<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Sports
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Opinion
 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Obituaries
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Our Town
 Section B: Venice Venue
 Section B: Well-Being
 Section B: Fresh Air
 Section B: Senior Scene
 Section B continued
 Section B: Travel
 Section B: Green Sheet
 Section B continued
 Section B: One Last Word
 Sun Coast Homes














Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00066
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Portion of title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) 58 cm. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Creation Date: June 12, 2005
Publication Date: 2001-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
oclc - 47264140
notis - ANK8420
lccn - 2001229429
System ID: UF00028295:00066
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
    Section A: Main: Sports
        page A 8
        page A 9
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 13
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 14
    Section A: Main: Obituaries
        page A 15
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 16
    Section B: Our Town
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B: Venice Venue
        page B 3
    Section B: Well-Being
        page B 4
    Section B: Fresh Air
        page B 5
    Section B: Senior Scene
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
    Section B: Travel
        page B 8
    Section B: Green Sheet
        page B 9
    Section B continued
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
        page B 13
    Section B: One Last Word
        page B 14
    Sun Coast Homes
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
Full Text


NOW ON WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY


VENICE 7





LonO eriA.

LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER FLORIDA'S I G


6t 7e


000027527 122805 02
NIV OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
0 BOX 117007
05 SMA UNIV. OF FLORIDA
AINSVILLE FL 32611


50 CENTS VOLUME 60 NUMBER 43


AN EDITION OF THE SUN


SUNDAY-TUESDAY EDITION, JUNE12-14, 2005


ruutonDQrw3Mru-rEbUar, f mvA?-ANDSUNDAY


A day


with the



repo man.


BY ELLA NAYOR
STAFF WRITER

Lunch hour has just passed and Dave
Lighthall is back on the road.
The tall, slim man hops into his work truck
and scrutinizes a pile of papers with names
arid addresses on them.
They're on the day's list.
He separates the local addresses and puts
them on top of the pile. Then he switches on
the ignition. listens for a second as his large,
black truck roars into life.
It's 2:50 p.m. and Lighthall has work to do.
In moments he's on the long gray stretch
toward a gated community. Lighthall has an
assignment here and he is hoping to get past
the gate guard.
Some idle chatter and he's in. It worked.
This isn't always the case.
Minutes later Lighthall spots his prey a
tan BMW parked in a driveway. With a quick
scan he checks the area. Nobody's around.
With a quick flick of his finger, Lighthall
pushes some buttons on a remote device
inside of the truck. In seconds, the BMW was
hooked to the back of the truck and Lighthall
turned out of the driveway.
Just as Lighthall was edging into the street.
the visibly angry car owner came running out
after his car. Lighthall's face remained un-
changed as he headed for the gate. Lighthall
was a bit concerned he wouldn't make it
through the exit gate before the man caught
up to him.
Then it would be a breach of peace a
legal no-no in his line of work. But luck was on
Lighthall's side that day. The gate slowly lifted
and Lighthill zipped out, leaving the upset car
owner behind.
And Lighthall is not in the least bit fazed by
this incident. With a shrug he heads back to
his shop to stow the car.
Meet the repo man
Dave Lighthall has the ability to make folks
shudder by his mere presence.
The tall, easygoing guy doesn't appear
intimidating at first glance.
But when he jumps into his hulking, shiny
tow truck, the soft-spoken man seemingly
transforms into something that strikes fear
into the hearts of many.
He's like the grim reaper, only, instead of
collecting souls with a scythe, Lighthall snags
unpaid cars with his high-tech tow truck.
"Everybody starts running when I start
backing up," he said.


Please see REPO, 2A


Fin finder


THIS
EDITION


THIS SECTION 3A
In the running
Florida House Rep. Naincy
Detert sets mark for,
Harris' spot.

DEATHSj 15SA
Jan Davenport
Mildred Arcaro

COUPONS.
Christie's Hearing.................... 9B
Durango .............................. 9B
- Kingfish Cafe....................... 9B


Good morning, Gondolier
Sun subscribers,
ROBERT AND BETTE SABO


Sun publisher


named to Florida


Press hall of fame


FROM WIRE AND STAFF REPORTS

Charlotte Sun Publisher
Derek Dunn-Rankin was in-
ducted into the Florida News-
paper Hall of Fame on Friday
during the annual convention
of the Florida Society off
Newspaper Editors and Flor-
ida Press Association.
"I was totally surprised and
honored to find myself in
such distinguished company
that includes some of my
heroes of the newspaper
business," Dunn-Rankin said,
late Friday.
Dunn-Rankin started, his
newspaper career as a paper-
boy for the Miami News and.
later worked as a reporter at
the St. Petersburg Times and
as a circulation manager at


the Miami News, various
North Carolina newspapers
and the Norfolk Pilot, a
Landmark Company news-
paper.
He served as a vice presi-
dent and president of Land-.
mark before returning to Flor-
ida in 1977 where he bought
weekly newspapers in Venice
and New Port Richey.
Dunn-Rahkin expanded
into neighboring areas, re-
sulting in the fast-growing
Charlotte Sun. The Sun, a
35,000-circulation daily, has
four zoned editions serving
Charlotte and DeSoto coun-.
ties, Englewood, North, Port,
and Venice.
Dunn-Rankin also served
as the Florida 'Press Asso-
ciation president in 1982.


FRONT SECTION


Gondo takes record seventh top award


The IVenice Gondolier Sun brought home 15
awards Sat urday night at the Florida Press
Association awards in Key West. This is the
seventh year in a row that the paper has been
named best newspaper in its circulation class by
the association and the eighth time in nine years


it has won the honor.

STAFF REPORT

The Venice Gondolier Sun
set a record Saturday by being
named the best newspaper in
its Florida
Press Associ-
ation circula-
tion class for
the seventh
year in a row.
It was also the
eighth time
the paper has
won the hon-
or in the last Cool
nine years.
The paper's editorial staff
also claimed 15 individual


OUR TOWN SECTION


awards in the FPAs Better
Weekly Newspaper Contest,
'which drew 2,410 entries. A
total of 88 newspapers were
entered in this category.
'Sports Editor Claude Lewis
and former photo editor
George McGinn took ;three
awards each.
Lewis got a first place in
Sports Story, a second place
in Sports Column and a sec-
ond., place for Outdoor
Writing. McGinn, claimed a
second place for Spot News, a
first place for Sports Picture
and a first place for Photo'
Series.
Taking two awards were


Features Editor Kim Cool,
with a first place in En-
vironmental Writing and a
honorable mention in Crit-
icism; Copy Editor Rob Broy-
les, who shared in the envi-
ronmental award and took a
second place for Individual
Graphic; and Editor Bob
Mudge, who received a first
place for Editorial Page and a
second place for First
Amendment Defense.
Staff Writer Tommy Mc-'
Intyre. took a second place for
In-depth Reporting.' Car-
toonist Dale Neseman earned
a first place for Local Cartoon.
Assistant Editor J.J. Andrews
also shared in the environ-
mental award.
The paper's editorial staff
was honored in the Com-
munity Service category with
, a second place for its series of
stories on local United.Way
agencies.
Its Best of Venice supple-
ment took third place in the
Newspaper Promotion cate-


ALSO IN THIS EDITION


14B CLASSIFIED
6B COMICS
8B COUPONS
3B TV BOOK
4B USA WEEKEND'
,..... .


District



may restrict



teen drivers

Committee will be formed for
policy change in school-hours
driving by students.

BY JENNIFER WALCHOK
GONDOLIER INTERN

Sarasota County schools need to take a
tougher look at student driving restrictions
during school hours, according to board
member Laura Benson.
Board members met Tuesday for their
monthly work session with Superintendent
Gary Norris.

ATA GLANCE
* More than 400 teen-age drivers were killed or
involved in a crash that resulted in fatality in
2003, according to the most current statistics by
the Department of Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles, and an overwhelming 36,810 teen dri-
vers were involved in crashes in Florida.
- Sarasota County School Board will form a com-
mittee to consider policy changes on parking
restrictions, penalties and limitation of students
driving during school hours.

Among the items was Benson's request to
evaluate driving privileges for high school stu-
dents. Benson discussed "tightening" district
policies.
Interest in this topic was sparked for
Benson because of the death of 17-year-old
John Garofalo Jr. last month. Garofalo was a
Riverview student who left school in the mid-
dle of the day fora fast food lunch and became
a fatality in a car crash while riding in a friend's
car.
And while it didn't happen during school
hours, the dangers of teens driving was felt,
locally when Venice High School student
Valerie Moore of Englewood died NMay 27 in a
crash while driving home from work.
Benson is concerned about the combina-
tion of inexperienced and unnecessary dri-
ving during school hours.
"We have a moral obligation to keep kids
safe," Benson said.
More than 400 teen-age drivers were killed
or involved in a crash that resulted in fatality
in 2003. according to the most current statis-
tics by the Department of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicle,, and an overwhelming 36,810
teen drivers were involved in crashes in
Please see RESTRICT, 6A


SUN PHOTO B'' J.INATHAI FREDII
A dolphin surfaces in front of a fisherman on a recent evening just off the South Jetty.


BOB VEDDER 13A LOTTO SA CROSSWORD IIB PHOTO ESSAY
CD RATES 16A OPINION 13A COFFEE BREAK 2B SENIOR SCENE
CITY MEETINGS 3A POLICE BEAT .15A DEAR ABBY 10B TRAVEL
LEGALS. .. 6A SPORTS 8A FRESH AIR 5B VENUE
LET'EM HAVE IT 14A WEATHER 5A GREEN SHEET 9B WELL-BEING
V -'' ', 0 1--1."[''-, -


I I









REPO frompagelA [


And like the grim reaper,
Lighthall does not discrimi-
nate.
Rich, poor, old or young, it
doesn't matter at all. The bot-
tom line is, if you fail to pay
your bills, there's a good
chance you will be making an
acquaintance with Lighthall
or one of his colleagues.
Lighthall, who co-owns
Southwest Recovery, a repos-
session business, works for
banks and financial institu-
tions to get their merchandise
back if a customer fails to
make their payments.
And contrary to popular
belief, Lighthall takes no joy in
taking folks' stuff.
"I'm not the the type of
repo guy who comes and says
I am going to take your car,"
Lighthall said. "We give a new
meaning to the words 'repo
man.'"
Lighthall and his associates
try to be friendly to the people
whose possessions they are
paid to repossess. In some
cases Lighthall has offered
assistance in the form of re-
ferrals to social service agen-
cies.
In one case eight months
ago, he had the heartbreaking
task of taking back a handi-
capped-accessible van from a
North Port woman who had
no legs.
Lighthall offered her a list
of services and phone num-
bers to agencies like St.
Vincent de Paul to help her.
Lighthall, 40, is no stranger
to repossessions either. He
had fallen on hard times
when he was 18 and lost his
job in New Hampshire. The
repo man knocked on his
door and asked for his keys.
But Lighthall and the repo
man struck up a rapport, and
a short time later Lighthall
was offered a job working for
the repo man. He took it, and
the rest, as they say, is history.
In 1987, he started his own
repo business in New Hamp-
shire, and several years ago he
and Barbara Scheele and Bill
Alvarez joined forces at
Southwest Recovery.
On the job -
For ighttallhe ob in-
volves miles and miles of trav-
el and regular confrontations
with angry people who are
less than happy to give up
their possessions.
On an average day, Light-
hall puts about 375 miles on
his truck. In one year he
racked up 121,000 miles on
his vehicle. His job covers.
Bradenton to Naples. And
since he works about six days
a week, the father of three
lives a solitary life on the high-
ways and byways.
In order to be efficient,
Lighthall drives a $60,000
vehicle equipped with a
remote device that allows him
to hook and lift a vehicle with-
out ever leaving .the driver's,
seat- a convenience for a re-
covery agent.
He also has a nearly $3,000
navigational computer
installed in his truck that does
everything but the actual dri-
ving.
On the job, lighthall usual-
ly fields about five or six car
repossessions a day, and his
business is doubling. Last
year he repossessed 1,165


vehicles.
Some days are better than
others, of course.
', "It's a lot like .fishing,"
Lighthall said. "You have
good days, you can have bad
days."
Hard times
He said business is in-
creasing because of all of the
car dealers offering big in6en-
tives to get cars. People get
the cars, can't afford them
and then the bank needs to
recover property it has paid
for.
His fee to the banks for a
normal recovery is $375. Per-
sonal repossessions involving
family members cost more
because of the extra hassle
involved, he said.
And despite what most
would think, a lot of Light-
hall's service is in luxury
neighborhoods where the
price tags on homes often
reach into the millions. The
repo man said much of his
work is done in posh areas of
Naples. Another fair share is
done on Marco and Sanibel
islands too.
Lighthall said many weal-
thy folks fall on hard times
when the stock market fluctu-
ates. or business becomes.


slow. Then-they are left with
high mortgage and car pay-
ments.
"They just live, above their
means," he said. "They could-
n't handle it."
Lighthall said he has taken
high-end cars from people in
the public eye like deputies
and school principals. He
recalls taking back a Porsche
from a Fort Myers school
principal right in front of the
school. The principal had re-
fused to turn in the vehicle at
home, so Lighthall was forced
to go to his place of business.
Students watched as the
principal bounded out of the
building running afterhis car.
Finding the cars
Snagging a car a piece of
cake, right? Nope, not at all.
In order to make his mon-
ey, Lighthall must procure
and secure the cars ordered
back by the banks: And often
the addresses that banks get
from their financially delin-
quent customers are incor-
rect, said Barbara Scheele, co-
owner of Southwest Recovery.
Scheele and her assistant
Julie Ogle do all of the. foot-
work involved in finding a
financially delinquent cus-
tomer.


SUN PHOTOS BY SARAH COWARD
Lighthall backs up a repossessed vehicle Wednesday in Englewood, positioning it for a tow
truck hook-up.


They scroll through the
local property appraisers Web
sites and contact families and
relatives in order to find
someone.
"It's a lot of 'PI' work in a
way," said Scheele.
Scheele and Ogle also
make sure all of the paper-
work sent down by the banks
is in order before they give it
to Ughthall.
Once Lighthall gets the
assignments, he 'does what-
ever it takes to get the cars for
his clients. That could mean
chatting with neighbors -
who according to Lighthall
are usually the best source for
finding an "elusive debtor," as
they are called in the repo
business.
"Neighbors are the first
people to give people up," he
said.
Last Wednesday Lighthall
collected a full load of cars -
five.
Not all of his repos are in-
voluntary. At 5 p.m. in Engle-
wood, Lighthall met with a
gentleman who volunteered
to give up his car. The car had
belonged to the man's father,
who had recently passed
away. The man could not
afford the payments and told
the bank he wanted to. reliw-


quish it.
Lighthall shook the man's
hand and then hooked up the
minivan.
Lighthall said that volun-
tary repossessions are better
than the involuntary ones be-
cause the person doesn't get
penalized as harshly. Light-
hall also said that it's a lot
more convenient for the car
owners to set up a time with a
recovery service than to be
caught off guard, like when
they're grocery shopping with
the kids.
Yep, that's right. A repos-
session service can legally
collect a car anywhere out-
side ,of a garage or covered
carport.
Lighthall once hooked up
the car of a woman as she
waited at a stop light. The
woman had to walk a few
blocks home.
Confrontations
Getting into scuffles and
altercations kind of comes
with the repo territory. The
repo man recalls how he and
his partner Bill Alvarez were
at a call in Sarasota when the
owners locked Alvarez in the
house and Lighthall had to
break him out.
Then there was the time


when a Hooters waitress
chased Lighthall through
Cape Coral and back to Punta
Gorda to try to get back a car
that her father had asked be
repossessed.
Right now there is a pend-
ing aggravated assault charge
against a local woman who
tried to run over Lighthall
with her truck after he repos-
sessed her car. She succeeded
in causing minor damage to
his truck.
Lighthall said people have
pulled guns and knives on
him during his nearly 20-year
foray in the repo business.
But none of it fazes him.
, "Whatever it takes," he
said.
End of the day
Lighthall's day, which be:-
gins after lunch, usually ends
around 3 a.m,
He collects all of his paper;
work and heads home to get
some sleep.
Despite the confrontadonr
and the frequent stress of no
collecting enough cars
LighthallloVes his job.
"Every day it's 'something
different," he said.
You can e-mail Ella Navor.
at enaior@sun-lierald.coilm.


I Sraot Cont Govern Im'&II']dlmen] ulI


To diversify your portfolio with steady, tax-free income or a
higher-yielding, taxable alternative, consider:

SLM Corporation EDNotes Marco Island FLA

5.409% Taxable 3.830 Tax-free'

For more information about how these investments may fit
into your overall financial plan, please contact me today.

Bob Kurvin -
Vice President Investments

RAYMOND JAMES
E Asov!-rTES. INC.s
Member. New York Stock Exohange/SlPC
1314 E Venice Ae., Suite A. Venice. FL 34285
941-412-1400/800-635-5870
Robert.Kurvin@RaymondJames.com
00
"- You first.
As of 6/1/2005. Prices and yields are subject to change based on market conditions and
availability.The yield quoted is the lesser of yield to maturity and yield to call.
1 Price 97.920; coupon 5.25%; maturity 3/15/2028. Rated A2/A by Moody's/Standard &
Poor's. 2 Price 99.652; coupon 3.80%; maturity 7/1/2020. Rated
Aaa/AAA by Moody's/Standard & Poor's. Interest is not subject to federal income tax
but may be subject to state, AMT or local taxes.


$5$70,000
$500,000

$400,000


$300,000

$200,000

$100,000

$50,000


I.nibed Wau
United Way of South County
Serving the People of Venice,
glewood, North Port, Nokomis,
Osprey and Laurel


AG Edwards Smith
Bank One South
Bank of Venice Sun Tri
Boone, Boone, Boone' Target
Koda & Frook TJX Co
Bradway and Assoc. Venice
Caldwell Trust Wacho
Colonial Bank Wal-M
Crane Environmental Wateri
Crow's Nest / Bogey's SRQ C
First National Bank SRQ C
FPL SRQ S
Harbor Chase SRQ SI
Jacaranda Trace SRQ T
MCC SRQ T
Merrill Lynch City ol
Northern Trust City o
Publix
Raymond James
Robert's Nationwide Insurance
Sarasota Herald Tribune


paigns
Barney
Trust
rust

companies
Gondolier Sun
ovia Bank
lart
ford
lerk
omm.
schools
heriff
ax AsK
ax Coll.
f Venice
f N. Port


CONTACT
United Way of South Sarasota County, Inc.
7810 S. Tamiami Trail, #A4, Venice, FL 34293
Ph: (941) 408-0595 Fax: (941) 408-8795
Email: uw.ssc@verizon.net


County Calendar
- Advisory Commission on the Status of
Women June 15, 6 p.m., Sarasota County
Administration Center, Second Floor, Conference
Room A/B, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call
861-2882.
* Board of County Commissioners Budget
Workshop June 13, 9 a.m., Administration
Center, Third Floor, Think Tank, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 861-5915
* Community Alliance Executive Committee
- June 15, 1:30 p.m., Community Foundation
of Sarasota County, 2635 Fruitville Road,
S.arasjia Call 861-2877.
* Early Learning,Coalition June 15, 6
p.m, S[h:oli Boar..r 'd Sarasota County, Brown
A'iAr,,r, in euli'lr,'i. F,,oms A-B, The Landings,
1960 Landings Blvd., Sarasota. Call 379-1479.
* Economic Development Corporation of
Sarasosta County Board of Directors
Meeting June 12, 8 a m, Live Oak
Corpo..:r.a Ce.',i,' .uiit ;"ii 'l 01 Cattlemen
Poo-d .aa -.:o1.a Can" 13 1' 0 1. .
SDevelopment Services Advisory Commit-
tee June 14, 3 p m e D'hcirrn ef.'i'.:s,
Building-A, Second Floor Conference Room, *
1301 Cattlemen Road, Sarasota. Call 861-6637.
SHealth Coverage for Uninsured Children
Subcommittee June 14, 3:30 p.m., Healthy
Start Office, 1750 17th Street, Suite M, Sarasota.
Call 861-2877.
* Integrated Pest Management Advisory
Board June 13, 3:30 p.m., Twin Lakes
Park, Conference Room A, 6700 Clark Road,
Sarasota. Call 861-9849.
-, Planning Commission June 18, 6:30
p.m., Administration Center, First Floor,
Commission Chamber, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861-6666.
* Planning Commission Public Hearing -
June 15, 6 p.m., Administration Center,
Commission Chamber, Housing Chapter
continuation (if necessary) and Future Land Use
Chapter, Including the 2050 Plan, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota. Call 861-5140.
, Sarasota Tree Advisory Council June 16,
3 p.m., Public Works Building, Conference
Room 4, 1001 Sarasota Center Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 861-0844.
* SCAT Transit Development Plan June 16,
4 p.m., Veric, (1r Hill 41.11 we '.'.ei rne
YAvenue, Venice. Call 861-0927.
. Solid Waste Management'Citizens
Advisory Board June 15, 9 a.m., 8750 Bee
Ridge Road, Sarasota. Call 861-1532.
* Tourist Development Council June 16,
4:30 p.m., Administration Center, First Floor,
Commission Chamber, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861-5246.
* Traffic Advisory Council June 13, 2005,
1:15 p.m., Administration Center, Commissioner'
Chamber, First Floor, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861- 0957.
* Waterways Advisory Council (WAC), June
14, 9:00 a.m., Government Operations Center,
1001 Sarasota Center Blvd., Sarasota, Osprey
Rbom.Call 861-0900.


Sarasota County hosts national conference
with a local angle for county residents
Citizens interested in learning how local governments operate are
invited to attend one of several free workshops when Sarasota County
hosts the 11th Annual Transforming Local Government (TLG)
-conference, June 15-17 at the Ritz-Carlton and the Hyatt hotels.
The conference, expected to be one of the largest ever held in
Sarasota,.will draw more than 700 public service professionals from
around the country. Sarasota County Administrator Jim Ley js
conference host and member of the board of directors of the
sponsoring organization, The Innovation Groups.
Residents are invited to attend one of the free workshops from 8-10
a.m. Wednesday, June 15, two of which Will be hosted by Ley and
county staff:
* An in-depth Look Inside Sarasota County Government, the High-
Performance Community.
* Speaking to the Hearts and Minds: Using Leadership, Insight, and
Technology for a Total Emergency Response.
The other five sessions include: Changing Environments and
Increasing Complexity, Requires a True Transformation; Servant
Leadership: Defining Leadership with an Evolving Design; The
Customer Value Propositions: Knowing Exactly What Your Cities
Expect from your Government; Young Leaders Conquering
Tomorrow; and How to Value and Prioritize Projects: Catawba
County's System for Prioritizing Water and Wastewater Projects.
"'The workshops will offer citizens valuable knowledge and insights
for community conversations about working together on our shared
values," Ley said.
Both the Wednesday pre-conference, workshops and the
conference opening session, from 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., will be
broadcast live on Sarasota County TV 19;, along with the closing
session from 11 a.m.-noon on Friday, June 17. Sarasota County TV
19 is available to Comcast Cablevision subscribers on Channel 19 or.
on the county's Web site at www.scgov.net.
For more information on the TLG conference and the free pre-
conference workshops, call the Sarasota County Call Center at (941).
861-5000, or visit http://www.tlgconference.org/sessions/
freeworkshops.htm#precon..

Advisory Council Vacancies
CLOSING DATE- July 1, 2005
Advisory Board: Bicycle Pedestrian Trail Committee
Information: Alex Boudreau, 861-0920.
Advisory Board: Citizen Tax Oversight Committee (2 Vacancies).
Information: Contact Kim Radtke, 861-5424.
Advisory Board: Community Action Agency Board
Information: Rik Jimison; Program Manager, 861-2564.
Advisory Board: Keep Sarasota County Beautiful (5 Vacancies).
Information: Sandra Washington, Program Manager, 861-6733.
Advisory Board; Planning Commission
Information: Contact Susan Anderson, 861-6602.

This listing is published weekly by Sarasota County Government Public
Communications. Board of County Commission agendas are available at
www.scgov.net; to subscribe to agenda via e-mail, go to scgoy.net/weeklycalendar.
For more information, 'call (941) 861-5900.


Recovery agent Dave Lighthall, employee at Southwest
Recovery Company in Port Charlotte, uses a nylon strap to
anchor a recovered vehicle to his tow truck.


Business


Cam


. I


Eng


SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2005


2AL VENICE GONDOLIER iUNh


.Ih






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


l IhfAY IIJINF 12 ,2005


Detert announces candidacy for Harris'seat

BY JEREMY ROTTGEN' addressed was protecting out from under them. .and attended Sienna Heights and the NCSL Wome
AFWRITER children from sexual preda- "You are basically walking College in Adrian, Michigan. Legislative Network. She v


Florida House, Rep. Nancy
.Detert announced to the
Venice/Nokomis Federated
Republican Woman's Club on
Friday y that she would enter the
@006 race to replace Katherine
lHarris' spot for the 13th
congressionall District.
: Harris' decision last Tuesday
inspired Detert and others to
make their announcemenLs.
*."This week I was already
scheduled to speak here and
;all of a sudden things kind of
,changed," Detert said. "Kath-
erine Harris has announced
that she will run for U.S.
Senate. Today, I would like to
announce that I am running
for Congress for District 13."
i, Speaker Pro-Tempore Les-
lie Waters introduced Detert
at the luncheon.
:, "She helped lead the charge
on education issues," Waters
said. "She's always been about
jobs and paychecks for the
working family."
Peter platforms
t. Detert addresses a number
of issues she plans to use for
her platform.
-"Number one, we want to
be safe in our homes," Detert
said. "We talk a lot about
health care, education and
those kinds of issues normal-
ty and then after Florida hurri-
canes we went back to the
basics."
Detert mentioned an
award-winning bill she creat-
ed regarding strengthening
building codes in considera-


State Rep. Nancy Detert
State Rep. Nancy Detert


tion to wind storms because
it was wind and debris that
inflicted most of the damage
during last year's hurricanes.
"Since we are a miracle
state we not, only, overcame
that, but we had a $2 billion
surplus," Detert said. 'As the
chair of tourism I was delight-
ed to see that Florida is still
open for business."
Another key issue Detert'


tors m me state ofFlorinua. Shne
commended the bill that was
recently passed requiring sex-
ual offenders to be monitored
for the rest of their lives.
"Florida should .not only
be a great place to do busi-
ness, it should be a great
place to grow up and the very
least we can do is. to make
sure children are safe in their
own neighborhood," Detert
said. "Frankly, sexual preda-
tors are incurable and should
remain in prison for the rest
of their days as far as I'm con-
cerned, but those who are out
on the street will have an:
ankle bracelet for life. I
thought that was one of the
best bills we did all year long."
Property rights
Detert also addressed pri-
vate property rights of indi-
viduals, especially those in
mobile home parks.
She said people who have
invested in these properties
are vulnerable to a loophole
in the law that makes it pos-
sible for the property be sold


-----------------------
A Barber Plus Barbering with Style

New Earlier Hours
We Do Short Hair Well Men & Women
see Gail, Jenny or Jay .
664 Tamiami Trl. (Rialto Center)
mon fri 7:30-4:30 sat 8:30-2:00
SMen's Reg. $8.00 486-8802 ,
) www.abarberplus.com I
Internet coffee ICafe while you wait I
L----------J---------------------


away irom your investment,
which is sometimes your life,
savings," Detert said. "It's a
very strange law. It's a hybrid
of private property rights. You
own the house, but you don't
own the land that it sits on.
"It's shocking to people to
find out that. their park is
going to be bulldozed over
and maybe turned into con-:
dominiums. Their private
property rights are being
trampled. It's a flawin the law
and it needs to be 'fixed."
Detert also mfientioned the
issue of affordable housing in
the area.
"Our workers do not have
homes," she said. "It's a basic
American principle that
needs to be defended."
Detert will set up a treasury
July 1 for her campaign.
Local resident
Detert has served Venice,
Sarasota, Nokomis, Engle-
wood and North Port since
1998 in the Florida House. A
resident of Venice since 1978,
Detert was born in Chicago, Ill.


SbOll is a mortLgage,. UroUker .
:and owner of Osprey Mort-
gage Company. She was elect-
ed to the House in 1998 and
defeated Libertarian Don
Wallace for the State House,
District 70 position by a 58
percent margin in the 2004
'election. She also serves on
the' Sarasota County School
Board." .
Detert's past' positions
includes being a board merem-
ber of Efiterprise Florida, the
National Conference of State
Legislators Financial Senices


CLARIFICATION

There is nothing wrong
with the structural integrity of
Venice Little Theatre's roof on
its storage building, formerly
the ABC Liquor store. A story
and headline inside the June
I'O edition of the Venice
Gondolier Sun did not clearly
state this.
City unsafe building code
violations were .for small,
holes around the fascia where


Dr. Nlascola, DO


en's
was


vice-piresiL ueJ. ui Vriece
Nokomis FRWC and legisla-
tive chair of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Mortgage Brokers
in 1998.
In 1996 she was president
of both the Republican Wom-
en's Club of Sarasota and the
Suncoast Chapter of Florida
Association of Mortgage
Brokers. Detert has three sons
named Mark, Bryan and Jamie
and nine grandchildren.
"The issues are the same,"
Detert said. "Just on a grander
scale."


the old store sign was re-
moved. This created a threat
that the roof could be com-
promised during high winds,
especially during hurricane
season.
Once these holes are filled
in, city inspectors verified
Friday they have no other
safety issues withVenice Little
Theatre's storage building.
There were never any build-
ing code issues with VLT's
main building.


Dr. Holguin, IMD


PRIMARY CARE

OF VENICE

492-2212


1211 Jacaranda Blvd., Venice Health Park


, .I .'


Flexible Savings Options.


2.Sooo. 3.ooo, o
APY APY
$25,000.$99,999 $100,000+


INVESTMENT SAVINGS
Boost your earning potential
without risk or long-term
obligation.


VISIT any Colonial Bank office.
CALL 877.502.2265.
CLICK on colonialbarik.com.





COLONIAL BANK.
ww w.lonialbank.com Member FDIC


*The Investment Savings account is a variable three-tiered interest-bearing account with a ........ ,pe,.., d.Lpoi. ;.d a minimum balance requirement of
$3,000. A $12 monthly service charge will be assessed if the balance falls below the minimum for that statement period. Fee may reduce earnings. Limited trans-
action account. Earn 0.50% APY on balances of $0-$24999; 2.50% APY on balances of $25,0004$99,999; 3.00% APY on balances of $100,000 or more. Annual
Percentage Yield (APY) for investment Savings account effective June 1, 2005. Rates are subject to change after account opening. For funds new to Colonial Bank.
**Annual Percentage Yield (APY) as of the date of this printing And subject to change without notice. The APY.reflects the total amount of interest earned based
on the interest.rate and frequency of compounding for a 365-day' period. Minimum opening deposit $500 (money new to Colonial). This offer cannot be used
in conjunction with,any other advertised special, Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Not available to financial institutions.


Direct Phone Numbets:
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000
Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220 Classified 207-1200
Editorial/Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified/Advertising Fax 485-3036
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100
Community Web Site http://www.venicegonidolier.com
DayStar Communications 207-7800
Publisher: Robert A. Vedder* Editor: Bob Mudge
President: Derek Dunn-Rankin


*5 The
Autilt
Bureau



SPrnted rycledpaper.


VENICE *

GJondoler Sun


USPS (221-700) ISSN (1536-1063)
The VENICE GONDOLIER SUN, an edition of The Sun, is published
every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday by The Sun.
200 East Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285.
Periodicals Postage paid at Venice, Florida and additional mailing centers.



Home Delivery
Wed., Fri. & Sun. Rate
Newspaper designated

(Sarasota Co.)
13 wks. $12.26
26 wks. $21.89
52 wks. $40'08
Mail Delivery
13 wks. $17.95
26 wks. $32.95
52 wks. $58.45.
Single Copy
50


"""" SUBSCRIBE TODAY!:
Enck E .i i ll, .: ___ liiIh .i i .. li. i. t.'l,.ll iii I,
Nam


CUSTOMER
SERVICE POLICY:
If youi do not receive
your'newspaper by
; 6 a.m., please call the


Add "' .Circulation uept. at
-'..,, 207-1300 and
City a newspaper will be
Phor. __brought to you.
Mastercard ( ) Visa ( ) Expiration Date. CUSTOMER
Charge card number____ SERVICE HOURS:
gisatur ., Mon.& Tues.
Signature ---8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Wed. & Fri.
'POSTMASTER: Send address'changes to Venice Gondolier Sun, 6 a.m. 5p.m.
Circulation Department, 200 E. Venice Ave., Venice FL 34285. Sat. 8 a.m. 11 a.m.
7% Tax Included Foreign rates upon request Sun. 6 a.m.-Noon


-'tlUt ,JUN Z U .


I -


. .. -.


-Z






4A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


hshe


BEST GOODS & SERVICES
Beach/Swimwear_
Computer Store_
Jewelry Store
Children's Clothing
Women's Clothing
Men's Clothing
Consignment Shop
Thrift Shop
Storage Facility
Discount Store_
Fabric Store
Shoe Store
Health Food Store_
Citrus Company
Supermarket
Meat Market
Fish Market
Deli
Bakery
Liquor Store
Produce Store_
Photo Developing
Picture Framing
Photography Studio_
Pharmacy
Medical & Healthcare Supplies
Therapeutic Massage
Hair Salon
Nail Salo n
Tanning Salon_
Hearing Aids
Optical Center & Eyewear
Staltionery Store_
Oflice Supplies/Furniture_
Dry Cleaner
Florist
Limousine Service_
Daycare Center_
Private School_
Pet Shop/Supplies
Pet Sitters
Pet Kennel
Pet Grooming
Veterinary Services_
New Car Dealer_
Pre-Owned Car Dealer_
Auto Service
Oil Changes
Tires
Auto Parts
Car Wash


SEND YOUR ENTRY IN TODAY!
Qualify ing entries will be selected
to \% in prizes to include:
Four 14) $25 Gift Certificates
from GOLD RUSH BBQ
$100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of any
merchandise at MNONTGONIERY CARPETS


ISLAND TOUCH MASSAGES
Two 121 $60 Gift Certificates


A gift basket front PINEBROOK
REHABILITATION & NURSING CENTER


BEST HOMES & LIVING
Rental Management
Rental Community
Mortgage Broker
Real Estate Sales Office_
Real Estate Development
Title Company
Homebuilder
Golf & Country Club_
Appliances, purchase
Appliances, service _
Beds & Mattresses_
Carpet Cleaning
Carpet/Tile/Flooring
Cooling & Heating Services_
Electrician Services _
Furniture
Furniture, dining & kitchen _
Furniture, patio
Hardware Store _
Home Accessories_
Home Electronics _
Housekeeping Services_
Hurricane shutters_
Landscape & lawn maintenance_
Lawn equipment
Lighting & fans_
Moving company
Nursery & garden center_____
Paint Store
Pest control
Plumbing service_
Pool installation_
Pool & spa service_
Water Treatment Co._____
Window treatments
TV & VCR repair

BEST SPORTS & LEISURE
Bicycle Shop
Tennis Club
Health Club
Sports Equipment
Golf course, local_
Golf Supplies & Equipment
Golf Attire
Bait & Tackle
Boat, purchase
Boating Supplies
Marina
RV Dealer
Day Spa

BEST LIFE PLANNING/RETIREMENT
Bank/Financial Institution_
Financial Planner _
Insurance Agency, specific local
Stock Brokerage Firm
CPA/Accounting Firm_
Trust Department
Home Health Services
Nursing/Rehab Center_
Assisted Living
Assisted Living 25- Beds_
Retirement Community
Funeral Home


BEST PLACES
Breakfast
Cup of Coffee
Sunday Brunch
Buffet/AllYou Can Eat
Cafe
Sandwiches/Subs
Business Lunch
Wine List
Happy Hour
Sports Bar
Have a Beer
Chicken Wings
Burger
Barbecue
Salad Bar
Ribs
Seafood
Steak
Homestyle Cooking
Early Bird
Dinner Under $10
Pizza, chain
Pizza, non-chain
Ice Cream/Yogurt
Dessert
Key Lime Pie
Pasta/Italian
Restaurant, Chinese
Restaurant, other ethnic
Restaurant, waterfront
Restaurant, romantic
Restaurant, best overall
Restaurant, outdoor dining.
Best New Restaurant


I


TO DINE OUT


BEST ARTS & CULTURE
Local Tourist Spot
Local Event
Park
Beach
Radio Station, local
Book Store
Art Gallery
Arts & Crafts Store
Antiques
Gift Shop
Wine Shop
Band, local
Banquet Facilities
Caterer
Dancing
Live Entertainment
Travel Agency
Video Rental/Sales
Free Fun .


Make your vote count by

completing at least 55 of the

categories and sending in this

ballot by the deadline below! You

Must Send in This Entire Page!


BALLOT REGULATIONS
ALL NOMINATIONS MUST: Pertain to people, places, services and
businesses located in the Venice area including the areas from
Manasota Beach through Osprey. EACH BALLOT MUST: 1.) Be
handwritten sorry, no mechanically reproduced, computer
generated or electronic ballots will be accepted. Only one entry
per person. No faxes. Originals only. 2.) Be on an official Venice
Gondolier Sun/Green Sheet entry form. 3.) Include your name,
address, phone number on the entry form. 4.) All ballots must be
received by 5 pm, June 17, 2005. 5.) All entrants must be 18 years
of age or older to qualify for drawing. 6.) 40% of ballot (55
categories) must be filled out. 7.) No more than 3 categories can
be voted for any one restaurant.
All ballots and nominations that do not meet these criteria will not
be counted. Please send your entry directly to our main office. No
purchase necessary to win. Winners are responsible for any taxes
resulting from receipt of drawing. Winner agrees to publication of
name, hometown and photograph. An announcement to the
winner of the grand prize drawing will appear in the Venice
Gondolier Sun, July 27, 2005. The name of the winner will not be
given out by telephone. Judges decision is final. Contest
coordinator will not enter into any written or oral discussion about
the contest, judges decision or awarding of prize. Employees of
the Venice Gondolier Sun/ Sun Coast Media Group (and their
immediate family) are not eligible.


I E~


Name:
Address:

City, State, Zip:

Phone:

Signature:

Do you currently subscribe to the Venice Gondolier Sun?


Yes J


No 1


Mail or bring your entry to:
Best of Venice 2005 Venice Gondolier Sun
200 E. Venice Ave. Venice, Florida 34285


SUNDAY, JUNE 12,2005


II


,I


TO DINE-OU


Picomqpr4pmpprpml


me
mmmmmw


m


I


. I


4 W2005
fill WIN


ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 17TH, 2005 @ 5pm






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


ci INIAV II IMC: 1) )Ann'


Hurricane expert



forecasts more



dangerous season

William Gray expects 15 named storms, eight
hurricanes and four intense storms all
increases from his April prediction.


BY BOB REDDY
STAFF WRITER
The last day of the off-sea-
son for hurricanes brought
bacdnews an expert increas-
ing his forecast for the new
season that started June 1.
n William Gray, a renowned
hurricane expert based at
Colorado State University,
released his updated seasonal
forecast May 31 and increased
his estimate for named storms
tb 15, up from 13 in his April
forecast.
: Gray also announced a
greater.probability that one of
the deadly storms will strike
the United States coastline.
The forecast also includes.
afl increase in the number of
Hurricanes to eight, up from
seven, and the number of
intense hurricanes with winds
df 111 mph or stronger, to
four, up from three.
: Gray also increased his
probability of a major hurri-
dane striking somewhere on
the U.S. coastline to 77 per-
cent, up from 73 percent and
Well above the historical aver-
Ige of 52 percent.
Precedents
: The conditions leading into
the hurricane season are simi-
lar to five previous seasons,
4ray said.
:Those seasons include
2004, which had 14 named








4


storms, nine hurricanes and
six intense storms. Similar
seasons also include 2003,
which had 16 named storms,
and 1995, which had 19
named storms. Gray bases his
forecasts on historical pat-
terns.
Six hurricanes Alex,
Charley, Frances, Gaston, Ivan
and Jeanne hit the United
States in 2004.
Four destructive hurricanes
made landfall in Florida dur-
ing a seven-week period in
August and September -
three of them crossing the
Florida peninsula.
During the last 10 years, the
Atlantic basin has experienced
137 named storms, 77 hurri-
canes and 38 major hurri-
canes. During that period,
only six of the 38 major,
Atlantic basin hurricanes
crossed the U.S. coastline.
'"Regardless of how active
.the 2005 hurricane season is,
a finite probability always
exists that one or more hurri-
canes may strike along the
U.S. coastline or the Carib-
bean basin and do much
damage," Gray said.
Stay tuned
Gray's new numbers were,
not unexpected and, while
ominous, the outlook does
not guarantee a repeat of the
devastating 2004 hurricane
season.-


JASTWO DAYS!

"Handbag

Trade-InmEvent
Bring in any clear-tiandbg and receive a.,diso"unt on any
regular-price handbag or walft purchase of $40-or more*.

