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 Section A: Main continued
 Section A: Main: Obituaries
 Section B: Our Town
 Section B: Coffee Break
 Section B: Venice Venue
 Section B: Milestones
 Section B: Pets
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 Section B: In Shape
 Section B continued
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Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00061
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Portion of title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) 58 cm. ;
Language: English
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Creation Date: June 1, 2005
Publication Date: 2001-
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002730652
oclc - 47264140
notis - ANK8420
lccn - 2001229429
System ID: UF00028295:00061
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: Sports
        page A 6
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section A: Main: Opinion
        page A 11
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 12
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 13
    Section A: Main: Obituaries
        page A 14
    Section B: Our Town
        page B 1
    Section B: Coffee Break
        page B 2
    Section B: Venice Venue
        page B 3
    Section B: Milestones
        page B 4
    Section B: Pets
        page B 5
    Section B: South News
        page B 6
    Section B continued
        page B 7
    Section B: In Shape
        page B 8
    Section B continued
        page B 9
    Section B: Around Town
        page B 10
    Let's Go
        page LG 1
Full Text



NOW ON WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY


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50 CENTS VOLUME 60 NUMBER 38 AN EDITION OF THE SUN WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY EDITION, JUNE 1-2, 2005 PUBLISHED WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY


THIS
EDITION
THIS SECTION I 13A


Personalizing hurricane evacuation alerts


Poll position
It's time to vote for the
best of Venice for 2005.


Paying

respects
Memorial Day in Venice
brings generations
together.


UUn TOWN I i B
Nautical

but nice
The Venice Women's
Sailing Squadron takes
to the water.


LET'S GO 18

Featured

film
Milton Green shot
the stars when there
were stars.

DEATHS 14A


Roy Bradshaw
Zelma Coleman
Elinor Evison
Sarah Kaplan
lean Lumley
Carl Lundgren
Valerie Moore


Sidney Runyon
Bert Schaf
Angelina Shippee
Wilhelmine
Tinney
Jeanette Watson


A new warning system will allow the city to notify
all of its residents.


BYJJ.ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR


June 1 is here, and hurri-
cane forecasters are predict-
ing another rough season of
weather for Florida.
Alerting Venice area resi-
dents to danger will be a little
easier this year. City staff are
in the final stages of running
tests on the new emergency
warning system. Code Red.
This emergency telephone
calling system uses Internet
mapping to target specific
areas. Unlike the city's previ-


ous system, called VINES, this
new software program calls
geographical areas affected
by weather or other emer-
gency conditions.
High wind warnings? Code
Red calls all of the identified
mobile home residences and
tells them.
Category 1, 2 or 3 hurri-
cane warning? Code Red calls
phone numbers in each geo-
graphic evacuation zone with-
in city limits.
As for Cateory 4 hurricane


ATA GLANCE
Code Red allows the city to
place calls to all 14,000 Venice
phone numbers within 15
' minutes, compared to the
seven hours the previous
emergency alert system
required.
Venice City Council
approved spending S 11,000 a
year on Code Red when the
contract came up for a vote
March 8.
Go online to venicegov.com
and click on the Emergency
Notification System link to
learn more and verify your
contact information.


Please see ALERTS, 4A


LOOKING FOR A BETTER LIFE


-^JSSJ ~Venice, City of, FL
CodeREDoRiadgdentla CoDataCleioaT gaai as in aa
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ E..u ttenai.si ..dnai$"g
^ ~ ~ ~ usr qifiaim ...i.iOi~t


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Sam r w0


SUN PHOTO
City of Venice's Web site has links where residents can learn
about Code Red, the new hurricane alert calling system, and
make sure their contact information is correct.


Education


budget


set


a.record

An increase of 8 percentwill
add $25.4 million to Sarasota
County's education budget.

BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER


SUN PHOTO b,' JEFF TAVARES ita.:.resi,',venicegondler corn
Anthony Johnson, 18, waits for a bus at the Venice Train Depot to take him to his new home in Sarasota. Johnson is
leaving Venice because he says, "It's boring, there's nothing to do here."


Venice in his rear view mirror


Opinions vary on whether there's enough entertainment for
youths in Venice, with young people who think there isn't
voting with their feet.


BYJEFF TAVARES
PHOTO EDITOR


Anthony Johnson, 18, doesn't
think there's anything for young peo-
ple to do in Venice, so he's doing
something about it: He's leaving.
At the Venice Train Depot last
Friday morning lohnson waited for
the next SCAT bus to take him to
Sarasota, a new aparunent he has
rented, and he hopes, a new and
more exciting life.
When asked how long he has been
considering moving, Johnson re-
plied, "Two years, been saving my
money."
Johnson said he spent last sum-
mer going to Tampa, where he was


born and spent the first half of his life
before his family moved to Venice,
where he has spent his teen-age
years.
Why is he moving? He didn't hesi-
tate when he responded, "It's boring.
there's nothing to do here. I mean, it's
like Oldsville."
He added that Venice city officials
are not only not interested in having
things for young people to do, he
believes they don't respect young
people.
Staying out of trouble
Venice residents Heather Howey,
14, and Shatun Carlson, 15, grew up
in Venice and have spent all their
summers here.


Carlson said he's only spent a
week outside of Venice once. when
his family went to North Carolina.
"We always find stuff to do. Once
in a while we're bored because we've
already done everything, but eventu-
ally we just go skate or something ...
try to stay out of trouble," said
Carlson.
After speaking to this reporter,
Carlson and Howey did skate in and
around the Venice Train Depot as
they waited for a bus to take them to
the mall in Sarasota. That is what
they have decided to do on ihis day.
Keeping them busy
Venice City Manager Marty Black
looks at the issue not onlyv from his
official post but also as a dad to 14-
and 16-year-old sons.
"We keep them quite busy," he
said, referring to his sons' activities.
Please see MIRROR, 5A


Education Conmmissioner John L.
Winn recently announced Florida's
education budget has reached rec-
ord levels. The total education bud-
get for FY 2005-06 is $27.6 billion, a
7.7 percent increase over the current
year.
Sarasota County School District
will receive 8.27 percent more than
last year, said Sheila Weiss, spokes-
woman for the district. ...
Class-size- reduction monies are
expected to increase nearly 3 percent
ver last year. The Florida Legislature
also increased the Base Student
Allocation by $72.16 per student, a
1.89 percent increase. Another 3.45
percent increase will help pay for an
increase in students, projected at
1,486 additional students next year.
In all, the district anticipates an
increase of almost $25.4 million over
last year's $347.9 million budget.
With hard budget figures in, the
Sarasota County School Board will
begin budget deliberations in earn-
est at its June 7 school board meet-
ing. Following that meeting, the
board will take a summer break,
resuming budget discussions July 19.
At a May 17 workshop the district
provided preliminary revenue fig-
ures, including a healthy reserve
fund of $50.6 million. The board
intends to keep $28.5 million in its
unreserved fund balance (7.5 per-
cent of the budget) in accordance
with district policy. Voted millage
due to estimated tax roll growth of 14
percent should add another $5.3 mil-

Please see BUDGET, 5A


City manager: Commit a crime, lose your pension


COUPONS
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INSERT
Publix
Sun Savings


BYJJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR


City Manager Marty Black
was shocked while watching
a news report out of the
Tampa area a while back.
A Hillsborough County fire
marshal was found guilty of
trying to meet a child for sex
while on duty. Today he sits in
jail for a felony conviction,


collecting retirement bene-I
fits.
Now the county fire depart-
ment, Hillsborough County
commissioners and firefight-
ers union are fighting over
whether convicted felons are
entitled to their government
pension plans.
Black wants to make sure
nothing like that happens
here.


"If we've got folks who
commit felony acts, it would
seem odd to pay for (their
retirement)," Black said.
A memo asking if Venice
would have to do that was
sent out last week to City
Attorney Bob Anderson and
Brenda Digges, director of
administrative services.
Because of vacations,
Black is still waiting on an


answer.
The city manager definite-
ly wants to restrict the retire-
ment benefits of any current
employee who is convicted,
but the memo also asks about
doing this to former employ-
ees.
"I am aware that it is possi-,
ble to structure the retire-
ment benefit program so that
upon conviction, current and


former employees would be
determined ineligible for
retirement benefits," Black
wrote in the May-20 memo.
No connection
When interviewed, Black
denied that this request has
anything to do with a crimi-
nal investigation by the

Please see PENSION, 4A


Good morning, Gondolier
Sun subscriber,
PHILLIP CAMPBELL


RF ONT SECOND


5A OPINION
12A POLICE BEAT
12A SPORTS
8A WATER WOES
14A WEATHER
-, "' ,' 'l ; | 1 : ', '


OUR TOWN SECTION LE TSSGOI SECnALSO TW1ES A IO1M
11A AROUNDTOWN 10B DEARABBY 9B DAYTRIP 8LG CLASSIFIED
14A BRIDGE 7B IN SHAPE 8B JOE GIORGIANNI 2LG AMERICAN PROFIJ.E
6A COFFEE BREAK 2B MILESTONES 4B MOVIES IOLG
3A CROSSWORD 7B SOUTH NEWS 6B FST REVIEW 5LG
8A DAVE BARRY 9B VENUE 3B '
... ... .... .... .... .. .. .... ... . L ,@


CITY NOTES
LEGALS .
LET 'EM HAVE IT
LOTTO .
OBITUARIES


I


rn`pni mmi pi


0-(


I










Venice gathers to remember those who gave all


People from all walks of life
assembled in Venice's Patriots
Park Monday to pay tribute to
the men and women who
gave their lives for their coun-
tryinwar.
Memorial Day 2005
brought together veterans
individually and in groups;
law enforcement; elected
officials; youths in band,
military and scout uni-
forms; and, most plentiful
of all, citizens wishing to
show their gratitude to the


veterans in attendance
physically and in spirit.
In between the strains of
the "The Star-Spangled Ban-
ner" and the mournful notes
of "Taps," theft crowd saluted
the colors, watched as
wreaths were laid by veterans
organizations, listened to
proclamations and tried to
stay cool, remembering the
sacrifices made in their behalf
in order that this generation
and those in the future would
remain free.




Do' itA
Coe*I:T


SUN PHOTOS B," 8 0 I6IMGE


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Although conventional dentures generally do an excellent job of
replacing lost teeth, there are certain problems which may require a
different approach. If a denture is placed over a ridge that has become
thin and sharp, the concentrated pressure of chewing can cause
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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


2A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


r


I~ii~j






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


WFDNFSAY IJUN 1. 2005


Stalled water project



could cause problems


BYJACKGURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

A $110 million project to
expand the Peace River water
plant is about two years be-
hind schedule and stalled,
while Sarasota County and the
other counties that own it
decide who should pay a $9.5
million bill for
additional .
reservoir
capacity.
At its most
recent .meet-,
ing, the coun-
ty commius-
sion listened
to a lot of his-
tory, facts and Mills
figures about
why the project has come to a
grind-ing halt, anywhere local
residents will get their drink-
ing water from if negotiations
continue on indefinitely with-
out a resolution.
"What's changed? Why
this delay?" commissioner
David Mills asked. "I thought
our water supply was
secure.
Deputy County Adminis-
trator-David Bullock respond-
ed that there is no emergency.
"We're secure," he said:
"This delay causes us to look
for bridging.".
Sarasota ,County is sup-
posed to receive up to another
9.725 million gallons of water
a day from the plant expan-
sion, which is scheduled to be
finished in 2007 or 2008 but
- because of the delay -:
may not be completed until
2009 or 2010.
This creates a short-term
problem for Sarasota County
because it is supposed to cut.
back on daily water purchases
of up to 10 million gallons a,
day from Manatee County.
This is. where' "bridging".
comes in. -
"We've askeds Manatee
County to back off until 2009
or 2010," Bullock said.
Who pays? ,
The Peace River water plant
is owned by Charlotte, DeSoto,
Manatee and Sarasota coun-
ties. Its production capability
is being expanded from 18


million gallons to 32.7 million
gallons a day, which will be
the maximum amount it can
treat and distribute.
A .$29 million Southwest
Florida Water Management
District grant leaves the four
counties with an $81 million
balance to pay for the project,
which includes a 6 billion
gallon reservoir. Sarasota
County has agreed to pay $49
million for its share of the
additional water.
"Sarasota County believes
a 4 billion gallon reservoir is
enough," said George Mac-
Farlane, the county's general
manager of business opera-
tions. "The question is: Who
should pay how much of the.
$12.5 million it will cost for
an extra 2 billion gallons of
capacity?"
Charlotte County has
agreed to pay $3 million and
apparently feels Sarasota
County should pay a lion's
share of the balance some-
where between $8.25 and $9.5
million.
"We'd like to pay zero,"
MacFarlane said, "' but haven't
suggested we won't pay some-
thing."
Not enough
The Sarasota County Com-
mission agreed to request the
Peace River plant expansion
get started, with a guarantee
the county would pay for its
share of the additional supply.
A letter will be sent for the
other three Peace River Water
Authority members to mull
over.
Sarasota County utility cus-
tomers .consume about 18,
million gallons of water a day.
Manatee County supplies up
to 10 million gallons, the Carl-
ton Plant in Osprey 6 million,
PeaceRiver3.25 million, Char-
lotte County 2 million, and a
University Parkway wellfield
up to 1 million.
As Sarasota County winds
down its daily purchases from
Manatee County, it has to plan
for new sources beyond the
Peace River project. An old
Venice area plant is being
retrofitted to provide 2.2 mil-
lion gallons a day, but it won't
be enough.


Correction

AMIFVenice Lanes initially charged $5 for teens who showed
up on Friday and Saturday nights but did not bowl, and then
increased that amount to $10. The fee was in response to
groups of 60 or more teens showing up for a place to hang out
on the weekend. Because of a reporter's error, a story in of the
May 29 edition left out the price increase.
The Gondolier Sun regrets the error.


Let Gondolier Sun Classifieds work for you.


By the year 2025, Sarasota
County utility customers are
expected to consume about
28 million gallons of water a
day. The county will evaluate
a wide range of possible wa-
ter sources, among them a
reverse osmosis plant that
would treat Gulf of Mexico
water.
Damaged and
endangered
The Peace River flows
through Polk, Hardee, DeSoto
and Charlotte counties before
it empties -a billion gallons of
water on an average day into
Charlotte Harbor. While it
doesn't touch, Sarasota Coun-
ty, the river is critical to future
growth plans.
Phosphate mines, agricul-
tural runoff and population
growth along upper regions of
the Peace River concern envi-
ronmental experts. Last year,
Hurricane Charley damaged
the river and dramatized the
importance of protecting its
health.
The Peace River has been,
identified by American.
Rivers, a nonprofit organiza-
tion in Washington, D.C., as
one of the nation's "Most
Endangered Rivers" due to
the threat of phosphate mine
discharges in Hardee and
Polk counties.
To make matters worse,
the Southwest Florida Water
Management District has -re-
ported that unregulated water
consumption in the 1950s,
'60s and '70s by the phos-
phate and agricultural indus-
tries drew so heavily from
aquifers that the river is per-
manendy damaged.
District experts .have re-
ported that portions of the
river no longer flow year-
round and, at times, upriver
water disappears .into sink
holes. This phenomenon
takes place near the river's
headWaters in Polk County,
which is in the heart of phos-
phate country.
While the Peace River peri-
odically dries up in Polk
County, it continues to flow in
Hardee and DeSoto counties
because small tributaries
replenish it.






,0ao,&6 ro- b ae"le .v.a/ o.eA
BROUGHTTOYOU BY:




A division of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.,
publishers of the Sun Herald Newspapers


Zoning irregularities subject of report


BY JACK GURNEY
PELICAN PRESS

A former Sarasota County
zoning official's unchallenged
decision that has allowed local
developers to construct du-
plex structures on undersized
residential lots for almost 20
years will be at the heart of a
June 7 report to the. county
commission.
The issue will be ad-
dressed by Zoning Adminis-
trator Mary Beth Humph-
reys, who assumed the re-
sponsibility 18 months ago
from her predecessor, Tate
Taylor. The problem began
with a unilateral decision
made by another of her pre-
decessors, Mike Miller.
On May 10, Humphreys
appeared before the com-
mission to briefly discuss the
issue of building permits for
non-conforming lots in the
county's least intensive
multi-family residential
zones, which are classified as
RMF-1 and allow only six,
dwelling units per acre.
The comminission gave her a
month to research the history
of a decision made by Miller
- who has long since retired
- to allow permits for duplex
units on lots that fail to meet
minimum size standards de-
scribed in the code, so long as
they are in an RMF-1 zone
district.
How many such permits
have been issued over the last
two decades is a question that
begs an answer, and how


many developers have recent-
ly been assured they will re-
ceive permits to build duplex-
es on non-conforming lots is
another.
Assumed application
On May 12, in an e-mail.
inquiry to the county attor-
ney's office, commissioner
Nora Patterson sought guid-
ance.
"I don't know who is at
fault," she stated, "but our
zoning administrator
(Humphreys) freely admits
that county staff have made
this error, even quite recently."
Assistant County Attorney
Gary Olderhoff responded, "It
appears this was actually not
an error in interpretation,
since the code provisions are
straightforward. Rather, it
probably was a practice that
might;have begun, by design
or in error and, as it occurred
more times, became the as-
sumed application of the
code."
County zoning adminis-
trators are given consider-
able latitude to make "deter-
minations" and "interpreta-
tions" when questions about
what the code allows are
raised by building officials.
Many of their decisions are
made without conferring
with the county commis-
sion. .
Patterson recalled in her
communication with the
county attorney's office that
the commission directed zon-
ing officials to enforce the


code as written when they
adopted revisions in 2003 -
without realizing Miller had
authorized the permits on
undersized lots.
Double standard?
On May 10, the commis-
sion proposed to resolve a
potential dilemma over the
issuance of more building
permits by amending the
code and making it legal on
the mainland, but not on
barrier islands such as Casey
Key, Manasota Key and
Siesta Key.
"This code change would
specifically not apply to barri-
er islands where the compre-
hensive plan forbids density
increases," Patterson stated in
her e-mail to the lawyers who
will decide whether a code
double standard mainland
versus barrier islands is
enforceable.
Several Siesta Key condo-
minium projects have recent-
ly proposed more dwelling
units than the code allows,
which may havebeen inspired
by the commission's decision
to legalize excess density for
short-term rental landlords
who previously owned the
sites.
'"Absolutely not," Patterson
said. "This has nothing to do
with short-term room rentals.
When the commission agreed
to that, it was emphatic that if
those units are demolished,
the code requires properties
go back to their original dens-
ity."


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7385 52nd Place East
758-6020


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4901 Cortez Rd. West
794-2090


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Square South
8383 S. Tamiami Trail
921-4400


Sarasota Commons Plaza*
935 N. Beneva Rd.
953-5250



Venice

Jackaranda Plaza*
1667 US Hwy 41 Bypass South
496-4122


Direct Phone Numbers:
General Office 207-1000 Newsroom 207-1000
Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220. Classified 207-1200
Editorial/Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified/Advertising Fax 485-3036
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100
Community Web Site http://www.venicegondolier.com
DayStar Communications 207-7800
Publisher: Robert A. Vedder Editor: Bob Mudge
President: Derek Dunn-Rankin


*5The
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Gondolier Sun
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Committee wants to eliminate volunteer coaches


A school committee on supplemental salaries
recommends funding for assistant coaches in
order to eliminate volunteer coaches but not
volunteers.


BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER


A school committee is rec-
ommending a trade-off to
level the playing field when it
comes to assistant high
school coach salaries add a
few extra paid positions at all
schools and eliminate volun-
teer coaches.
The Supplements Com-
mittee made the recommen-
dation to the school district's
management negotiations
team and the Sarasota
Classified/Teachers Associ-


ation. Both parties will con-
sider the recommendation
during negotiations over the
summer.
Under the proposal, assis-
tant coaches would be paid
roughly 8.5 percent of their
annual salary in supplemen-
tal wages. For a first-year
assistant coach earning
$31,500 as a teacher, the sup-
plemental salary would
equate to $2,500 per season.
In addition to the head
football coach position, the
committee recommends
funding for two football coor-


dinator positions at a slightly
higher supplemental than
assistant coaches, and fund-
ing two additional assistant
football coach positions.
Currently some assistant
coaching positions are paid,
while other volunteer assis-
tant coaches are not.
At some schools it's com-
mon practice for sports
booster clubs, mainly foot-
ball, to "thank"' volunteer as-
sistant coaches with a check
at the end- of the season,
whether or not they are paid.
Eliminating the use of all vol-
unteer coaches and adding a
few paid positions solves that
inconsistency and inequity,
said Jan Gibbs, principal at
Booker High, who presented
the committee's report as her
last official act upon retiring.


The proposal would con-
tinue to allow schools to uti-
lize volunteers in their sports
programs, but the volunteers
could not receive official,
recognition as a coach.
Give and take
Barry Dubin, executive di-
rector for Sarasota Classifi-
ed/Teachers Association,. said
he was surprised by the rec-
ommendation, but thinks it
just might fly.
"My folks would support it.
We don't want volunteers re-
placing paid assistant coach-
es," Dubin said.
Dubin also wants to take a
closer look at the proposal as
it relates to elementary
schools.
Dubin said the current sys-
tem of supplemental salaries


for some coaches and not
others, and use of volunteers
in team sports, is messy.
Plus, he said, "It's hard to
manage volunteers. If they
don't agree with you, they just
do what they want anyway.
Under the proposal, they
could still volunteer. They just
wouldn't be coaches."
Gibbs outlined a series of
proposed increases in supple-
mental salaries for most high
school athletics coaching posi-
tions, as well as teachers who
lead high school arts programs,
including musical and play
directors, marching band, and
concert, jazz, stage and or-
chestra.
Under the proposal, de-
partment chairs would re-
ceive supplemental salaries.
Small Learning Community


coordinators would receive
paid release time, teaching
half days, and a supplemental
salary. SLC Academy Direct-
ors would also receive a sup-
plement.
At the middle school level,
golf and volleyball would
each lose a head coach posi-
tion, instead gaining an assis-
tant coach position. A new
drama/musical and play di-
rector position are added at
each middle school.
Elementary schools would
receive one new non-desig-
nated position earning a sup-
plemental salary.
Sarasota County teachers
who run student clubs do not
receive supplements.
You can e-mail Greg Giles
at: ggiles
@venicegondolier.com.


ALERTS from page 1A


warnings?
"If we get anything above a
3, we're calling everyone and
telling them to leave," City
Manager Marty Black said.
The National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
is calling for an above-normal
season with 12 to 15 named
storms. A normal season
brings 10 named storms.
NOAA is predicting seven to
nine hurricanes normal is
six and three to five of these
becoming major hurricanes of
Category 3 (maximum sus-
tained winds of 111 mph or
stronger) or greater. A typical
season sees two major storms.
The hurricane season runs


HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TAX HOLIDAY STARTS
The first-ever 12-day sales tax holiday on hurricane-preparedness
supplies begins today (Wednesday) and runs through June 12.
No state or local sales tax will be collected on certain hurricane-
preparedness items from 12:01 a.m., June 1, through midnight,
June 12, including:
* Portable electrical generator costing less than less than $750.
* Radios, two-way radios, weather-band radios, tarpaulins, flexible
waterproof sheeting, ground-anchor systems and tie-down kits
less than 550.
- AA, C, D, 6-volt, and 9-volt batteries less than $30. (Excludes
automobile and boat batteries. AAA batteries are still taxable).
- Coolers or ice chests less than 530. (Electrical coolers are still tax-
able.)
* Gas or diesel fuel containers less than $25.
* Portable self-powered lights, battery-operated flashlights, bat-
tery- or gas-powered lanterns or candles selling for less than $20.


