air for the Venice
Gondolier Sun. I will buy the
paper every day if you'll keep
printing her comments.
Obstruction. I'm opposed
to the extension of the dock at
Fisherman's Wharf another
200 feet. I don't think the dock
to begin with is safe and it will
be an obstruction.


GIVE US A CALL
The Let'em Have It line allows
readers to sound off on issues of
local interest. Opinions
expressed here are solely those
of the callers and do not neces-
sarily represent the views of this
newspaper. Opinions or com-
ments that are personal attacks
on people; attacks on or com-
mercials for businesses; political
endorsements; or otherwise
unfit for publication will not be
printed. If you would like to par-
tidpate, call the line at 207-1111.
Call no more than once a week.
Please keep your comments
brief. The line is available all
hours. Caller identification is not
required.


Insult to injury. When I first
heard about the Fisherman's
Wharf dock a few years back, I
felt confident such an out-
landish proposal would never
see the light of day. It would
despoil the natural setting of
the inlet and would destroy
all possibility of enjoyment of
the waterfront for the folks in
the Harbor Lights communi-
ty. Unfortunately a dock of
400 feet was approved, and
what a mess it will make of
that inlet. Now they want to
add another 386 feet, which
would just be adding insult to
injury. What a terrible injus-
tice to the Harbor Lights peo-
ple. Its approval is just
unthinkable.
Adverse impact. I am a
Venice resident and I am
calling in opposing to the
extension of Fisherman's
Wharf's dock. The proposed
project would be contrary to'
Section 54-664, the permit
approval criteria of Sarasota
County, particularly
Paragraph 8, which requires
the proposed project not
adversely affect the public
health, safety and welfare. It
is not in the public interest to
permit the extension
because it would clearly be a
risk to have such an enor-
mous dock in the middle of
the Intracoastal WVaterway.


Sarasota County Gover] illnm]eut


County Calendar
* Bicycle/Pedestrian/Trail Committee
- June 21, 5:30 p.m., Sarasota County
Administration Center, First Floor,
Training Room, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861- 0920.
* Community Alliance Steering
Committee June 20, 1:30 p.m.,
School Board of Sarasota County, The
Landings, Brown Awning Building, .
Conference Rooms A/B, 1960 Landings
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 861- 2877.
* Community Disaster Preparedness
Committee (CDPC) June 24, 8:30
a.m., Southwest Florida American Red
Cross, 2001 Cantu Court, Sarasota. Call
861- 2976.
* Criminal Justice Commission -
June 20, 11:00 a.m., Judicial Center,
Room 810, 2002 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861- 2577.
* Early Learning Coalition June 20,
9:30 a.m., School Board of Sarasota
County, The Landings, Blue Awning
Building, Room 101, 1960 Landings
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 379-1479.
* Human Services Advisory Council
- June 24, 3 p.m., Administration Center,
Second Floor, A/B Conference Room,
1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call 861-
2882.
* Library Advisory Board June 22, 1
p.m., Twin Lakes Park, Building A,
Conference Room A, 6700 Clark Road,
Sarasota. Call 861-9844.
* Planning Commission Public
Hearing June 22, 2005, 6 p.m.,
Administration Center, Commission
Chamber, Future Land Use Chapter
(continuation), 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861 5140.
* Planning Commission Public
Hearing June 23, 2005, 2005, 6 p.m.,
Administration Center, Commission
Chamber, Future Land Use Chapter
S(continuation), including requests for
map designation changes, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 861 5140.
* Sarasota Firefighters' Insurance
Trust Board Meeting June 22, 11:30
a.m., The Hampton Inn at Bee Ridge
Road and 1-75, 5995 Cattleridge Road,
Sarasota. Call 362-0891.
* SCAT Future Transit Development
Plan and. Minor Changes to Route 15
- June 21, 4 p.m., Ringling School of
Art, 2700 North Tamiami Trail, Christ-
Janer classroom #6 Call 861-0927.





SaxteCounty


County budget receives highest
award of recognition
Sarasota County has received the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award
for the current fiscal year from the Government Finance Officers Association
(GFOA): This award is the highest form of recognition in governmental
budgeting and represents a significant achievement by the county's Fiscal
Planning and Budget business center.
This is the 14th year that Sarasota County has received this award, which
reflects a commitment to the highest principles of governmental budgeting. It
won by satisfying stringent guidelines for effective budget presentations that
assess how well the budget serves as a policy document, financial plan,
operations guide and communications device.
The GFOA is a nonprofit professional association serving 14,000
government finance professionals throughout North America. GFOA's
Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program is the only national
awards program in governmental budgeting. Since the inception of the
GFOA's Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program in 1984,
approximately 900 government agencies have received the award.
To view the Sarasota County adopted budgets for the last five years, visit the
county's Web site at www.scgov.net/budget.
Cluster volunteers drive economic vision
Sarasota County's economic future is coming into focus, and hundreds of
volunteer leaders from business, education, workforce, local governments, the
arts and social services are at the center of creating that new vision.
Working groups called "targeted business clusters" are mobilizing the
community behind a mission of high quality, sustainable economic expansion.
The results will be a more livable community, with higher-wage jobs and
professions.
The cluster approach is an innovation being tested by a handful of forward-
thinking communities. The business clusters targeted so far in Sarasota
County include creative services, high technology, life and environmental
sciences, and specialty manufacturing.
Cluster volunteers and community leaders will gather on June 23 at
Serendipity Country Club to network and discuss cluster group projects. To
learn more, go online to www.edcsarasotacounty.com or call the Economic
Development Corporation of Sarasota County at (941) 309-1200, ext. 203.
Advisory Council Vacancies
CLOSING DATE July 1, 2005
Advisory Board: Bicycle Pedestrian Trail Committee
Information: Alex Boudreau, 861-0920.
'Advisory Board: CiRizen Tax Oversight Committee (2 Vacancies).
Information: Kim Radtke, 861-5424.
Advisory Board: Community Action Agency Board
Information: Rik Jimison, Program Manager, 861-2564.
Advisory Board: Keep Sarasota County Beautiful (5 Vacancies).
Information: Sandra Washington, Program Manager, 861:6733.
Advisory Board: Planning Commission
Information: Susan Anderson, 861-6602.
Advisory Board: Sarasota County Health Facilities Authority Citizens Advisory
Committee*
Information: Richard Gleitsman, 861-5430.

This listing is published weekly by Sarasota County Governmqnt POblic
Communications. Board of County Commission agendas are available at
www.scgov.net; to subscribe to agenda via e-mail, go to scgov.net/weeklycalendar.
For more information, call (941) 861-5900.


VEDDER from page 13A


Dale Neseman won a first
place with one of his funny
pieces.
I was particularly proud
that we won a second place
for the work we have done for
United Way.
We don't get in these con-
tests to win awards. We get in
to find out what our peers
think of our work and to rec-
ognize the great work our
team does.
It happens for an overall
effort throughout the organi-
zation, including the graphics
folks and the the pre-press
and press work on top of great
writing and design. However,
we always come away with
something we need to do bet-
ter for you.


By's Cracke An irate
lady seeking divorce in
court told the judge, "My
husband thinks of nothing
day and night but golf. He
doesn't even remember
our wedding day." "That's
a lie," shouted the out-
raged husband. "We were
married the day Jack
Nicklaus won the U.S.
Open."


It came as a surprise that
Waterford submitted its new


LETTERS from page 13A


he'll volunteer to be in a
group when one of us old
folks says, "I'm looking for a
doubles game."
With only sparse availabili-
ty of players at this time of the
year, snowbirds having
returned North Bobby has
been taken into the group
almost condescendingly, but
has acquitted himself by
banging away at the ball, at
times so "skillfully that he fills
in rather well. When his,


waterfront district proposal.
The had been getting com-
ments from all over the com-
munity, and I thought from
that they were going to modi-
fy their proposal. Instead, it
got submitted as presented.
It seems rather premature
to me to do anything until the
Envision Venice process is
complete. There have been
clear messages coming out of
that process. While everyone
is excited about cleaning up
the area this proposal encom-
passes, I don't think they ever
envisioned seven-story build-
ings, which is about half of
the area.
Just as a point of informa-
tion, that area currently has
height restrictions of 35 feet
except in an area where an
exception to 45 feet is
allowed.

Today's Ism (one of
Murphy's Laws): In order to
get a bank loan, you must first
prove you really don't need it.
****** *
There are many ways to
look at the school grades just
released. One good way is to
say that 70 percent of the
Sarasota schools are A or B
schools. Another good way
would be to say that every
grade school in the Venice
area is an A school.


walkie-talkie buzzes that it's
time to come home, he duti-
fully leaves us, even in the
middle of a set.
I have encouraged him
that he can continue playing
tennis for at least another. 70
years, until 2075, when he'll
be my age and playing Venice
tennis on these very courts,
but I don't think he can grasp
the concept since I myself
never expected to see the year
2000.


On the other hand, you
might say that eight schools
went down in grade while
only four went up this year. Of
the four that went up, three
were charter schools that had
low scores the first year, much
like the "C" the Sarasota
Leadership Academy in
Venice had. You could also say
that Venice Middle and
Venice High went down.
The Venice High stat is
really disappointing with the
many new programs they
have in place and the fact that
North Port students no longer
go there, which used to be the
excuse.
Charlotte high schools had
76 percent receiving an A
grade and 94 percent getting
anAorB.
*******
Don't forget the art fest
downtown today.

The osprey nest is coming
along. Weeks Machine Shop is
going to put braces up for the
platform and FPL will do the
rest.

Bumper sticker: Support
bacteria it is the only cul-
ture some people have.

Robert A. Vedder writes a
weekly column in this news-
paper


I must say it would be
interesting to see what Venice
and Bobby are like in 2075.
My own offspring will have
passed away by then, leaving
my mobile home to be sold
by my grandchildren to a
developer for a million bucks.
Will my geezer grandchil-
dren then take kindly to
another 10-year-old?.

Martin Bregman
Venice


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OBITUARIES


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 15A


Barbara A. Crossen
Barbara Ann Crossen of
Venice died Wednesday, June
15, 2005. She was 84.
She was born July 8, 1920,
in Mitchell, Ind., and moved
to the area in 1972 from
Kansas City, Kansas. She had
attended Warrensberg State
'Teachers College and was a
member of Emmanuel Lu-
theran Church.
Survivors include two
sons, Chuck of Kansas City
and James of Jacksonville,
Fla.; four grandchildren; and
five great-grandchildren.
Services: There will be a
memorial service at 10 a.m. Wed-
nesday, June 29, at Emmanuel
Lutheran Church. Inurnment will
be in Fort Leavenworth National
Cemetery, Fort Leavenworth,
Kansas.
Contributions: Memorial


donations may be made to
Emmanuel Lutheran Church,
800 South Tamiami Trail, Venice.
Graham R. Giesler
Graham R. Giesler of Ven-
ice died Thursday, June 16,
2005. He was 77.
He was born Aug. 6, 1928,
in Baltimore City, Md., and
moved to the area from there
in 1986. He was a retired fire-
fighter and member of the
International Association of
Firefighters Local No. L0734
in Baltimore. He attended
Venice, Church of the Naza-
rene.
Survivors include his wife
of 45 years, Mary; two daugh-
ters, Denise Lynne of Venice
and Joan Marie Shusterman
of Newington, Conn.; a son,
Graham R. Jr. of Reisterstown,
Md.; three sisters, Lillian M.


Buell of Reese, Md., Shirley A.
Oppliger of Maryland and
Rught E. Hickman of Florida;
and five grandchildren.
Services: Memorial services
Will be announced at a later
date.
Contributions: Memorial
donations may be made to
Church of the Nazarene Work.
and Witness Program, 1535 E.
Venice Ave., Venice.
Arthur P. Landry
Arthur P. Landry of
Venice died Friday,
June 17, 2005. He was
85.
He was born Dec. 26,
1919, in Dedham, Mass. He
served in World War II as an
officer and B-29 pilot in the
Pacific and flew more than
100 missions during the 1948-
49 Berlin Airlift. He .was


awarded the Distinguished
Flying Cross and Air Medal
with four Oak Leaf Clusters in
recognition of his military
activities. He graduated from
the University of Connecticut
and worked in the insurance
field until retiring to Venice
from Colonie, N.Y, in 1981.
He was an advisor on the
board of the Sarasota County
Fire Commission and found-
er of the Association of
Myakka Communities. He
was a member of the San
Pedro Catholic Church in
North Port.
Survivors include his wife
of 63 years, Ruthelsie Max-
well; a son, Arthur P II of
Nashua, N.H.; a daughter,
Jean Landry Nightingale of
Boonton Township, N.J.; a sis-
ter, Catherine Louise D'Espi-
nosa of Norwood, Mass.;


three grandchildren; a great-
granddaughter; and a
nephew.
Services: A Mass of Christian
Burial will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
June 21, at San Pedro Church
with a memorial service immedi-
ately following at 11 a.m. at
Harbor Isles Park. Interment at
Florida National Cemetery at
Bushnell will be at a later date.
Farley Funeral Home, North Port,
is handling arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial
donations may be made to San
Pedro Catholic Church, 14380
Tamiami Trail, North Port, 34287.

Ralph T. Hamm
Ralph T. Hamm of Nokomis
died Monday, June 13, 2005, in
Venice. He was 44.
He was bornNov. 25,1960, in
Freeport, Long Island, N.Y, and


moved to the area 35 years ago
from Bellmore, Long Island,
N.Y. At the time of his death he
was employed by the Crow's
Nest Restaurant.
He was a graduate of Venice
High School and a member of
Faith Lutheran Church, Sara-
sota.
Survivors include his moth-
er,- Joan of Nokomis; a sister,
Donna Reilly of Boulder, Colo.;
two brothers, Gary of Cun-
ningham, Tenn., and Rick of
Venice; two nieces; and two
nephews.
Ewing Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial
donations may be made to Faith
Lutheran Church, 7750 Beneva
Road, Sarasota, 34238; or
Deborah Hospital Foundation,
101 W. Venice Ave., Suite 31,
Venice; or a favorite charity.


POLICE BRIEFS


Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office arrests
Lance R. Forrestledford,
20, 900 block Horizon Road,
Venice. Charges: driving
while license revoked -
habitual, possession of drug
paraphernalia, no motor
vehicle registration. Bond:
$2,240.
Roy J. Osborne, 24, 500
block Albee Farm Road,
Nokomis. Charges: giving a
false name after being arrest-
ed, no valid driver license.
Bond: $620.
Robert A. Olsen, 42, 300
block N. Elm St., Englewood.
Charge: driving while license
suspended or revoked. Bond:
$250.
Tiffany L. Patrzykont, 19,
400 block Olive Ave., Noko-
mis. Charge: domestic bat-
tery. Bond: no listing.


SCAT holds meeting
Sarasota County Govern-
ment is seeking the public's
input on its update of the
Transit Development Plan at
public meetings during June.
The final meeting will be
on Tuesday, June 21, at
Ringling School of Art and
Design, 2700 North Tamiami
Trail, Sarasota, from 4-6 p.m.
The Transit Development.
Plan is a five-year capital and
operating plan for public
transportation services in
Sarasota County. It must be
updated annually to main-
tain federal and state funding,
and the next major update is
due to Florida Department of


James W. Pendley, 19, 100
block Maness Road, Venice.
Charges: DUI, no valid driver
license. Bond: $1,000.
Michael A. Houston, 45,
5000 block Venice Ave.,
Venice. Charge: domestic bat-
tery. Bond: no listing.
Charles E. Sparks, 50, 200
block W. Coconut St., Engle-
wood. Charge: contempt.
Bond: $2,660.
Willis Chambers, 64, 600
block Coquina Court, Noko-
mis. Charges: no motor vehi-
cle registration, driving while
license suspended or
revoked. Bond: $370.
James V Spangler, 48, 40
block W. Oak St., Osprey.
Charge: domestic battery.
Bond: no listing.
Amanda E. Ross, 29, 1400
block South Quail Lake,
Venice. Charge: retail theft.


Transportation by June 30.
SCAT officials have already
held three meetings. Officials
have also met with residents
in recent months to discuss
route changes along with the
TDP. The meetings in June
will allow additional time for
the public to comment on the
proposed update.
For more information on
SCAT route changes, call the


Bond: $120.
William T. Floyd, 41, 900
block Horizon Road, Venice.
Charge: sale or delivery of
cocaine. Bond: $10,000.
Michael G. Throckmor-
ton, 37, 400 block Beverly
Road, Venice. Charge: proba-
tion violation. Bond: $7,500.
Catherine M. Pierson, 20,
1000 Falcon Road, Venice.
Charge: probation violation
-three counts. Bond: $1,000.
Michael E. Moore, 27, 700
block Groveland Ave., Venice.
Charge: contempt two
counts. Bond: $2,500.
Jose A. Pagan, 60, 1500
block Lakeside Drive, Venice.
Charge: contempt. Bond:
$2,500.
Ian M. Rochek, 20, 1900
block Faun Road, Venice.
Charge: possession of canna-
bis. Bond: $7,500.


Sarasota County Call Center
at (941) 861-5000. For infor-
mation on SCAT services and
schedules, call (941) 861-
1234.
Comp plan hearings set
Sarasota County urges the
public to become involved in
the updating of its compre-
hensive plan by reviewing
draft amendments to the plan


Volunteers for hurricane response


STAFF REPORT

During the very busy
2004 hurricane season,
more than 2,000 people reg-
istered to volunteer in the
aftermath of Hurricane
Charley and the hurricanes
that followed. The volun-
teers performed exceptional
acts of compassion in sup-
porting and caring for resi-
dents in affected areas.
Local agencies such as
the American Red Cross, the
Salvation Army, Goodwill
Industries, Medical Reserve
Corps of Sarasota County
and many others were able
to extend their capacity to
respond because of those
volunteers. Other people
volunteered without any
particular affiliation to an


and providing feedback at
planning commission public
hearings scheduled for June.
Draft amendments are
being made available online
at scgov.net/ear or at the


agency through Volunteer
Connections of Sarasota
County, which helps match
volunteers interests with
community needs.
The Community
Alliance's Community
Disaster Preparedness com-
mittee is working to stream-
line the delivery of health,
medical and human ser-
vices, including the registra-
tion and placement of vol-
unteers in anticipation of
what could be another
active storm season.
Local volunteer service
agencies want to make
things easier on everyone
this year and are requesting
that potential volunteers
who are not currently affili-
ated with a volunteer agency
register now. Those who reg-


county's Planning Services
office on the fifth floor of the
Administration Center, 1660
Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
The schedule for the June
public hearings is:;


ister early will have the
opportunity to participate
in specialized disaster
response training, and have
medical and other licenses
and credentials registered in
a central data base along
with placement preferences.
By doing all this in ad-
vance, the community as a
whole will be better served
and there will be less stress
on the four registration cen-
ters that will be used to reg-
ister volunteers who come
from other counties and
states to assist in the recov-
ery/response effort.
For more information or
to register as a volunteer,
call (800) VOLUNTEER or
log on to 1800volunteer.org
and register with the Local
Volunteer Center.