Save $15 l.
on any $40.-$75'regular-princ, dbag or wallet purchase
Save $25W '
_. on any .ic hdbag or wallet purchase


"6n an;$126-$200'regol ar.p. handbag or wallet purchase

Qlor more reg ulice handbag purchase
*; "0 ated to rv One aiscount per new handbaQ
f.en June 12 E lu.e Coach


50% off
Men's
Roundtree
& Yorke
Knit
Sportshirts
Choose from
assorted stripes
and prints.
Orig. $32,
now $16.


WEATHER


THE









od
7








J I


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
(Including Sarasota and Charlotte counties)
Southeast winds at 10 to 20 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet, moderate chop.
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
Southeast winds at 35 to 45 knots.
Seas 10 to 15 feet, rough chop.


Gray's forecast is also right
on target with the seasonal
forecast released,by the Na-
tional Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration on
April 16.
NOAA's forecast calls for
an above-normal season with
12 to 15 named storms. A
normal season brings 10
named storms.
The forecast calls for seven
to nine storms becoming
hurricanes normal is six-
with three to five of these
becoming major hurricanes.
A typical season sees two
major storms.:
The NOAA disclaimer to
the forecasts adds that condi-
tions change throughout the
season andtoo many factors
go into hurricane develop-
ment to know for sure if any
storm will approach the
coastline.


High Saturday 87
Low Saturday 74
Rainfall
Total this week 2.16
Total this year 20.74
NormalYTD 13.08
Rainfall totals are for a 24-hour
period ending at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday as recorded at the
offidal weather station in
Venice.


Above
nomial
for
June



June
rain
09.92


Sunday
High 90, Low 74
Partly cloudy with a
chance of a storm.
Monday
High 91, Low 75
Partly cloudy with
scattered afternoon
rain.
Tuesday ;
High 92, Low 76
Partly cloudy with
scattered afternoon
rain.
Wednesday
High 92, Low 76
Partly cloudy with
scattered afternoon
rain.


Tonight's sunset
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonrise
Moonset


8:25 p.m.
6:35 a.m.

11:25 a.m.
12:54 a.m.


DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


DATE.
SUN 12'
MON 13
TUE 14
WED 15


HIGH HIGH LOW LOW
A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M.
6:25 3:36 9:30
6:45 4:38 1 2:03 11:04 a
7:07 5:50 12:42 12:38
7:31 7:14 1:21 2:02
*STRONG TIDE
a-A.M. p-P.M.


FLORIDA LOTTERY


June
June
June
June
June


10......468
9........291
8........730
7........508
6........453


tA
- ,. U


June
June
June
June
June


10....6775
9......0444
8......9670
7......5093
6......1624


I MEGA MONEY


June 10 ......... 3-9-19-24-34
June 9........... 26-27-29-33-36
June 8 ............ 4-20-27-30-35
June 7 ........... 7-18-19-31-32
June ,6 ........... 1-5-21-23-31
Payoff for June 10
2 5-digit winners..;...$118,745.19
407 4-digit winners..............$94
11,912 3-digit winners:............$9
2-digit winners ...........Quick Pick ticket


June 10.............7-35-36-37
i M egaBall...........................
June 7.............10-18-25-32
MegaBall.......................1...
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for June 10
04 of 4 + MB................... $-
5 4 of 4..... .............$1,986.50
72 3 of 4 + MB..............$302
1,057 3 of 4................$61
1,965 2 of 4'+ MB... ........ $23


I LOT TO


June 8 ....17-21-22-40-43-45
June 4 ...... 9-11-16-22-44-52
June 1 .... 18-19-21-34-36-49
May 28 .... 7-18-23-25-31-32
May 25 .. 13-32-33-34-47-49
May 21 .... 2,16-17-18-20-29


Payoff for June 8
0 6-digit winners ................. $ -
50 5-digit winners....$5,407.50
2,594 4-digit winners:.......$84.50
56,581 3-digit winners:...$5.50
Drawing occurs Wednesdays, Saturdays


Estimated jackpot $6 million


'. .. r _-


Happy Father's Day
from Great Clips & American Crew'!
SI' ,,,. r, i,:, ,, n r,,n r :an r r 1, :-" p,,,-, .'. I ,,Ault
mnaeIaHhra,,ro : ,_,,nplhnw r.rI ,,1 3, r ..ni :.,ri :re, .
_StarlU ru ",; Io'

- --- -C ---U-- --ON --

. m'. $,7 99.
Haircut -
Not valid with other offers. Limit one coupon per customer.
Good at participating locations. Offer expires 7/30/05.
Sensa n l Ct Sn ib- i- -


______________ 4


names
savings..


selection.

9 each
$29.99 piece
orig. $44
Misses'
Jag Swim
Separates
Tankini and
halter tops,
plus retro and full
French bottoms.
Misses' S-M-L.


75% off
ENTIRE STOCK
Juniors'
Social
Occasion
Dresses
Ball gown,
long column,
tea-length and
more styles.
Orig. $99-$279,
now $24.75-$69.75.


Selected styles.
Selection varies by store.


Dillard's


: USE YOUR DILIARD'S CHARGE. WEALSO WELCOME VISA, MASTERCARD, AMERICAN EXPRESS, DINER'S CLUB & DISCOVER CARD.
Port Charlotte Town Center, (941)255-1778 *Southgate Plaza, (941)955-2241 Sarasota Square Mall, (941)925-1722: Mon.-Sat. 10-9, Sun. 12-6


IU/-XY, Jul t 1 Z, zuu:


I LY1


I ALMANAC I


I CAH 3


I FANTASY 5.


I


JUIL


Sunrise/set








SUNDAY, JUNE 12; 2005


6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Peace River plant agreement clears the wayfor expansion


Water supply partners agree on cost-sharing for-

mula and plan to over-size reservoir. Sarasota

County will get another 9.725 million gallons a


day when the project is fi


BY JACK GURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

Four counties that own the
Peace River water plant have
agreed to sell, $117 million
worth of bonds so they can.
pay off existing debts and
finance an expansion project
that will supply regional utili-
ty customers with up to 32.7
million gallons a day by late
2008.
Sarasota County stands to
be the biggest beneficiary of
the deal., It will receive' an
additional 9.725 million on
top of its current 3.25 million
daily allotment, Charlotte
County 3.342 million gallons,
North Port 1.508 million gal-
lons and DeSoto County .125


wished.


million gallons.
On June 1, a stalemate over
one phase of the project was
resolved when .representa-
tives from the three counties
met in Bradenton with the
fourth partner, Manatee
County, and agreed on who
should pay how much to'
over-size a new reservoir
from 4 billion to 6 billion gal-
lons.
Charlotte County broke
the logjam when it conmmit-:
ted to pay 27.2 percent of the
overall expansion costs in
return for 22.7 percent of the
additional water, a $3 million
concession that will provide
additional reservoir capacity
and guarantee a long-term
water supply for its cus-


tomers;.
"The additional reservoir
capacity will be there if envi-
ronmental regulators do not
extend permits for our
aquifer storage and recovery
wells," said Peace River Au-
thority Executive Director Pat
Lehman. "We are currently
working on a resolution of
that issue."

Capacity
Federal and state authori-
ties have reduced the maxi-
mum allowable limits of nat-
urally occurring arsenic in
storage wells, which could
cause long-term problems.
The plant has 21 wells, but 12
have permits that expire at
the end of three years and two
others have been shut down.
If. all 21 are allowed- to
operate at full capacity, they
couldprovide up to 18 million
gallons a day for regional cus-
tomers during dry seasons
when the river is low. The


arsenic issue could cut that
figure to only about 6 million
gallons a day, and place heavy
reliance on the reservoir.
"Concerns have been
raised by the Environmental
Protection Agency and Flor-
ida Department of Environ-
mental Protection about the
dissolution of naturally: 0c-
curring arsenic as it goes
through' limestone forma-
tions in underground aqui-
fers," Lehman explained.
"The limits on arsenic have
been lowered from 50 to 10.
parts per billion," he ex-
plained.. "We are collecting
data that indicates arsenic
flushes out. For some reason,
the levels have been lower in
our older wells and higher in
the new ones. This is happen-
ing with many utilities."

Cutting back
When the Peace Rivei-
plant expansion project is fin-
ished, and Sarasota County


receives its additional 9.725'
million gallons of water a day,
it will be able to cut back on
daily purchases from
Manatee County under the
terms of an agreement that
terminates in 2024.
The Peace River flows
through Polk, Hardee, DeSoto
and Charlotte counties before
it empties an average of 1 bil-
lion gallons of water a day
into Charlotte Harbor. Water
plant operators will expand
the facility's treatment capac-
ity from 18 million to 32.7 mil-
lion gallons a day.
Sarasota County utility
customers consume about 18
million gallons of water a day.
Manatee County currently
supplies up to 10 million gal-
lons, an Osprey)area plant 6


million, Peace River 3.25 mil-
lion, Charlotte County 2 mil-
lion, and University Park-way
wells up to 1 million.
As Sarasota County winds
down its daily purchases from
Nlanatee County, it has to
develop new sources other
than the Peace River. An old
Venice area plant is being
retrofitted to provide 2.2 mil-
lion gallons a day, but it won't
be enough.
By die year 2025, Sarasota
County utility customers are
expected to consume, about
28 million gallons of water a
day. The county is evaluating
a range of possible water
resources, among them a
reverse osmosis plant that
could treat Gulf of Mexico
water.


Let the Gondolier Sun Classifiedfwork for yot,


RESTRICT t inin I A


Florida.

School consequences
Benson proposed an idea
to the board for making par-
ents more aware and
accountable of driving privi-
leges for their children by
implementing a new policy
requiring parents to sign and
acknowledge a parking priMi-
lege contract with the school
at the time the'student re-
ceives an on-campus parking
decal.
The contract would make
parents aware of die school's
code of conduct related to
driving and parking on cam-
pus and what can constitute
the consequence of losing
privileges ahead of time.
Benson wants to make a dis-
trictwide policy that leaving
campus during school hours
could cost a teen his or her
parking privileges.
The contract also would


give parents a clear under-
standing.
"Parents will be less likely
to defend die student for vio-
lating the rules," Benson said.
'"It gives the schools more
muscle and teeth to enforce
the parking privilege rules."
As the mother of two teens,
Benson has personal experi-
ence of being uninformed of
school driving privileges, and
that "a parent has the expec-
tation of the school to know
where their child is between
the hours of 7:30 to 1:45."

Suspended
Associate Superintendent
Lori White said she would
look into the idea of a district
driving policy.
"If you look at the bulk of
school suspensions, they are
for kids trying to leave campus.
... We don't have the ability to
'lock people th',' White said. .
Schools such as Venice


High have a gate with an
attendant students must pass
when leaving campus. Many
students also are legitimately
allowed to leave campus dur-
ing the day.
For years students have
abused driving and parking
privileges on the Venice cam-
pus and schools countywide
by leavinghin the middle of the
day even though it is against
the rules, according to some
area students.
"I know of students that
leave school after third period
for lunch and sometimes
don't return to school that
day. ... If they know they plan
to skip that day they often
park off campus," VHS junior
Kelsey Twedt said.

Keeping track
The board agreed keeping
track of every student coming
and going frori 'campus all
day does not have a simple


solution.
They also agreed that re-
voking parking privileges could
then force students to park in
nearby neighborhoods, creat-
ing a further problem.
The superintendent also
added the issue of students
being absent and skipping
class is being looked into and
new technology will allow
parents to immediately know
through an online service if a
student is not in class. Norris
and board members further
discussed the best way of
making an overall policy
change on driving privileges.
The board decided a com-
mittee will be formed of stu-
dents, teachers, staff and par-
ents to gain feedback into the
parking privilege issue for
students around the county,
the board will then consider
serious options for policy
'" hMiges fr6ftrtherecdhimek-'
dations.


GencleLASE


D Ch3 jI r E i roqur:


GeittleL4SE" Pennanent Hair Removal
Offered by Charles Rodriquez, M.D. Plastic Surgeon

Call for a FREE Skin Assessment Consult

,492,'3,93 '241 Souih Nokomis Ave ,Venice


,A~' CirSi


NOTICE OF ADMIN.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
il RE E: TATE COF
ELIZABETH A. BURKMAN,.

File No 2005-CP-005169 NC
Division: Probate
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
Thre .,adT,ri, r arr 'o rre vr i l ,- .l
ELIZABETH A. BURKMAN.
,lt.:ea; File Number 2005-
CP 005169-NC, .: o.dr.,,; .n Ir e
C(rclt C'ouri luo Sarasota Courr'v
F rds, Fro:u.ie uiition, ir
jdre;h i ,rrLarh ,. P.O. Box
3079. Sarasota, Florida 34230-
3079. Tr,, t nlTe.: jnu 3,1r.,r .:
ire ire F'.r' ,7,.'r.al 3 .epr irinl[. and
Ine IF r:'r'l .I rer ? .rh;ie -' r e! r t.Il:, r
ne, ajre 'el Irlr.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All pEir). ": ,:,r. r vrW .Ti I r.. i .. -i
-E-jr *hl -i,, riv, Obl?,lOrc, IrlI
Ch illenge le vl.dr/ 01I rhe .ill 1e
QuljC arl.: 51 Ir, e| er io arEjl eDrc-
enicjlpv: ve-iiue i r elrdi:h-ri (-
[tis1 ',)jurl re required' 10 lie -iir
Lc.tl..:I.nrr mi .l Ir.., urt WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All .c're.i-. .r r in.ne ,Ie.:edEr. a,,i.d
oIhwr per. oi- riW.ng cllim or :i
.1.t .r.:- a.fa.nri ldecedeir.r eIalj
con wnhir 3 c-py ,01 tfi l.: ni, t.ce i;
.ervaed inrhir tnrre- mnijn: "jnei
the dale 0I me biril1 o.tl. li1.0.. CrI
ir,, c-lI.:e Tutir Ile other i:r aims
mir, l.,-, Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All ,iLer .: rmlull : l i ith r li: .lr.h
3rid.j ir7,:,r.-r, ivn(r i1:lim,, or
drl'O r.do ae.ari- the de,: ,-Inir:.
ec i le Ta u ;! II T tj l. .:I i T V: tl h
Iri cr.ourl WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
IS JUNE 5. 2005.
Personal Representative.
JOHN M. BURKMAN. JR.
1530 N Key Blvd. #1222
Arlington. VA 222099
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
Terry L Dillon
Florida Bar No. 0664499
6200 South Tamiami Trail
Sarasota. FL 34231
(941) 922-3505
PUBLISH June 5, 12, 2005


NOTICE OF AUCTION
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION-
The Il:, :.nri ich. : ulves'el ll : il
b ,'j-,'- .':..d I:cr u.np-r d I.:. ng .r.
'ro'i e Ccri-,; ,:o.,1n,, oUr
F 13
I 0'l "i| .lrp, ;L I T41 li.
O,' 6. 29. 05 a 1i0 I00 aT, al
Jim's Auto Repar & ToArng
5 a'.," afr
5 ar :a. l, Erl.
PUBLISH: June 12, 2005
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Thr ,I.i.,W.' u-er..,:le I e' lllen I dl
te 3au.:oi 'ed l:r urnci ,ld o ,m g .
Mlor g- .:r.rge: onriy. ier IF.
'1.3 7 VernI.:l?-,
Johnson's Towing
604 N. Tamiami Trail.
Nokomis, FL
I l*'? D.;,EI irlrr..-..i 140. Gri.-
2e HOUIfE9vH' 264, .
2 1939 Mer.: Gr. -d Mar.]ui'. JI4,
Ili IMEFM6O1.if Hl :d .'.6
3 v1995. ld'. i:aillt .,Se'urir rnmp.
C6 Td. IG23wT32'5 Ca-<^j428'
Or, 6, 29,2005 aI i Xrr. Ai
abo-e -Iddre''
PUBLISH: June 12, 2005
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The Follo.,-,ag vehl:iea vezie-llil aill
be .ju:hicrned l'. urnSa.. I. .r.- ,l .
ilOr'ge rrn.gli-s only p.,1 I-i ,
'l ': h. PN Rcj
I ,C: :.14R2M8 .'i) Biu '
I2 2 0 F,:,h:ru I f., f Wr,
I FLn :', I riA4- ,l':
3 I ,E. buu: L'7jarwr. 0) tu..
I G4( rw..'?, 14,:'6.
D. -"1I. Fo:.rd. Spu Tr .: r .Ui Bi.
IF M..U L7Eu2U1i';'?'66 ,3
i U0,2 H)ur, A.:.:e,, 4[I,. 61i
r MsH(l JSt. 'U :"3(.", IS
On 6, 29,2005 at 9:00 am at
106 Corporation Way.
Venice, FL 34285
Vehicle @
North Collier Collision. Inc.
16210 Old 41 S. Bonita Springs
PUBLISH: June 12, 2005


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The Io-li.,a'ig sernn.:le ue: ell -. inll
t-i aauc rioned li',r u ,'ir w'- ,e '
"13 "8
; e yagn c rger .e l Cer F
1 1'?'15 rne, i1O P Pie,e
IlaCSI19J[ .S 1 I S'C,
On 6.29.05 at 9.00 am at
106 Corporate Way. Venice
Vehicle @
Pierson Auto Parts
284 S. Center St. Pierson
PUBLISH: June 12, 2005

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RIE ESTATE OF
GERALD W HAM.
Iece.' d,
File No. 2005-CP-004908-NC
Probate Division


Advertise in NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The I.Tnr.Advertise in m:iron ,. Ie se .
The Classifieds! GERALD W. HAM. ,.e"a e,:el
wc, Ae -aln e1 d 'sr wa-'s Decem-


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

ner 24. 2004, File Number
2005-CP-004908-NC. i, Pead-
nig 1 lie1. i r.:ui ..r urt iSr Saraso-
ta ,:.u t,, Flc. Frr,.J I. :r.to. n-
siK:r' ,1A1ddrer:. ;or wr..r.:rn P.O.
Box 3079, Sarasota, FL 34230-
3079. Tr ..iomr:; arnd jddr:l.e-V
i: [.e i-Cer:i 0 r1i -r'r-re -re i ste randd
th- f .r unirl ro-r :-ri r-uc l.:.rl
r. are, :ti ir.:.n i tekl i r
All ; or i ul iric de':ediaeni nd
cr.er i ,er l- ris' nl'i g ciirrn -'r
l-, rT .l ~g a..- I de~-c e.Ld nr;
e. ie.: ,rn whom 'op/ I in :
rn:.nice '. r ie'luirnd .. l t. ervau d
Tmu si lie i1er I1:s.TI; t r Iri s ioun
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other .creditors of the decedent
andd c.lir OIen ;orn hjv;ng :hiim. ,or
d-iTns gOsafir.i ,teC' dent' e;|Ile
rmeil hie Ir ,:la..i,-N Alh In-- cOurl
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
.DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED, .
The date of first publication of


this notice is June 5. 2005.
Personal Representatives:
SUSAN HENRY HAM
7550 Bee Ridge Rd.
Sarasota. FL 34241
H. Greg Lee
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Florida Bar No. 0351301
H. GREG LEE, P. A
2014 Fourth Street
Sarasola, Florida 34237
Telephone: 1941)-954-0067
Facsimile: (9411-365-1492
PUBLISH June 5. 12 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
cli.T ir. Irn.! court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All r. r crleIr ,or. the ) i :ned, r|
nd otirl e, ,r.; r, iiir, ,lmi nd ,Ln. n j irr..1, ad .l.:d r ; )
mTu: I iiie ti eir cIla.m': I nr r' Ieh cI ur
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC.
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE.
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
JUNE 5, 2005.
Personal Representatives:
CATHERINE HILLS
1714 Sandy Ct.
Venice, FL 34293
Attorneys For Personal
Representative:
Kanetsky, Moore &
DeBoer, P.A.
Attorneys At Law
227 S. Nokomis Ave.
P.O. Box 1767
Venice. FL 34284-1767
Telephone: (941) 485-1571
By: ERIK R. LIEBERMAN, ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 393053
PUBLISH: June 5. 12. 2005


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
iri RE ESTATE .'F
ANN LOUISE MARTIN.
a k a ANN L MARTIN.
aik a ANN MARTIN.
File No. 2005-CI-3937-SC
Lv.:,uonr. ProDlt


IIIl 6E ESTATE OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS
ONA M. HILLS. Tr, ad.ritrar-r.oi- OIl he esilale OCI
0-:!eiled ANN LOUISE MARTIN, a-k.'a
ANN L MARTIN. a.'-/a ANN
File No 05-CP-3134-SC MARTIN. deceased dhnoie date oi
dealI iva-: November 23, 2004,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS and nh,:-,se So-cal Secu,',r- [lucr ,V
Trie adiHTii. riai.on :.i1 tre i l.[ l i.:I .5 479-44-8846., .;s eria.; i ire
ONA M. HILLS, deeoied. 'ie nC.,ua C-sun -lur Sarasota Cc-ulry
d 1ai 1 devi rn i a, M arch 5. Flc.r,.ij frr ain Ji-.lr. Ine
1994, orId an:i..ne ,',-aol ?,curit ,-dre-oa .,1rl.:n a'4000S. Tamn-
IjTnb.r i. 319-56-2184, -: 'ernd- ami Trail. Venice, FL 34293.
i' ir. trie ,r.:ui Co:urt I.or SARA- Tr.t ,e na-.-e and address'': 01 me
SOTA ':.:junrr. Flori,as Prohiaile Ci, personal repre.ar.'eaiie and Ipe
ion the addre- or; han.h i-s 2000 pier-onril reoreera ine-T S3t-rneie
Main St.. P.O. Box 3079. Sara- are sel Irth bIelow.
sota. FL 34230-3079. Tre All credto.r .:.I1 the decedent al d
'a.,rri: .a- alresces 5.11 ine er er other erion halnrg Claimrr: Or
ac-nil rprn.;ei'al.h ,,r an Ir-E. [per dema.rnd, r. galnst deedeiti
.,',l real Ie.'rl .eS 3riorrJej ire eia31e irn w OITri a I:coy .1 Iri
:ei i-,rit t l.ei.- ri:.ti.:e i: reau.red I L:- b.e ? .rvEd
All ,:readICr.;. I0 irie de C .i'at rI nd Tua 1 li [fther ClI.5r, arI Tr. T C L--un
,,rner Oeri'n. nIa,re .:ia..T. ,:,r WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
ldeT'id: asainrsI dO:eClenr ;r re MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
Cn aV'.rr, a c...., c.i I.i n,,-,,ce THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
re.lu,redI I.. bIe served mui.l h.ie TIreir THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS


NOTICETO CREDITORS NOTICETO CREDITORS NOTICETO CREDITORS NOTICETO CREDITORS NOTICETO CREDITORS


AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creadOrs 01 [he dCcederlI
and Orirner 1iero n[ rasin.e Cltimn u or
d-Iemindf f g,,a i rfthe de:cedliarer
e:Ie Tu:l file their -:loiar writr,
tri, court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO rILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE.


ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER ,THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
Tre dale I Itrt l f ouDli0raon ol rthi
norcr.cr June 5. 2005.
Personal Representative:
BRENDA McCLURE
70 La Costa Street
Nokomis, Florida 34275
Mark W. Mazzeo
Attorney for Personal


THIS NOTIC.E anll i-e I.puJIl,'red
Once i wce lor Il.-ur 141 .:cr:.e.:u
uie edtE i,. THE vEIli'E GO fiCr-
LIER
Daled Ir 2'.rth lday ul Ma, '-"0 ,
al S ra.oila, Florda


Representative
Florida Bar No. 0351301
H. GREG LEE, P. A.
2014 Fourth Street
Sarasota, Florida 34237'
Telephone: 1941)-954-0067
Facsimile: (9411-365-1492
PUBLISH- June 5, 12, 2005


FAEli E HJHHIG IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARAS.TA C.l..Aillr SARASOTA COUNTY.


By: M.Irgarel F H,:.rIon
l .r l e 1 a: :.urt


FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
III RE ESTATE lIF
LINDA G. WILBORN,
Fec ileeIr4 -:
File No. 05-CP-4812-SC


ANY' LRIMn rFILEu wTu l representative IN RE: ESTATE OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE Florida Bar No. 119350 PUBLISH DATES: ANNA M. STOVER. Tre adirTrri-rsr.r, l li-c etaile 01
DECENDENTS DATE OF DEATH 4140 Woodmere Park Blvd. MAY 29. 2005 NA SOVERed LINDA G WLBORN dead.
IS BARRED. Suite 4 JUNE 5, 2005 : .: "ro ea- odeatn was March 3,
nThe dale o thre lirl publrcalton or Venice, Florida 34293 JUNE 12. 2005 FileNo. 2005-CP-004936-NC 2005. a rd rsre Socil escurar'
thr. rob,:e .s June 5, 2005. Telephone: (941) 408-8555 JUNE 19. 05 2 I l number 367-44-3327 pered-
Fax: 1941) 408-8556 NOTICE TO CREDITORS ig r. the Car.:ui Courtn or SARA-
Personal Representative: PUBLISH: June 5, 12. 2005 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR The adrr,,,ar' [% re e 01alsO SOTA TCourt Florrda Probate DI)
Sara J. Reese SARASOTA COUNTY. FLORIDA ANNA M. STOVER. decei..se. e, r r a.I.,iress 01 wnoCh s 2000
290 Brandon t. 46131 THE TWELFTH JUDICIALOURT OF PROBATE DIVISION noe dae l death wa April 20. Main St., P.O. Box 3079. Sara-
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR 2005. and hr,,e SaSoci ec urery sota. FL 34230-3079. The
Attorney for Personal SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA rl RE ESTATE F OLurPH1 ,: 144-30-9993 rc e,--, rna mn- aire.-ies ,1t mh per-
treyfrPersonlMARIE R. RANDOLPH, ,rg, iaI ,. C i:rui Couri or Saraso- .o,,d ,repre er,1he.s rid the per
Representative: Ia .Ciurit. FI,-rada Prrn1Cle ow nls' represerI-IaIt, v .' ,rney are
DAVID R. CORNISH Case No. 2004-CA-11125-NC D: la eaedu. r. r,, he .d-r. ro ,ie : 0 nal represenrative. rn are
Florida Bar No. 0225924 1 Ln li.
355 W. Venice Ave. MARY-LOU MOULTON. B'. ?0.79. rSra:.,,sl ;Fioror All c red.ilrs '51 [re de:ledil ,ard
Venice. FL 34285 a/k/a MARY-LOU YOUMANS File No. 2005-CP-004924-NC 4, 3i'., The name.: ,,d onrer per',:,r, h3a,n.g cI,,Ts or
Telephone: 19411-4834246 MOULTON, Probate Division s, a.re : lI ihe personal repc-re- deanceder..: e:rsle
PUBLISH: June 5, 12, 2005 :Plaintiff,. NOTICE TO CREDITORS r, Ire re r e,. r.n ahum I .ePre i U,,S. ,.i,:,e ."e
S. .* NOTICE TO CREDl|TORS .;e,-,arijr : 3norne,, .are iet iort r. r quirer lu i. ) cti ed r ruam stfil te eir
s The ad.mi.rivrat,,.rr or, ine eS ;tal e l0 c im'A vwar, rr,,s court WITHIN THE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MARIE R. RANDOLPH, decei ed, All -redalr4 of ir, I.e d.ceaenl and LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
SARASOTA COUNTY FLORIDA WILLIAM H. HYDE, whose caie oi death was Febru- riner irs,r, rasr, ,Ia3T,m rr THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
PROBATE DIVISION JOAN G. HYDE: ary 10, 2005: File Number ,le,,ar, ar, .,,n-I ,e sieno i. CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
; .... -, *. ENGLEWOOD BANK: et al.. 2005-CP-004924-NC. a. penrd eri!ne or, ,rm r, a .:o', ol Il'i DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
iri RE ESTATE f Deerant .ng in ,e I .r.uil ..ourt lor Saraso- ,,l.c r,.qu,i.d It;,o e ered VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
EVELYN G. McCLURE, ta Cour y Flr'r.dl Probate Jn' mTiJ.v l their ,:la..TJ nlrh Ihn. Court NOTICE ON THEM.
a/Ia, NOTidE OF ACTION. : hor, iMe uaddre dsaWhr, P.O. WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE All orrner credi,r. olhf Ihe de,:Ederi
EVELYN GERTRUDE McCLURE. Box 3079. Sarasota, FL 34230- 131 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME an, otr oe persons haurag c13,,s or
Deceased, TO De-lefendant, SUiAlAE ,GORTON, 3079. The nSa'ies nd addreL:. OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF deTinr,d -aga.,,l.:ednerri elate
S Tru iJ-iee or Ie -orge' Of theIr p.,rs nal preserat.uies n5,l THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY 1301 music l.le ihe.r .:13.mSw llh thisrcourt
File No. 2005-CP-003387-SC Teo-dore Hyde TLus-, Ihe persor.,1 re.,re-e:,,ialive an:.r. DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER- WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
ney are setl ortr, t-el:,n. VICE OF A COPY OF THIS DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
NOTICE TO CREDITORS i.OU AiRE IIOTIFIED that Cc'. All .:re.dI,[r.: -I Inn de-,a,:di and1 NOTICE ON THEM. TION OF THIS NOTICE.
The admn-.ir,inationr I the estate of plinri ,n 3r, action Io eion-irm an other persons r, aing c ,lai,T An A tlh- r -:relcori ,:. l,-i rejdeea l ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
EVELYN G. McCLURE, a/K,'a. .nsrrument and OUIET TITLE nas dem3ran,. a.gar.ni de,:ee.; ,i ar ,o,rner er,,n: r,.aing cla.ir, or WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
EVELYN GERTRUDE McCLURE. ,nen filed jgaanil ,u ad all opar. ette. I:, h ernm C C:'y or Ihr! .lmani o. e,:\, delenrt 'latlt FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 0F
deceased, ,ti.se d 1ae d ot death ie clr.in niiere rs ti, ir.rugh. nonce re,'ur. ,;, be r .it'd r ruI fIle tneir alT, l. [h-,. ,:,:,url THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
w October 28, 2004. ,is pnd-- under or .against De-endan rrli u.le Iher ,ram,: crlm.m-this c,ur' WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
g, irn te Cir.:u lC.-.urlIor Saraso- .nclumng any uHinlric*,, w -oue-. WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
ta Country. Fio.dia 'r,'al'te ,D',- hIn,,... er.-:.ra reore'senim3,es. MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
.:rIIn-neaiddreszo *Ir, l,'it 4000 e,-ieei. granlees creei.iors ,r THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
South Tamiami. Trail, Venice, olter cilimani cla.mrr.ng t, THIS NOfICE OR 30 DAYS WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
Florida 34293 The niAme eand it.rougr, un-', er or gar Delerr AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
addresses ot Ire oer;inai repre- ,1lar, hro ae e. A0r, lo.n 1O t[- OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE IS BARRED.
senltatre .-I Ine c.ersor.ial repre- ,i.3,1 ,r alais anti n oraeer on. -THEM. WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
senIlive atorirne, are sel lorin o ned a r ir, e rCompnlain All oli er credaor 1 ir. ie,:edleni NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME CATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
itor e i.d ,' ral l.be e quiled in ire andlher p.ftn: ra,rg n ,,r PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, JUNE 5, 2005.
All creditors of -he de-.eder andt IPlaintiffs t) ihe loIh-.,icrie.crahed ademIr,,:- g"a-.i .:ld.cedernr'. e-re ANY CLAIM FILED TWO. (2)
other persons -avir.ng clai,,T, or pjerty must ile their ClOa3 i ihi,:Court YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE Personal Representatives:
demands aga r nti dcedenr t'. -WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH ROBERT L WILBORN
estate, on whom a c.:.p, u1 ih:. Unit E-72. OF BAY OAKS, a DATE OF THE FIRST" PUBLICA- IS BARRED. 121 Dory Lane
r,,i;c ? i, reuired Ic be served. Condominium according to the TION OF THIS NOTICE. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA- Osprey, FL 34229
mu-t lie thIearS. Cl',rir, ,lIlhari,,:Our Declaration of Condominium ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED TION OF THIS NOTICE IS JUNE -
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 recorded in Officialoecords WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. 12 2005. N KEVINJ. ARNFIEL
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF Book 1067. Page 620, and NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME 119 Walnut Plain Rd
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF amendments thereto, and as PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE. Personal Representative: Rochester, PA 02770
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS per plat thereof, recorded in ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Robert T. Klingbeil
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE Condominium Book 8. Page 30. YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE c 'o Klingbell & Roberts, P.A. Attorneys For Personal
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON and amendments thereto of the CEDENsB DATE OF DEATH 341 Venice Avenue West Representative:
THEM. Public Records of Sarasota IS BARRED. u'bI I Venice. Florida 34285 Kanetsky. Moore &
Alli other :redtrs c. the decedern County, Florida. The date of first publication o DeBoer, P.A.
.'r or.er Der,on-. honav-ing clairsm or this notice is June 5. 2005. Attorney for Personal Attornays At Lau


demiand-; 3aga3n' de,:edenr,r- estate
T'uI aile [eir lNi.ii a H daIt, [tnlS .: urun
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE.


i.-,U ARE REQUiREDl 10 erve a
corI/ l your An.*er Io IMe Cornr
plairt on STEPHENI H KURviri.
ESQ, Soul, Lime Avenue. Sara
,ola FL 342"32 on or (bel.orn June
28 20.105 11i you lail o d-Io )so
Ju-dmIent by Deiault a*il be later.
agairil ,ou for Ine reiel d iare1ded
in', tr Complnini


Per sona
WILL
4000


H. Greg Lee
Attorney for F


_I 1 Representative: "
ial Representatives: Gregory C. Roberts ,,'
IAM M. RANDOLPH Florida Bar No 438782
Aston Gardens Dr. Klingbeil & Roberts. P.A
S 106 341 Venice Avenue West
Veice, FL, 34292 ,Venice. Florida 34285
Telephone: (9411-485-2900
Personal PUBLISH: June 12. 19, 2005


227 S. Nokomis Ave.
P.O Box 1767
Venice. FL 34284-1767
Telephone: (941) 485-1571
By: ERIK R. LIEBERMAN. ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 393053
PUBLISH: June 5. 12, 2005





VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2005


WAC HOVIA
Uncommon Wisdom


2005 Wachovia Corporation. Wachovia Bank, N:A. Member FDIC. SouthTrust is a registered trademark of Wachovia Corporation,


SOUTHTRUST IS NOW WACHOVIA.
Welcome to the combined strengths of SouthTrust and Wachovia. To new resources. To familiar faces
with new answers to your financial needs. Welcome to fresh perspectives and ideas. All with the same
handshake. Stop by the local Financial Center, call 800-WACHOVIA (922-4684) or visit wachovia.com.







Venice Gondolier Sun


8A SPORTS
SUNDAY ...R
JUNE 12,2005


CONTACT US
CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
lewis@venicegondolier.com


CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR



County Cup

drags on

Doomed? Maybe not.
Snakebitten? More likely.
It seems someone or some-
thing has it in for this year's
County Cup Little League
Tournament.
The start of the event was
delayed five days because of
rain and wet grounds.
Now Tropical Storm Arlene
has dumped on the area big
time.
The end result was two
more days wiped out.
Tournament officials have
plans to carry out the comple-
tion, even if it butts heads with
All-Star practice.
District All-Star selections
will be made by Wednesday.
At the earliest, the County
- Cup will wrap up Saturday.
And that's if there's no more
rain this week.
The finals are set for noon
Saturday at Twin Lakes Park. If
the losers' bracket team wins,
then a deciding game will be
at 2:p.m.
Rain could push that 'back
even further.
The County Cup will no
doubt interfere with All-Star
practice. Some managers
are upset about the conflict
and may have to make a
choice if push comes to
shove.
Babe's Hardware is the lone
Venice Lilde League team still
in the winners' bracket. The
Bambinos are scheduled to
play the Sarasota Marlins at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
There are several teams still
alive in the losers' bracket. A
bunch of them are slated to
play Monday. The Lawyers
and Lions will face off at 5:30
p.m. On other diamonds at
5:30, A.G. Edwards will play
the Sarasota Padres and Ki-
wanis will play the Sarasota
Indians. At 7:30 p.m., Nation-
wide and the Doctors will take
on opponents from other
areas.
*

ENGLEWOOD CAUGHT
RED-HANDED Seems like
a team from Englewood got
caught cheating in the County
Cup. ,
County Cup teams are sup-
posed to.field the teams they
had during the regular season
in their respective leagues.
One Englewood team got
caught with a player from
another team. The kid was
even wearing another kid's
uniform.
The manager of the Engle-.
wood team said he didn't.
have enough players.
If that's the case, he should-
n't have entered the tourna-
ment in the first place.
***
SENIOR SOFTBALL
STANDINGS
WEDNESDAY SILVER
SPRING SEASON
SW L GB
Builders Specialties ; 4 0 -
TuBe Computers ,. 4 1 .5
Rugs As Art. 2 2 2'
PelusoAir 2 3 2.5
Critter Landscaping 2 3 2.5
Palmer Ranch Travel 1 3 3
WCAGA Trainers '1 .4 3.5
RESULTS, JUNE 8
Palmer Ranch Travel 11t, WCAGA
Trainers 0
Peluso Air 25, Critter Landscape9 .
Builders Specialties 18, WCAGA
Trainers 5
Rugs Ss Art 17, Tu Be Computers 12-
WEDNESDAY GOLD
TorchTip 4 1 -
Hap'sHonda 3 2 1
Total'Athlete 2 3. 2
Custom Homes / 1 4 3
RESULTS, JUNE 8
Custom Homes 17, Hap's'Honda 16
American Torch Tip 22, Total Athlete 12


SAwards piling up for slugger Strausbaugh


STAFF REPORT

Western Carolina Univers-
ity right fielder Steve Straus-
baugh, who was tabbed con-
sensus Southern Conference
Freshman of the Year last
month, was named to the
2005 Louisville Slugger Fresh -
man All-American team, as
chosen by Collegiate Base-
ball.
Strausbaugh, who excelled
at Venice High before playing
atWCU, became just the sec-
ondCatamount to be named
the Freshman All-American
team since its inception in
1991. Chris Moore earned the
honor in .1996 after batting
.373 with 19 doubles, five
home runs and 39 RBI. Moore


PHOTO COURTESY WESTERN CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'
Western Carolina's Steve Strausbaugh was the top freshman in
the Southern Conference.



Goto college and pitch


RAY SINIBALDI
SPORTS COLUMNIST


The major league baseball
draft was held this past week
and, of course, the big news
is that former Venice High
standout and Auburn grad
Arnold Hughey was taken in
the 13th round by the San
Diego Padres.
He will report to Arizona
for workouts and head on up
to Eugene, Ore.. for a short
season schedule that begins
on June 21. He will don
the uniform of the Eugene
Emeralds and join former
Venice Indian Jon Knott in the
Padres organization.
Hughey joins Craig Faulk--
ner, Mark Guthrie, Jack Voigt,
Ricl4 Carroll and Adam Pav-
kovich as former 'Indians
drafted by major league
teams.
The MLB draft was first
held in 1965, the year in
which Sarasota High's Wayne
Garrett was the first local
product to be drafted. The
Milwaukee Braves made him
their fourth pick in the sixth
round. Garrett was the 104th
player chosen in that inau-,
gural draft. In December of
1968, he was taken by the
Nlets in the rule V draft and
played a key role in the,
Miracle N lets world series win
over Baltimore in 1969.
Later in the same draft, the
Baltimore Orioles chose a
catcher out of the University
of New Hampshire with their,
fifth pick in die 48th round.,
The kid's name was Carlton
Fisk. Being the 758th overall
player chosen, he decided to
return, to school and in the
1967.draft, he became the first
pick (fourth overall) of the
Boston Red Sox. He had a
pretty decent career wearing
first red then white socks and
in 2000 was elected into the
Major League Baseball Hall
of Fame.
Garrett is a regular partici-
pant in the annual Celebrity
Golf Tournament at the Plan-


station and Fisk has teed it up
there as well.
Eligible for the draft are all
high school players, all col-
lege players from a four-year
institution who have com-
.pleted their junior year, all
junior college players and
anyone. who is at least 21
years of age.
There were many local
players who joined Hughey
in this year's draft. At the top
of the list is Charlotte High
product and current Gator.
ceinterfielder Jeff Corsalerti,
who was a sixth-round pick
of the Red Sox. Also drafted
froni Charlotte High was their
graduating centerfielder Tyler
Wright in the 24th round by
the White Sox.
Three former Sarasota
Sailors were taken. Current
Florida State catcher Aaron
Cheesman was a 29th round
selection of the Phillies. Sailor
senior Raphael Vera was a
40th round pick of the White
Sox and Mississippi State
University junior Thomas
Berkery was a 46th round pick
of the Rangers. Berkery led
the Bulldogs in home runs
this past season.
Riverview High pitcher
Rich Dubee was a 32nd
round pick of the Kansas
City Royals. Dubee is the
son of Philadelphia Phillies
pitching coach Rich Dubee,
who himself was a third
round pick of the Royals in
the 1976 draft.
Former Lakewood Ranch
Mustang and a current left-
handed pitcher at Manatee
Community College, Brent
Solich, was a 43rd round
choice of the Los Angeles
Angels. Cape Coral Mariner's
right-handed pitcher Casey
Coleman was a 49th round
selection of the Devil Rays. ITt
was Coleman who was on the
mound this season when the
Tritons eliminated Venice
High 3-2 in regional play.
In all 1,501 players were
chosen with 956 coming from
the college ranks and 530
from liigh school. There were
794 pitchers and 703 position
players chosen. In all only six
teams (Boston, Cubs, Detroit,
Angels, Brewers and Pirates)
drafted more position play-
ers than pitchers, while the
Washington Nationals draft-
ed equal numbers of both.
So the moral of the story is
simply this the kids who
have the best percentage shot
of being drafted are those
who pitch and go to college.
What a surprise.


would go on to earn All-
American honors in 1999,
batting .388 with 21 home
runs that season.
Strausbaugh, who was
additionally tabbed second
team All-SoCon by the
league's coaches, ended the
2005 season as the leader
among SoCon: freshman in
batting average (.367), home
runs (12), RBI (51), slugging
percentage (.592), total bases
(129) and hits (80).
Among all SoCon players,
"Stackhouse" is ranked 14th
in batting, 12th in hits, 12th in
RBIs, 10th in total bases, 16th
in base percentage and 11th
in slugging percentage.
Strausbaugh's batting,
home run and RBI totals


additionally led Western
Carolina, making him the
12th player in school history
to win the team triple crown.
A starter in all of WCU's 56
games including once as a
pitcher .at .Clemson -
Strausbaugh had two signifi-
cant hitting streaks during his
rookie campaign, including a
15-game streak and a 19-
game streak. The two streaks
were separated by one game
without a hit and he collected
at least one hit in 35 of the
final 37 games of the regular
season. During the 19-ganie',
streak, he batted .427, includ-
ing seven straight games with ,
at least two hits. During his
15-game streak, he batted
.426.