June 1-Nov. 30. Code Red's software, how- number and address are on
ever, matches locations with file, so they're encouraging
Out with the old the appropriate phone num- people to log onto venice-
The old VINES system was bers. Even unlisted phone gov.com and click on the link
not able to pinpoint specific numbers will be part of the to verify emergency contact
areas in Venice and had to system, according to Black. information.
cycle through all 14,000 city Some of the bugs are still Venice City Council ap-
phone numbers. A resident being worked out, and tests proved spending $11,000 a
would have to already know are being conducted. City year on Code Red when the
which evacuation zone he or staff advise residents not to contract came up for a vote,
she lives in. assume their correct phone as was detailed in a March 9


Venice Gondolier Sun story
about the system.
Code Red allows the city to
place calls to all 14,000 Venice
phone numbers within 15
minutes, compared to the
seven hours VINES would
have required. Venice also
could qualify for Federal
Emergency Management
Agency grants to cover part of
the costs.
As the system is installed,
Black and other city staff are
beginning to see other appli-
cations for Code Red. Venice
plans to use the calling soft-
ware for alerts on water out-
ages, sewage spills, missing
children and Alzheimer pa-
tient warnings and other
emergencies, especially since,
it can send out phone calls
house-by-house, by city block
or even citywide.
"We're only beginning to
see the other applications for
this," Black said.
You can e-mail].]. An-
drews at jandrews
@venicegondolier. com.


PENSION from page 1A
Environmental Protection
Agency into actions by previ-
ous wastewater department
managers. City council ap-
proved a plea agreement in
whichVenice will assist feder-
al prosecutors in their case
against former or current
employees.
Besides, it is unclear if a
change in the benefit rules
could be applied to employ-
ees no longer with the city,
Black said.
No names have been bffi-
cially released, but Black has
said no current city employee
or elected official is under
investigation for criminal
charges. The entire waste-
water department manage-
ment team was fired last
August in a cost-cutting
move, which also paved the
way to replace the belea-
guered supervisors with a pri-
vate management company.
Venice has only had its
own retirement system since
1996, according to Public
Information Officer Pam


Johnson.


"Post retirement, I
don't know about
them. If it happens
while employed, we
shouldn't have to fund
them with the benefits
after termination."
Marty Black,
Venice city manager


"I saw the chaos going on
north of us, and that's what
triggered this in my mind,"
Black said. "Post retirement, I
don't know about them. If it
happens while employed, we
shouldn't have to fund them
with the benefits after termi-
nation."


You can e-mailJ.J.
Andrews at jandrews
@venicegondolier. com.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


4A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


BUDGET from page 1A


lion to the budget.
The school board is also
considering a plan "B" bud-
get in case the millage refer-
endum is not renewed in
2006. The board has yet to
take an official position in
support of the referendum,
but Superintendent Gary
Norris is putting all his eggs
in that basket, banking on
the referendum to drive the
district's long-range plan to
further technology in the
school district.


State ed budget
"I am pleased Gov. Bush
and the Legislature contin-
ued their commitment to
education in Florida by
championing record funding
levels," Winn said. "These
increases will sustain Florida's
efforts toward education re-
form and rising student
achievement."
Highlights of the 2005-06
state education budget are:
Total education funding:
$17.8 billion was appropriat-
ed from all state funds for
educational operating bud-


gets. This includes $13.3 bil-
lion from general revenue,
almost $1 billion from lottery,
and $3.6 billion from other
trust funds.
FEFP funding: Funding in
the Florida Education Fi-
nance Program increased by
8.85 percent to $1.33 billion in
total potential funds, one of
the largest increases in K-12
funding history, for a total of
$16.4 billion. Funding per
student is $6,133.97, an in-
crease of $355 or 6.15 percent
over the current year, which
will serve almost 2.7 million


students, including 66,275
new students.
Class size: Funding to
address the mandates of the
class-size amendment in-
creased by $556 million for a
total of $1.5 billion in operat-
ing funds. Implementing
class-size reduction contin-
ues to be one of the biggest
challenges facing Florida. The
education department said it
will continue searching for
ways to assist districts with
this effort.
Reading initiatives: $89
million for a K-12 compre-


hensive, district-wide system
of research-based reading
instruction with $50,000 min-
imum for each school district.
Additionally, $10 million is
provided to, the Just Read,
Florida! office to sponsor pro-
fessional development cours-
es and to provide schools
with diagnostic testing tools
in order to determine reading
instruction needs.
Voluntary pre-kinder-
garten: $387.1 million was
appropriated to implement
the Voluntary Pre-kindergar-
ten Program. This represents


$2,500 per child to provide a
quality educational founda-
tion for all of Florida's 4-year-
olds.
Workforce programs: $31
million for Succeed, Florida
and Jobs for Florida's Future
to help fill workforce needs in
critical areas such as nursing
and teaching.
For more information on
Florida's education budget,
visit fldoe.org.

You can e-mail Greg Giles
at: ggiles
@venicegondolier.com.


MIRROR from page lA


Black believes parents are
important in providing guid-
ance to their teens to help
match their interests to the
opportunities that are avail-
able in Venice.
Although the city of Venice
does not offer any specific
programs, he noted that Sara-
sota County offers many or-
ganized activities, generally of
a sports or recreational na-
ture.
Black also cited scouting,
church-based programs and
activities such as the Venice
Yacht Club's sailing program.
No respect
In making the decision to
move, Johnson clearly had
issues with Venice other than
not having anything to do.
"It's mostly older people
that don't really respect
younger people around here,"
he said. "I mean, we're people
too and they seem to like walk
all over us and tell us it's their
town."
Johnson said a lot of his
friends have left Venice al-


MTY NOTES
SCAT meetings
Sarasota County Govern-
ment is seeking the public's
input on its update of the
Transit Development Plan at
three public meetings during
June.
Sarasota CountyArea Tran-
sit will hold the first meeting
4-6 p.m. today, June 1, at
Venice Train Depot, followed
by another meeting Thursday,
June 2, at North Port Public
Library, 13800 Tamiami Trail,
North Port. The second meet-
ing will be held Thursday,
June 16, at Venice City Hall,
401 W. Venice Ave., Venice,
and the third on Tuesday, June
21, at Ringling School of Art
and Design, 2700 North Tami-
ami Trail, Sarasota. All three
meetings will be held 4-6 p.m.
The Transit Development
Plan is a five-year capital and
operating plan for public
transportation services in
Sarasota County. It must be
updated annually to maintain
federal and state funding, and
the next major update is due
to Florida Department of
Transportation by June 30.
SCAT officials have already
held one meeting, on May 23,
in Englewood. Officials have
also met with residents in
recent .months to discuss
route changes along with the
TDP The meetings in June will
allow additional time for the
public to comment on the
proposedupdate.
For more information on
SCAT route changes, call the
Sarasota County Call Center
at 861-5000. For information
on SCAT services and sched-
ules, call 861-1234.
Can I have my job back?
At around the same time
Venice City Council approved
spending $15,000 to find a
new finance director, an e-
mail arrived to Mayor Dean
Calamaras from the previous
finance director who quit
without advance notice after
only five weeks on the job.
"Iam writing to inquire if
there is an interest on your
part to discuss the open fi-
nance director position with
me," James Olson wrote.
"Please let me know at your
convenience."
The mayor's response was
a diplomatic one, informing
Olson that because of the
"unusual circumstances" in
which he left, Calamaras
doubts if there's be much sup-
port in bringing him back.


ready and more are planning
to.
"A lot of them have moved
to Sarasota or other cities
because they thought this is
not the type of place for peo-
ple of teenage years, to maybe
even their early 20s," added
Johnson.
"It's a shame that the city
puts down its younger peo-
ple. It might not know it does
that, but literally, it does."
Still, he did say that one of
the main reasons he's moving
is because he and his friends
have nothing to do. He cites
the closing of the movie the-
ater and lack of a mall in
Venice.
"Kids here got nothing bet-
ter to do than hang out. I wish
they did and I wish the people
that run the city would look
into that more," said Johnson.
Advice unheeded
The city does get some ad-
vice on youth issues through
its Youth Advisory Board,
which it started seven years
ago.


The YAB's mission state-
ment is to "improve and in-
clude permanent recreational
facilities for'the youth in the
area. Communicate and cor-
respond'effectively with city
council regarding youth is-
sues. Involve youth to make a
positive difference in the
community."
The board, which held 10
meetings between/ January
2004 and April 2005, initiated
the idea for the city Skate
Park, which originally operat-
ed at the Venice Circus Arena
and last year moved to the
South County FamilyYMCA.
However, other events sug-
gested by teens who ,were
board members have not take
place.
According to Winston
Smith, who graduated from
Venice High School this May,
the teens' ideas were heard by
the city, but the only idea that
got adopted was the Skate
Park.
Smith said suggestions
were also made to have a vol-
leyball tournament or con-


certs on the beach with
games for teens to play while
"hanging out" and listening
to live music.
. Amanda Lasprogato, who
will be a senior at Venice
High, was also on the Youth
Advisory Board in 2004-2005.
Lasprogato said a lot of the
ideas board members pre-
sented to the city came from
fellow students at VHS.
One such suggestion was
to have concerts at the Ga-
zebo in Centennial Park.
"There are concerts for old
people in Venice, so the teens
thought it would be a great
idea to have concerts for their
own generation at the Ga-
zebo." Lasprogato said.
Not looking back
Venice Deputy Police Chief
Dan McGogan has served as
the city staff liaison to theYAB
since 2001.
McGogan recalled the sug-
gestions made by Smith and
Lasprogato. He said an at-
tempt was made to schedule
a volleyball tournament that


never took place due to
weather-related issues in the
summer of 2004.
Concerts at the Gazebo
were put on hold due to noise
level issues and also a con-
cern about the time of day the
concert would be scheduled.
McGogan, who took the
position with the YAB be-
cause he felt he "wanted to try
and do something" for teens
in Venice, sees the issue in
broader terms.
"We've got to give these
kids something of interest to
do," he said. "When they get


out of school, we don't want
them to leave here and not
look back."
Like Anthony Johnson,
waiting for the bus that will
take him out of Venice for the
last time as his home. He said
that for two years as his saw
his friends leave he knew that
one day he would follow
them.
Gondolier Sun intern
Jennifer Walchok contributed
to this story.
You can e-mailJeff Tavares
atjtavdres
@venicegondolier.com.


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN SA


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005







Venice Gondolier Sun




SPORTS


6A
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 1, 2005


CONTACT US
CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
lewis@venicegondolier.com


SEC crown for Mississippi State, Laninfa


CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


County Cup

this week

With everyone hopefully
having a great and safe
:Memorial Day weekend, the
sports schedule will pick up
again this week.
The Venice Little League
Majors teams will begin
County Cup play Wednesday.
This is a double-elimination
event at Twin Lakes Park in
Sarasota.
The home run derby and
parade of teams were Tuesday
night.;
American Legion ball will
also kick into gear by this
'weekend, There will be two
teams. The B team for those
entering ninth and 10th
grades will be managed by
Jeff Callan. The A team for
those entering grades 11 and'
12 will be managed by Craig
Faulkner.
There are also a number of
summer camps starting up,
There is quite a variety cover-
ing a number of sports.

The first Linebacker Club
meeting of 2005 will be held
on Tuesday, Aug. 23; at the
Holiday Inn on the Bypass.
This will be the first year the
Linebacker Club will meet off
of the island. The Kickoff
Classic will be that Friday,
Aug. 26, at Lemon Bay.

The Venice Sports Hall of
Fame banquet is coming up
fast. The third group of in-
ductees will. be honored on
Thursday night, June 23. The
Class of 2005 includes golfer:
Sheryl Maize, football booster
Ralph Adrian Sr. and the late
softball and volleyball ,enthu-
siast Milt Maas. :
The banquet will begin at
6:30 p.m. June 23 at Bogey's
Rstaurant and Sports Pub.
The proceeds of the event
"go to the Rotary Future's
Program at the high school.'
To sponsor an athlete, table
or if you want to just attend,


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR

Brian Laninfa can add a
Southeast Conference cham-
pionship ring to his collection
of baseball memorabilia.
The upstart Mississippi
State University baseball
team was easily the hottest in


the SEC Tournamentplayed
in Birmingham, Ala.
The Bulldogs went a per-
fect 4-0 in tourney play to,
win the crown and earn a
berth in the NCAA Tourn-
ament.
MSU, seeded seventh out
of eight teams in the tourney,
won Sunday's final, 4-1, over


rival Mississippi. Laninfa, a
sophomore, started as des-
ignated hitter and went
1-for-3.
The game was played in
front of 12,290 fans at the
Hoover Met.
Laninfa was an All-State
outfielder during his days at
Venice High. ,


,MSU takes a 40-20 record
into NCAA play.

Venice High product A.J.
Hiner is playing for St. Peters-
burg College in the Junior
College World Series being
played in Grand Junction,
Colorado.


Hiner is the starting short-
stop.
St. Pete is one of 10 region
winners at the JUCO World
Series.
St. Pete dropped its opener
Sunday night, 12-6, to Po-
tomac, W.Va. St. Pete fell to
a losers' bracket game
Tuesday.


Senior tennis league provides exercise & fun


BY GERALD A. ROGOVIN
CORRESPONDENT

Tennis in Florida junior,
senior, scholastic, collegiate,
amateur and professional -
involves thousands of men
and women. Thanks to ideal
weather, individuals and
teams made up of players
from the age of eight to more
than 80 compete for trophies,
recognition and satisfaction
year-round.
One of the first organiza-
tions for senior men in the
state is the Sarasota County
Senior Men's Tennis League.
Originally created in 1979 and
more formally in the early
80s with just eight teams of
players 60-and-over, it has
grown to 124 teams, whose
rosters total more than 1,100
players. Teams today com-
pete in age divisions of 60-
plus, 70-plus, 75-plus and
80-plus.
.The Venice area includes
teams in all age divisions
that represent Venice City
Courts, Venice Golf & Country.
Club, Waterford, Plantation,
Jacaranda West; Courtside
and the Oaks in Osprey. All
together, 25 clubs,, city; and
county public courts field
teams that use about 300
courts each week in an 18-
week season.
The League's growth has
prompted it to create a Web


call Mark Costanzo at 488-
9156.
I
The 2005 Major. League.
Baseball draft will unfuld June
7-8. No local players are
expected to g0o ih the low


site that is tied into a nation-
wide network, according to
Steen Carstensen of the Oaks,
who is secretary and web-
master. "In the early days,
team captains had 72 hours
to phone in match results,"
he said. 'As the League grew,
we went to FAX, and short-
ened the reporting time to
eight hours. Now, anyone can
e-mail, and our division
recorders can compile results
and team standings within
an hour after the last match
is played."
The new Web site is tied to
a nationwide network of 130
tennis leagues. It provides
scores of matches, team ros-
ters, schedules, a calendar
and a. newsletter. Edward
Wooddell of Venice, who
retired this spring after seven
years as president, admits,
"We've come a long way since
our start."
,The reigning champion in
the 75-plus division is the
Oaks Club. It typifies League
teams. Its season, just con-
cluded, involves eight oppo-
nents in an 18-match season.
To be eligible, players must be
75 years old sometime during
the season. The youngest
member of the Oaks' team is
76, and the oldest is 83. They
average almost 78 years.
But age may not be as
important as skill. The Oaks
team won its division, this


rounds. However, some:
teams may nibble at some-'
one like an Arnold Hughey or.:
aTim Orlosky in a later round.
We'll wait and see. The Dia-
mondbacks have the No. 1
pick this year.


year with 43 of a possible 49
points. Two years ago, it also
won the division, but was not
as dominant. Three teams of
doubles play each match. The
best play at the top level. The
League tries to match compa-
rable twosomes to foster the
highest level of competition.
New teams enter the low-
est ranked division in each.


age group. The two: highest-
ranked teams at the end of a
season move up to the next
higher division. The two low-.
est in the standings are
dropped to the division be-
low. This achieves parity and
enhances competition, said
Carstensen.
Al Pezzillo, captain of the
Oaks 75s, has played in the


League since 1991, in the 60s,
70s and 75s. 2005 was his
third season in: the 75s. He
also filled in when the 60s
and 70s teams needed a sub-
stitute. One of his 75s team-
mates has competed in the
League since its establish-
ment 26 ears ago. "But he's
no longer able to play at
Number I," said Pezzillo.


PHOTO COUTESY OF AL PEZZILLO
Reigning champion of the Sarasota County Senior Men's Tennis League at 75 years and over is
the Oaks Club team from Osprey. From left to right are Charlie Fredey, Bruce Butler, Eli Tobias,
Don Hayner, Al Pezzillo, Dick Greathouse and Bob Fisher.


We are the champions


PHOTO COURTESY OF TONYA HERSCHBERGER
The Lawyers capped a fine season in the Venice Little League Majors by winning the City
Cup Tournament. The Lawyers went unbeaten in the prestigious event involving all the
teams. Front row from left are Charlie Jerla, Philip Traub, Nick Fotos, Tayler Callaghan,
Joey Buncik and Michael Johnson. In the middle row are Andrew Chlebina, Brett Swikle,
Blake Herschberger, Troy Richards, Dante Altieri and Jack Zarling. In the back are coaches
Gary Swikle, Andy Zarling and John Richards.


K ingofclout


PHOTO COURTESY OF TONYA HERSCHBERGER
Derek Frye of Babe's HardWare won the Venice Little League's Home Run Derby held
Thursday evening at Chuck Reiter Field 1. He is shown with his team's manager, Frank
lorio. Frye defeated Clay Burton, 3-1, in the third and final round. Burton also plays for
Babe's. Twenty one 12-year-olds participated in the event. Those advancing to the sec-
ond round were Wes Ojeda, Rex Ingerick, Blake Herschberger, Chris Runion, Kyle Ridley,
Cody Salis, Burton and Frye.


_ s_








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


The sport of rowing revived by Lemon Bay Crew


BYGERALDA, ROGOVIN Growth in the past three
CORRESPONDENT years has been slow, according
to Carolyn Pope, president.
The Lemon Bay Club Crew But membership has grown to
has begun to hit its stride, 36 men and women. Two
thanks to the enthusiasm of wooden shells remained from
several veterans and neo- the high school program, and
phytes in rowing and a retired these were refurbished. Two
crew coach from Massa- used composite shells were
chusetts, who has conducted bought from a rowing club in
several clinics on Lemon Bay. Jacksonville. With their equip-
A local student attending ment in hand, the group en-
the U.S. Olympics in Atlanta, listed a coach from Punta
after watching the crew races, Gorda, who has overseen the
wished aloud to his parents, Sunday morning program.
"Boy, I sure would like to do College students who row
that!" The wish evolved, with elsewhere have worked with
the help of $10,000 raised by the masters on vacations and
his parents and other enthusi- during the summer.
asts in Englewood for high "We're not forgetting the
schoolers in 2001. About 15 kids as we move forward,"
youngsters were soon in- said Pope. Working with the
volved. But after a year, when Englewood YMCA, the club
no one could be found to had its first summer camp for
coach them, the program eight boys and girls in 2004.
folded. This year's 16 places were
Then, months later, several taken in a matter of days. The
women, recalling that the next objective is a year-round
youngsters had performed youth program. But before
well in regattas conducted by that happens, the club must
the Florida Scholastic Rowing raise enough money to sup-
Association, wondered if they port a coach.
could learn to row. From "The word is getting
lessons taken from a coach for around that this is a wonder-
a rowing club in Sarasota on ful activity," said Pope. An
several Sunday mornings, the insurance agent specializing
group determined it could in employee benefits for 28
start a masters rowing pro- years, she admits being
gram in Englewood. "hooked" the first time she


stepped into a shell. "I'm still
hooked," she added. ,
Pope believes that interest
has picked up since Mayrene
Earle began offering lessons to
club members. Coach of the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology women's crew for
15 years before retirement,
she was named New England
Collegiate Coach of the Year
for six years. Twice this year,
in February and April, she
conducted four-day single
sculling lessons and three-day
sweep clinics for club mem-
bers. A second sweep clinic
was opened to women from
around the country. Rowers
from Detroit, Minneapolis,
Washington and Hyannis,
Mass., found their -way to
Lemon Bay to participate.
Earle's national reputation
and the club's efforts to
expand its programs has be-
gun to prompt inquiries, said
Pope. Learn to Row Day is
scheduled for June 11 on
Lemon Bay. It will offer ex-
perienced rowers the oppor-
tunity to try their skills in
shells. A video on rowing and
demonstrations of rowing
.strokes will be given on the
ergonomic machines that the
rowers use for training.
Peter deManio, a rowing
coach who is credited with


z.,---she


AMA-



PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROLYN POPE
The Lemon Bay Crew Club will sponsor a Learn to Row Day on June 11. Here is a picture from its
inaugural camp in the summer of 2004.


having introduced the sport
to Sarasota County in the
1980s, suggests that "rowing is .
an excellent cross-training
vehicle. It builds one's
strength and endurance, and
it's helpful in training for


other sports." If he's correct, it
is easy to understand how
hard the club members work.
They row every day at 6:30
a.m. and two afternoons at
5:30 in 8-crew shells, two 4s
and one single.


During Pioneer Days in
Englewood, the club will hold
its second annual Pioneer
Regatta. But it will really be
only the first. Hurricane
Charley blew away the inau-
gural one last year.


SUiMMER CAMPS


Faulkner Catching Camp
The inaugural Craig
Faulkner Catching Camp will
take place July 25-28 at the
Venice High Complex. This
camp will teach the finer
points of the art of catching.
Faulkner is a former VHS
catcher who went on to excel
at LSU and in the Baltimore
Orioles chain. He is currently
head baseball 'coach at VHS.
There will be two sessions
- one for. ages ,7-11 and
another for ages 12-18.
Any catchers who want to
improve their game should
call Faulkner at 412-3611 or
488-6726.
Boys hoops camp
The Venice Community
Boys Summer Basketball
Camp will take place for four
weeks in June in the high
school's north gym.
It will unfold Mondays
through Thursdays starting
June 6 and ending June 30.
It is for boys entering
grades 4-8. It will take place
2-4 p.m. each day.
The cost is $125. Players
will also receive aT-shirt.
Monday and Wednesdays
will feature individual in-
struction, camp skill devel-
opment, drill stations, inter-
camp league games and
team contests.
Tuesday and Thursdays
will also have 3-on-3, 2-on-2,
1-on-1 and free throw com-
petitions.
The camp is directed by
new Venice High coach Steve
Cavallaro. Cavallaro previous-
ly coached at Sarasota High
and in Maine.
For more information, call
408-0661.