Future Land Use Chapter
continuation, 6 p.m.,
Wednesday, June 22, Sarasota
County Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota.


Support The Salvation Army
through a
Life Income Plan
such as a
Charitable Gift Annuity
Depending on Age & Circumstances you could qualify for a rate from

5.3% to 11.3%
guaranteed.

And support the programs of for more information call:
The Salvation Army 1-800-758-2769
at the same time. Ext 5706

Send this coupon today for more information.
The Salvation Army Planned Giving Department
P.O. Box 270848, Tampa, FL 33688


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SUINDAY, JUINE I LU0.5


WILLS *TRUSTS ESTATE PLANNING ELDER LAW
PROBATE ADMINISTRATION GUARDIANSHIPS
MICHAEL A. CHIANTELLA
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW
209 NASSAU STREET SOUTH
SUITE 101 TELEPHONE: 488-1779
EMAIL: MICHAEL@CHIANTELLA.COM ON THE WEB: WWW.CHIANTELLA.COM


SB.~B%'-'~'~I~~


56 venice gon 6/05






SUNDAY, JUNE 19,2005


AREA INTEREST RATES

Phone Money 6-month CD 1-year CD 5-year CD
Banks Number Market
Rate/Yield -Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep.

Acacia F.S.B. (941) 473-0656 3.25 / 3.30 $500 3.73 / 3.80 $500 4.36 / 4.45 $500

First Community Bank (941) 627-8550 1.49 / 1.50 $2.5K 3.44 / 3.50 N/Q 3.68 / 3.75 N/Q 4.64 / 4.75 N/Q

MetLife Bank (941) 366-0687 x111 2.96 / 3.00 $5K 1.14/1.15 $1K 3.83 / 3.90 $1K 4.40/4.50 $1K

Peninsula Bank (941) 474-7734 2.25 / 2.27 $50K 3.00 / 3.04- $1K 3.50 / 3.56- $1 K 4.75 / 4.85 $1 K

State Farm Bank (941) 492-2400 1.49 / 1.50- $1K 3.00 / 3.05 $500 3.20 / 3.25 $500 4.26 / 4.35 $500

tarpon Coast National Bank (941) 629-8111 -/- -/- / -/-

Brokers

Edward Jones (941) 637-6787 2.25 / N/Q N/Q 3.35 / 3.35 $5K 3.70 / 3.70 $5K 4.40 / 4.40 $5K


Edward Jones, Port Charlotte (941) 624-2411 / 3.35 / 3.35 $5K 3.70 / 3.70 $5K 4.40 / 4.40 $5K


Edward Jones, Venice (941) 485-6556 2.26 / 2.28 $500 3.35 / 3.35 $5K 3.70 / 3.70 $5K 4.40 / 4.40 $5K


Raymond James & Assoc. (941) 627-4774 2.36 / 2.39 $1K 3.01 / 3.06 $5K 3.35 / 3.41 $5K 4.26 / 4.35 $5K


Smith Barney Venice (941) 488-3994, /- 3.35 / 3.38 -$1K 3.70 / 3.70- $1K 4.40 / 4.40 $1 K
This service is provided by The National Financial News Services. Figures are current as of June 16, 2005 and 'are subject to
change without notice. Call (610) 344-7380 ext. 111 if you are interested in participating in this survey. N/A service is not avail-
able. No Quote figures were not quoted this week.


PUBLIC NOTICE
VENICE CITY COUNCIL
Notice is hereby given that the regularly scheduled
meeting of the Venice City Council to be held on June
28, 2005 has been canceled. The next regularly
scheduled meeting will be held July 12, 2005. -

Is/ Lori Stelzer, MMC, City Clerk

Publish: June 19, 2005




CLANDSCAPING & GARDENING
How will all this rain affect my plants and what can I do to help out this
problem?
As you know we have received well over our quota for rain this month.
Our plants expect all this rain water once it comes. This rain makes
our plants look lush. And they use up a lot of fertilizer. If you haven't .
fertilized your plants it might be a good time to fertilize them now.
We have a Fertilome Tree and Shrub Fertilizer and it gives the trees
and most shrubs that little push they need if and when we get more
rain. If it rains like the weather man says then we will need that extra
push to keep everything green and lush. If you have blooming plants,
use a 2-10-10.This will keep your plants blooming as well as maintain
them during all the summer rains.
If you have problems with your citrus trees, clean out all the
grass to the drop line of the tree and rake under the trees so
as not to disturb the roots. This will airiate the soil and dry it
out some. Remember just have bare ground and nothing else
under the citrus. Spray the citrus with liquid copper and let it WINNER
drip into the ground.This might help with any fungus in the root
system.
If you have problems come into'OUKE GARDEN CENTER.
We have the staff to help you with your problems.
Summer Hours:
7:30 AM to 4 PM Monday thru Saturday.
Duke Garden Cente
Service Is Our #1 Priority
Lynn Johnson 601 US 41 By Pass So. 488-7141 A


AREA MORTGAGE RATES

Financial 15-yr. fixed 30-yr, fixed Adjustable Financial 15-yr., fixed 30-yr. fixed Adjustable
Instiution Rate/ LIP Rate/ pLi Rate/ LIP Institution Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP
Points Points Points Points Points Points
A 2 Z Home Loans 5.000 30 5.375 30 4,000 30 Florida Mortgage Corp. 5,000 30 5.375 30 4.375 30
941-629-3450 0 0 0 FHAVA 888-825-6300 0 0 0
Absolute Mortgage Co. 5.000 30 5.250 3.500 30 Golden Rule Mortgage 4.625 30 5.000 30 2,500 30
888-90-HOMES 0 0 0 FHANVA 800-991-9922 1.88 1.75 1 ,
Accountable Mortgage 5.000 30 5.500 30 4,000 30 Guardian Mortgage 5.000 30 5.375 30 No 30
FHANVA 800-840-8771 0 0 0 800-967-3060 0 0 Quote
All Fund Mortgage No 30 No 30 No 30 H.D, Financial 5.125 30 5.625 30 No 30
866-535-8987 Quote Quote Quote 888-368-0655 0 0 Quote
American Federal Mortg. 4.625 30 4.875 30 3,625 30 Home Finance of America 5.000 30 5.250 30 3.000 30
FHANVA 888-321-4687 1.5 2.25 0 941-929-9112 0 0 0
American Home Finance 5.000 30 5.250 30 3.500 30 Homestead Mortgage 5.125 30 5.375 30 4.000 30
888-429-1940 0 0 0 888-760-6006 0 0 0
America's Best Mortgage 5.000 5.375 No Indemae Home Loan 4.7500 5.125 30 4.375 30
FHANVA 800-713-8189 0 0 Quote 877-839-9829 1.25 1 .83
Amicus Mortgage Group 5,125 5.375 No 30 Lighthouse Mortgage 5.000 30 5.375 30 No 30
VA 877-385-4238 0 0 Quote FHAIVA 800-784-1331 0 0 Quote
Amtrust Funding 5,000 30 5.250 30 300 30 Sovereign Mortgage 5.000 30 5.250 30 4.500 30
FHANVA 800-774-0779 0 0 0 FHANVA 800-996-7283 0 0 0
Borrower's Advantage 5.000 30 5.375 30 No 30 Stepping Stone Lending 5.125 30 5.375 30 No 30
VA 888-510-4151 0 0 Quote FHANVA 800-638-2659 0 0 Quote
Diversified Mortgage No 30 5.250 30 4500 30 Summit Mortgage No 30 No 30 No 30
VA 866-211-8662 Quote .25 1.88 800-377-0623 Quote Quote Quote
First Rate Mortgage Group 5.000 30 5375 30 No 30 Tarpon Coast Nat' Bank No 30 No 30 No 30
800-887-9106 0 0 Quote 941-629-2884 Quote Quote Quote
Rates provided by The National Financial News Services and are valid as of June 16, 2005 and are subject to change without notice. Quotes-apply to single family, owner-occupied dwellings and are based on a
$120,000 loan amount. Rates are inclusive ol discount, origination, and brokerage fees. Contact lender directly for APR's. N/A -program not offered. LIP- Lock-in Period (days)= Guarantee of rate during process
I ,r I :,r.), u1 i :0,) h..i "ui W:- i;ll, li h .,I11 ..il l ,l li. ;'! Foradditionalinformation on mortgages, go to: www.SarasotaMortgageRates.com.


5. LOOK FOR THE
NEXT VENICE

CITY COUNCIL

AGENDA



IN THE VENICE

GONDOLIER ON SUNDAY

JUNE 26zs, 2005






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4242 S. Tamiami Trail
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I T PW VINIB-F kUI'4U%.JILn JUI N


I Learn About: I~


Monday, June 20, 2005 10:00 AM
For Reservations call

485-5486
(Leave Message)


16A VEINICE GONDOLIEIR SUN







Venice Gondolier Sun


SUNDAY,
JUNE 19, 2005

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com

RECIPES AND MORE 28


PETS IN HISTORIC HOTELS 86


SECTION



l.-1


VACATIONING IN VENICE 14B


FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST


Dads, enjoy

your day

Three cheers to all the dads
who know one of the most im-
portant things in life is being
one of the most important peo-
ple to your children.
Heard in church
Once the snowbirds leave
town everyone is hurting for
volunteers including Epiph-
any Cathedral. One Sunday
the pastor, the Rev. George
Ratzmann, was encouraging
members to become ushers.
"If you like to tell people
where to go," Father said,
"This is the job for you."
New in town
With all the building going
on in Venice, it's always fun to
meet new neighbors who
want to make a difference.
Pat Short decided when
she was 12 and traveling in
Florida she wanted to live
here. Her dream finally came
true when she retired. She
comes from Cape Cod.
Pat has already discovered
the Miami Avenue shops, the
Venice Art Center, the Venice
Little Theatre, Epiphany Ca-
thedral and is getting season
tickets to the Venice Sym-
phony. No doubt you'll be
seeing her photo in Our Town.
Jim VanLalen graduated
from the KMI. He left the
quiet little town of Venice and
never returned. When the
school was having its reunion
a few years ago, Jim's wife,
Judy, almost had to force him
to attend. After one day here,
he phoned her and said he
found paradise.
Jim and Judy bought Bob
Anderson's house on south
Harbor. Jim is already retired
and Judy can't wait to bring
her design business here from
Roanoke, Va.
Jim said it touched his
heart to see the families lined
up for the Christmas parade. I
can only imagine how he'll
feel when he sees the event in
clear weather and not the
downpour we had last year.
Linda and Rob Clark bring
their real estate business to
Venice from Sarasota. While
it's only a short distance, this
wise couple knows they want
to be part of paradise.
Congratulations
Kathy Cellura is the new
president of the College Club
of Venice. In addition to her
leadership in the club, Kathy
finds time to work with the
grants board of the Plantation
and the Venice Opera Guild.
When it comes to leader-
ship in this town, Jackie Ken-
nedy is one of the best. The
Women's Club of Venice re-
cently named her the "Serto-
man of theYear." Jackie is also
the president elect of the
group.
Pat on the back
On a layover while travel-
ing recently, Don and Mary
O'Nesky spotted two military
men and asked the duo if they
could treat them to lunch.
While eating the young men
told Don and Mary they were
on leave from Iraq.
One of the men showed the
rosary beads he always car-
ried in his pocket. He said his
grandpa gave them to him.
Grandpa said he carried those
beads in his pocket when he
served at Pearl Harbor during
World War II and when he
came home. Now he wants
his grandson to do the same.


ather's


Dad
By Alex Banks
V 'Tou are very special to me
You are the greatest
bYou never give up
You are an amazing cook
I love you for what you are


The Perfect Daddy
By Htuner Cross

Dad you are so kind
Dad you are so very nice
I know you love me
Forever until you die
And you know that I love you


FATHER'S DAY POETRY BY MRS. NAPLE'S FIFTH-GRADE CLASS VENICE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


Dad .ke s a 5lice of AvipieA :n
o Dad are w..hat or when or wY, "-::'
u never lt oo ow You kiss me good night i da
Buthe will awaslove to show You help,mewith my hornewvork ,
That ing what lhe ke ddy I love you ,
And

luttt adoisa labda weird, Mot I
soiiyour avbe a beard.
,me,1 feeteoe ra.I. always true'
l1st know he loves .ou-
you lovees hiDId an
World's Best Dad!
By Cara Patete By Jake Ittel


You're always there to talk with-me,
You're always there to walk with me.
To comfort me on rainy days
When it's sunny out with me you'll play.
Nobody could ever keep us apart.
'Cause you're the one who's the key to my heart.


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SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


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PHOTO COURTESY OF WOODY MILTENBERGER
Ray Rodgers submitted this action shot of Josh Boyle hitting the ball out of the park when Roberts Nationwide faced
Venice-Nokomis Rotary on June 16. Ray is Josh's Big Brother mentor. Josh received three As and three Bs on his report
card at Venice Middle School for the last period of the school year.


Pelican Man donations needed


The Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary is in need of all sizes
of animal carriers and bird
cages. Please call the sanctu-.
ary at 388-4444 or drop off
donations at the hospital
entrance, 1708 Ken Thomp-
son Parkway, Sarasota.

ILLUSTRATION FROM 'TALKING EYES"
COURTESY OF ILSE KERN


"Talking Eyes" by Venice
resident Ilse Kern, is pub-
lished by Havert Press and is
available for $19.98 at the
following stores:
* The Book Shop
241 W. Venice Ave.
Venice
,488-1307


* Frames by the Thousands
110W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood
474-4413
* Sarasota News & Books
1341 Main St.
Sarasota
365-6332


Sarasota Chorus

makes history


For the first time since its
inception 55 years ago, The
Chorus of the Keys will rep-
resent Sarasota at the
Barbershop Harmony Soci-
ety's International Competi-
tion in Salt Lake City the
week of July 4. As part of their
fund-raising effort to help
cover the expense of taking
more than 75 men, the non-
profit chorus organization is


offering a unique opportuni-
ty for individuals or groups
to participate in a raffle. A
total of 200 tickets will be
available at $100 each, and
the drawing will be held June
28.
The holder of the winning
ticket will win $10,000 or 50
percent of the ticket sales.
For more information, call
Mike Miller at 359-2403.


Now you can take


the Gondolier


Sun with


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and keep in touch with all the local
news for just $2.95 a month.
The Gondolier Sun E Edition is an exact
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CONTACT US
DEBBIE SHULMAN
VENUE EDITOR
(941) 207-1106
dshulman@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun



VENICE VTHE LOCAL
SJuli IL 1 SCENE


3B
SUNDAY
JUNE 19, 2005


SUNDAY,
JUNE 19
Legion entertainment
The Larry Williams Band
performs 4-8 p.m. at the
American Legion No-Vel Post
159, 145 E. Venice Ave. Call
488-1157.
Tenor concert
Local Julliard tenor, Chris-
topher Tiesi, performs at
Church of the Redeemer at
9 and 11 a.m. at 222 S. Palm
Ave., Sarasota. Tiesi, who
recently performed in the
church's Puccini-Fest, will
sing Caesar Franck's "Panis
Angelicus" and "Ave Maria" by
Charles Gounod. All are wel-
come. Call 955-4263.

MONDAY,
JUNE 20
Music makers
* TheVenice Gondoliers Men's
Barbershop Chorus rehearses
Monday at 6:30 p.m. at
Venice-Nokomis United
Methodist Church, 208 Palm
Ave., Nokomis. All men who
like to sing are welcome. Call
484-6333 or 484-3966.
* The Venetian Harmony
Chorus rehearses Mondays at
7 p.m. at United Church of
Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd.,
Venice. All area women are
welcome. Call 907-9545.
* Hear live acoustic music at
Books-A-Million, 4230 South
Tamiami Trail in Venice, every
first and third Monday, 7-9:30
p.m. Call Richard Brobst at
408-9515.
Dancing
Intermediate line dance
classes take place at Jaca-
randa Trace, Mondays, 7:15-
8:45 p.m. $4 per class.
Instructor: Jackie Wheeler.
Call 493-2776.
Masons
The Venice Lodge 301 F &AM
holds a stated communica-
tion at 7:30 p.m. at 118 E.
Venice Ave. All members of
the order welcome. For more
information, call 484-0311.
Estate planning
Attorney Charles E Wheeler
leads an Estate Planning for
Peace of Mind seminar at 10
a.m. at Jacaranda Public
Library, 4143 Woodmere Park
Blvd. in Venice. Wheeler will
assist with living wills and
trusts and will touch on
recent tax law changes affect-
ing estate planning. No res-
ervations necessary. For more
information, call 861-1270.
Balloon art
PitterPat the clown demon-
strates the basics of balloon
twisting for teens ages 9-13 at
3 p.m. at Elsie Quirk Public
Library, 100 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. All balloon sup-
plies are free. Register by
calling 861-12122.

Senior Friendship Center in
Venice, 2350 Scenic Drive,
584-0075
* Camera Club, Mondays, 10
a.m. Free, donations encour-
aged.
* Dancercise, Mondays, 11
a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Shuffleboard
Venice huffleboard Club
meets at 9 a.m. every Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday.
Lessons available. Call Barb-
ara at 485-1678.
Trippin'
Women on the Go Solo meet
every third Monday, 2:30-4
p.m. at Venice Public Library,
300 S. Nokomis Ave., to dis-
cuss travel tips and local trip
planning.
Seniors group
Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-


3:30 p.m. for a meeting and
cards. Call 485-8739.
Meditate
Kelsang Donwang leads a
beginners Buddhist medita-
tion, Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m., at
Woodmere Community Cen-


ter, Room 2-B, 3951 Wood-
mere Park Blvd., Venice. Do-
nation: $5-$9. Call 373-1600 or
visit meditationinflorida.org.

TUESDAY,
JUNE 21
Elks dinner
The Venice Nokomis Elks
Lodge holds a ham dinner,
5-7 p.m. at 119 E. Venice Ave.
Cost is $6. Call 486-1854.
Officers lunch meeting
The local section of the Flor-
ida Chief Petty Officers' As-
sociation holds its monthly
meeting at 11:30 a.m. at the
Honoluana Tiki Bar and
Grille, 504 South Tamiami
Trail in Venice. All retired or
active duty Chief Petty Officers
in the U.S., Navy or Coast
Guard are eligible and wel-
come to attend. RSVP to CPO
Chuck Regan at 488-7885.
Showtime
Jacaranda Public Library
shows "Mystic River" at 2 p.m.
in the meeting room at 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd. in Ven-
ice. Free movie and popcorn.


Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0052
* 10 a.m.-noon, Tuesdays, Be-
ginners Basket Weaving with
Barbara and Chris.
* 10 a.m., Tuesdays,, Pine
Needle Weaving.
Dance events
* Summer square dance plus-
level workshops will be held
3-5 p.m. Tuesday, June 7-
Sept. 27 at the Country Club
Estates Clubhouse, 700 North
Waterway on Venice island.
Cost is $5 per person at the
door. Call Gayle at 484-0066.
* Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays
Center, 303 South Tamiami
Trail in Nokomis, offers
Argentine Tango Basics for
Beginners, 8-9:30 p.m. $10.
Call 486-0326.
Good sports
Certified Pilates instructor
Randi Green teaches an on-
going six-week session with
exercise ball for beginners
Tuesday, 4-5:15 p.m. at Se-
renity Gardens in the Brick-
yard Plaza in Venice. Cost is
$75 for six weeks or $15 for
Walk-ins. For more informa-
tion, call 497-2239.
Tuesday bingo
Venice Gardens Civic Center,
406 Shamrock Blvd., doors
open at 11 a.m., bingo starts at
noon. Hot dogs and snacks
available. Public welcome.
Call 493-6541.

WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 22
Architect appearance


PHOTO COURTESY OF AFHU
Michael Arad, the acclaimed
designer of the World Trade
Center Memorial, speaks at a
cocktail reception for Amer-
ican Friends of The Hebrew
University, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at
G. Wiz, the Hands-on Science
Museum, 1001 Boulevard of
the Arts in Sarasota. Arad was
selected from 5,201 competi-
tors for his design, "Reflecting
Absence." Space is limited
and reservations are required.
For more information, call
AFHU at (800) 899-2348.


BEST BETS
THE LOCAL SCENE JUNE 19 JUNE 21


SUN FILE GRAPHIC


Let's hear it for Dad!
- The Italian American Club of Venice holds its annual Father's
Day breakfast at 8 a.m. Sunday, June 19 at 1375 Ringling Drive.
Enjoy eggs pancakes, bacon, sausage, home fries, fruit, toast,
juice and coffee. Tickets are on sale now: 55 for members and
56 for nonmembers. Call Carol at 493-6279.
- Disabled American Veterans hosts a Father's Day ham dinner
by Tony, Sunday, 2-4 p.m. at 600 Colonia Lane in Nokomis.
Donation: $5. All are welcome. Call 492-6697 or 488-4500.

Association meeting
The South Venice Civic Association, 720 Alligator Drive, meets
Monday, June 20 at 7 p.m. County Planner Jane Grogg and
Patrick Jaehne of Waterford Companies are speakers. Dessert
and coffee after the business meeting. All are welcome. This is
the last general meeting until September. Call 493-0006.

Stamp club
The Venice Stamp Club meets Tuesday, June 21 at 7 p.m. at
Venice Public Library, 300 S. Nokomis Ave. Dr. Peter McCann,
past president of the APS, presents Postal History of the British
Virgin Islands. Newcomers and guests welcome. Call Jim at
486-8607 for more information.

Shakespeare
The Shakespeare reading and discussion group meets at Selby
Public Library, 1331 First St., Sarasota, Tuesdays. 2-3:30 p.m. All
are welcome. Call 721-8390 or 924-3710.


Wednesday bingo
6 p.m. at the American Legion
No-Vel Ppst 159, 145 E. Venice
Ave. For more information,
call 488-1157.
Food bank
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services and All Faiths Food
Bank distribute free USDA
commodities to eligible Sara-
sota County residents, 3-5
p.m., at the Laurel Commun-
ity Center, 509 Collins Road.
Call 483-3338.
Kayak and snorkel
The American Littoral Society
invites you to kayak the near-
shore waters of the Gulf of
Mexico from Turtle Beach
county park to Point of Rocks,
8:30-11:30 a.m. Snorkel
among the fish, mollusks,
crustaceans and other critters
of the Gulf in a shallow rocky
area. Bring snorkel equipment
and sunscreen. All kayak
equipment provided. Cost:
$20 for ALS members, $25 for
nonmembers. RSVP to John
at 966-7308.

Read all about it
Venice Public Library's Con-
temporary Book Discussion
Group meets at 7 p.m. the
fourth Wednesday of each
month at 300 S. Nokomis Ave.
June 22, the book is Erik
Larson's "The' Devil in' the
White City." All are welcome.
College info session
Busy adults can learn about
earning a bachelor degree at
an Eckerd College information
session, 5:30 p.m. at Sarasota
Center, 2050 Oak St. RSVP to
957-3397 or visit eckerd.edu/
pel.


Dancing
* Lola Miller leads line dance
lessons on Wednesdays at
Venice United Church of
Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd.
Beginners lessons, 5:30-6:30
p.m.; intermediate, 6:30-8:30
p.m. Cost: $4. Call Miller at
493-9665.
* The Senior Friendship Cen-
ter at Epiphany Parish Hall,
305 W. Tampa Ave. in Venice,
holds free ballroom dancing
Wednesday at 10 a.m. No
partner required. Donations
accepted. Call Kathie Mc-
Murrian at 584-0052.
* Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays
Center, 303 South Tamiami
Trail in Nokomis, holds ball-
room dancing every Wednes-
day and Friday. Group lesson
7-8 p.m.; open dancing until
10 p.m. $7, snacks included.
Call 486-0326.

Senior Friendship Centers,
Epiphany Parish Hall, 305 W.
Tampa Ave., Venice
* Quilting with Liz, 9:30 a.m.
Call 493-3065.
* Beginners Spanish, 1-3 p.m.
Call 584-0052.

Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0052
* Yoga In/Around a Chair,
Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
* Wednesday Walkers, 9 a.m.
* Italian, Wednesdays, 2:45
p.m.
* Attorney consultations,
Wednesday 9:30-11:30 a.m.
with Elizabeth Weis, Attorney
Emeritus with Legal Aid of
Manasota. Reserve your time
slot by calling 584-0075.
Masterpieces
The first session of the Sara-
sota Music Archive's Masters


and Masterpieces Forum
takes place with an overview
of the classical period, 10:30-
11:45 a.m. at Selby Library,
Geldbart Auditorium, 1331
First St. Presented by Dr. John
Goodman. No prior knowl-
edge necessary; all sessions
are free and open to the pub-
lic. To learn more, call 861-
1175 or e-mail vneumann@
scgov.net.

THURSDAY,
JUNE 23
Horse show


Thursday bingo
* 11 a.m. Senior Friendship
Center, 2350 Scenic Drive.
Call 493-3065.
* noon, The Jewish Commun-
ity Center of Venice, 600
Auburn Road, nonsmoking.
Hard cards available for sight-
impaired players. Doors open
at 10 a.m. Lunch available.
Call 493-7558.

Women's Resource Center of
Sarasota County, 806 Pine-
brook Road, Venice, 485-9724
* Beginners yoga Thursdays,
10-11:30 a.m. and 5:45-7 p.m.
Bring a mat. Men welcome.
Fee: $5.
** Be Connected: Featuring the
State of Michigan, 2:30-5 p.m.
Meet over coffee with your
neighbors from Michigan and
learn about the WRCSC. Free.
* Starting Over: A Support
Group, 3:30-5 p.m. Fee: $5.


PHOTO COURTESY OF AQHA.COM
INF 24


The Fox Lea Farm Summer
Shows, an American Quarter
Horse Association-approved
show, will be held June 23-26
at the Fox Lea Farms inVenice.
All horse owners and fans are
welcome. Call Meredith "Peg"
Edmondson at 484-4687 or
visit aqha.com.
Legion entertainment
Brass Rings perform and burg-
ers and wings served 5-8 p.m.
at the American Legion No-Vel
Post 159, 145 E. Venice Ave.
Call 488-1157.
Dancing
Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays
Center, 303 South Tamiami
Trail in Nokomis, holds be-
ginners dance night every
Thursday, 7:30-9 p.m. Learn
steps all evening with four
teachers available to help. $5,
snacks included. For more
information, call 486-0326.
Showtime
* Jacaranda Public Library
screens the children's movie
"Shiloh" at 10 a.m. at 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd. in Ven-
ice. The 1997 movie is based
on the book by Phyllis Naylor
and is rated PG. Popcorn and
refreshments served. A little
later, see "Ladder 49" at 2 p.m.
and, as part of Cannes in
Venice Film Festival, see "The
Pianist" at 5 p.m., based on the
memoirs of Polish-Jewish vir-
tuoso Wladyslaw Szpilman.
Admission is free.
* Venice Public Library hosts
thriller-chillers, Thursdays at 6
p.m. in June. See Harrison
Ford and Michelle Pfeiffer in
"What Lies Beneath" on June
23 at 300 S. Nokomis Ave.
Connecticut Club
Connecticut Club member-
ship is open to anyone who
has lived in Connecticut and
is a great place for newly re-
tired people in Sarasota and
Manatee Counties to make
new friends. The next Summer
Fun meeting takes place at 5
p.m. at the Roaring 20s Pizza
and Pipes at 6750 North U.S.
Highway 301 in Ellenton, 1-75,
Exit 224. RSVP to Frank or
Sarah Clark at 341-0504.
Embroiderers meet
Sarasota Chapter, Embroid-
erers' Guild of America Inc.,
Night Needlers, holds a
monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m.
the fourth Thursday of the
month- at Fruitville Library,
100 Coburn St., Sarasota. Call
351-7011.

Senior Friendship Center, 2350
Scenic Drive, 584-0052
* Quilting for Fun, Thursdays,
9-11:30 a.m. Bring own mate-
rials.
* Beginner Bridge, Thursdays,
9 a.m,
* Shell craft class, Thursdays,
1-3 p.m. in the Transportation
Building.


I yi-t K s __
Flute circle
The Venice Native American
Flute Circle for beginners
takes place 7-8 p.m. at Se-
renity Gardens, Brickyard
Plaza, 530 South U.S. 41
Bypass. It is not necessary to
read music or have a flute to
participate. Call Serenity
Gardens at 486-3577 or e-mail
Ann-Marie at veniceflutecir-
cle@verizon.net.
Club entertainment
* The Tony D Band performs
at dinner, 7-10 p.m. at the
American Legion No-Vel Post
159, 145 E. Venice Ave. Call
488-1157.
* The Venice Elks Club pre-
sents live music in the lounge
Friday, 7-10 p.m. at 119 E.
Venice Ave. Members and
guests welcome.
Pasta
Lotsa Pasta is available 4:30-
7:30 p.m. Friday at the Italian
American Club of Venice,
1375 Ringling Blvd. Cost is
$7. Take out is available. Call
486-1492.
Songs and stories
Recording artist "Mrs. Kate"
Carpenter shares her original
Florida folk songs in a family
friendly concert, 10:30 a.m. at
Selby Public Library, Geldbart
Auditorium, .1331 First St.,
Sarasota, and at 6:30 p.m. at
Jacaranda Public Library,
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Venice. Recommended for
ages 6 and older. Call the
Sarasota County Library
System at 861-5000 or visit
mrskate.com.

Senior Friendship Center,
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0052
* Balance movement class,
Friday, 9 a.m. Includes
warm-ups and simple
strength building. It is rec-
ommended that individuals
attend the Balance Matters
Falls Prevention introduction
before starting this class. Call
556-3223.
* Duplicate Bridge, Fridays, 1
p.m.

RSVP
Dance
Gotta Dance Studio holds a
first anniversary bash 8-11
p.m. Saturday, June 25 at 4-
Bays Center, 303 South Tam-
iami Trail in Nokomis. Open
dancing between dance dem-
onstrations, prizes galore,
great music, hors d'oeuvres
and wine. Tickets: $15.
Everyone welcome. For more
information, call 486-0326.
Boating course
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 82 holds a one-
day American Boating Course
Saturday, June 25 at 9 a.m. on
+ht third flUr' nf +th KA .tinr


Ue JLUUn L Uuor o eeA ..Jlwng
Music for kids Building, Mote Marine
The Earthlings Electric Wash- Laboratory, Kenasota. Thompson
board Band musical group course is required for persons
performs at 10 a.m. and again under age 21 to operate boats
at 11:15 a.m. at Selby Public underage2l t o operate boats
Library, Geldbart Auditorium, withmore than 9.9 horsepow- famil
,1331 First St., Sarasota. Rec includes book and materials.
ommended for ages 5 and Register by calling Mr. Alfred
younger. No registration re-
qufred. Call 861-1174. Please see VENUE, 12B


Ilir 'i~lLB~,.lB






Venice Gondolier Sun



4B L
SUNDAY
JUNE 19,2005 B


CONTACT US
JEREMY ROTTGEN
WELL-BEING EDITOR
(941) 207-1143
jrottgen@venicegondolier.com


toward helping arthritis


PHOTO COURTESY OF FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF VENICE
The "Awesome Powers" of the First Baptist Church of Venice participated in the Arthritis
Walk. The month of May was national arthritis month. Linda Emmons, project manager
for the Arthritis Foundation Southwest Region, said the Arthritis Walks brought in more
$60,000. The foundation takes care of Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee, Collier, Hardee,
Desoto and Highlands counties. In this eight-county region Arthritis Walks were held,
which are a nationwide event. The foundation held its first walk in the Venice area at the
Wellfield Complex. The day was beautiful and more than 50 participants raised more
than $5,000. Food and music were all part of the walk's challenge to raise money and
support the efforts of the foundation.


Local man turns pints into gallons


STAFF REPORT

Richard Kozlowski donat-
ed blood on the Big Red Bus
at the Venice Yacht Club on
Tuesday, June 7, and won a
prepaid gas card for 55 gal-
lons. June is "Pints For Gal-
lons" month at Florida's
Blood Centers. Everyone
who donates blood during
the month of June is auto-
matically entered into a
drawing for a pre-paid gas
card for 55 gallons. One win-
ner will be drawn each day.
If you do not win on the day
you donate you still have a


chance to win each remain-
ing day of the month.
Think about it 55 gal-
lons. That's a barrel of gaso-
line. Did you know it takes 55
gallons of blood to save lives
daily in South Florida hospi-
tals served by Florida's Blood
Centers? That's 440 pints per
day. This means 440 people
need to donate 1 pint of
blood each day.
Come join our life-saving
family and help ensure an
adequate blood supply is
available to our local commu-
nity. Locally, Florida's Blood
Centers is the sole provider of


blood and blood products for
Venice Regional Medical
Center and Englewood Com-
munity Hospital.
To donate blood, you must
be in good health, 17 years of
age or older and weigh a min-
imum of 110 pounds. As a
benefit to the donor, a mini
health check, which includes
evaluations of blood pressure,
iron level and cholesterol, is
performed to help the donor
maintain his or her good
health. The entire procedure,
from completing a short

Please see PINTS, 12B


Suncoast Communities Blood Bank reschedules Golf


STAFF REPORT

Due to Tropical Storm
Arlene, Suncoast Commun-
ities Blood Bank is reschedul-
ing its 17th Annual Duffers &
Donors Golf Tournament that
was set for June 11. The golf
tournament is rescheduled to
take place on the following
dates:
* Stoneybrook Golf Course
location, July 9


* Meadows Golf Course loca-
tion, July 9
* Longboat Key Club Course
location, Sept. 10
The Blood Bank will
remind golf tournament par-
ticipants prior to these re-
schedule dates of the event
and details. Due to the can-
cellation, Suncoast Com-
munities Blood Bank is ex-
tending the entry date for the
golf tournament.


Anyone interested in play-
ing in the upcoming tourna-
ment is welcome to make a
blood donation or recruit
someone to donate for them
to qualify to play. To find out
how to make a blood dona-
tion or for details regarding
entry qualifications, please
call 954-1600, Ext. 240. Walk-
ins are welcome. One blood
donation can save up to three
lives. 4


ADVERTISEMENT
WORDS WORTH
HEARING









By Vicki Connell,
M.A., CCC-A
Certified Audiologist
Q. I recently purchased two
hearing aids from a local
hearing aid retailer that
advertised, "Buy one get
the 2nd hearing aid at half
price." They told me they
were digital hearing aids
but they still amplify a lot'
of back ground noise. I
can't even use them on the
phone because they whistle.
I thought digital hearing
aids were supposed to work
better than this. What's
wrong?
A. Not all digital hearing aids
are alike! Each manufacturer
has their own design which
may, or may not, be suitable
for your particular type of
hearing loss. Hearing retail
stores like Miracle Ear,
Beltone and Audibel are only
allowed to offer the hearing
aids made by their
manufacturers so they won't
mention many features that
could benefit you. On the
other hand, Audiologists have
access to all hearing aids and
are able to pick and choose
those features which will be
most beneficial to your
lifestyle. Even though
persons like you try their best
to be informed about
different types of hearing
aids, there is simply no way
you can know all of the
different features available
on a hearing aid and which
ones are right for you. That is
why you should always seek
a second opinion before
making a decision to
purchase-hearing aids. If you
had done so, you could be
using hearing aids with
directional microphones that
eliminate back ground noise.
You also could have
benefited from an Auto coil,
which automatically couples
the hearing aid to a telephone
so no whistling occurs. To
learn more about the latest
features available in digital
hearing aids or to get a
second opinion before
making a hearing aid
purchase. Call the
Audiologists at Woodmere
Hearing & Balance Center
at 492-4327.
Jacaranda Office Park
4120 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Suite 8A
(across from Jacaranda
Public Library)


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on the Island"


DR. SCOTT WALKER
Board Certified Optometrist
Eye Examinations Contact Lenses
Fashion Eyewear Diseases of the Eye
Accepts Medicare Assignments
The Pattison Building
262 West Miami Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285
485-2468


Dr. Julio Gonzalez, of the Orthopaedic Center
of Venice, is pleased to announce the opening
of his second location at 13815 Tamiami Trail
in North Port. Please call our Venice office for
appointments at either location.