Umpires and players and coache`fIokii the Dentists ad .Sarasota Pirates recite the Little'
League Pledge before Thursday night's game at Twin Lakes Park. The Pirates won the
game, bouncing the Dentists from the County Cup Tournament.




Wolfpack win states,



heading to Nashville


STAFF REPORT

The Suncoast Wolfpack, a
16-and-under AAU girls bas-
ketball team composed of
players from southern Sara-
sotd and. Charlotte counties,
captured the USSSA State
Championship held last
weekend in Lakeland.
Two players from Venice
are on the team guard
Natalie Gaudreau and for-
ward Samantha Worthington.
Both were on the Venice High
team that made it to the Class
5A State Finals this past
March.
Other Wolfpack players
come from Englewood, North
Port and Port Charlotte.
With the state tide in
hand, the Wolfpack have
earned the right to competeI
at the Women's World Bas-I

Please see WOLFPACK, 9A,


PHOTO COURTESY Of SALLY YODER
The Suncoast Wolfpack won the 16-and-under AAU state
championship last weekend in Lakeland. The team is trying to
raise money so they can play in Nashville, Tenn., next month.
In the front row are Molly Ernst, Erin Ernst, C.J. Johnson and
Brandy Howard. In the back row are Samantha Worthington,
Chelsea Lauer, Colby Keefe, Natalie Gaudreau, Secoya Black,
Melissa Crosby and coach Scott Hall.


SUMMER SPORTS

SPOTLIGHT.,"

Jeff Callan has been the pitching coach for Venice High baseball the past
seven sears. A former standout at Treseeca Nazarene University. Callan
once pitched for the Canadian Olympic team. He runs a summer camp
teaching the finer points of hurling. He also volunteers time in the
summer as manage of the Legion B team. Callan is a big Maple Leafs fan.


SSPORTS PUS2Y
652 E. Venice Ave. 488-9156
www.bogeys-venice.com


Food d Fun
*Burgers -Wings *Pizza
BESr' Wing Sauces I
garlic parm Cajun
honey bbq voodoo
.15 Draft Beers- Full Bar
*19 TVs- 5'x8' Giant -
Screen Kid's Menu
S'NTN' Trivia


Jeff Callan


*NBA Finals
*Baseball *US Open Golf

Fathers Day
Roast Prime Rib of Beef
Gift for bAb and
Raffle for Golf Foursome


I -






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


i IlraI^v\ II IKI 11 "ln


SUNDAYT, JUINL IL, LUUJ


Go away, Arlene, you're ruining my weekend


'Saturday morning, 8 a.m.
I rise from my peaceful
slumber hoping that Arlene
is long gone. But no, as I exit
the owner's suite of our pala-
tial South Venice home, I real-
ize that we still have compa-
ny..I quickly flip on the TV to
see how bad the day is going
to be. Quick-moving squall
lines but fairly clear to our
south, I begin to hope. It's
early, I say, so maybe there's a
chance. After all I actually saw,
the sun this morning, a har-
binger of good luck, right?..
Absolutely incorrect, sir!
All the local courses are
closed;, as they should be.
We've been, hammered over
the last two weeks and every-
thing is soaked, yet some-
how I have the gall to expect
to play golf. How rude of me.
We've all seen the com-
mercial on TV about the sin-
glein the rain. Sitting in a tiny
shelter as a torrential rain-
storm rages, a lone golfer
waits. It's gonna ,'clear up
soon, he thinks. And then as if
on crte, another moron walks
up and asks if he's a single.


Michael Lamond
THE ZONE.

What's funny about this is it's
absolutely true. I was once
that moron.
In our home at the front
door is a small bit of brick-a-
brackery. A small wooden
plaque with a pair of tiny golf
clubs and an inscription, "I
only play on days that end in
Y." It used to be true. One day,
while playing in a game in the
rain, I ran into a friend who
was having lunch as I made
the turn. I asked why he was-


GOLF RESULTS


JACARANDA WEST
COUNTRY CLUB
MEN'S DAY WEDNESDAY
1 BEST BALL FRONT/2 BEST
BALLS BACK
MINUS 18 Mario Testa, Charlie
Picker Don Blem, Len Hodgson.
MINUS 17 Sam Till John
Ziinyar Don Lazzaro, Bob Perkins.
MINUS 17 .D. Powers. Bill
Prizio, Doug Scont Don Anderson.
MINLIS 4 Hank Sonnabend, Jay
Hartman, Hossein Alemazkoor.
JACARANDA JILLS
INDIVIDUAL LOW NET
A FLIGHT Diane Hation 38.
Arlene Goldberg 39. Anna Haumann
47. Sara Peterson 4:


WOLFPACK
ketball Championships held
in July in Knoxville. Tenn.
To win state, the Wolfpack
defeated,teams from Orlando,
Lakeland and Bradenton. The
fi al was a 49-47 victory over
-,the Lady Ice of Tirusville
played at George Jenkins
High.
Worthington had a great
four games and was named to
the all-tournament team.
Gaudreau saw limited playing
time because of a sore ankle.
It is estimated that it will
take approximately $4,500 to
finance the team's trip to
Nashville next month. This
includes food, lodging and
transportation.
Those wishing to help
sponsor the team should call
Sally Yoder at 423-1828.


I Hour Erection in) MInutes!
FDA APPROVED
ME mrARr uVEREDn


B FLIGHT Diane Marting 37,
Shirley Warren 43. Pam Reigleluth 48
Mary Feldmann 64.
18 HOLE LADIES
1-2-3 ON 3-4-5
MINUS 8 Carolyn Wolf, Patsy
Severin. Polly Girouard, Marilyn
Anderson.
MINUS 6 Wilma McCabe. Gail
Pederson, Ellen Dempster. Mary
Powers.
MINUS 5 Marijke Fisher, Sharon
Finlayson, Pat Miller, Edna Joslyn.
MINUS 3 Dot Seelow, Jennene
Brower, Barb Elton. Mary Ellen Snell.
LAKE VENICE GOLF CLUB
WOMEN's 18 HOLES
MYSTERY HOLE

GOLF DIGEST






Always a Beautiful
Day at Bobcat TRail...
SUMMER RATES
$38.00 .4 $27.00
7 A M -N..i n 12 1. )-Close-
Big Summer
Card Rates
$26.00 4 $19.00
7 AM.-N..n 12 0ii-C ose
(941) 429-0500
1350 Toledo Blade Blvd.
North Port. FL 34288
Open Io
the Public
vin.bobcattrailgc.com
Located off 1-75
7 E'it 179


Real Human Growth
i HORMONE THERAPY
Ex inB Testosterone Replacement
EXilvI ni ,__ .
I" Lose 20.30% Body Fat
Sex. (c.n.eiFallt Ito lor. Bod, MaI.
1 0% Discount bUindel lIwOily
WE SPECIALIZE:
Erectile Dysfunction Low Sex Drive
Lack of Energy Premature Ejaculation
& Fatigue Penile Curvature
E THE GOULET ANTI-AGING FOUNDATION &
THE BRITISH DIAGNOSTIC INSTITUTE


MIId, AA.i... SARASOTA FT.MYERS
ORDER BY PHOE 941-953-3799 239-277-7700


.j=iI


A.G. EDWARDS.
FULLY INVESTED IN OUR CLIENTS.


BUY, SELL OR HOLD?
YOU MAY WANT TO GET
A SECOND OPINION.

SInvesting your hard-earned money is not easy.
As with any major decision, it's wise to get
' more than one opinion about what to do. So if
you're wondering what to do next with one or
more securities you own, let us help.
Call today for a no-cost, no-obligation second
opinion on your investments. .


iEnglewood. .
699 S. Indiana Avenue
Englewbod, FL
941-474-3271


Venice Norlh
700 US 41 N. Bypass
Venice, FL
941-488-6751


Venice South'
4242 S.Tamiami frail
Venice. FL.
941-408-8797 t.


51A GEd S .


CLASS A 1. Shiriey Krebiehl 26 2.
Jackie Wheeler 31- 3 Peggy Nicholas
31.
CLASS B 1. Lois Rodgers 26; 2.
Pat Zingler 30. 3 Grace Babcock 32
LADIES 9 HOLES
EVEN HOLES HALF HANDICAP
CLASS A I Ruth Tacy 24- 2. Dot
DeJohn 26- 3 Dot Hakman 26
CLASS B 1. Edna Laurnia 22.2.
Phyllis Sullivan 24 3 Marge Carrier 24.
CLASS C 1. Dot Henderson 26; 2.
Jan Stout 27: 3. Joan Turner 28.
MONDAY GROUP
QUOTA POINTS
PLUS 6 Dick Drumgool Bruce
Wells Chuck Stevenson Noel Michals.


Plenty


of good cheer


n't playing, and he just said
there are too many good days
to play in the rain. I realized
he was right.
If you choose to try to play
in inclement weather, here
are a few tips.
1. Bring a radio. When
you're under a tree trying
to stay dry, it's nice to have
some soothing music like
Black Sabbath to calm. your
frayed nerves.
2. Bring four more towels.
than you think you will need.
You can never have, enough
towels in the rain.
3. Buy a cart cover. Best
deal around when it's pour-
ing.
4. Bring plenty of patience,
because it's going to be a
long and slow round.
5. Lastly, try to play with
friends, if you have any It's
no fun sharing a rain shelter
with a guy with bad breath
and a worse attitude.
Seeya.

Alike Lamond writes a
weekly golf column for the
Gondiolier Su.n.


...............i ~ ~ *~c':3


SMINUS I Jerry Greenler Bob
Favor. Moe Marceau
INDIVIDUALS -,Chuck
Stevenson plus ", Jerry Greenler'
plus 4, Gerry Chascin plus 2, Chet'
Hamlin plus 2, Dick Drumgool
plus 2.


Price minluj ar md rarg.-.
.U Gc,.,-.d Lhrodph 9/10105
,', Prnp [-P a r M h r ua iequi J.
MEMBERSHIPS.
North Port Sumtir BIJ. AVAILABLE
Between L.S.41 .ndI1.75- Exit 182 wwv.heron-creek.comni









To honor the contributors to Venice's Sports Legacy

2005 Inductees

Ralph. Adrian Sr. Sheryl Maize
l'ton 'Maas'

Class of 204 CliS 'of 2003
Dr. Jerry Biller. DOhnie Young
a Dan & FredaBoone Mark Guthrie
AlvinMichell Jim Powell
Larry S adburg, Jack-Dundas
.ack Vigt -Chuck Reiter.

CElIEM NY& BANQUET
:.Thu"IsdayjiUne 23- 2005 at 6:30 pm
"16'& ''y's Restaurant
S -.652 .Eas'Venice Avenue .
,.. $,00:pderPerson 'cash bar available* '
SReservationfo'rms available at Rotary Futures
Office at VHS, or Bogey's Restaurant.
.To benefit Rotary Futures Program at Venice High School..

Space provided by i idher un


MYAKKAPINES GOLF CLUB Gerri Harnish 3S.


18 HOLE LADIES
LOW NET
FLIGHT A Connie Treece 71.
':FLIGHT B Teresa Pifer 66. FLIGHT C
- Sachiko Sidhu 72 FLIGHT D -


9 HOLE LADIES
MYSTERY HOLES
FLIGHT A Audrey Garruto 40
FLIGHT B-- Doris Wigley 47. FLIGHT C
-". Mary Landis 51.


MULCH SALE $1.49
CYPRESS B. GOLD, RED, ENVRO i
.* 2 CU FT WHILE SUPPLIES LAST 20 BAG LIMIT I
La NadI 5175 S.R.776 Venice, FL 34293 i1
JL IPhone 493-1293 Openr 7daysper week' "
SNext to the Dome Flea Market


How do you help protect your home and family from Dying glass and storm
damage? The answer is 3Mt1 Scotchshieldn' Ultra Safety and Security Window
Film. This transparent, micro-thin film adds shatter-resistant protection to your
windows. It's highly resistant to penetration and tearing. So esen if a window is
broken, most wind and water can still be sealed out.
Call your authorized 3M Dealer now and take advantage of our special offer.

15% OFF Window Film:
S- With this ad. Exp. 7/31/05

HURRICANE GLASS

SHIELD, INC.
921-0844 or 1-866-224-8300
4123 Clark Rd., Sarasota, FL 34233
www.hurricaneglassshield.com
,r,,..,. I m+ Available from


THE LOOKOUTI CLiA
STORM PANEL
is made of General Electric UV
Rated Lexan' XL-10 sheet, which
carries a warranty by G.E. against
yellowing, breakage & light
transmission under constant
xnosrure for 10 vears.


HURRICANE GLASS
SHIELD, INC.
921.-0844 or
1.866.224.8300
4123 Clark Rd.,
Sarasota, FL 34233


INSTALLATION IS
PANELS ARE NEARLY QUICK & EASY!
INVISIBLE Meets the New Florida &
INVISIBLE International Building Codes.
FROM 50 FEET AWAY! It has never been penetrated in test.
"IT TAKES THE IMPACT & JUST BOUNCES BACK!"
Super light-weight panels, weighing an
estimated 12 to 15 pounds.
A certificate of warranty is. issued that the panel
is virtually indestructible for 15 years.
LEAN


SOLA IRRIGATION
Pump and Irrigation Services
Quick Response Competitive Pricing
Specializing in Maintenance & Repairs
SLeonhard Sola, Owner Operator
20 years of Experience 941-484-3575
Free Estimates on Maintenance Agreements *


5


SUN PHOTOS B', CLAUDE LEWIS
Top, members of the Hot Tamales do their cheer routine Thursday at the School's Out
Sports Camp at Pine View. The Hot Tamales were voted to have the best cheer squad in
the second and final week of the popular camp. Below, members of the Code Red team
perform their winning cheer during competition last Thursday, June 2. Code Red was
judged the best in week one.


I







10A VENICE GONDO


I IFR SUN


SUNDAY, JUNE 12,2005:


Code board gets



second shotfor for fines


Resident's attorney argues that city shouldn't get
to rehear case just because his client won.,


BYJJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR


An attorney for a local resi-
dent thinks city code inspec-
tors shouldn't get a second
shot at fining his client simply
because Venice staff were not
prepared a month ago.
City Attorney Wayne Hall
disagrees in a case that's
turned into a mix-up of build-
ing permits, accusations of
false testimony and at least
$3,000 worth of potential
fines hanging over a blue col-
lar man's head.
Venice resident Conrad
Meyer was ordered to obtain
building permits for work
he's done to a home at 716
Groveland Ave. A month ago,
code enforcement officers
asked the board to fine him
$50 a day for at least 60 days
because Meyer still hadn't
gotten the permits.
Code board members
found the resident:in compli-
ance after Meyer held up three
city building permits that he


CMTY NOTES


Traffic warming
The traffic signal at the
intersection of Harbor Drive
and West Venice Avenue in
downtown Venice is not func-
tioning. It should be treated
as a four-way stop until it can
be fixed, probably Monday
morning. Temporary four-way
stop signs have been posted
by the city.
Envision Venice workshop
The public is invited to


had paid for. City staff were
unable to give a clear expla-
nation of these permits that
appeared to fulfill his obliga-
tion, so the code board ruled
in his favor.
Turns out those permits
had been revoked and no one
at the code board meeting
knew that.
On Friday, the city riled it
can rehear the case, much to
the dismay of Venice attorn-
ey Matthew Rheingans, who
Meyer finally hired after being
called back in front of code
board for the fourth time on
the permits issue.
Rheingans argued that re-
hearing of cases is not allowed
simply because the city lost.
He also pointed to how the
city had continued the case
multiple times, which Rhein-
gans believes was also be-
cause the code officers were
unprepared.
"This (rehearing) is be-
cause the code officers were
not prepared, and now they're
asking for a fourth bite at the


attend a two-day design work-
shop as part of the Envision
Venice process. The workshop
will place the critical issues
identified during the public
forums in a visual context to
illustrate their potential effect
on the city. It is held by the city
of Venice Planning Depart-
ment.
The workshops take place
at Village on the Isle, Renais-
sance Room, 930 South
Tamiami Trail, from 10 a.m. to


apple," Rheingans argued to
code board. "If I came to trial
four times unprepared, a
judge would laugh me out of
court."
The city's attorney dis-
agreed with the Rheingans
and told the code board they
can rehear the case next
month. Venice Code Enforce-
ment Officer John Patek
claims that Meyer knew his
permits had been revoked
and lied under oath in May.
However, the city's comput-
er did not show that during
the May hearing and no city,
staff person could say with
certainty why Meyer had ap-
proved permits. Meyer said
Friday the city never told him
they had revoked his permits,
and there is no documented
notification by the city.
Code board's decision to
rehear the casewas unani-
mous, 7-0, which frustrated
Rheingans, who believes the
city is not following the law.
"The law is very clear. ...
This guy is just plainly being
harassed," Rheingans said.
You can e-mail J.. Andrews
at: jandrews@venicegondolier.
com.


2 p.m. A light lunch will be
provided.
On Monday, June 20, par-
iticipants will identify com-
munity character issues such
as streetscapes and neighbor-
hood design.
On Tuesday, June 21, par-
ticipants will create commu-
nity, design concepts and
vision statements.
The goal of the two-day
workshop is to heighten
awareness of what consti-


Council weighs height limits


Venice hospital and red tide
also top Tuesday's agenda.


BY JJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR

Venice's first Height Overlay
District cleared one 35-foot
tall hurdle three Weeks ago,
and now it's in the final sprint
to the finish line.
The only obstacle left in its
way would be the Venice City
Council members who must
approve it, and their fears the
height cap could be to restric-'
five and turn the stretch of
West Venice Avenue headed to
Venice Beach into a string of
35-foot, flat-roofed, box-style
homes.
Despite lengthy debate at
the last council 'meeting, the,
first reading passed unani-
mously. Council could issue
final approval, revisions or
even denial.
The Height Overlay District
would limit all buildings west
of Armada Road along Venice
Avenue to no more than 35
feet total. A second height-
related ordinance up for final
approval conditional use--
would give city council the.
power to approve exceptions
for height, taking it away from
Venice Planning Commission.
City council meets in coun-
cil chambers at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday.


tutes the true value of Venice
and to encourage participa-
tion of the community in the
planning process to ensure
long term stability.
.Envision Venice is part of
the comprehensive plan up-
date process. For more infor-
mation, call Planner Kathie
Ebaugh or Administrative
Aide Bette Dd1ton at 486-2626.
Street closure
-Miami Avenue, between


VRMC status
Venice Regional Medical
Center will lead a 20-minute
presentation Tuesday to out-
line what the new owners of
Venice hospital have accom-
plished during its first 120
days of ownership. Represent-
atives also will present an out-
line of some future initiatives.
Hospital CEO Melody
Trimble is expected to intro-
duce a proposal to redo the
front of the hospital and other
changes at an estimated cost
of $4.5 million. Venice hos-
pital was purchased earlier
this year by Health Man-
agement Associates Inc., mak-
ing it privately owned for the
first time in the hospital's 50-
year history.
VRMC is Venice's second
largest employer. The update
to city council was prompted,
in part, by Sarasota Memorial
Hospital asking for city coun-
cil's blessing to build a public-
owned medical facility within
city limits at Laurel and
Pinebrook roads.
Red tide update
Students and science
teachers from Venice High
School will present their year-
end red tide research report.
Venice High's science depart-


Nokomis Avenue and Nassau
Street in downtown Venice,
will be closed to traffic from
5 a.m. Saturday, June 18, until
8 p.m. Sunday, June 19, due to
the annual Miami Avenue
Craft Fair.
The craft fair will take place
on both days from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. It is sponsored by Venice
MainStreet.

Compiled by Assistant
Editor .1. Andrews


ment is working to verify local
inventor Bob Rigby's cure for,
red tide blooms in the Gulf of
Mexico, which causes skin'
and lung irritations among
humans and can kill fish. '
So far, city council has'
been the only outside organi-
zation to make donations
toward the research by high-
schoolers and science teach-'
ers. Last year's $1,000 grant-
paid for a high-powered
microscope, and this year's
$1,000 helped pay for fish
aquariums to study the cure's
impact on fish.
Other items
The full agenda is available,
online at venicegov.com. Here.
are the highlights of Tuesday's
city council agenda.
Political signs First
reading on a new Venice law
that would restrict placement
of political candidate signs,
until after a person has quali-:
fled to run. The, law also
would clearly state that signs.
are only allowed on private
property.
Law mowers-- Residents'
who want to mow their grass
at 8 a.m. on Sunday mornings
are almost out of time. Coun-:
cil will have its first reading
on a law restricting operation
of domestic power tools and;
lawn mowers within city
limits after 10 p.m. on any
night of the week., Grass can
start being cut at 7 a.m. week-'
days, 8 a.m. Saturday and hol-'
idays, and 9 a.m. Sunday.
Critical Issues Report --
Planning and Zoning Director
Tom Slaughter will present
council members with the list
of eight critical issues, which
will shape the state-mandat-
ed Evaluation Appraisal
Report due later this summer.
Council needs to accept this
list in order to move the
process of revising the city's
comprehensive plan, which
determines the future look;
land use and public services
in Venice.


Ii


_____






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11A


CI IMlNfAV II IIIC 1 ) 2 f1


Teen's journey to help orphans


A 13-year-old takes a family cruise to Honduras to
deliver "backpacks of hope."


BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER

Not many kids can say
they've gone to hell and back,
but 13-year-old Charlotte
Bliss can.
"We went to the city of Hell
(on Grand Cayman) and
stayed for 15 minutes," said
Bliss. It was part of her itiner-
ary for a cruise she planned
since last year.
She survived class eight
gale winds on the high seas,
and swam with stingrays -
"They felt like mushrooms"
- but visiting Hell and swim-
ming with stingrays wasn't
the highlight of her trip.
Her real mission was to
deliver backpacks filled with
supplies to an orphanage.
The Venice eighth-grader
called her project "Backpacks
of Hope." What .started out as
a Pine View school project to
help out a fellow Arcadia
school hit by the hurricanes,
and surfing a cruise line mes-
sage board, snowballed into a
mission for the teen.
"Charlotte asked not to get
games or toys for Christmas
this year," said her mother,
Mitzi. "Instead, she asked us
to turn in purchase points on
our credit cards for a cruise to
Roatan."
"When learning about.
Roatan," said Charlotte, "I
found out about an orphan-
age that is in need of many
things. So, we'took extra back-
packs filled with clothes, toi-
letries and school supplies."
"Many places in the world
cannot get the simple basics
they need due to poverty and
transportation problems. If
basic needs are met i.e.
clothes, toiletries, shoes it
might help a child survive
and keep a family together."
Helping hands
: On'their way to Miami the
Bliss family met up with one


of the people she befriended
on the cruise message board
affiliated with Children's
Services International. They,
too, deliver supplies to
orphanages in needy parts of
the world. Their new friends
loaded up the Bliss family
with more supplies destined
for the orphanage.
NCL Spirit staff were also
helpful.
"The crew bent over back-
wards so Charlotte could get
the packages, bags and back-
packs to the orphanage. They
also took-a collection in the
crew's quarters for the Island.
We found out the cruise line
helps different organizations
needing assistance. They
helped the orphanage last
year," said Mrs. Bliss.
"When we got to the pier
we called the orphanage,
which sent a taxi. The ride
was like playing a real live
game of Frogger. There are no
stop signs or traffic signs or
speed limit signs. No one is
required to have a driver's
license," said Charlotte.
"I was looking forward to
seeing all the children's faces.
One of them was Anna, a 7-
year-old with Down syn-
drome. Because of that she
was kept in a chicken coop
until she was found and
brought to the orphanage.
"While at the orphanage
we learned they are not going
to have any public education
after sixth-grade. There are
30,000 people on the island
without a library and without
secondary education. The
reason for this is because of a
lack of teachers and school
books."
Next time'
Half of the girls in Roatan
.are pregnant before they
reach 20 years of age.
AIDS/HIV affects between 40
to 60 percent of the island's
population, depending on


Charlotte Bliss (front) with children at the Child Sponsorship
International Orphanage, a Christian, nondenominational mis-
sion organization in Roatan, Honduras.


whom you talk with.
Most of the women of
child-bearing age do not have
a sixth-grade education. Ap-
'proximately 30 percent are
severely malnourished. The
poverty rate is possibly as
high as 80 percent, said Mrs.
Bliss.
"They are desperate for
anything, from diapers to
medicines and school sup-
plies. But it is the orphanage
that we will never forget. We
would love to go back with
more of the needed supplies.
We were truly moved by the
need and the wonderful,


kind, generous people we
met."
After stashing supplies
under her bed for nearly five
months, Charlotte can now
rest easy having accom-
plished her mission.
"It was definitely worth it,"
said Charlotte. "I found two
other orphanages on Roatan
that need supplies. I'll start
collecting supplies now for
those children."
For more information on
how you can contribute to
Backpacks of Hope, visit back
packsofhope.com or e-mail
backpacksofhope@aol.com.


PHOTO COURTESY OF JERRY WOELFEL
During Venice MainStreet's Thursday Night Stroll the
Collectors' Gallery & Framery played host to world-
renowned commentator Jack Perkins, who is pictured here
showing off two of his other talents, captivating photogra-
phy and his book of poetry entitled "Acadia."



Say cheese


Superintendent meets

board expectations


BY JENNIFER WALCHOK
GONDOLIER INTERN

The school board revealed
annual evaluation results for
Superintendent Gary Norris-
last week, and
rne m b e r s
unanimouslyr
agreed Norris
at least met or
exceeded
expectations
pi every cate-
gore bers.
icThe super-
intendent and Todd
ngthe publicpr-
!were able to hear outstanding
praise of the superintendent
byce boardinly Benson
SBoard member Laura Ben-
Vice Chair Dr. IN

son Caroeed with Todd.
egan heeded a leader with





oulanationde of the box thing to
aNorris' evalu-
,ation by say-
ing the super-
iny asked bout his vision of
certain, instructiBenson

expectanizational andons. hu-
;mBoard member Laura Ben-t,
son agreed with Todd.
"We needed a leader with
outside of the box thinking to
;commit long term," Benson
Said.
The board members evalu-
,ated Norris by using an evalu-
ation instrument that specifi-
1cally asked about hisvision of
Earning, instructionalleader-
1ship, organizational and hu-
,man resource management,


collaboration with communi-
ty stakeholders and partner-
ships, ethical practices and
political, social, economic,
legal and cultural contexts.
The board was asked to
evaluate the superintendent
in these various areas, then'
reveal their views if he fell
below expectation, met ex-
pectation or exceeded expec-
tation.
Norris states
the evalua-
tion was
designed after
a set of stan-
dards for edu-
cational lead-
ers in the
country with
an emphasis
Norris on instruc-
tion.
"Using this model sets a
tone for instructional priori-
ties in the district," Norris
said. '
Although four of the five
board members did find
Norris to at least meet expec-
tation in all areas, board
member Frank Kovach point-
edr out two areas in need of
improvement.
"I feel we need to look into,
current programs and evalu-
ate them before adding new
programs," Kovach said.
Overall the board is im-
pressed with Dr. Norris' vision
for the district.
"I share any success in the
past, 15 months with many
employees that worked very
hard as well,"' Norris said.


At Sarasota Memorial, we're much. more than' a hospital. We're a community-owned hospital. So for
more than 75 years, we've been making'decisions that put the community's needs first, not our own.
Unlike other area hospitals, we.don't cut programs people need simply because they're unprofitable.
Instead, we bring superior, affordable health care to ourneighbtirs and local businesses in meaningful
and innovative ways. And when we do turn a profit, we' urA it-back into the services you need..
Call 941-917-7777 or visit smh.com and get to know the only area hospital that operates strictly for
. the common good. Which makes us uncommonly proud. '


'SARASOTA
. EMRAL A_


.- MEMORIAL
HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
S ", A decision as important as lift ilself.


5,


Triple threat


PHOTO COURTESY OF FRIENDSHIP COTTAGE CHEESE
Kristophor Alspach of Venice, a senior at Cardinal Mooney
High School, has been awarded a $1,500 scholarship as
part of Friendship Cottage Cheese's first Project Friendship
Scholarship in Florida. The son of Cindy Alspach, he is one
of 10 Florida high school seniors to be awarded a total of
$20,000 in scholarship money for academic excellence,
commitment to community and placing value on the
importance of friendship. Shown from left are president
and COO of Friendship Cottage Cheese Joseph Murgolo,
Alspach and Tampa Bay Buccaneer linebacker Derrick
Brooks.


V Wref iteb6s#1e1


t CALLSUNLINE:
Smli ( (941)629-8256 or
A di vision of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., (941 483-4848
il W"I age ___(940483_ ______


!)UNUAY, JUVIt I Z, LUUD






SUNDAY, JUNE 12,2005


1 fl Irc cF nMhlklnn IFR cl IN


The science of sharks


Aquatic All-Star
Flynn Angley,
10, checks out a
hammerhead
shark Friday
during a shark
dissection at the
scout house.
Flynn said "it
was really cool,"
and "I'd never
dissected a
shark in my life
before."


SUN PHOTOS BY KH-ARLI ROSE
4-H Agent Keith Wilson shows the Aquatic All-Stars, a group of home-schooled children inter-
ested in marine biology, the anatomy of a shark Friday. The dissection was intended to teach
children about the appreciation of sharks' biology, a shark's contribution to the food chain, and
how humans can conserve their population,



Get students

immunized
now

STAFF REPORT


Officials for the Florida
Department of Health urged
parents to make sure their
,children receive the required
immunizations before the
next academic school year;
Immunizations are vital to the
health and welfare of all
Floridians,\ especially chil-
dren.
"Our children's health
should be our number one
priority," said DOH Secretary
John-O. Agwiunobi. "Ensuring
your child's health through
proper immunizations is the
best start you can give himor
her for a successful school
year."
Before children can regis-
ter for school, parents must
provide documentation (De-
partment of Health Form 680..
Certification off Immuniza-
tion) showing proof of vacci-
nation against diphtheria,
tetanus, pertussis, measles,
mumps, rubella, varicella
(chickenpox), hepatitis B and
polio diseases.
S. Florida's effort to increase
the nwnber of fully immu-
nized children continues to
Show positive results. The
recent goal of immunizing 85
percent of 2-year old children
this year was exceeded, and
new goals are being estab-
lished.
* State officials point to
Florida State Health Online
Tracking Syste, the statewide
immunization registry, as a
valuable tool in helping the
state reach immunization
goals.
The mission of Florida
SHOTS is to develop public
and private partnerships
,between health-care provid-
ers to share electronic inmmu-
,nization data. This informa-
tion will be used as a tool to
increase and maintain child-
hood immunization levels,'
and to help eliminate vac-
'cine-preventable diseases.
D a Not only does Florida
SHOTS house immunization
data, it also helps health-care
h providers identify children
..who are' due or. past due for
Vaccinations, and facilitates
providers' quick access to a
;., *child's vaccination history to
Sdetemine the vaccines need-
ed on a particular visit.
For more information on
all back-to-school immuniza-
tion requirements, visit the
SDepartment of Health's Web
SSite at doh.state.fl.us. and
Slick the immunization ser-
- ,.vices link.
For additional information
-on how to obtain required
Vaccinations, contact your
health care provider or your
local health department. For
more information on Florida
SHOTS, visit flshots.com.,


"That's a beauty, isn't it?" Aquatic All-Star Luis Jack, 5,
asks 4-H Agent Keith Wilson about his gill filament as
Wilson adjusts the microscope during a shark dissection.


,* 05 Ford
* FOCUS 2X4
, .,With Aultomatic nmisji



* -05 Ford
* 500 SE
* Auto, A/C, V-6, AM/FM I
SAluminum Wheels, Stk#02
A MSRP $22,795

x ( STOP IN TO I
* AT HOMESTEAD MIU
S,* 3 NIGHTS ACCOMMODATE(
*r !* RESERVED TICKET FOR THI
, | RESERVED TICKET FOR THI
*LUXURY MOTORCOAH,.TR


CD,
69


NEW Ford'
TAURUS S
Auto, V-6, A/C, Fully
Loaded, Stk#8218


Aquatic All-Star Luis Jack, 5,
peeks between the,hands of,
4-H Agent Keith Wilson as
Danika Yoder, 11, places a
piece of a shark inside a
glass vial.


Aquatic All-Star Flynn
Angley, 10, was not the
only one who covered his
nose during a shark dissec-
tion. When asked if it
smelled like a dead fish, his
reply was "not exactly."


05 Ford
S F-150
SUPER CAB
Auto, V-8, AM/FM Stereo,
Cruise Control Stk#7925
MSRP $25,930



05 Ford *
FREESTYLELE *
..........'.


2005 Ford *
FREESTAR *
hA SES *
Auto, V-6, A/C, 7 Pass, Fully
Loaded, Stk#5484 *
MSRP $29,210 ,*


'04 KIASEDONA EX Aul. v 6. 7 P, fuliyLadd SIk11 34.3B '16,995 '02 FORD WINOSTAR LX Ai. V..PAs,; F, Allytl, a9Si. 62A.... 12,995 '98 FORD MUSTANG G7 s svfw VI hiM. s8,995 *
'04 FORD RANGER EDGE Auo v uI Fultyoaid.d SapCt.al:. ;15SASi 5,990 '02 HONDA ACCORD EX AuTm vi. ,' ulfuoliEi S4 92A ........*'16,995 02 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER A,..f. LI ur.. Fuliit.f iA 9 Mi4i s'13,995 9
'04 F-350 CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL Auo, v l ia ful, :r,i 4t.VwA. '34,990 "00 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB Abo,. full LA'l, i.9A. '8,995 '00 BUICK REGAL ,Au, .. r4L.r 4o.II.,1 I ,A.i7 $12,495
.00 DODGE CARAVAN-SPORT AuwO. IC PaTr,ger S i IA ... 7,995 '02 STRATUS SE Au I o>,,,r Fully,,,dJ i n '. 7,995 00 FORD F-250 SUPER CAB XLT 4-. MAu,, FuRL,,,B.io s4 n7, .'17,995 *
'01 FORD WINDSTAR SG Aui -t 7: Pa.rg, s' 0 . 14,995 '98 FORD MUSTANG GT 5 ;~a vF ,,lyLotu. So~ .SS ... 8,995 '03TOYOTA AVALON XLS Au:o v, Me,,,L.n.i.L.n d t*,I 1 s .,A '24,995
'03 FORD FOCTAURUS SE Au 0 v. Fi1A .4 5A1 A *. 79195 '95 LINCOLNTOWN CAR SIGNATURE oAuV. F,,,,ll Ladis.. ,u,5A '5,995 '04 FORD MUSTANG CONV Ao(. Lue t,,,e e to 18,995
'01 FORD 10 ALT SUPER0 CAB t V. FuIy L.A.S ..IA 13,995 '03 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR ,i,...4:ve w.4,,,i. rS., s fSO 6 $33,995 '04 FORD F.150 XLT CREW CAB aur ai .,ar Sr .. '25,995
1908 South McCall Rd. (SR 776), Englewood 1-800-608-6332
xww.vbaybharborford.com =8VO8 6
Retail buy payments are with 2500 cash or trade down. Payments are for 60 month WAC through FMCC. All rebates to the dealer.
Home Depot $500 cash rebate including down payments. Not responsible for typographical errors. Photos are for illustration purposes only.
*************A*** A** A** A*********A* A* ********


What makes

Daddy tick
Father's Day. It's a ticker.

RE PgfJNS


S493-1911
1975 S. Tamiami Trail *Venice
www.reflectionsingold.com
VISA- NEW SUMMER HOURS:
Closed Sun. & Mon. Thes. to Fri. 10am to 6pm Sat. 10am to 5pm
Appointments Available


*BATRIM_ M m2 DAYS ONLY!I

* A tiot

I This is,. M O CC *




OI ED FOR LESS ,i


~si~s, ~ss


Km*


I.Ail. Vtl I\L VIlltII-tV~


NOWL~


REGISTER TO WIN IlCkETS FOR THE FORD 400 RACE
AMI SPEEDWAY WEEKIY DRAWINGS AND ALSO GRAND PRIZE
IONS AT THE FAIRFIELD INN, MIAMI* FORD 400 EVENT $OUVENIR PROGRAM
I FORD 300 NASCAR *WELCOME GIFfS'AND MORE
iE FORD 400'NASCARNEgEL, !.PROFESSIONAL'ON SITE STAFF FOR ASS18TAN(E
RANSPOKATION
Wx --.awmw= I I Nin loollill 01ill


MOAU









EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (,941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460 ,
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


PUBLISHER
ROBERT A- VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
13A
SUNDAY
JUNE 12, 2005


OUR VIEW -



New YMCA a welcome addition to Englewood


A s the Englewood area grows with
homes and more homes, which also
means more people, the infrastructure
is getting stretched out of shape. One of the
needs throughout the area, as well as in the
rest, of Charlotte and Sarasota counties, is
more recreational facilities.
The Englewood YMCA seemed large
enough at one time, but not anymore. The Y
in the Englewood Center, 272 Indiana Ave.,
began with 1,400 square feet before expand-
ing to 10,000 square feet seven years ago.
But with 2,000 people being served every
year, it's not nearly big enough There are 200
children in afterschool programs and 300 in


you th basketball leagues. TheYhas borrowed
fields, parking lots and gymnasiums, includ-
ing space at the Englewood Sports Complex.
There didn't seem to be an answer to the
problem. But, then a Manasota Key resident
wrote a check for $1 million and Venice's Gulf
Coast Community Foundation came through
with $700,000. The Bible Alliance contributed
33 acres across from the .Englewood
Community Hospital on Medical Boulevard.
So, a year ago, the YMCA Foundation signed a
contract for a new $3.5 million center. The new
Y will open in about two months.
It shows what can happen when people
see real needs and decide to do something


about it. In this case, it was several someones
who saw the need for a place where people
from toddlers to senior citizens could go to
learn, to exercise, to have fun.
The newYis a 42,000 square-foot edifice. It
will have a 25-yard, six-lane swimming pool.
There will, of course, be a gymnasium and
lots of rooms for the activities that now in-
clude yoga, spinning, gymnastics and step-
aerobics. With the additional room, Director
Pat Ryan and his staff will be able to initiate
even more programs.
Ryan said almost everything has been.
completed except the floors. There will be
various types and some will have carpet,


while the foyer will have finished concrete.
The Y is not for everyone, but it is for any-
one who wishes to use it and can make ar-
rangements for a membership. Youth mem-
berships cost $16 a month and adult mem-
berships, $31 a month. There are also family
memberships.
The new Y will be a welcome addition to
Englewood; a facility that can be used for
many purposes. Let's hope that its member-
ship doesn't soon outgrow the building.
Then, again, maybe that would be a good
thing. People have already proved that if theY
isn't big enough, they'll come through with
solutions, not complaints.


Quaint and



charming?