Cavallaro's boys
hoop camp
Venice High's new boys
varsity basketball coach -
Steve Cavallaro will be
holding a summer hoops
camp for kids entering grades
9-12.
It will take place from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday
through Thursdays from June
1 through July 14. Venice
Highs north gym will be uti-
lized.
The camp is based on
teaching the correct funda-
mentals and well as develop-
ing a proper attitude. The
camp is under the direction
of Cavallaro, who has been
doing summer camps for 15
years. He was "Coach of the
Year" in his native Maine

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before he came to Florida. He
has been a successful mentor
at .Sarasota High the past
several years.
The cost of the seven
weeks of camp is $150.
Candidates need to fill out
forms before attending camp.
Forms can be picked up in the
athletic office at VHS.
For more information, call
726-0139.
Venice Pitching Clinic
The ninth annual Venice
Pitching Clinic will be held
June 6-9 atf the Venice High
Baseball Complex.
There are two sessions -
one for children 6-1, years
old and another for those
ages 12-18. Those 6-11 years
old will meet 9:45-11:45 a.m.
daily and those 12-18 years


old from 12:45-2:45 p.m.
The cost is $80 per player.
Players will be taught the
proper mechanics along
with fielding the position.
Campers will be taught two
and four seam fastballs,
breaking ball (12 and up) and
change-up. Also covered will
be holding base runners, cov-
ering bases, arm strengthen-
ing and mental preparation.
The camp is directed by
Venice High pitching coach
Jeff Callan, a graduate of
Trevecca University and a
member of the 1993 Canad-
ian Olympic team.
To reserve a spot in the
clinic, call Callan at 492-4001.
Velez hitting clinic in June
The fifth annual Coach
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Clinic will take place frqm
June 14-17 at the Venice High
Baseball Complex.
There are two sessions a
morning one for ages 6-12
and an afternoon one for ages
13-18. The cost is $80 per
camper ($10 off for brother or
sister).
Attendees should bring
their glove, bat, shoes and
shorts.
The clinic is tutored by Jose
Velez, hitting coach at VHS.
He had an outstanding career
at Chipola Junior College and
played in the farm systems of
the Texas Rangers and Cali-


fornia Angels.
Areas covered in his clinic
includes bunting, swing me-
chanics, adding power, and
hitting all types of pitches.
The goal of the clinic is to
offer campers maximum
instruction and establishing
excellence with a strong
foundation on hitting and
fielding skills.
To get signed up, pick up
an application form at Total
Athlete or at the Chuck Reiter
Complex.
For more information,
call Velez at 468-4385 or 493-
9697.


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005


- - - - --- - -


I;


i'








8A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


SARASOTA COUNTY BRIEFS


Comp plan hearings set
Sarasota County urges the
public to become involved in
the updating of its compre-
hensive plan by reviewing
draft amendments to the plan
and providing feedback at
planning commission public
hearings scheduled for June.
Draft amendments are be-
ing made available online at
scgov.net/ear or at the coun-
ty's Planning Services office on
the fifth floor of the Admin-
istration Center, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota.
The schedule for the June
public hearings is:
Environment Chapter- 6
p.m., Wednesday, June 8,
Robert L. Anderson Admin-
istration Center, 4000 South
Tamiami Trail, Venice.
Housing Chapter 6
p.m., Thursday, June 9, Sara-
sota County Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota.
Future Land Use Chapter
including the 2050 Plan 6
p.m., Wednesday, June 15,
Sarasota County Administra-
tion Center, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota.
Future Land Use Chapter
continuation, 6 p.m., Wednes-
day, June 22, Sarasota County
Administration Center, 1660
Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Future Land Use Chapter
continuation, .including re-
quests for map designation
changes 6 p.m., Thursday,
June 23, Sarasota County Ad-
ministration Center, 1660
Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Continued public hearings
as necessary 6 p.m., Thurs-
day, June 30, Sarasota County
Administration Center, 1660
Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Interested parties can ap-
pear and comment on the
proposed amendments at the
public hearings. Each speaker
will have a limit of five min-
utes on each chapter.
Residents who are unable
to attend the public hearings
can provide written com-
ments to Sarasota County
Planning Services, 1660 Ring-
ling Blvd., fifth floor, Sarasota,
34236, or by using the public
input form link at scgov.net/
ear.
Copies of the proposed
amendments will also be
available at the Office of the
Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners and at the
Sarasota County Planning and
Development Services Busi-
ness Center, 1660 Ringling
Blvd., on the second and fifth
floors respectively. Residents
can also view the proposed
amendments at the Robert L.
Anderson Administration
Center, Room B-14, 4000
South Tamiami Trail, Venice,
and at all Sarasota County
public libraries.
For more information, call
the Sarasota County Planning
and Development Services
Business Center at 861-5140.
County to host
community conversations
The public is invited to a
series of community conver-
sations to discuss community



CITY from page 5A
After Olson quit his Venice
position Aug. 9, it was re-
vealed he hadnever officially
resigned from his finance job
with the city of Jamestown,
N.Y. He continues working
there.
council member John
Simmonds, on the other
hand, was a bit more direct in
responding to Olson's e-mail.
"I have no interest in talk-
ing to this person concerning
any relationship with the city
of Venice ... he departed with
15 minutes notice. Un-
believable for an executive,"
Simmonds wrote.
Colin Baenziger & Asso-
ciates was hired to conduct


the city finance director
search, The contract comes
with a guarantee that if one of
their recommendations is
hired and doesn't stay with
the city for two years, the
company will conduct anoth-
er search at no charge, acI-
cording to City Manager
Marty Black.

Compiled by Assistant
Editor J.J. Andrews


values and the kind of com-
munity residents want to cre-
ate for future generations. The
meetings will be hosted by
Jim Ley, Sarasota County
administrator.
During similar listening
sessions four years ago, the
county identified a number of
community issues. Ley said
these new meetings are the
next step to understand what
residents value in a commu-
nity and to hear what they
want to contribute to their
community's future.
"I believe our shared future
depends on people with di-
verse interests coming to-
gether to share their passions
and talents," Ley said. "We
invite people to bring open
minds and to be prepared to
offer and consider many per-
spectives."
Residents are asked to con-
tact the. Sarasota County Call
Center at 861-5000 to reserve
a spot at the most convenient
meeting date and location.
All of the Community Con-
versation sessions are from
5:30 to 7 p.m.:
Thursday, June 9, North
Sarasota Library, 2801 New-
town Blvd., Sarasota.
Monday, June 27, Bay-
front Community Center, 803
North Tamiami Trail, Exhi-
bition Hall, Sarasota.
Thursday, July 7, Engle-
wood Sports Complex, 1300
South River Road, Englewood.
Monday, July 18, Twin
Lakes Park, Conference Room
A, Green Office Complex,
6700 Clark Road, Sarasota.
Tuesday, Aug. 9, George
Mullen Activity Center, 4956
City Center Blvd., North Port.
SCAT for a dime
Sarasota CountyAreaTran-
sit is once again offering its
popular "Dime a Ride" Sum-


THE WEATHER


I VE NICE OUTLOOK


,] r -" x



/" ..
V
..- -
" "


-7


Wednesday
High 87, Low 74
Sun and clouds with
scattered rain and
thunderstorms.
Thursday
High 89, Low 72
Partly cloudy, chance
of an afternoon
thunderstorm.
Friday
High 89, Low 72
Partly cloudy, chance
of an afternoon
thunderstorm.
Saturday
High 89, Low 72
Partly cloudy, chance
of an afternoon
thunderstorm.


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
(Including Sarasota and Charlotte counties)
South winds at 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet, moderate chop.
Tarpon Springs-to Apalachicola:
Southwest winds at 15 to 20 knots.
Seas 3 to 4 feet, choppy.


High Tuesday 87
Low Tuesday 71
Rainfall
Total this week 4.89
Total this year 15.61
Normal YTD 10.33
Rainfall totals are for a 24-hour
period ending at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday and '
Saturdayas recorded at the
official weather station in
Venice.


Sunrise/set
Tonight's sunset
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonrise
Moonset


Below
normal
for
June



June
rain
00.00


8:20 p.m.
6:35 a.m.

10:46 p.m.
9:04 a.m.


DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


DATE
WED 1
THU 2
FRI 3
SAT 4


HIGH
A.M.
9:05
9:30
9:54
10:19


HIGH
P.M.
9:33
11:04
2:21
3:29


*STRONG TIDE
a A.M. p P.M.


mer Freedom program, which
allows students up to age 18
to ride the bus one way on
any regular SCAT route for 10
cents from May 25 to Sept. 3.
That's a sizeable drop from
the regular bus fare of 50
cents per ride; or 25 cents for
seniors (age 65 and over) and
persons with disabilities.
Plus, said Mobility General
Manager Jim Harriott, 'All the
buses are equipped with bike
racks, so it's easy to bring your
bicycle along. It's an inexpen-
sive way to get to jobs, the
beaches, parks, camps, li-
braries and movie theaters."
No bus passes are required
to receive the rate, although
proof of age maybe requested
from older teenagers.


May 29.......272
May 28.......117
May 27.......157
May 26.......044
May 25...... 984


May
May
May
May
May


29...........6-8-16-22-32
28...........8-14-26-33-35
27...........9-15-17-22-35
26...........1-12-33-34-35
25..............1-6-8-27-30


Payoff for May 28
5 5-digit winners.......$49,348.90
293 4-digit winners......$135.50
9,190 3-digit winners:...........$12
2-digit winners ...........Quick Pick ticket


I ALMANAC


I LOTTO


May
May
May
May
May
May


28.....7-18-23-25-31-32
25...13-32-33-34-47-49
21 ...2-16-17-18-20-29
18...14-20-21-29-36-44
14.....5-10-16-21-47-53
11 ........4-5-9-17-19-30,


Payoff for May 25
0 6-digit winners....................$-
63 5-digit winners....$6,106.50
5,113 4-digit winners:............$61
95,207 3-digit winners:...$4.50
Drawing occurs Wednesdays, Saturdays


Estimated jackpot $9 million


PUBLIC MEETINGS


City of Venice meeting June 8
times, dates and locations are Airpo
subject to change. If you are p.m., c(
disabled and need assistance, hall
please contact the city clerk's
office at least 24 hours prior to June 9
the meeting by calling 486- Archit
2626. 9 a.m.,
Many of these meetings hall
post their agendas online at
venicegov.com under the pub- June 10
lic meetings link. *
Enforce:
JUNE cil chami
June 7
* Planning Commission, 1:30 June14
p.m., council chambers, city City
hall council


rt Advisory Board, .2
council chambers, city



tectural Review Board,
council chambers, city



Municipal Code.
ment, 9:30 a.m., coun-
ibers, city hall


Council, 1:30 p.m.,
chambers, city hall


June 15
* Senior Living Committee,
9:30 a.m., council chambers,
city hall
June 16
* Venice Historical Commis-
sion, 9 a.m., council cham-
bers, city hall
June 20
* Parks and Recreation, 3 p.m.,
council chambers, city hall
June 21
* Planning Commission, 1:30
p.m., council chambers, city
hall


5dA ,A.:-CJ,, ~ A CA~ ,'.~r


titnes baking serviceslike Freeriff

-n .- k". e t . . ...... ... ..... .... .. . ..
f-''- ,


..".


Business Money Market


Performance Account


o -P> W
8ariket.,.RerforlManc


ltb In' 41 ve-ea sy v'










is~~ orote S trt





5..


7- -


m


*Annualized 3.25% rate based on daily compounded rate. Applies only to the Business Money Market Performance Account. The minimum required balance to earn the introductory rate good through 10/14/05
- is $25,000 of new money with a maximum balance of $750,000. Once the introductory period has ended, interest will accrue at the standard Business Money Market Performance Account rate. Offer good for '
g Business Money Market Performance Accounts opened through 8/12/05.
SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. 2005, SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust is a federally registered service mark of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


May 29.....5718
May 28.....8760
,May 27.....7876
SMay 26 ....6296
May 25.....7056


May 27.......17-32-37-39
MegaBall..................7...
May 24.......18-21-34-43
MegaBall................20
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for May 27
1 4 of 4 + MB.........$ 1.3 Million
10 4 of 4... .......... $1,061.50
57 3 of 4 + MB.................$408
1,185 3 of ....................$58.50
1,601,2 of 4 + MB. .........$30


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


8A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


I UNIS, UNE


FLOMDI LIOTTIERY




VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


' lI


iT


I:i


0oie, On&d 050699


a1


Roasted Turkey
Slow-roasted served with corn-bread stuffing,
homemade gravy & cranberry sauce
Old Fashioned Meatloaf
Mel's original recipe served with homemade gravy


Boneless Fried Chicken
Seasoned boneless chicken breast,
hand breaded and deep fried
Breaded Pork Cutlet
Hand breaded and deep fried
served with Mel's applesauce
Chopped Sirloin
10 oz. ground patty topped with
grilled onions and au jus
Virginia Ham Steak
Lightly dusted and grilled, topped with
a sweet pineapple ring


Country Fried Steak
Deep-fried and served with
Mel's famous sausage gravy


Baby Beef Liver
Lightly dusted and pan-fried topped with
grilled onions and au jus
Roasted Herbed Chicken
Roasted half of chicken marinated
in a special blend of spices
Al4 plate, aite served uai. Yoa eoepoe of
Iteat na4ed potatoes nd /tav.y
natuOal eut /daa4o Ies o asked potato
aad veyetabte of t4e day.
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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


0'


,1 I






WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


1 OA VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Venice High students who turned their lives around


For these young adults, attending Venice High
and winning a school award meant overcoming
serious obstacles in order to improve their lives.


BY GREG GILES
STAFF WRITER


For some kids, school does
not come easy.
Take Quang Bui, who
moved to the United States
from Vietnam at 16 years old
knowing no English at all. Or
Jordan Martens, who lost his
mother, then lost interest in
school. Or Trista Silver, who, at
17 years old, was failing all of
her classes, ready to drop out.
Others struggled with drugs or
antisocial behavior.
Yet these and a number of
other young adults turned
around their lives, or are well
on their way to doing so, while
at Venice High School. It's the
kind of success story that in-
spires teachers and others to
go that extra mile for a student
struggling to make better
choices or to help someone
get back on track.
They are just a few of the
60 Sarasota County students
honored at the seventh annu-
al Most Improved Student
Awards program sponsored by
Northern Trust.
Fifteen Venice High stu-
dents were honored, five each
from the sophomore, junior
and senior classes. Some of the
VHS students participated in
the school's New Deal pro-
gram, which targets students
identified in need of academic
improvement or who exhibit
attendance or behavioral prob-
lems.
Most improved
The "most improved"
awards have been coordinat-
,ed for the past six years by the.
Sarasota County School Dis-
trict's Pupil Support Services
Division. The program recog-
nizes students who, in the
judgment of their school guid-
ance counselors and princi-
pals, have overcome serious
'obstacles in substantially im-
proving their lives.
Each student must have
made a turnaround in his or
her life in the academic, social
or behavioral realm; demon-
strated evidence of communi-
ty involvement; shown poten-
tial as a role model for oth-
ers; and remained drug- and
crime-free.
Seniors received a $1,000
scholarship toward postsec-
ondary education.. A $5,000
scholarship. was awarded to
one of the seniors at each of
the four participating high
schools, which included Ven-
ice High, Booker High, River-
view High and Sarasota High.
Funds were provided by the
Harold C. and Jacqueline E
Bladel Foundation, Evalyn
Sadlier Jones Foundation,
Annette J. Hagens Memorial
Foundation, and Kunkele
Family Foundation.
The following summaries
of student improvement were
provided by SCSD.
Jordan Daniel Martens,
12th grade. Jordan won the
top scholarship among, the
Venice High seniors. For the
last several years, Jordan has
overcome several major ob-
stacles in his life. He lost his
mother, and had absolutely
no interest in his academic
classes. However, last year he
met with a friend who was a
missionary, and Jordan has
since become very active in
his church's ministry. He pro-
gressed from almost dropping
out of school to possessing a
high senior GPA. He has been
accepted at the Marine Reach
School, which includes a five-
month missionary trip to Fiji
working with medical and
education relief clinics.
* Quang Bui, 12th grade.
After moving to the United
States knowing no English at
all, he was thrown into school
feeling very scared and isolat-
ed. ESOL staff was a saving
grace for him, and the interna-
tional language of math kept
his self-esteem strong. Quang
demonstrated an excellent
work ethic and he plans to
study pre-medicine at MCC.


Jaclyn Clarke, 12th grade.
Jackie expressed a desire to
drop out of school. She entered
New Deal, and staff worked on


de-escalating confrontations
and attitude. The metamor-
phosis was a thing of beauty.
As she succeeded, her attitude
became one of appreciation
for the people in her life. Her
GPA went up, and she became
active in a youth group. Jackie
is planning to study at SCTI
after graduation.
Damian Mazon, 12th
grade. Damian entered New
Deal with a low GPA and has
since made a tremendous
effort to earn credits and
excellent grades, allowing
him to graduate with his
class. He has been an extraor-
dinary role model to his
peers, exemplified by speak-
ing to ninth-grade classes
about the value of education,
the pitfalls that befell him,
and advice for staying on
track in school. He plans to


attend SCTI to study network
support services.
Trista Silver, 12th grade.
When Trista entered New
Deal, she was 17 years old and
failing all of her classes. She
felt overwhelmed by high ex-
pectations that she was afraid
she could not meet. She was
drastically behind in credits
and was about to give up.
Thanks to the intervention of
an aware guidance counselor,
Trista began working hard and
improved her GPA, enabling
her to graduate. She plans to
continue education at MCC.
Undergrad awards
Eleventh-grade winners of
the Most Improved' Award
went to the following Venice
High students:, Christopher
Amole, Antonio Charles,
Cameron Martin, Sabrina
Reeb and James Robbins.
Tenth-grade winners were:
Erin Barnes, Dustin Hartman,
Rachael Hinkle, Gabriel
Rodriguez and AlyssaVawter.


Most improved Venice High seniors: Scholarships were awarded to Damian Mazon, Jordan
Daniel Martens, Jaclyn Clarke, Trista Silver and Quang Bui (not pictured).


SME-


TastPERMARKE Passion.

Taste the Passion.


5855 Placida Rd., Enqlewood
(Corner of Placida Rd. and Rotonda Blvd.)
(941) 697-8644


1951 S. McCall Rd. #300, Engfewood
(Corner of S. McCall Rd. & Pine St.)
(941).475-9590


*. C


www.SweetbaySupermarket.com


458 N. Venice By-Pass, Venice
(Betweef Albee Fwrm Rd. & Bird Bay Dr,)
(941) 485-2912


1254 Jacaranda Blvd, Venice
(Ccrner of Jacaranda aOd Center)
(941) 497-2602










EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
11A
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 1,2005


OUR VIEW



Dear legislators: Please protect our children


As more information has come out about
the allegations of child abuse at Venice
Presbyterian Church's Early Childhood
Center, it is apparent there are some enor-
mous holes in the laws that are supposed to
keep our children safe.
Steve Zimath, the state attorney in the
case, declined to file charges in spite of evi-
dence of abuse, based on a recent appellate
ruling that the spanking of an 8-year-old that
left "only" temporarywelts and bruises wasn't
prosecutable child abuse under current
Florida law
We're already on record as opining that a
precedent upholding traditional corporal
punishment should not bar the prosecution.
of teachers accused of "jacking" 3- and 4-
year-old children into the air and slamming
them to the floor, mixing their food with salt
and mustard and force-feeding it to them,
and other despicable acts.
The statute that governs child-care facili-
ties bans such punishments (though it car-
ries no penalty), and in only a few of the
instances at ECC was the mistreatment of a
child linked to any conduct that called for
discipline of any nature certainly nothing
of the sort that two of the teachers are


accused of meting out with some regularity.
There is no formal way to challenge Zi-
math's decision, though a group of parents of
children believed to have been abused is urg-
ing reconsideration of it. Unfortunately, that
seems a possibility only if the Florida Su-
preme Court reverses the appellate court rul-
ing he relied on.
While the victims at ECC maybe denied jus-
tice (though several have filed lawsuits and
more are expected to), it is not too late to
change the lawto reduce the risk of otheryoung
children being mistreated by their teachers.
Here's what we think needs to happen:
Put some teeth in the child-care statute.
It means nothing to prohibit the corporal
punishment of children 5 and under if there
is no consequence for breaking that law. Also
banned are punishments involving food or
humiliation. Criminalize violations of those
laws, too.
In the case of preschool children, make
zero tolerance the standard for prosecution.
A pattern of conduct, violence, or physical or
mental harm to the child should only be
aggravating factors, distinguishing between
misdemeanor and felony charges, or degrees
,of a misdemeanor or a felony. 'It shouldn't


take a broken bone to prove child abuse,
especially in a preschool setting.
License child-care workers. In cases in
which criminal prosecution was deemed too
difficult, a disciplinary proceeding would still
hold out the possibility of license revocation
so an accused abuser would not be able to
work in child care again.
Stress the duty to report suspected child
abuse. The practice of jacking apparently was
an open secret at ECC, since numerous
teachers and aides testified to witnessing the
act at least once and having reported it to the
former administrator. Until later they didn't,
however, report it to the state hotline, as the
law requires, and neither did she. Nor, we
understand, did she enforce the requirement
that teachers sign off on mandatory records
that they had been counseled about the duty
to report child abuse.
Overhaul the child-care certification pro-
gram. ECC was a Florida Gold Seal facility,
having been accredited by the National
Association for the Education of Young
Children. But many of the incidents investi-
gated by the VPD occurred during that
accreditation process, which certainly calls
into question the thoroughness of the review


by the NAEYC and the weight to be given to
its findings. The state relies on accreditation
by NAEYC and other such organizations to
award its Gold Seal status, a practice now
shown to be dubious at best.
Florida is one of a number of states that
still believe to spare the rod is to spoil the
child. Threats to that philosophy make a vari-
ety of people rush to its defense.
But our local legislators don't have to chal-
lenge that attitude to protect children in child
care since the law already says they aren't
supposed to be spanked.
If that prohibition is to be taken seriously,
it's time to attach a meaningful penalty to it.
Much attention has properly been focused
on efforts to keep children safe from sexual
predators. But we musn't lose sight of a prob-
lem that, by the numbers, is much greater: In
the last year one Sarasota child was abduct-
ed, sexually assaulted and murdered by a
man with a criminal record. At ECC alone, 77
children were considered potential victims of
child abuse.
Surely the problem is big enough to
deserve attention now, before a child suffers
the type of injury our state attorney would be
willing to file charges over.


What council


and Mike Miller


talked about


t~ f








ED MARTIN
COLUMNIST

Developer' Mike Miller
hopes to build a mixed-use
complex involving a hotel,
housing, one or more restau-
rants, retail and parking space
on and near Tampa Avenue in
the area near the Waterfront
towers he has built on the
Intracoastal Waterway.
Following the report last
week in this column that
Miller had met with all seven
members of council in private
meetings, I was able to speak
with six members (Bill Wil-
lson was on vacation.)
All members felt the meet-
ings were appropriate and
reasonable as part of the con-
stituent service' they try to
extend to citizens. Several
cited other meetings with in-
dividuals, civic groups, busi-
ness owners, etc. as similar
attempts to'be available to
constituents.
Not all council members
reported exactly the same dis-
cussions, as the presentation
did not follow a written script.
All agreed that Miller showed
them some concepts with
various overlays representing
different approaches to de-
sign, massing and height.
Some members remember
a nine-story option, others
focused on four or five stories.
Some also discussed the need
to develop a new zoning des-
ignation that would allow the
mixed uses not provided in
any single part of the existing
code.
Some comments by mem-
bers, in alphabetical order:
Mayor Dean Calamaras
said an "informal meeting"
with a developer on an im-
portant and complicated pro-
ject seemed reasonable.
Drawing up detailed plans is
an expensive proposition and
council members could ad-
vise on ideas they thought
would not be acceptable be-
fore those expenses were
incurred. Calamaras said he
told Miller some versions of
his plans were "too massive."
He and other members said
no "agreements" were made.