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From a common cold
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Chie Cre of Venice
Walk-in Clinic


Appearances Count!
Don't Let Yours Be Ruined by Imperfections.
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other pigmented lesions with
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Free banners for boaters: Help protect

Manatees this 4th of July weekend


STAFF REPORT


They're being used more
and more on the waterways by
concerned citizens bright
yellow banners from Save the
Manatee Club, designed to
make it quick and easy to
communicate with approach-
ing boaters whenever mana-
tees are spotted in the area.
The free waterproof banner
which reads, "Please Slow:
Manatees Below," alerts boat-
ers to the presence of mana-
tees with the intent to slow
boaters down to help prevent
manatee injuries and deaths.
"The 4th of July weekend is
one of the busiest holiday
weekends of the year, and the
county waterways will be
very active," said Judith Vallee,
Save the Manatee Club's Exe-
cutive Director. "Manatees
face ever-increasing threats
mostly from human activities,
and the largest known cause
of manatee mortality is from
collisions with boats. Hope-
fully, people will watch out for
manatees, and those who
have the banners will use them
to help slow down boat traffic
if manatees are spotted."
A number of waterways
that have been documented


as having high manatee use
include the Peace River,
Charlotte Harbor, Turtle Bay
and the southern portion of
Lemon Bay.
Those who plan to be out
on the waterways this 4th of
July weekend should follow
some general guidelines to
help protect these fascinating,
endangered animals. Wear
polarized sunglasses as they
can help eliminate the glare of
the sun and can help you see
below the water's surface. Stay
in deep water channels and
follow all posted boat speed
regulations. Avoid boating
over shallow vegetation beds
where manatees might be
feeding. Look for the mana-
tee's snout, back, tail, or flip-
per breaking the surface of the
water; a swirl or a flat spot on
the water signals a manatee
may be swimming below.
And if you see a manatee
when operating a powerboat,
remain a safe distance away-,
about 50 feet. If you want to
observe the manatee, cut the
motor, but don't drift over the
animal.
Also, if you spot an injured,
dead, tagged or orphaned
manatee, or if you see a man-
atee who is. being harassed,


call (888) 404-FWCC (3922) or
#FWC or *FWC on your cellu-
lar phone, or use VHF Channel
16 on your marine radio.
Florida boaters can request
a free "Please Slow: Manatees
Below" banner by contacting
Save the Manatee Club at
education@savethemanatee.
org, by 500 N. Maitland Ave.,
Maitland, FL 32751, or by call-
ing toll free at (800) 432-JOIN
(5646). Just include your
name, mailing and' e-mail
addresses, and the area where
you boat in Florida. Also, if
you are a Florida shoreline
property owner, you can get
a free aluminum sign for
your dock that reads, "Please
Watch for Manatees: Operate
With Care." Be sure to include
your name and mailing ad-
dress and the address where
the sign will be posted, if dif-
ferent.
Manatee protection tips
are available at savethemana-
tee.org/boatertips.htm. For
more information on mana-
tees, the Adopt-A-Manatee
program, or Save the Manatee
Club programs and activities,
visit savethemanatee.org, call
the toll free number listed
above, or send a request via
regular mail.


Baas~P~~raer~sP88~P ~H 4


Donations needed
The Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary is in need of all
sizes of animal carriers and
bird cages. Please call the
sanctuary at 388-4444 or
drop off donations at the
hospital entrance, 1708
Ken Thompson Parkway,
Sarasota.


Wild Florida
. Englewood's Elsie .Quirk
Library hosts a series of pro-
gram for ages 5-11 on the
Florida environment, 1:30
p.m. Monday, through July
25. June 20: Gardening with
Patricia Porchey; July 11:
Salt Water Aquariums with
Keith Wilson; July 18:


Bf'II


Birdwatching with Kathi
Rader-Gibson; and July 25:
Sea Turtles. The library is
located at 100 W. Dearborn
St. .Individual registration
not required, but groups
must register by calling
861-1212.

Please see NATURE, 12B


Botanical



exhibit opens at Selby


"Paphiopedilum" by Ruth
Ann Wetherby-Frattasio
Marie Selby Botanical
Gardens, 811 S. Palm Ave.,
Sarasota, presents a
unique botanical watercol-
or and textile exhibit
titled "Flowers and Fibers:
Needle and Brush," featur-
ing works by watercolor
artist RuthAnn Wetherby-
Frattasio and textile artist
Maureen Ridley. The
exhibit is open 10 a.m.-
5 p.m. daily through July
13 and is included in regu-
lar Garden's admission:
$12 for adults, $6 for chil-
dren ages 6-12, and free
for Garden's members and
children 5 and younger.


PHOTO COURTESY OF SELBY GARDENS


A decision as i


important as the community itselF. j


Open a business account,
and get this extensive
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941.485.3699
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At Sarasota Memorial, we're much more than a hospital. We're a community-owned hospital. So for
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Unlike other area hospitals, we don't cut programs people need simply because they're unprofitable.
Instead, we bring superior, affordable health care to our.neighbors and local businesses in meaningful
and innovative ways. And when we do turn a profit, we turn it back into the services you need.
Call 941-917-7777 or visit smh.com and get to know the only area hospital that operates strictly for
the common good. Which makes us uncommonly proud.
SARASOTA
MEMORIAL
HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
A decision as important as lif itself


5B
SUNDAY
JUNE 19,2005


Gardens


~lj~;~,i~-~drg~i~k~gji~BB~i~j~d~96~'~~ 'i~b;llj~USPHd~-F~-~sp"~sp~rulgP;-u-s~i


'';I ..? I







Venice Gondolier Sun



6B 9,05SIORS
SUNDAY
JUNE 19, 2005 01(


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941)o207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


Venice: A tale of two cities


KEITH BACKIHAIUS
GUEST COLUMNIST

Venice is two cities. Like
the rest of Sarasota County,
Venice is really two cities of
older adults living a different
life.
The largest city is living the
Florida dream. They live in a
nice home, safe neighbor-
hood with a social network.
They are in good health and
connected to family and
friends. They enjoy the beau-
tiful sunsets and access the
amenities available.
But there is a significant
minority of elders who are in
trouble. This second city of
older adults is struggling;


despite a lifetime of hard
work, they live on the edge of
a financial precipice. These
elders are devoted to family
and country but they are
mostly living a bad dream.
These elders live side by side
with the other group of active
healthy elders. They could be
only a few streets away. But
for sure they live within your
community, maybe on your
street. We often do not recog-
nize them or unintentionally
ignore their soft call for help.
About five years ago we
started training many com-
munity groups and service
clubs to be on the lookout for
this second city of older
adults. We asked them to be-
come SCOUTS. The program
is designed to systematically
locate and identify high-risk
older adults, particularly
those who are isolated, living
alone and in need of some
type of assistance to maintain
their independence. The
SCOUTS became the eyes
and ears for locating these
elders. They referred these
folks to us so we could con-


Going to the birds


VIRGINIA DEUPREE
GUEST COMINI!ST

Did you ever see two birds
attacking and killing a snake?
No? Neither did I! A friend told
me recently that she and her
husband spent a fascinating
30 minutes watching two
mockingbirds methodically
aggregate and torture a black
snake. One bird pranced
around the snake, tempting it


until it was ready to strike.
Meanwhile, the other bird
would peck at the back of the
snake's head. These actions
continued until the snake
finally died. Do you suppose it
had stolen the birds' eggs
from the nest? I dunno!
My mother always said,
"The more you know, the
more you know you don't
know!" I know almost nothing
about birds, but as in my old-
reporting days, I ask ques-
tions. I discovered almost
everyone has a bird story to
tell. My most memorable bird
experience is visiting the Ding
Darling Wildlife Sanctuary on
Sanibel Island: We were at the
entrance at sunset and
watched five roseate spoon-
bills flying in perfect forma-
tion, gracefully gliding down
Please see DEUPREE, 7B


nect them with community
resources and Friendly
Volunteers to help them live
with dignity and indepen-
dence in their own homes.
You see, just like the rest of us,
sometimes we are embar-
rassed or afraid to ask for
help. We think we might get
into trouble and we are not
sure whom we can trust with
a family crisis. We do not want
to inconvenience our neigh-
bors or become a burden.
Here are the symptoms of
someone in trouble that you
can identify and then call us
at the Senior Friendship Cqn-,
ter. Our number is 584-0065
or 584-0060. We are NO sub-
stitute for 911. Look for sud-
den changes in:
Mental state memory
loss, confusion, disorienta-
tion
Physical change seeing,
speaking, hearing or sudden
weight loss, alcohol or sub-
stance abuse
Emotional state loss of
spouse, depressed, anxious or
withdrawn
Social state isolated, no


Lunch is served at noon at
Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0090 or 584-0031. Reser-
vations required' 24 hours in
advance. Suggested donation:
$3. All meals served with
bread and milk.
MONDAY, June 20: Meat-
loaf with tomato sauce, mash-
ed potatoes, mixed vegeta-
bles, old-fashioned peanut
butter cookie
Frozen alternative: Veal
patty with brown ^gravy,
mashed potatoes, carrot cuts
TUESDAY, June 21: Cream
of tomato soup, lemon pep-
per chicken legs, whipped
sweet potatoes, farmer's
greens with turkey ham
Frozen alternative: Spa-
ghetti with meat sauce, green
beans, chopped spinach
WEDNESDAY, June 22:
Butter bean and sausage cas-
serole, winter veggie medley,


social contact, neglected or
abused
Appearance change -
unkempt, dirty clothes
Home needs repair,
neglected yard, old newspa-
pers, unattended pets, offen-
sive odors
Economic confused
about money matters, prob-
lems paying bills, no food
Suicide multiple or re-
cent losses, talk of giving
away possessions, increased
alcohol abuse
If you or your organization
would like more training on
helping us, please call to
schedule a training session.
We believe that all of us
have an obligation to help
those most in need. Attend-
ing to the needs of frail, vul-
nerable older adults is every-
one's responsibility. As a com-
munity we need to break
down the walls that separate
these two cities.
Keith Backhaus is an elder
advocate with Senior Friend-
ship Centers-Venice. He
writes an occasional column
for this page.


hot raspberry applesauce,
oatmeal cookie
Frozen alternative: Un-
breaded chicken patty, rite
pilaf au gratin, seasoned car-
rots, broccoli cuts
THURSDAY, June 23: Fish
patty with dill -sauce, cut
green beans, mashed pota-
toes and cheese, tossed veggie
salad with Italian dressing
and fresh banana
Frozen alternative: Chick-
en nuggets, potatoes au gra-.
tin, corn and peas medley; -.
FRIDAY, June 24: Sliced
turkey with gravy, whipped
potatoes, green peas, cran-
berry orange relish mold
Frozen alternative: Oven-
broiled beef patty with brown
gravy, mashed potatoes, It-
alian flat beans


Available Medicare


preventive services


JIM MILLER
GUEST (OLtMCNISTf

Dear Savvy Senior,
My husband and I have made
our health a priority. We exer-
cise regularly, eat right and
remain trim. And, as recom-
mended, we go in for all the
required visits and tests. So far
we have been blessed with an
insurance company smart
enough to recognize the bene-
fits of early screenings. But I've
learned that Medicare doesn't
cover annual visits to the doctor
and I'm worried that when we
hit 65 we'll lose coverage for
some of the routine screenings
that are one of the cornerstones
for good health. What can you
tell me about this? Is Medicare
going to be there? Screened
in Scranton
Dear Screened,
Not to worry! While your
annual physical will have to
come out of your own pock-
et, Medicare will pick up the
tab for some key preventive
services that can help you
stay healthy.
Preventive health service
on your body is like preven-
tive maintenance on your
car. It helps them both run
better and last longer. That's
why Medicare is working to
make it easier for its benefi-
ciaries to. get more preventive
care services. Here is a list of
some of what's paid for:
Colorectal cancer screen-
ings for all people with
Medicare. Tests that are cov-
ered are: fecal occult blood
test (once every 12 months),


flexible sigmoidoscopy (once
every 48 months),
colonoscopy (every 24
months if you are at high risk
or every 10 years if you are
not), and barium enema
*(every 24 months if you are at
high risk).
Mammography for
breast cancer screening.
Available to all women once
Every 12 months.
*Pap smears and pelvic
examination for cervical can-
cer screening. Available to all
women and is covered every
24 months, unless you are at
high risk and then it will pay
for it once every l2 months.
Prostate cancer screen-
ings. Available to all men
every 12 months and
includes the digital rectal
exam and the prostate specif-
ic antigen (PSA) Tests.
Diabetes self-manage-
ment training, glucose moni-
tors, test strips and lancets.
Glaucoma testing done
by a licensed eye doctor who
is legally allowed to provide
this service in your state.
Available every 12 months to
people at high risk for the
disease (diabetes, family his-
tory of glaucoma, African
American).
Flu and pneumonia
shots, and Hepatitis B shot.
Bone mass measure-
ments to detect osteoporosis.
Available every 24 months.
Talk to your doctor to see if
you qualify.
Medicare coverage
The preventive services
that are listed are covered by
Medicare Part B, but not
completely. Medicare in most
cases will pay 80 percent,'
which means you'll pay the,
other 20 percent of the
approved amount (or a co-
payment amount) after pay-
ing the annual Part B
deductible. In some cases,
Please see MILLER, 7B


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ISNDAY ILNF 19. 005


MILLER from page 6B


SENIOR BRIEFS


however, the test may be fully
covered.
Also, many of these pre-
ventive services are for peo-
ple who are at high risk for
the particular disease. As to
what constitutes high risk is a
medical assessment, that will
have to be made by a doctor.
But it usually takes into
account you age, health and
family history.
For more information on
Medicare preventive services
visit medicare.gov/Health/
Overview.asp. Medicare also
offers a free publication
called "Medicare Preventive
Services To Keep You
Healthy" (publication 10110).
To order a copy, or for any
questions call Medicare at
(800) 633-4227.
Survivors benefits
Dear Savvy Senior,
Can you tell me about Social
Security benefits if my husband
dies? I have never held a full-
time job outside the home since
we married, and I'm worried
about what will happen to me, if
something should happen to
him. Worried Wanda
DearWanda,
It's a good concern, but if
something should happen to
him, Social Security can
probably help you! Many
peoplee don't know that Social
Seuritypays survivors insur-
ancm also known as survivors
benefits. In fact, today Social
Security pays monthly sur-
vivor's benefits to about 7
million Americans, almost 2
million of whom are children.
How it works is when
someone who has worked,
and paid into Social Security
dies, survivor benefits can be
paid to certain family mem-
bers. The number of work
credits a person needs to be
eligible depends on their age
at the time of death. But,
nobody needs more than 40
credits, which is 10 years of
work.
W ho are the survivors?
Social Security survivors
benefits can be paid to:
A widow or widower. They
can receive full benefits at full
retirement age (currently age
65), or reduced benefits as
early as age 60. A disabled
widow/widower may receive
benefits as early as age 50.
A widow or widower at
any age if they take care of
the deceased's child under
age 16 or disabled, who
receives Social Security bene-
fits.
Unmarried children under
18, or up to age 19 if they are
attending elementary or sec-
ondary school full-time. A
child can receive benefits at
any age if he or she was dis-
abled before age 22 and
remains disabled. Under cer-
tain circumstances, benefits
can also be paid to stepchil-
dren, grandchildren, or
adopted children.
Dependent parents at 62
or older.
How much do
survivors get?
The amount of survivors
benefit will depend on the
earnings of the person who
died. So, the more Social
Security taxes a person pays,
the higher the benefits will
be. The amount a widow or
widower receives also
depends on the age they are
when they start receiving
benefits. Here's a percentage
breakdown of what you
could expect:
Widow or widower full
retirement age (currently age
65) or older, 100 percent.
Widow or widower age 60
to 64, about 71-94 percent.
Widow or widower at any
age with a child under age 16,
75 percent.
Children, 75 percent.
Switching benefits
If a person is receiving
widow or widower's benefits,


they can switch to their own
retirement benefits as early
as age 62 (assuming they are
eligible and their retirement
rate is higher than the
widow/widower's rate). In
some cases, a widow/widow-
er can begin receiving one
benefit at a reduced rate and
then switch to the other ben-
efit at an unreduced rate at
full retirement age. However,
Please see MILLER, 13B


Health insurance help
SHINE (Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders) vol-
unteers will be available to
assist with health insurance
questions and concerns, 9
a.m.-noon, June 28 at Jaca-
randa Public Library, 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice.
No reservations necessary.
Call 861-1270.
Estate planning
Attorney Charles E Wheel-
er leads an Estate Planning
for Peace of Mind seminar
Monday, June 20, at 10 a.m. at


Jacaranda Public Library,
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd. in
Venice. Wheeler will assist
with living wills and trusts
and will touch on. recent tax
law changes affecting estate
planning. No reservations
necessary. Call 861-1270.
Seniors needed
The Senior Companion of
Southwest Florida needs se-
nior volunteers, age 60 or
older, to be companions and
friends to homebound se-
niors and others who have
difficulty with daily-living


tasks. Senior Companions
will serve 20 hours a week and
receive a tax-free stipend of
$2.65 an hour, plus mileage
reimbursement of $0.29 per
mile, plus an annual physical
exam. Call Joan at (800) 332-
5346.
Volunteers needed
for aging survey
The NORC (Naturally Oc-
curring Retirement Com-
munities) project is looking
for volunteers to participate
in a needs assessment survey.
NORC is a federal demonstra-


tion project designed to test
innovative strategies to em-
power seniors. Jewish Family
& Children's Service (JFCS) is
working in collaboration with
Catholic Charities, Senior
Friendship Center and USF to
develop the local project.
Contact Pamela Baron, NORC
Project Coordinator, JFCS at
366-2224 or pbaron@jfcs
cares.org.
Drivers program
The AARP's Driver Safety
Program, the oldest and most
recognized comprehensive


nationwide course designed
especially for the older driver,
consists of two, four-hour
training sessions and is of-
fered year-round at two loca-
tions in Venice, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
Monday and Tuesday or
Thursday and Friday. Cost is
$10 per person. Learn Getting
Started, Judging Yourself,
Physical Changes, Potential
Trouble Spots, Aggressive
Driving and Road Rage, Safety
Considerations and more.
Registration required; call

Please see SENIOR, 11B


DEUPREE r" ; '


to land. They made a beauti-
ful sight with their rosy-col-
ored breasts and spoon-
shaped beaks. A few minutes
later, I had my first glimpse of
a real stork (it wasn't carrying
any babies). A number of
large white storks had come
down to roost for the night.
Then I learned a friend
who lives near the Myakka
River often had visiting storks
and those big birds would
walk down the streets ignor-
ing the oncoming traffic! I
told her about a nervy gull
that snatched a hamburger
from my husband's hands at
Venice Beach. She then relat-
ed how sea gulls would some-
times steal a piece of meat
cooking on the outdoor grill!
If we had out-of-town visi-
tors, we would often take
them to the rookery of large
water birds behind the South
County courthouse. As I live a
very cloistered life with al-
most no vision, I called Dolly


and Dory in Venice and Lynn
in Connecticut, all members
of the local Audubon Society,
to ask questions. Lynn, a
snowbird, knows everything
about the birds in this part of
Florida and suggested this lit-
tle known South County
rookery.
The last time we visited the
rookery, Roger Tory Peterson,
world renowned in the bird-'
ing field, had been there tak-
ing, motion pictures of the
birds nesting. This was about
15 years ago. I am told that he
was the first to make the field
guides that the bird watchers
use on their study trips.
The rookery is located on a
very small island. The Bra-
zilian pepper trees on the lit-
tle hill make a perfect nesting
place for great blue heron,
egret and anhinga, and on
occasion, the black crown
night heron. And, Lynn tells
me, a small but feisty alligator
keeps the raccoons from


bothering the nests.
Wow! Am I impressed with
what I have learned.
I didn't know, until these
helpful ladies told me, that
the Audubon. Society has a
Visitors' Center in the main
building of the courthouse
(formerly occupied by the
Loveland School). They have
quite a collection of books
and pictures.
I suppose, in the balance of
nature, the morning dove has
its place. I have a particular
dislike for these birds: I find
them lazy and dirty. They
have the bad habit of nesting
in outdoor potted plants. Too
late I learned that a plastic
snake or red ribbon will keep
them away, since they are
afraid of snakes. Was I cruel
when I asked my husband to
destroy -the birds' eggs that
had been laid in one of my
hanging pots? For two weeks
thereafter one of the morning
doves dive-bombed me every


time I left my condo. How did
it know I was the culprit?
My high school helper's
mother, Ann Pinney, relates
this story:
My mother's childhood
friend, Mrs. Lindsay, was talk-
ing to her hospice nurse
about the difficult process of
a terminal illness, and death,
and the hereafter. The nurse,
trying to comfort and distract
her dying patient, asked her
what she would like to come
back as. Mrs. Lindsay replied,
after just a moment's con-
templation, "A cardinal!"
Later, after Mrs. Lindsay's
funeral and learning about
this conversation, my moth-
er, not buying into the here-
after business, sadly scoffed,
"We don't' have cardinals
around here ... it's too cold."
Not two days after this discus-
sion, a brilliantly vermillion
cardinal landed on their con-
dominium's bird bath and
proceeded to entertain the


residents with its cleaning
and preening techniques. My
mother was amazed and
delighted, but still not con-
vinced. It wasn't until
Mother's Day, and 1,200 miles
south, when my mother
looked up during a concert at
Selby Gardens and saw a car-
dinal perched and staring
right at her from a bamboo
branch, that she became a
believer. Now, it seems, that
Mrs. Lindsay is watching all of
us ... from Sarasota to Mich-
igan to New Jersey to Illinois.
And, we are waiting patiently
for her eldest daughter, tem-
porarily located in South
Africa, to announce -the ar-
rival of a familiar red bird.