BOB VEDDER
COLUMNIST

Mike Miller has been ex-
plaining the "Waterfront
Business District" he is pro-
posing to anyone who willlis-
ten. He has talked to his
staunchest supporters and
biggest detractors hoping to
.get a sense of how people feel.
about his dramatic proposal.
On Monday he tackled the
toughest crowd, the Venice
Taxpayers League. The meet-
ing included more than tax-.
payers members, with city
council members, chamber,
executives and many interest-
ed citizens, listening in and
participating.
As Mike often does with his
proposals, he's trying to solve
community problems while
at the same time fashioning
something that makes sense
for his company. He has done
that well. .
In this proposal he has
many, goals, almost all of
which are noble. He wants to
provide some hotel rooms to
a town that has lost many. He
wants to include a restaurant'
on the water, quaint shops
and parking for the down-
town area. He even includes a
modest amount of public
dock space. He wants to make
an areawewoukiallbe proud
of.
His proposal includes all of
these elements in buildings
from seven stories to four sto-
ries high. His presentation is
very professional and the'
drawings are quite appealing,
pven though they have a way,
of making a two-story build-
ing look the same height as
four-story buildings.
The audience asked a lot of
good questions. The lady who
got the most response from
-the crowd said what is great
about Venice is its charm and
its quaintness, and that this
proposal would ruin that
because of its massiveness.
She missed the mark with this
comment because I don't
think there was a person who-
thought any one of these
buildings, was less attractive
or quaint than the Elks, the
radiator shop and the Out-
look bar.
However, the questioner
qualified her statement to say
that there was just too much
height in the proposal, to
which she got the largest ap-
plause of the meeting. That
was a strong sentiment of a
good number of those in
attendance.
I think maybe the best
question was from a lady who


wanted to know if an impact
study had been done on what
this specific project would do
to downtown. The answer
was no, other than internal
studies and the broad-based
study done by the city a cou-
ple of years ago.
The concern such a:study
might address is what impact
this development would have
on the traffic challenge we
have on the Tampa and Ven-
ice avenue intersections,
which are already very stress-
ed in season. It is hard for me
to fathom heavy load of cars
trying to merge into Venice
Avenue from the side street in
front of the old Elks location.
Traffic is a nightmare now;
with this it would be worse.
Another questioner noted
that there was not one piece
of green space in the design.
Mike pointed out that on the
waterway itself there would
be the walkway and some
open space. Knowing how
narrow that land is, there
won't be much.
' When he proposed the
three Waterfront towers to
city council and others to be-
gin with, he did so on the
basis he would build a park
where the Oudook is. In this
concept that is replaced by a
restaurant.,
Another person wondered
how would people connect
between this, and the west
side of 41 and from Tampa to
Venice avenues without walk-
ing all the way around the
project rimming the entire
block. This certainly remains
a concern. Mike mentioned,
the lights n, 41 would be
tied better, which we have
heard before.
The project would provide
parking in a two-story garage;
half of the spaces would be
for the hotel, which is to have
100 to 140 rooms. Some of the
rooms will be like condos
over the shops. Actually they
have been careful not to call
them condos, but 'rather
short-term rentals, maybe
even time shares or vacation
rentals.
Parking could be a conf-
,cern. The hotel at max is to
have 140 rooms. Its parking
needs don't include all of the
cars needed for h banquet
facility, which could be in the
hundreds. I wish the Gondo-
lier Sun had extra' spaces, so
we might be able to rent some
out, but unfortunately we
don't.
This project certainly will
affect us. Might be good to
invest in a towing company.
If you add the 100-plus
rooms, a building with a cou-
ple of different restaurants,
the banquet facility and all
the shops, the parking garage
maybe inadequate. There will
be a little street parking and
some under the Venice Ave-
nue Bridge (designated for
the Venetian Waterway Park).
Please see VEDDER, 14A


"Copyrighted Material


I Syndicated Content FlI

Available from Commercial News Providers"


p e


- .


.w mmoo.4p0


O- m.


LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


Steps to prevent child abductions


Editor:
Readers of the GondolierSiun are familiar with several recent
stories about. child abduction tragedies in Florida. These
shocking events remind all of us about the great importance of
protecting all children from abuse.
The Child Protection Center works closely with law enforce-
ment, schools and other social service agencies to intervene,
treat and prevent child abuse in our community. The public
has recently become more aware of the extent of the problem
of child abuse statewide. '
Listed below are steps; we can all take to help prevent child
abuse:
Become an extra set of "child protection eyes and ears." If
you see, hear or .suspect that a child is being abused, call 9-1-1
or (800)96-ABUSE.
Encourage and support organizations that provide safe.
activities for children. Children who are engaged in meaning-
ful activities are much less likely to become abuse victims.
If you know someone who has suffered past abuse, en-
courage them to get treatment from a qualified professional..
S,We must prevent child abductions by closely supervising
children at all times. Children must be taught that there is more
safety in numbers. Groups of three or more children are much:
safer. If children are missing, call 9-1-1 immediately. Do not
delay in reporting missing children.
,* Contact your local legislators and tell them that you want
those who commit sex crimes to receive stiff sentences and
long-term treatment both during confinement and after re-
lease.
For more information about ways to protect children from
abuse, exploitation or abduction, please contact the Child Pro-
tection Center at 365-1277, Ext. 100.
At the Child Protection Center we envision a community
where all children are safe from abuse and free to thrive.


Hal Hedley
Executive Director
Child Protection Center
Sarasota


There's room for
two hospitals here
Editor:.
Having participated in the
studies and actions done in
the past three years by the
Community Health'Improve-
ment Partnership and the
Laurel, Osprey, Venice, No-.
komis Community Health,
Action Team, plus being a 50-
year-plus health practitioner,


I just want to give my person-
al and professional reaction
to, the Venice City Coun-
cil/Sarasota Memorial work-
shop.
There was important dis-
cussion relating to competi-
tion, tax structure and other
important issues.
Many topics were not
deeply focused on that are
also of equal importance


such as:
1. While we need our local
hospital. we also need a South
County public hospital that
can provide services VRMC
does not.
2. The concern for rapid
transportation in time of
emergencies was not really
addressed.
It was noted, however, that
with the population growth
off the Island ofVenice, a pub-
lic facility near Interstate 75
could become essential.
3. Insurance companies
and private hospitals often
change contracts, causing,
policy holders to find.their
hospital no longer accepts
their insurance.
Having a back-up public
hospital would remedy that
stress.
4. We in the Venice area
already pay property taxes to'
support SNIH.
5. We elect the board that
governs Sarasota Memorial
Hospital. Venice Regional
Medical Center has an ap-
pointed advisory board that'
does not make policy.
Our citizens deserve both
public and private hospital
care with continued good
cooperation between our
council and the two hospitals.
Evelyn R. Barrnitt
Venice.

If you can't make
sense, make noise

Editor:
Normally Idismiss the rash
of hateful, anti-Bush rhetoric.
in your Letters section, but a
recent few warrant rebuttal.
Once again, some authors
simply regurgitate baseless
liberal talking points without


factual support.
They refer to the Iraq war
-as a quagmire, yet it's doubt-
ful any of them have firsthand
knowledge of the operations
there.
They complain about a
poor economy, yet businesses
are filled with shoppers,
home sales are at record highs
and consumer indices con-
tinue to rise.
They whine that President
Bush is dismantling Social
Security, yet the reality is that
his reform plan offers some
people a new opportunity
while maintaining a status
qtno for others.
In the absence of truth,
they resort to cries of
impeachment, vilification, of
private industry and the evil
rich, and an endless parade of

left-wing carpings that origi-
nate from the Democratic
Party, are spun by their politi-
cians and enabled by' their
willing accomplices in the
press, all stemming from a
,collective blind hatred of the
president.
I cannot imagine how dif-
ficult President Bush's job
must be in the wake of con-'
stant obstruction of his'
policies and appointments
by vindictive Democrats,
endless hypocrisy and bla-
tant misrepresentation by
the liberal media, and disin-
genuous editorials from
,enraged citizens.
As the old debating adage
says, "When you have the
facts, pound the facts. When
you don't have the facts,
pound the table."
To these letter writers, a lit-
tie less table pounding, if you
please.
Joseph P. Calitri
North Port


I'm


a4mot









LET 'EM HAVE IT! ARE YOU SAD TO SEE THE OLD VENICE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DEMOLISHED? CALL US AT 207-1111.



City should keep fining homeowners in violation of codes


Fine by him. I was calling regarding the article about code
enforcement and the high fines that are being placed on resi-
dents. I think it's a great idea. I think Venice should keep it up
and South Venice should do the same thing. When you have so
many people living in one city block, one or two neglected
properties drag everything down. No one even poor people
- don't want to live next to anything like that. It costs nothing
to get out and mow the lawn but 50 cents worth of gas way
cheaper than cigarettes and beer. When somebody lets their
property go, it's usually pure laziness. There may be some cases
where some people cannot take care of their property due to
health; maybe it's time to sell the place and move into assisted
living. Pay someone to take care of the property or move.


Wrong runway. The latest
city of Venice newsletter
reports that the main runway,
31-13, will be reconstructed.
Why? As a pilot I know that
31-13 is already in the better
condition of the two runways


at the airport and has the best
lighting for night-time opera-
tions. The airport manage-
ment has- published noise-
reduction procedures that
identify the other runway for
jet departures and arrivals. I


also know that this construc-
tion is going to be paid for
with tax dollars. I'm wonder-
ing why we should spend the
money to improve a runway
'that is not the airport's pre-
ferred runway. Why should
jets be allowed to use runway
31-13 at all? Jets using it often
fly less than 100 feet above the
homes near the airport. I've
watched them do this; some
of these jets barely clear the
trees. The danger of a jet crash
is there and is very real. I
know of no other airport in
the country where this is per-
mitted. In this case the homes
were there first because they
were there before the jets
came to Venice en masse. By


allowing this to continue, our
city officials are abdicating
their primary responsibility:
to ensure the safety, security
and well-being of all the citi-
zens of Venice.
Un-checked. What's with
the post office? A pension
check was postmarked and
mailed April 29 in Gary, Ind.
We received it May 9, after 6
p.m. Another letter sent from
St. Louis, which is supposed
to be mailed out the last
Friday of the month, didn't
arrive until May 9.
Wake up. I think the no-
wake zone should be expand-
ed. I've seen' boats go flying
over the waterway and there's
just nothing done about it.


GIVE US A CALL
The Let'em Have It line allows readers to sound off on issues of local
interest. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the callers and do.
not necessarily represent the views of this newspaper. Opinions or com-
ments that are personal attacks on people; attacks on or commerdals
for businesses; political endorsements; or otherwise unfit for publication
will not be printed. If you would like to participate, call the line at 207-
1111. Call no more than once a week Please keep your comments brief.
The line is available all hours. Caller identification is not required.


VEDDER frompage 13A


This area will need to be
looked at closely.
Most of the structures
seem to be right on the side-
walk with no setback. At these
heights, that would not be
very attractive up close.
One comment was about
covered walkways for the
summer rains and the brutal
sun. This is a matter of taste
and practicality, yet nice
sounding.
One person asked if they
had taken into account the
future widening of the Venice
Avenue Bridge. Mike indicat-
ed a study had shown that to
do that would bring more
people into an already crowd-
ed intersection, so the experts
were saying it wouldn't hap-
pen.
It would seem those com-
ments mean he shouldn't
develop at all for the same
reason.
The. bridge widening
should be considered be-
cause currently the narrow-
ness, at least at the bottom,
does not allow for good traffic"
dispersal.
So if just the lower portion
were widened it would solve
some problems. This ques-
tion needs further review
because once everything is
built, we are done.
There is another important
issue that I don't have time or
enough knowledge to explore,
and that is the idea of a spe-
cial mixed-use district that is
at the center of this proposal.
So I have mentioned some
concerns and some negative
thoughts that were raised, but
overall the idea of extending
the shopping district, making
nice shops, providing more
hotel rooms and a restaurant
has a great deal of appeal to
almost everyone. The mas-
siveness of the project and its
impact is and should be the
overriding concern. It should
not be that tall all the way
around was the sense that I
got.
Congratulations to Mike
and his Waterfdrd team on
trying to provide some solu-
tions to problems that are in
front of us and to listening to
everyone's feelings about it.
As one person said, it is
better to have a Venetian
doing a project than someone
from Texas (guess this person
doesn't trust Texans).


By's Cracck A Gondolier
Sun salesman says that an
advertisement is like a
kiss. What you get out of it
depends on what you put
into it.
***** *
Venice Regional Medical
Center is getting ready to
bring to city council propos-
al to redo the front of the hos-
pital. Along with other chang-
es being made to upgrade
rooms the cost will be $4.5
million.
This is solid evidence it
plans to stay on the island,
which CEO Melody Trimble
confirmed in a speech this
week. She also pointed out
that it now contributes $1.1
million in property taxes to
Sarasota County. It has more
than 1,000 employees and 650
volunteers.
Speaking of the hospital,


she also told me that United
Way would get $20,000, which
is a huge amount about
double what was gathered
before: That puts United Way
near $590,000.

Today's Ism (this sign on a
health food store): Closed due


I hope by the time you read
this the Gondolier Sun will
have once again taken first-
place honors in state compe-
tition for weeklies. I am very
proud of the staff, who will be
honored with 15 awards.
****** *


.so far and not too many
answers, but the overall idea
of trying to help solve this
enormous problem is lauda-
tory. I hope they consider all
options.
There is some talk that
they would build $180,000-
$200,000 homes, which is not


to illness. What Gulf Coast Com- what most would consid(
****** munity Foundation ofVenice affordable housing.
Anne Graf wrote me from is doing to help the cause of ******
Roan Mountain, Tenn. She affordable housing is.encour- Bumper sticker: Madne,
sent on an article about a aging. It is contemplating takes its toll. Please have exa
Frisbee (sometimes called 'spending $16 million on change.
disc) golf course. They have developing a large tract of
about 15 acres to develop this land northeast of town for RobertA. Vedder writes a
game, which is gaining in affordable housing. weekly column in this news-
popularity. There are a lot of questions paper.


Her name is Mary Young, and she'll take the time to


No Payment


14A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2005


er


ct








OBITUARIES


SUNDAY. JUNE 12. 2005


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN, 15A.;


Jan A. Davenport
Jan Anna Davenport of
Venice died Friday, June 10,
2005. She was 57.
She was born April 14,
1948, in Celina, Ohio, and
came to Venice in 1982 from
there.
She was a child care em-
ployee for Church of the
Palms.


Survivors include her hus-
band, Art; a daughter, Dawn
Renee of Gainesville, Fla.; a
son, Craig of Baton Rouge,
La.; a brother, Francis "Butch"
Querry of Celina, Ohio; and
four grandchildren.
Services: A memorial service
will be held at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, June 14, at Wiegand
.Brothers Chapel. Wiegand


Brothers Funeral Home of
Sarasota in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mildred Arcaro
Mildred Arcaro of Noko-
mis died Wednesday, June 8,
2005. She was 86.
She was born June 13,
1918, in Lyndhurst, N.J., and
came to the area in 1976 from


Rockland County, N.Y.
She was a retired supervi-
sor from Metropolitan Life
Insurance Company in New
York.
She was a member of
Epiphany Cathedral.
Survivors include a son,
Anthony Palladino of Frank-
lin Lakes, N.J.; two daughters,
Anita Palladino and Grace


Joyce, both of Nokomis; two
stepsons, Daniel of New York
and Joseph of Georgia; two
stepdaughters, Tonia Lester
and Susan Osborne, both of
Georgia; a sister, Grace Savino
of Queens, N.Y; 17 grandchil-
dren; many great-grandchil-
dren; and a great-great-
grandchild.
Services: A visitation service will


be 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.
Sunday, June 12, with a
Scripture Service at 7:30 p.m.
at Ewing Funeral Home in
Venice. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be at 11 a.m.
Monday, June 13, at Epiphany
Cathedral. Burial will follow at
Venice Memorial Gardens.
Ewing Funeral Home of Venice
in charge of arrangements.


Nokomis Beach Pavilion gets


jump-start from lawmakers


BY TOMMY MCINTYRE
STAFF WRITER


Compared to Bill Gates'
net worth, $300,000 is chump
change but in the scheme
of things, it ain't bad. ,
"I am honored to inform
you that the Florida Legis-
lature appropriated $305,000
in Historic Preservation
grant-in-aid funds to assist
your organization with the
Nokomis Beach Pavilion Pro-
ject," Florida Secretary of
State Glenda E. Hood wrote
Sarasota County Adminis-
trator Jim Ley.
The letter from Hood to
Ley was dated June 2, 2005.
The money represents
about one-half the projected
$600,000 the pavilion reilova-
tion will cost.


In addition to the $305,000
from the state, there is a
$185,000 grant from the Flor-
ida Recreation Development
Assistance Program
The balance of the funding
will come from the county, ac-
cording to Sarasota County
Commission ChairJonThaxton.
The county got serious
about rehabilitating the di-
lapidated 51-year-old land-
mark when a piece of the roof
fell on a woman's head in
April 2002.
Thaxton said the pavilion's
original design and color
scheme will be preserved. He
said there will be a communi-
ty room and an outdoor pla-
za.
Plans call for the restrooms
to be modernized' while
maintaining their original


character.
Construction is being ten-
tatively scheduled for De-
cember 2005 or January 2006.
The pavilion is the first
building famous Sarasota
architect Jack West designed
after going out on his own as a
young architect, giving it even
more historical significance.
West was a pioneer in a
cutting-edge philosophy of
open-style architecture de-
signed to bring the outdoors
in and to blend with the flat,
Florida landscape.
That style of architecture
led to the publication of a
book, "The Sarasota School of
Architecture," depicting inno-
vative designs of Sarasota
homes and businesses that
were recognized worldwide
from 1941 to 1966.


CONE ZONE


The following is a summa-
ry of Sarasota County projects
that are expected to have an
impact on local traffic during,
the week beginning Monday,
June 13, and continuing
through Sunday, June 19.
For more information, call
861-5000 or visit scgov.net.
Englewood
McCall Road -- Construc-
tion of approximately 3,300
feet of sidewalks along the
west side of McCall Road from
Wentworih Street to 'Artisfs
Avenue. Work will cause tem-
porary lane closures, al-
though no closure will last
longer than 24 hours. Signs,
barricades and flaggers will be
present to direct traffic. Work
is expected to be completed


POLICE BEAT
Sarasota County
Sheriffs Office arrests
Lauri B. Moore, 47, 100
block Pennsylvania Ave., Os-
prey. Charge: sale or delivery
of a controlled substance.
Bond: $2,500.
Sean Moench, 18, 400
Pennsylvania Ave., Osprey.
Charges: sale or delivery of
cocaine, sale or delivery of
cannabis. Bond: $7,500.
Alonzo Jackson, 20, 5600
block Stephens Road, Venice.
Charge: possession of can-
nabis less than 20. grams.
Bond: $120.

HELEN SULLIVAN
READ
Helen Sullivan Read, (nee
Hungerford) age 85 died on June 8,
2005 at Sunset Health and
Rehabilitation Center in Venice,
FL. She was born on May 31, 1920
in Concord, MI and moved to
Venice, FL in 1982 from
Springfield, MA. She graduated
from Michigan State University and
was a special education teacher in
Jackson, MI until her retirement.
She was a volunteer at the Venice
Regional Medical Center, Venice
Little Theatre, and St. Marks
Episcopal Church Thrift Shop. She
was a member of the Venice Aachi
Club and St. Marks Episcopal
Church.
She is survived by her husband,
Darwin Read' of Venice, FL.
Daughter, Ann Smith and her
husband Tom of Leslie, MI, step
children, Marcia Thomason, Nancy
Emery, Barbara 'Baird, and Alan
Read, grandsons, Corey and
Christopher Giroux. She was pre-
,ceded in death by her first husband
John Sullivan and her brother
Richard Hungerford.
A Service of Remembrance will be
held on Monday, June 13th, 2005 at
2:00 PM at St. Marks Episcopal
Church. Interment is private.
Memorial donations may be made
in her name to St. Marks Episcopal
Church Fund, 513 Nassau Street S.,
Venice, FL 34285.
Farley Funeral Home and
Crematory, Venice Chapel is' in
charge of arrangements. 225172


by the end of November.
Siesta Key
Higel Avenue Bridge Re-
placement of the Higel Avenue
Bridge on Siesta Key is a com-
plete closure, but access to res-
idential property will be main-
tained at 'all times. Traffic is
being rerouted to surrounding
bridges and roadways. Detour
signs are posted.
Primrose Path Bridge -
Replacement of the Primrose
Path Bridge on Siesta Key is
expected tC"take about three'
months. This is a complete
closure, but access to residen-
tial property will be main-
tained at all times. Traffic is
being rerouted to surround-


ing bridges and roadways.
Detour signs are posted.
Contento Drive Bridge -
Replacement of the Contento
Drive Bridge on Siesta Key is
expected to take about four
months. Since the bridge pro-
vides the only access to -the
adjacent neighborhood, one
lane will remain .open at all
times. Temporary traffic sig-
nals have been installed to
direct traffic.
Azure Way Bridge Re-
placement of the Azure Way
short-span 'bridge is expected
to be complete by mid-July.
Since the bridge provides the
only access to the adjacent
neighborhood, one lane of the
bridge will remain open.


WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT PLAQUE
We. hear a great deal about plaque these days in dental product
advertising. Since its' elimination is so important in, controlling dental
decay and periodontal disease, there are a few things you should
know. '
Your mouth normal contains a large numbers of bacteria. Many of
these bacteria digest sugar. Among the by products of digested sugars
are acids particularly lactic acid. If these bacteria remain
undisturbed on your teeth, they combine with food debris and their
own digestive products to form a sticky film called plaque.
Plaque hold the acids released by bacteria in firm. prolonged contact
with the tooth. These acids react chemically with the minerals in the
enamel and dissolve them. Decay usually begins with a tiny pit on the
surface, which enlarges to become a cone-shaped "soft spot" of
partially dissolved enamel. When more sugar is fed to the bacteria,
more acid will be produced, and the decay progresses faster.
Untreated, it will eventually destroy the tooth.


Ellin

SDr. Charles Dr. Brent Dr. Caryn
Denta Health Professionals Davis Beyer Davis




Home &
Office
Furnishings

Honesty

SAV Quality
V Price

7,000 sq. ft.
showroom
Pre-OWned,
S'3 L Tnew, factory
Seconds
ON OFFICE We buy used
office furniture


S-'Phone: Il
941-485-7015
S _881 E.Venice Ave.,
FURNITURE Venice, FL 34285


Impact of red tide toxins proven


'STAFF REPORT


New research findings
have revealed that the toxins
produced during Florida red
tides do pose a threat to ma-
rine mammals, even after the
blooms have disappeared.
As reported in the June 9
issue of Nature, scientists
from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's Fish and Wildlife
Research Institute and the
University of North Carolina
Wilmington Center for Ma-
rine Science, together with
collaborators from Mote Ma-
rine Laboratory, Harbor'
Branch Oceanographic Insti-
tution and the National Oce-
anic and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration have discovered
how brevetoxin accumulation
and transfer in the food web, a
series of interconnected food
chains, resulted in mass fatal-
ities of endangered manatees
in 2002 and bottlenose dol-
phins in 2004.
In Florida, red tides cause
massive fish kills, contami-r
nate shellfish with brevetox-
ins, making them unsafe for
human consumption, and
can cause respiratory prob-
,lems in humans.
Brevetoxins, the dangerous
neurotoxins produced during
Florida red tides also have
been implicated in numerous
mass marine mammal deaths
in Florida. However, the me-
chanisms of intoxication
leading to the animals' deaths
have remained uncertain.
"We knew that brevetoxins
were involved in manatee
mortalities, but we did not
understand how these her-
bivorous mammals could be


exposed to lethal amounts of
toxins after the red tide had
dissipated," said Leanne
Flewelling of FWRI's Harmful
Algal Blooms group.
Concentrations
The authors reveal that
brevetoxins can accumulate
in high concentration on sea-
grass, the principal food
source for manatees, and can
remain thereafter the bloom
is gone. This can be especially
dangerous when the red tides
form in early spring and the
migrating manatees move to
coastal waters, eating sea-
grass that has been exposed
to the red tide toxins.
The involvement of breve-
toxins in dolphin mortalities
has been much debated, pri-
marily because toxins were
not always found in dead ani-
mals and because the source
of the poisoning was not un-
derstood.
"Because red tides typical-
ly result in massive fish kills,
people believed that breve-
toxins, could not accumulate
to concentrations dangerous
for marine mammals that
feed on whole live fish prey,"
said Jerome Naar, research
assistant professor at
UNCW/CMS and corre-
sponding author in the publi-
cation.
Researchers explained that
planktivorous fish can in fact
feed on the red tide cells, but


brevetoxin seems to be fatal
to them only if the toxin pass-,:
es through their gills.
When there is only a low
level of toxin dissolved in the
seawater, these fish can be-
come contaminated, particu-:
larly in the internal organs,
and can cause fatalities inh
other species, such as dolphin
or seabirds which rely on
whole fish as a food source.
The 2004 spring mortality
of 107 dolphins in the Florida
Panhandle was the first evi-
dence that brevetoxin-conta-
minated fish are a threat to
dolphins.
Barros, of Mote, has been
studying the food webs of
toothed whales. for the past;
two decades. He participated
in the necropsies of many of
these dolphins and noted
some telltale signs pointing to
brevetoxin accumulation in
the fish as a possible cause of.
death.
The dolphins that died had
been feeding in large part on
menhaden, a type of fish that
eats plankton.
"This prey composition is
substantially different from
what we usually find in Other,
areas," Barros said.
Despite. documented an-,
nual red tides in the Gulf of
Mexico since the late 1800s,
there are no reports of human,
poisonings from fish con-
sumption in red-tide impact-
ed areas.


Jeffrey P. Fraser, D.O.
Board certified
in Family Practice


Neetha Sallapudi, M.D.
Board certified
in Family Practice


Beth Rhamy, P.A.
Physicians Assistant


OfieHus
'onayFrda
U:0.m.-5pm


Beth Rhamy, P.A., Jeffrey Fraser, D.O., and' Neefha Sallapudl, M.D.

Family Practice Physicians
Dr. Jeffrey P. Fraser
and
Dr. Neetha G. Sallapudi

Physicians Assistant
Beth Rhamy, P.A.


1295 Jacaranda Boulevard, Venice.
Facing the CenterRoad entrance to the HeathPark
Call (941) 486-6060 for appointment
VENICE HEALTHPARK FAMILY MEDICAL AND WALK-IN CENTER


WILLS e*TRUSTS ESTATE PLANNING ELDER LAW
PROBATE ADMINISTRATION GUARDIANSHIPS
MICHAEL A.., CHIANTELLA
ATTORNEY AND-eOUNSELOR AT LAW
209 NASSAU STREET SOUTH L '
SUITE 101 TELEPHONE: 488.-179
EMAIL: MICHAEL@CHIANTELLA.COM ON THE WEB: WWW.CHIANTELLA.COM


MICHAEL J. WOLPMANN, MD, FACOG, FACS
BOARD CERTIFIED ~ FELLOW, AMERICAN COLI.EGE OF SURGEONS
ANNUAL EXAMS ~ BLADDER CONTROL PROBLEMS ~ MENOPAUSE
ADVANCED LAPAROSCOPY ~ LASER SURGERY ~ PELVIC PAIN'
PELVIC PROLAPSE ~ MENSTRUAL DISORDERS.- SECOND OPINIONS

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME 485-5700 VENICE & ENGLEWOOD
WWW.BAYSIDEGYN.COM OFFICES


Now ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


OF ALL AGES


__.._....__ ~ __






SUNDAY, JUNE 12,2005


1 6A VENICEF GONDOnI FR SUN


..to expect the best.


Our commitment to excellence
.oo ~is more than a claim or a promise.
2004 Its reality is brought to life every

Bestof day in the dozens ofways we touch
Venice
people's lives, at HarborChase
Assisted Living.

(941) 484-8801




64ARBORCHASE
of Venice
ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY
SKILLED NURSING CARE k
S* M VA Assistance Welcomed
43.-' ,..t ,. "yt+ .7 0, r ,:r .-P .';" .,,--:, ". : ,,+ _., .--. ; ,: .. :".'",,- .L ,- -"-" .


Kilin You''~rself9,
Hpois Wors


I Stop Smoking Reduce Weight
Control: Stress Anxiety
Fears Phobias Insomnia
Call Venice 492-4114


ILL


. AUERS C.H.


f Venice Area Professional
^ ', Networking Meeting
Is Moving Its
Meeting Timesl ,


When: 6/16/05 8:30 AM
Third Thursday of Every Month

Where: Pinebrook Rehab and Nursing Center
1240 Pinebrook Rd., Venice, FL 34285
941-488-6733

Guest Speaker To Be Announced

Continental Breakfast Included


AREAINTEREST RATES___

BanksPhone Money 6-month CD 1-year CD 5-year CD
Rate /Yield- Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep. Rate / Yield Min. Dep.

Acacia FS.B. (941) 473-0656 -/- 3:25 / 3.30 $500 3.73 / 3.80 $500 4.36 / 4.45 $500

First Community Bank (941) 627-8550 1.49 / 1.50 $2.5K 3.44 / 3.50 N/Q 3.68 / 3.75 N/Q 4.64 / 4.75 N/Q

MetLife Bank (941) 366-0687 x111 2.96 / 3.00- $5K 1.14 / 1.15- $1K .3.83 / 3.90- $1K 4.40 / 4.50 $1 K

Peninsula Bank (941) 474-7734 2.25 / 2.27 $50K 3.00 / 3.04- $1K 3.50 / 3.56- $1K 4.75 / 4.85 $1 K

State Farm Bank (941) 492-2400 1.49 / 1.50- $1K 3.00 / 3.05- $500 3.20 / 3.25- $500 4.26 / 4.35 $500

Tarpon Coast National Bank (941) 629-8111 1.06/1.07 $25K 2.34 / 2.37- $1 OK 2.83 / 2.87 $1 OK -/-

Brokers

Edward Jones (941) 637-6787 2.21 / N/Q- N/Q 3.30 / 3.30 $5K 3.70 / 3.70 $5K .4.35 / 4.35 $5K



Edward Jones, Port Charlotte (941) 624-2411 -/- i3.30 / 3.30 $5K 3.70 / 3.70 $5K 4.35 / 4.35- $5K



Edward Jones, Venice (941) 485-6556 -/- -/- /



Raymond James & Assoc. (941).627-4774 2.31 /2.38- $1K 2.91 / 2.95 $5K 3.35 / 3.35 $5K 4.'26 / 4.35 $5K



Smith Barney Venice (941) 488-3994 -/- 3.30 / 3.33- $1K 3.70 / 3.70 -$1K 4.25 / 4.25 $1K

'This service is provided by The National Financial News Services. Figures are current as of June 9, 2005 and are subject to
change without notice. Call (610) 344-7380 ext. 111 if you are interested in participating in this survey. N/A service is not avail-
able. No Quote figures were not quoted this week. ,


AREAIMOP' e &e

Financial 15-yr.fixed 30-yr. fixed Adjustable Financial 15-yr., fixed 30-yr., fixed Adjustable
Institution Rate/ LP Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Institution Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP
Points Points Points Points Points Points

A 2 Z Home Loans 4.875 5.125 4.000 30 Florida Mortgage Corp. 4.875 30 5.250 3 4.375 30
941-629-3450 0 0 0 FHA/VA 888-825-6300 0 0 0
Absolute Mortgage Co. 4.875 30 5.125 30 3.500 30 Golden Rule Mortgage 4.500 30 4.875 30 2.375 30
888-90-HOMES 0 0 0 FHA/VA 800-991-9922 1.5 1.38 1
Accountable Mortgage 4.875 30 5.250 30 4.000 30 Guardian Mortgage 4.875 30 5.375 30 No 30
FHANVA 800-840-8771 0 0 0 800-967-3060 0 0 Quote
All Fund Mortgage No No 30 No 30 H.D. Financial 5.125 30 5,625 30 No 30
866-535-8987 Quote Quote Quote 888-368-0655 0 0 Quote
American Federal Mortg. 4.625 4.875 30 3.250 30 Home Finance of America 4.875 30 5.250 30 3.000
FHANVA 888-321-4687 1.38 1.38 0 941-929-9112 0 0 0
American Home Finance 4.875 3 5.125 3.375 30 Homestead Mortgage 4.875 30 5.250 30 4.000 30
888-429-1940 0 0 0 888-760-6006 0 0 0
America's Best Mortgage 4.875 30 5.250 30 No 30 Indemae Home Loan 4.750 30 5.125 30 4.375 30
FHAVA 800-713-8189 0 0 Quote 877-839-9829 1.25 1 .83
Amicus Mortgage Group 5.125 30 5.375 30 No 30 Lighthouse Mortgage 4.875 30 5.250 No 30
,VA 877-385-4238 0 0 Quote FHNVA 800-784-1331 0 0 Quote
Amtrust Funding 4.875 5.250 30 3.000 3 Sovereign Mortgage 4.875 30 5.125 450 30
FHANVA 800-774-0779 0 0 0 FHAVA 800-996-7283 0 0 0
Borrower's Advantage 4.875 30 5.250 No 3 Stepping Stone Lending 4.875 30 5.375 30 No 30
VA 888-510-4151 0 0 Quote FHANVA 800-638-2659 0 0 Quote
Eagle Mortgage No 30 No 30 No 30 Summit Mortgage No No No 30
FHANVA 941-496-9800, Quote Quote Quote 800-377-0623 Quote Quote Quote
First Rile Monrgap Group 5 00i 550 31 : J Tjrp.:.riC:l IJ.- : l r,)i ri., I tr I l:,
800-887-9106 .0 0 Quote 941-629-2884 Quote Quote Quote
H'A 0.p I :.,VlJIb y Ti,n ir' ,l 3Ir' L ,n i11:0j 1 N ew it lu l ,, ile 311 t J .l fi ,9'1,ji ul-l L..i h Ip ..l 'II1.'r, ). 'o J l: l ly. I ,"'1. la l ,1lI I I ...1 ,,,', ,pIe:,I'a ll, Ji ,1-o, r.r.,:,h I ,
S.: :cl dlll uli, Jiiii I.iu l :Hil : i 'rc rlJi ,1: i.r dm'aiu, lr ii I i h, r'l ,iQ l i, t l j l. h .1il l l I I N/A '[.1,! i ,I', ,,'l. LIP I ,,t, I' ih = l ,-,i. |_'.,, 1 i .,i ,],Jr l .lir [,,,
,'i- ','!i,(ir,:,, uii ,',':i" (.'.,.l*.llllr ; ^lr~w lh *u Ylll@' )..lll :l. l .,ilhl0l ,j~ll~l lI |'ll|l ."Ju( l Y;' I:' ,,I f r lun ,i~i l ,r',i i..1,'m .. ,i.hi. nmiw S3rj-:lll.) unijJjt'R3IM .OT r i,


'W. GRADY HUIE'
Attorney At Law

Living usts Joint .....$600
Single ...$500
Simple Will ..............$75
Probate & No Consultation
Incapacity Fee
143 East Miami Ave. Venice, FL 34285
488-8551.
Hiring an attorney is an important decision that should not be based upon advertisements alone. Before
you decide ask for our free information package including attorney qualification experience & fees. .


I. PHROCLAMATIUN
Presented to Lisa Bricker, Vice President of Development, Mote
Marine Laboratory, week of June 13. 2005. in honor of their 50th
Anniversary, Mote Marine Laboratory Week
II. BOARD REAPPOINTMENTS
Municipal Code Enforcement Board. Al Feinsod. Jr. Parks and
Recreation Advisor Board, Verna Silk
Ill. PRESENTATIONS
Charlie Powell and Dan Kelly, Venice High School, Marine Science
Department, Red Tide Year End Report
Melody Trimble. CEO, Dave Williamson. CFO. Michael Curran,
COO, Jonie Jeanette. CNO, Venice Regional Medical Center
Tom Slaugher, Director of Planning and Zoning, Evaluation
Appraisal Report. Critical Issues
IV. PUBLIC HEARINGS
Rezoning East Gate Park, a dedicated Park West of Block 12,
East Gate Subdivision, from RSF-2 (Residential. Single-Family)
to GU (Government Use) Petition No. 04-7RZ)
V. UNFINISHED BUSINESS
ORDINANCES FINAL READING AND PUBLIC HEARING
Ordinance No. 2005-07, Amending Chapter 86, Land Development
Code to Add a New Section on Conditional Use for Height
Ordinance No. 2005-24, Amending Chapter 86, Land Development
Code to Add a New Section on the Neighborhood Height Overlay District
Ordinance No. 2005-26, Rezone 04-11 RZ. Target Area No. 1, Blocks
1 and 29, Gulf View Section of Venice, RMF-4 and RTR to RMF-4/
NHO and RTR/NHO, South of Barcelona Avenue North of Granada
Avenues East of Esplanade West of Armada Road
VI. NEW BUSINESS
ORDINANCES FIRST READING
Ordinance No. 2005-30, Amending Chapter, 22 Elections, Add
Section on Political Signs and Revise Qualifying Dates for
Candidates
Ordinance No. 2005-31, Amending Chapter 34, Environment, Noise
Control, Reducing the Probited Hours of Operation for Domestic
Power Tools
RESOLUTIONS
Resolution No. 2005-11, Authorizing the Mayor to. Execute Local
Agency Program Agreement for Venetian Waterway Park, Segment
7a-1
COUNCIL ACTION
Annexing 10+- acres, Metes and Bounds, Shirley I. Houghton; 5+-
acres, Lot 11, Woodland Acres, 280 Curry Lane, North Venice,
Florida, William L. & Barbara.Ann Queen; 5+- acres, Lot 9, Woodland
Atmee, 2000 Curry Lane, North Venice, Florida, Tim & Patsy I. Sears;
20-1. acres, Lots 6, 7, 8 and 10, Woodland Acres, 2901, 2905, 2906
and 290)9 Curry Lane, North Venice, Florida, Royal Capri
Development, LLC. (Petition No. 04-4AN)
Final Plat .for Venetian Golf & River Club, Phase 3E, WCI
Communities
Final Plat for Venetian Golf & River Club, Phase 4A, WCI
Communities
Two Interlocal Agreements between the City of Venice and Sarasota
County Relating to Fuel Tax Allocation and Distribution
VII. ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS

Finance Director
1..Extend Auditor's Contract Three Years
2. Revenue Status
City Manager
1.Venice Area Beautification to hold a FundraiserDinner and Silent
Auction at North Brohard Park, November 5,2005
2. Venice Area Beautification to hold a Fundraiser Holiday Boat
Parade Party at the old Chamber of Commerce Building, December
3,2005
VIII. COUNCIL REPORTS
Vickie Taylor Report: Discuss Direction for Youth Advisory Board
UPCOMING MEETINGS
Committee on Senior Living: June 15 at 9;30 a.m.
Venice Historical Commission: June 16 at 9:00 a.m.
Planning Commission: June 21 at 1:30 p.m.
Architectural Review: June 23 at 9:00 a.m.
Planning Commission: July 5 at 1:30 p.m.

Municipal Code Enforcement: July .... at 9:00 a.m. -


A.G. E DWARD S.
FULLY INVESTED IN OUR CLIENTS.
A.G. EDWARDS
FEATURED BOND
Citigroup Inc.4.125%


4.103%*
Priced at 100.526
Final maturity = 02/22/2010 YTM 4.00%
Moody's Rating Aal
Standard & Poor's Rating AA-
CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION
Yield to maturity) quotes as of 06 06/05.Yield and market value
n I flructuate f thie bonds are sold before maturity: Subject to
price change and availability. Commissions and fees are included.
t Corporate' bonds are usually subject to state, local and federal taxes.
Any bond called prior to maturity results in.reinvestment risk for the'
owner of the bond. Bonds may be subject to extraordinary call.
Call John Holic or Kathryn Anderson
4242 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL
G 941-408-8797 .
0 Memer"SIPC-2004AG.Edwards&Sons,Inc.


UJIM__ik___w~


.... .... ....-u = .....


I Wirt vLIIL






SUNDAY,
JUNE 12,2005

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondoller.com

RECIPES AND MORE 2B


Venice Gondolier Sun







KEY WEST COMES ALIVE IN THE SUMMER 88


SECTION


ST. FRANCIS ANIMAL. RESCUEE OF VE.-M-CE143


FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST


Two-faced

ladies in

Venice'

Some people keep journals
these days but artist Janet
Mishner found a way to docu- '
ment her life and friends in a
unique way. The artist created
a series of computer generat-
ed depictions of "Faces Cele- 1
bratingWomen."
The fantastic work is on
display and for sale at the
Women's Resource Center.
Janet Torina, Leslie Yard
Nancy Hintilian and Cecelia
Alexander helped made the
reception for the opening of
the show special.
What do Jingles the Clown,
Princess Patty, Barb the
Builder, Dixie Diva Girl and
Cowgirl Kylie have in com-
mon? Actually they are all the
same person. Sherry Jenlkins
created these whimsical char-
acters after graduating from This is the famed tortoise that lives under the parking log at OscarScherer.
Clown College.
She takes them on the road
and clowns around at birth-
day parties, fund-raisers,
openings and corporate
events. This designing wom-
an learned magic tricks, face .
painting and balloon sculpt-
ing to help her at her gigs.
Sherry is available at 493
1437.