Fred Hammett said he is
an advocate for mixed-use
development and that he
strongly supports "property
rights." He, too, saw some ver-
sions as "too massive" and felt
nine stories would be not
acceptable to the community:
He liked the hotel, which he-
felt was needed. Most mem-
bers commented favorably
on a hotel as part of the plan.
John Moore said he saw
differences between council
and the planning commis-
sion, which decided not to
meet individually with Miller
and his counsel, Jeff Boone.
He saw council as setting pol-
icy for the city and needing to
have vision for the next 10 to
20 years. Meetings with con-
stituents were necessary to
develop that kind of view. The
planning commission, on the
other hand, has a more spe-
cific mission dealing with le-
gal specifics. Moore said he
raised a number of topics
with Miller, including the
need for a "broad-based" ap-
proach to affordable housing
that would need to involve
city, county, state and the pri-
vate sector.
Rick Tacy commented that
he thought some people were
too committed to a 35-foot
height limit everywhere in the
city and that he thought a
plan like Miller's that would
have several levels "stepping
up" toward the towers would
be acceptable. He expressed a
concern about massive struc-
tures, including what he
terms "McMansions" in resi-
dential areas. He did not favor
new buildings approaching
the height of the towers.
Vicki Taylor remarked on
the design options, saying
that she recalled layering of
retail shops and a hotel build-
ing above a parking area. She
said the designs had a "stag-
gered" roof line, with some
areas, such as at corners, dif-
fering in height from sur-
rounding roofs. She saws
designs calling for up to nine
floors, but like other mem-
bers said she felt there would
be "height issues" with that
approach. Taylor mentioned
that "main street" merchants
might not favor the retail
space and recommended
Miller meet with them.
John Simmonds said that
his conversation did not get
into specific "likes" or "dis-
likes." He asked whether the
garage would be open to the
public and felt it would be.
Please see MARTIN, 12A


I V oy =,V& IuIt;tu p unnti n nt

Available from Commercial News Providers"


LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


Get after them or quit the board


Editor:
I wish to comment on the Gondolier Sun article regarding
the Municipal Code Enforcement Board: Any board member
who can lean toward feeling sorry for repeat violators that will
not take care of their property should resign from the board.
Why should caring homeowners take their time and effort and
spend money to keep up their property and live next to or in a
neighborhood where repeat violations occur?
'I have passed the Cypress Avenue unkept property. It is
more than an overgrown grass problem and it hasn't just
recently happened. This property is far below decent compli-
ance standards. Both the house and property outside need
major work.
The unwarranted statement by Al Feinsod about having
people mowing their lawn twice a day is ridiculous. A qualified
code board member should know the difference between over-
grown grass and a property that has not been kept up to rea-
sonable code standards.
I believe the Venice Municipal Code Enforcement Board
needs to have more authority and take direct action against
property owners and occupants who do not care about the
property appearance, nor their neighbors or neighborhood.
Yes, there are others in the same category as the Cypress
Avenue property.


Read the report, then
make up your mind

Editor:
I am a parent of an affected
child who previously attend-
ed the Venice Presbyterian
Church Early Childhood
Center. The recent decision
by the state attorney's office
to not move forward with
criminal charges at this time
apparently has opened a win-
dow of opportunity for those
individuals who were investi-
gated to apply for child-care-


related positions w
community.


Bill Baxter
Venice

within our


I can speak only for what I
know. I have read the 500-
page document of findings,
corroborating statements,
eyewitness testimony and
statements by the children.
The report shows the follow-
ing people were "named" in
the abuse of or for failing to
report the abuse of these chil-
dren.
According to the Venice
Police Report, Joyce Michelle
Gill, Kari Ann Harris, Susan


Will Bensen, Anna M. Sweet-
ing, Alexis E. Satterley and
Chris Romig were all suspects
within this investigation.
These individuals were sus-
pects in probable cause affi-
davits.
Unfortunately, I cannot
change what my child or oth-
ers experienced. However, I
can alert those within the
community of the potential
threat of them working with
your children.
I would invite all parents of
children in child care and
administrators of those facili-
ties to read this report. Make a
decision based on the chil-
dren's safety and emotional
well-being. If nothing else,
make a decision based on the
possibility of what kind of a
spotlight may be shone on
your facility.
For those who believe it
couldn't happen to them, take
the time to read the report,
decide for yourself and, in
turn, for our children. Are you
willing to take that risk?
Lisa M. Blaise
Venice

EDITOR'S NOTE: Bensen and
Romig were under investigation
for claims they failed to report
child abuse, not for participating in
any form of abuse, while the other
four were accused of actually
abusing children.


There's plenty to do,
for pay or for free
Editor:
Two items caught my eye,
both having to do with our
youth. One headline was:
"Venice needs more youth,
concluded city council." What
wisdom! The article contin-
ues to state our average age is
68.
Dear city council: The spir-
it is willing, but the flesh is
weak Anyway, we had a good
laugh.
More seriously, the Let'em
Have It section had the head-
line, Nothing for youth to do
here, responding to Mr. Ved-
der's question about where all
the kids went. It is sad that
somehow the caller thinks it is
up to others to keep them
busy or to entertain them.
That sounds foreign to me.
When we were kids we
accepted our environment
(not nearly as favorable as
Venice) and we always found
things to do.
Here are some suggestions:
How about cutting my grass
for less than the $40 some
commercial lawn services
charge? Want to wash and
polish my car? Find out who
wants their house painted.
Many of the supermarkets,
gas stations and the fast-food
places offer part-time em-
ployment.
Entertainment? You have
Please see LETTERS, 12A


~...,









12A VENICE GONDOLIER SUNWEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005


LET 'EM HAVE IT! DOES THE CITY OF VENICE ENFORCE CODE STAN-

DARDS STRICTLY ENOUGH? CALL US AT 207-1111.


Seeing through Envision Venice


Foregone. I'm calling in regards to Envision Venice. After
attending four meetings, I think that probably the Venice
Gondolier Sun was right: Most of the people had already made
up their minds. It was sort of like a charade. And then I under-
stand that even after all of this was said and done you can still
change it the different developers and builders, if they wish,
can petition to have it changed. So I guess this is sort of like
camouflage to make things look good, as if the citizens did the
job, when in reality it's already predetermined.


Limelight hogged. These
little piggies should go whee,
whee, whee all the way home.
Fund-raiser, yes; tourist at-
traction, no. A fund-raiser is
acceptable, but for a year is
pushing it. Enough is enough.
Does Venice want to be
known distinctively as the
shark's tooth capital for its
fossilized sharks' teeth, or
demeaningly as pig city for its
tacky, gaudy streets of swine?
RenewVenice's image.
Partnership. Why don't the
city and the Venice Little The-
atre get together and build a
three-story parking garage on
the theater's parking area. It
would fit right in with the
height of the theater and Bella
Costa and not be offensive,
and would be available for
downtown and enhance the
shopping on Tampa Avenue.
Hair today. Does anyone
else have a pet peeve like
these: stringy, long bangs that
look like windshield wipers
for the eyeballs? Or girls with
long, straight hair that con-
stantly gets whipped behind


the ears? It's very distracting.
Water waste. I live in Bay
Indies. Why is there a charge
of $36-$37 per month for
water and sewer when I am
gone and none is used?
A-peeling. What's wrong
with our new traffic light
poles downtown? All the
black is either fading into sil-
ver or peeling. They're a year
old. Come on, FDOT, get the
warranty out on those and get
them fixed. There's no reason
why they're in such poor con-
dition already.
Untrained. I've just return-
ed from a trip up North and I
was appalled at all the trucks
on the road.-They jam up the
road something terrible com-
ing and going. I wonder why
they don't use the railroad
more to carry their wares.
High gas. I just can't under-
stand why the price of gaso-
line in Venice is so high. I just
got back from a trip up North
and the prices ranged from
$2.05 to $2.11, and I get back
to Venice and it's $2.25 at the
lowest.


GIVE US A CALL
The Let'em Have It line allows readers to sound off on issues of
local interest. Opinions expressed here are solely those of the
callers and do not necessarily represent the views of this newspa-
per. Opinions or comments that are personal attacks on people;
attacks on or commercials for businesses; political endorsements;
or otherwise unfit for publication will not be printed. If you would
like to participate, call the line at 207-1111. Call no more than
once a week. Please keep your comments brief. The line is avail-
able all hours. Caller identification is not required.


I went to Wisconsin and
that's what on found on 75
and in those areas up there.
Why are our prices so much
higher? Are we greedy?
No difference. I wonder
who is the really bright person
who came up with the idea of
pigs as the Venice mascot. I
find it to be so ridiculous. It's
getting so you can't tell the
tourists from the pigs on dis-
play
Take a hint. Lots of adopted
kids search for their parents.
Pro-lifers, take a hint.
Post position. I see the
comments about three-day-
a-week delivery from people
who have the paper delivered.
The Gondolier Sun is unable
to be delivered in the area
where I live, so it comes by
mail. Once again, I got the
Sunday paper on Thesday. If I
could have it delivered, that
would be fine, but I can't. I'm
dependent on the mails, and I
find the Sunday paper not ter-
rific. I'd prefer to go to a
Saturday paper.
Suggestion. I'm calling
about what we should name
the former island water treat-
ment plant. The name I
thought would be good is Par-
adisePark.
.Name them. I'm calling in
response to sex offenders'
names and addresses being
put in the paper: I think that is
a good idea to make parents
more aware. I do believe their
addresses should also be in
the paper.
Second, I do like the three-
times-a-week paper. If you
don't finish in one day, you
can read it the next day.
Third, the apartments on
Airport Avenue are an eyesore
to tourists and visitors and
they need to do something
about that to make them look
presentable.


LETTERS from page 11 A

free beaches for swimming,
you can go canoeing for free
on the Myakka River. Plenty
of places for fishing.
There are more and more
bicycle paths.
There are free basketball
hoops and tennis courts at
,the parks.
I could go on. Get with it,
you "cool" kids.


The horse is gone,
lock the barn door
Editor:
Make everything
feet high. What's ti
ence? The city is
ruined anyway.
The condos by t
Bridge are a total eye


they look out of place.
Fred Otte Who in their right mind
Venice would want to live there and
put up with all the traffic try-
ing to access their (affordable
million dollar) condos?
Money, money, money is
100-150 all it's about.
he differ- Who are the politicians
already getting the kickbacks?


he North
sore and


MARTIN from page 11A


Simmonds said Miller spelled
out several scenarios as re-
ported by others.
I tried to include Miller's
view of the meetings, but he
was on vacation, not return-
ing until after our deadline, so
I will include his views in a
future column.
In sum, it seems as though
the general idea of mixed uses'
of the type Miller proposed
found support among coun-
cil members, but. opinions
about building design will
need to await specifics. Not
too surprisingly, given the
public discourse in various
city meetings, council mem-'
bers were wary of mass and
height issues.
Whether such private
meetings are needed as
opposed to an open work-
shop for informational pur-
poses, not approval proba-
bly depends on your view of a
preferred process for devel-
oping public policy.

Height overlay district
Before city council approv-
ed, unanimously, first reading
of a proposal to create a
height limit of 35 feet for the
area one block from the
beach involving West Venice
Avenue, and bounded by
' Granada, Barcelona, Armada
and the Esplanade, three
members Fred Hammett,
Rick Tacy and John Sim-
monds raised issues about
"flexibility," implying some
opportunity for a variance


might be in order.
Simmonds said he favored
going ahead *with the vote
while it was timely, but in-
quired if an amendment
could be made on second
reading. City Attorney Wayne
Hall and City Manager Marty
Black advised that small
changes might be made, but
more significant changes
would require a new descrip-
tion of the revised ordinance
be advertised.
Tacy talked about three
stories rather than 35 feet, but
citizen comments pointed
out that without a specific
definition council would have
to' decide if three 15-foot or
20-foot "floors" would be
accepted. Hammett and
Simmonds identified a three-
story building in the area that
had a peaked design in the
center of the roof area, and
said that they would be con-
cerned if such a building
could not be built.
My visit to the building in
question suggests that since
height is measured by the
middle of the roof line, a 35-
foot building, could be built
using a similar design, with
that part above the mid-
point. Also, certain design
features are permitted above
the limit, including pedi-
ments and equipment.
More significantly, the long
block between Park Avenue
and Armada has only one-
story houses on West Venice,
Granada and Barcelona, so


that allowing heights above
35 feet would break an attrac-
tive pattern. Only one com-
plex seems to be above 35 feet
in that area. That is a complex
on the comer of Granada and
the Esplanade.
I spoke with Tacy, Ham-
mett and Simmonds con-
cerning whether they intend-
ed to modify the decision
approved on first reading.
Tacy and Hammett said no.
Hammett will not be present
for the meeting.
Simmonds said he doubt-
ed he would offer a change,
but wanted to speak with city
staff about the rules that
might affect a building such
as, described above. He was
thinking of possible excep-
tions of a few feet, not more. I
expect the height overlay dis-
trict will be. approved by
council on second reading.

Ed Martin, a full-time resi-
dent of Venice since 1994, is
active in community affairs;
serves on the board of a sci-
ence-related Fortune 500
company; taught public poli-
cy at Harvard and Columbia
Universities; and worked for
the Congress and executive
branch in Washington. He
can be contacted at tilting
atwindmills@comcast.net.


NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE OF SALE OTHER NOTICES OTHER NOTICES


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO:
2005-DR-4833-SC
CONSTANCE MARIE HAWK,
Petitioner
and
JOHN HAROLD HAWK,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: JOHN HAROLD HAWK
281 Taconic Rd.
Venice,.FL 34293
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on CONSTANCE M. HAWK,
whose address is 3311 Papaya
Rd, Venice, FL 34293 on or
before June 24, 2005, and file
the original with the clerk of this
Court at 4000 S. Tamiami Trail,
Venice, Florida 34293, before ser-
vice on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a
default may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.
Copies of all court documents in
this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of Circuit
Court's'office. You may review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of Circuit
Court's office notified of your cur-
rent address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to the
address, on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in.sanc-
tions, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.
Dated Mav 18 9005


PUBLIC
MAY 2


acting, Mary K. Surles, Assis- PUBLIC VEHICLE AUCTION
tant General Counsel, Prosecu- Per F.S. 713.78,
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald on 6/15/05 @ 10:00 a.m. at
Cypress Way, Bin #C65, Talla- Konrad's Towing & Recovery
hassee Florida 32399-3265, 800 U.S. 41 By-Pass So.
(850)-414-8126. Venice, FL 34285
-1986 FORD PICKUP
If no contact has been made by VIN 1FTHF25H9GNB11543
you concerning the above by -1996 VAN
June 15, 2005, the matter of VIN 2P4GP4530TR746720
the Administrative Complaint 1991 NISSAN 4-DR. -
will be presented at an ensuing VIN JN1HJ01POMT510755
meeting of the Board of Nurs- 1982 VOLKSWAGEN CONVERT-
ing in an informal proceeding. IBLE VIN WCA0151CK019573
PUBLISH: June 1, 2005


In accordance with the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending
this notice not later than seven
days prior to the proceeding at
the address given on the notice.'
Telephone: (850)-414-8126, 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770(V), via Florida Relay
Service.
PUBLISH:
MAY 11, 2005
MAY 18, 2005
MAY 25, 2005
JUNE 1, 2005

NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE
BOARD OF NURSING OF
RESPIRATORY CARE
IN RE: The license to practice res-
piratory care of
Michael Daniel Fraser, C.R.T.
1816 East Avenue
Sarasota, Florida 34239
Case No. 2004-50360
License No.: TT 8812
The Department of Health has
filed an Administrative Com-
plaint against you, a copy of
which may be obtained by con-
tacting, Lynne A. Quimby-Pen-
nock, Assistant General Coun-
sel, Prosecution Services Unit,
4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin
#C65, Tallahassee Florida
32399-3265, (850)-414-8126.


.. z If no contact has been made by
KAREN E. RUSHING you concerning the above by
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT June 15, 2005, the matter of
By: P. Frank the Administrative Complaint
Deputy Clerk will be presented at an ensuing
SHED: meeting of the Board of Nurs-
S2nn0 0 ing in an informal proceeding.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARJORIE R. GRUNER,
Deceased.
File No: 2005-CP-00270-NC
Division: Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
MARJORIE R. GRUNER,
deceased, File Number 2005-CP-
00270-NC is pending in the Circuit
Court for Sarasota County, Flori-
da, Probate Division; the address
of which is 2000 Main Street,
P.O. Box 3079, Sarasota, FL
34230-3079. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate,'including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, must
file their claims with 'this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PDIIIpA-


.JUNE E2005 In accordance with the Ameri- TION OF THIS NOTICE IS MAY-
JUNE 8, 2005 cans with Disabilities Act, per- 25, 2005.
JUNE 15, 2005 sons needing a special accom-
NOTICE OF ACTION modation to participate in this Petitioner:
proceeding should contact the NANCY ANN STRONG
BEFORE THE individual or agency sending 41 Maple Street
BOARD OF NURSING this notice not later than seven Princeto NewJer 08542
days prior to the proceeding at Princeton, New Jersey 08542
IN RE: The license to practice nurs- the address given on the notice. Attorney For Petitioner:
ing of Telephone: (850)-414-8126, 1- tt F Titionep
800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800- THOMAS C. TYLER, JR. P.A.
Jeffery Davidson, C.N.A. 955-8770(V), via Florida Relay orida Bar No.d 911585te 104
4606 Summer Oak Avenue East Service. 981 Rdgewood Ave, Suite 104
Apt 627 Venice, FL 34285
Sarasota, Florida 34239 PUBLISH: Telephone (941) 488-4422
MAY 11, 2005 PUBLISH: May 25, June 1,
Case No. 2002-29466 MAY 18, 2005 2005
MAY 25, 2005 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
License No.: CX 74241 JUNE 1, 2005 SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
-. n-... .. ...... PROBATE DIVISION


The department of Health has
filed an Administrative Com-
plaint against you, a copy of
which may be obtained by con-


IN RE: ESTATE OF
MABEL K. LOVEJOY,


Deceased. other persons having claims or AFTER THE DATE OF: SERVI
demands against decedent's estate OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE I
File No. 2005-CP-004348-NC on whom a copy of this notice is THEM.
Probate Division required to be served must file their All other creditors of the decede
claims with this court WITHIN THE and other persons having claims
NOTICE TO CREDITORS LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER demands against deceder
The administration of the estate of THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI- estate, including unmatured, c
MABEL K. LOVEJOY, deceased, CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 tingent and unliquidated clain
whose date of death was March 6, DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER- must file their claims with this co
2005; File Number 2005-CP- VICE OF A COPY OF THIS WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER T
004348-NC, is pending in the Cir- NOTICE ON THEM. DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC
cuit Court for Sarasota County, All other creditors of the decedent TION OF THIS NOTICE.
Florida, Probate Division, the and other persons having claims or ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILl
address of which is P.O. Box demands against decedent's estate WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
3079, .Sarasota, FL 34230- must file their claims with this court The date of the first publication
3079. The names and addresses WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE this notice is May 25, 2005.
of the personal representatives and DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
the personal representatives' attor- TION OF THIS NOTICE, Person Giving Notic
ney are set forth below. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED NANCY M. LEMON
All creditors of the decedent and WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET 1121 Gladstone Bouleva
other persons having claims or FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF Englewood, Florida 3422
demands against decedent's THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
estate, on whom a copy of this WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Attorney for Person Giving
notice is required to be served NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME Notice:
must file their claims with this court PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, DEAN HANEWINCKEL
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Florida Bar No. 454818
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE LAW OFFICES OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH DEAN HANEWINCKEL, P.A.
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS IS BARRED. 2650 South McCall Road
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI- Englewood, FL 34224
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON CATION OF THIS NOTICE IS Telephone: (941) 473-2828
THEM. MAY 25, 2005. PUBLISH: May 25, June 1,
All other creditors of the decedent 2005
and other persons having claims or Personal Representatives:
demands against decedent's estate DAVID BRUCE THOMAS NOTICE OF SALE
must file their claims with this court 258 Wellingwood Dr.
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE East Amherst, NY 14051 ADVERTISEMENT OF SAL
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- ADVERTISEMENT OF SAL
TION OF THIS NOTICE. SARA T STRAUB
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED 4975 Pepperwood PI. Notice Is hereby given that I
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Venice, FL 34293 undersigned intends to sell t
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME property described below
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, Attorneys For Personal enfprce a lien imposed on s,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) Representative: property under the Florida S
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE Kanetsky, Moore & Storage Facility Act Statutes (Se
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH DeBoer, P.A. tion 83.801-83.809)' The und
IS BARRED. Attorneys At Law signed will sell at Public Sale
The date of first publication of 227 S. Nokomis Ave. competitive bidding oni the 9th d
this notice is May 25, 2005. P.O. Box 1767 of Juae, 2005 at 9:00 a.m.