Virginia Deupree, a 91-
year-old legally blind resident
of Harbor Chase of Venice,
was formerly the city editor
for the Pioneer in Big Rapids,
Mich. She writes an occasion-
al columnist for this page.


PLANTATION

SHUTTERS


Custom Toppers, Valances,
Swags, Cascades, Cornices
250 styles to choose, up to 60 styles on display


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B TRAVEL
SUNDAY
JUNE 19, 2005


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


Historic hotels went to the dogs years ago


National Trust Historic Hotels of America has an
affinity for animals of all shapes and sizes.


STAFF REPORT

Think pet-friendly hotels
are a recent phenomena?
Guess again.
Some of America's oldest
hotels have hosted guests of
all persuasions, from four-
legged friends to songbirds
and steers. While many made
their mark with a special
appearance, others are be-
loved residents or even val-
ued employees. Some His-
toric Hotels of America mem-,
ber hotels provide special
packages and amenities for
non-human guests. For a list
of more than 60 pet-friendly
hotels, visit the Historic
Hotels of America Web site,
historichotels.org/ cata
log/Vacations and_Leisure/P
et_Friendly.htm.
In addition to housing
guest pets, some of these his-
toric hotels showed their
affinity for animals and other
wild and domestic creatures
in a variety of ways.
For nearly 50 years in the
early 1900s, live alligators
graced the fountain of Palm
Court at the Jefferson Hotel
in Richmond, Va. According
to legend, travelers pur-
chased the gators for pets
while on vacation in Florida.
The creatures accompanied
them to Richmond and upon
checking out, the owners
decided tobestow them upon
the hotel. The 'gators reput-
edly had a hankering for the
finer things and bellmen
would often find them reclin-
ing on the h6tel's luxurious
lobby furniture.
In keeping with a long-
standing tradition, the Brown
Palace Hotel in Denver show-
cased the 2005 Grand Cham-
pion Steer from the National
Western Stock Show in its ele-
. gant lobby during afternoon
tea. The tradition of livestock
animals in the lobby of the
Brown Palace Hotel dates
back to .1945 when Dan
Thornton, who later became
governor of Colorado, sold,
two Hereford bulls for
$50,000 each. A Life magazine
photographer wanted to
shoot the picture of them in


the lobby of the Brown Pal-
ace, hence the animals were
led into the hotel.
In 1998, as that year's
champion left the hotel, he
escaped from his handlers
and ran down the street.
Fortunately, his vanity got the
better of him and was safely
subdued when he stopped to
admire himself in the window
of a nearby office building.
The Davenport Hotel in
Spokane, Wash., once fea-
tured live cattle auctions right
in the hotel. Entitled "Ladies
in the Lobby," the events were
held during the 1980s. Mem-
ories linger however, and one
group recently insisted upon
a "no cattle" clause in their
event contract' due to an
unfortunate bovine encount-
er some 20 years earlier.
During a visit to the Music
City in the 1940s, singing
cowboy and cinema ,star
Gene Autry checked into the
elegant Hermitage Hotel in
Nashville, Term. 'Naturally, he
was accompanied by his
faithful companion and fav-
orite co-star, his horse Cham-
pion. Photographs of Autry
signing the hotel register
show Champion by his side in
the hotel's lobby. ,
The venerable Hotel
Monteleone in New Orleans'
famed French Quarter has
graciously welcomed guests
for more than a century.
Some of the 'hotel's more
memorable visitors were of
the four-legged variety. Long-
time employee Charlie Farrae
still vividly recalls the day he
reported to work and found
two enormous Clydesdale
horses in the middle of the
hotel, shooting a commercial.
William A. Monteleone, the
hotel's owner, was a close per-
sonal friend of August Busch
of the Anheuser-Busch Brew-
ing Company. The giant ani-
mals filled the hotel's lobby,
but the Hotel Monteleone
proved up to the task, its cen-
tury-old marble floor never
cracking under the horses'
combined weight of nearly 2
tons!
The Little Hotel by the Sea,
located at the Grande Co-


lonial Hotel in La Jolla, Calif.,
consisted of seven small gue-
strooms when it opened in
1925. After doubling in size,
the hotel underwent a major
remodeling effort in 1939
which incorporated a beauti-
ful 'six-passenger mahogany
elevator, making it "The
Littlest Hotel in the World
with an Elevator." The hotel
was owned by Helena Chase
Johnson, a publisher and au-
thor of children's stories. The
Johnson brood included five
children and two Shetland
ponies named Peanuts and
Pardner. The ponies became
popular residents of the sea-
side village and were consid-
ered members of the family,
participating in everything
from holidays and birthday
parties to nightly dinners. The
Johnson's planned a grand
celebration of the hotel's
reopening in 1940 with a
party in the hotel's rooftop
solarium, accessible only by
the hotel's celebrated eleva-
tor. As usual, Peanuts and
Pardner were featured on the
guest lists. Sadly, repeated
attempts to load the pair on
,the new elevator were unsuc-
cessful and the pair was rele-
gated to the ground floor
where they served as official
greeters.
Going to the dogs
Guests entering the Ad-
miral Fell Inn in Baltimore
often remark on the unusual
portrait of a Dalmatian dress-
ed as Napoleon Bonaparte.
The dog belonged to Admiral
Fell and his wife, who literally
found the pup on their
doorstep. Ensconced in a bas-
ket, the puppy had a small
chew toy clenched in its
mouth.(On closer inspection,
the toy turned out to. be a
small figure of Napoleon. In
addition to his favorite em-
peror, which he was rarely
seen without, the dog loved to
chew bones of all shapes and
sizes. This penchant earned
him the nickname Chewy,
short for his proper name,
Chew A. Bonaparte.
The Williamsburg Inn in
Virginia has found a four-
legged friend that helps keep
a gaggle of geese from de-
stroying its manicured
greens. Meg, a border collie,


roams the hotel's three cham-
pionship golf courses and
engages in mind games with
the geese. Instead of biting or
growling at the birds, Meg
needs only to "give them the
eye." It seems that border col-
lies have eyes similar to those
of wolves and one look from
Meg and the geese sense a
predator on the premises.
The geese simply fly away to
"greener" pastures.
The Fairmont Copley Pla-
za in Boston has truly gone to
the dogs with their newest,
employee, a black Labrador
named, Catie Copley. In her
role as the hotel's canine
ambassador, Catie meets and
greets guests, is available for
walks and runs and serves as
a community liaison. Catie
was originally trained as a
guide dog for the blind, but
after developing cataracts,
she was forced to change
career paths. The concierge
staff maintains ,Catie's
appointmentibook and she is
often spotting relaxing
between jobs in her cozy dog
bed or assisting the bell staff
with room deliveries. Catie
even has her own business
cards and e-mail address.
Visitors to the famed Bilt-,
more in Coral Gables are
often overwhelmed by its
beauty, but it is the hotel's fine
feathered friends that bring
music to their ears. Owners
Robert and Enid Kay, who
raise songbirds at their home
in New York, felt that the
lobby needed to be brought
to life. Kay would occasional-
ly bring the birds from his col-
lection-the first "flight of the
nightingales" took place in
1994 on American Airlines
757 from New York to Miami.
Architect Barry Berg. fash-,
ioned two nine-foot tall ma-,
hogany birdcages with port-
hole windows to house finch-
es and nightingales. Ob-
servant guests will note that
the cages' design is actually
an inverted version of the
chandeliers that hang in the
lobby.
Each Christmas, the Car-
olina Inn in Chapel Hill, N.C.,
is festively decorated in a
classic "Twelve Days of
Christmas" theme. The tab-
leaux's real draw isn't the par-
tridge in a pear tree, but the


two snow-white turtledoves
named Bill and Coo.
Throughout the holiday sea-
son, visitors "flock" to the inn
to see the doves in their grand
Georgian-style cage. Bell and
Coo spend most of the year
with their original owner, but
enjoy VIP treatment while at
the inn. The staff checks the
doves frequently to maintain
their well-being and even
provide daily maid service.
In the late' 1930S a rather
disheveled feline wandered
into The Algonquin Hotel in
New York, searching for food
and shelter. The quintessen-
tial host, owner Frank Case
welcomed the furry traveler
into the Algonquin and a tra-
dition was born of having a
hotel cat (Matilda when the
cat is female and Hamlet
when the cat is male). Ma-
tilda, the current resident cat,
has the run of the house. Each
year Matilda is given a birth-
day party. In 2002, while cele-
brating her seventh birthday
with 150 of her closest
friends, she jumped on her
cake and ran out of the room,
leaving a trail of paw prints.
The Greyfield Inn on
Cumberland, Ga., was origi-
nally built as a wedding gift
for Margaret Ricketson and
was eventually inherited by
Miss Lucy Ricketson
Ferguson and her 'husband.
The eccentric pair shared a
love of a nature and a few
personality quirks. Miss Lucy
never left the house without
her dagger strapped to her
hip and her husband was fre-
quently spotted roaming the
island dressed only in a loin-
cloth. The couple cohabitated
with an eclectic array of pets,
from a tapir, a distant cousin
to the anteater, which she
eventually donated to the
Washington Zoo, to an aban-
doned vulture chick that con-
sidered Miss Lucy's black
Labrador as its mother, to a
muntjac, a miniature deer.
The latter must have held a
special significance as it was
stuffed on its demise and now
sits atop a shelf in the inn's
library.
A little bit of Scotland has
made its way to the American
Club in Kohler, Wis. A flock of
Scottish blackface ewes have
found a home on' Whistling


Straits, one of the resort's
championship golf courses.
The presence of more than 40
sheep enhances the course's
look of timelessness and pro-
vides a view as memorable as
any to be found in the Celtic
countryside. As natural, low-
maintenance grazers, the
flock requires little more than
the grass they feed upon and
have long been used for land-
scape management and as
four-legged fertilizers.
It has long been said that
novelist Stephen King pen-
ned his horror classic "The
Shining" at the Stanley Hotel
in Estes Park, Colo. Could the
hotel have inspired yet anoth-
er King classic? A short dis-
tance from the hotel sits a pet
cemetery, a loving memorial
created by one of the hotel's
former general managers.
While living on the property, a
number of beloved family
pets were interred, complete
with personalized head-
stones. One can't help but
wonder if the view from a
guestroom window gave King
inspiration for his horror tale
Pet Cemetery.
For a listing of Historic
Hotels of America members
welcoming pets, visit histori-
chotels.org/catalog/Vacation
s_and_Leisure/Pet_Friendly.
htm.
Historic Hotels of America
is a program of the National
Trust for Historic Preser-
vation. Historic Hotels has'
identified 219 hotels that
have faithfully maintained
their historic integrity, archi-
tecture and ambiance. To be
selected for this prestigious
program, a hotel must be at
least 50 years old, listed in or
eligible for the National Reg-
ister of Historic Places or rec-
ognized as having historic
significance.
A, directory of member
hotels can be purchased for
$4 by sending a check to
National Trust/HHA, PO. Box
320, Washington, DC 20055-
0320. Rooms at any of the
member hotels can be
reserved by calling (800) 678-
8946 or at historichotels.org.
Reservations made
through Historic Hotels of
America support the National
Trust, a nonprofit organiza-
tion of 200,000 members.


Pet-friendly packages available throughout country


STAFF REPORT

Puppy Love/Guppy Love
Hotel Monaco, Washington,
D.C. (202) 628-7177.
After pets arrive and regis-
ter, a special package is deliv-
ered, complete with food and
water bowls, a bottle of Evian
water, a special treat, a dog,
walking map of the neighbor-
hood and a pet information
card listing local veterinarians
and pet-sitting services. The
front desk keeps a supply of
disposable dog walking bags
and the room, service menu
has food available for pets. In
addition, the hotel offers a
temporary goldfish on a com-
plimentary basis for those
who are petless during their
stay. The housekeeping staff
feeds and cares for the tem-
porary pet.
'Head to Paw' Pampered
Pet Package







3 NIGHTS Pr erso,
DI. Occ.
Pay $125 *Receive over
$70 Meals/Cash/Bonuses,
Staying at Treasure Bay Casino Resort
ESCORTED MOTORCOACH TRANSPORTATION
Call Now!" ,' .

," i-" .L (941) 473-1481 *1 (800) 284-1015
1546 S. McCALL, ENGLEWOOD 34223 "
ON THE ROAD AGAIN TOURS


Don CeSar Beach Resort
St. Pete Beach, Fla.
(727)360)1881
During their, two-night
stay, furry friends enjoy gour-
met dog biscuits served in a
glamorous bowl, a trip to pet-
friendly Fort DeSoto Park, a
bubbling body shampoo and
manicure, therapeutic mas-
sage and gourmet dinner.
Owners receive a lesson in pet
massage, plus a personal
massage for themselves as
well as breakfast. The cost is
$768 through Sept. 30. Valid
Sunday-Thursday only; week-
ends slightly higher.
Cat Suite
Red Lion Inn, Stockbridge,
Mass. (413) 298-1690
The Red Lion Inn has



Happy Heart Tours

June 29...... St Pete's HistoricalVinoy ResortTour &
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Call for Full Detailed Tour Booklet 2
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Nokomis, FL 34275 FLReg.,#10319 I


unveiled its new "Cat Suite."
Guests wanting the company
of a furry feline can stay in the
inn's Wilder Suite, located in a
guest house adjacent to the
main inn. They are greeted by
Wilbur, a slightly finicky but
affectionate black-and-white
cat. The suite boasts tasteful
antiques, a fully equipped
eat-in kitchen, dining area,
luxurious bathroom and
enclosed porch. Food, cat toys
and a litter box are provided
for Wilbur and guests can take
home a. commemorative
photo of their new feline
friend. Those preferring to
travel with their own cat or
Please see PACKAGES, 13B




COSTA CRUISE LINE
FALL CARIBBEAF ^.".,
7 nt. Nov. 20, Dec. 30, 2005
WESTERN CARIBBEAN, Incl.
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7 nt. Dec. 4,11, 23, 2005
EASTERN CARIBBEAN, Incl.
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7 nt. Nov. 7, 14,2005
BEST GREEK ISLES, Incl.
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NEW MAGICA ITALY, Spain
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Come Cruise with Costa &
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Venice Gondolier Sun


. 1'.


FEATURES EDITOR
KIM COOL
PHONE: (941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


TIT,


DINING
TRAVEL
ENTERTAINMENT!


OUR TOWN 19B
SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


Libraries offer help with gardening, computers, kids fun and more


Jacaranda Public Library
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Venice
861-1270
Showtime
Jacaranda Library offers
you the best seat in the house.
Tuesday, June 21, see "Mystic
River," starring Sean Penn,
Tim Robbins and Kevin Ba-
con, at 2 p.m. Also see recent
movie releases at 2 p.m.
Thursday through June 30.
June 23: "Ladder 49" and June
30: "13 Going on 30."
Cannes in Venice Film
Festival presents "The Pi-
anist" at 5 p.m. Thursday,
June 23.
Coming up in July, newly
released hits, 2 p.m.
Thursday. July 7: "The Avi-
ator;" July 14: "Terminal;" July
21: "Wimbledon;" July 28:
"Phantom of the Opera."
Estate planning
Attorney Charles E Wheel-
er leads an Estate Planning
for Peace of Mind seminar at
10 a.m., Monday, June 20.
Wheeler will assist with living
wills and trusts and will touch
on recent tax law changes
affecting estate planning. No
reservations necessary. Call
861-1270.
Book club
Jacaranda Library Book
Club discusses "The Passion

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of Artemesia" by Susan Vree-
land, 9:30-11 a.m. Tuesday,
July 5. June Wood facilitates
the discussion. All are wel-
come.
Computer class
The Ask Jack computer
class for intermediate-level
computer users is held 1:30-
2:30 p.m. Friday through July
29.
Gardening sessions
A certified Master Garden-
er from the University of Flor-
ida/Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences-Sara-
sota County Extension offers
tips and answers about gar-
dening in Florida, Thursdays
through June 30, 1:30-3:30
p.m.

Youth activities
* Doggie Tales: Tuesdays
through July 26, 3-4 p.m.
Children of all ages are invited
to read to trained pet therapy
dogs from the Suncoast
Humane Society and create a
small pet craft.
* Preschool Storytime: Mon-
days, 10:30-11:15 a.m. for
ages 3-5 years: June 20: Dog-
gie Treats; June 27: Full Speed
Ahead.
* Toddler Tale Time: Fridays,
10:30-11:15 a.m. for ages 1-3
years and a caregiver: June 17:
My Daddy; June 24: Droolin'
Dogs. Coming up in July: July


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1: Boats are Cool; July 8: Pitter
Patter Rain; July 15: Frog
Jump; July 22: Down on the
Farm; July 29: Piggies.
* Summer elementary school
reading program: Thursdays
through July 21, 10 a.m.
Storytime, including poems,
jokes, games and crafts, plus a
summer reading log that
awards a prize at the end of
the week. June 23: Dog Movie
Day; June 30: Special guest,
Pirate Lady Grania O'Malley;
July 7: Take a Hike; July 14:
Special guest, John Storm's
Reptiles; July 21: 6 p.m., Grow
with Books evening party.
Pick up a reading log at the
library.