SUIJ PHOTOS B'I JEREMY ROTTGEN


er


Family Law Connection
When The Venice Founda-
tion first came to Venice, De-
nise Roberts was the grants
director. Many of us who vol-
unteered for the organization
remember her great sense of
humor in addition to her or-
ganization.
Denise is now the director
for The Family Law Con-'
nection in Sarasota. She re-
cently organized an Annual
Advocacy Luncheon at Mi-
chael'sOn East.
Keynote speaker Jack Le-
vine challenged the audience
to help improve the quality of
life for all families in the com-
munity. .
On hand at the luncheon
were Wendy Demng and
Kirsten Fullarson from the
Gulf Coast Foundation ofVen-
ice. Also on hand were Esther
,Olds, Hal Hedley from the
Child Protection Agency and
Caroline Zucker.
Three cheers for girls
Jan and Jeff Cornell are
now thinking pink. They re-
cently welcomed a new
granddaughter, Sara Peyton
Cornell. The new princess,
her brothers Tanner and Ma-
son and mom and dad
Heather and Todd live in
Brewster, Mass. This means
Jan andJeff will be chalking
up frequent flyer miles visit-
ing Sara and the rest of the
clan. Congratulations.
Community galas
While the date has not
been set, Bill Millner an-
nounced recently that his
Venice Concert Band will be
performing at a Gala Grand
Opening .Concert at the Ven-
ice Community Center in the
fall.
Venice Youth Librarian
Mother Goose, also known as
Jo Lize and her committee are
planning a special birthday
celebration for the Venice
Library that turns 40 in Oc-
tober. Wouldn't it be fun to:
have a huge city reading cele-
bration?
****** *
Remember Tuesday is Flag
Day.


BYJEREMY ROTTGEN
STAFFWRITER.


The gopher tortoise de-
serves more. protection in.
Florida.
Think of a gopher tortoise
as a nice landlord that doesn't
charge rent.
The gopher tortoise cre-
ates homes for a variety of
species, including mice,
snakes and insects. It's con-"
sidered a key part ofSarasota's
wildlife because more than
'300 species of animals live in
or use its burrows.
All tortoises are turtles, but
not all turtles are tortoises.
To avoid any further confu-
sion, Becky Smith, a gopher
tortoise expert and contractor
for Environmental Studies at
the Kennedy Space Center in
Titusville, Fla., said "the word
'tortoise' is not really a scien-
tific designation, but a lay
term. It refers to a turtle that
spends its life on the land as
opposed to in the water, but
nobody ever says "box tor-
toise."
The biggest indication of a,
tortoise's presence is holes.
That is the gopher charac-


.teristic of these turtles. They
burrow in the ground be-
cause it provides a safe place
where nobody can bother
them unless there are hu-
man plans to build over them
-- or eat them. The tortoises
digs burrows up to 40 feet
long and 10 feet deep provid-
ing year-round shelter from
predators and inclement
weather.
According to Florida law,
the tortoise is vulnerable to
exploitation and changes to
its envirorunent. "Take" per-
mits have made it possible to
"buy" the tortoises and build
right over: top of them, in
most cases trapping and suf-
focating them underground.
The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commis-
sion established the inciden-
tal take permit process in July
1991 as an alternative method
of addressing potential im-
pacts to the gopher tortoise.
The formula created by the
FWC for figuring the permit
process requires that the
acreage of gopher tortoise
habitat mitigation is positive-
ly related to both the total
acreage of occupied tortoise


This tortoise was found grazing near the boat ramp on
Manasota Key.


habitat affected, and the tor-
toise density within occupied
habitat areas. A site support- .
ing five tortoises would have a
density of 0.2 tortoises per
acre, which is five tortoises
per acre, would be required to
move 7.5 percent of the
impacted habitat area, which
is roughly 1/3 of the five tor-
toises. At a density of 0.8 per
acre 15 percent will have to be
relocated.
It's unlawful to keep go-
pher tortoises as pets.
It's also unlawful to build
within 50 feet of a gopher tor-
toise burrow unless the devel-
oper has a special permit. The
more popular choice is relo-,
cation, but it can be difficult
and expensive depending on
the circumstances.


Not easy ._. .__..."" .%",_-'" ..
Enforcing the law is diffi
cult according to environ- i Markers like this one are placed near burrows at Manasota
mentalcaordingtiesbe Beach to prevent cars and trucks from crushing them. It
mental authorities because doesn't always work
the tortoises are not tracked. doesn't always work.
That's why it's important for
citizens to report any burrows
in danger of being disturbed
because of nearby construc-
non sites.
Gopher tortoises do not
grow to jumbo sizes like some
of their sea turtle relatives.'
Reaching about 15 inches
when mature, they do require
a favorable piece of land.
They're territorial creatures,
so simply relocating a tortoise
is an unstable alternative.
Gopher tortoises are not
relocated to Oscar Scherer
State Park in Osprey because
environmental specialists say
that park is already at capaci-
ty for the species. A new tor-
toise would be pushed out by
others and possibly end up
crossing a road like U.S. 41 to
find a suitable habitat. That is
*a certain and quick death for
any turtle.
Park workers at Manasota
Beach have placed yellow
markers near the burrows in
the parking lot to keep trucks
from parking on top of them.
As you can see from the pic-
tures it doesn't seem to be Gopher tortoises always make sure to get their greens. In
Please see GOPHER, 13B grassy areas you can find them yanking up blades of grass.


It


7 4
ell







COFFEE BREAK


2B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2005


rimurn
wL -
- 0 c


112W



0
I..
0~
U)





C.,




.0




lu-


Awu


Legionnaire of the Month
SSUN STAFF PHOTO


~.


Carl R. "Bud" Gustin has
been finance officer of the
American Legion Post 159 for
the past year. Bud joined
the Army Air Corps in 1946,
retiring in 1973 as a Chief
Master Sgt. from the U.S. Air
Force, serving in the areas
of Finance and Club
Management. He then
worked for 17 years with
Air Force Nonappropriated
Funds (NAF) in Club
Management and retired
as Chief of Banking and
Accounting for Air Force-wide
NAF in 1990. Bud and his
wife, Norma, live in-Venice.


rElr [ PACI


America's Murphy Bed Store"
www.morespaceplace.com
*Wall Bed Experts
Custom Closets
Home Offices
Computer Armoir
Entertainment Ctrs.
Computer Design Ctr. Turn one room into two or three
203978 7418 S.Tamiami Trail, Sarasota (941) 927-0807
1182TamiamiTr., Port Charlotte (941) 613-2797 .


Venice Regional Medical

Center seeks volunteers


Healthcare Volunteers of
Venice seeks men and wom-
en who are looking for a
meaningful experience.
Volunteers are needed at
the hospital to escort/trans-
port patients, serve 'as cash-
iers at the Coffee Cafd, gift


shop and thrift store or assist
the nursing staff.
If you have time to share
and would like to give four or
more hours per week, call
483-7050. Monday dirough
Friday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for an
application and interview.


Volunteer drivers needed


The Charlotte County
Veterans Van Program is in
urgent need of drivers Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday to
transport local veterans to
Fort Myers VA Medical Clinic
and Bay Pines Medical Center
in St. Petersburg.
,.' ,,0,, ,


This program will be dis-
continued without enough
volunteer drives to fill the two
runs three times a Week. Men
and women, nonveterans
welcome.
Call Driver Dispatcher
Jason at (941) 575-3670.


*AK


Venice mews


Vy is a tiny ball of fluff with tabby markings and inquisitive blue eyes. Can you give her a home? St. Francis Animal Rescue
is a nonprofit, no-kill facility, located at 1925 South Tamiami Trail, Venice. Adoption hours are Monday through Thursday,
1-5 p.m., and Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Call 492-6200.


VOTED AREA'S BEST BEACHWEAR


30 to 40% OFF

SWIMWEAR
EXCLUDES PREVIEW "2006"


Mon. -Sat. 9:30-5:30


141 West Venice Ave. Downtown Venice 485-7946


.10


rm7ore


lace-


Ts








CONTACT US
DEBBIE SHULMAN
VENUE EDITOR
(941)207-1106
dshulman@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




VENICE VENUETHE LOCAL
v JNI( V NU SCRENE


3B
SUNDAY
JUNE 12, 2005


SUNDAY
JUNE 12
Hibiscus meeting
The Gulf Coast Chapter of the
American Hibiscus Society
meets at 2 p.m. in the Venice,
Public Library meeting room,
300 S. Nokomis Ave. The pro-
gram features hybridizing:
pollen, seeds and plants.
Everyone is welcome; refresh-
ments served.
Bike ride
Ride leader Charlie Pierce of
The Coastal Cruisers Bicycle
Club leads a ride from Lemon
Bay Park in Englewood
through Englewood, down
Manasota Key, up to Sham-
rock Park, and back to Lemon
Bay Park for a moderate ride
of 30 miles. The entrance
to the park is off Old Engle-
wood Road, about a mile east
of downtown Englewood.
Helmets required. Leave at
8:30 a.m. Call 497-4187.
Author appearance
Tori Carrington, aka Lori and
Tony Karayianni, visit Circle
Books, 478 John Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota, at 1 p.m. to
meet the public and sign
copies of their latest novel, a
mystery, "Sophie Metropolis."
Call 388-2850.
Legion entertainment
The Larry Williams Band per-
forms 4-8 p.m. at the
American Legion No-Vel Post
159, 145 E. Venice Ave. Call
488-1157.

MONDAY,
JUNE 13B


Open house
The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
hosts an open house and
reception Friday, June 17, 4-7.
p.m. at 628 Cypress Ave.,
Vettice. Meet Christopher D.
Wagner, new executive direc-
tor, and help celebrate the
new office. RSVP by (941) 758-
2539 voice or TrY by June 13,
or e-mail sharris@ccdhh.org.

Senior Friendship Center in
Venice, 2350 Scenic Drive,
584-0075
* Camera Club, Mondays, 10
a.m. Free, donations encour-
aged.
* Dancercise, Mondays, 11
a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Neighborhoods meeting
Venice Neighborhoods Coa-
lition meets at 3 p.m. at Ven-
ice Public Library, 300 S.
Nokonis Ave. Open to resi-
dents of Venice and South
Venice. Call 484-8520 or visit
veniceneighborhoods.org.
Seniors group,
Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-
3:30 p.m. for a meeting and
cards. Call Marie at 485-8739.
Auto Club
The Venice Chapter of the
Antique Automobile Club of
America meets the second
Monday of the month at 7
p.m. in the rear meeting room
at Venice Public Library, 390 S.
Nokormis Ave. All who are
interested in antique, classic
or custont ears are welcome
- you need nrrobwn a car to
join. Call Gary at 493-3780.
Shuffleboard
Venice Shuffleboard Club
meets at 9 a.m. every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Les-
sons available. Call Barbara
at 4857-1.678.

TUESDAY,

JUNE 14'
Showtime
Jacaranda Public Library
shows "Meet the Parents" at
2. p.m. at 4143 Woodmere
Park Blvd. in Venice. Free
movie and popcorn.
Medicare basics
The Women's Resource Cen-
ter of Sarasota County hosts
The Basics of Medicare Now,


10-11:30 a.m. at 806
Pinebrook Road inVenice. Led
by Seniors Specialist Laura
Kitay. Fee: $5. Call 485-9724.
Association meeting
The Nokomis East Association
holds its next general meeting
at 6:30 p.m. at the Nokomis
Community Center, 234 Nip-
pino Trail. Guest speaker is
George Tatge from Sarasota
County Parks and Recreation.
Coffee and desserts served.
Call Richard Bess, president,
at 484-5925.
Elks dinner
The Venice Nokomis Elks
Lodge holds a three-piece
fried chicken dinner, 5-7 p.m.
at 119 E. Venice Ave. Cost is $6.
Call 486-1854.
Shakespeare
The Shakespeare reading and
discussion group meets at
SelbyPublic Library, 1331 First
St., Sarasota, Tuesdays, 2-3:3.0
p.m. All are welcome. For
information, call 721-8390 or
924-3710.

Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0052
* 10 a.m.-noon, Tuesdays,
Beginners Basket Weaving
with Barbara and Chris.
* 10 a.m., Tuesdays, Pine
Needle Weaving.
Dance events
* Summer square dance plus-
level workshops will be held
3-5 p.m. Tuesday, June 7-
Sept. 27 at the Country Club
Estates Cluhibhouse, 700 North
Waterway on Venice island.
Cost is $5 per person at the,
door. Call Gayle at 484-0066.
* Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays
Center, 303 South Tamiami,
Trail in Nokomis, offers'
Argentine Tango Basics for
Beginners, 8-9:30 p.m. $10.
Call 486-0326.
Good sports
Certified Pilates ,,'istrtctlo,
Randi Green teaches an ongo-;
ing six-week session with
exercise ball for beginners
Tuesday, 4-5:15 p.m. at
Serenity Gardens in the
Brickyard Plaza in Venice.
Cost is $75 for six weeks or $15
for walk-ins. Call 497-2239.
Tuesday bingo
Venice Gardens Civic Center,
406 Shamrock Blvd., doors,
open at 11 a.m., bingo starts at
noon. Hot dogs and snacks
available. Public welcome.
Call 493-6541.

WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 15


Serenity Gardens, 530 South
U.S. 41 Bypass, Brickyard
Plaza, Venice, 486-3577, seren-
ityofveni6e@aol.com
* 6-7 p.m., Guided Meditation
with Veronica. Registration
required; donations request-
ed.
* 7:30-8:30 p.m., Introduction
to Emotional Freedom Tech-
nique, with Sophia Cayer.
Accupuncture without nee-
dles. Registration required;'.
donations requested.
Kayak trip
Take a full moon, quiet-water
kayak trip on Little Sarasota
Bay, 7-9:30 p.m. See birds, fish,
the Neville Preserve and other
islands in the bay, led by natu-
ralist John Sarkozy of the
American Littoral Society.
Equipment and training pro-
vided. Cost: $20 for ALS mem-
bers, $25 for nonmembers.
RSVP to 966-7308.
Marines meet,
The First' Marines Division
Association, Southwest Flor-
ida Chapter, meets for a noon
lunch at the Family Table
Restaurant, 14132 South
Tamiami Trail in North Port.
All Marines and spouses
welcome. Call Fred .at (941)
,255-1828.
Volunteer coffee


BEST BETS


THE LOCAL SCENE


JUNE 12- JUNE 14


PHOTO COURTESY OF VENICE OPERA GUILD


Summer salon
The Venice Opera Guild's first summer salon, Strollin' Down
Memory Lane, begins June 12 at 3 p.m. and features Bruno
Mollica singing selections from Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and
others. The salon will take place at 606 Bird Bay Drive in
Venice. Tickets are $15 at the door, at the Paper Pad down-
town, or by calling 497-1952.

Other area music events
- The Sarasota Music Archive presents an afternoon of chamber
music performed by young artists from the Sarasota Music
Festival, Sunday, June 12 at 2:30 p.m. at the Jack J. Geldbart
Auditorium of Selby Library, 1331 First St., Sarasota. Admission
is free. Archive members may call 861-1168 for reserved seat-
ing. For more information, e-mail smarchive@yahoo.com.
- The Venice Gondoliers Men's Barbershop Chorus rehearses
Monday at 6:30 p.m. at Venice-Nokomis United Methodist
Church, 208 Palm Ave., Nokomis. All men who like to sing are
welcome. Call 484-6333 or 484-3966.
* The Venetian Harmony Chorus rehearses Mondays at 7 p.m.
at United Church of Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd., Venice. All
area women are welcome. Call 907-9545.
Eat out
d The cafeteria at Venice Regional Medical Center,540 The
Rialto, Venice, offers specially priced eveningmeals to those
55 years and older. Meals are offered in the hospital cafeteria,
5-6 p.m., daily, and include a selected entree, starch, vegetable,
fountain drink and a dessert all for $4.60. Parking is avail-
able in the hospital garage, or you may valet park. Weekly
menus are posted outside the cafeteria. After purchasing
10 meals, get the 11th free. No reservations needed just
come on in.


Golf & Country Club, '500
Rockley Road in Venice. A
brief overview of volunteer
services will be presented and
volunteers will be available to
answer questions about the
services they perform for
Venice Regional Medical Cen-
ter. Volunteers are needed for
the thrift store, gift shop and
coffee kiosk. RSVP to 483-
7050.
Lunch bunch
The Sarasota-Manatee Chi
Omega Alumnae Association
holds, its monthly Lunch
Bunch at 11:30 a.m. at the
Hillview Grill, 1920 Hillview
St., Sarasota. The group meets
the third Wednesday of every,
month. RSVP to Virginia at
371-5106.
It's a zoo out there!
The Manatee-Sarasota Chap-
ter of the Sierra Club sponsors
a Zoo Nite at Tampa's Lowry
Park Zoo July 22 and 23. Bring
your, sleeping bags and pillows
and find out what the zoo is
like when the sun goes down.
The adventure includes crafts,
hikes, behind-the-scenes with
zookeepers, animal encoun-
ters, snacks and more. Cost is
$40 for children and adults.
Full-day admission to the zoo
is $7. Deposits and reserva-
tions due by June 15 to Gayle
at 923-5903..
Magic fun for kids
Elsie Quirk Library hosts "The
Magical Genie of Abackar," at
11 a.m. at 100 W Dearborn
St., Englewood. This free pro-
gram for ages 5 and older fea-
tures a magic show with
Christopher Oz. Individual
registration not required;
groups must register by calling
861-1212.


Venice Regional Medical Cen-
ter invites you to a continental Democrat meeting
breakfast at 9 a.m. in the Winning Democratic Cam-
Manor Dining Room at the paigns is the topic at the
Club House at Plantation Democratic Club of Sarasota's


discussion, 1:30-3:30 p.m. a
the Fruitville Library Nleetin;
room, 100 Coburn Road. Th
public is welcome to this frei
event.
Dancing
* Lola Miller leads line danci
lessons on Wednesdays a
Venice United Church o
Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd
Beginners lessons, 5:30-6:31
p.m.; intermediate, 6:30-8:31
p.m. Cost: $4. Call eMillr a
493-9665.
* The Senior Friendship Cen
ter at Epiphany Parish Hal
305 W. Tampa Ave. in Venice
holds free ballroom dancing
Wednesday at 10 a.m. N(
partner required. Donation
accepted. Call Kathie Mc
Murrian at 584-0052.
* Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bay
Center, 303 South Tamiam
Trail in Nokomis, holds ball
room dancing every Wednes
day and Friday. Group lessor
7-8 p.m.; open dancing unt
10 p.m. $7, snacks includes
Call 486-0326.
Paralegal dinner
Southwest Florida Paralega
Association Inc. holds it
monthly. dinner meeting 6
8:30 p.m. at the Sarasot.
Yacht Club, 1100 John Ringlin:
Blvd. Psychologist Christo
pher M. Cortman discuss
Things Someone Should Hay
Taught You By Now. Visi
swfloridaparalegals.com 6o
call Vicky at 364-2489.

Senior Friendship Centers
Epiphany Parish Hall, 305 V
Tampa Ave., Venice
* Quilting with Liz, 9:30 a.ir
Call 493-3065.
* Beginners Spanish, 1-3 p.r.
Call 584-0052.

Senior Friendship Centers
2350 Scenic Drive, 'Venice
584-0052
* Yoga In/Around a Chait
Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m.


* Wednesday Walkers, 9 a.m.
* Italian, Wednesdays, 2:45
p.m.
* Attorney consultations
Wednesday 9:30-11:30 a.m
with Elizabeth Weis, attomey
emeritus with Legal Aid o:
Manasota. Reserve.your time
slot by calling 584-0075.
Wednesday bingo
6 p.m. at the American Legior
No-Vel Post 159, 145 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.

THURSDAY,
JUNE 16


Card party
The Venice-Nokomis Drove
No. 141 BPO Does hosts a
Guys and Dolls Card Party
11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. at the
Venice Elks Club, 119 E. Venice
Ave. Snacks and desserts wil
be served and prizes awarded
Donation: $4. Call 488-5448.
Republican meeting
The Republican Party of Sara
sota County holds an execu
tive committee meeting 6:30
8:30 p.m. at Faith Baptis
Church, 6901 Bee Ridge.Road
Sarasota County Supervisor o
Elections Kathy Dent will bi
featured speaker.
Legion entertainment
Lee & Char perform and burg
ers and wings served 5-8 p.m
at the American Legion No-Ve
Post 159, 145 E. Venice Ave
.Call 488-1157.
Catch a flick
* Venice Public Library hosts
thriller-chillers, Thursdays at
6 p.m. in June. See "The
Verdict" on June 16 at 300'S
Nokomis Ave.
* Jacaranda Public Library
shows high-demand recent
movie releases, Thursdays a
2 p.m. in June. June 16 sei
"Meet the Fockers" at 4143
Wood mere. Park Blvd. i,
,Venice e:'"
Federal employees .


Venice Lanes, 1100 South U.S.
5 Bypass. No experience neces-
sary. Call Leon Thompson at
, 475-1369 or Yola Levenson at
. 493-5849.
f 'Eat and read'
e Families are invited for "Eat
and Read" night at 6 p.m. at
Jacaranda Public Library,
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd. in
i Venice. The event includes
e special storytime and a small
craft. Pizza and refreshments
served. RSVP to 861-1275.
Thursday bingo
11 a.m. Senior Friendship
- Center, 2350 Scenic Drive.
Call 493-3065.
Noon, The Jewish Com-
e munity Center of Venice, 600
a Auburn Road, nonsmoking.
' Hard cards available for sight-
e impaired players. Doors open
at 10 a.m. Lunch available.
U Call 493-7558.
5-6:30 p.m. Arby's, 430 U.S.
41 Bypass. Prizes are gift cer-
tificates.

Women's Resource Center of
Sarasota County, 806 Pine-
- brook Road, Venice, 485-9724
Beginners yoga Thursdays,
)f 1041:30 a.m. and 5:45-7 p.m.
Bring a mat. Men welcome.
Fee: $5.
Starting Over: A Support
Group, 3:30-5 p.m. Fee: $5.
-
. 1


it



3.
y~


The National Active and Re-
tired Federal Employees Asso-
ciation, Chapter 717, meets at
11 a.m. at the Venice Holiday
Inn, 455 North U.S. 41 Bypass.
Cost of the meal is $13. All fed-
eral retirees and employees
t and their guests are welcome.
Newly elected second vice-
g president Wally Roepke dis-
e cusses legislative issues and
e convention highlights. Call
492-6916.
Dancing
e Gotta Dance Studio, 4-Bays
t Center; 303 South Tamiami
Trail in Nokomis, holds begin-
I ners dance night every Thurs-
0 day, 7:30-9 p.m. Learn steps all
evening with four teachers
available to help. $5, snacks
included. Call 486-0326.
' Elks dinner
The Venice Nokomis Elks
g Lodge holds a spaghetti din-
ner, 5-7 p.m. at 119 E. Venice
s Ave, Cost is $6. Call 486-1854.

Senior Friendship Center, 2350
s. Scenic Drive, 584-0052
Quilting for Fun with Helen
- Magan, Thursdays. 9-11:30
a.m. Bring own materials.
1 Beginner Bridge, Thursdays,
9 a.m.
S Shell craft class, Thursdays,
1-3 p:m..in the Transportation
Building.
1 Music
The band G-Force performs
a 6-9 p.m. at the Ca d'Zan Ter-
race at The John and Mable
j


'An A Capella
Extravaganza'


The chorus of the Keys 2005
International Representatives
present a fabulous evening
of music and entertainment
Friday, June 17 at 7:30 p.m. at
The Venice Little Theater, 140
W. Tampa Ave. This special
event features Special Edition,
My Three Sons, Harmony
Bay, Sweet Adeline Quartet
"In the Mix,"- and special
guests, The Ditchfield Family
Singers. Proceeds benefit the
Sarasota Chorus of the Keys'
Travel fund to the 2005
International Competition in
Salt Lake City in July. Tickets
are $15; callVLT at 488-1115.
School Daze
Every Child Inc. presents
School Daze, 7 p.m. Friday
June 17 at Payne Park Aud-
itorium. Adults 21 and older
will feast on a Jamaica Me
Ribs buffet, enjoy root beer
floats, vote for prom king and
queen, dance and hang out.
Tickets are $75 for open bar
and food. Proceeds benefit
Every Child's efforts to pro-
vide children with'proper
school' materials. For more
information, call 955-5506.
Skate party
The Community'outh Devel-
opment Party and the Venice
YMCA present Skate Park
Party for teens in grades
6-12, Saturday, June 18, 7-10
p.m. at the Venice YMCA
Youth Center, 701 Center
Road. There will, be contests'
and live entertainment'
throughout the night. Re-
freshments served. Bring
photo ID. Call 492-9622, Ext.
133.
Juneteenth
The SaraMana. Black Repub-
lican Club will have a booth at
the Newtown Juneteenth,
Celebration Saturday, June 18,
3-11 p.m. at the Newtown
Community Center, 1845
34th St. in Sarasota. Volun-
teers needed. For more infor-
mation, call Vivian at, 313-
0098.


g ngitmg museum of Art, ,54Ui
Bay Shore Road in Sarasota.' Health careers camp '
$3 cover charge, cash bar and
food vendors. No reservations YMCA The Souand the Co Gulf Coasmily
requited Call 359-5700 s, a t cat
Teq Lemo Cl Ba y50 South Area Health Education
* The Le Center hold orientation Sat-
Company the Englewood' .. .......
Chmanyt (P-038) of the 'irday June 18, 9-10:30 a.m.
.Capter (-o. oy e for a special camp introduc-
Barbershop H arm ony Society, .. ..
m reet h u a at 6 p ing health careers available
meets Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. Sarasota County. Designed
at Christ Lutheran Church, in Sarasota County. Designed
;atfor high school sophomores,
701 N. Indiana Ave. Call 493 for high school sophomores,
6417 or visit harmonize.com juniors and seniors, the camp
bcc. runs June 20-July 2 and in-
cludes discussions on car-
Bowling diology, optometry, veteri-
Snary medicine, emergency
Florida Wheelers Bowling room physicians and more.
Association welcomes wheel- Students must apply. Call


chair- and standup bowlers,
Thursday at 3 p.m. at AMF


Please see VENUE, 12B


it



9
.e





-

:e


['
[

[


r
i





E
LS


IS






Venice Gondolier Sun



4B
SUNDAY
JUNE 12, 2005WLE


CONTACT US
JEREMY ROTTGEN
WELL-BEING EDITOR
(941) 207-1143
jrottgen@venicegondolier.com


Practice food safety


RENE LAPIRRE
STAFF WRITER

Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles Bronson is re-
minding people to keep safety
in mind to avoid turning a
party into a trip to the emer-
gency room.
Picnics are a summertime
favorite and is a good time
to remind consumers about
how to prevent food-borne ill-
nesses caused by improper
handling, preparation and
storage of food.
Each year, an estimated 76
million people suffer from a
food-borne illness and about
5,000 cases are fatal. Cases of
food-borne illness normally
increase during the summer.
However, there are ways to
ensure that the food you pre-
pare will be safe as well as
delicious.
"Picnics and barbecues are
extremely popular this time of
year but food safety measures
are particularly important,
especially as temperatures are
heating up," Bronson said.
"There are some easy tips to
follow to prevent a tragedy
from occurring."
Clean: Wash hands and
food contact surfaces often.
Unwashed hands and food
contact surfaces are a prime
cause of food-bome illness.
Separate: Don't cross-.
contaminate. Cross-contami--
nation during storage, prepa-
ration, grilling, and serving,
food are, a prime source of
food-borne illness organisms.
When packing the cooler
for an outing, wrap raw meat
and poultry securely to pre-
vent liquids from coming in
contact with other foods,
especially ready-to-eat foods.
Wash plates, utensils and
cutting boards that contact
the raw meat or poultry
before using agaih for cooked


ADVERTISEMENT
WORDS WORTH
HEARING


food. Carry a clean plate out
to the grill to hold the safely
cooked food.
It is best to use a different
cutting board for meats and
vegetables to avoid contami-
nation.
Cook: Cook to proper
temperatures. Food safety
experts agree that food is safe-
ly cooked when it reaches the
safe internal temperature
needed to kill harmful bacte-
ria that cause food-borne ill-
ness. ,
Take your thermometer
along. Meat and poultry
cooked on a grill often browns
very fast on the outside, so be
sure that they are cooked
thoroughly. Check them with
a food thermometer.
Cook hamburger and
other ground meats (veal,
'lamb, and pork) to an internal
temperature of 160 degrees
and ground poultry to 165
degrees. Beef, veal and lamb
steaks and roasts may be
cooked to 145 o Fahrenheit for
medium rare. Whole poultry
should be cooked to 180
degrees as measured in the
thigh; breast meat to 170
degrees. All cuts of pork
should reach 160 degrees,
Chill: Refrigerate
Promptly. Holding food at an
unsafe temperature is a prime
cause of food-borne illness.
Keep cold food cold!
"* Bacteria multiply rapidly.
between 41 and 135 degrees.
Never leave potentially haz-
ardous food in this "anger
zone" more than two hours. If
potentially hazardous food
reaches 90 degrees or above,
discard the food. if it has
Please see SAFETY, 12B


HEALTH BRIEFS


Cholesterol screening-
A cholesterol screenings will
be held June 13-15, 10 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. and 2:30-5 p.m. at
Kmart, 501 North Beneva
Road, Sarasota. A variety of
screenings available include
diabetes, liver function, H.
Pylori, Thyroid, PSA, hemo-
globin, Alc and blood type.
Most results available on site.
Grandparents
raising grandkids
The Grandparents raising
grandkids Support Group will
meet on Tuesday, June 14, at
9:30 a.m. in the Englewood
Community Hospital Cafe-
teria. Call 475-3615.
Flag Day
Suncoast Communities
Blood Bank accepts. dona-
tions on Flag Day, June 14 at
its location in Nokomis, 1097
North Tamiami Trail, 8 a.m.-3
p.m. Anyone interested in
making a blood donation
must be at least 17 years of
age, weigh at least 110 lbs.
and be in reasonably good
health. To find out more
about the Blood Bank,, visit
scbb.org or call 954-1600, Ext.
240 to make an appointment.
Walk-ins welcome.
Outreach screenings
Englewood Community Hos-
pital will sponsor a Cho-
lesterol and Hypertension
Screening on Wednesday,
June 15, 8:15-9:15 a.m. at the
office of Dr. Stephen Sollot,
4315 South Tamiami Trail,
Suite 420 in Venice. Cost of
the cholesterol screening is
$5, cash only. Requires fasting
from midnight before, water
only, while blood pressure.
checks are free and require no
fasting. Appointments are


required for cholesterol
screenings. Call 473-3919 to
reserve a space.
Alzheimers
Support Group
The Alzheimers Support
Group will meet June 15 at 2
p.m. at River Oaks; 925 River
Road South, Englewood. Call
474-8600.
Look Good... Feel Better
The American Cancer Society
will offer its Look Good... Feel
Better program to residents
in Venice, North Port ahd,
Englewood. guided by volun-
teer cosmetologists, female
cancer patients who partici-
pate in this class will learn
how to use make-up and
skincare techniques to over-
come the appearance-related
effects of chemotherapy and
radiation. The class runs from
10 a.m. to noon and will be
held at the American Cancer
Society Resource Center
(Tandem Center) at 333
South Tamiami Trail, Suite
375, Venice. To register or for
additional information call
(800) ACS-2345.
Seminar
Melinda Leeson, DOM, an
acupuncture physician spe-
cializing in family medicine,
is offering a'free seminar at
her clinic "Howv To Help Your
Body Heal Itself," in Sarasota
on Wednesday, June 15, from
7 to 8:30 p.m. Find out how
your body can truly heal it-
self gently arid safely using.
homeopathic medicines
made from nature. This
seminar offers a simple way
to observe the interconnect-
ed activities of body, mind
and spirit using the modern
business corporation as a


~~.1
p.


model for understanding how
illness and healing occur.
Attendees are invited to
explore the principals that
govern the application of this
energetic medicine as well as
how healing is observed in
clinical practice. Treatment
principles for this 200-year-
old medical approach will be
described in a patient friendly
manner, emphasizing the
importance of treating the
whole person instead of a dis-
ease. Space is limited. Call
(941) 918-8318 to register in
advance. For driving direc-
tions, visit naturesownwell-
ness.com
Free knee screening
Englewood Community Hos-
pital, Dr. Ronald Heromin
and Mark Winter, PA-C will
sponsor a free knee screening
Thursday June 16, from 3 to 5
p.m. in the hospital Suncoast
Auditorium. Registration and
X-rays will be in radiology.
Anyone with knee pain or
other knee ailments is en-
couraged to make an ap-
pointment. You are in no way
obligated for the free X-ray or
screening. Appointments are
required. Call 941-473-3919.
Parkinson's Support
The Parkinson's Support
Group will meet on Friday,
June 17, at 10, a.m. in the
Englewood Community Hos-
pital Suncoast Auditorium.
Open house
The Community Center for
the Deafand Hard of Hearing
hosts, an open house and
reception Friday, June 17, 4-7
p.m. at 628 Cypress Ave.,
Venice. Meet Christopher D.
Wagner, new executive direc-
tor, and help celebrate the


new office. RSVP by (941) 758-
2539 voice or TTY by June 13,
or e-mail sharris@ccdhh.org.
Celiac Support
The Celiac Support Group of
Sarasota/Manatee will meet
Saturday, June 18, at 1:30 p.m.
in the Papaya Room, second
floor of the Waldemere
Medical Plaza, 1920 Walde-
mere St., Sarasota. New
Participants and their fami-
lies are welcome. For more
information, .cll '9'2-1205 or
721-0150.
Osteoporosis Support
The Osteoporosis Support
Group will meet on Monday,
June 20, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
in the Englewood Commun-
ity Hospital Suncoast Aud-
itorium. Call 473-9865.
Hearing support
CCDHH is hosting a support
group for hard-of-hearing
individuals who do not sign
and are still trying to use their
residual hearing. Meetings
are from 11:30-12:30 p.m. at
the CCDHH's Venice office,
found at 628 Cypress Ave.
Joan Haber of the Sarasota
Chapter of Self-Help for
Hard-of-Hearing People
(SHHH) will facilitate. The
session schedule is: June 20'
and July 25. For more infor-
mation, please contact Sarah
Harris at: Community Center
for the Deaf & Hard of
Hearing Manatee/Sarasota,
Inc. 5107 14th St.W. Braden-
ton, 34207
Living Smart
diabetes program
Englewood Community Hos-
pital and Dr. Lenita Hanson

Please see HEALTH, 12B


Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Complete service in gynecology
including major and minor surgery
Accepting new patients
600 Nokomis Avenue South, Suite 101A, Venice, Florida 34285

www.gynofvenice.com


By'Vicki Connell,
M.A., CCC-A Q
Certified Audiologist
Q. My husband's hearing
aid often times "whistles"
or "squeals" when he
opens his mouth or turns
his head. Is there any way
to stop this without turning
the hearing aid down?
A. The largest cause of
whistling or "feedback" is
wax impaction in the ear
canal. The amplified sound
enters the ear canal and
bounces off the wall of wax
or back, out the ear canal
causing a whistle, Once the
wax is removed from the ear
canal the hea4ng aid will
return to normal functioning.
If this does not occur then
this means a "leak" is present
between the hearing aid and
ear canal. This too can be
corrected with a reshell or
remake of the outer part of
the hearing aid. If the hearing
aid is under warranty, this
remake is usually made at no
charge. If the instrument is
older, there may be a charge
for this service. Either way, it
is important to see an
audiologist before under-
going a remake to insure that
the problem of feedback will
be resolved. Call. the
Audiologists at Woodmere
Hearing & Balance Center
at 492-4327 to schedule an
appointment to solve hearing
aid whistling today.
Jacaranda Office Park
4120 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Suite 8A
(across from Jacaranda
Public Library)


Dr. Julio Gonzalez, of the Orthopaedic Center
of Venice, is pleased to announce the opening
of his second location at 13815 Tamiami Trail
in North Port. Please call our Venice office for
appointments at either location.


P ys I T


Tel: (941) 484-8107
Fax: (941) 484-5186


Located at Pinebrook Plaza, 834 Pinebrook Rd., Venice, FL 34285


%, "Building our LEGACY one patient at a time"


-- Walk-in Clinic --


Say Goodbye to Shaving,
Tweezing... For Good!
Affordable Hair


Waxing and


Removal On All
is Skin Types.
The Palomar StarLux Pulsed
Light System removes
d unwanted hair from the fairest
to the darkest (including
tanned) skin with safety,
comfort and speed. Call today
for more information!
-2 I
L--- -------------_-------i1

Dr. ArnoLoeffler & Sherry Loeffler


1455 E. Venice Ave., Suite 211 941-488-1906


You're Invited..
Discover The Latest Advances in:
Smile Makeovers Implant Technology
TMJ Headaches
Neuromuscular Dentistry






Dr. Jill Morris and Dr. Burr Bakke are clinical instructors at the world
renowned Las Vegas Institute for advanced dental studies. As
nationally recognized cosmetic and restorative dentists, patients and
dentists travel from around the world to experience their expertise. For
your personalized consultation, call our office or visit our website to
see our amazing life-changing smile transformations.


Please call 941 -954-0044
a today for your reservation


INSURANCE FOR: LIFE FLOOD BOATS BUSINESS
AUTO HOME UMBRELLA CONTRACTORS
Ah. You may be eligible s a
for up to: Nationwide"
10% Off Insurance &
Your Home & Auto Financial Services
S Insurance at Nrationwide Is On Your SIde'
Terri Y.Ramey I Nationwide, 1
Agency 497-2468 166 Center Rd. 2,


A Medical Practice

Promoting Healthy Choices


Come in and allow u
to care for you.
From a common col
to more urgent
needs.
Hours: M-F 9-5, Sat. 9-
Dr. Anthony Lyon
Located in the Venice Commons by the Publix
Directly behind the Dairy Queen


DR. SCOTT WALKER
Board Certified Optometrist
Eye Examinations Contact Lenses
Fashion Eyewear Diseases of the Eye
Accepts Medicare Assignments
The Pattison Building
= "The Eye Doctor 262 West Miami Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285
8 on the Island"485-2468


I I


.ra` aur


i






Venice Gondolier Sun




FRESH AIR


NATURE BRIEFS


Donations needed
The Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary is in need of all
sizes of animal carriers and
bird cages. Please call the
sanctuary at 388-4444 or drop
off donations at the hospital
entrance, 1708 Ken Thomp-
son Parkway, Sarasota.
Hibiscus meeting
The Gulf-Goast Chapter of
the American Hibiscus Soci-
ety meets Sunday, June 12, at
2 p.m. in the Venice Public
Library meeting room, 300 S.
Nokomis Ave. The program
features hybridizing: pollen,
seeds and plants. Everyone
is welcome; refreshments
served.
Wild Florida
Englewood's Elsie Quirk
Library hosts a series of pro-
gram for ages 5-11 on the
Florida environment, 1:30,
p.m. Monday, through July
25. June 13: Sharks! with Keith
Wilson; June 20: Gardening
with Patricia Porchey; July 11:
Salt Water Aquariums with
Keith Wilson; July 18: Bird-
watching with Kathi Rader-
Gibson; and July 25: Sea
Turtles. The library is located
at 100 W. Dearborn St. In-
dividual registration not re-
quired, but groups must reg-
ister by calling 861-1212.
Kayak trip
Take a full moon, quiet-
water kayak trip on Little
Sarasota Bay, Wednesday,
June 15, 7-9:30 p.m. See birds,
fish, the Neville Preserve and
other islands in the bay, led by
naturalist John Sarkozy of the
American Littoral Society.
Equipment and training pro-
vided. Cost: $20 forALS mem-
bers, $25 for nonmembers.