Personal Representatives:
SUNTRUST BANK,
GULF COAST
ALAN BLAIR
Vice President
1777 Main St.
Sarasota, FL 34236
H. Greg Lee
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Florida Bar No. 351301
H. GREG LEE, P. A.
2014 Fourth Street
Sarasota, Florida 34237
Telephone: (941)-954-0067
Facsimile: (941)-365-1492
PUBLISH: May 25, June 1, 2005
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELEANOR T. THOMAS,
Deceased.
File No. 05-CP-4694-SC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ELEANOR T. THOMAS,
deceased, whose date of death
was May 3, 2005, and whose
Social Security Number is 071-16-
5570, is pending in the Circuit
Court for SARASOTA County, Flori-
da, Probate Division; the address of
which is 2000 Main St., P.O. Box
3079, Sarasota, FL 34230-
3079. The names and addresses
of the personal representatives and
the personal representatives' attor-
ney are set forth below.
All-creditors of the decedent and


Venice, FL 34284-1767
Telephone: (941) 485-1571
By: ERIK R. LIEBERMAN, ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 393053
PUBLISH: May 25, June 1,
2005


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
EDWARD A. VITALE, SR.,
a/k/a EDWARD A. VITALE,
Deceased.
File No: 2005-003906-NC


Value Self Storage, 3000
Tamlami Trail, Venice, Coun
of Sarasota, State of Florida.
List of Units:
Unit A1075. Household Goods
Amanda Beal
'Purchases must be paid for at t
time of purchases in cash. All p
chased items sold as is where
and must be removed at time
sale. Sale subject to cancellation
the event of settlement Should
be impossible to dispose of the
goods on day of the sale, the si
will be continued on such succeed
ing days thereafter as may be n
essary to complete the sale.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS PUBLISH: May
The administration of the estate of 2005
EDWARD A. VITALE, SR., a/k/a
EDWARD A. VITALE, deceased, IN THE CIRCLE
FILE NUMBER 2005-003906- THE TWELF
NC, is pending in the Circuit Court CIRCUIT, II
for SARASOTA County, Florida, SARASOTA COI
Probate Division; the address of
which is P.O. Box 3079, Saraso-
ta, FL 34230-3079: The names 2004
and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal repre- PLAINTIFF(S)
sentative's attorney are set forth WILLIAM LAKE,
below.
All creditors of the decedent and DEFENDANT(S)
other persons having claims or ROBERT JOHN I
demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on NOTICE,
whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with Notice is hereby
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF the final judgmentt
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF the above noted c
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF the following pro
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS Saribed asota Cu


25, June

ITr COURT OF


"H JUDICIAL
N AND FOR
UNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO:
-CA-012249-SC


v.
MCKIERNAN,

OF SALE '
given pursuant to
Border entered in
case, that I will sell
iperty situated in
unty, Florida,


CE
ON
ent
or
it's
on-
ms,
urt
HE
;A-
ED
of

:e:
DE
ird
23


30-FOOT CHRIS CRAFT BOAT
at public sale, to the highest and
'best bidder for cash, at the Sara-
sota County Courthouse, 2000
Main Street, Historic Courtroom,
East Wing, Sarasota, Florida
34237 at 11:00 a.m. on
06/20/2005. The highest bidder
shall immediately post with the
Clerk, a deposit equalto 5% of the
final bid. The deposit must be cash
or cashier's check payable to the
Clerk of the Circuit Court. Final
payment must be made on or
before 5:00 p.m. of the date of the
sale by cash or cashier's check.
Date: May 26, 2005
KAREN E. RUSHING
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Suzanne M. Pomerleau
Deputy Clerk
PUBLISH:
JUNE 1, 2005
JUNE 8, 2005


Florida Statutes that the STATE OF
FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF HIGH-
WAY SAFETY AND MOTOR VEHi-
CLES (DEPARTMENT), through its
Division, The Florida State Highway
Patrol, on or about the 18th day
of April 2005 in the County of
Sarasota, State of Florida, seized
the above-described personal prop-
erty and is holding the personal
property pending the outcome of
forfeiture proceedings. All persons
or entities who have a legal interest
in the subject property may request
a hearing concerning the seized
property by contacting Joseph H.
Lee, Assistant Attorney General,
OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENER-
AL, General Civil Litigation/Tampa
Branch, 501 East Kennedy Boule-
.vard, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL
33602-5237. A Petition for Forfei-
ture has been filed in the above-
styled Court. The trial court on
the 20th day of May 2005
entered an Order Of Finding Of
Probable Cause. If no response
by Claimants, the DEPARTMENT will
seek a Final Order of Forfeiture.
P1runQ4-i..: un.0.1 Auunr


--- HuSLBU : June 1, 8, 20UU0
NOTICE OF SALE ______PULSJue1820
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the IN THE CHANCERY COURT FOR
undersigned intends to sell the per- SEVIER COUNTY, TENNESSEE
sonal property described below to
enforce a lien imposed on said Docket Number 01-2-058
property under The Florida Self
Storage Facility Act Statutes (Sec- MARANDA LYNNE MERRITT
LE tion.83.801-83.809). Plaintiff/Counter-Respondent
The undersigned will sell at public /Mother
he sale by competitive bidding on u
he Thursday, the 21st day of June, versus
to 2005 at 11:00 a.m. on. the
aid premises where said property has RANDAL PAUL MERRITT
elf been stored and which are located Defendant/Counter-Petitioner
ec- at QUALITY SELF STORAGE, /Father
er- 225 N. Tamiami Trail, City of
by Nokomis, County of Sarasota,
ay State of Florida, the following: ORDER OF PUBLICATION
. at
SJesse Tate, #574, HHG; This cause came on to be heard
inty upon Father's Motion for Order of
Purchases must be paid for at the Publication, the Affidavit incorporat-
time of purchase in cash only. All ed therein, the Tennessee Secre-
purchased items are, sold as is, tary of State's Affidavit, and from
Where is, and must be removed at the record as a whole, from all of
the time of sale. Sale is subject to which it appears to the Court that
cancellation in the event of settle- the Mother is a non-resident of the
he ment between owner and obligated State of Tennessee, and/or is evad-
Sparty. ing service of process, and it fur-
ur- thermore appearing that the where-
is Dated this 1st day of June and 8th about of the Mother are unknown,
f day of June 2005. so that ordinary process cannot be
it n served upon her, it is therefore,
it PUBLISH: June 1, 8, 2005
ale ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND
ed- OTHER NOTICES DECREED that publication be
e- OHE. NI______C__ made for four (4) consecutive
S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT weeks, as required by law, in The
THE TWELFTH JUDICIALOURT OF Venice Gondolier, a newspaper pub-
1 THE CIRCUIT lished in the vicinity of Venice, Flori-
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF da, notifying the Mother to appear
IN AND FOR THATE OFCOUNTY OF and defend the above-styled cause
SARASOTA, STATE OF FLORIDA nf ctinn or the alleg|t,,ion therenf


IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1982 FORD ECONOLINE
F150 (WHITE)
VIN 1FTDE14E8CHA47250
Case No.: 2005-CA-4632-SC
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS
TO ANY AND ALL PERSONS WHO
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE FOL-
LOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY:
1982 FORD ECONOLINE
F150 (WHITE)
VIN 1FTDE14E8CHA47250
NOTICE IS given pursuant to Sec-
tions 932.701 through 932.707,


will be taken as confessed and
hearing will be set on an ex part
basis, as to the Mother
ENTER this the 10 day of Mar,
2005.-
/s/The Honorable Telford E. For-
gety
Sevier County Chancellor
PUBLISH:
MAY 18, 2005 -
MAY 25, 2005
JUNE 1, 2005
JUNE 8, 2005


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
COURT IN AND FOR SARASOTA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF:
Case No.: 2005-CA-1638-NC
$1,157.00 U.S. Currency
TO: DARIEN L. GRABLE
* UNKNOWN ADDRESS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
forfeiture action has been filed
against the above described cur-
rency by the Sarasota County Sher-
iff's Office. You are required to file
your written defenses with the
Clerk of the Court, 2000 Main
Street, Sarasota, FL 34237, and to
serve a copy of these defenses on
or before the 20 day of June,
2005, on Kurt A. Hoffman,
Esquire, Post Office Box 4115,
Sarasota, Florida 34230-4115.
Failure to file your defenses will
result in a default being entered
against you.
WITNESSED by hand and the Seal
of the Court on this 5 day of May,
2005.
KAREN RUSHING
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Laurel Mullen,
Deputy Clerk
PUBLISH:
MAY 18, 2005
MAY 25, 2005
JUNE 01, 2005
JUNE 08, 2005


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Call:
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Venice


L eg~a IFbtces


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


12A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


I Classified Wor]ks!


I


Ud1e1 rv


IVM ZU
UJ NE I-20t








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


MIS


111


jTh


BEST GOODS & SERVICES


Beach/Swimwear_
Computer Store_
Jewelry Store_
Children's Clothing
Women's Clothing
Men's Clothing
Consignment Shop
Thrift Shop
Storage Facility
Discount Store_
Fabric Store_
Shoe Store_
Health Food Store
Citrus Company
Supermarket_
Meat Market_
Fish Market
Deli-
Bakery
Liquor Store
Produce Store_
Photo Developing
Picture Framing
Photography Studio
Pharmacy
Medical & Healthcare Supplies
Therapeutic Massage
Hair Salon_
Nail Salon ,
S Tanning Salon


I


Hearing Aids_
Optical Center & Eyewear
Stationery Store_
Office Supplies/Furniture-
Dry Cleaner_______
Florist_
Limousine Service_
Daycare Center_
Private School_
Pet Shop/Supplies_
Pet Sitters
Pet Kennel
Pet Grooming
Veterinary Services
New Car Dealer
Pre-Owned Car Dealer
Auto Service
Oil Changes
Tires
Auto Parts-
Car Wash


SEND YOUR
ENTRY IN TODAY!
Qualifying entries will be selected
to win prizes to include:
Four 14) $25 Gift Certificates
from GOLD RUSH BBQ
$100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of any
merchandise at MONTGOMERY CARPETS


ISLAND TOUCH MASSAGES
Two (2) $60 Gift Certificates


BEST HOMES & LIVING
Rental Management
Rental Community
Mortgage Broker_
Real Estate Sales Office_
Real Estate Development_
Title Company
Homebuilder
Golf & Country Club_
Appliances, purchase
Appliances, service_
Beds & Mattresses_
Carpet Cleaning.
Carpet/Tile/Flooring
Cooling & Heating Services_
Electrician Services_
Furniture
Furniture, dining & kitchen_
Furniture, patio
Hardware Store_
Home Accessories_
Home Electronics_
Housekeeping Services_
Hurricane shutters_
Landscape & lawn maintenance_
Lawn equipment
Lighting & fans_
Moving company
Nursery & garden center_
"Paint-Store
Pest control
Plumbing service_
Pool installation_
Pool & spa service_
Water Treatment Co._
Window treatments
TV & VCR repair_

BEST SPORTS & LEISURE
Bicycle Shop
Tennis Club
Health Club
Sports Equipment_
Golf course, local_
Golf Supplies & Equipment_
Golf Attire
Bait & Tackle
Boat, purchase_
Boating Supplies_
Marina
RV Dealer
Day Spa

BEST LIFE PLANNING/RETIREMENT
Bank/Financial Institution_
Financial Planner_
Insurance Agency, specific local
Stock Brokerage Firm
CPA/Accounting Firm_
Trust Department
Home Health Services
Nursing/Rehab Center_
Assisted Living_
Assisted Living 25- Beds_
Retirement Community
Funeral Home


BEST PLACES TO DINE OUT
eakfast


Cup of Coffee
Sunday Brunch
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Cafe
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Rihbs


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Steak


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Dinner Under $10
Pizza, chain
Pizza, non-chain
Ice Cream/Yogurt
Dessert
Key Lime Pie
Pasta/Italian
Restaurant, Chinese
Restaurant, other ethnic
Restaurant, waterfront
Restaurant, romantic
Restaurant, best overall
Restaurant, outdoor dining.
Best New Restaurant


BEST ARTS & CULTURE
Local Tourist Spot
Local Event
Park
Beach
Radio Station, local
Book Store
Art Gallery
Arts & Crafts Store
Antiques
Gift Shop
Wine Shop
Band, local
Banquet Facilities
Caterer


Dancing
Live Entertainment
Travel Agency
Video Rental/Sales
Free Fun


Make your vote count by

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ballot by the deadline below! You

Must Send in This Entire Page!


_____________________ U


BALLOT REGULATIONS
ALL NOMINATIONS MUST: Pertain to people, places, services and
businesses located in the Venice area including the areas from
Manasota Beach through Osprey. EACH BALLOT MUST: 1.) Be
handwritten sorry, no mechanically reproduced, computer
generated or electronic ballots will be accepted. Only one entry
per person. No faxes. Originals only. 2.) Be on an official Venice
Gondolier Sun/Green Sheet entry form. 3.) Include your name,
address, phone number on the entry form. 4.) All ballots must be
received by 5 pm, June 17, 2005. 5.) All entrants must be 18 years
of age or older to qualify for drawing. 6.) 40% of ballot (55
categories) must be filled out. 7.) No more than 3 categories can
be voted for any one restaurant.
All ballots and nominations that do not meet these criteria will not
be counted. Please send your entry directly to our main office. No
purchase necessary to win. Winners are responsible for any taxes
resulting from receipt of drawing. Winner agrees to publication of
name, hometown and photograph. An announcement to the
winner of the grand prize drawing will appear in the Venice
Gondolier Sun, July 27, 2005. The name of the winner will not be
given out by telephone. Judges decision is final. Contest
coordinator will not enter into any written or oral discussion about
the contest, judges decision or awarding of prize. Employees of
the Venice Gondolier Sun/ Sun Coast Media Group (and their
immediate family) are not eligible.


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Address:

City, State, Zip:

Phone:

Signature:

Do you currently subscribe to the Venice Gondolier Sun?


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No [


Mail or bring your entry to:
Best of Venice 2005 Venice Gondolier Sun
200 E. Venice Ave. Venice, Florida 34285


U


IALLL~Z M,


i =Lr


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I


ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 17TH, 2005 @ 5t)m


r- r ---


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 13A









OBITUARIES


14A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005


Roy CA. Bradshaw
The Rev. Roy CA. (Brad)
Bradshaw of Venice died
Friday, May 27, 2005. He was
82.
He was born in England on
Sept. 11, 1922, and moved to
Venice in 2003 from New
York.
He served as a lieutenant
colonel in the British Army
during World War II, and after
the war moved to Washing-
ton, D.C., to serve on the staff
of the British Embassy.
In his later career, he was
the director of the Redding,
Conn., Health Department.
After retiring he was ordained
by the New Seminary in New
York, then later continued his
ministry at Englewood Com-
munity Hospital and Pine-
brook Nursing Home.
He was a member of the
Jacaranda Men's Club and the,
Society of St. John the Evan-
gelist.
Survivors include his wife,
Joanne;, three daughters, Su-
san Stewart of Houston, Tex-
as, Claire Pantello of Trum-
bull, Conn., and Anne Nigro
of Fairfield, Conn.; and six
grandchildren.
Services: A funeral service will
be held Wednesday, June 1, at
11 a.m. at St. David's Episcopal
Church in Englewood. Lemon
Bay Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238; or to the
Society of St. John the
Evangelist, 980 Memorial Drive,
Cambridge, MA 02138.
Zelma Coleman
Zelma Coleman of Venice
died Saturday, May 28, 2005.
She was 76.
She was born on Aug. 7,
1928, in Portsmouth, Ohio,
and came to Venice in 1994
from Columbus, Ohio. She
became a registered nurse
after graduating from White
Cross Hospital in Columbus
and was a member of Grace
United Methodist Church in
Venice.
Survivors include her' hs-
band, Bill of Venice; a daugh-
ter, Laura Cassel of Honolulu,
Hawaii; a son, Tim of Beckley,
W.V; a brother, Herbert Ed-
wards of Troy, Ohio; two sis-
ters, Jerri Miller of North Olm-
sted, Ohio, and Murl Preble of
Prescott, iAriz.; and four
granddaughters.


Services: Visitation and funeral
services will be in Ohio. A
memorial service will be held at
Grace United Methodist Church
in Venice Thursday, June 9, at 3
p.m. Farley Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238; or Grace
United Methodist Church, 400 E.
Field Ave., Venice, 34285.
Elinor F. Evison
Elinor E Evison of Venice
died Monday, May 30, 2005.
She was 90.
She was born June 8, 1914,
in Northwood, N.H., and
moved to Venice one year ago
from Concord, N.H. She was a
retired social worker.
She was a graduate of the
University of New Hampshire
and Smith College in North
Hampton, Mass. She was a
member and past president
of the Auburndale Garden
Club in Massachusetts and
member of the American
Society of Social Workers. She
was of Protestant faith.
Survivors include a son
William of Venice; two grand-
children; and three great-
grandchildren. -
Services: Services and burial
will be in New Hampshire. Ewing
Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to the New
Hampshire Audubon Society, 3
Silk Farm Road, Concord,.NH
03301.
Sarah G. Kaplan
Sarah G. Kaplan of
Venice died Tuesday,
May 31, 2005. She was
85.
She was born in Atlanta,
Ga., and came to Venice more
than 50 years ago. She was the
widow of the late Dr. Samuel
E. Kaplan, one of the found-
ing fathers of Venice Hospital.
She was a registered nurse
and served under Gen.
George Patton in the Bkttle of
the Bulge as a second lieu-
tenant in the Army Medical
Corp:"" ..' "
" She was of the Jewish faith,
and was a member of the
Temple Beth Shalom in Sara-
sota.
Survivors include a daugh-
ter, Sheila Kaplan Fox, and
two sons, Harold and Robert,
all of Venice; a sister, Leonora
Golson of Atlanta; and many


nieces and nephews.
Services: Visitation will be
Thursday, June 2, at 10 a.m. at
Ewing Funeral Home, with ser-
vices to follow at 11 a.m. Burial
will be in the Temple Beth
Shalom Cemetery in Sarasota,
Fla.
Jean Lumley
Jean Macy Lumley of Boca
Grande, formerly of Venice,
died Sunday, May 29, 2005.
She was 85.
She was born March 9,
1920, in Orlando, Fla., and
resided in Venice from 1960-
1983, where she and her hus-
band, the late Jay H. Ltumley,
owned the Blalock Insurance
Agency. They retired to Boca
'Grande in 1983.
She was the past president
of theVenice-Nokomis Rotary
Anns; past treasurer of the
Cecilian Music Society of
Venice; a former member of
the Coquettes of Venice; the
only female to sing in the
original Boca Grande Barber-
shop choir; past treasurer and
secretary of the Boca Grande
Woman's Club; and co-editor
of the Boca Grande Woman's
Cook Book. She was a mem-
ber of the Boca Grande
Barbershop singers, the Boca
Grande Woman's Club and St.
Andrews Episcopal Church.
Survivors include a son,
Richard of Sarasota; a daugh-
ter, Barbara Jean Hargrove of
Englewood; five grandchil-
dren; and seven great-grand-
children.
Services: A memorial service
will be scheduled in October.
Farley Funeral Home is in charge
of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to a favorite
charity.
Carl' H. Lundgren
Carl H. Lundgren of
Venice died Thursday,
May 26, 2005. He was,
80.
He was born March 25,
1925, in Upper Nyack, N.Y.,
.and moved to Venice in 1993
from'New Hampton, N.J.
He was a retired tool crib
manager for American Na-
tional Can Company of
Washington, N.J.
He was a member of the
VFW Post 9215 in Upper
Nyack, having served in the
U.S. Navy during World War II
on the USS North Carolina,
then later joined the National
Guard.


He was of the Lutheran
religion.
Survivors include his wife
of 57 years, Kay; three daugh-
ters, Judy Thompson of West
Virginia, Linda of Willsboro,
N.Y., and Jennye Lindermann
of Oxford, N.J.; two sons,
Russell of Florida and Rick of
Pennsylvania; four sisters,
Edith Adams of New City,
N.Y, Svea Coleman of Upper
Nyack, Patricia Brooks of
Congers, N.Y, and June Yeck
of South Carolina; a brother,
Eddie of Congers; and five
grandchildren.
Services: A memorial service
will be announced at a later
date.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238; or the
VFW Willis-Polhemus Post 9215,
250 Birchwood Ave., Upper
Nyack, NY 10961.
Valerie J. Moore
Valerie Joan Moore of
Englewood died Friday,. May
27, 2005. She was 17.
She was born April 11,
1988, in Bryn Mawr, Pa., and
moved to the Englewood area
as an infant in 1989. She was
in the Color Guard of the
Venice High School Marching
Band and played the clarinet
in the Venice High Concert
Band.
She worked at Sonics in
Venice as a carhop and a
cook. She also volunteered at
St. Francis Animal Rescue in
Venice.
Survivors include her par-,
ents, Charles and Allison of
Englewood; her brother, Jor-
dan of Englewood; and her
grandparents, Frank and Joan
Palmer of Englewood.
Services: Visitation will be on
Friday, June 3, 10 a.m.-noon at
Englewood United Methodist
Church, with funeral services to
follow. Lemon Bay Funeral
Home, Englewood Chapel, is in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Venice
High School Band, 1 Indian Ave.,
Venice, 34285; or to St. Francis
Animal Rescue, P.O. Box 563,
Nokomis, 34274.
Sidney S. Runyon
Dr. Sidney S. Runyon
of North Port, formerly
of Venice, died Thurs-
day, May 26, 2005. He
was 80.
He was born July 7, 1924, in


Ashland, Ky., and moved to
Florida in 1975 from Lan-
caster, Pa.
He graduated from the
University of Kentucky and
received his doctorate from
Chicago College of Osteo-
pathy. He interned in Co-
lumbus, Ohio, and his resi-
dency was in Philadelphia,
specializing in orthopedics.
He practiced medicine in
Lancaster for 30 years.
He was a member of the
American Legion in Port
Charlotte, the VEW, and the
Rotonda West Elks, and was
active with his tennis club. He
served. in the U.S. Army,
Company 4, 71st Infantry,
and was a recipient of the
Purple Heart in 1945.
Survivors include his wife,
Phillis; three daughters, Carol
Cofer of Lake Hartwell, Ga.,
Michelle Hoverson of
Huntersville, N.C., and
Pennie Bray Domenico of
Boeme, Texas; two sons, Scott
of Sarasota and David of
Somerset, Ky.; and seven
grandchildren.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to a favorite
charity or to the Salvation Army,
2120 Loveland Blvd., Port
Charlotte, 33980.
Bert S. Schaf
Bert S. Schaf of Ven-
ice died Saturday, May
28, 2005. He was 94.
He was born May 14,
1911, in Athelstane, Wis., and
came to the area eight years
ago from Tavernier, Fla. He
was a contractor and served
in the U.S. Navy during World
War II.
Survivors include his sister,
Martha Wendt of Nokomis;
three nephews; and a niece.
Services: Memorial services
were private. Ewing Funeral
Home was in charge of arrange-
ments.
Angelina B. Shippee
Angelina B. Shippee of
North Port died May 27,2005.
She was 90..
She moved to the area in
1978 from Vermont.
She was a homemaker arid
a member of the American
Legion Ladies Auxiliary and a
member of San Pedro Cath-
olic Church in North Port.
Survivors include six
daughters, Angelina Tomes
and Shirley Webb, both of
Tavares, Fla., Beatrice Towsley
of North Port, Mary Jane


Smith of Castle Rock, Colo.,
Avis Wilkins of Seymour,
Conn., and Catherine Smith
of East Swanzey, N.H.; four
sons, Alfred Huey of Center
Harbor, N.H., Richard Hewey
of Gambler, Ohio, and Vern
Wilkins and Raymond Wil-
kins, both of Midland, Texas;
39 grandchildren; 42 great-
grandchildren;/ and 12 great-
great grandchildren.
Services: No services are sched-
uled at this time. Ewing Funeral
Home is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238.
Wilhelmine Tinney
Wilhelmine Reine (Caron)
Tinney of Venice died Thurs-
day, May 26, 2005. She was 96.
She was born March 8,
1909, in Kankakee, ll., and
moved to Venice 31 years ago
from Glenville, Ill.
She retired in 1962 from
the Kankakee Daily Journal,
where she worked for several
years as a proofreader. She
was a member of Epiphany
Cathedral.
Survivors include, her sis-
ter, Henrietta Raiche of
Venice; and several nieces
and nephews.
Services: A memorial mass will
be held Thursday, June 2, at 11
a.m. at Epiphany Cathedral.
Interment will follow in the
church garden. Farley Funeral
Home is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Epiphany
Cathedral, 350 W. Tampa Ave.
Venice, 34285.
Jeanette Watson
Jeanette Watson of Venice
died Monday, May 30,2005.
She was born in New York,
N.Y., and came to the Venice
area in 1969 from Wilton,
Conn.
She was a housewife and a
volunteer with the Venice
Hospital Auxiliary.
Survivors include two
sons, Peter of Culebra, Puerto
Rico, and Gordon Jr. of Burl-
ington, Vt; nine grandchil-
dren; and 12 great-grandchil-
dren.
Services: Services will be pri-
vate. Farley Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to a charity
of choice.


POUCE BEAT


Molestation
charge dropped
A Venice man accused of
molesting a 14-year-old girl
will not face criminal charges.
The Sarasota County State
Attorney's Office will not pur-
sue a case against Marshall
Byers, 21, after the victim's
mother recanted her story
and the teen told investiga-
tors she initiated a kiss with
him.
According to a North Port
Police Department report:
The girl's mother said she
walked into the living room to
find Byers kissing and
fondling her daughter. When
she yelled that she was going
to call police, Byers ran from
the house. The woman then
called 9-1-1.
When police interviewed
Byers, he said he and the teen
were sitting close enough on
the couch that their knees'
touched, but denied touching
or fondling the teen. He said
he and the girl "were just talk-
ing."
During a prefiling inter-
view, the girl's mother said she
had not seen the two kissing,
but thought she saw him fon-
dle the teen.
The teen told the state
attorney's office that she and
Byers were in the living room
watching a movie when she
told him she thought he was
"very cute," and leaned over
to kiss him before he could
react. She denied that Byers
ever touched her.'
Suspect leaves cell
phone at crime scene
Sarasota police arrested a
26-year-old local man and
charged him with the mo-
lestation of three female
members of the same family.