Venice Public Library
300 S. Nokomis Ave., 861-1330
http://suncat.co.sarasota.fl.us
Great literature
The Contemporary Book
Discussion Group meets the
fourth Wednesday of each
month at 7 p.m, and reads a
variety of new fiction. The
group examines Erik Larson's
"The Devil in the White City"
June 22. New members wel-
come.
Film noir festival
Film historian Jim Orville


presents thriller-chillers with
showtimes at 6 p.m.
Thursday in June. June 23:
"What Lies Beneath" (2000);
June 30: "Sudden Fear"
(1952).
Vacationland
Thursday at 6 p.m., tour
the world without leaving
Venice. The magical musical
tour begins July 7 with "The
Bandwagon" (1953); July 14:
"Hello, Frisco, Hello" (1943);
July 21: "Sun Valley Serenade"
(1941); July 28: "On the Town"
(1949); Aug. 4: "Week-End in
Havana" (1941); Aug. 11: "Em-
peror Waltz" (1948). Hosted
by Jim and Eleanor Orville,
this tour is free, including
refreshments.
Video lectures
Friday, 2-4 p.m. through
Sept. 16: The second half of
the lecture series that began
last summer by Professor
Arnold Weinstein of Brown
University. Each class views
two half-hour video lectures
followed by a discussion for
those who wish to stay. The
lectures in June will finish the
poetry section and the
remaining lectures will focus
on the narrative. June 17:
Wallace Stevens, June 24,
Adrienne Rich and the poetry


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of protest.
Oui, oui
Practice your basic French
language skills Fridays at 10
a.m. with the VPL French
Club. The group practices
French conversation during
the first hour, followed by
readings from French litera-
ture and current topics dur-
ing the second hour. Copies
of the readings available at
the VPL circulation desk. New
members welcome.


Alcoholic beverages not available at all Walgreens locations.
To find a location near you call 1-800-9254733.
g Rebates subject to the conditions of the manufacturer.
S Right reserved to limit quantities on all items,


Learn e-mail and Intemet
Venice Public Library of-
fers weekly computer instruc-
tion at the public terminals
Tuesday, 9:30-10:30 a.m. A
VPL reference librarian teach-
es an introductory class on e-
mail and Internet functions.
Registration is necessary. Sign
up the Monday before the
Tuesday class at the Refer-
ence desk or call reference at
861-1340.

See LIBRARY, NEXT GREEN SHEET


VISAiM
w -


FL Good 6/19 thru 6/25/05


I







SUNDAY. JUNE 19. 20C5


10B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


LIBRARY from last Green Sheet
Explore the Library System
Web site at http://suncat.
co.sarasota.fl.us, where you
can use your library card to
renew checked-out items and
request titles found in the
Sarasota County libraries. The
Web site also provides free
access to several subscription
databases and links to other
helpful Web sites.
Bugged?
Bring your gardening
questions to Venice Public Li-
brary every Thursday, 9:30
a.m.-noon. From pesky in-
sects to alien plants, the
friendly experts from the
Sarasota County Extension
Service will help you with
your horticultural problems.
Youth activities
* Dial-A-Story: Dial 486-2330
and enjoy a two-minute fairy
tale for children 5-10. The
story is changed every two
days.
* Preschool Storytime: Tues-
days, 10-10:30 a.m. for inde-
pendent 3- to 5-year-olds.
* Tot Time Storytime: Thurs-
day mornings, 10-10:30 a.m.
for birth to 3 years and a care-
giver. The themes for the
Preschool Storytimes and the
Tot Time Storytimewill usual-
lr be .the same: June 21 and
23: Turtle Time; June 28 and
30: Yankee Doodle; July 5 and


7: Animal Tales; July 12 and
14: Veggies, Yum!; July 19 and
21: Stay Healthy.
* Health and Yoga for 'Tweens:
June 23 and 30, 2-3 p.m. Ages
9-13 are invited for yoga with
instructor Zelena One, make
new friends and enjoy a
healthy snack.
* American Red Cross Baby-
sitter's Course: June 25, 10
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Registration
required and $35 fee. Call
861-1348.
* Family events Tuesdays in
June. June 21, 2 p.m.: The
songs and stories of Kate Car-
penter; June 28, 2 and 7 p.m.:
Pirate fun with Holly Gamel.
* Summer reading logs: For
preK through entering grade
five Pick up your reading
log in the youth area and read
books throughout June and
July. Prizes will be awarded for
five and 10 books read.
* Special art events: July 5, 12
and 19, 2-3 p.m. Enjoy a vari-
ety of art activities taught by
versatile artist Andrew Kiss
and his family. No registration
necessary.

Selby Public Library
1331 First St., Sarasota
861-1174
Summer teen fun
Teens can develop acting
skills and self-confidence
through exploring the world
of theater, plays and stories.


The free workshop, for ages 13
and older, runs 2-5 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays
through June 23, and con-
cludes with a public perfor-
mance at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
June 29. Register by calling
Janet at 861-1131 or e-mail
jhansen@scgov.net.
'Tales of the South'
The Open Circle Players
perform "Tales of the South:
Brer Rabbit and His Friends,"
Friday, July 1, at 10:30 a.m.
Children ages 6 and older will
love the performers' humoi
and audience participation.
Family singalong
Citizens of all ages are in-
vited to celebrate their coun-
try through song at "Red,
White and Blue on July 2" at 1
p.m. in the Geldbart Audi-
torium. Enjoy favorites like
"Yankee Doodle Dandy" and
"Take Me Out to the Ball-
game."
Cine Selby
Travel the world with the
Cine Selby foreign film series,
6 p.m. the last Tuesday of the
month. June 28: "The Castle"
from Australia (R); July 26:
"The Color of Paradise" from
Iran (PG); Aug. 30: "Brassed
Off" from England (R); Sept.
27: "Shall We Dance?" from
Japan (PG); Oct. 25: "Y tu
mama tambien" from Mexico
(R).


Check out the great meal deals in the Green Sheet


CHOICES CHOICES CHOICES
You've got to see it...
Florida's Largest Display
of Brand Name Bar Stools & Dinettes.
'**-,f ,,~L --,


Venice Venice Village Shopps
(Now Open 12.4 pm Sunday
4179So TamamlTr. (USJ1),Tel (9411497-7191
BRADENTON Across from Wal-Mart
5302 Cortez Rd. West Tel. (941) 792-1776
SARASOTA 1/2mile so. of Bee Rdge Open Sundays
4227 SoTamiamiTr, (US 41)fTel.(941)924-7114


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I JULY 1ST ALUMNI MEET & GREET 7 PM to Midnight
A $10 donation at one location get's you into any of the following locations.
Receive a wrist band, special drink prices and appetizers. Transportation is
available between locations at no charge from 8 PM to Midnight.
Left Coast Seafood Co., 750 US 41 Byp N. Classes of 1930 to 1969
T.J. Carney's, 231 W. Venice Avenue The 70's
Buffalo Bills Holiday Inn, 455 US 41 Byp N. The 80's
Bogey's Restaurant, 652 E. Venice Ave. Classes of 1990 to 2005
JULY 2ND- PARTY IN THE PARK & ALUMNI PARTY Raindate:


Centennial Park Downtown Venice
10 AM to 4 PM Visit the Venice Archives and view
a special display of Venice Schools at the Triangle
Inn on Nassau Street. Take a tour of the Historic
-Train Depot.
12 PM Kids' Play Area and Food Vendors Open
Blood Drive by the Florida Blood Centers until 4 PM
1 PM to 3 PM Live Music by Soul Source
2:30 PM to 4:30 PM Wacky Warrior Games
4 PM to 6 PM Live Music by Vertigo
7 PM to 9:30 PM Live Music by the GunnRunners
10 PM to 2 AM Alumni Party at the Venice Island
Pub with Live Music by the Big Kahuna Band
100 W. Venice Ave., Upstairs


Join the Wacky Warrior Games!
Teams: Eight people, four must be
VHIS alumni! $20 entry fee per team.
Register with Marilyn Arnall at ,
(941) 350-9575 or
nolegirl83@yahoo.com.
We need volunteers...
Call Amy Baker at
(941)416-3300.
All proceeds benefit the Venice
High School Alumni
Association's scholarship


Advrtsi ng ii n Me o 'isPrdcios .G dars& os IcEnlwod-M son&Mor
I I FiancalTea oon.Lw Frm Buweser M nate olfI


For more info. www.vhsalumni.net or call (941) 207-1212.


MAE


To honor the contributors to Venice's Sports Legacy


2005 Inductees -.
Ralph Adrian Sr. Sheryl Maize Milton Maas


Class of 2004
Dr. Jerry Biller
Dan & Freda Boone


Class of 2003
Donnie Young
Mark Guthrie


Alvin Mitchell 1 Jim Powell
Larry Sandburg Jack Dundas
Jack Voigt Chuck Reiter


CEREMONY & BANQUET

Thursday, June 23,2005 at 6;30 pm
Bogey's Restaurant
652 East Venice Avenue
$60.00 per Person *cash bar available*
Reservation forms available at Rotary Futures
Office at VHS, or Bogey's,Restaurant.
To benefit Rotary Futures Program at Venice High School.
SVENICEr Sun
Spaceprovidedby6, Gondoier Sun


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11B


SUNDAY, JUNE 19,2005


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


New books

at the library

The following books are
available at Jacaranda Public
Library:
1. "JEWISH AMERICAN-
LITERATURE, THE CAMBRIDGE
COMPANION," edited by
Michael P. Kramer and Hana
Wirth-Nesher.
2. "THE WICKENHAM
MURDERS," by Amy Myers.
3. "RICHARD WAGNER: THE
LAST OF THE TITANS," by
Joachim Kohler.
4. "YA-YAS IN BLOOM," by
Rebecca Wells.
5. "THE MAKER'S DIET: THE
40-DAY HEALTH EXPERIENCE
THAT WILL CHANGE YOUR
LIFE FOREVER," by Jordan S.
Rubin.

Let the Sun Classifieds
work for you


Adopt-a-pet


PHOTO COURTESY OF HUMANE SOCIETY OF SARASOTA COUNTY
Tammy is a very sweet dog; she's a 1 and a 1/2-year-old mixed
breed. She is affectionate and playful and would make a great
addition to your family. Can you give Tammy a home? Visit the
Humane Society of Sarasota County at 2331 15th St., Sarasota,
or call 955-4131.




%: 6:.'" d ', J,


SENIOR from page 7B


488-1407.
Senior Academy
Fifteen summer session
courses are now open for reg-
istration at the USF Sarasota-
Manatee Senior Academy at
5700. North Tamiami Trail. A
summer special of $75 enti-
tles you to sign up for all 15
courses, ranging from history
and literature to computers,
art or music.
Classes meet once a week
for 90 minutes between 9
a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday or Wednesday. Call
359-4296 for a catalog, or visit
sarasota.usf.edu/senioracad
emy.
Seniors group
Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-
3:30 p.m. for a meeting and
cards.
Call 485-8739.


Grandparents group
The Grandparents Raising
Grandkids Support Group
meets the second Tuesday of
the month (July 12) at 9:30
a.m. in the Englewood Com-
munity Hospital Cafeteria,
700 Medical Blvd. Call Sandy
at (941) 475-3615.
Volunteers needed
The Foster Grandparent
Program of Southwest Flor-
ida, sponsored by the Dr.
Piper Center for Social Serv-
ices Inc., needs senior volun-
teers, age 60 or older to be-
come foster grandparents
and tutor and mentor chil-
dren in Head Start Centers in
Sarasota County. Foster
grandparents serve 15-20
hours a week and receive a
tax-free stipend of $2.65 an
hour, plus mileage reim-
bursement of $0.29 per mile,
plus an annual physical ex-
amination. Call Joan at (800)


332-5346.
Senior Friendship Centers
Free; donations encouraged.
SFC 2350 Scenic Drive,
584-0052
* Camera Club, Mondays, 10
a.m.
* Dancercise, Mondays, 11
a.m.-12:15 p.m. Call 584-
0075.
* Beginners basket weaving,
Tuesday, 10 a.m.-noon.
* Pine Needle Weaving, Tues-
days, 10 a.m.
* Yoga In/Around a Chair,
Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
*WednesdayWalkers, 9 a.m.
* Italian, Wednesdays, 2:45
p.m.
* Attorney consultations,
third Thursday, 1-4 p.m.
Complimentary 30-minute
consultation with Marcella
Mika of Wilson & Mika, PA.


,,"Copyrighted Material

a-s Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Please see SENIOR, 13B


IStop Smoking Reduce Weight
Control: Stress Anxiety
Fears Phobias Insomnia
Call Venice 492-4114


Air--conditiloning
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Looking
for

Stock


Ideas


*


Buying quality stocks that have fallen out of favor can be a
smart investment. I can provide a current list of recommended
companies that are well below their peak prices.
Call or stop by today for details.


Call 485-6556 to
schedule an appointment
Christine Crites
244 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL 34285-2419
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
EdwardJones
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871


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SUNDAY, JUNE 19,2005


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medical history to drawing
blood and resting afterward
with refreshments, takes ap-
proximately 30 to 45 minutes.
Blood donation is safe, and
healthy people can donate
every 56 days.
Donate blood today at
your nearest location:
* Florida's Blood Center -
Venice, 2065 South Tamiami
Trail, Galleria Plaza, Venice,
492-9202. Hours are Wednes-
day and Friday, 8-4 p.m.,
Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Closed Monday and Tuesday.
* Florida's Blood Center -
Englewood, 2670 South Mc-
Call Road, (941) 460-0698.
Hours are Monday 8- 4 p.m.,


Tuesday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Closed Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday.
You can also donate on
the bloodmobile which will
be in the following locations:
* Monday June 20, 9-11 a.m.,
Riverwalk Mobile Home
Village, 103 Riverwalk Drive,
North Port.
* Wednesday, June 22, 11:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m., Manor Care,
1450 E. Venice Ave.
* Wednesday, June 22, 3:30-
7 p.m., North Port Moose
Lodge, 14156 Tamiami Trail.
* Thursday, June 23, 9 a.m.-
2 p.m., Publix at Shoppes of
North Port, 14879 Tamiami
Trail.


* Friday, June 24, 9 a.m.-
noon, North Port Industrial
Park, Busy Bee Cabinets,
2226 Murphy Court.
* Saturday, June 25, 10 a.m.-
2 p.m. Super WalMart Engle-
wood, 2931 South McCall
Road.
* Monday, June 27, 9 a.m.-
11:30 a.m. at Medicine
Shoppe Pharmacy, 14255
Tamiami Trail, North Port
* Monday, June 27, 1-3:30
p.m., Bon Secours Health
Park sponsored by Peace
River Home Health, 15121
Tamiami Trail, North Port.
* Wednesday, June 29, 9 a.m.-
noon, Home Depot, 2450
Jacaranda Blvd. N. Venice.


NATURE from page 5B


Things that make
you go'choo,
Retired pediatrician and
pollen counter, Mary Jelks,
gives a lecture on allergy-
causing plants at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 22 at Selby
Public Library, Geldbart
Auditorium, 1331 First St.,
Sarasota. The program is free
and open to the public. No
registration is necessary. For
more information, call 861-
1174.
Kayak and snorkel
The American Littoral
Society invites you to kayak
the near-shore waters of the
Gulf of Mexico from Turtle
Beach county park to Point of
Rocks, Wednesday, June 22
and Thursday, July 7, 8:30-
11:30 a.m. Snorkel among the
fish, mollusks, crustaceans
and other critters of the Gulf
in a shallow rocky area. Bring
snorkel equipment and sun-
screen. All kayak equipment
provided. Cost: $20 for ALS
members, $25 for fonmem-
bers. RSVP to John at ,966-
7308.
Florida House classes
Sarasota County Extension


Service holds free public pro-
grams Wednesdays at 2 p.m.
at the Florida House Learning
Center, 4600 South Beneva
Road in Sarasota, on the cam-
pus of SCIT at Beneva and
Proctor Roads. Registration
required by calling 316-1200.
June 29, 2-3 p.m.: Hurricanes
vs. Trees; July 6, 2-3:30 p.m.:
Hurricane Shutter Class; July
13, 2-3 p.m.: Hurricane Sur-
vival Kit: Emergency Sup-
plies; July 20, 2-4 p.m.: Ants,
ants, ants; July 27, 2-4 p.m.:
Termite Biology and Control;
Aug. 10, 2-3:30 p.m.: Hurri-
cane Shutter Class.

Kayak trips
* Take a quiet-water kayak
trip at South Lido Park/Otter
Key, Wednesday, June 29,
8:30-11:30 a.m. led by natu-
ralist John Sarkozy of the
American Littoral Society.
Explore the area and see the
bird and marine life. Equip-
ment and training provided.
Cost: $20 for ALS members,
$25 for nonmembers. RSVP
to 966-7308.
* John Sarkozy of the Amer-
ican Littoral Society shows
you the natural beauty of
Little Sarasota Bay, Saturday,


July 2, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Take a
break on the crown jewel and
swim, walk or do some bird-
ing before paddling back to
the mainland. Equipment
and training provided. Cost:
$20 for ALS members, $25
for nonmembers. RSVP and
for informaiton, call 966-
7308.
* Enjoy a full-moon, quiet-
water kayak trip with the
American Littoral Society on
Little Sarasota Bay to Palmer
Point, Wednesday, July 13,
7-9 p.m. See birds, fish, the
Neville Preserve and other
islands in the bay. Equipment
and training provided. Cost:
$20 for ALS members, $25
for nonmembers. RSVP to
966-7308.

Gardening sessions
A certified Master Gar-
dener from the University of
Florida/Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences-Sara-
sota County Extension offers
tips and answers about gar-
dening in Florida, Thursdays
through July, 1:30-3:30 p.m. at
'Jacaranda Public Library,
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd.',
Venice. For more informa-
tion, call 861-1174.