RSVP to 966-7308.
It's a zoo out there!
The Manatee-Sarasota
Chapter of the Sierra Club
sponsors a Zoo Nite at
Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo July
22 and 23. Bring your sleeping
bags and pillows and find out
what the zoo is like when the
sun goes down. Crafts, hikes,
behind-the-scenes with zoo-
keepers, animal encounters,
snacks and more. Cost is $40
for children and adults. Full-
day admission to the zoo is
$7. Deposits and reservations
due by June 15 to Gayle at
923-5903.
Hibiscus festival
The second annual Punta
Gorda National Hibiscus
Festival takes place June 16-.
18, featuring music, craft
vendors, antique cars and
more. Free trolley rides;
Secret Garden Tour includes
six for $5. Each garden fea-
tured was decimated by last
summer's storms, and is now
a Florida Certified Yard. Call
(941) 575-7128 or e-mail
rae1052@hotmail.com for
more information.
Things that make
you go'choo
Retired pediatrician and.
pollen counter, Mary Jelks,
gives a lecture on allergy-
causing plants at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, June 22 at Selby
Public Library, Geldbart
Auditorium, 1331 First St.,
Sarasota. The program is free
and open to the public. No
registration necessary. Call
861-1174.
Kayak and snorkel
The American Littoral So-
ciety invites you to kayak the


near-shore waters of the Gulf
of Mexico from Turtle Beach
county park to Point of Rocks,
Wednesday, June 22, 8:30-
11:30 a.m. Snorkel among the
fish, mollusks, crustaceans
and other critters of the Gulf
in a shallow rocky area. Bring
snorkel equipment and sun-
screen. All kayak equipment
provided. Cost: $20 for ALS
members, $25 for nonmem-
bers. RSVP to John at 966-
7308.
Florida House classes
Sarasota County Extension
Service holds free public pro-
grams Wednesdays at 2 p.m.
at the Florida House Learning-'
Center, 4600 South Beneva
Road in Sarasota, on the cam-
pus of SCIT at Beneva and
Proctor Roads. Registration
required by calling 316-1200.
June 29, 2-3 p.m.: Hurricanes
vs. Trees; July 6, 2-3:30 p.m.:
Hurricane Shutter Class; July
13, 2-3 p.m.: Hurricane Sur-
vival Kit: Emergency Supplies;
July 20, 2-4 p.m.: Ants, ants,
ants; July 27, 2-4 p.m.: Termite
Biology and Control; Aug. 10,
2-3:30 p.m.: Hurricane Shut-
ter Class.
Gardening sessions
A certified Master Garden-
er from the University of
Florida/Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences-Sara-
sota County Extension offers
tips and answers about gar-
dening in Florida, Thursdays
through June 30, 1:30-3:30
p.m. at Jacaranda Public
Library, 4143 Woodmere Park
Blvd., Venice.
Take a hike

* The American Littoral So-
ciety, Southeast Region,
leads a Bayshdre critter


search at Bird Key, Saturday,
June 18, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Collect, identify and learn
about local fish and inverte-'
brates with ALS biologists.
Wear hard-soled sneakers
and sunscreen. Call Ruth at
366-9479.
* The Manatee-Sarasota
Sierra Club holds a 5-mile
Oscar Scherer State Park
Walk, Saturday, June 18 at 8
a.m. Wear sturdy shoes. and
bring water and lunch if-you
like. RSVP to Sally at 484-
4113.1
Tropical Fourth of July
A patriotic music concert
by Sarasota Concert Band


highlights the Marie Selby accepted for candidates to
Botanical Gardens' Tropical the Florida Agricultural Hall
Celebration Monday, July 4 at of Fame. The deadline for
6 p.m. on the Gardens' bay submissions is Sept. 1. The
front grounds. Festivities start 28th annual Florida Agricul-
at 6 p.m. with a cookout, chil- tural Hall of Fame banquet
dren's games, face painting .and awards ceremony takes
and family fun, culminating place at the Florida State Fair
in a fireworks display over in February 2006. Agricultural
the bay. Tickets are $18 in teachers, researchers, farm-
advance for adults, $17 for ers, ranchers and government
members, and free for chil- leaders are commemorated
dren 12 and younger, and are in a permanent display. For
available by calling 366-5731, nominationtforms, call (813)
Ext. 260, at the Welcome 628-4551, visit flaghallof-
Center at 900 S. Palm Ave., or fame.com or write Chair,
online at selby.org. Florida Agricultural Hall of
Fame Foundation, 4508 Oak
Hall of Fame 'Fair Blvd., Suite 290, Tampa,
Nominations are being 33610.


"It' SIMPLE Just Add BODY WRAPS !!
I Lost 121 POUNDS And Still Ate The CARBS"
I went from a size 32 to a 10 %
I lost 24" my first wrap 5OFF
PROGRAM
I lost 175" Total RG M

"I LOST 2 Dress Sizes After 5 Body Wraps"
Guaranteed Permanent Quick and Easy
i R r PT CHARLOM SARASOTA
SIENlfl Z 624-5673 918-1966
WALK-INS WELCOME
NDYOFFTMYERS WEIGHT OSS CAPE CORAL NAPLES FT. MYERS


Join the

Venice Regional Medical Center


) VENICE REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER


SOUTHSIDE IS NOW LIFESTYLE

Lifestyle Family Fitness has just added 4 great
locations to its family of clubs in your area!



$49 to Enroll*
(Regularly S149.99)


Call today for a FREE 1-day pass and club visit.


Bradenton
Fountains Plaza
4836 14th Street West
782-0420


Creekwood Crossings Plaza*
7385 52nd Place East
758-6020


Oakmont Club*
4901 Cortez.Rd. West
794-2090


Sarasota
Square South
8383 S. Tamiami Trail
921-4400


Sarasota Commons Plaza*
93%5 N. Beneva Rd.
953-5250


Venice


Jacaranda Plaza*
1667 US Hwy 41 Bypass South
496-4122


* Formerly SouthSide Athletic Club


CONTACT US
(941) 207-1000


5B
SUNDAY
JUNE 12,2005


Trails celebration


PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTY ANDREWS
Celebrating National Trails Day on June 4 at the Venetian Waterway Park are Phil Phillips,
Venice Police Departmeent, and Venice Area Beautification Inc.'s Trailblazers bike
patrollers Terry,Redman, Peggy Walker and Mike Gippert. Monty Andrews, Trailblazer,
took the photo.


Cardiac Club


LEARN ABOUT


MEMORY Loss

Vinod K. Bhatnager, MD


Monday, June 13, 2005

In the Hospital's Auditorium A.
540 The Rialto

5:30 p.m. v Blood pressure checks

6:00 p.m. v Lecture
Refreshments will be served..
The gated north lot will be open for parking at 5:00 p.m.
Registration is required. Call 486-6057.


LVENICE
Heart Center


I I


Lo n g t e m C o nt r a c t s
4-week Money-back Guarantee q FAMILYN
3 Free Personal Training Sessions
BRING YOUR BODY TO LIFE


V.


I


~6~g~4a






Venice Gondolier Sun



E SENIOR SCENE
SUNDAY
JUNE 5,2005


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


What about the bench at the bus stop?


KEITH BACKHIAUS
GUEST COLUMNIST

Why am I making such a
public stink about benches at
bus stops? Why all this effort
and newsprint? The answer is,
simple. The lack of bus stop
benches and shelters in South
Sarasota County is a symp-
tom of why the SCAT system
is designed to fail.
I have attended numerous
meetings over the last five
plus years on how to improve
ridership and find more fund-
ing for the SCAT system. Each
time a list of suggestions, one,
always being add benches to
the bus stops, is developed.
But I have never seen any
action taken on these com-
munity and rider recommen-
dations.
If we look at the SCAT sys-


tem we see a system designed
for people who are able to
walk some distance to a bus
stop and wait. This does not
fit our South County popula-
tion.. It really does not fit the
entire county's inhabitants.
Our population is older than
any other state in the Union.
The average age in the county
is older than 50 and in Venice
the average is 69 years of age.
SCAT says they are re-
sponding to the elder popula-
tion by conducting rider
training in assisted living
facilities. That is very strange,
because most people move
into ALFs when they are too
frail to walk to a bus stop.
Particularly one without a
bench or shelter.
I understand the way we
pick bus routes is by looking
for. new housing develop-
ments. Lots of new houses
must mean many potential
new riders. Who is buying
those houses? I bet it is most-
ly new retirees. Do you really
think they are going to take
the bus to the golf course?
While the General Develop:-
ment homes in North Port
and the Warm Mineral
Springs area do without ser-
vice.


Now look at South Venice,
a community of 6,500 homes,
and maybe 200 feet of side-
walks. You seldom see people
walking here. Who is going to
walk to a bus stop in a ditch
on those narrow streets and
be forced off into the weeds?
Yet here is another large
group of potential riders.
Maybe a bus riding class at
the South Venice Community
Center would generate more
riders?
Remember when the elder
housing, Villa San Marco, on
Albee Farm Road opened?
There are 80-100 seniors liv-
ing there. SCAT moved the
bus stop from in front of the
building out to the comer at
U.S. 41 Bypass.
This intersection is one of
the most frightening for
someone walking. Even if
someone is brave enough to
attempt it there is no bench
or shelter.
If we would have benches
and appropriate shelters
throughout South County we
would have fewer riders using
the SCAT Plus system and
more riders on the fixed
route.
Safety and, convenience
builds ridership. If you can-


not get people to the bus, they
are not going to ride the bus.
The biggest problem fac-
ing SCAT is one of attitude of
our county government. They
do not see SCAT as a public
service on par with our sher-
iff's and fire departments.
All three save lives and are
vital to a community. If it were
a public service in the minds
of our government leaders,
SCAT would have 'received
the same increases over the
years as the sheriff's depart-
ment. /
Public transportation is a
public service and needs to
* be treated that way.
* We need our county com-
missioners to step up to the
plate and tell SCAT, "You are a
:public service and we expect
you to act that way. Here are
the same percentage increas-
es we gave to the sheriff's
department. Now go out and
design a system that fits the
unique population of Sara-
sota County and do not forget
the benches!"
Keith Backhaus is an elder
advocate with Senior
Friendship Centers-Venice.
He writes an occasional col-
umn for this page.


LUNCH MENU


Lunch is served at noon at
Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0090 or 584-0031. Reser-
vations required 24 hours in
advance. Suggested dona-
tion: $3. All meals served with
bread and milk.
MONDAY, June 13: Sliced
ham and fruit sauce, whipped
sweet potatoes, broccoli/car-


rot/cauliflower mix, apple-
sauce
Frozen alternative: Veal
patty with brown gravy,
mashed potatoes, carrot cuts
TUESDAY, June 14: Blend-
ed fruit juice, stewed chicken
with veggies, yellow rice,
chopped spinach, oatmeal
raisin cookie
Frozen alternative: Beef


patty with onion gravy, mash-
ed potatoes, whole corn
WEDNESDAY, June 15: Veg-
gie soup, Swedish meatballs
with mushroom gravy, whip-
ped potatoes, peas and carrots
Frozen alternative: Mac
and cheese, seasoned carrots,
green peas, fresh bananas
THURSDAY, June 16: Tur-
key chili, white rice, whole-


kernel corn, vanilla pudding
Frozen alternative: Meat-
loaf with brown gravy, black-
eyed peas, turnip greens
FRIDAY, June 17: Baked
rotini casserole, Italian veggie
medley, tossed veggie salad
with French dressing
Frozen alternative: Fish nug-
gets, mashed potatoes au gratin,
green beans, spiced peaches


New knee replacement option

has limited availability


JIM MILLER
GUEST i N !.

Dear Savvy Senior,
Some time back, I read your
column about a new hip
replacement procedure that has
patients up and recovering
sooner, has them spending less
time in the. hospital and may
even cost less money. Sounds
great. But I don't have a hip
problem, I have a knee problem,
and I wonder if there's a similar
knee replacement surgery. I'm
an active senior who pastors a
large church and I'm dreading
the lengthy recovery, not to
mention pain that is part of the
conventional remedy. Can you
help? Praying for Relief
Dear Praying,
Your prayers may be an-
swered! A new technique is
now available for worn-out
knees, called the Zimmer
Minimally Invasive Solutions
(MIS) Quad-Sparing Knee
Replacement. Each year,
more than 300,000 Amer-
icans (most over age 65) un-
dergo total knee replace-
ments because of arthritis,
injury or a lifetime's worth of
wear-and-tear and that num-
ber is growing dramatically.
MIS knee replacement
Using modified tech-
niques and instruments, sur-


geons can now place the
same clinically proven im-
plants used in traditional
knee replacement surgery;
but through a much smaller
incision and without cutting
through key tendons and
muscles. In traditional sur-
gery, the surgeon makes a 12-
inch incision down the front
of the knee and thetendon
and quadriceps inuscle,
which controls the bending
of the knee, are cut. In the
MIS procedure, a 3-to-5-inch
incision is made on the side
of the knee, and the tendon
and "quad" muscle are sepa-
rated, rather than cut. Be-
cause of that, recovery time is
dramatically, reduced.
The benefits
The potential benefits of
the Zimmer MIS quad-spar-
ing knee replacement as
compared to traditional sur-
gery include:
Less tissue trauma and
scarring.
Shorter hospital stays;
one-two days, rather than
four-five days. Many patients
who have had the MIS knee
replacement go home the
same day.
Less pain.
Greater range of motion.
Faster rehabilitation. Us-
ually around five weeks ver-
sus three months.
Quicker return to work or
daily activities.
Cost. Because you are in
and out of the hospital quick-
er and recovery is
quicker, the cost may be low-
ered by around 30 percent.
Savvy note

Please see MILLER, 78


nortth
E l, :.,: ". .


Now you can take


the Gondolier


With you!

I -.
,* : ,..'

".: : I ,.':
;44- : '. J. "" : ,

"i ) .. '" N" ? ..


-4



--- '4


Subscribe to the


.( .. IN 10 1- VI In I


c inon-lo-ler un E i alltO

i and keep in touch with all the local


news for just $2.95 a month.

The Gondolier Sun E Edition is an exact

copy of our printed edition that you can read
anywhere that you have internet access!
GVENICE r S

Gon oler Sun


LOCAL NEWS COVER TO COVER


FLORIDA'S NO WEEKLY


Subscribe online today at www.venicegondolier.com


Sun


K>


,-.:, ,


f"I: -~" _


I


-I-I -~-- ---- II~- ----- I --- C3llllslP~II~L~I~LZ~B~dll~i~BT~Lii~L~


198 78 --- .


AP


.!







A JNE .NL


SENIOR BRIEFS


Health insurance help
SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders)
volunteers will be available to
assist with health insurance
questions and concerns, 9
a.m.-noon, June 14 and 28 at
Jacaranda Public Library,
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Venice. No reservations nec-
essary. Call 861-1270.
Hurricane preparation
The American Red Cross
presents a hurricane disaster
preparedness seminar at 10
a.m. Friday, June 17, at the
Senior Friendship Center,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice.
Estate planning
Attorney Charles E Wheel-
er leads an Estate Planning
for Peace of Mind seminar
Monday, June 20, at 10 a.m.at
Jacaranda Public Library,
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd. in
Venice. Wheeler will assist
with living wills and trusts
and will touch on recent tax


law changes affecting estate
planning. No reservations
necessary. Call 861-1270.
Seniors needed
The Senior Companion of
Southwest Florida needs
senior volunteers, age 60 or
older, to be companions and
friends to homebound se-
niors and others who have
difficulty with daily-living
tasks. Senior Companions
will serve 20 hours a week and
receive a tax-free stipend of
$2.65 an hour, plus mileage
reimbursement of $0.29 per
mile, plus an annual physical
exam. Call Joan at (800) 332-
5346.
Volunteers needed
for aging survey
The NORC (Naturally Oc-
curring Retirement Com-
munities) project is looking
for volunteers to participate
in a needs.assessment survey.
NORC is a federal demonstra-
tion project designed to test


innovative strategies to em-
power seniors. Jewish Family
& Children's Service (JFCS) is
working in collaboration with
Catholic Charities, Senior
Friendship Center and USF to
develop the local project.
Contact Pamela Baron, NORC
Project Coordinator, JFCS at
366-2224 or pbaron@jfcs-
cares.org.
Drivers program
The AARP's Driver Safety
Program, the oldest and most
recognized comprehensive
nationwide course designed
especially for the older driver,
consists of two, four-hour
training sessions and is of-
fered year-round at two loca-
tions in Venice, 9 a.m.-1/p.m.,
Monday and Tuesday or
Thursday and Friday. Cost is
$10 per person. Learn Getting
Started, Judging Yourself,'
Physical Changes, Aggressive
Driving and Road Rage, Safety
Considerations and more.
Registration required; call


488-1407.
Senior Academy
Fifteen summer session
courses are now open for reg-
istration at the USF Sarasota-
Manatee Senior Academy at
5700 North Tamiami Trail. A
summer special of $75 enti-
ties you to sign up for all 15
courses, ranging from history
and literature to computers,
art or. music. Classes meet
once a week for 90 minutes
between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Monday, Tuesday or Wednes-
day.
Call 359-4296 for a catalog,
or visit sarasota.usf.edu/
senioracademy.
Grandparents group
The Grandparents Raising
Grandldds Support Group
meets the second Tuesday of
the month (June 14) at 9:30
a.m. in the Englewood Com-
munity Hospital Cafeteria,

Please see SENIOR, 13B


MILLER from page 6B


The MIS Knee Replace-
ment is a new procedure, so
studies on the long-term
implications are limited.
Not for everybody
The MIS knee replace-
ment procedure is a great
option, but it's not for every-
body. You'll need to consult
with your doctor, but factors
that may keep people from
being a candidate for this
surgery include obesity
(more than 30 percent over
recommended body weight),
knee problems such as being
knock-kneed, recent history
of a blood clot, prior replace-
ment of the same knee and
other unstable conditions.
Find a doctor
There is currently about
100 specially trained ortho-
pedic surgeons nationwide
that offer this new proce-
dure, but that number could
climb to several hundred by


the end of this year, as they
complete training. Surgeons
who perform the MIS knee.
replacement procedure are.
trained through The Zimmer
Institute, an
Indiana-based company that
helped pioneer the tools
needed for this new surgery.
For more information, or
to locate surgeons, visit
PaceWithLife.com, or call
(866) 346-3647.
Savvy resources
American Academy of
Orthopedic Surgeons: Visit
aaos.org or call (800) 346-
2267.
American Association of
Hip and Knee Surgeons: Visit
aahks.org or call (847) 698-
1200.

W hat's your aging IQ?
Dear Savvy Senior,
My 49-year-old husband has
become age phobic. He has


stuck in his head that
all old people are depressed,
grouchy, live in nursing homes
and don't know what day it is.
Part of his phobia stems from
his mother who has dementia
and his father who recently died
in a nursing home with
Alzheimer's disease, which he's
convinced he will too. I recently
heard of a new aging IQ booklet
that helps inform people what
normal aging is about. Can you
tell me about this and would
this be good for my husband to
read? Realistic Rita
Dear Rita,
Lot's of people like your
husband have misconcep-
tions about getting old. But,
considering what he's gone
through with his parents, it's
pretty understandable. The
booklet you're asking about
is called "What's Your Aging
IQ?," a free booklet published
by the National Institute on
Aging (NIA) that presents
mini-stories and quiz ques-


tions to test your knowledge
of aging and health. And yes,
it's a great booklet for every-
body to read.
Aging IQ
What does it really mean
to be old. If you think you
know, you might be sur-
prised. In "What's Your Aging
IQ?," you're asked 28 very
enlightening questions that
explore some of the com-
monly-held misconceptions
about aging. Here is a sam-
pling to test your whites.
Questions
1. If your parents had
Alzheimer's disease, you will
inevitably get it. True
or False?
2. Most older people are
depressed. Yes or No?
3. The,older a person gets,
the less sleep he or she
needs. True or False?
4. Heart disease is a much
bigger problem for older


men than for older women?
True or False?
5. Most older people live
alone? True or False?
6. Do people get grumpy
as they age? Yes or No?
Answers
1. False. Alzheimer's dis-
ease gets more common as
people grow older, but it is'
not a normal part of aging.
The overwhelming number
of people that get AD have
not inherited the disorder.
2. No. For many people,
their later years are an active,
rewarding time. Depression
can be caused by medicine,
physical illness or stress.
Once the cause of depression
is known, the problem often
can be treated.
3. False. In later life, it's the
quality of sleep that changes,
not total sleep time. Older
people may have trouble
falling asleep or staying
asleep which can cause them


to wake up tired. But this,
too, can be treated.
4. False. The risk of heart
disease increases dramatical-
ly for women after
menopause. By age 65, both
men and women have a one
in three chance of develop-
ing heart disease, but risk
can be significantly reduced,
by following a healthy diet
and exercising.
5. False. About eight out of
10 older.men and six out of
10 elder women live in
family settings with a hus-
band, wife, or other family
members. Less than 5 per-
cent of people over age 65
live in nursing homes.
6. No. Personalities are
usually consistent through-
out life. So, 'a young grumpy
person is likely to become an
old grumpy person, just as a
friendly youngster is likely to
become a friendly senior.

Please see MILLER, 13B


HARRIS Wat I Knw...
GRI
"COMMITTED .
TOSERVICE"o I -
Your
Residential 4
Real Estate -
Professional
Servicing Venice & 941-308-4548 .
Sarasota for 11 years. 1314-B East Venice Ave .. ..
Your Full-Time Realtor Venice FL 34285
Working For You!! debraharris.com ..- -.


* Beautiful landscaping 1-1/4 acre private home site New appliances/granite counter
* Irrigation system with well 4 bed./3 bath/2 cg 2 master suites
* Desirable central area Caged solar heated pool One year American Home Shield Warranty
BL' hfroR. i -] 'L' If you're in the market for a really nice spjciuus property .
you should take the opportunity to look at this one! $499,000
Properties OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, JUNE 12T
S' I_ -- .. ... T I kn T. t D /P


Angela Moulton


2961 Placida Rd.
Englewood, FL 34224
941-697-5924 office
941-270-2199 cell
e-mail: moulton@ewol.com


lN"V IN I J-J J LV
845 VAN GOGH, ENGLEWOOD
Directions: 776 (Indiana Ave.) to Artists Ave. go west.
' Proceed to Van Gogh, turn right, house on right.


H


i a


2045 S. Tamiami Tr., Ark Plaza


Pinemoor i

Golf M


Summer Rates
before 1 pm
$22 plus tax
after 1 pm
$17 plus tax

Championship
West Course
18 Holes Par 71
(6,425 yds)
697-7006
80 Clubhouse Rd.
Rotonda W., FL

s Rates subject to change


If you watch cable,
we can help you quit.
DUMP YOUR CABLE AND SAVE WITH DISH NETWORK.
>FREE DVR UPGRADE
PAUSE LIVETV. REWIND AND FAST-FORWARD RECORDEo ABOUT OVER 60 CHANNELS
SHOWS. DIGITALLYRECORD UPTO 100HOURSOF INCLUDING LOCAL
PROGRAMMING WITHOUT VIDEOTAPE AND EVEN
RECORD TWO SHOWS AT A TIME. CHANNELS*STARTING
:NO EQUIPMENT TO BUY AT $31.99/MONTH.
FREE 4-ROO INSTALLATION A DAY! OHL $4. OISH NETWORK DVR SERVICE.
:" FREE 4-ROOM INSTALLATION FEE APPLIES FOR THE DISH PLAYERVR.. .


SEalviNG MAria[iE AND SAPAbOTA COUIallES
Svenice
Bradenton
M Lakewood Ranch
Manatee Community College


Accredited bV the Commission on Colleges of the Soulhern Assoclaion ol Colleges and Schools 10 aw\ar,.d s5.ociale in aris,
associate In applied science and associate in science degrees An equal accessiequal opportunity irnsulion


Citizens rally

for Social Security


PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROLYN MONTGOMERY
Venice residents Kathy and Doug Stumpfl (front row) with
Henry, chair of Sarasota Democratic Party, and Virginia
Bright, president of the Venice Democratic Club, at the
Rally to Protect Social Security that took place May 24 on
the Sarasota Bayfront.


-~l--l,~ur-m*---rc~-~lw.~-~-rl* I~rro-n-r*,u*~~,lr-~l~M-l--l


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN'7B


DIRF AY JUNE 10 2005


I I










SUNDAY
JUNE 10, 2005


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


Enjoy summer fun in the Florida Keys


STAFF REPORT


Hardly a summer weekend
goes by in the Florida Keys
without a special event or fes-
tival taking place. The choices
are endless, ranging'from
powerboat races to culinary,
musical, historical and. cul-
tural celebrations and quirky
*off-the-wall events featuring
underwater music and chick-
ens. i
But even before summer
officially kicks off, the Keys
are the venue for several
events popular with visitors.
Visitors can taste'the culi-
nary delicacies indigenous to
the Florida Keys when the dog
days of summer are made a
little tastier during the Key
West Summer Food.& Wine
Festival, July 30-Aug. 8, featur-
ing gourmet wine dinners
and classes, cocktail galas and
dessert tasting.
Summer brings the annual
Cuban American Heritage
Festival, a showcase of the
rich Cuban customs and cul-
ture still present on the island.
The Key West event is slated
for June 13-18.
The following month, the
historic discovery of the
Spanish shipwreck Nuestra
Sefiora de Atocha is the focus
of the Mel Fisher Maritime
Heritage Society's "Diving
into Glory: The Atocha 20
Years Later," scheduled July
17-23. Discovered 35 miles off
Key West after, a 16-year
search, the shipwreck is re-
garded as one of the 20th cen-
tury's most important under-
water finds.
It has yielded more than
$400 million in artifacts and


treasure including gold and
silver bars, coins, rare naviga-
tional instruments and weap-
ons.
The One Human Family
approach to living in KeyWest
is celebrated during Women-
fest, featuring art shows,
water, activities and comedy
performances Sept. 6-11.
Offbeat and unique events
of the Florida Keys dot the
events calendar as well. One
example is ChickenFest Key
West, June 16-19, a celebra-
tion that honors the viva-
cious, living, breathing,
squawking Key West chicken
with a variety of lighthearted
events culminating in the
Poultry in Motion parade.
The following month on
July 9 is the 21st Annual Un-
derwater Music Festival, a
quirky concert broadcast un-
derwater for divers and
snorkelers, held at Looe Key
in the Florida Keys National
Marine Sanctuary. This year's
theme is "AquaCulture: Music
and Art in the Key of Sea."
And in October, divers carve
pumpkins among the fishes
during the annual Under-
water Pumpkin Carving Con-
test held in Key Largo as part
of the island's Halloween fes-
tivities.
In July, Hemingway Days
draws fans of Ernest Hem-
ingway's literature and life-
style to Key West, the island
where the author lived and
wrote throughout the 1930s.
The 25th anniversary of
the event, which features a
look-alike contest, author
readings and presentations,
the catch-and-release
Drambuie Key West Marlin


.* l
.. -


I JJ,~


From the widow's walk atop the Curry House, one can see
most of Key West.


fishing tournament, the Lor-
ian Hemingway Short Story
Competition and an offbeat
"Running of the Bulls," is
scheduled for July 19-24.
In late August and early
September the,Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary
takes center stage with an
annual natural phenomenon
scuba diving enthusiasts have
dubbed Sex on the Reef.
It's the annual coral
spawning ritual and dive'
shops throughout the area
conduct evening excursions
to witness the ritual some
compare to an upside-down,


underwater snow storm.
Slated for the fall is the
Florida Keys Birding & Wild-
life Festival, Oct. 1-2, held in
Marathon and the Lower'
Keys, celebrating the, natural
wonders of Florida wildlife
during peak season.
Islamorada's rich heritage
is at the center of the Indian
Key Festival, set for early
October, where significant
historic events from the area
are reenacted.
The most outrageous of all
fall events in the Florida Keys
is the 27th annual Key West
Fantasy Fest, themed Freaks,


SUN PHOTOS BY KIM COOL
A part of an anchor from an old Spanish galeon is on display
at the Mel Fisher Museum in Key West.


Geeks & Goddesses, Oct. 21-
30.
The 10-day masking and
costuming celebration fea-
tures elaborate costume com-
petitions, promenades and
street fairs, masquerade galas
and a grand parade with lav-
ish floats and eccentric


marching groups.
For more information
about the Florida Keys and
Key West including a com-
plete schedule of events visit
the Keys Web site at fla
keys.com.
Or, in the U.S. and Canada,
call toll-free (800) FLA-KEYS.


Funky chickens flock to ChickenFest in Key West Jute 16-19


STAFF REPORT


Funky chickens, roistering
roosters and their fine feath-
ered friends are to have some-
thing to crow about in Key
West this summer a festival
that pays homage to the.
island city's own "birds of par-
adise."
ChickenFest Key West,
scheduled for Thursday
through Sunday, June 16-19,
celebrates the living, breath-
ing, crowing feathered resi-
dents who freely roam the
historic Old Town neighbor-
hood probably descended
from chickens once kept for
food and eggs, and from
roosters bred generations ago
for cockfights.
" The Key West chickens'
contribute to the island city's
offbeat, laid-back atmos-
phere," said the event's direc-
tor, Linda O'Brien. "The visi-
tors who come here love to
see the quirkiness of the
island, and the chickens
exemplify some of that eccen-
tricity."
ChickenFest Key West is to
feature four days of family-
friendly fowl play. Organizers:
have hatched a schedule that
'includes a competition for the
best-looking "drumsticks," a
chicken look-alike contest, a
beauty pageant for feathered
chicks and the Poultry in
Motion Parade. '
The festival's egg-centric
activities are to begin with the
Fowl Follies, a costume con-
test and talent revue slated for
7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 16,
on the beach at the Pier
House Resort, One Duval St.


ANSWERS from page 118


"Copyrighted Material 3
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Co-sponsored by Fairvilla
Megastore, the "who let the
birds out" bash is sure .to
attract, rowdy roosters and
classy chicks dressed in their
finest feathers.
Admission to the Fowl
Follies is free. For informa-
tion, call (305) 296-0268.
At 9 p.m., birds of a feather
are to gather for a showing of
the hilarious film "Chicken
Run" under the stars at the
Atlantic Shores Resort, 510
South St. Just prior to the
"chick flick," event organizers
are planning a crowing con-
test for attendees sure to be
equally hilarious.
For information, call (305)
296-2491.
Those who aren't chicken
about displaying their drum-
sticks are to strut their stuff at
9:30 p.m. at the Hog's Breath
Saloon's Chick-n-Dales Drum-,
stick Contest, at 400 Front St.
A $500 prize awaits the person
who possesses the best-look-
ing legs in the barnyard.
, Admission is free; for more
information, call (305) 296-
0268.
The following day, if it
tastes like chicken, it probably
isn't, because the Tastes Like
Chicken Cook-off at the
Crowne Plaza La Concha Ho-
tel, 430 Duval St., is specifical-
ly designed to showcase
chickenless cuisine. A flock of
Key West's culinary all-stars
are to compete in this gour-
met gala, creating poultry-
free treats that inspire tasters
to crow, "It tastes like chick-
en!"
The cook-off, benefiting


the Monroe Association for
Retarded Citizens, is to begin
at 5 p.m. Admission is free.
For information, call (305)
296-5596.
Friday evening is to bring a
celebration of the "Conch
Republic Eagle" in the garden
,-at KeyWest's Bourbon St.:Pub,
724 Duval St. The Caribbean-
flavored ChickenFest Jammin'
Jamboree is scheduled for 7-
10 p.m., featuring live music.
and a lively good time. ,
Admission is free. For in-
formation, call (305) 296-
1992.
Though Key West chickens
are infamous for their flying
skill, early-bird athletes are to
stay grounded for the 5K
Running of the Chickens at 8
a.m. Saturday, June 18.
Race day registration is
scheduled at McCoy In-
digenous Park at Atlantic
Boulevard and White Street
before the run, with the start-
ing line at the White Street
Pier. A kids' fun run is sched-
uled immediately after the
main race.
Shoppers are to have
something to squawk about
Saturday during the Why Did
the Chicken Cross the Street?
Fair on Key West's colorful
Duval Street. -Presented by
Howard Livingston and The
Mile Marker 24 Band, the
bizarre bazaar is to run from



Happy Heart Torg
48947568 hhtours@aol.com
June 2.... ModemBroadwayThemed Lunch Cruise
June 21.. Arabian Nights. New for 2005 matinee!
June 29. St Pete's Historical Vinoy ResortTour &
Lunch. Alsovisit beautiful Sunken Gardens
July 4 ....... Cityof Ft.Myers Fireworks Dinner Cruise
July 6,.. Mission Inn LunchiYahala Bakery/M tDora
July 12.Fun Mystery Lunch Cruise Starlite Princess
July 1......... Seminole Hard Rock Casino-Tampal
July17.. Beauty andThe Beast Broadway Palm Matinee
July 19. SL Johns River Rivership Romance Lunch Crulse
July21......Naples Princess Cruise+Teddy BearMuseum
July 23.29 Islands of New England featuring
Martha'sVineyard &Nantucket& much more
July 23.24 Annual Christmas In July! Boca Raton ~
Embassy SuiteslTwo Great Shows+ HolidayPartyl
Seat. 18.23 ........... HistoricTrains of the Southwest
Featuring the Grand Canyon &-National Park
Oct. 6.14.......... Annual Back Road & Country inns
Nov 5.9...............RFlyto Branson Christmas Shows
Dec. 1-5............... Fly to Branson Christmas Shows
Dec. 29-Jan. 5......Rose Bowl Parade + Las Vegas
Nov. 16............10 Day HawallThanksgiving Cruise!
Bermuda Cruise April of 20061 Will sell FAST! Call
Call for Full Detailed Tour Booklet
With These & Many More Tours!
Nokomis, FL 34275 FL Reg. #10319


noon to 9 p.m. between Front
and Fleming streets. Attrac-
tions are to include arts,
crafts, food, poultry-themed
paraphernalia and home-
hatched entertainers.
From 4 to 6 p.m., poultry
pretenders and good-looking
chicks are invited to compete
in Sloppy Joe's Chicken Look-
Alike Contest & Cock-Tail
Party. Feathers are sure to fly
as competitors vie for a $250
first prize at the 201 Duval St.
watering hole. The event- is
free to watch. For informa-
tion, call (305) 296-2388, Ext.
21.
ChickenFest's main egg-
stravaganza is scheduled for
Saturday evening, when
Comcast's Poultry ,in Motion
Parade steps off at 6 p.m.
Chickens of the sea, Foghorn
Leghorn lookalikes and roost-
er revelers of all sorts are slat-
ed. to participate.
The parade's costumed
chickens and feathered floats
are to leave Bayview Park,
Truman Avenue and Eisen-
hower Drive, and proceed
along Truman to Duval, sub-
sequently promenading
down Duval to Fleming
Street.
Sunday, June 1?, festival
participants can brunch with





COSTA CRUISE LINE
FALL CARIBBEAN SALE
7 nt. Nov. 20, Dec. 30,2005
WESTERN CARIBBEAN, Incl.
Port Taxes. Fr; $599pp
7 nt. Dec. 4,11,23,2005
EASTERN CARIBBEAN, Incl.
Port Taxes,Fr. $599pp
7 nt. Nov. 7,14,2005
BEST GREEK ISLES, Incl.
Port Taxes, Fr. $799pp
7 nt. Nov. 6,13,20,2005
NEW MAGICA ITALY, Spain
Tunisia, Incl. Port Taxes,
Fr. $799pp
Come Cruise with Costa &
Cruise "The Italian Way"
Special Group Departures


their hatchlings at a Father's
Day Roosters' Brunch. Set for
10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., the gulf-
side' gala is to take place at the
Hilton Key West Resort &
Marina, 245 Front St. For
costs and reservations, call
(305) 292-4320.
Before chicken-lovers fly
the coop until next year,
they're invited to' check out
the chicks (and roosters) at


the Live Chicken Beauty Pa-
geant at Crabby Bill's, 511
Greene St. Bold, and beau-
teous birds are to compete for
$500 in cash and prizes (and
that's not chicken feed!), with
the winners crowned King
Rooster and Queen Chicken.
The free event is set to begin
at noon. For information, call

Please see FLOCK, 11B


Same Great Deals & Exceptional
Service for Almost 20 Years!
'f Agents Now Available 24 Hours / 7 Days A Week
v" New & Improved Website: shipandshorecruises.com


5 Night ,Sootaisawn. camtval.h
Western C ribbean '
,iang roundup from Tampa '. $579

8 Night o D-noee2rbsaeoi Caarnival.
'Exotic Southern Caribbean ..
Saing undp fm udFt ae $(
CamihraLegend ....................$5m JJ
BALCONY CABINS ..............oP849

7 Night oDe,,b.a5o O II
Western Caribbean
Sai'ngroundtpfromnTampa $r62
Legend of the Seas .............n J-.J629
BALCONY CABINS........ ..... $949

7 Night metolo l200ns' A nI ealbn
Western Caribbean
Saying roundriplfromTampa, $
Veendam ..........................fr 00 J9 J


7 Night August 20m aiN CslebritXnaI s
Northbound Alaska $750
Sailing from Vancouver toS E- "
Summi.........................

7'Night Oct.N.sooo.,00s sm
Hawaii Air
Saying roundtrip from Maud $PAQ
Pride fAloha.................... 84.. 9 'T
BALCONY CABINS ............S1579

10 Night oobso5 05 hmdAoohnia
Sunfarer & Panama Canal
Saying rodtrrip from R. Laudedale ti'|
Zaandam ............. $1,,,. 13,..9on l I D.,

10 Night spta-be=.rCare. c stXerX-v
Westem Mediterranean
SaRing moundrip fom Barcelona $m 550
Century. ...................... 0 f 15 0 .


Cruise Tour Packages


9 Night sopaneros [1s"
Northbound Alaska Cruise Tour
7 night Northbound Alaska cruise followed
by a 2-night escorted land tour
nto he terior o aska. $1189
Vision of the Seaas ..........from


10 Night Augrot 200 sas
Madrid Barcelona Cruise Tour
3 night escorted land tour
combined with a 7 night,
Mediterranean c ....se 9
.Splendour of the Seas.. ori /-\


1-800-711-8381
shipandshorecruises.com
Prices are per person, double occupancy; port charges are Included; gov't taxes are additional; $19.D service foe additional;
ImIted avalability. Satisfaction Guarantee: for complete details, call us or visit our wobsi, Prices show r n am in. forms s select
departure dales. Other daes higher, Not responsible for last minute changes of price or Itinerary by nrulse line, or any errors or omissions in
the content of this ad. Some restrictions and cancellation penalties may apply. Hotel taxes, fees and/or surcharges may apply. Price of alrfare
includes all Government Taxes, Sunrsarges and Fees. Foreign Departure Taxes of up to 45 may also be additional and paynabtto the
foreign Apo t Authodlty. Ships' Registry: Greece, Noray, Bahamasn bea, Panama & Italy. lloof Travel Rog, No. ST-31120, IA l
no. 654, OH no, 8789121, CST # 2028107-50. Licensed & Bonded C 2005.


4 DAYS" 5$ '
3 NIGHTS Peerson,
* Pay $125* Receive over
$70 Meals/Cash/Bonuses
Staying at Treasure Bay Casino Resort ,
ESCORTED MOTORCOACH TRANSPORTATION
Call Now!
JUNE 26T
JULY 10TH& 17TH& 24 TH
FL Reg. 22363
(941) 473-1481 1 (80,0) 284-1015
1546 S. McCALL, ENGLEWOOD 34223 M
ON THE ROAD AGAIN TOURS .






Venice Gondolier Sun

I J.. i i I


FEATURES EDITOR *
KIM COOL "
PHONE: (941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


DINING
TRAVEL
ENTERTAINMENT!


I;~j~s


Computers, movies and fun for the kids .. all at the library


Jacaranda Public Library
4143 Woodmere Park Blvd.,
Venice
861-1270

Showtime
Jacaranda Library offers
you the best seat in the house.
Tuesday, June 21, see "Mystic
Rivepristarring Sean Penn,
Tim Robbins and Kevin Ba-
con, at 2 p.m. Also see recent
movie releases at 2 p.m.
Thursday through June 30.
June 23: "Ladder 49" and June
30: "13 Going on 30."
Cannes in Venice Film
Festival presents "The Pi-
anist" at 5 p.m. Thursday,
June 23.
Estate planning
Attorney Charles E Wheel-
er leads an Estate Planning
for Peace of Mind seminar at
10 a.m., Monday, June 20.
Wheeler will assist with living
wills and trusts and will touch
on recent tax law changes
affecting estate planning. No
reservations necessary. Call
861-1270.
Computer class
The Ask Jack computer
class for intermediate-level
computer users will be held
1:30-2:30 p.m. Friday, June 24.
Gardening sessions
A certified Master Garden-
er from the University of
Florida/Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences-Sara-
sota County Extension offers
tipsand answers about gar-
dening in Florida, Thursdays
through June 30, 1:30-3:30
p.m.
Youth activities
* Doggie Tales: Tuesdays, June
14-July 26, 3-4 p.m. Children
of all ages.are ignited to read.
to trained pet therapy dogs
from the Suncoast Humane
Society and create a small pet
craft.
* Preschool Storytime: Mon-
days, 10:30-11:15 a.m. for
ages 3-5 years: June 13: I Love


Dad; June 20: Doggie Treats;
June 27: Full Speed Ahead.
* Toddler Tale Time: Fridays,
10:30-11:15 a.m. for ages 1-3
years and a caregiver: June 17:
My Daddy; June 24: Droolin'
Dogs.
* Summer elementary school
reading program: Thursdays
through July 21, 10 a.m.
Storytime, including poems,
jokes, games and crafts, plus a
summer reading log that
awards a prize at the end of
the week. Topics include:
June 16: Reading is a Family
Affair; June 23: Dog Movie
Day; June 30: Special guest,
Pirate Lady Grania O'Malley;
July 7: Take a Hike; July 14:
Special guest, John Storm's
Reptiles; July 21:6 p.m., Grow
with Books evening party.
Pick up a reading log at the
library.
* Yoga for 'tweens: Wed-
nesday, June 15,2 p.m. As part
of the VERB program, chil-
dren ages 9-13 are invited to a
yoga demonstration by the
Venice Family YMCA, fol-
lowed by healthy snacks.
Register by calling 861-1275.
* Family night: Thursday, June
16,6 p.m. Families are invited.
for an Eat and Read night at
the library, including a special
storytime and small craft.
Pizza and refreshments serv-
ed. Register by calling 861-
1275.