The victims were a 32-year-
old mother and two of her
daughters, 14 and 7 years old.
Ronald A. Ates, 26, was
charged with two counts of
lewd and lascivious molesta-
tion, sexual battery with vio-
lence, and burglary with bat-
tery.
According to a Sarasota Po-
lice Department arrest report,
Ates illegally entered the
home shortly before 4 a.m.,
May 26.
He first went into the 7-
year-old's bedroom, then to
the 14-year-old's bedroom,
then to the mother's bed-
room. In each case Ates en-
gaged in lewd and lascivious
behavior with each of the
three females.
Ates fled the home but left
his cell phone behind.
While police were investi-
gating the crime the cell
phone began ringing. The
incoming call was traced back
to an address in the 600 block
of N. Orange Ave.
Police went to that location
and subsequently arrested
Ates.


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James Curry,
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Ten-year sentence for
armed kidnapping
I A convicted felon accused
of raping a woman and
threatening her with a gun
received a 10-year sentence in
state prison after he pleaded
guilty to armed kidnapping,
aggravated assault with a.
deadly weapon and posses-
sion of a weapon by a convict-
ed felon.
.Hugh Dinny Wilson, 42, of


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Closed Mondays 1200 Jacaranda Blvd.
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919 S.Tamiami Trail
Located in the block just 941-4930887
south of Capt. Eddie


North Port, was also charged
in November with involun-
tary sexual battery by threat-
ening and false imprison-
ment. As part of the plea
agreement, the state did not
pursue those charges.
Peter Lombardo, assistant
state attorney, said the victim
was satisfied with the 10-year
sentence. The deal also
relieved her of having to testi-
fy.


Manatee County Sheriff's
officers arrested Wilson at a
friend's house in Bradenton.
Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office arrests
Christopher M. Plotter,
24, 40 block Deer Lane, Eng-
lewood. Charge: violation of
domestic injunction. Bond:
no listing.
Ryan S. Lawrence, 18, 1100
block Myrtle Ave,, Venice.


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Punta Gorda: (Under construction)


Charges: aggravated assault
with a deadlyweapon, criminal
mischief. Bond: $5,500.
Jerry G. Strickland, 46,
1400 block Porpoise Road,
Venice. Charge: aggravated
battery. Bond: $5,000.
Everett J. Newton, 32, 100
block East Colonia Lane,
Nokomis. Charge: worthless
check. Bond: no listing.






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WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 1,2005


SECTION B


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com

RECIPES AND MORE 2S


RUNNING: HILL WORKOUTS 8B


VENICE HIGH HOLDS BAND BANQUET 10


Come sail away with them


KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR


VAC hosts

Monroe and

Cary Grant

Opening this Friday at the
Venice Art Center is a photo
exhibit curated especially for
the VAC, featuring the world
of renowned portrait photog-
rapher Milton H. Greene.
This display contains
priceless photos of stars such
as Marilyn Monroe, Judy
Garland, Grace Kelly, Sophia
Loren, Sammy Davis Jr., Clau-
dia Cardinale, Gary Grant,
Frank Sinatra and others.
The VAC is at 390 S. Noko-
mis Ave. on the island. For
more information, call 485-
7136.
******
The Venice Little Theatre is
taking subscriptions for its
2005-06 season of Stage II
productions in the Yvonne T.
Pinkerton Theatre. Scheduled
for next year are "Cops" by
Terry Curtis Fox, "Cabaret"
by Joe Masteroff with music
by John Kander and lyrics by
Fred Ebb, "The Dunes" by
Craig Pospisil and "The
Vagina Monologues" by Eve
Ensler.
Tickets for all four shows
are $59 perpe rson, one of the
Great theater bargains in the
county, especially when you
consider that Stage [1 produc-
tions lately have been win-
ning more than their share of
the awards to be garnered in
the Sarasota County area. In
the 2004 season, two Stage 1I
productions of '"Assassins"
and "Boom Town" collected
seven of 14 drama awards
from Sarasota Magazine, in-
cluding Best Play, Best Mu-
sical, Best Director, Best Actor
in a play and Best Actor in a
musical.
The Pinkerton theater itself
earned strong praise from
Pam Daniel of Sarasota Mag-
azine in its Best of the Best
issue, when she said "VLT's
intimate Stage II risks materi-
al most community theaters
wouldn't touch ... it's a drive
for some, but a refreshing
change from the ordinary
fare."
For more information
about the coming season in
either the Pinkerton or the
MainStage theaters at theVLT,
call the theater's box office at
484-1115. The theater is at 140
W. Tampa Ave. on the island.

Venice area schools are on
display through November at
the Venice Archives and Area
Historical Collection, 351 S.
Nassau St. The exhibit con-
sists of early photographs and
information of the 1896 Ven-
ice School, Laurel School,
Nokomis School, Nokomis
Elementary, Venice-Nokomis
High School, Venice High
School, Woodmere School,
African American School and
Epiphany Catholic School.
Yearbooks and memorabilia
also are on display, as are
photos of Venice High School
activities.
The archives is located in
the historic Triangle Inn
building, which is open. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tues-
day and Wednesday, January
through May, and Monday
and Wednesday from June
through December. The
building also will be open Sat-
urday, July 2.
S Please see COOL, 7B


PHOTOS COURTESY OF VENICE WOMEN'S SAILING SQUADRON


Students from the,learn-to-sail course discover the basics in small
STORY BY JEREMY RO1TGEN STAFF WRITER

.T he Venice Women's Sailing
Squadron offers a beginner's course
in sailing.


The open water can be a
scary place for a beginner,
that's why the Bitter Ends are
there to help.
The Bitter Ends have been
an active club for 29 years in
the Venice community and
has about 50 members who
meet every week to raise their
sails in Roberts Bay. The club
also offers a week-long learn-,
to-sail course that covers all
the basics and piques interest
in sailing.
. "We launch from the Ven-
ice Yacht Club grounds, and
use the Venice Youth Boating
Association pram shed for
boat storage and skipper's
meetings," said Cecily Cerutti,,
captain of the club. "The
VWSS is a member of the
Florida Women's Sailing As-
sociation and competes regu-
larlywith eight other women's
sailing groups on the Gulf
Coast, at home and away."
Gulf Coast first
According to the FWSA
Web site, the Bitter Ends
formed in 1976 as the first:
women's sailing club in the
area. They sail prams and
sunfish boats in Roberts Bay,
launching from the Venice
Yacht Club dock and using.
the Venice Young Boaters
Association's pram shed for
boat storage and club meet-
ings.
The course is open to any
woman who wishes to learn
more about sailing. You do
not have to be a member to
take the course. Members of
the group do teach their cours-
es.
"We teach them the basics
of sailing," said Nancy Mul-
'doon, a member of the group.
"We teach them how the wind
is, what knots are, nautical
terms and a few basic rules."
The Bitter Ends is a nick-
name for the VWSS. They are
part of a larger group called
the Florida Womenfs Sailing
Association. Currently, there


are nine other sailing groups
on the Gulf Coast that make
up the association.
"I took the class in 2001, I
had to wait a year to get into
the class," Cerutti said. "I
started sailing a pram and
then moved up my second
year to a sunfish. We have a
lot of active people who have
a lot of active jobs."
Cerutti said the position of
captain is held for only one
year. She started learning
only a few years ago and now
she can maneuver one of the
advanced boats.
She is one of the success
stories from the learn-to-sail
course.
"I think a lot of the. experi-
ence factor depends on how
often you sail," Cerutti said.
"I'd say that I've gained a great
deal of experience that I
would otherwise not have
had the opportunity to learn."
Even though the club uses
the:Yacht Club and Youth
Boater's resources, they are
not technically part of either
:group. So, to be a member
one needn't be a member of
the Yacht Club or a young
boater.
"It allows women who oth-
erwise wouldn't have that
opportunity to sail on a regu-
lar basis," Ceruiti said.
The club is many things to
its members. The course is
something the club sees as a
,community service as well as
a social way of educating the
women of Venice. This year
the last sailing day for the
club was May 18 followed by a
final meeting May 25.
"Some people don't realize
what we do, but we compete.
Members from our club trav-
el to Tampa, St. Pete and
Dunedin for regattas," Cerutti
said.
For 2005 the class will be
taught the second week in
September. They will teach
any interested women in the
area the basics of sailing. At


ler boats.

the end of the course, they
have a picnic in Higel Park
during which each student is
invited to join the- club to
increase knowledge and sail-
ing ability. Most of the stu-
dents end up joining the club
in order to learn more about
sea faring.
To graduate students must
successfully maneuver the
course that is in Roberts Bay.
Graduates of the course get a
diploma along with photos of
themselves on the water.
Muldoon said she liked
teaching the course because
it benefits her as well.
"Actually you learn more
sailing with them and en-
couraging thenn" she said.
Muldoon has learned all
she knows about sailing from
the group and she has fun
when she is sailing.
"I've been sailing for 18
years," Muldoon said. "I fig--
ured we could rent a boat for
a weekend. When I found this
course I jumped in."
Recently the group was in
a race that ran all the way
from Venice to Tampa. Mul-
doon said it took only about
an hour to get there.
"I would say it was at least
six years before I felt really
comfortable," Muldoon said.
"You can't absorb it all either,
so I still learn."
The club is mostly about
having fun, but they are also
an extraordinarily close and
supportive group.
"It's so relaxing, for one
thing. The club is such a won-
derful group of people and
they really are the most
unusual people. We come
from all kinds of different
backgrounds."
Students learn how to sail;
in small boats called "Op-
timist Prams" that were origi-
nally designed as an alterna-
tive for Boy Scouts in Florida
to learn sailing.
"It's like a bath tub with a
sail," Muldoon said.
Once students have suc-
ceeded in graduating and
have been sailing in a pram
for a year, they can move on
to'a sunfish, which has a big-
ger sail for a faster experience.

Please see SAIL, 9B


Members of the Venice Women's Sailing Squadron launch an
Optimist Pram into the water.


Members of the squadron have to inspect the boats before
putting them into the water.


..-.'.-.-.~ ~.,-.
- ~


Venice Gondolier Sun





OUR TOWN


ALL


'''' '








2B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN CO FFEE


A' JIB RE AI& WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1 2005


Florida

House

honors

volunteers

at annual

recognition

picnic
Florida House Learning
Center recently held its annu-
al Volunteer Recognition
'Picnic. Volunteers received
shirts, pins and certificates for
reaching milestones of
between 100 and 2,200 hours
of donated time. Florida
House volunteers greet visi-
tors and give tours of the
Florida-friendly model home
and landscape.
Florida House is located on
the SCTI campus at the
northwest comer of Beneva
and Proctor roads in Sarasota.
For more information, call
861-5000 and ask about
volunteering at Florida
House.


(MM lrmIT' I
( *i~l ll~ )


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PHOTO COURTESY OF FLORIDA-HOUSE
Florida House volunteers, left to right, include Judy Sullivan, Suzanne Kreis, Dot Beeman, Jerry
Becker, Bob Burtwell, John Vollstedt, Joe Hanson, Ellie Gibeau, JeAnne Lewis, Walter Bligh, Jan
Sieve, Carl Benninghoff, Lydia Towner, Sandy Herrick, Nick Cook, Ann Sullivan, Marta Ellis,
Michael Ireland, Terry Stewart, Erland Stephens, Pauline Everett, Jo Hanson, Michele Guffanti,
Joan Resker, Nancy Nicholson and Norman Carmel.


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Venice Gondolier Sun





VENICE VENUETLLSCENE .


WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 1
Youth center
The South County Young
Adult Center, 1400 Ogden
Road in Venice, holds sum-
mer hours, noon-9 p.m. start-
ing June 1. The center offers
video games and daily activi-
ties. Monday: pingpong,
Tuesday: pool; Wednesday:
theater arts; Thursday: two-
on-two volleyball; Friday:
three-on-three basketball;
Saturday: special events. The
center is located off Center
Road, behind Community
Bank. Call 408-1765.
Bingo
Get up a game at 6 p.m. at the
American Legion No-Vel Post
159, 145 E. Venice Ave. Call
488-1157.
Musical storytellers
The Battersby Duo provide an
enchanted journey through
music, comedy and theater to
kick off the summer reading
program at 11 a.m. at Elsie
Quirk Public Library, 100 W.
Dearborn St., Englewood.
Pick up a reading log at the
youth desk to be eligible
for end-of-summer prizes.
Groups such as preschools
and summer camps must reg-
ister by calling 861-1212.
Go for a ride
Enjoy a quiet-water, open-
seat kayak ride with the
American Littoral Society,
from Caspersen Beach to
Lemon Bay, 9 a.m.-noon.
Training and equipment pro-
vided. Cost: $20 for ALS mem-
bers, $25 for nonmembers.
Call 966-7308.
Volunteer coffee
Mote Marine Laboratory
holds a volunteer recruitment
coffee, 10 a.m.-noon at 1600
Ken Thompson Parkway,
Sarasota. Volunteers are
needed with customer ser-
vice, teaching or retail experi-
ence. There are openings for.
greeters, exhibit guides,
cashiers, teaching assistants,
at the information desk, and
more. Training is provided for
all positions. RSVP to Andrea
Davis, director of volunteer
resources, at 388-4441, Ext.
438 or visit mote.org.

THURSDAY,
JUNE 2.
Legal specialists dinner
Sarasota-Manatee Associa-
tion of Legal Support Spec-
ialists holds its monthly din-
ner meeting at Hillview Grill,
1920 Hillview St., Sarasota, at
6 p.m. Jefferson E Riddell, Esq.
of Riddell Law Group speaks
on 1031 Exchanges. Meetings
are open to all interested in
the legal field. RSVP to Lisa at
376-2336 or lfolis@corporate-
attorneyservices.com. For
membership, visit smalss.
com.
Art event
A wine-and-cheese reception
for Janet Mishner's Faces and
Images Celebrating Women
takes place 4-6 p.m. at The
Women's Resource Center of
Sarasota County, 806 Pine-
brook Road in Venice. This
digital art series celebrates the
Fabulous Faces ladies -
"women who have reached a
certain age and become
beautiful." Call 485-9724 for
more information.
Club events
* Larry Williams performs and
burgers and wings served 5-8
p.m. at the American Legion
No-Vel Post.159,145 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.
* The Venice Nokomis Elks
,Lodge holds a spaghetti din-
ner, 5-7 p.m. at 119 E. Venice
Ave. Cost is $6. Call 486-1854.
* Trinity Commandery No. 16
K.T. holds a stated meeting at
7 p.m. at the Venice Masonic
Lodge, 118 E. Venice Ave. All
members of the order wel-
come. Call 488-1575.


Support group
Phyllis K. Jensen, Psy. D., leads
Building Self-Esteem, 6-7:30


p.m. Thursday at The Wom-
en's Resource Center of Sara-
sota County, 806 Pinebrook
Road in Venice. Fee: $5. Call
485-9724.
Mac group
The Englewood Area Mac-
intosh User Group meets at
1:30 p.m. at Elsie ,Quirk
Library, 100W. Dearborn St. in
Englewood. Call Mary Lou at
423-2192.

FRIDAY,
JUNE 3
Art event
A 70-image exhibit curated
exclusively for the Venice A-rt
Center opens at the 390 S.
Nokomis. A gala reception for
Portraits of an Era, featuring
world-renowned portrait pho-
tographer Milton H. Greene,
takes place June 3, 6-8 p.m.
Complementing the exhibit
are three lecture luncheons
with Milton widow and Venice
resident Amy Greene, June
9-11,. 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Tickets for these special lec-
tures are $35 and are available
at the center. The exhibit runs
through Aug. 19. For more
information, call 485-7136.
T-REC dance
Thearapeutic Recreation Coa-
lition of Sarasota County
holds a dance for teens and
adults with disabilities, Sat-
urday, June 4, 7-9 p.m. at the
Colonial Oaks Park gymnasi-
um, 5300 Colonial Oaks Blvd.,
Sarasota. Music by Wired for
Sound. Families and care-
givers are welcome to attend
this free, supervised event.
RSVP by June 3 to 480-3213.
Legion entertainment
Brass Rings performs 7-10
p.m. at dinner at the American
Legion No-Vel Post 159, 145 E.
Venice Ave. Call 488-1157.
Bridge
Play Duplicate Bridge every
Friday at 1 p.m. at Senior
Friendship Center, 2350
Scenic Drive. Call 584-0052.
Pasta
Lotsa Pasta is available 4:30-
7:30 p.m. Friday at the Italian
American Club ofVenice, 1375
Ringling Blvd. Cost is $7. Take
out available. Call 486-1492.
Friday walk, exhibit


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PALM
AVENUE GALLERY
"Venice" by Louis Giusti is one
of the works on exhibit during
June at The Palm Avenue
Gallery, 45 S. Palm Ave. See
these and Giusti's other large,
scale oils on canvas at gallery,
Tuesday through Saturday, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. and by appoint-
ment. Call 953-5757.

The Burns Square galleries
and shops on Sarasota's South
Pineapple Avenue hosts a First
Friday Walk, 6-9 p.m. Enjoy
music) dining, entertainment
and more. Call 957-0002.

SATURDAY,
JUNE 4
Vets luncheon
The Tarpon Basha of the
China-Burma India Associa-
tion meets at the Olde World
Restaurant, 14415 South
Tamiami Trail, North Port.
Social hour at noon, lunch at 1
p.m. All former World War II
veterans and spouses are wel-
come. RSVP to 497-2193 or
639-8089.
Ecosystem workday
The American Littoral Society
leads volunteer work, 8:30
a.m.-noon, at Caspersen
.Beach and Palmer Point,


BEST BETS
THE LOCAL SCENE JUNE 1 JUNE 2


PHOTO COURTESY OF AMPHIBIOUSFORCES.ORG
The Amphibious Forces Memorial Museum is an Oregon
nonprofit organization dedicated to the restoration
and preservation of the USS LCI 713, and the USS
Washtenaw County (LST 1166). Its mission is to preserve
the history of the Amphibious Forces in WWII, Korea,
and Vietnam, and to educate future generations.

Luncheon
An Amphibious Forces luncheon takes place at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, June 1, at the American Legion of Venice,
No-Vel Post 159, 145 E. Venice Ave. The group meets the first .
Wednesday of each month. Call 497-0345.

Yoga
Evening yoga is back The Women's Resource Center of
Sarasota County hosts two sessions of yoga on Thursdays:
.10-11:30 a.m. and 5:30-7 p.m. at 806 Pinebrook Road in Venice.
Fee: $5. Appropriate for beginners. Please bring a mat.
Call 485-9724...

Thriller chiller at VPL,
Venice Public Library's film nolr.sbmmer festival' begins
Thursday at 6 p.m. with its showing of "The Phantom Lady."
Franchot Tone stars in a story about a man framed for murder'.
A missing woman can clear him but the real killer is closing
in. No one will be seated after the movie starts. The library is
located at 300 S'. Nokomis Ave. Call 861-1330.


clearing nonnative vegetation
and planting native plants. If
there are enough volunteers,
some will work in the green-
house atVenice High School in
preparation for growing native
plants to be used at local
beaches. Bring sunscreen,
water and work gloves. Call
John at 966-7308.
Take a hike
The Manatee-Sarasota Chap-
ter of the Sierra Club meets for
a 5-mile walk at Carlton
Reserve in Venice, 7:30 a.m.
Wear sturdy shoes and bring
12 oz. water and brunch. RSVP
to Sally at 484-4113.
Bird rescue class
The Pelican Man's Bird Sanct-
uary, 1708 Ken Thompson
Parkway, Sarasota, holds a free
training class for wild bird res-
cue, 10:30 a.m. No registration
required. The sanctuary also.
seeks volunteers for baby bird
season, at its hospital, wel-
come center, gift shop, tour
guides and for its thrift stores
in Nokomis (484-5715) and
Sarasota (355-0229). For more
information, call the numbers:
above or 388-4444.
Selby Saturday
The John and Mable Ringling
Museum of Art, 541 Bay Shore
Road in Sarasota, is among the
many local attractions that
will be open, free of charge, to
celebrate the 50th anniversary
of the William G. Selby and
Marie Selby Foundation.
Other upcoming Selby Sat-
urdays are June 11, 18 and 25.
Call 359-5700 or visit ring-
ling.org.

Trails Day
Oscar Scherer State Park cele-
brates National Trails Day by
highlighting the Lester Finley
Barrier Free Trail, a trail that is
totally accessible to every
member of the community. As
part of its participation in the
VERB Summer Scorecard
Campaign, refreshments will
be provided to all VERB partic-
ipants who walk the path 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Park entrance fees
waived for those who get their.
VERB scorecard stamped at
the ranger station. The VERB
program is part of the Obesity
Prevention Coalition of Sara-
sota County's effort to create a
healthier community and'
takes place at the park June


4-Aug. 13. Call 483-5956 or
visit floridastateparks.org/
oscarscherer.
Karaoke
Coast Entertainment presents
Karaoke at Snook Haven,
noon-4 p.m. Saturday. Snook
Haven is located at 5000 E.
Venice Ave., Venice. Call 485-
7221 for more information.
Dance


one living with cancer and
their families ae welcome to
attend this free event. Enter-
tainment includes magician
lim Chartier and music by
Sparrow. Refreshments serv-
ed. Registration is required by
calling 917-777 or visit
smh.com.
Art reception, exhibit
Unity Gallery, 3023 Proctor
Road in Sarasota, presents the
works of artist and instructor
Sue Lynn Cotton, on exhibit
through June 30. A reception
for the artist will be held at
11:30 a.m. The public is wel-
come. Gallery hours are Tues-
day through Friday, 10 a.m.-2
p.m. and Sunday mornings.
Call 955-3301.

MONDAY,
JUNE
Family bowling
D.A.R.E. and AMF Venice
Lanes present the sixth annual
youth and family bowling
nights on Mondays, 6:30-8:30
p.m., beginning June 6. First
week is free. Glow in the dark
bowling, music, games, activi-
ties and prizes by Harry,
Wright. Call 484-0666.
Food bank
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services and All Faiths Food
Bank distribute free USDA
commodities to eligible Sara-
sota County residents, 10
a.m.-1 p.m., at St. Mark's
Episcopal Church, 508 Riviera
St., Venice. Call 379-6333.
Navy League


Sarasota-Mlanatee Council,
Navy League of the United
States, meets at 6 p.m. at the
Bird Key Yacht Club, 301 Bird
Key Drive. Speaker is Rep.:
Katherine Harris. Dinner is
$26 and the public is invited.
RSVP to Larry at (941) 741-
9630.
Computer users


The June
Venice Are
Group me
Island Co
652 South'
Rialto Pla2
hospital. O


Gotta Dance Studio, 303 South 6-7 p.m. T
Tamiami Trail in Nokomis: ing your c(
Free beginning dance lessons ware. Gue
Saturday, 10-11 a.m.; Bronze Dues for o
Beginner 1 Class of ballroom individuals
basics with Brian and Olivia, Members i
Saturday, 11 a.m.-noon. ited numb
Singles welcome. $6 for cou- month. Fo
ples, $4 for singles; and ball- don, call S
room dancing Saturdays. For inform
Group lesson 8-9 p.m., open call Judy at
dancing until 11 p.m. $7, d
snacks included. For more H'Ot dogs


information, call 486-0326.
Market
Visit the Farmer's Market
every Saturday, 8 a.m.-noon
downtown Venice in Cen-
tennial Park, at the comer of
Tampa and Nokomis Avenues.
For more information, call
484-3801.