Rise to the challenge


BY DOROTHY RODDY
GUEST WRITER


Appearances are often de-
ceiving. One example of this
can be found at a storefront
business located in the
Pinebrook Plaza on Venice
Avenue and Pinebrook Road
in Venice. It's a modest size
space, but the message on the
window says it all: "Women
helping women." This place is
the Women's Resource Center
of Sarasota County.
When women go into the
office, they are usually amaz-
ed at the number of services
offered. The calendar of
events on the front desk tells
of the classes that are offered,
as well as at the Sarasota loca-
tion on South Tuttle Avenue.
Classes are also given in the
communities of North Port
and Englewood.- Workshops
on financial and legal matters,
workshops on relationships,
workshops on self esteem
and special events are offer-
ed. In addition to the many
workshops, there are three
core programs that form the
basis of the mission of
Women's Resource Center.
The Employment and Busi-
ness Success Program con-
centrates on career and edu-
cational planning, resume
assistance and job search
assistance that can lead to self
sufficiency for a woman's
career. The Peer Counseling
Program utilizes specially


Tropical Fourth of July
A patriotic music concert
by Sarasota Concert Band
highlights the Marie Selby
Botanical Gardens' Tropical
Celebration Monday, July 4 at
6 p.m. on the Gardens' bay
front grounds. Festivities start
at 6 p.m. with a cookout, chil-
dren's games, face painting
and family fun, culminating


trained listeners who give
nonjudgmental support and
referrals to women who turn
to them for help. The Chal-
lenge Program could be
called, "getting your life back."
The Challenge Program is a
30 hour in-depth course that
promotes emotional and eco-
nomic self sufficiency, setting
life goals, developing a plan
of action and generously
mixed with self esteem. Many
women are referred to the
Challenge course after a ses-
sion with one of our peer coun-
selors, who talk privately with
each client. Many women are
referred to the program by
friends who have taken the
course already and are happy
to tell others how the course
changed their
lives. In order to make the
Challenge program available to
as many as possible, the class
alternates between a day class
one month to an evening class
the following. Because we are
now serving many women in
the south county area of
Englewood/Cape Haze and
North Port, we are exploring
places to hold the Challenge
program in these areas.
I've seen women come into
the first class looking sad or
anxious but after a few hours
of interaction going over the
notebooks, I can hear laugh-
ter.coming through the doors.
In almost every instance, the
group bonds and when
Graduation Day arrives, most


in a fireworks display over
the bay. Tickets are available
by calling 366-5731, Ext. 260,
at the Welcome Center at 900
S. Palm Ave., or online at
selby.org.
Master Conservationist
training
Florida House Learning
Center, 4600 South Beneva


of the women don't want the
class to end. Many friend-
ships have been made and
these friendships will provide
ongoing support after the
class is over. One Challenge
graduate became a volunteer
at the Women's Resource
Center, then found employ-
ment with one of the agencies
we refer clients to and is now
an instructor of the Challenge
evening program. Talk about
making changes in your life!
It takes a good deal of
courage to walk in the door,
talk with a stranger about
painful subjects that are diffi-
cult to deal with and then start
rebuilding your life. The chal-
lenge for most of the women
who come to the Women's
Resource Center is to realize
that they do have options. As
they participate in the Chal-
lenge Program, they begin to
see that it's not the problems
that are standing in their
way, but how they face these
problems. They discover that
what was an obstacle, or chal-
lenge, could actually be a gift.
The women who finish the
course and start getting their
lives back have truly risen to
the Challenge, our wonderful
program!
Dorothy Roddy is challenge
coordinator at The Women's
Resource Center of Sarasota
County, 806 Pinebrook Road,
Venice. Contact the Center at
485-9724 or thewomensre-
sourcecenter.org.


Road, Sarasota, offers a vol-
unteer training program for
greeters and tour guides, 1-4
p.m. Monday, July 11-Aug.
29. This course prepares par-
ticipants for teaching practi-
cal information to Florida
homeowners. Class fee is
$50 For an application, call
316-120 or e-mail flhouse
@scgov.net.


VENUE fr ,


at 378-5620.
Youth babysitter course
The American Red Cross
holds a babysitter's course for
young people, June 25,. 10
a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Venice
Public Library, 300 S. Noko-
mis Ave. Registration required
and $35 fee. Call 861-1348.
Dad's dinner
Venice-Nokomis Fraternal
Order of Eagles #3482 holds a
late Father's Day dinner on
Sunday, June 26 at 621
Colonia Lane in Nokomis.
Enjoy roast beef, mashed
potatoes and gravy, veggies,
and dessert. Free for fathers
with membership card and
$6 for ladies. Call 828-7742.
Juggling fun
Teens ages 9-13 are invited
to a juggling workshop at 3
p.m. Monday, June 27 at Elsie
Quirk Public Library, 100 W.
Dearborn St., Englewood. A
materials fee of $7 will be
charged. Register 'by calling
861-1212.
Democratic club
Donald Leidel, former
ambassador to Bahrain,
speaks about Foreign and
Domestic Policy Issues and
Democratic Strategies at the
Democratic Club of Sarasota
lunch meeting Saturday, July
9 at the Meadows Country
Club, 3101 Longmeadow,
Sarasota. Social at 11:30 a.m.,
lunch at noon. Cost is $17.
RSVP June 27-July 6 by voice-
mail to 379-92333 or e-mail
reserve@sarasotadems.com.
Hurricane workshop
The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
hosts a Hurricane Pre-
paredness Workshop for Deaf
and Hard of Hearing people
on Tuesday, June 28 at 6 p.m.
at 628 Cypress Ave. in Venice.
Ann Miller from the Sarasota
County Emergency Manage-
ment discusses surviving
hurricane season. For more
information, call Sarah at
(941) 758-2539 (phone or
TDD), videophone at (941)
758-2542, or e-mail sharris
@ccdhh.org.


Bridge luncheon
The Venice-Nokomis Wom-
en's Club hosts a benefit
bridge luncheon at noon,
Wednesday, June 29 at 200
North Harbor Drive in Ven-
ice. Tickets are $7.50 and
proceeds benefit the Schol-
arship Fund and Civic
Activities. Call 493-0605 or
493-7068.
'Breaking Legs'
The Mafia and the theater
worlds clash hilariously in
this comedy by Tom Dulack.
Performances Wednesdays
through Saturdays at 8 p.m.
and Sundays at 2 p.m. at
Lemon Bay Playhouse, 96
W. Dearborn St., Englewood.
Tickets are $12. Call 475-6756.
Florida House classes
Sarasota County Extension
Service holds free public
programs Wednesdays at 2
p.m. at the Florida House
Learning Center, 4600 South
Beneva Road in Sarasota, on
the campus of SCIT at Beneva
and Proctor Roads. Regis-
tration required by calling
316-1200. June 29, 2-3 p.m.:
Hurricanes vs. Trees; July 6, 2-
3:30 p.m.: Hurricane Shutter.
Class; July 13, 2-3 p.m.:
Hurricane Survival Kit:
Emergency Supplies; July 20,
2-4 p.m.: Ants, ants, ants;
July 27, 2-4 p.m.: Termite
Biology and Control; Aug. 10,
2-3:30 p.m.: Hurricane
Shutter Class.
Movie and discussion
Serenity, Gardens and rela-
tionship experts Gay and
Kathlyn Hendricks present
"Into Me See," about the
transformative power of rela-
tionships, 6:30-9 p.m. Thurs-
day, June 30 and Saturday,
July 2 at 530 South U.S. 41
Bypass in the Brickyard Plaza
in Venice. Tickets are $15.
Registration required by call-
ing 486-3577.
Reunions
* The Venice High School All-
Class Reunion takes place
July 1 and 2 (rain date July 3).
All attendees of Venice-
Nokomis High School or
Venice High School arp wel-


come. Events throughout
Venice each day. Call 207-
1212 or visit vhsalumni.net.
Volunteers needed: Call Amy
at 416-3300.
* Graduates from Miami High
School Class of 1960 are in-
vited to their 45th class
reunion at the Don Shula
Hotel and Golf Club in Miami
Lakes. Save July 29-31 for a
fun-filled weekend. Contact
Sherrin at (305) 448-2598 or
sas56chevy@aol.com.
Chili cookoff
The third annual Burr Smidt
Memorial Chili Cookoff takes
place Saturday, July 2 at
Englewood Beach-Chadwick
Park Pavilion. Chili is cooked
on the premises and turned
in to judges by noon. Be a
cook, judge or a taster. Entry
fee is $20, or buy a taste cup
for $1. All proceeds benefit
Suncoast Humane Society.
For more information, call
Scott at 266-3799 or visit
chili.org.
Independence Day
* The Italian American Club
of Venice hosts a Country
Western Independence Day
celebration Sunday, July3,5-9
p.m., featuring live entertain-
ment, great food, fun and
games at 1375 Ringling Drive.
The menu includes hot dogs,
burgers, chicken, chili, corn
on the cob and more. Horse-
shoes, bocci and other activ-
ities for the whole family.
Tickets are $8 for members
and $10 for nonmembers.
Call Estelle at 223-4008;
* Come one, come all to the
Fourth of July dance at 7:30
p.m. Monday at Bay Indies'
Indies Hall, 950 Ridgewood in
Venice. Bill Milner provides
the music. BYOB; snacks and
setups provided. Tickets are
$7 for residents and $9 for
nonresidents, available at the
door. Doors open at 7 p.m.
* The Venice-Nokomis Elks
hold an Independence Day
picnic on Monday, July 4,
4-7 p.m. at 119 E. Venice
Ave. Enjoy hamburgers, hot
dogs, salads, baked beans
and draft beer and gun soda.
Entertainment by the Kool
Katz. Tickets are $8 at the


door. Parties of eight or more
can RSVP to 486-1854.
Lounge is open 2-10 p.m.
* A patriotic music concert
by Sarasota Concert Band
highlights the Marie Selby
Botanical Gardens' Tropical
Fourth of July celebration
Monday, July4 at 6 p.m. on the
Gardens' bay front grounds.
Festivities start at 6 p.m. with
a cookout, children's games,
face painting and fireworks
display over the bay. Tickets
are $18 for adults, $17 for
members, and free for chil-
dren 12 and younger, and are
available by calling 366-5731,
Ext. 260, at the Welcome
Center at 900 S. Palm Ave., or
online at selby.org.
Kayakand snorkel
The American Littoral Society
invites you to kayak the near-
shore waters of the Gulf of
Mexico from Turtle Beach
county park to Point of Rocks,
Thursday, July 7, 8:30-11:30
a.m. Snorkel among the fish,
mollusks, crustaceans and
other critters of the Gulf in a
shallow rocky area. Bring
snorkel equipment and sun-
screen. All kayak equipment
provided. Cost: $20 for ALS
members, $25 for nonmem-
bers. RSVP to John at 966-
7308.
Painting class


PHOTO COURTESY OF EAC
Come paint with Max Muller
(above, helping Marie Poulin)
at Englewood Art Center, 350
South McCall Road. Enjoy a
three-week session, 9 a.m.-3
p.m. Friday. Choose your
own subject matter and learn
the method of layering or
glazing and how to become a
better watercolor artist. Max
will help with layout, compo-
sition and sketching. Next
session starts July 8. Fee:
members, $60; nonmembers,
$85. Call 474-5548.


Tribute to
Rosemary Clooney
Venice Little Theatre kicks off
its summer cabaret season
with "Rosemary and Time: A
Tribute to the Music of
Rosemary Clooney," opening
July 9 in theYvonne Pinkerton.
Theatre at 140 W. Tampa Ave.
The talented cast perform
"Come on-a-my house,"
"Mambo Italiano," "Come
Rain or Come Shine" and
other favorites. The show
runs through July 31 with per-
formances at 8 p.m. Tuesday-
Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday.
Tickets are $20 and may be
purchased at the box office
or by phone at 488-1115.
Master Conservationist
training
Florida House Learning
Center, 4600 South Beneva
Road, Sarasota, offers a vol-
unteer training program for
greeters, and tour guides, 1-4
p.m. Monday, July 11-Aug.
29. Volunteers are invited to
become Master Conserva-
tionists, greet its 10,000 annu-
al visitors, answer questions
and conduct tours. This
eight-week course prepares
participants for volunteering
while teaching practical in-
formation to Florida home-
owners. Class fee is $50
Registration deadline is Tues-
day, July 5. For an applica-
tion, call 316-120 or e-mail
flhouse@scgov.net.
Golf benefit
The Marines Corps Reserve
holds its third annual Toys for
Tots Golf Benefit Saturday,
July 9 at Bent Tree Country
Club, 4700 Bent Tree Boul-
evard in Sarasota. This four-
person scramble event, pro-
ceeds of which will benefit
tsunami victims in Phuket,
Thailand and Madras, India,
includes lunch, beverages
and 18 holes with cart. 7:30
a.m. registration, 8:30 a.m.
shotgun start. Fee: $75 per
person. Call Ray McGuire at
485-6005 or Top Harrison at
485-9045.

'That's Italian'
Italian food, cars and culture


await you at the "That's
Italian" Ringling Festival at
The John and Mable Ringling
Museum of Art, Saturday, July
9, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at 5401 Bay
Shore Road in Sarasota.
Activities for children and
adults. Admission is $15; chil-
dren younger than 12 free
with an adult. RSVP to 358-
3180.
Critter search
Explore the marine life of
Sarasota Bay at Bay Walk
(City Island), 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Saturday, July 16, with the
American Littoral Society.
Collect, identify and learn
about our local fish and
invertebrates with ALS biolo-
gists. Wear hard-soled sneak-
ers and sunscreen. Cost is $3
for ALS members, $5 for non-
members, kids free. RSVP to
Ruth at 366-9479.
Kids theater camp
Lemon Bay Playhouse holds
summer theater camp for
ages 7-12, July 18-30, Monday
through Friday mornings.
Cost is $50. Registration
begins July 5. Call (941) 475-
6756 or visit 96 W. Dearborn
St., Englewood.
Back to School party
The Venice-Nokomis Elks
holds a Back to School party,
3-7 p.m. Sunday, July 24 at 119
E. Venice Ave. Food, games
and prizes. Music by Ziggy.
Donations are $8 and can be
made in the lounge. Do-
nations of school supplies
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call 486-1854.
J.O.Y. ride
The Salvation Army J.O.Y.
Fellowship sets sail to the
Bahamas Oct. 10-14 with the
Royal Caribbean Cruise Line
on the Majesty of the Seas.
Ports of call include Miami,
Nassau, Coco Cay and Key
West. Rates are $229-$289,
plus insurance. The bus
leaves from the Salvation
Army at 1051 Albee Farm
Road in Venice. A $200
deposit is required at registra-
tion; final payment due by
July 25. Call LaVerne at 484-
6227, Ext. 230.







VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 13B


SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2005


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"




MILLER from page 7B


they will not be paid both
benefits. Only the higher of
the two.
Divorced survivors
benefits
Divorced spouses can also
receive benefits under the
same circumstances as a
widow or widower at age 60
(50 if disabled) if the mar-
riage lasted 10 years or more.
But, you can't receive bene-
fits if you remarry before the
age of 60 (50 if disabled)
unless the marriage ends,
which would make you eligi-
ble again. Also, remarriage
after age 60 (50 if disabled)
does not affect divorced sur-
vivors benefits.
Medical debt
Dear Savvy Senior
I guess you could say I'm one


of those unfortunate people
who took the gamble and lost. I
didn't have adequate health
insurance and after my wife's
unexpected three-week stay in
the hospital, we were hit with
thousands of dollars in medical
bills. We don't have the money.
The hospital has already rolled
the bill over to a collection
agency and they're turning up
the pressure. A friend of mine
advocates taking out a second
mortgage on the home to pay
the loan, which right now looks
like my only option. Any advice?
- Flat Busted
Dear Flat,
You do have a few other
options, but I don't think tak-
ing a second mortgage
should be one of them. If you
do this you'll be converting
unsecured debt into secured
debt, which means that since


you already have received the
medical care, the hospital
can't take it away from you.
But if you put your house on
the line with a second mort-
gage and then fail to make
those payments, you could
lose your house.

Negotiate
The National Consumer
Law Center recommend
negotiating with the hospital.
And not just the amount
you'll pay each month,
either, but negotiate the size
of the bill. Find out what they
are charging for some of the
basic services and watch out
for $10 aspirins and $25
Band-Aids. Keep in mind
that insurance companies
negotiate bills all the time, so
this is a very common tactic.


POETRY B
Daddy
By Joan Dean

Daddy, you are strong
Stronger than anybody
But always loving

Daddy
By James Fong

Fathers are so special
They care and love me
Daddy works hard
And on this special day
Do what you wish

Dad
By Spencer Grubb

Always taking care of me
Every day and night
From when I'm happy
To when I'm filled with fright
Always rewarding me,
Like no one else and
Not with toys or other joys,
But with love like no other
man.


Father's Day
By Jacob Harper

Happy Father's Day, Dad
Hopefully today you're glad
Today is for you
We'll do what you want to do
We can go on the boat
We can go hit some balls
Today is for you
I love you!!!!

My Dad
By Mason Johnson

Dad...
You're the best
of the rest
You love me
I love you
So on your special day
I'll see what you say
But I know what I will say
Dad, I love you!

Dad
By Matt Mcguire

Dad, you're great,
With out a doubt.


I love you so,
With all my heart
Today's your day
So have a ball!

Father's Day Poem
By Max Smetts

My dad is so nice
Because he loves me so
much
He helps me a lot
Thanks Dad, you are the best
dad.

Rad Dad
By Christie Swanson

I,have the best dad,
He's really quite rad.
He cheers me up when I'm
sad.
My dad is a rad dad.
Sometimes he gets mad,
But he is still a rad dad.
He may work this a tad,
But he's still a rad dad.
My dad's a not bad,
He's a really rad dad!
Happy Father's Day, Dad!


SENIOR fom page s11B


and Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30
a.m. with Elizabeth Weis,
Attorney Emeritus with Legal
Aid of Manasota. Reserve
your time slot by calling 584-
0075.
* Quilting for Fun, Thursdays,
9-11:30 a.m. Bring own mate-


rials.
* Beginner Bridge, Thursdays,
9 a.m.
* Shell crafts, Thursdays, 1-3
p.m.
* Balance movement class,
Friday, 9 a.m. Includes
warm-ups and simple


strength building. It is recom-
mended that individuals
attend the Balance Matters
Falls Prevention introduction
before starting this class. Call
556-3223.
* Duplicate Bridge, Fridays, 1
p.m.