Venice Public Library
300 S. Nokomis Ave., 861-1330
http://suncat.co.sarasota.fl.us
Great literature
The Contemporary Book
Discussion Group meets the
fourth Wednesday of each
month at 7 p.m. and reads a
variety of new fiction. The
group examines Erik Larson's.
'"The Devil in the White Cir y
June 22. New members wel-
come.
Film noir festival
Film historian Jim Orville
presents five thriller-chillers


with showtimes at 6 p.m.
Thursday in June. June 16:
"The Verdict" (1946); June 23:
"What Lies Beneath" (2000);
June 30: "Sudden Fear"
(1952).

Vacationland
Thursday at 6 p.m., tour
the world without leaving
Venice. The magical musical
tour begins July 7 with "The
Bandwagon" (1953); July 14:
"Hello, Frisco, Hello" (1943);
July 21: "Sun Valley Serenade"
(1941); July 28: "On the Town"
(1949); Aug. 4: "Week-End in
Havana" (1941); Aug. 11: "Em-
peror Waltz" (1948). Hosted
by Jim and Eleanor Orville,
this tour is free, including
refreshments.
Video lectures
Friday, 2-4 p.m. through
Sept. 16: The second half of
the lecture series that began
last summer by Professor
Arnold Weinstein of Brown
University. Each class views
two half-hour video lectures
followed by a discussion for
those who wish to stay. The lec-
tures in June will finish the
poetry section and the re-
maining lectures will focus on
the narrative. June 17: Wallace
Stevens, June 24, Adrienne Rich
and the poetry of protest
Oui, oui
Practice your basic French
language skills Fridays at 10
a.m. with the VPL French
Club. The group practices
French conversation during
the first hour, followed by
readings from French litera-
ture and current topics dur-
ing the second hour. Copies
of the readings available at
the VPL circulation desk. New
members welcome.
Leam e-mail an1 d lhteret
Venice Public Library of-
fers weekly computer instruc-
tion at the public terminals
Tuesday, 9:30-10:30 a.m. A
VPL reference librarian teach-
es an introductory class on e-


mail and Internet functions.
Registration is necessary. Sign
up the Monday before the
Tuesday class at the Ref-
erence desk or call reference
at 861-1340.
Explore the Library System
Web site at where you can
use your library card to renew
checked-out items and re-
quest titles found in the
Sarasota County libraries. The
Web site also provides free
access to several subscription
databases and links to other
helpful Web sites.
Bugged?
Bring your gardening
questions to Venice Public
Library every Thursday, 9:30
a.m.-noon. From pesky
insects to alien plants, the
friendly experts from the
Sarasota County Extension
Service will help you with
your horticultural problems.
Youth activities
* Dial-A-Story- Dial 486-2330
and enjoy a two-minute fairy
tale for children 5-10. The story
is changed every two days.
* Preschool Storytime: Tues-
days, 10-10:30 a.m. for inde-
pendent 3- to 5-year-olds.
* Tot Time Storytime: Thurs-
day mornings, 10-10:30 a.m.
for birth to 3 years and a care-
giver. The themes for the
Preschool Storytimes and the
Tot Time Storytime will usual-
ly be the same: June 14 and
June 16: Off to Camp!; June 21
and 23: Turtle Time; June 28
and 30: Yankee Doodle; July 5
and 7: Animal Tales; July 12
and 14: Veggies, Yum!
* Health andYoga for 'Tweens:
June 16, 23 and 30, 2-3 p.m.
Ages 9-13 are invited for yoga
with instructor Zelena One,
make new friends and enjoy a
healdty snack.
* American Red Cross
Babysitter's Course: June 25,
10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Registration
required and $35 fee. Call
861-1348.
* Family events Tuesdays in
June. June 14, 2 and 7 p.m.:


"The Magic of Lyndel;" June
21, 2 p.m.: The songs and sto-
ries of Kate Carpenter; June
28, 2 and 7 p.m.: Pirate fun
with Holly Gamel.
*Summer readinglogs: For preK
through entering grade five -
Pick up your reading log in the
youth area and read books
throughout June and July.
Prizes will be awarded for
five and 10 books read.

Selby Public Library
1331 First St., Sarasota
861-1174
Summer teen fun
Teens can develop acting
skills and self-confidence


STAFF REPORT

The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
of Manatee/Sarasota Inc.
holds a summer day camp
program June 20-24, 9 a.m.-3
p.m. at 5107 14thW. 14th St.,
Bradenton. The program, for
grades K-five, is for deaf and
hard of hearing children and
their siblings and children of
deaf and hard of hearing par-
ents.
Volunteers are needed to
work at the camp, 8:30 a.m.-
3:30 p.m. Contact Wanda at


through exploring the world
of theater, plays and stories.
The free workshop, for ages
13 and older, runs 2-5 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays
through June 23, and con-
cludes with a public perfor-
mance at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
June 29. Register by calling
Janet at 861-1131 or e-mail
jhansen@scgov.net.
Songs and stories
Recording artist "Mrs.
Kate" Carpenter shares her
original Florida folk songs in a
family friendly concert, Fri-
day, June 24, at 10:30 a.m.
Recommended for ages 6 and
older. Visit mrskate.com to
learn more.


Museum of Asian Art moving


The Museum of Asian Art,
located at 640 S. Washington
Blvd., Sarasota, is undergoing
changes for the purpose of
expanding and is moving to a
different address. During this,
transition period, the muse-
um will be closed and its re-


opening will be announced at
a later date.
The museum is a nonprof-
it organization in existence
since April 2000. For more in-
formation, call or fax Dr.
Helga Wall-Apelt, president
and founder, at 383-5950.


camp@ccdhh.org.
Donations are also re-
quested of the following:
empty toilet paper rolls, fab-
ric paints, crayons, glue
sticks, kiddie scissors, paper
goods like paper plates,
bowls, napkins, ice cream,
money for pizzas, lunch
meat, bread, chips, snacks
and cookies,.fruit drinks and
rnicro\va\able popcorn.
To register for camp, to vol-
unteer, or to arrange for a
donation, call (941) 758-2539
(voice and TTY) of e-mail
camp@ccdhh.org.


r IF YOU KNOW SEAFOOD
A Bitofo YOU NEED TO KNOW US
S t SUMMER SPECIAL
Shrimp Cocktail on Crisp Cold
Garden Salad with Dressing & Cocktail
Sauce on the Side Only $6.99
Cool Crisp Garden Salad with a Cup of
OSlO Our Famous New England Clam
Chowda Only $5.25
S 496-458 Dinner for Two Only $22 All Day
ues.- Sat.11AM 8PM 2 Cups of Clam Chowda
Friday 11:00 tl 9 PM 2 Haddock or Cod Platters
1939 S.Tamiami Tr. in Venice With Rice or Fries, Cole Slaw and Tarter Sauce
For Directions 2 Soft Drinks Limited time offer. Not valid
Call For Directions w/other Offers Present coupon when ordering



Treat Yourself-
Royally At The

BREAKFAST SPECIAL$3.33
Not t b3Eggs ,i Bacii, 3 1Paincai-es .- :
I Not to be combined Wih a/ other 'ofler.No Sharing) 1
I Not valid on Sundays/Holidays Exp. 6/16/05
, --------------------------q
I ** I



Open 7a.m.- 2:30 p.m. Everyday (941)484-1840
Serving Dinner 5:00 p.m. 9 p.m. SV IO' i T0J
S Tuesday Saturday RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED
SLocated at the Veranda Inn on the Island of Venice


SUMMER
STEAK SALE
6 oz. Sirloin ......*8.99
8 oz. Sirloin.... $10.99
1 lb. T Bone... 116.99


It's A Carib Carnival
Featuring Carib Beer
Island Pepper Mill
Steak .................... $10"
Sweet & Hot Shrimps $11"
Jamaican Jerked
Half Chicken.......... $9"9


KIDS EAT Mor &Ts LUNCHES Starting at$579

FR E 1 Kld Per 2 Mdults M-S 11:380 4:00 PM
"UO f-Odi-th O~ O .-- ------NE -
HALF OFF VG 5 000Off VG:
LUNCH MENU ITEMS On $25 Purchase
AvalaSble Mon Lhru Sal 11.30AM to 4:00 PM Valid Sun thru Thur After 4:00 PM'
SNot valid with any othei offers Not valid with any other offers I


bi

Gfwupx a i
FwA Gmufex i
S"t' IVP '10A"


Pt. Charlotte
743.0055




Venice
408.8157


I.t-


Sarasota
923.6070

I


Bradenton
752.5833


ls n sc


NORMA JEAN'S BoA
Jacaranda Plaza, 1635 41 By Pass
(Opposite End to KMart) Ph. 492-5524
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS SUMMER BEER SPECIAL
Mon. Thur. 3:30 to 600 PM Norma Jean's Brew
Shrimp Basket $5.95 Norma Jeans Brew
Crab Cake Basket $5.95 All Day. Every Day
Fried Chicken Basket $5.95 990 Mugs $5 Pitchers
WE HAVE THE THE BEST FRIDAY NIGHT

BEST BURGERS FISH FRY
L in town. 3to9'M Only $6.95
Because our Customers say SO. In Restaurant Or To Go I




100% Digital 6xp

$559 to .859CWO

HEARING AIDS
Best Quality Best Service
Best Dependability Best Prices Frank Christie
Ask the man who wears hearing aids himself serving the Hard of
30 Day Trial Hearing Over 38 Years




3944 S.Tamiami T. -in Courthouse Plaza
Venice, FL 34293
U 497-0343
NEXT TO S. COUNTY ADMINISTRATION COMPLEX


Summer day camp for deaf

and hard of hearing set


r


gr


-- ----- ---------------


I


OUR TOWN 19B
SUNDAY, JUNE 12, 2005


Afb







i Qp xrlliiF rxr:dnnii rFR qi iN


1I~



*~41* ~.)
U
.4 -


E0


"O


0




-3







-
. mmm


I f


. 4


*~:. ~ ed


- 0





0.


2m)





0


jz



CD rI


UER


0

*0












rII


L





L


-MI'


I


- -gap1l -.N 1


I
[



~














*


-- -- -


- -


o -
- ~ -


FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 2005


Historic dance hall lets visitors two-step back in time


BY ALYSON WARD
GUEST WRITER


On spring and summer
nights, the long windows of
Gruene Hall stay propped
open. There's no air condi-
tioning in this creaky old
dance hall, and the jeans- and
cowboy hat-wearing dancers
inside need all the delicious
night-air breezes and cold
beer that they can get.
The ramshackle building
isn't much to look at, but
Gruene Hall, in New Braun-
fels' Gruene Historic District,
hails itself as Texas' oldest
dance hall. It was built in 1878
- just six years after Gruene
was established because
the area's cotton farmers and
their families needed a place
to socialize.
Before long, the boll weevil
and the Depression thwarted
Gruene's potential as a bust-
ling town. But in the 1970s,
the area was' revitalized as a
historic district and tourist
attraction.
Inside Gruene Hall are
long, scuffed tables and a
wooden floor for dancing (or,
depending on the show,. for
crowding toward the stage).


The walls are cluttered with
autographed black-and-
white glossies of the country-
music legends who have
played on its modest stage:
Willie Nelson, Lyle Lovett,
Merle Haggard, Jimmie Dale
Gilmore and Townes Van
Zandt.
The music still plays, too.
Marcia Ball, Ray Wylie Hub-
bard and the Greencards -
the bluegrass trio named
"best new band" at last year's
Austin Music Awards all
came around earlier this year.
Outside, the muted mel-
ody carries out over streets
that look like time stopped
somewhere around the turn
of the century.
On weekend afternoons,
Gruene's streets and shops
are filled with sightseers and
shoppers; the visitors stroll
among boutiques and an-
tique shops, pottery stores
and a wine tasting room.
In the afternoons, you get
the sense that everyone is just
hanging out, waiting for the
sun to go down. And when it
does, you'll probably see
them again at the Gristmill
River Restaurant, built from
an old cotton gin right behind


Gruene Hall. Then you'll all
wander over to the hall to
hear the music play again -
as it has for nearly 130 years.
The Gruene
Historic District
The Gruene Historic Dis-
trict is on the northern edge
of New Braunfels. Take
Interstate 35 south from Fort
Worth; after about 230 miles,
take Exit 191. Turn right on
Farm Road 306 and left on
Hunter Road. At this point,
you can probably follow the
signs to Gruene Historic
District.
What to do
Go to Gruene Hall, 1281
Gruene Road, (830) 606-1281.
In the summer, there's live
music seven days a week; in
the winter, you can at least
count on a show every Friday
and Saturday night.
Check the schedule before
you go at gruenehall.com.
Eat at the Gristmill River
,Restaurant and Bar, directly
behind Gruene Hall, at least
once.
The Gristmill, on a bluff
that looks out over the
Guadalupe River, was built
/ .


from the remains of a cotton
gin destroyed by fire in 1922.
See the menu at gristmill
restaurant.com.
Sample Texan and German
wines at the Grapevine wine
tasting room, 1612 Hunter
Road. Visit grapevinein
gruene.com for a wine list.
Shop for locally made pot-
tery at Dos Rios Pottery, 1707
Hunter Road. Visit the catalog
at dosriospottery.com.
Where to stay
You'll find plenty of inex-
pensive chain hotels in New
Braunfels. For those who pre-
fer a bed-and-breakfast,
Gruene has more, than one.
Try the Gruene Mansion Inn,
which is next to Gruene Hall
and has a beautiful wrap-
around porch for relaxing.
Rooms range from $159 to
$209 per night; call (830) 629-
2641 or go to grueneman-
sioninn.com.
The Gruene Homestead
Inn, just down the road, offers
rooms from a group of six his-
toric homes.
Rates are $105 to $185 per
night; call (800) 238-5534 or
go to gruenehomesteadinn
.com.


History Center requests info and artifacts for WWII exhibit


STAFF REPORT


The Sarasota County His-
tory Center is asking thm pub-
lic for information and arti-
facts related to local experi-
ences in Sarasota County dur-
ing World War II. The request
is in preparation for the
History Center's upcoming
exhibit commemorating the
60th anniversary of the end of
World War II. Artifacts may be
loaned for the exhibit or do-
nated to the History Center;
the exhibit is scheduled to
open later this summer.
During World War II, Sara-
sota County was home to air
bases in Sarasota and Venice,
a USO facility in Newtown
and anArmy-Navyclub at. the
Municipal Auditorium in
Sarasota, among other facili-
ties. As citizens did through-
out the nation, Sarasota
County's families often open-
ed their doors to servicemen
and women who were sta-
tioned here, offering hot
meals, cold drinks and friend-
ship to soldiers and sailors,
many of whom were far from
home.
"Our goal is for the exhibit
to reflect the atmosphere of
Sarasota County during that
era both as a 'homefront'
and a training ground," said
Ann Shank, Sarasota County
historian. "If'anyone was sta-


tioned here during the war, or
has stories or artifacts from
family members or friends
who were here at the time,
we'd like to hear from them.
We'd love to have gifts or loans
of a wide range of materials -
including uniforms, supplies,
memoirs, letters and other
memorabilia from the period.
While we are interested in
World War II ii general, the


focus of this exhibit is the lo-
cal experience during the
war."
People with information or
artifacts from the era are
asked to contact Mark D.
Smith, History Center archiv-
ist, at 861-1186.
The Sarasota County His-
tory Center is located at 701
North Tamiami Trail, Sara-
sota.


For more information
about the History Center and
its exhibits, collections and
mission, contact the Sarasota
County Call Center at 861-
5000.

Check the great meal
deals in the Green Sheet


TH LLCASSRENON130-205
1 1S S 1


Sponsored by: Venice Gondolier Sun, Barbara Jqrnigan-Marketing Consultant, MacKenzie Printing & Advertising,
Living Memories Productions, A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc., Englewood Mason & Moore Financial Team,
Boone Law Firm, Budweiser, Manatee Golf
I / JULY 1ST ALUMNI MEET & GREET 7 PM to Midnight
SA $10 donation at one location get's you into any of the following locations. Receive a wrist
band, special drink prices and appetizers. Transportation. is available between locations at
Left Coast Seafood Co. Classes of 1930-1969
ST.J. Carney's The 70'S Join the Wacky Warrior Games! Call
Buffalo Bills Holiday Inn The 80's Marilyn Arnall at (941) 350-9575
for more info. Event volunteers
Rain date: July 3rd Bogey's Restaurant Classes of 1990-2005 are needed call Amy Baker at
JULY 2ND PARTY IN THE PARK & ALUMNI PARTY (941) 416-3300.
Train Depot & Venice Archives tours begin at 10 AM. A festival will be held 12 PM to 10 PM at Centennial Park Live
music, food vendors, Budweiser & more, an alumni party will be held at the Venice Island Pub from 10 PM to 2 AM.
A For more info. www.vhsalumni.net or call (941) 207-1212.
All proceeds benefit the Venice High School Alumni Association's scholarship programs!


Special Summer
Membership
The perfect, inexpensive way to try the
best country club deal on the Suncoast.


JACARANDA WEST
COUNTRY CLUB -
. 1901 Jacaranda Blvd., Venice


.- Over 40
, Varieties Available!


TWSTR
FRZN0 LS
NOVETE


t /r- rIf-;i.Ir F rI-F[ rtr!


b Low Fat Soft, A
Serve Yogurt.
Varieties of
^ Flavors Available -


r
DIRIMP


I


I I


I


13th Annual

FDcowntown Ve nice

eni ]e



.Summer Cra Fair


*
.


*


-






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 11 B


Adopt-a-pet


I


is


"-

o .et

* Vni lIU t r


S** -

p


v pJJy g1J iv jLI ii

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. FRANCIS ANIMAL RESCUE
Deja is a little boy with a lot of love to give. He will soon grow
into his great big ears and is eager to find a family to love him.
Can you give Deja a home? St. Francis Animal Rescue is a
Nonprofit, no-kill facility, located at 1925 South Tamiami Trail,
Venice. Adoption hours are Monday through Thursday, 1-5
p.m., and Saturday, 11 a.m,-5 p.m. Call 492-6200.


P T %A9ION&@%J: i


S


-
~cuE
-
L
6.0 =


CU'E
~fW'


FLOCKS from page 8B


(305) 304-1188.
Last but not least, roosters
and hens can flock to the.
Shake Your Tail Feather
Barbecue at the Parrotdise
Bar & Grille, Mile Marker 28.5
bayside on U.S. Highway 1 on
Little Torch Key. The avian
action is to run 2-6 p.m. on
the property's sandy water-
--ront beach, with highlights
including chicken dance and
egg toss contests. Organizers
report that the party is strictly
BYOB (Bring Your Own Bird),


and prizes await the most col-
orful and most talkative birds.
For details, e-mail parrot-
disebar@yahoo.com or call
(305) 872-9989.
For more information
about ChickenFest's cackling
good time, visit the official
festival Web, site at chicken-
festkeywest.org.
For lodging information in
Key West, contact the Key
West Chamber of Commerce
at (800) LAST-KEY, or visit the
Keys Web site at fla-keys.com.


New books at the library


The following books are
available at Jacaranda Public
Library:
1. "NIRVANA BITES" by
DebiAlper:
2. "A BRIEF LUNACY" by
Cynthia Thayer.
3. "MISTRESS BRADSTREET:
THE UNTOLD LIFE OF



P .


NOW OPEN
Simply said "Itzzabetta Pizza"



Only $4.99
Toppings $1.25 ea.
Carry Out Only
Delivering to most
of Venice
Come by and get a menu &
see our brand -
new kitchen. o
Now Hiring

2045 S. Tamiami Tr., Ark Plaza|


AMERICA'S FIRST POET" by
Charlotte Gordon.
4. "KOSHER LIVING: IT'S
MORE THAN JUST THE FOOD"
by Rabbi Ron Isaacs.
5. "EARLY BIRD: A MEMOIR
OF PREMATURE
RETIREMENT" by Rodney
Rothmah.


CHOICES, CHOICES, CHOICES
You've got to see it,,
Florida's Largest Display
of Brand Name Bar Stools & Dinettes.
^ssSadti


BRADENTON s Across from Wal-Mart


Senior Friendship Center

needs volunteers


The Friendship at Home/
Faith, in Action at Venice
Senior Friendship Center,
2350 Scenic, Drive, provides
volunteers tp serve as visitors,
telephone reassurance callers,
and drivers to our more vul-
nerable seniors.
Volunteers are needed in
this program for two new
positions: Volunteer Elder
Service Assistants will work a
minimum of 10 hours per
week with staff to establish
care plans for clients. This
group of volunteers will mon-
itor the clients, work with
assigned volunteers and re-
port to the staff Elder Advo-
cates and Elder Service


Specialists.
Also needed are volunteers
to provide four. hours of
respite care per week in
clients' homes.,, For nmope
information, call Caroline
Allen at 556-3249 or Janet
Onnie at 584-0063.
Home-delivered meals
drivers are needed at Senior
Friendship Cefiters in Venice
and North Port. Also needed
in Venice are a dining re-
ceptionist and kitchen aide.
The Healthy Aging Clinic
needs dentists, dental aides,
clerical help and nurses.
Become part of "people
helping people" today. Call
Caroline Allen at 556-3249.


Let Gondolier Sun Classifieds work for you.


His name is synonymous with money and power. His magazine,
Forbes, features the latest in business trends and economic news.
Join us for our midyear review as Sieve Forbes and Edward Jones
Managing Partner Doug Hill share their thoughts on the key issues
facing investors today.
We'll discuss:
* Forbes the man publishing magnate, business icon
* How the latest trends in business may impact you
* Midyear checkpoint-does your portfolio need rebalancing?
Bring your family and friends to this free view presentation. For
reservations, please call or stop by.
Tues., June 14th
Time 11:30 AM & 6:30 PM


Call 485-6556 to
schedule an appointment
Christine Crites
244 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL 34285-2419
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
EdwardJones
Serving Individual Investonr Since e87


-


*


h.
I -
-


- C


-~ C q
~.
-
* -


O,2

C 0


-c 0




owl ~ C


= -4


'1/'



elm


I -
I -


1-
II


low~






C -


* Q


CL)



0)


Reverse Mortgage
MvERsMo Associates, LLC
Let Me show you how your
home's equity can work for you!
No Mortgage Payments No Up-Front Costs
No Credit Approval Required Receive Monthly Payments
Cash Lump Sum or Line of Credit
Call Joan Fullam
K W / for your FREE Analysis
A* 429-9195 637-7441 1-800-491-8410
www.FLreverse.com
A member of National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association


SUNDAY. JUNE 12.2005


~


-r


o


.1






FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 2005


21 B VENICE GONDOLlE N


VENUE from page 3B


Melanie at 492-9622.
Concerts


PHOTO COURTESY OF VAN WEZEL
The Van Wezel Performing
Arts Hall welcomes Dave
Mason (above) and Starship
featuring Mickey Thomas,
Saturday, June 18 at 8 p.m. at
777 North Tamiami Trail in
Sarasota. Tickets available
through the Charge-It Line,
953-3368; toll-free at (800)
826-9303, or online at van-
wezel.org.
Father's Day breakfast
The Italian American Club of
Venice holds its annual
Father's Day breakfast at 8
a.m. Sunday, June 19 at 1375
Ringling Drive. Enjoy eggs,
pancakes, bacon,. sausage,
home fries, fruit,, toast, juice
and coffee. Tickets are on sale
now: $5 for members and $6
for nonmembers. Call Carol
at 493-6279.
Balloon art
PitterPat the clown demon-
strates the basics of balloon
twisting for teens ages 9-13,
3 p.m. Monday, June 20 at
Elsie Quirk Public Library, 100
W. Dearborn St., Englewood.


All balloon supplies are free.
Register by calling 861-1212.
Architect appearance
Michael Arad, the acclaimed
designer of the World Trade,
Center Memorial, speaks at a
cocktail reception for Amer-
ican Friends of The Hebrew
University, Wednesday, June
22, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at G. Wiz,
the Hands-on Science Mu-
seum, 1001 Boulevard of the
Arts in Sarasota. Arad was
selected from 5,201 competi-
tors for his design, "Reflecting
Absence." Space is limited
and reservations are required.
Call AFHU at (800) 899-2348.
Get Connected
The Women's Resource Cen-
ter of Sarasota County is start-
ing a Get Connected series
with a home state theme. The
state of Michigan will be the
focus of the first meeting,
Thursday, June 23, 2:30-
5 p.m. at 806 Pinebrook Road
in Venice. Meet and mingle
at this free event. RSVP to
485-9724.
Dance
Gotta Dance Studio holds a
first anniversary bash 8-11
p.m. Saturday, June 25 at 4-
Bays Center, 303 South Tam-
iami Trail in Nokomis. Open
dancing between dance dem-
onstrations, prizes galore,
great music, hors d'oeuvres
and 'wine. Tickets: $15.
Everyone welcome. For more
information, call 486-0326.
Boating course
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary Flotilla 82 holds a one-
dayAmerican Boating Course
Saturday, June 25 at 9 a.m. on
the third floor of the Keating
Building, Mote Marine, La-


boratory, Ken Thompson
Parkway, Sarasota. This
course is required for persons
under 21 to operate boats
with more than 9.9 horse-
power. Cost: $20 per family
includes book and materials.
Register by calling Mr. Alfred
at 378-5620.
Youth babysitter course
The American Red Cross
holds a babysitter's course
for young people, June 25, 10
a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Venice
Public Library, 300 S. Noko-
mis Ave. Registration required
and $35 fee. Call 861-1348.
Dad's dinner
Venice-Nokomis Fraternal
Order of Eagles #3482 holds a
late Father's Day dinner on
Sunday, June 26 at 621
Colonia Lane in Nokomis.
Enjoy roast beef, mashed
potatoes and gravy, veggies
and dessert. Free for fathers
with membership card and
$6 for ladies. Call 828-7742.
Juggling fun
Teens ages 9-13 are invited to
a juggling workshop at 3 p.m.
Monday, June 27 at Elsie
Quirk Public Library, 100 W.
Dearborn St., Englewood. A
materials fee" of $7 will be
charged. Register by calling
861-1212.
Hurricane workshop
The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
hosts a Hurricane Prepar-
edness Workshop for Deaf
and Hard of Hearing people
on Tuesday, June 28 at 6 p.m.
at 628 Cypress Ave. in Venice.
Ann Miller from the Sarasota
County Emergency Manage-
ment discusses surviving
hurricane season. Call Sarah


at (941) 758-2539 (phone or
TDD), videophone at (941)
758-2542, or e-mail
sharris@ccdhh.org.
Bridge luncheon
The Venice-Nokomis Wom-
en's Club hosts a benefit
bridge luncheon at noon,
Wednesday, June 29 at 200
North Harbor Drive in Venice.
Tickets are $7.50 and pro-
ceeds benefit the Scholarship
Fund and Civic Activities.
Call 493-0605 or 493-7068.
Florida House classes
Sarasota County Extension
Service holds free public pro-
grams Wednesdays at 2 p.m.
at the Florida House Learning
Center, 4600 South Beneva
Road in Sarasota, on the cam-
pus of SCIT at Beneva and
Proctor Roads. Registration
required by calling 316-1200.
June 29, 2-3 p.m.: Hurricanes
vs. Trees; July 6, 2-3:30 p.m.:
Hurricane Shutter Class; July
13, 2-3 p.m.: Hurricane Sur-
vival Kit: Emergency Sup-
plies; 'July 20, 2-4 p.m.: Ants,
ants, ants; July 27, 2-4 p.m.:
Termite Biology and Control;
Aug. 10, 2-3:30 p.m.: Hur-
ricane Shutter Class.
M6vie and discussion
Serenity Gardens and rela-
tionship experts Gay and
Kathlyn Hendricks present
"Into Me See," about the
transformative power of rela-
tionships, 6:30-9 p.m. Thurs-'
day, June 30 and Saturday;
July 2 at 530 South U.S. 41
Bypass in the Brickyard Plaza
in Venice. Tickets are $15.
Registration required by call-
ing 486-3577.
Reunions
* The Venice High School All-


Class Reunion takes place
July 1 and 2 (rain date July
3). All attendees of Venice-
Nokomis High School or
Venice High School are wel-
come. Events throughout
Venice each day. Call 207-
1212 or visit vhsalumni.net.
Volunteers needed: Call Amy
at 416-3300.
* Graduates from Miami High
School Class of 1960 are in-
vited to their 45th class
reunion at the Don Shula
Hotel and Golf Club in Miami
Lakes. Save July 29-31 for a
fun-filled weekend. Contact
Sherrin at (305) 448-2598 or
sas56chevy@aol.com.
Independence Day
The Italian American Club
of Venice hosts a Country
Western Independence Day
celebration Sunday, July 3, 5-9
p.m., featuring live entertain-
ment, great food, fun and
games at 1375 Ringling Drive.
The menu includes hot dogs,
burgers, chicken, chili, corn
on the cob and more.,
Horseshoes, bocci and other
activities for the whole family.
Tickets are $8 for members
and $10 for nonmembers. For
more information, callEstelle
at 223-4008.
Tropical Fourth of July
A patriotic music concert by
Sarasota Concert Band high-
lights the Marie Selby
Botanical Gardens' Tropical
Fourth of July celebration
Monday; July 4 at 6 p.m. on
the Gardens' bay front
grounds. Festivities start at
6 p.m. with a cookout, chil-
dren's games, face painting
and family fun, culminating
in a fireworks display over the
bay. Tickets are $18 in ad-
vance for adults, $17 for


members, and free for chil-
dren 12 and younger, and are
available by calling 366-5731,
Ext. 260, at the Welcome
Center at 900 S. Palm Ave., or
online at selby.org.
Watercolor sessions
Come paint with Max at the
Englewood Art Center, 350
South McCall Road. Enjoy a
three-week session with in-
structor, Max Muller, Fridays,
9 a.m.- 3 p.m. Choose your
own subject matter and learn
the method of layering or
glazing and how to become a
better watercolor artist. Max.
will help with layout, compo-
sition and sketching. Next
session starts July. Fee: $60 for
members, $85 for nonmem-
bers. For more information,
call 474-5548. '
Golf benefit
The Marines Corps Reserve
holds its third annual Toys for
Tots Golf Benefit Saturday,
July 9 at Bent Tree Country
Club, 4700 Bent Tree Boul-
evard in Sarasota. This four-
person scramble event, pro-
ceeds of which will benefit
tsunami victims in Phuket,
Thailand and Madras, India,
includes lunch, beverages
and 18 holes with cart. 7:30
a.m. registration, 8:30 a.m.
shotgun start. Fee: $75 per
person. Call Ray McGuire at
485-6005 or Top Harrison at
485-9045.
Kids theater camp
Lemon Bay Playhouse holds
summer theater camp for
ages 7-12, July 18-30, Monday
through Friday mornings.
Cost is $50. Registration
begins July 5. Call (941) 475-
6756 or visit 96 W. Dearborn
St., Englewood.


HEALTH from page4B


are proud to co-sponsor
monthly Living Smart Dia-
betes Seminars held at the
Englewood Community Hos-
pital Cafeteria June 20. If you
are serious about managing
your diabetes, we, invite you
to attend this seminar. The
cost of this program is cov-
ered by Medicare and most
insurance. Complimentary
lunch provided. Class size is
limited, so call to reserve a
space at 207-3000.
CCDHH summer camp
AprogramofThe Conmnunity
Center for the Deaf and Hard
of Hearing of Manatee/
Sarasota, Inc., June 20- 24,. 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. for Manatee &
Sarasota K-fifth-grade deaf
and hard of hearing children
and their siblings and chil-
dren of deaf and hard of
hearing parents. CCDHH of
Manatee/Sarasota Inc. is'


SAFETY from page 4B
reached this temperature in,
one hour.
Cold perishable food like
luncheon meats, cooked
meats, chicken, and potato or
pasta salads should be kept in
ar insulated cooler packed
with several inches of ice,;
frozen gel packs, or contain-
ers of frozen water to keep
the temperature belbw 41
degrees.
Keep the cooler in the
coolest part .of the. car, and
place in the shade or shelter,
out of the sun, whenever pos-
sible. Chill cold drinks in a
separate cooler to avoid con-
stantly opening the one con-
taining perishable foods. .
Preserve the cold temper-"
ature of the cooler by replen-
ishing the ice as soon as it
starts melting.
Take-out food: If you
don't plan to eat take-out
food within two hours of pur-
chase, plan ahead and chill
the food in your refrigerator
before packing for your out-
ing.
Following these simple
food safety tips can help en-
sure a picnic or backyard bar-
becue is a celebration rather
than resulting in any number
of food-borne illnesses which,
while rarely fatal, can make
one violently ill -sometimes
for number of days.

You can e-mail Rene
Lapierre at rlapierre@
sun-herald.com.


located at 5107 14th St. W,
Bradenton. To register, con-
tact (941) 758-2539 V/TTY or
e-mail camp@ccdhh.org. Vol-
unteers are needed to work at
the camp from 8:30 to 3:30
p.m. If you are interested,
contact Wanda McMullen at
camp@ccdhh.org. To make
camp successful, we will need
donations of: empty toilet
paper rolls, fabric paints,
crayons, glue sticks, kiddie
scissors, paper goods like
paper plates, bowls, napkins,
etc., ice cream, money for piz-
zas, lunch meat, bread, indi-
vidual packs of chips, snacks
and cookies, fruit drinks and
microwave popcorn..
Stroke support
The Stroke Support and
Education Group will meet
on Wednesday, June 22, from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. .in the
Englewood Community Hos-
pital Suncoast Auditorium.
Please RSVP'to 475-3558.
Sneezing
Learn about plants, that make
you sneeze from Dr. Mary
Jelks at Selby Library on
Wednesday, June 22, at 2 p.m.
in the Geldbart Auditorium,
1331 First St., Sarasota. The
local retired pediatrician and
pollen counter will discuss
allergy plants and their nose-
tickling 'effects. The program
is free and open to the public.
No advance registration is
necessary. For more informa-
tion contact the Sarasota
County Call Center at (941)
861-5000.
Memory Care Support
The Memory care Support
group will meet Thursday,
June 23, at 2:30 p.m. at Ster-
ling House, 550 Rotonda
Blvd., Rotonda West. Call
698-1198.

Youth babysitter course
The American Red Cross
holds a babysitter's course for
young people, June 25, 10
a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Venice
Public Library, 300 S. Noko-
mis Ave. Registration required
and $35 fee. Call 861-1348.
ASL Improv Night
The Second Annual ASL
Improve Night will feature sev-
eral Deaf and Hearing enter-
tainers on Saturday, June 25,
7:30 p.m. at the Tampa
Westshore Marriott Hotel,
Tampa. Invited entertainers
include Keith Wann, Crom
Saunders, Sarah Harris and


others. Come and be pre-
pared to be laughing so hard'
and you may fall off the chair
like some people did last year.
Hotel rooms are available at
$84 per night; ask for Silent
Weekend Rate. For more
information, go to
aslimprov.com.
Free hearing screening
The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
(CCDHH) is proud to offer
free hearing screenings June
27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to
anyone interested. A trained
hearing aid specialist and/or
audiologist will be on site to
conduct individualized eval--
uations, make recommenda-
tions and provide informa-
tion regarding hearing loss.
The screening will be held at
the CCDHH, 5107 14th St. W,
Bradenton. Call 758-2539 to
make your appointment.
Hurricane preparedness
The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
is hosting a Hurrican
Preparedness. Workshop for
deaf and hard-of-hearing
people 6 p.m. on June 28 in
the CCDH Venice office at 628
Cypress Ave. Call 758-2539.
SHHH.'
* Instead of regular meetings
during the summer, member
and friends will join for
lunchtime at noon the first
Friday of July, August and
September at the Super Inter-
national Buffet at Charlotte
Square, 2200 Tamiami Trail
in Port Charlotte. Call (941)
575-1914.
SouthernSoftball
Association of
the Deaf Inc.
Southern Softball Association
of the Deaf is having its third
co-ed Softball Tournament
hosted by the Greater Tampa
Bay Association of the Deaf
Inc. July 7-10, at the Greco
Softball Complex,' 11000 N.
50th St., Tampa. The event
will be headquartered at
Holiday Inn Tampa/Busch
Gardens at 2701 E. Fowler
Ave., Tampa. Hotel reserva-
tion: (813) 971-4710 Code:
SAD Room Rate: one to four
persons, $64 plus tax. Combo
at Door: $35. Make a check or
money order to
SSAD/GTBAD 2005 Maria
Elmore, 7081 44th St. N.
Pinellas Park. Personal checks
will not be accepted after
June 20, and reservations are


non-refundable. Contact Ma-
ria Elmore at gtbadtreasur-
er@aol.com or go to ssad.net
Captioning the
Imagination
InSight Cinema is a nonprofit
organization dedicated to
bringing the big screen.
movie-going experience to
the 30 million deaf and hard-
of-hearing (DHH) and Eng-
lish-as-a-second-language
(ESL) audiences in the United
States. Open-captioned films
confirmed for Florida are:
* Fort Myers, Regal Bell Tower,
"Sahara," June 20 and 21
* Naples, Regal Hollywood 20,
"The. Longest Yard," July 25-
26
* Sarasota, -Regal Hollywood
20, "The Interpreter," June 13-
14
* Sarasota, Regal Hollywood
20, "The Longest Yard," July
11-12
* St. Petersburg, Muvico
Baywalk 20, "Moster in Law,"
June 19-21 '
* Tampa Regal Citrus Park,
"Monster in Law," June 20-
21
For show times, visit
insightcinema.org/links and
follow the links to the the-
aters. Please be aware that
many theaters do not post
show times until a few days
before the showing.
Discounted golf
The Arthritis Foundation Golf
Book allows you to golf at
more, than 230 Florida cours-
es at free green fees with cart
rental or reduced green fees.
Books are $15. Buy three, get
one free. The book is valid
through'Oct. 31. and is avail-
able at Edwin Watts Golf
Shop, 6230 Lake Osprey Drive
'in Lakewood Ranch, or call
907-1060. Send check or
money order made payable
Arthritis Foundation to: Arth-
ritis Foundation, 501 Village
Green Pkwv.. No. 5, Braden-
ton, 34209.

H2U-Health, Happiness, You
of Englewood Community'
Hospital, 700 Medical Blvd.,
473-5048
* Bridge club Fridays, 2-5 p.m.
Refreshments provided. Cost
is $1 a person.
* Hatha yoga, Thursdays, 5-6
p.m. Taught by certified
instructor Linda Davison.
* Easy Does It exercise classes,
Monday, 4-5 p.m. Taught by
certified instructor Paula
Flammia.
* T'ai chi classes three days a


week: Tuesdays, 3-4 p.m.,
advanced t'ai chi Tuesdays, 4-
4:30 p.m. Friday, 12:30-1:30
p.m., and Saturdays, 12:30-
1:30, p.m. Taught by certified
yang-style instructor Nancy
Dellamura. Cost per class for
nonmembers 'is $3. Senior
Friends are $1; advanced
class is $2 and $4 for non-
members. .
* Card club Tuesdays at 1:30
p.m. in the cafeteria, Games
include 65, pinochle, Hand,
and Foot (Canasta) and Phase
10. Coffee and cookies pro-
vided. Cbst is $1 per person.

Alcoholics Anonymobs meets
Tuesday and Thursdays at
7:30 p.m. at Englewood Com-
munity Hospital, 700 Medical
Blvd. Call 466-7655.

Acupuncture
Susan Davis, acupuncture
physician offers free weekly
support groups, is located in
Wellness Services Inc. at the
Brickyard, 530 U.S. 41 Bypass,
Unit 22-A, Venice. Programs
include Stop Smoking, Tues-
days, noon-1 p.m. This multi-
modality approach combines
ear acupuncture, relaxation
and behavioral change to


assure your success. Chronic
Pain, Wednesdays, 2-3 'p.m.
and weight loss, Thursdays,
noon-1 p.m., which is a com-
prehensive program that
includes acupuncture, weight
monitoring and support to
keep you on goal. Facial reju-
venation is also available by
appointment. Call 412-1686.

Red Cross Infant/Child and
Adult CPR, AED.and First Aid
courses are offered in Venice
the third Saturday each
month. Call 379-9300,' Ext.
242, or visit southwestflori-
da.redcross.org.

Low-cost meals
The cafeteria at Venice Re-
gional Medical Center, 540
'The Rialto, Venice, contin-
ues to offer specially priced
evening meals to those who
are 55 years old or older.
Meals are offered in the hos-
pital cafeteria, 5-6 p.m.,
daily, and include a selected
entree, starch, vegetable
fountain drink and a dessert
- all for $4.60. Parking
available in the hospital
garage or you may valet
park. Weekly menus are
posted outside the cafeteria.


Joanne Sergo joins Suncoast

Communities Blood Bank


PHOTO COURTESY OF SCBB
Suncoast Communities Blood Bank is pleased to
announce that Joanne Sergo joined its staff as a
Recruiter in May 2005. To learn about blood donations
or how to schedule a blood drive, call Joanne at
863-993-9366 or e-mail her at jsergo@scbb.org.
One blood donation can help save up to three lives!










VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 13B


FRID A IIINF 103. n0'


s-"Copyrighted Material. -

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


MILLER frompage 7B


So, how did you do?
Did you know everything
or did some of the answers
surprise you?
If ypu want to take the full
IQ test you can order a free
booklet or see it online at
niapublications.org.
: Savvy resource
National Institute on
Aging: Offers lots of great
publications on health, aging
and care gimgiss,ues, most


SENIOR from page 7B


700 Medical Blvd. Call Sandy
at (941) 475-3615.
Seniors group
Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-
3:30 p.m. for a meeting and
cards. Call 485-8739.
Volunteers needed
The Foster Grandparent
Program of Southwest Flor-
ida, sponsored by the Dr.,
Piper Center for Social Serv-,
ices Inc., needs senior volun-
teers, age 60 or older to
become foster grandparents
and tutor and mentor chil-
dren in Head Start Centers in
Sarasota County. Foster
grandparents serve 15-20
hours a week and receive a
tax-free stipend of $2.65 an
hour, plus mileage reim-
bursement of $0.29 per mile,
plus an annual physical
examination. Call Joan at
(800) 332-5346.
Senior Friendship Centers
Free; donations encouraged.
SFC 2350 Scenic Drive, 584-
0052
* Camera Club, Mondays, 10
a.m.
* Dancercise, Mondays, 11


of which are free. To see
what's available visit niapub-
lications.org or call (800) 222-
2225.

Send your senior questions
to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box
5443, Norman, OK 73070, or
visit www.savvyseniororg.
Jim Miller is a regular con-
tributor to the NBC "Today
Show" and author of "The
Savvy Senior" book.


a.m.-12:15 p.m. Call 584-
0075.
* Beginners basket weaving,
Tuesday, 10 a.m.-noon.
* Pine Needle Weaving, Tue-
sdays, 10 a.m.
* Yoga In/Around a Chair,
Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
*WednesdayWalkers, 9 a.m.
* Italian, Wednesdays, 2:45
p.m.
* Attorney consultations,
third Thursday, 1:4 p.m.
Complimentary 30-minute
consultation with Marcella
Mika of Wilson & Mika, PA.
and Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30
a.in. with Elizabeth Weis,
Attorney Emeritus with Legal
Aid of Manasota. Reserve
your time slot by calling 584-
0075.
* Quilting for Fun, Thursdays,
9-11:30 a.m. Bring own mate-
rials.
* Beginner Bridge, Thursdays,
9 a.m.
* Shell crafts, Thursdays, 1-3
p.m.
* .Balance movement class,
Friday, 9 'a.m. Includes
warm-ups and simple
strength building. It is recom-
mended that individuals
attend the Balance Matters
Falls Prevention introduction
before.starting this class. Call
556-3223.


This tortoise was found burrowing under a fence at the back of
Oscar Scherer State Park. Fences can't keep tortoises out if
they want to get in. They're expert burrowers.


GOPHER from page 1B
working.
These reptiles are also at
risk of an upper respiratory
disease that can spread
quickly to other tortoises. The
tricky job of relocation
belongs to many organiza-
tions. The Gopher Tortoise
Council is one such organiza-
tion.
According to the council,
habitat alteration and land
development pose the most
serious threat to the contin-
ued survival of the gopher
tortoise. Both people and tor-
toises like to live in high, dry
areas. In addition, phosphate,
limestone and sand mining
have destroyed countless
acres of tortoise habitat, par-
ticiularly in Central Florida.
John Jensen, cochair of the
council, said the tortoises can
be found anywhere the water
table'is far enough under-
ground or the sand is deep
enough for them to burrow. It
is a wonder why more haven't
been crushed in parking lots
and at beaches.
"Human uses have .dis-
placed a number of them," he
said. "They are still not listed
federally, though."
The Gopher Tortoise


Council has raised money to
find homes for displaced tor-
toises, promotes the conser-
vation of gopher tortoises and
upland habitats, as well as,
advocate conservation.
"There are lots of tortoises
in our region," said Alex
Kropp, assistant regional
nongame biologist, for FWC.
"People can start the permit
process by calling me, but,
standard relocation permits
are done through the Talla-
hassee office."
Turtles in town
In Venice, a large number
of tortoises have made Pine-
brook Park their home. Bur-
rows can be found around the
perimeter. The area also serv-
es as a storage area for the
city's line rock. In the future,
when the park is expanded,
they may have to be relocat-
ed.;
- The reason for relocation is
because they are a species of
special concern. Encroach-
ment on territories has push-
ed them into Florida and
South Georgia, probably the
two last domains for them.
According to the state of
Georgia's Web site, it is the
state reptile. It was designated
as such in 1989 because it's


SUN PHOTOS BY JEREMY ROTTGEN
Oscar Scherer State Park is home to many gopher tortoise, and
this burrow is situated near the entrance by the parking lot. A
family of rabbits live in the burrow as well.


one of the oldest living spe-
cies native to Georgia and it
belongs to a group of land
tortoises that originated in
North America 60 million
years ago.
Chris. Becker, an environ-
mental specialist for the De-
partment of. Environmental
Protection at Oscar Scherer
State Park, said the tortoise
needs to be regarded more as
endangered, so it "doesn't get
added to the list of endan-
gered species.
"Some people are still out
there poaching them," he
said. "To some people in Flor-
ida that's what they've always
done."
Tortoises are easy game
and during the Depression
they became a popular food.
Depression-era tortoises
were called Hoover chickens.
Since 2000, the gopher tor-
toise doesn't exist outside of
its protected areas, which
include Florida and Georgia.
The reptile is endangered in
Louisiana, Mississippi and
parts of Alabama. Florida, by
far, has the most terrain for
them.
Tortoises at Oscar Scherer
enjoy a completely natural
setting with plenty of grass to
eat. One brave tortoise lives in.


the parking lot at the entrance
to the park. A family of rabbits
is said to share the burrow
with the tortoise. When con-
trolled bums are enacted at
the park the reptiles are not
harmed because they retreat
underground.
Gopher tortoises can be
found roaming the scrubs
near a beach or munching on
grass blades near forests. At
Manasota Beach you can eas-
ily find a significant number
of burrows near the beach
and by the parking lot.
They're fun to look for be-
cause they don't venture out
too often, so seeing one is a
rare treat.
Usually the tortoise will
emerge to forage for about an
hour. If you are searching for
them, the best places are well
elevated above water and in
scrub-filled areas. Your
chances are even better if you
find burrow nearby. Observ-
ing them isenjoyable, but
they should not be disturbed
unless they are trying to cross
a busy road.
Contact the Lakeland FWC
office's 24-hour law enforce-
ment line at (863) 648-3200 if
you witness a tortoise being
disturbed without the proper
permits.


Makeadeallyappy WithOe Of These

FA ETHE'JS DAY



GOLF GLOVES !
US Tour Premium Cabretta
Small thru X Large In Both Regular and Cadet. /
Reg.$9.95 Now Only $6.99 '-

GOLF CART
Reg. $49.99 Sale $09
M-330 Father's Day $34.99

ALL GOLF BAGS

$20 OFF Over $99.99


V


~, (1 Mile S. of Jacaranda Blvd.)
4419 S. TamiamiTr., S. Venice, FL 34293
Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9am-5:30pm Tues. & Fri. 9am-8pm
493-0025


COOK'S/
SPORTLAND, INC.


ENJOY A MILLION DOLLAR VIEW
For much less than a million. Golf course view, on the
water overlooking 5 fairways! Three bedrooms, 2.5 baths,
2 car garage. New roof and A/C. Electric hurricane
shutters. $380,000. Call now for your appointment to see
this home TODAY! Joan Hawkins, PA Key Realty, Inc.
Office: 474-3228 or Direct: 266-0779.


x# ge.ay, .4o.


8 1201 S. McCall Road
Englewood, FL 34223


Joan C. Hawkins
!Broker-Salesperson
Office: 941-474-3228
Fax: 941-473-2604
Toll Free: 888-850-4539
joan @ keyagency.net


The Smile Centre
State of the Art Esthetic and





BEFORE




AFTER




Wren Gardner, D.D.S Rebecca Swartz, D.M.D.


941-351-4468 941-497-5451 941-474-1245


10 0 Includes: I

10 Vents One Cold Air Return
One Main Duct Single Zone System
Technician will give estimate for some systems that
may require additional services
IMPROVES THE AIR QUALITY IN YOUR HOME!
-er,'..es dirt, dust, animal dondef onr p .len
I Reduces air c..rond'ti, ninra oad hIeahrng cor, "t,.I.in bio'.,ter fan
and A,'C c ,il cleaning
Electrostatic flteo s ori, o mnl'irlon procrarri available,
I ASK ABOUT OUR COMMERCIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING I
AND DECONTAMINATION PROCESS I
8 am 8 pm Coll Todoy I
America's Best Cleaning & Restoration I
I 412-9206 Venice I
-, I ....766-8709 Pt. Char. l."
6 -- ----i i--- -a a -


ServiceToday Or it's Free
i 0id *i0jJi ; *daCm


Ourthoght an
pr fljs rewt

0~ ~ f of our00**I


rmut I, UPILIV, -VV


I











ONE LAST WORD


"This benefit of seeing... can come only if you pause a while,
extricate yourself from the maddening mob of quick impressions
ceaselessly battering our lives, and look thoughtfully at a quiet
image... the viewer must be willing to pause, to look again, to
meditate." Dorothea Lange, Photographer (1895-1965)


SUNDAY
JUNE 12,2005


ani mal esev es at ance


-- From the Mission Statement, St. Francis Annimal Rescue of Venice


JEFF TAVARES
PHOTO EDITOR


Exact numbers are. impossible
to determine, but some feline
experts estimate there are more
than 60 million feral cats, offspring
of stray or abandoned household
cats, in the United States.'
More than 200 of that total cur-
rently live and wait for adoption at
the St. Francis Animal Rescue of
Venice.
Adoption Coordinator Alberta
Erickson has worked at the shelter
since November 2004.
"You get here and you see so.
many animals that need help.'
They've been abandoned, they've
been double-crossed by humanity.
They don't know why they're here,
what they did wrong ... and it just
goes on and on and on, you get
frustrated, you lose sleep at night
crying," responds Erickson when


asked why she works at the shelter,
Thousands of organizations
and shelters across the United
States continue to fight against the
odds to find homes for these cats
and to educate the public on the
need for neutering and spaying.
The St. Francis shelter averages
one cat adoption a day. With more
cats being brought in each day, the
facility faces tough odds to just,
keep even witththe problem.
The shelter is a "nokill" facility.
Cats are not euthanized when
populations at the facility become
overwhelming.
In 1993 Judy Lane, a cofounder,
and current vice president of St.
Francis, discovered 28 cats living at
the North Jetty in Nokomis. Lane'
began making trips to the je.my to
feed and care for the cats.
The cats survived for months
with care from Lane and other
women from the Venice area.


Three months after Lane and
the women began caring for the:
feral cats at .the jetty, they were
joined by Grace Joyce, cofounder,
and current president, and Angle
DiGregorio, also a cofounder.:
By then the cat population.
around the jetty had grown to
more than 50.
Then the three women had an
idea. They got some traps and
began capturing the animals and
bringing thqm to their own homes.
Each cat was taken to the vet for a'
physical. treated and given any.
necessary medications.
After some yard sales, money
raised through the operation of a
thrift store and a loan, the women
opened the nonprofit St. Francis
Animal Rescue of Venice in July
1995. The shelter is still located in
'its original location at 1925 South
Tamiami Trail in South Venice.
Cats are everywhere in the


seven small rooms that. maze
through the building. There are
not enough cages to house all of
the cats, and it is difficult'to take
more than three steps in any direc-
tion without finding a cat in your,
path.
The staff is helped by a core of
volunteers who spend mornings
cleaning the facility and caring for
the cats.
Carolyn Matthews is one of,
those volunteers.
"I love animals. I have four cats.
and two dogs at home and my
husband says no more cats in the
house, so I come here and get to
pet a hundred of them and feel like
I've done something to help," says
Matthews.
Matthews is now an 'adoption
counselor, which means she is,
directly responsible for getting the
cats new homes.
For Adoption Coordinator


Alberta Erickson, the struggle con-
tinues to find homes for the cats of
St. Francis. The struggle is a frus-
trating one.
"We even picked up one moth-
er cat with her kittens that were in
a box, put out with all the moving
trash. The neighbors heard them
crying. People are so irresponsit
ble," said Erickson.
U.S. animal shelters are forced
to kill an estimated 15 million
homeless cats and dogs annually

The St. Francis Animal Rescue.
of Venice is located at 1925 South
Tarniami Trail in Venice. They are
open Monday through Thursday,
1-5 p.m. and Saturday, 11 a.m.-5
)p.m. For more information, call
492-6200.

Jeff Tavares can be reached at
jtavares@venicegondolier.com.


SUN PHOTOS BY JEFF TAVARES


Left: Alberta Erickson has served as adoption coordinator since November 2004. Above: The shelter is
located at 1925 South Tamiami Trail in Venice. Right: One of more than 200 cats awaits adoption.













Sun
Southwest Florida's Guide To j


THE SUN





C oasdeling Your Home
Building & Remodeling Your Home \ .


Sunday June 12, 2005


Editor: Donna Davidson at ddavidson@sun-herald.com


A section of the Sun


-noto proviaea


The Carll Burr Homes' Malaya starts at $319,900 on the buyer's lot.


GRAND OPENING



Carll urr



unveils the



Malaya


STAFF REPORT
r'he Burr family brings its legacy of building luxurious
upscale homes and a commitment to creating
communities since 1948, from Northport, N.Y., to
North Port, Fla.
Carll Burr Realty LLC and Carll Burr Homes LLC,
announces the opening of its new realty offices located at
12457-Tamriami Trail, Units l and 2 in North Port, Fla.
This is a temporary office location while the new office
space is under construction at the North Port Commons.
Carll Burr Homes LLC also announces the opening of the
first of three models located at 3423 W Price Blvd. in North
Port. The grand opening of the flagship Malaya model home
will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., June 17, 18 and 19.
For more information, please call Sales and Marketing
Director Carolyn Hawkins or Barrie White at the Malaya
model at (941) 426-1616.
PRICES AND STANDARD FEATURES ARE LISTED ON PAGES 3


COASTAL

LIVING


Need a builder?
Click on Membership at
www.charlottecountychamber.org


RIDING THE BOOM
See page 2


Find your new home
and Sun Coost Homes features
on Sun Web.site
welcome-home.com


Builder expands low-cost model


MIAMI-June 9, 2005--As
More people turn to the
Internet to buy and sell their
homes, Homekeys, a South
Florida-based company, has
begun the rollout of a new
business model that pro-
vides powerful tools and
services directly to con-
sumers, allowing them to
bypass industry profession-'
als. The company, operating
-in Miami-Dade County, has
recently moved its services
into Broward County and is
in the process of expanding
to Palm Beach and other
densely populated Florida
counties'.
"The architecture and
design of our technology
facilitates rapid deployment
and expansion throughout
the country," says Home-
keys President and CEO
Manuel Iraola. Homekeys
plans for a national expan-
sion into select markets
between the fourth quarter
of this year and the first
quarter of 2006. ,
Homekeys delivers the
knowledge, tools and
resources consumers need
to buy and sell confidently
on their own. As a result,
buyers and sellers maintain
control of the transaction
and enjoy unparalleled
savings.
"There is little differentia-
tion among the offerings of
traditional full-service
brokerage firms," says
Iraola. "Discounters sell the
traditional package for a
little less. The a-la-carte
companies unbundle the
traditional package and sell
it piece-by-piece. But these
business models have more
:commonalities than differ-
ences. They all rely on an
intermediary who controls
the information, and subse-
quently the transaction
between buyer and seller.
This limits consumer choice
and adds thousands of
dollars in costs. Homekeys is
different! We provide tech-
nology and services to
transform the traditional
business model, not perpet-


"Map searches
and other
advancements
have really
improved the
way people
search for
properties in
recent years.
We've taken this
a step further by
adding a value
component to
property searches ."
Manuel Iraola,
Homekeys President and CEO

uate it."
Today, real estate profes-
sionals rely on sophisticated
tools and technology to help
them buy and sell properties
effectively. Homekeys make
powerful, user-friendly
versions of these tools
available directly to con-
sumers. In fact, some of the
tools and technology Home-
keys provides to its sub-
scribers can't be found
anywhere,else.
For example, Homekeys
features the patent-pending
ValueKey(TM) and Value-
Search(TM) Web-based
tools. ValueKey(TM) enables
buyers, sellers and investors
to get objective, real-time
estimates of current proper-
ty values. ValueSearch(TM)
;helps buyers and investors
quickly find and evaluate
potentially undervalued,
properties.
"Map searches and other
advancements have really
improved the way people
search for properties in
recent years. We've taken
this a step further by adding.
a value component to
property searches," Iraola
said. "This is the first time a
tool like ValueSearch(TM)
has been available, even to


real estate professionals.
ValueSearch(TM) helps
consumers find potentially
undervalues homes in a
matter of seconds."
The innovative Home-
keys.netWebsite is backed
by Homekeys' professional
staff and partners, who
provide what they call a "no
worries, real savings"
experience for buyers and.
sellers. In addition to tools
and services, the company'
also offers low-cost contract
review and preparation
through attorneys in its
Homekeys Title & Escrow
group.
"Industry change is /
inevitable because con-
sumer behaviors and atti-
tudes about real estate have
changed. By combining
innovative tools and tech-
nology with the services
people need, Homekeys
delivers real value at an
extremely low price point,"
Iraola said. "We feel that
Homekeys is the best
available alternative for
consumers who/want to take
charge of their real estate
transactions, get better
results and preserve the
equity that's lost through
high transaction costs."
About Homekeys
HomeXperts Inc. d/b/a
Homekeys is a South-Florida
based developer, integrator,
and distributor of innovative
Web-based content, applica-
tions and resources for the
real estate market. HomeX-
perts Inc. 'd/b/a Homekeys
is a real estate broker-in the
State of Florida licensed
(License CQ1019055) by the
Florida Real Estate Commis-
sion, through the Depart-
ment of Business and
Professional Regulation,
Division of Real Estate.
HomeXperts Inc. d/b/a
Homekeys is an Equal
Housing Opportunity
Corporation and abides by
the Code & Ethics of the
National Association' of
REALTORS(R). For rhore
information, visit
www.homekeys.net.


Now Selling Very Active Lifestyles

In Cypress Falls At The Woodlands.
There' noil lo :,t c.:o,n-tru,:or, a,:u.i going o,: at C)re> Fall. But as our construction
activity) rinds doTin, our recreaatiorin, activities -ill b,.n And it you act now, you can have
first choice of our most desirable homesites. It's a great opportunity to live in a beautiful
community with plenty of opportunities to be as active as you want to be.
Cypress Falls at The Woodlands is located in North Port just minutes from 1-75.
The community will feature a resort-style clubhouse chock full of activities, and offers
a wide selection of home styles that fit perfectly with your active adult lifestyle.
Although our models aren't complete, you can see them up and furnished nearby at our
sister community Venetian Falls. From 1-75, take the Jacaranda Boulevard exit, travel south,
turn left onto Center Road. Venetian Falls is on the left across from Rockley Boulevard.


AT-''9"B"
A T T H :E 1\ 0 ) 0 I 1 A, N I)
For more details call (941) 737-9538
or visit www.centexhomes.com


VENICE

SOT VNC
SOUTH VENICE
.5***'


"~~rc: -


I-I
\Li


'~~~- F.";I~ ..0 x-W % --wmc"~g


E 7wa'-
CENTEX HOMES .,NYSE
Over 50 Years ol'Building Homes
2-Year Fit & Finish Warranty I CIA Pylortgage Commercel'itle 0 Centex Insuranck- A(vencN,
1"icir"j, plans'llid spoolwat I., "'object to cflwcju "Ohout w lvo. Glk'hhow- !; L'' old ...... 1, CIIGULilll:l





Page 2 D/E/N/C/V


venice uunuoinur .u f


Sunday, June 12, 2005 The Sun


SEE NEiS HAPPENING?
CALL US .
Charlotte OGMot North Port Englewood
206-1100 49-03 0 26-9544 474-5521


7


U ( *~


q440i0


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


mom


- -4


- -a.4


-


SPECIAL
AVOD THE 30% INCREASES COMING Thi3 YEAR
DESIGN YOUR NEW HOME TODAY WITH, aCo DOWN
PAY FOR IT WHEN YOU RETURN N E;T YEAR

Hre relaxed
^"'''u'rBBlooking
|v~~~r yoili ~F^ MSaw
B~~~~a Visit-^^ li^H -


R Y STA L


LA K


ES


5010 Country Lakes Drive Fl. Myers, FL 33905-5110
www.crvstallakesflorida.com 1-888-694-7454 (toll free)
1-75, exit 139. East 1/4 mile on Luckett Road. Left on Cr.unlry Lakes Drive.
One mile to gated entrance on left.


- -1bv -


.
-
- -.-


Ni


- .I


4w -ob ~ ,


I 4Tan affordable price.
w w hom e rnasterscon str ct ion. on m


Model Homes
Turnkey Packages
North Port. Florida


Home Mas trs
. .Copstruction .( orp. 1.8
Service is our reputation sce 1985
State Cert. Lie. #CB C033157


1.800.330.6132
1.941.423.6144
1.941.492.4494


MODELS OPEN
% . .... .,.
DAILY!
MWA


SRedefining Luxury
._... ": '\, /' 5',, VWei End Dne. Puna Gorda. Florida 33950l


Show You Your Dream Home Plans Today! .., ._


3


-, ,,f, ,-.u s, ,e .S.- .,
.^(i1,-*, te '- ;**- ''-^^, ^^jM-- *M i**.'**!.':?90ft


((J{ak'J


I,


A 55+Coniluniutl Lu\u\ Villa, Starung belov. $200,000
Full cale modAd in the PArt Charlomtt Tu.wn Center
SOpen NI F 1 941-627-9080
,,,,.,, Sun I' n J p m A-


4

II


Located iest on Rio I ilia Road OFF olf S 41,
South of downtown Punta Gorda.
(941) 575-8144
Thi nwi.',. adul mainte naince free acrii lift Oylfe gated
commulnii. 'ir1 i nlcrn 601 laAefroi t-is .aiuh t ,nmmunin center pool.
iitini, court and main olher uptcalc aime ntrie


U


I 295o u~..


THIS SPACE
AVAILABLE
CALL: 941-206-1256


NN
IxS

114k .>HArb'our V
7 A-4v.+ 75 Height's

Ed Habo
Dr ~.1 rt l~rotte'-


21...(it4V Cleveland
c' O& L- -0.



CharlOut



4.11P

'Char._.
A- r
.?J I-
ji 'oi'P


----I


II II~ I-- --


ufAniE Fnnfflfnip Sam


f I r 9 0 9 )$Pal too,


0 o


o o


-- 4WD


m m KNOWN V q I MAMMMITZ A V, W, I& M. *--,: T~p-';~:


16 om







The f Sun


Page 3 D/E/N/C/V


w 'lu.e. s un,. r o ..-- -----i .. .. .

Carl Burr Homes features include:


Malaya and Palmira upgraded
standard features package exterior
features includes:
Professional upgraded landscape
package
Fully sodded lawn with St.
Augustine grass
Sherwin Williams quality exterior
paint
30 year Timberline shingle roof
(tile roof selection available as an
option),
Concrete drive, entry & walkway
Irrigation system
Standard mailbox
Side entry service garage door
o White aluminum window and
.frames (screens included & code
compliant to 130 mph)
Colonial panel garage door
Interior Features include:
9'4" high volume ceilings
Cathedral ceilings
Knock down textured walls and
knock down textured ceilings
Spacious walk-in closets with
wire shelving

Carll Burr Homes
is exclusively represented
by Carll Burr Realty LLC
The Malaya, 3 bedroom, 2
bath, media room, 2 car garage,
lanai, 2,973 total square feet,
2,248 square feet under air -
1/2 pool bath or extended
media room is included at no
additional charge with a pool or
extended lanai, or deck/cage.
Standard upgraded options
pkg included, $319,900.
The Palmira, 3 bedroom, 2
bath, 2 car garage, lanai, 2,316
total square feet, 1,697 square
feet under air.
Standard upgraded options
pkg included, $243,900.
Lot preparation allowances
are included for permits, impact
fees, lot clearing, fill dirt is priced
per lot.
Prices are subject to change


Rounded wall corners throughout
S8' sliding glass door's
Glass panel French front entry
doors)
d Front door chime
Choice of (4) granite, or full
selection of solid surface on kitchen
counter tops, vanity tops
Window sills are cultured marble
in white or bisque
5 1/4 wide baseboards
Raised panel designer Interior
doors (pocket doors per plan)
Designer lever interior door
hardware throughout
Choice of standard selection
designer wood cabinetry, & white or
bisque raised panel thermofoil
Laundry tub in base cabinet in.
white or bisque raised panel
thermofoil, with cultured marble top in
white or bisque
Laundry room upper cabinets in
white or bisque raised panel
thermofoil
Raised panel closet doors
Choice of (3) 8X12 ceramic tile


shower walls (to top of wall & above
guest bath tub
Choice of (2) upgraded shower
floor tiles
Full size bath vanity mirrors
Choice of (3) 16X16 straight-set
floor tile throughout except: bedrooms
or den/media room
Dual sinks in master bath
Oversized Kohler acrylic oval tub
in master bath in white or biscuit
(option to add jets)
Upgraded Level I Shaw stain
control carpet standard choice of
colors and styles
Quality 8 lb. carpet padding
Sherwin Williams quality interior
wall paint & on garage walls, &
painted & sealed floor (one color
throughout)
Shower seat & shower wall
shampoo niche in master bath
. Mitered master bath shower
enclosure
Wall niches per plan
Please see BURR, page 4


Art provided
The Palmira, with a standard upgraded options package and on the owner's lot, starts at $243,900.


New Homes GULFSTREAM DEVELOPMENT & KANE REALTY
" Ready Now! (9 ) 4294711

S9 4 4, -2 4 711 ..


1301) RoImoJrd 'hrr. Buca Grande~- 1 1484 juqtica St. BomGrandt-
- 141101 SF unarr air. 3 BR. 2 BA or I1-1It0 SIF under air. 3 BIR. 2 BA for
$ 229.400. I-I.-P" lc l l-1, H .~ 2'. o r -,,,s. ulc vikiin ,, i*r.
-,.- .-! --J -.J a-
L'jrld cv-.ISL


14-16 Gardenside Cir Cayman -
1660 SF under air 3 BR, 2 BA for
$256,900 H. n.e [ uL1ed .r.- el are.-'
Sad j '.'. included


d 1772 %rd-.iaSL -iK "I W *'1711 SF i 1492Fug~nia (a~man -1653 .SF t 1570 %%aldorf Dr. -St. Marlin 1660)
- ndfr ar. 3 BR. all 'aulk-in dud.. 2 undr air. 3 BR. 2 BA for 1250) F u ndr air. 3 BR. 2 BA 'a,-iud~
133k % .lud) for 1.293.4m)II. Ti J .,. q-I ..o' ,I,.J I, 'f- &cj d r 264.0IIIJ. H.p,. I. i ,
31-11 Arld JgrhAil- ..Ir"U&O pplln~cmIL i4 ,'lea. n 'W ad MIApLr JIL -ru ,r-i,...ir
-- a...' -. .- .,*. ...


16041 Ludge Coura Boca Grande
14m) SF under air. 3 BR. 2 BA [or
$.255.9010. H,.me i. ,.Ied in % e a ci
ard.pia3ppl' .,:4 r. ,,,.'IdedCut dlc-..,


1260 Bos-well Si. (aiman 1653
SSF under air. 3 RR. 2 BA for
$* 259.'il0. H... e l d c. [ U -
S .iri l,!ir NCa e ir, .,cldcd. )


2445 Brester Rd. Trinidad 1436
SF under air. 3 BR, 2 B4 fur
$240.00 H. HomeI or, an- oler[i2zd i
..,'rlr ',Ic T lc r, ei areas. man,
iu ---^J a^^aA-.~ -





1802 Ardisia St. St. Martin -
1660 SF under air. 3 BR. 2 BA for
i$256.900. Home is filed in wvet area
and a.ppliances are minuded.


Fanc alLeders





of North Port


SLOC ATOR


%1. Creditosdee
ki~iruc.ion Pq~rm Loin -
Same CDaj SAppra..31
No %pp re,
Man$ Pr,,gram.


Mortgage Approval Services, Inc.
"'"Your Neighbor in Mortgage Lending"
2587 Toledo Blade Blvd. North Port, FL 34289
Toll Free 1-888-229-3573 x109 Cell: (941) 223-9773
twwtw. mortgageapprovalservices.com


mr -18


CAPITAL
FINANCIAL
MORTGAGE
Simple One Time
Rehab or Renovation
Loans Available

Debt Consolidation
For All Credit Ranges


Nora K. King
Branch Manager
Sr. Loan Officer
iioraking'J'capti nmor gage cornm
119 Tamiami Trail,. Suite B
Port Charlotte. Florida 34253


Office
(941) 2555- Ill


M w m


hU


NORTH PORT: 941-429-3000
PORT CHARLOTTE: 941-206-1000

Ask for Sales


buying, Building or Refinancing your home?
Call Anne Heinen, Loan Officer
SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.
18501 Murdock Circle, 2nd Floor
941-625-9218
www.suinrusrImortgage.comrnaheinen
SWirRUsT 4
ur, Tru..- f I kr.
"* ^ l;.- ,,jI lI-.:j.,:,,', al. 1, 1 1:,' ,,,1r1,,,,:.l[]:, I,, h .. I ;*:, ; ,,',


Peachland Blvd.


Miaway Blvd











~Countrywide-
HOME LOANS
F'~1l~zT1I.. ~tBW~ 1931 T-1MI.AMl TRAIL 46
BR-a*..iH kpl 1RPO)RT CHARLO-)T-E. FL 33948

10-11 5.531 "S up i, I on #

E-M~ai: Pau-ic ia a FillLC 1 4-Count ry Wde.com
y41-lis Opsilo p ion#1


MR*6M ft-."NNI. &O1


"~~"Jennifer Watters


This Space

Available


- I I --I


-II I I --


I- I


ll-


F I


,q% 00,


-INW,


I Voit-6 rnnniir Su S~nlav Jun 12,200


-ASK


low~ir: Q9E5


/j/\4v


A






Pe4 I/CMunaJue1,25 Te S


*.BURR
From page 3
Appliances
Choice of (two) Whirlpool
appliance packages in stainless,


white, or bisque
P Upgraded garbage disposal (1/2)
Plumbing
Castleby standard bath faucets in
chrome
Choice of chrome, glacier, or
ivory Aberdeen Moen kitchen faucet


Stainless steel double sink drop-
in-50/50 split (optional sinks & splits
are available)
Four exterior hose bibs
Copper ice maker line to
refrigerator
Rheem 50 gallon water heater on


a galvanized pedestal
1-1/2 gallon water closets for
water conservation
White or bisque cast iron tub in
guest bath (option to change out to a
shower)
Washer/Dryer hook-up


Electrical
Prewire for light s& ceiling fans in
main living areas, kitchen, all
bedrooms, master bath & lanai, or for
intercom & security
Cooper wiring throughout house
Multiple phone lines for use with
computers, fax machines in main
living areas, kitchen & bedrooms.
Four exterior weather proof
outlets
Smoke detectors per plan
Decora style light switches
Solid colonial panel garage door
Two remotes included with
garage door
Recessed lighting in kitchen,
baths, laundry room, hallways,
closets, garage, & pantry
Bath exhaust fans & range
exhaust vent
200 amp service
Structural Features include:
Safe Room (per FEMA specs)
Concrete floor reinforced with
steel
*Taped 6 ml vis queen vapor
barrier under foundation
*1 Concrete block walls reinforced
with steel & concrete for added
strength
Lintels with steel reinforcement &
concrete atop masonry walls for


added strength
Soil termite control treatment
under entire house
5/8" Stucco exterior wall finish
Pressure treated wood where
wood meets masonry
Fully engineered truss system
secured with metal hurricane straps
and brackets
Maintenance free aluminum soffit
and fascia in choice of colors
Attic roof vent & pull down stair
unit with light, & flooring for additional
storage
One year new home warranty
punch-out service
2/10 Builder's Homes Warranty
Gingerbread faux stone trim on
front elevation
Climate Control Features
include:
Trane high energy efficiency heat-
pump cooling system (minimum 12
seer)
Programmable thermostat
Air returns in all main living
areas, bedrooms, closets & kitchen
pantry
R-30 ceiling insulation & 5-5.4
Thermax insulation on block walls
Noise Control feature:
Dural insulated wall between
great room & master bedroom


Sun Coast Homes
is a section of the SUN,
23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, Fla. 33950

Donna Davidson, Features Editor
(941) 206-1164
For advertising questions, please call:
Debbie Dunn-Rankin
Advertising Manager
(941) 206-1500


Charlotte Sun
David Starks
Advertising Executive
Fort Myers, Cape Coral
(941) 206-1263

Account Executive
Port Charlotte'
(941) 206-1257

Rachelle Pastorfield
Account Executive
Punta Gorda/Burnt Store
(941) 206-1256


North Port Sun
Steve Sachkar
(866) 562-6204

Englewood Sun
Lang Capasso
(877) 827-6204

Venice Gondolier Sun
Dave Cherry
(866) 357-6204

DeSoto Sun
Richard Hitt
(888) 690-6204


R.iiFAT MAKES ~w~ AN(ECEPIONL OM UNITY ~IJ~ I


Beautiful Homes
'*"^ '^'^ ^'T" .'" fflfi


OUR AWARD-WINNING BUILDERS


Extraordinary Golf


Fime -i rnurr a 3rchitect Arthur Hili' hq crevred q 'I27-Hle mn1oerpiece t
Mffm- Heri Crevl (j[ Ir Hil .,trulk Fo ir.]hrk:~u


Best Design


hI i; rle Ifl ,,',l,,lr,', ,,rh', r,^ Mri ., ir, :
perlrk il, !.,. ite .:.:.raluurti .1 l' [:,luriB
beauty, uncompromising value, and Beyond enjoyment of the natural surroundings and fantastic views, Heron
convenience. Homesites have been optimized for vistas of manicured Creek has something for everyone, including 27-Holes of golf, Har-
fairways, sparkling lakes, and pristine natural preserves. In .\ Tru tennis, the Fitness Center, and resort-style pool & spa. The
recognition, WHERE TO RETIRE magazine has selected Heron new 21,000 sq.ft. Main Clubhouse, with casual and fine dining,
Creek as one of America's 100 Best Communities, the only such makes Heron Creek the ultimate in gated community living.
community in Sarasota County.

- HERON CREEK I -z


FU ISE


3401 S. Sumter Blvd. North Port, FL 34287
Between US 41 and 1-75 / Exit 182
(941) 423-6755 Toll Free: 877-334-3766 www.heron-creek.cor


The Picasso

AREA SQ. FT. Homes, I
Living 2,482
Garage 529 Main Office:
Lanai 219 941-474-9523
SEntry 72
TOTAL SQ. FT. 3,302


iwi
S& LIG11 Ve
1^^ ^ INTERIOR& L l/ft
EXTERIOR LIGHTING l
GREAT SELECTION
OF CEILING FANS
WE WILL STORE
MERCHANDISE
INSTALLATION &
PARTS
(941) 475-6901
NE\\PORT SQU ARE i
3579 SR 776 & SPINNAKER BLVD.* I .....
EN(,LE,\\OOD, FL <.,,: .'
IMOND.AE -FRIDAl\ 9-5*STtRDA 10-2 3
Send questions Io:
S Ianlads-lighting -e ol.com -


--~c------- --- -- ---~--Ull ------ -~II~,~---~.--~,~


Sunday, June 12, 2005 The AA', Sun


Page 4 D/E/N/C/V


vanica Gondolierv Sun


". -.0 ."j -, -I- I .. -,'. =! -,. -






The 4 Sun


Valn %.-.=%AS.A na e1 20


Page 5 D/E/N/C/V


Crn

-hi


0.


0 -

(~D


0

-z.=
ML




-~ CL


1 HERON







No r i IL'* LII
S j'









































Home--d-ignd..
% h.%ou in mind
I No






















-'-I



,,

~~DF4


:z
0
*0










CL
Z


We're working hard for you.

rAt Englewood Bank we work hard to package a
loan that fits your budget and unique needs.
Offering:,


Reed Nielsen
Direct: (941) 473-2738
Cell: (941) 662-0550
rdnielsen@englewoodbank.com


Home Mortgage Loans,
Bridge Loans,
Lot Loans,
Construction-to-permanent Loans.

We'll meet with you at your convenience.
Give us a call.


ENGLEW()D


*


BANK


Apply online at www.englewoodba nk.comin


Bob Bauer
Dircrt: (04.1) 473-8801
Cell: ('t 1) 62879143-
rjbauer@englewoodbank.com


3401, S. Summer BI~d.
North Port. FL 34287
Between U.S. 41 and 1-75i 1 31-----
Exit 182
i C 'E K19411423-6755 I K
loll Free: 8771-34-3766
%% ..her~on-creelk.com LL



r1l Bu3irr I-corie

W.~~~4 F- ,JlcJJd 1
!3 C h -d j *





LicS CBCtI'8290 ,t i 1 1 N,
W"


Home Masters .
m e aire Blvd,
Construdion,:Corp. I .,
Ser'nic is our Reputation" .-' '
homemastersconstruction.com E


16954 Toledo Blade Blvd.
North Port, FL 33954 .
Phone (941) 766-8828- t l
S Toll Free (866)766-8828 .
WIL B Websile: www.ADBhomes.com
____________a____ 1_ 15 Models Available
1 Spec. Homes Available :
C eL Your Land or Ours % 41.- P "..v. i --..

c .: :i,:c Price E d


NEW HOME & LOT PACKAGES / /
A HUNDREDS OF LOTS AVAILABLE fi
JI T Golf Course -Waterfront-
VELOPMENT & Duplex- Standard '
A sNE REALTs NEW GOLF COURSE CONDOS m Delcris St.
941-429-4711 Investment Opportunities .



HERON COVE Chancellor Blvd Hillsborough Blvd
CONSTRUCTION, INC. Phone
1941 426-9779 eP u
wv.heroncoveconstruction.com |4
Tue.-.-Fn. 11 00-5:00 |
Sa i. by Appt.
9r70


ca" L 9.. 4 9 H 3
94.1-429-M7772 A- PRE-. ,: .
\pr SA.INGS *,*S;A;.'..- ,, ,'W
9 Call Today '. "": ..':,:, '"
^ jnggt "il BOI~g* For Appointment ': ,' .-
T.c-cc ioa "More Hc:FO 'Les "



T"Is s.l"O v:N11,""


: COLL 94-,,,,42M,


4,N
ZM


.................41






7-1.




L~NL
iktN [,1, V '*. !'? **.^ :* *-^^ .^







1- ,. I ^
.*/ ** "1'*.^ *J^ :^ *
,.. .A-
W : .. ',' : -. V ." '." .;


"~~p- ,**,*.,... I=Isr


''A. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ A 44Qv 2' ...A .&i*:


I --t--- ~1 I


- --~--~-


I h


Sunday, June 12, 2005


Venice GondolierC Sun~


o






Sunday, June 12, 2005 The Sun


Veic Godle SunI PageB 6 D IE/N/C /V


I
I


I-
i.
r 2 gc~*


.'''.







~-,y ~ II~Al I~ 0"AIrd
]04'
; ,I :.


..Mow


.. immerse yours
O"


4 *-. 'I'-

,' l'.-.<


I


n~~~"o"re z~;i-:~


seemingly endless crystal blue waters
embrace the shoreline. And another perfect
day begins. It's an unrivaled lifestyle that
can only be Punta Gorda. And here, in the
heart of this tranquil coastal town, is Vivante,
a new residential community. featuring
spacious condominiums Xrwith three levels of
luxury living over a private garage, plus
superb amenities that include a grand
Clubhouse with a resort-style pool and spa.
The beautiful neighborhoods of Bella Lago
and Boca Lago, offer magnificent harbor, lake
and nature views. Enjoy life as it was meant
to be lived... at \Vivante. A place where you
can get back in touch with yourself. Where
you'll discover days to remember and the
very best of Gulf Coast living.


Luxully Resid)ence from the $500Me
to over $1 Ifillion.


VISIT OUR SALES CENTER
2950 West Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Tel:(941)833-8999 Toll Free: 1-800-901-0106
www. vi.vane-fl .com

1-75 to Evit 16-i. Ir,'..t 6 mil/. t,' Punta Gjt'ri L,''.



r liy p, rpn: .l.p:... er. ,I I.:.*..T..1 : .l .l. .- I 1 :1 -.-..sr t :. .: r.-, -...1 .- I ., r. r:.r .:,l,
L, r .x i .: i r.. ...- : E .I I .." I I r .-. ir,- .. .. .
d r ,--.I.:..,r3or.. u e. 3 I.: d* ..:r Irc I5et. 1 1. I I .. : r,. 3 arr Ir.:.. ... Ir: I ... I


Page 6 D/U/N/CiV


Venrice Gondolier Sun