SUNDAY,
JUNE5
MDA ride
The Sarasota Ladies of Harley
and Harley Owners Group
sponsor an MDA Summer
Camp Ride. Register at 10 a.m.
and leave at 11 a.m. All motor-
cycles welcome; leave from
Rossiter's on Cattlemen Road.
MDA provides a one-week
camp at no cost to families for
youngsters ages 6-21 affected
by any of 43 neuromuscular
diseases in its program. Entry
fee is $15 for the ride, pin and
lunch; $10 for the ride only.
Call 951-7890.
Legion entertainment
Larry Williams performs '4-8
p.m. at the American Legion
No-Vel Post 159, 145 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.
The Magic of Life
National Cancer Survivors"
Day will be celebrated 2-4
p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom,
1050 S. Tuttle Ave., at the cor-
ner of Bahia Vista in Sarasota.
All cancer survivors and any-


meeting of the
ea Computer Users
ets at 6 p.m. at the
mmunity Church,
Tamiami Trail in the
a just south of the
pen Q and A forum
he topic is protect-
omputer from mal-
ests are ,welcome.
me year are $35 for
s, $45 for couples.
may take an unlim-
ber of classes each
r meeting informa-
Sandra at 492-5555.
action about classes,
t228-2826.


Enjoy hot dogs all day at the
American Legion No-Vel Post
159, 145 E. Venice Ave. Call
488-1157.
Sewing meeting
The Englewood/Venice Sew
Much Fun group meets every
first Monday, 1-3 p.m. at
Jacaranda Public Library, 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice.
Call Joyce at 492-6675 or e-
mail strbngrjoy@cs.com.

Senior Friendship Center in
Venice, 2350 Scenic Drive,
584-0075
* Camera Club, Mondays, 10
a.m. Free, donations encour-
aged.
Dancercise, Mondays, 11
a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Masons
The Venice Masonic Lodge
No. 301 F&AM meets -for a
stated communication, at 7:30
p.m., 118 E. Venice Ave. All
members welcome. For more
information, call 484-0311.

Shuffleboard
Venice Shuffleboard Club
meets at 9 a.m. every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Les-
sons available. Call Barbara at
485-1678.
Seniors group
Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-
3:30 p.m. for a meeting and
cards. For more information,
call 485-8739.


Buddhist meditation
Kelsang Donwang leads ,a
beginners Buddhist medita-
tion, Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m., at
Woodmere Community Cen-
ter, Room 2-B, 3951 Wood-
mere Park Blvd., Venice.
Donation: $5-$9. Call 373-
1600 or visit meditationin-
florida.org.
Orchidia
* The Englewood Orchid
Society welcomes speaker
Norman Fang of Norman's
Orchids at its 7 p.m. meeting
at the Christ Lutheran
Church, 701 N. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. The public is
welcome.
* The Sarasota Orchid Society
hosts a public forum on
orchid growing at the Marie
Selby Botanical Gardens
activities room, 811 S. Palm
Ave. A beginners class takes
place at 7 p.m., led by Jeff
Higel of Orchids, Etc., fol-
lowed by discussion. The
public is welcome to attend
this free event.

RSVP
Art event
A 70-image exhibit curated
exclusively for the Venice Art
Center opens June 3 at 390 S.
Nokomis Ave. A gala recep-
tion for Portraits of an Era,
featuring world-renowned
portrait photographer Milton
H. Greene, takes place June 3,
6-8 p.m. Complemendng the
exhibit are three lecture lun-
cheons with Milton's widow,
Venice resident Amy Greene,
June 9-11, 11:30 a.m.-2:30
p.m. Tickets for these special
lectures are $35 and are avail-
able at the center. The exhibit
runs through Aug. 19. Call
485-7136.
MDA ride


The Sarasota Ladies of Harley
and Harley Owners Group
sponsor an MDA Summer
Camp Ride, Sunday, June 5.
Register at 10 a.m. and leave
at 11 a.m. All motorcycles wel-
come; leave from Rossiter's
on Cattlemen Road. MDA
provides a one-week camp at
no cost to families for young-
sters ages 6-21 affected by any
of 43 neuromuscular diseases
in its program. Entry fee is
$15 for the ride, pin and
lunch; $10 for the ride only.
Call 951-7890.
Navy League
Sarasota-Manatee Council,
Navy League of the United
States, meets Monday, June 6,
at 6 p.m. at the Bird Key Yacht
Club, 301 Bird Key Drive.
Speaker is Rep. Katherine
Harris. Dinner is $26 and the
public is invited. RSVP to
Larry at (941) 741-9630.
Democratic club
Political consultant' David
Beattie speaks at the Demo-
cratic Club of Sarasota lun-
cheon meeting Saturday, June
11, at Meadows Country Club,
3101 Longmeadow, Sarasota.
Social at 11:30 a.m., lunch
served at noon. Cost is $17.
RSVP by Jine 8 by voicemail
to 379-9233 or e-mail reserve
@sarasotadems.com.
Album class
The Community Center for
the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
of Manatee/Sarasota Inc.
holds an expandable photo
album class at 6 p.m. Friday,
June 10, at 628A Cypress Ave.
in Venice. Led by Laura
Pudela, Stampin' Up demon-
strator. Fee: $10. RSVP to
Sarah at sharris@ccdhh.org

or (941) 758-2539 TTY.
Party
The Venice Nokomis Elks
hosts a Belmont Stakes Party,
3-7 p.m. Saturday, June 11, at
119 E. Venice Ave. Finger food
included. Members and
guests welcome. For more
information, call 486-1854.
Youth babysitter course
The American Red Cross
holds a babysitter's course for
young people, June 25, 10
a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Venice Pub-
lic Library, 300 S. Nokomis
Ave. Registration required and
$35 fee. Call 861-1348.


3B
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 1,2005











4B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005


Sertoma students of the month


Sertoma's students of the year are Tommasina Miller and
Jonathan Casella. In the center is Jason Hughes, student
coordinator for Sertoma. Miller and Casella were award-
ed $500 each.


Hughes presents Kara Pevkovich and Matthew Rossheim
with plaques for being Sertoma's students of the month
of May.


* Lindsay Gehrls of Venice
will attend Presidential Class-
room's program, June 25-July
2 in Washington, D.C. PC, the
leader in civic education, pro-
vides the best and brightest
high school juniors and
seniors unprecedented ac-
cess to the leaders who shape
America's public policy.
Participants will explore
the role the government, mil-
itary and private sector play
in planning and executing
defense and homeland secu-
rity policy.
* Kendra Marie Theise, a 2001


MILITARY NEWS

Jones graduates
from Navy Nuclear
Power School


-. .



_7 --. ---- _- .
:. -. -* _' '- *-- *.. ,ii
*-- -*-"- :-- .; i ^f
.: _2 '",' .


PHOTO COURTESY OF LORI EGGLEFIELD WALKER

WEDDING

Egglefield-Walker


]
aro
Gei
Sna
19,
exc
Loi
Wa
whi
wit
bride
of
tH-.


graduate of Venice High n'
School and daughter of Karen Egg
and Greg Theise of Venice, Wa
graduated from The Uni- Th
versity of Tampa with a bach-
elor of science degree in
chemistry.
She was PE.A.C.E. head
coordinator and selected
student leader of the
month.
* David J. Volpe, son of
Theresa and Michael Pizzi of
Venice, earned a bachelor
degree in music, magna cum
laude, from Saint Michael's
College.


SAV


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Family and friends from
und the United States and
many boated to Venice's
ike Island Thursday, May
at sunset to witness the
change of vows between
ri Egglefield and Hal
Iker. Chaplain Jerry Jones,
o recently served in Iraq
h Hal, officiated. The
de's attendants were: Maid
honor, Lynn Egglefield
ag; Flower baby: Lily
glefield Haag; Bridesmaids:
linda Egglefield, Kayla
Iker and Dakota Egglefield.
e groom's attendants were:


Best man, Pete Walker;
Groomsmen: Keith Olson, Jim
Clinch and Beau Walker.
Lori is the daughter of,
George Egglefield and the late
Janet Egglefield of Nokomis.
Hal is the son of Col. (Ret.)
Berrisford Walker and the late
Clarice Walker of Venice.
Lori and Hal attended
Venice High School and grad-
uated in 1975 and 1976,
respectively. Hal graduated
from the U.S. Military
Academy in 1980 and is a U.S.
Army Flight Surgeon in West
Point, N.Y.


Machinists Mate 3rd Class
Robert E. Jones has graduated
from the U.S. Navy Nuclear
Power School near Charles-
ton S.C. on May 13.
During the six months of
training, Jones distinguished
himself by qualifying for a
Confidential Security Clear-
ance and completing a num-
ber of intensive and highly
technical classroom courses
that are fundamental to the
design, operation and main-
tenance of naval nuclear
propulsion units. It is a de-
manding 24-week course of
instruction consisting of
more than 600 hours of col-
lege-level mathematics, phy-
sics, chemistry, reactor phy-
sics and related subjects and
is among the most difficult
and intensive schools in the
Navy.
After a two-week leave in
Venice, Jones will return to
Charleston to attend the Navy
Nuclear Power Prototype
. School. Graduates of the full
one-year Power and Proto-
type School are considered to
be in the top 10 percent of the
Navy's technical personnel.
Jones has volunteered for
submarine duty, anticipating
assignment to either a mod-
em fast attack submarine or a
ballistic missile submarine.
Contaty graduates
from Coast Guard
Training Center
Coast Guard Seaman Ap-
prentice Philip P. Conaty, son
of Patricia A. Corona of
Venice, and Philip J. Conaty of
Portsmouth, Va., recently
graduated from the U.S.
Coast Guard Recruit Training
Center in Cape May, N. J.
During the eight-week
training program, Conaty


PHOTO COURTESY OF GORDON JONES
Jones
completed a vigorous train-
ing curriculum consisting of
academics and practical in-
struction on water safety and
survival, military customs
and courtesies, seamanship
skills, first aid, fire fighting
and marksmanship. A major
emphasis is also placed on
physical fitness, health and
wellness.
Conaty and other recruits
also received instruction on
the Coast Guard's core values
- honor, respect and devo-
,tion to duty and how to
apply them in their military
performance and personal
conduct. Conaty will join
36,000 other men and women
who comprise Coast Guard's
force.
Men and women train
together from the first day in
the Coast Guard just as they
do aboard ships and shore
units throughout the world.
To reinforce the team con-
cept, Conaty and other re-
cruits were trained in pre-
venting sexual harassment,
drug and alcohol awareness,
civil rights training and the
basics of the work-life bal-
ance, as well as total quality
management.
Conaty is a 2002 graduate
of Venice High School.


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Announcing the 5th Generation
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Born April 13, 2005
4 Pounds, 10 Ounces
to
Mary & Michael Williams, Venice, FL
Big Brother: Brian Williams
Grandparents:
Joanne & David Farley, Venice, FL
Judy Greenhalgh, Tamp, FL
Ron Williams, Nokomis, FL


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LOOKING FOR REGULAR INCOME? .
CONSIDER BONDS.
By staggering your bond investments, you can receive
a monthly interest check instead of one check every
six months. You'll get a regular income stream, which
makes your overall planning much easier. Call me to
find out more about monthly bond interest checks.
Investors should keep in mind that as interest rates
rise existing bond prices of already-outstanding fixed-
income securities tend to fall. Long-term bonds are
generally more exposed to interest rate risk than
short-term bonds.
Call John Holic or Kathryn Anderson
4242 S. Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL a
941-408-8797
2004 A. G. Edwards & Sons,.Inc. Member SIPC


4B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


MILESTON.,VES










CONTACT US
DEBBIE SHULMAN
PET EDITOR
(941) 207-1106
dshulman@venicegondolier.com


PETS


Providing for your pets if something happens to you


GRACE JOYCE
PET 0LiM1I ST


It's not unusual to find pet
owners that have already
made plans for their pets'
passing. Most owners have
thought about it at one time
or another, since pets usually
have shorter life spans than
their human caregivers. What
many owners may not think
about, however, is what will
happen if you are the one that


becomes ill or incapacitated
and cannot adequately care
for your pet. St. Francis Ani-
mal Rescue continually re-
ceives calls regarding stray
animals that have been
turned into the streets when
their owner passes.
Quite often we find it was a
friend or family member that
has turned out the animal
simply because no arrange-
ments have been made to
care for the pet and there is
no one immediately willing
or able to take the animal.
We also receive numerous
calls from friends and family
members inquiring as to
what to do with animals that
have been left without any
plans for their future care.
As a responsible pet owner,
you provide your pet with
food and water, shelter, vet-
erinary care, and of course,
love. To ensure that your be-
loved pet continues to receive


this care, it's important to
plan ahead.
The best way to be sure
your wishes are fulfilled is by
making formal written ar-
rangements that specifically
cover the care of your pet(s).
It's not enough that long ago a
friend verbally promised to
take in your animal, even if
you've talked about leaving
money to your friend for that
specific purpose.
The only way to guarantee
that your wishes will be hon-
ored is to work with an attor-
ney to draw up a special will,
trust, or document to provide
for care and ownership of
your pet. It's also important to
specify the amount of money
that will be set aside to care
for your animal.
When making a decision
as to who will care for your
pet there are many choices
available. Family, close
friends, neighbors and even


not-for-profit animal rescue
organizations are good choic-
es to consider.
Decide if all your pets will
go to one person or organiza-
tion, or if different pets
should go'to different places.
If possible, keep pets that
have bonded with one anoth-
er together.
When selecting caregivers,
consider all of your options
carefully. It's also important to
name alternate caregivers in
the event your first choice
becomes unable to care for
your pet as planned. If you
find that you are unable to
locate a suitable caregiver you
may want to explore animal
rescue organizations that find
adoptive homes for animals.
Be sure you interview the
organization to find out
exactly what will happen if
the organization is unable to
locate a permanent home.
Many organizations have no-


kill facilities that allow the
animal to live out their lives,
while others have policies on
how long an animal will be
cared for if not adopted. Be
sure yott know which type of
shelter or organization you
are working with and what
financial considerations you
will make to provide for your
animal.
When you're ready to pro-
ceed with a written plan, it is
best to consult with a lawyer.
One thing to keep in mind is
that a will takes effect upon
your death and may not be
probated and formally recog-
nized by a court for days or
even weeks. If a dispute aris-
es, the final settlement of
your property may be pro-
longed and your beloved pet
could get caught in the mid-
dle of a lengthy legal process.
This doesn't mean that you
should not include a provi-
sion in your will for your pet,


but it does mean that you
should explore creating addi-
tional documents to com-
pensate for the will's limita-
tions.
In the event you are inca-
pacitated and can no longer
care for your pet, additional
documentation will definitely
be needed for these circum-
stances.
'No matter what plans you
have in place, remember that
when it comes to the long-
term care of your pet, it's
always better to be safe than
sorry.

Grace Joyce is St. Francis
Animal Rescue president and
co-founder St. Francis
Animal Rescue is a nonprofit,
no-kill facility, located at
1925 South Tamiami Trail,
Venice. Adoption hours are
Monday through Thursday,
1-5 p.m., and Saturday, 11
a.m.-5 p.m. Call 492-6200.


Adopt-a-pet


PHOTO COURTED"' OF H UJkl." i SO-CITYOF SARASOTA COUNTY
Star is an adult shepherd/rotti mix. She has been well trained
and knows all the basic obedience commands. She is very
playful and well behaved. Can you give Star a home? Visit the
Humane Society of Sarasota County at 2331 15th St., Sarasota,
or call 955-4131.



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Man's best friend can help you fight arthritis


Did' you know that the
family dog could be the best
thing to happen to your
health? A brisk walk with your
canine companion can help
keep you and your dog fit and
can relieve some of the aches,
pains and stiffness associated
with osteoarthritis.
More than 20 million
Americans have osteoarthri-
tis, also known as OA. OA is a
degenerative joint disease
that is characterized by the
breakdown of joint cartilage,
with bone eventually meeting
bone. Many of the disease
signs, symptoms and treat-
ments are similar in both pets
and people.
"With proper diet, exercise
and medical treatment,
mobility can be maintained
and arthritis pain reduced,"
said Dr. John H. Klippel, pres-
ident and CEO of the Arthritis
Foundation. "This means that
your twice-daily walks can
help to keep both you and
your pet fit while alleviating


pain and reducing swelling."
Early morning stiffness is a
common sign of arthritis.
While the temptation to rest
to avoid aggravating the con-
dition is strong, exercise actu-
ally helps keeping joints
lubricated and strengthening
muscles and cartilage. The
stronger the muscles and tis-
sue are around joints, the bet-
ter they will be able to sup-
port and protect those joints
- even those weak and dam-
aged by arthritis.
Exercise will help you and
your pet:
* Keep your joints flexible.
* Keep muscles around the
joints strong.
* Prevent further deteriora-
tion of bone and cartilage.
* Improve your ability to per-
form daily activities.
* Improve your overall health
and fitness by giving you
more energy, helping you
sleep better, making your
heart stronger and control-
ling your weight.


Taking a brisk walk with your dog can improve overall health.


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5B
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 1, 2005


IKnit & Pick L
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SUMMER f7 M
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Sat 10am-2pm .


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June4th, 1thand 18th1030am-12 30pm June 25th
For Children and Young Adults For Children
MAKE A FELTED PURSE & HAT KNIT A PONCHO WITH FRINGE
This 3 session course is $30 O upp Trh. 2 .:niin,.:,ur iii :u00
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8T :. ,


6B
WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 1, 2005


Veggie soup


from a blender


BROTHER CRAIG



Well, there I was with Bro-
ther John at Sears in Sarasota
(I'll explain why it a bit. Don't
rush me.) and this very
charming couple (originally
from Brooklyn) asked if I was
the one who wrote the col-
umn for this paper.
Since my photo is dis-
played, I can't get out of ad-
mitting it by responding in
Mongolian. Then again, I
don't speak Mongolian.
Now since this is the sec-
ond time this has happened
this week, I have come to be-
lieve that some people are
actually reading this column.
I don't mind telling you
that sure came as a surprise to
me.
I never thought I'd see the
day when people would have
nothing better to do than to
read such nonsense.
Don't they have better
things to do? Does anyone
hook rugs anymore?
And what about that great
tradition of the weekly taffy
pull?
And doesn't anyone do
glass blowing?
But no people persist in
wasting their time.
Sure, I write this column
but I never read it. As Abra-
ham Lincoln 'said, "You can
change none of the people
none of the time and the rest
of the time you can't change
the others."
Anyway, about why we


were in Sears: We bought a
new blender. The old one had
only one slight problem. -
the blades wouldn't go
around.
Whereas many would con-
sider this a minor defect, I can
be a bit picky about such
things. We use the blender
much.
I like to put in a banana,
add some water, add ice,
crush the ice and there you
have it, a banana smoothie.
As long as I remember to turn
it on.
My specialty is veggie soup.
This recipe has quite a history.
I made it for a reporter (and
photographer) who was com-
ing to interview me about my
diet book, "Love Yourself so ...
Hate the Weight!" (Wood-
bridge Press), which I wrote
after I lost 114 pounds.
I knew from reading inter-
views that whatever is served.
would be mentioned in the
article: "Mia Farrow served
me her apple-cinnamon rimuf-
fins with tea."
Well, my soup wasn't only
mentioned, but the reporter
called for the recipe.
Only I didn't have one.
So I had to make the soup.
again and measure what I
used.
It is two cans of mixed veg-
etables mashed with a potato
masher (or use a blender)
until they are not all the way
indistinct. (This is not con-
sume.)
Be sure to use the water
from the canned veggies. It is
great with a little tomato
sauce added and some onion
powder and (that neglected
seasoning) celery seed.
So when you meet me, be
sure to tell me if you made the
'soup.

You can contact Brother
Craig through his communi-
ty's Web site at monksof
adoration.org.


Juiced up


SUN PHOTOS BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
Juice Newton signed autographs for her fans following her
show Saturday at the North Port Performing Arts Center
that featured "Queen of Hearts" and "Keeping Me Alive."


over Juice Newton concert


Telling the audience she has never been to North Port,
Newton said she drove across the grass at the school. She
provided more comic relief saying she accidentally worn
her underwear backwards while traveling on an air plane.


North Port raises transportation impact fees


The increase comes months after the county
raised its fees, triggering an obligation under an
interlocal agreement for the city to follow suit.


BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT ASSISTANT EDITOR

The city of North Port
increased transportation im-
pact fees on-Monday to keep
up with the rate Sarasota
County is charging. The new
27-percent rate went into
effect Tuesday.
Impact fees are a one-time
charge to a homeowner or
commercial builder for con-
struction to help pay for the
impact of new construction
on the area.
In September, Sarasota
County raised its transporta-
tion impact fee rates. North
Port was required through an
interlocal agreement with the
county to raise the rate then
but did not do 'so until


Monday.
When a developer or
homeowner pulls a permit, 25
percent of the road impact fee
is paid to, Sarasota County.
The other 75 percent stays in
North Port in a fund for trans-
portation impacts on North
Port.
The new rates range from
$495.69 for an adult living
facility to $1,787.89 for light
industrial and warehousing.
With North Port's estimat-
ed 4,000 new homes planned
for this year, the new trans-
portation impact fee rate for a
single home is $1,874.42 (a
one-time fee) per house. The
new rate for a supermarket is
$4,821, for manufacturing,
$1,376; for a fast-food restau-
rant, $13,339; for a corporate


headquarters building,
$1,859; for a shopping center,
$7,005; for a bank with a
drive-through, $9,386; for a
hospital, $5,635; for a day-
care center, $4,975; and $429
for each elementary. school
student in a newly built ele-
mentary or middle school
and $753 for each student in a
newly built high school.
Most of the fees are
charged by the square footage
of the proposed new build-
ings or homes.
Money from these fees car
be used for widening majoi
roads in the city such as Price
Toledo Blade and Sumtei
boulevards.
Since 1980, North Port's
population has increased 12(
percent. Sarasota Count3
commissioners have beer
asking city officials to raise
impact fees to accommodate
the city's growth and impact,
on the county.


During the upcoming bud-
get hearings in August, city
commissioners are likely to
see impact fee increase pro-
posals by several city districts
including the fire rescue divi-
sion.

You can e-mail Elaine
Allen-Emrich at eallen
@sun-herald.com.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
mu


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No DIP
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OPEN YEAR RO 4
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8th Annual -


. Sponsored by the Sertoma Club of Venice


Our distinguished sponsors invite
you to party with the Sertoma Club
of Venice at its Reverse Raffle on
Saturday, June 4, 2005 from 6 11 p.m.
at Jacaranda West Country Club to
benefit the Sertoma Speech Clinic.
Billed as "the zaniest fun you can
have in pursuit of a good cause," the
casual evening includes buffet dinner,
wine, beer, live music and dancing,
black jack table, silent
auction, door prizes, and
the famous "Reverse
Raffle" all for $75 per person.
Tickets can be purchased by
calling: Jim Foubister, 441-1944
or Fred Hind, 485-3400.