PACKAGES fompage 8B


dog are welcomed in the inn's
specially designated pet-
friendly rooms. The Cat Suite
is priced at $215-$300 per
-night, weekdays and $270-
$360 per night weekends,
depending upon the season.
Have Dog, Will Travel
Rosario Resort & Spa,
Eastsound, Wash.
(360) 376-2222
The two-night package in-
cludes accommodations, pet
fee (normally $20 per pet, per
room), Handi-Drink 2 pet
water bottle and a copy of
"Have Dog, Will Travel" guide
to pet-friendly accommoda-
tions in the Pacific Northwest.
Pets and their owners will
enjoy the extensive resort
grounds as well as the adja-
cent 5,000-acre Moran State
Park. From $252 per package.
Historic hotels that
welcome pets
(Call the hotels directly for
specific details regarding their
pet policies)

Pet friendly
Alabama


The Tutwiler, Birmingham
Arizona
Royal Palms Resort and
Spa, Phoenix
Hassayampa Inn, Prescott
Hermosa Inn, Scottsdale
Arkansas
1886 Crescent Hotel & Spa,
Eureka Springs
California
Napa River Inn, Napa
Ojai Valley Inn & Spa, Ojai
The Inn at Rancho Santa
Fe, Rancho Santa Fe
The Fairmont Hotel San
Francisco, San Francisco
Hotel La Rose, Santa Rosa
The Ahwahnee, Yosemite
National Park
Colorado
Hotel Jerome, Aspen
The Brown Palace Hotel,
Denver
The Stanley Hotel, Estes
Park
Connecticut
The Lighthouse Inn, Resort
and Conference Center, New
London
Delaware


Hotel du Pont, Wilmington
District of Columbia
Hotel Monaco, Washing-
ton
The Omni Shoreham Ho-
tel, Washington
The Hay-Adams Hotel,
Washington
Florida
The Colony Hotel &
Cabana Club, Delray Beach
Lakeside Inn, Mount Dora
Don CeSar Beach Resort, a
Loews Hotel, St. Pete Beach
Louisiana
The Fairmont, New Or-
leans, New Orleans
Maine
The Colony Hotel, Kenne-
bunkport
Maryland
Admiral Fell Inn, Baltimore
Peabody Court, Baltimore
Massachusetts


The Boston Park Plaza and
Towers, Boston
The Fairmont Copley Pla-
za, Boston
Cranwell Resort Spa and
Golf Club, Lenox
The Porches Inn, North
Adams
Hawthorne Hotel, Salem
The Red Lion Inn, Stock-
bridge
Missouri
Renaissance Grand Hotel,
St. Louis
New Hampshire
Wentworth by the Sea,
New Castle
New Mexico
The Bishop's Lodge Resort
and Spa, Santa Fe
New York
Hotel Saranac of Paul
Smith's College, Saranac Lake
North Carolina


25 Years In Venice

493.7000 AmericaEW
Licensed/Insured CPC053910 119-E COrppPalion Way, Venice


The Carolina Inn, Chapel
Hill
Ohio
The Vernon Manor Hotel,
Cincinnati
The Lafayette, Marietta
Oklahoma
Hotel Ambassador, Tulsa
Oregon
Ashland Springs Hotel,
Ashland
Rhode Island
The Hotel Viking, Newport
Providence Biltmore,
Providence


South Carolina
Wentworth
Charleston
Tennessee


Texas
The Driskill, Austin
The Fairmount San An-
tonio, San Antonio
Vermont
The Middlebury Inn, Mid-
dlebury
Basin Harbor Club, Ver-
gennes
Virginia
The Jefferson Hotel, Rich-
mond
Williamsburg Inn, Wil-
liamsburg
Colonial Houses-Historic
Lodging, Williamsburg
Wahngo


Washington
The Fairmont Olympic
Mansion, Hotel, Seattle, Seattle
The Davenport Hotel,
Spokane


Sheraton Read House Ho-
tel, Chattanooga
The Hermitage Hotel,
Naswhville


Wisconsin
Hotel Metro, Milwaukee


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. Thi Ctasaa S\o&a

118.Nokomis Ave. S. 941-488-7788
(Just Steps Off The Avenue
Behind Venice Wine & Coffee Company)

D. Joseph Italy Sandles
$16.00 to $28.00



Costume Jewelry At Fantastic Buys
I i. ,.
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HURRICANE PROTECTION PRODUCTS
0 -old aftA f lostalled, 6 r Nffff/c, afle czamf saleld, /l/c,
13M SAFETY WINDOW FILM







Venice Gondolier Sun


SUNDAY,
14B JUNE 19,2005


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.,~ ,~ ~,


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.... ...


PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTHA BELLOS
Gail Taylor, Chair of the Florida P.E.O. Scholarship Committee
for Chapter EY, presents Florida State University student
Melissa Reilly with a scholarship for $2,000 at a recent P.E.O.
Chapter EY luncheon.


Bill and Lynn Johnson of Nokomis recently visited the U.S.S. Midway in San Diego with friends Jack and Larraine Calderon and
Jack Pritchard from Nevada.


I -, ,;..:. .


PHOTO COURTESY OF 'PETE' PETERS
Seven new members of the board of directors of the Arts and
Culture Alliance were installed on May 11 at the Venetian Golf
and River Club. Left to right back are John Chapman and Tracey
Vivano. In front are Katherine Zauner, Erica Williams, Liana
Martin and Terry Brawley. Muriel Van Patten is not pictured.
. L' ,, ... -. -' .


PHOTO COURTESY OF PAT CHERVENAK


Stevie Manofsky of Kissimmee takes vacation time to visit her
South Venice friends and hold the sun at Venice Beach.

MY CLUB____


Venice Moose Lodge #1308 and the firemen representing the
Venice Fire Department Benevolent Fund hosted a barbecue at
the Moose Lodge to help the family of firefighter Stephen
Worobel, whose son Stephen has a rare blood disease and
requires treatments. The young Worobel and his father pre-
sented the Venice Moose Lodge with a plaque thanking them
for the Lodge's hosting the benefit. Left to right are Past
Governor, Chuck Stevenson; Stephen Worobel; honored guest,
Stephen Worobel; and Lodge Administrator, Jack Brown.




YOU SHOULD BE IN PICTURES
We'd love to print your photograph, but we can't if it is a
printout or a Polaroid. Images must be high resolution. E-mail your
photographs in .jpg format to dshulman(,venicegondolier.com or
mail your photo to: The Venice Gondolier Sun, ATTN: My Pictures,
200 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34285.


PHOTO COURTESY OF RUTH BYLER
Rena Kay Byler Breeding holds little Natasha Louise Breeding,
born May 22 in Denver. Natasha is the seventh grandchild of
Bob and Ruth Byler of Venice.


PHOTO COURTESY OF 'JODIE BAUER


PHOTO COURTESY OF VAGC


New officers for the Venice Newcomers Club were installed at the Venice Yacht Club on May 11. Members of the Venice Area Garden Club dedicate the refurbished Blue Star Memorial Marker
For membership information, call Nancy at 488-6875. outside the Venice Area Chamber of Commerce. With them is Marker Chair, Joan Garrison, right.


AP~g ~,F






THE SUN



Southwest Florida's Guide To Building & Remodeling Your Home

Southwest Florida's Guide To Building & Remodeling Your Home \,


Sunday, June 19, 2005


Editor: Donna Davidson at ddavidson@sun-herald.com


A section of the Sun


Who

knew

concrete

could

be as

refined

as it is

strong?


See pages 4 & 5


Degussa Wall Systems photo


Homes made with insulated concrete construction methods can have very attractive exteriors and complex designs.


:rTr~:~7rrl~aa~lrrrsa- zi1 -.~:7


lantial Lenders



of North Port


LOCA TOR


M


All Credit Con
Consrructior, Per
"Iamc Dj, \p,
No App F.
Man\ Proer


rI Jennifer Watters
Al,,rtng'e Bnker
Mortgage Approval Services,
"Your Neighbor in Mortgage Lending
2 2587 Toledo Blade Blvd. North Port. FL 34;
Toll Free 1-888-229-3573 x109 Cell: (941) 22
wwwiv.mortgageapprovalservices.com


FIN APCITAL
MORTGAGES
.%iin pie One Time
R-hrh or Renotar~in
Lo~ans -At alaaule
Deb~t Consolidat ion
Fot All Credit Ranges


Nora K, KII
Branch Managc
Sr. Loan Office
noraking' .'caplinmorrta
119 Tamiami Trail., 5
Port Charlotte, FloridE

(941) 2' -)S I


This Space


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289
3-9773







age o-m
Suite B II
S34253


us
41 ),


Building or


Refinancing your home?
' 1 I I! i j 'l i'


AVailableh SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.
Ni 18501 Murdock Circle, 2nd Floor
NORTH PORT: 941-429-3 00 ...
Swww.suntrustmorlgage.conm.aheinen
PORT CHARLOTTE: 941-20- 9 '


Ask for Sales


-I T~ui.


Midw3y Blvd


- Countrywide
HOME LOANS


IPrrJ:.,A.. 1FFTwU",a2uLL,` 19c31 T1 i-
(941 1 I25-5-553If.)option #1
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Venice Gondolier Sun


Page 2 D/E/N/C/V


Sunday, June 19, 2005 The Sun


Sihngs


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"Copyrighted'Material a-.- -


- Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
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ft. of living area, and are priced from the low $400's "<-, (Sy (6" |
to the $500's, including standard homesite. 3401 S. Sumter Blvd.,- North Port, FL 34287 Between US 41 and 1.75 / Exit 182
(941) 423-6755 -Toll Free: 877-334-3766 *www.heron-creek.com ,


SPECIAL
AVOID THE 30% INCREASES COMING THIS YEAR
DESIGN YOUR NEW HOME TODAY WITH 10% DOWN
PAY FOR IT WHEN YOU RETURN NEXT YEAR
BUY ORLE' ,ASEI Ir:LAN .


R Y STA L


LAKES


S50 Country Lakes Drive Ft. Myers, FL 33905-5110
WWw. c ystalkesik orida.com 1-888-694-7454 (toll free)
S175; eit39 St/4 nii on Luckett Road. Left on Country Lakes Drive.
*'O..ne mile to gated entrance on left.


U a -
-


percent of total
ary 2005, acco


mw a-


l volume in Janu- Adams," according to Ronald
)rding to Pruden- King, Scarafoni's project man-


Sun Coast Homes
is a section of the SUN,
23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, Fla. 33950

Donna Davidson, Features Editor
(941) 206-1164

For advertising questions, please call:
Debbie Dunn-Rankin
Advertising Manager
(941) 206-1500


Charlotte Sun
Advertising Executive
Fort Myers, Cape Coral
(941) 206-1263

Christine Nichols
Account Executive
Port Charlotte
(941) 206-1257

Rachelle Pastorfield
Account Executive
Punta Gorda/Burnt Store
(941) 206-1256


North Port Sun
Steve Sachkar
(866) 562-6204

Englewood Sun
Lang Capasso
(877) 827-6204

Venice Gondolier Sun
Dave Cherry
(866) 357-6204

DeSoto Sun
Richard Hitt
(888) 690-6204


* Many To Choose From Starting In The Low $400's
" In Rotonda West With Golf and Lake Views
* Very Private and Tropical Area
* Custom Finishes Including: Granite Tops, Wood Ci
kPorcelain Tile, Exotc Pool, and Much More.


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1484 Justica St. Borca Grande I
1400 SF under air, 3 BR, 2 BA for
$232.900. Home is tiled in wei areas
ana appliances are included.


1446 Gardenside Cir Cayman 1604 Dodge Court Boca Grande -.
1660 SF under air 3 BR, 2 BA for 1401) SF under air. 3 BR. 2 BA' for
$256.900. Home is tiled in' eit arcja $255.900. Home-is filed in wet areas
and appidin. aire included and .pplin.,:e- .- inc luded Cul-de-sac


2445 Brewster Rd. Trinidad 1436 J
SF under air. 3 BR, 2 BA for
$240,000. Home i on an on'.rsized i
corner loi. Tile in wet areas. rari
upgrade" & appliances included


410- 4-a '
S a. ~- -m


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1260 Boswell St. Ca3man 1653 I 1802 Ardisia St. St. Martin -
SF under air, 3 BR. 2 BA for 1660 SF under air. 3 BR, 2 BA for
$259,900. Home is tiled in wet areas $ 5256,900. Home is uiled in wer areas
and appliance- :re included I arid appliances arc included.


r '0
1"72 .Ardkia St. ke %Velt 1870 SIF
unilir air. 3 RR. all %alk-in cioseta. 2
11% wiudi ftrer$293.90)0. Tiledii nwet
.I C IF-1 Jff1.-3I c. *included


1492 Eugenia Cayman 1653 SF
under air, 3 BR, 2 BA for $255.000.
Home is tiled in wet areas ind
appliances are included.


15'0 Wialdorf Dr. S. iMartin 1660
SF under air. 3 BR. 2 BA /Ituod)
lor $264.900. Homie i l.J idn .et
area .,i- :Jppl Inccs are in.re ludIced


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Venice Gondolier Sun Sunday, June 19, 2005.


Page 3 D/E/N/CN


Cafrl Burr oi~S
Y^/Cl-l 11 J ?J_ 1 A. J ..,llA .,...c


BUILDING EXCEPTIONAL HOMES SINCE 1948


Friday, Saturday &
June 17, 18 &
10:00 a.m. to 5:00


Sunday
19
p.m.


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Florida!


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S, BUILT

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SSolid Surface
IFtops
inSystem.
Ilted Ceilings
i i.al Landscape Pkg.


LsaO9-900


ON YOUR LOT OR OURS

? MODELS AVAILABLE
rmwof -/ ~ 6. it, 900


aYIr.,/AVde


* 16 x 16 Tile Throughout
(except bedrooms & den)
* Wide Decorative Ceiling
and Base Moulding
* Designer Plumbing Fixtures


- `.".,. ; 4 ii.' ,/ .*;-'. ,.
owances reJ Ud6 lot clearg Pi, dirt iadr a iad priced accordingly. Carll Burr home sites are available for purchase. Prices, terms, conditions and specifications are subject to

Come Visit Us At...
3423 West Price Blvd., (between Cranberry & Salford)
North Port, Florida Telephone: 941-426-1616 1-888-426-1616


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DEVELOPING A STRONGER COMMUNITY



Protecting yourself from the big, bad storms


DEAR JIM: I am looking at
various construction options
for our new house. I like
concrete for its
strength, effi-
ciency and
l abundant
materials. What
are some of the
common ways
concrete can be
used for
homes?- Donald A.
DEAR DONALD: For all of
the reasons you mentioned,
concrete is perhaps the best of
all building materials for
homes. You have probably
seen many homes with a basic-
concrete construction, but did
not notice them.
Other than the fact they will
still be standing after a
tornado or hurricane, they
look like any other stick-built
home.
People don't often think of
concrete as being energy
efficient, but concrete homes
are some of the most efficient.
The concrete itself provides
the airtightness and rigidity


for the structure. Exterior
insulation, usually rigid foam,
provides the efficient thermal
barrier.
With the heavy mass of the
concrete, these homes are
comfortable and quiet to live
in. Quite a few options are
available for residential
concrete .construction.
Concrete panels have been
used in Europe for many years
and are becoming more
popular here. Large wall
panels, with the windows and
door openings, form the
exterior envelop of the house.
The insulation is usually fixed
to the exterior of the walls and
the interior is finished con-
ventionally.
The panels can be manufac-
tured to your building plans in
a factory and shipped by truck
to your building site. Another
option is to first pour the
foundation and slab at your
building site. The wall forms
are placed on the slab and the
concrete wall panels are cast
right there. With either
method, it requires a crane to
lift the wall panels into place.


Tierra Concrete Homes photo
Interior rooms in a concrete panel home are very attractive. The strength of the walls allows for unique inte-
rior floor plans.
Another panel option uses a Concrete is sprayed (called ing upon the thickness of the
thick foam panel with a wire shotcrete) over the wire mesh foam in the center, the wall
mesh attached to the sides, to create a solid wall. Depend- insulation R-value can be as


high as you like.
This method allows for the
most design flexibility and
smooth unique wall curves
and contours. A newer option
uses autoclaved aerated
concrete blocks. The concrete
is made using fine aggregate,
cement and an expansion
material. Through the use of
heat, the material expands to
create tiny air cells as it cures.
As much as 80 percent of
the block is air, which is a
good insulator. The blocks are
assembled with mortar
similarly to any concrete
block wall.
The insulated concrete form
(ICF) method is very popular
now. This uses hollow foam
insulation blocks which are
stacked together or large foam
panels with ties between
them. Using a pump truck,
the cement is poured into the
top of the blocks or panels
and it fills the interior. When it
sets, the insulated walls have a

Please see CONCRETE on 5


Sunday, June 19, 2005 The A-','t Sun


Page 4 D/E/N/C/V


Venice Gondoliero Sun






W. =. n.n n Sunda. un 1.005h,.


Page 5 D/E/N/CN


Degussa Wall Systems Illustration
Insulated concrete wall forms stay in place after the concrete is poured in between them.


Precast concrete wall panels are made to your specific building plans. They are heavy and a crane is
needed to set them in place.


- *** CONCRETE
W From page 4


Impact International photo
A foam panel is used for shot-
crete wall construction. Once the
panels are erected, concrete is
sprayed on the wall surface.


seamless, strong concrete
core.
The following companies
offer concrete construction
systems:
Aercon Florida,
(863) 422-6360,
www.aerconfl.com;
American Insulock,
(602) 309-1177,
www.insulock.com;
* Impac International,
(800) 227-9591, www.
impac-international.com;
Perma-Crete,
(800) 607-3762
www.permacrete.com; and
Tierra Concrete Homes,
(800-373-9930,
www.tierraconcretehomes.com


Send inquiries to James
Dulley, Newspaper Name,
6906 Royalgreen Dr.,
Cincinnati, Ohio 45244 or visit
www.dulley.com.


50.


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ICF
SenergyW Base Coat
Sei-iergy'' Reiiif-rcing,
Mesh
Energy' Base Cc'.t
Senergye Finrih Coat


II //
Boca Royale, a South Sarasota golf, tennis and Counlry Club gated community of
exquisite single-family homes on large beautiful lanId capedloi, each home featuring
a panorama of goll course, lake or nature preserve. An expansi4e palette of luxurious
model homes by award-winning builders Arthlurs Ruienberg, lee WeLheringlon Homes
and Thompson Cusiom Homes await sour inspection. Model homes tiai feature
unrivaled architectural design, spacious and imaginative floor plans and premium
finishes diat add character, dimension, style and extraordinary beaurv.
HOME/LOT PACKAGES FROM THE $500'S

1601 HIGHWAY 776
4 MILES SOUTH OF US 41
(941) 474-5525 OR (800) 348-4554


"O
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t an affordable price.
an. a rd able prce.


ww w. Ih o m e a- a s t e r s c o n s tr c ti o n .c o m

Model Homes Iome m asers 1.800.330.6132
.opstructLon .uor .9. 423.614
Turnkey Packages Service is our reputation ce 195 1941.423.6144
North Port, Florida State Cert. Lic. #CB C033157 1.941.492.4494


Call 941.485 5-444
950Riif% ,rod Avenrj \ .nice Florida -wwi.u CquirN litLrlc corn
L 1 II I I ,:11cr O' i- Jr, l k Au hi V. ilitIilihR


INTERIOR & -
'-, .EXTERIOR LIGHTING
GREAT SELECTION
OF CEILING FANS
A # WE WILL STORE
MERCHANDISE
INSTALLATION &
PARTS
(941) 475-6901
NEWPORT SQUARE
3579 SR 776 & SPINNAKER BLVD. SR77 McCall Road
ENGLEWOOD, FL 4VENICE PT CHARLOTTE
a MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-5 SATURDAY 10-2
Send questions to:
[ga lgg fanlady-lighting@ewol.com


The Am, Sun


Venice Gonndolier Sun SudyJne1,20


~f;tct;b~





Sunday, June 19, 2005 The 4- Sun


Living Area


Carll Burr

unveils the

Malaya |

model

today

in North

Port

Master Suite
---. --, i


Carll Burr Homes
is exclusively represented
by Carll Burr Realty LLC
THE MALAYA is a three-bedroom, two-bath home
with a media room, two-car garage, lanai and 2,973 total
square feet (2,248 square feet under air).
The one-half pool bath or extended media room
are included at no additional charge with a pool or
extended lanai, or deck/cage.
The standard upgraded options package is included in
the $319,900 price (on the buyer's lot).
Dining Area


Sun photos by Marisa Sinclair


Open House:
From 10 a.m, to 5 p.m. today
at the Carll Burr Homes
flagship model, the Malaya,
at 3423 W. Price Blvd.
in North Port.
Call sales associates
Kathy Koroschetz
or Barrie White
at (941) 426-1616
for. information.


Second Bedroom
:2


Page 6 D/vE/N/CN


Venice Gondollier Sun