Ve c S cho Alu niAssoiaton'
A ,LCLA S-


I


JULY 1ST ALUMNI MEET & GREET 7 PM to Midnight
Classes will meet at various locations. Check the web site for more info.
JULY 2ND -PARTY IN THE PARK & ALUMNI PARTY
Train Depot & Venice Archives tours begin at 10 AM. A festival will be held 12 PM
to 10 PM at Centennial Park. Live music, food vendors, Budweiser & more, an
. alumni party will be held at the Venice Island Pub from 10 PM to 2 AM.
i For more info. www.vhsalumni.net or call (941) 207-1212. R


Sponsored by: Venice
Gondolier Sun, Barbara
Jernigan-Marketing
Consultant, MacKenzie
Printing & Advertising,
Living Memories
Productions, A.G.
Edwards & Sons, Inc.,
Englewood Mason &
Moore Financial Team,
Boone Law Firm,
Budweiser'
ain Date: July 3rd


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Venice
ldenton


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I : ~~ ___ ~II __


,I








WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005


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GOREN BRIDGE


Q 1 Vulnerable, you hold:
A Q 10762 2 A 6 oAJ954 4 A
Partner opens the bidding with one no
trump (15-17). What do you respond?
A If you play transfer bids, life is
simple. Transfer into spades and then
make a forcing bid of three dia-
monds. If transfer bids are not in
your arsenal, you have to crowd the
auction, either by jumping to three
spades immediately, or by trying two
clubs (Stayman), then jumping to
three spades should partner bid 'any-
thing other than two spades.
Q 2 Neither vulnerable, you hold:
A-A9765 v Q6 0 1062 K98
Partner opens the bidding with one
spade. What do you respond'?
A If you play limit raises, this is a
borderline hand. However, with the
value of the queen of hearts unknown,
we prefer the slightly conservative
single raise to two spades rather than
the jump to three spades. If you can-
not make a limit raise, there is no
problem raise to two spades.
Q 3 Vulnerable, you hold:
4K864 Q98 0 A106 0 K84
Partner opens the bidding with one
heart. What do you respond?
A If you have a method of making
a.forcing raise in hearts that shows
specifically three-card support, by all
means use it. If you play one-no-
trump forcing, use that weapon then
jump to game in hearts at your next
turn. If neither.of these weapons is
available, either respond one spade
or two no trump, and follow up by
bidding game in hearts.
Q 4 Vulnerable, you hold:


*109642 vKQ7 o AK962 Void
Your right-hand opponent opens the
bidding with four clubs. What action
do you take?
A You would like the hand better if
one of your diamonds was a heart, but
life at the bridge table is seldom per-
fect. If you pass, your left-hand oppo-
nent might raise the pre-empt. Partner
is unlikely to have enough to act then,
and you would have to decide what to
do one level higher. Double now -
for takeout, of course.
Q 5 Both vulnerable, as South you
hold:
AQ97 'A10864 OAK1076 *Void
The bidding has proceeded:
SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST
12 14 2v 3*
What do you bid now'?
A Don't tell the opponents more
than they need to know. You have
found a fit in your major and you
don't need much from partner to col-
lect 10 tricks. Suppress the diamond
suit. Jump to four hearts.
Q 6 East-West vulnerable, as South
you hold:
*KJ873 W AK5 0A76 .4Q2
Partner opens the bidding with a
weak two hearts (6-11 points). What
do you bid now?
A Chances of slam are remote. Since
partner is unlikely to hold more than
one ace, you start off with a black-suit
loser. There is no reason to expect
partner to have enough for a slam. Bid
four hearts. and let the opponents
wonder whether you are making a
power raise or an advance sacrifice.
Send e-mail to gorenbridge@aol.com.


COOL from page 18B


For more information, call
the archives at 484-8679.
Harley riders might be
interested to learn that there
is a new Orlando Harley-
Davidson retail location at
Disney's Downtown Pleasure
Island. Custom motorcycles
with one-of-a-kind paint
designs and plenty of chrome
are on display for guests to
see, touch and sit on.
Guest information for Walt
Disney World is available at
disneyworld.com or call (407)
824-4321.
Lemon Bay Playhouse will
hold a summer theater camp


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for children 7-12 years old at
the theater, 96 W. Dearborn
St., Englewood, July 18-30.
Sessions will be Monday
through Friday mornings.
Cost is $50 per camper.
Registration will begin July 5.
For more information, visit
the box office at the theater or
call 475-6756.
Tickets are on sale for the
Oct. 20 appearance of Neil
Diamond at the St. Pete
Times Forum in Tampa. "Neil
Diamond Live" will be pre-
sented at 8 p.m.
Tickets are available at the
Forum and all Ticketmaster
outlets. Reserved seats are


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Discover the beauty and
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****** *
It is time to purchase your
tickets for the annual Love-
land Follies at the Venice
Little Theatre. This year is the
10th anniversary show, fea-
turing students from Love-
land, the center for the devel-
opmentally handicapped, at
157 Havana Road, Venice.
Entitled, "Lights! Camera!
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is movies and will feature
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films, put together in a film
festival format. There will be
just two performances 8
p.m. Saturday, June 11, and 2
p.m. Sunday, June 12, on the
MainStage at the VLT, 140 W.
Tampa Ave.
The director is Matt Mc-
Cord with choreography by
Becky Holahan, music direc-
tion byJo Snyder and produc-
tion by Yvonne T. Pinkerton,
who formed the VLT-Love-
land partnership 10 years ago
and has directed the show
each year since its founding.
Tickets are $10 per person,
with all proceeds benefiting
Loveland and the VLT. For
tickets, call 488-1115.


New books

at the library

These books are available
at Venice Public Library.
1. "THE COMMAND OF THE
OCEAN: A NAVAL HISTORY OF
BRITAIN, 1649-1815," by
N.A.M. Rodger.
2. "COPELAND'SCURE:
HOMEOPATHY AND THE WAR
BETWEEN CONVENTIONAL
AND ALTERNATIVE
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MEDIEVAL SPAIN'S GOLDEN
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Venice Gondolier Sun



8BIN SHAPE
WEDNESDAY
JUNE 1, 2005


CONTACT US
JJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR
(941) 207-1103
jandrews@venicegondolier.com


Back and forth on


Hatchett Creek Bridge


J.J. Andrews
BACK OF THE PACK

I am guilty of taking plea-
sure in the sounds of disbelief
from nonrunners while shar-
ing my experiences in a pair
of jogging shoes.
Take last Sunday. As my
girlfriend and I drove off
Venice island on Hatchett
Creek Bridge, I casually men-
tioned this was where I did
my hill workouts up and
down the bridge, at nearly full,
speed, four times, followed by
a 4-mile run along the Intra-
coastal Waterway at a quick
pace.
"Oh, that's just not right,"
was her response.
Bingo! Slam dunk! Just the
reaction I was looking for.
Right or wrong, the ego is
boosted whenever someone
looks at me as if I'm nuts for
running up and down a
bridge four times almost as
fast as I can. It's one of those
yeah-I-did-that moments.
This also is how I stay


motivated to do something as
insane as running up and
down Hatchett Creek Bridge
under the watchful eye of the
bridge tender who must
wonder if I cannot make up
my mind.
Getting faster
Week after week I've writ-
ten about how jogging or
any fitness program is con-
nected to one's positive emo-
tional and spiritual condition,
as well as physical health.
Speed, distance and time
doesn't matter. Running is
about realizing the potential #
we all have in our lives.
Doing hill workouts, how-
ever, has little to do with fun
and is all about trying to get
faster. It's the running version
of lifting weights, building up
endurance and leg strength
for those key moments in a
5K road race.
The closest a person
comes to a true hill in Florida
are the fire ant mounds litter-
ing the ground. So what we're
left with is finding a bridge
and creating our own hill.
Adapted from Jeff Gallo-
way's book on marathon
training, my workout takes
me to Hatchett Creek Bridge.
Of the three Venice island
bridges, it appears to be the
steepest and have the widest
sidewalks. The Venice Avenue
Bridge, in my opinion, is not a
safe option because of the
narrow sidewalks with barely


enough room for someone to
walk, let alone sprint.
Galloway suggests begin-
ning runners start with only
one or two hill repeats, inter-
mediates start at three or four
and advanced runners at
four or more, depending on
skill levels. I went with four
bridge repeats during my hill
workout.
Start off with a mile
warmup to make sure you're
loose. By my car's odometer,
from Tampa Avenue to Har-
bor Lights Drive is 0.3 miles,
so each repeat is just more
than. a lap around a quarter-
mile high school track.
Do not sprint. Instead, I go
at a quick pace and focus on
solid running form all the
way up and down the bridge
from Tampa to Harbor Lights.
Walk for a minute or two
(longer if you need it), and
then repeat.
Now doesn't that sound
like fun!
Not convinced? Then go
.out and do that workout,
share that with a nonrunning,
friend, make it sound easy
and then bask in their looks
of disbelief.
Yes, I am bad.

Back of the Pack is a
weekly running column
appearing every Wednesday.
Send running-related e-mails
to Assistant Editor JJ..
Andrews at: jandrews@
venicegondolier.com.


FITNESS BRIEFS


Your opportunity to



fight childhood obesity


BY MELANIE MULLALLY
GUEST COLUMNIST

Here's something that is not
a news flash. Childhood obesi-
ty has become a national epi-
demic.
I don't think any child
wants to be overweight or any
parent wishes this for their
child. Not only is overall
health compromised, but
social ridicule and emotional
stress are often prevalent as a
result of obesity. This can have'
effects on physical and emo-
tional development and have
long term effects well into
adulthood.
So what can we do to help
prevent and treat this prob-
lem? Here are just a few things
that I have compiled from dif-
ferent researchers and organi-
zations who have been study-
ing childhood obesity and
prevention.
Television Limiting TV
watching is a good first step in,
obesity prevention. Many
families restrict this to only
favorite shows, and use videos
as special treats. Several stud-
ies have found a strong link
between television, video
games and computer viewing
time (screen time) and obesi-
ty.
Get active Be active
yourself, and get out with your
kids. Plan ways to incorporate
some active and enjoyable
family adventures into your
life. Most important is to help


your child find activities that
are fun.
Family meals Have regu-
lar meals together, which
becomes a comforting ritual
for both parents and kids.
Children like the predictability
of family meals and parents
get a chance to catch up with
their kids. Kids who take part
in regular family meals are
also more likely to eat fruits,
vegetables and grains. They're
also less likely to snack on
unhealthy foods, less likely to
smoke, use marijuana, or
drink alcohol.
Food variety Kids, espe-
cially younger ones, will eat
mostly what's available at
home. That's why it's impor-
tant to control the supply lines
- the foods that you serve for,
meals and have on hand for
snacks.
. Role model- The best way
for you to encourage healthy
eating is to eat well yourself.
Kids will follow the lead of the
adults they see every day. By
eating fruits and vegetables
and not overindulging in the
less nutritious stuff, you'll be
sending the right message.
Another way you can be a
good role model is by limit-
ing portions and not overeat-
ing. Talk about your feelings
of. fullness, especially with
younger children.
No food fights -Avoid bat-
tles over food. It's easy for food
to become a source of conflict.
A better strategy is to give kids


some control; but to also limit
the kind of foods available at
home. Kids should decide if
they're hungry, what they will
eat from the foods served, and
when they're full. Parents con-
trol which foods are available
to the child, both at mealtime
and between meals.
Collaboration Involve
kids in the process. Most kids
will enjoy making the decision
about what to make for din-
ner. Talk to them about mak-
ing choices and planning a
balanced meal. Some children
may even want to help shop
for ingredients and prepare
the meal. At the store, help
your child look at food labels
to begin understanding nutri-
tional values.
The South County Family
YMCA has developed the
Mini-Me program for children
5-7 years old and the Pre-Teen
program for those 10-12 years
old that both use a fun ap-
proach to help children be-
come both more active and
eat healthy.
These half-day programs
incorporate a variety of
hands-on activities ranging
from organized games, team-
building games, nutritional/
food preparation, swimming,
rock climbing and more.
To find out more about
these two camps, call the
YMCA at 492-9622.
Melanie Mullally is the
wellness director with Venice
YMCA .


Healthy, active kids camp
The South County Family
YMCA has developed the
Mini-Me program for chil-
dren 5-7 years old and the
Pre-Teen program for those
10-12 years old that both use a
fun approach to help children
become both more active and
eat healthy.
These half-day programs
incorporate a variety of
hands-on activities ranging
from organized games, team-
building games, nutritional/
food preparation, swimming,
rock climbing and more.
Dates of the camps will be
June 6-10, 13-17, June 27 to
July 1, and July 11-15. The
Mini-Me camps are from 9
a.m. to noon, and the Pre-
Teen camps are 1-5 p.m.
Cost for YMCA members is
$45 for the weeklong camp,
and $60 for nonmembers.
Late fees are applied on regis-
trations submitted after Wed-
nesday of the week prior to
any given camp.
To find out more about
these two camps, call the
YMCA at 492-9622.
Swim practices
The Venice Bonefish Mas-
ters Swimming Team has
organized practices available
for swimmers 19 and older at
the Venice YMCA.
Practices are Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri-
day from 5:30 to 7 a.m.
Monthly and walk-in rates are


A Med
Promoting


4


Dr. Anthony Lyon
Located in the Veni
s Directly behi


available.
Contact Mike Norton at
492-9622 for additional infor-:
mation.
Venice Triathlon Club
The South County Family
YMCA in Venice is sponsoring
the Venice Triathlon Club for
area triathletes.
Southwest Florida Triath-
letes also is sponsored by area
businesses. Club events,
training sessions, seminars,
and coaching are available
through the club.
Contact Mike Norton at


492-9622 for additional infor-
mation.
Venice morning runs
Area joggers are invited out
to informal morning training
runs in Venice. These runs
will start at 6 a.m. Wednesday
and Friday mornings on the
island and meet at the main
parking lot, called Centennial
Park, in downtown Venice
near the public restrooms.
Runners of all abilities and
ages are encouraged to par-
ticipate in these runs that are
over by 7 a.m. Distances and


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running pace vary based on a
person's ability.
Send e-mails seeking more
information to jandrews@
venicegondolier.com or call
207-1103.
Youth physical
activity kick-off events
The VERB youth fitness
campaign in Sarasota County
is about to kick off. These
kickoff events will begin the
12-week VERB Summer
Scorecard campaign to keep
children ages 9-13 active all
summer. Kick-off activities


Jeffrey P. Fraser, b.O.
Board certiited
in Family Practice


Neetha Sallapudi, M.D.
Board certified
in Family Practice


Beth Rhamy, P.A.
Physicians Assistant


8:0 am0, pm


will include a disc jockey,
interactive games, prize give-
.aways, and a meet-and-greet,
table.
VERB activities will contin-
ue until Aug. 12 with an end-
of-summer grand finale cele-
bration. More than 60 com-
munity organizations are
partnering with Sarasota
County to provide activities,
discounts,. and prizes to
encourage young people to
get active.
Locations for these events
are:
Beach Party and Beach


Run 5:30-8 p.m. June 1 at
Venice Fishing Pier beach
area, .1600 South Harbor
Drive.
Go Wild, No School
Tween Dance 7-9:30 p.m.
June 3 at Selby Public Library,
1331 First St., Sarasota.
Pool party 2-4 p.m.
June 4 at Venice YMCA, 701
Center Road.
For more information,
contact the Sarasota County
Call Center at 861-5000 and
ask about the VERB youth
program or log onto Verb-
Sarasota.com.


Beth Rhamy, P.A., Jeffrey Fraser, D.O., and Neetha Sallapudi, M.D.

Family Practice Physicians
Dr. Jeffrey P. Fraser
and
Dr. Neetha G. Sallapudi

Physicians Assistant
Beth Rhamy, P.A.


1295 Jacaranda Boulevard, Venice
Facing the CenterRoad entrance to the HealthPark
Call (941) 486-6060 for appointment
VENICE HEALTHPARK FAMILY MEDICAL AND WALK-IN CENTER



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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9B


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"Copyrighted Material



"-"- Syndicated Content


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Muldoon said one of the
first maneuvers students
learn is capsizing the boat, to
feel what it's like to be in a wet
and unfamiliar situation.
The club sails every
Wednesday morning depend-
ing on the weather. The sail-
ing season for the Bitter Ends
runs from September to the
early part of May. The biggest
reason is because of the boats
and course being lent to sum-
mer programs for children
that are out of school.
On bad weather days the
group still meets to discuss
different sailing strategies and
techniques. Repair has also
been discussed because the
club had to perform the task
themselves for a while.
"Normally if we don't sail
we'll have a workshop or an
instructional meeting," Mul-
doon said.
Some of the members of
the Bitter, Ends have started-
another. group called the
Loose Ends that will kayak in
local rivers.
The club has events all sea-
son long including a Christ-
mas party, member of the'
group made a donation to
SPARCC last holiday season.
At the end of the spring
session the club has a picnic
where awards are given out
and officers are elected for the
next season.
Any woman interested in
taking the course should call
486-8283. The VWSS is a open


to all area women, Sept. 12-
16. Tuition for the course is
$75, which includes a book
and materials. Space is limit-


ed.
For more information on
women's sailing in the area
visit fwsa.net.


STRANGE WORDS OF SAILING
* Aback Wind on the wrong side of the sails.
* Ballast a weight at the bottom of the boat to help keep it
stable.
* Camber The curvature of an object such as a sail, keel or deck.
* Douse To drop a sail quickly.
.* Eddy Water or air currents flowing in circular patterns.
* Fathom A nautical measurement equaling 6 feet (182 cm).
Usually used to measure depth.
* Gale A storm with a wind speed between 34 to 40 knots.
* Hawser A rope that is very large in diameter, usually used
when docking large vessels
- Isobars Lines drawn on a weather map indicating regions of
equal pressure.
* Jibe To change direction when sailing in a manner such that
the stern of the boat passes through the eye of the wind and the
.boom changes sides.
* Keel -A flat surface built into the bottom of the boat to prevent
or reduce the leeway caused by the wind pushing against the side
of the boat.
* Lazafette A small aft storage space for spare parts-and other
items' '
1'V.Moor -. Toattach a b6at to a mooring, dock, post, anchor, etc.
* Neap tide The tide with the least variation in water level,
occurring when the moon is one quarter and three quarters full.
* Outboard On the side of the hull that the water is on.
* Pooped A wave that breaks over the stern of the boat.
: Quay Also a wharf. A section parallel to the shore for docking
and unloading vessels.
* Regatta A series of boat races.
- Sextant A navigational instrument used to determine the
vertical position of an object such as the sun, moon or stars.
* Telltale A small line free to flow in the direction of the breeze.
* Windage The amount of a boat, sail or other object that the
wind can push on.
S'* Yaw Swinging off course, usually in heavy seas.
* Zephyr -A gentle breeze. The west wind.


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 2005


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Venice Gondolier Sun



.. .


WEDNESDAY
JUNE 1, 2005


FRAN VALENCIC
SOCIAL COLUMNIST


VHS Band

hits a

high note

The annual Venice High
School Band spring banquet
and awards night demonstrat-
ed the excitement generated
when musicians get together.
Booster President Mary
Petty recognized parents and
friends who raised money,
made food and generally sup-
ported the band members
and their projects. She wel-
comed Lisa Davis from the
Salvation Army who present-
ed the group with the Dis-
tinguished Service Award for
their donations and service to
Hurricane Charley victims.
Jason Johnson showed a ter-
rific power point presentation
of band members working at
the hurricane site.
The Jazz band performed at
the banquet and David Pan-
ton and Alexis Humphrey
jumped up and started danc-
ing when the band played, "In
the Mood." Jessey Foster
wowed the group with his
featured drum solo.
Former Venice High Music
Director Dick Thierry was
recognized for his volunteer
work with the band. He
spends several days a week
helping them get ready for
competitions and perfor-
mances in addition to playing
with The Venice Symphony,
The Venice Concert Band and
the Sailor Circus. Dick is re-
tired. He told me-when he-was
in high school, his band was
called the Jolly Jivers.
Another former Venice
High School Band Director
Don Burman was honored.
He is retiring this year from
Laurel Nokomis School, It was
fun to see the number for par-
ents who stood to be ackn owl -
edged as former students of
the two men.
Next year the band promis-
es to be even more spectacu-
lar with Emily Young and
Nick Gissal as the drum
majors. They are both great
musicians whose energy is
contagious.
Seniors David Panton,
Jessica Todd, Nelson Hertzog
and Josh Downes reminisced
about their band experiences.
Band Director Jonathan Case
presented awards to Holly
Mason, Jessica Todd, Tori
Prince, Greg Anderson, Aus-
tin Brist, Michael Canfield,
Stephen Apple, Emily Young,
William Petty, Josh Downes,
Brent Billington, Samantha
Lamotte and David Panton.
Jessica Todd received a $500
Band Booster.Scholarship.
The great music, spirit, ter-
rific barbecue dinner by Jonny
Poole and great dessert buffet
of homemade pastries provid-
ed by the parents made the
evening spectacular.

"To Kill A Mockingbird"
recently played at the Venice
Little Theatre. The show was
great and Nancy Bloomquist
performed brilliantly as Mrs.
Dubose. Nancy is the ticket
office manager at the VLT.

The special person of this
week is David Panton one of
this year's Venice High School
drum majors. Whether lead-
ing the band down Venice
Avenue in one of our parades,
performing at a school func-
tion, or volunteering at one of
the fund raising projects,
Dalid always was a fine repre-
sentative of the school.
David is one of dithe 2005
graduates of Venice High
School who helps make this
town special.


Cecilia A. Kueltzo admires the pastel by Nancy Hook Colby, the
featured artist in the gallery at the Venice Little Theatre.


'-UI PHOT,'.:l Fi ,LI '.. ALEI IC
Nadene Burman pins a rose on her husband, Don, who is retiring from teaching this year. Don
was the band director at Venice High School and at Laurel Nokomis School.


Nancy Bloomquist and Chris Casswell
perform as Mrs. Dubose and Atticus Finch
in "To Kill A Mockingbird."


Director Allan Kollar smiles and enjoys the
accolades for "To Kill A Mockingbird."


Venice High Principal Candy Millington
smiles.as she receives a candy bouquet
from the Venice High School Band
Boosters.


Bill Mowrey and Steve Cantees spend time
together at the band banquet. Steve is leaving
Venice High to be the new principal at the
Phoenix Academy.


Gerri Becker, Matt McCord and Gina Schonfeld enjoy visiting at
the Venice Little Theatre. Gerri is a longtime volunteer. Matt
played the mean Bob Ewell in "To Kill A Mockingbird" and
Gina volunteers ith the Loveland Center cast.


Will Petty and Alexis Humphrey developed a nice friendship as
members of the Venice High Band.


From left, Lisa Davis, representing the Salvation Army, presents a special Seniors David Panton, Jessica Todd, Nelson Hertzog and Josh Downes had a
plaque to Mary Petty, Dalene Johnson and Jonathan Case for the lot offun in their years with the Venice HighSchool Band.
contributions the Venice High School Band Boosters and members made l
on behalf of Hurrican Charley victims.


,- I. The huge bouquet for Sue g
Gissal is a gift from the band -,
members for her special -, ..
dedication in preparing all _
kinds of food for them and
Jessey Foster wowed the audience with his drum solo at for supporting the group in Dick Thierry is honored for his years of teaching and
the Venice High School band banquet., every way. volunteering with the Venice High School Band.
. V "'I g ._,_ ......... ) '. ,r4: $ AJ. ,^ ', ,"':7 : ; .: ;' ... '". ,.- ,.


I UO


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