Title: Venice gondolier sun
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028295/00050
 Material Information
Title: Venice gondolier sun
Uniform Title: Venice gondolier sun
Alternate Title: Venice gondolier
Gondolier
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Venice Gondolier Sun
Publisher: Venice Gondolier Sun
Place of Publication: Venice Fla
Publication Date: May 1, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Venice (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Venice
Coordinates: 27.098611 x -82.438889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 56, no. 7 (April 4-6. 2001)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for April 4-6, 2001 also called April 4, 2001.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028295
Volume ID: VID00050
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ANK8420
oclc - 47264140
alephbibnum - 002730652
issn - 1536-1063
lccn - 2001229429
 Related Items
Preceded by: Venice gondolier (Venice, Fla. : 1983)

Full Text



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50 CENTS VOLUME 60 NUMBER 25 AN EDmON OF THE SUN SUNDAY-TUESDAY EDITION, MAY 1-3, 2005 PUBLISHED WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY AND SUNDAY





Venice Housing Authority staying put


Relocation ideas have been shelved and attention
turned to building better, bigger and more public
housing at Grove Street.


BY JJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR

President George Bush
went on TV across the coun-
tryThursday night and prom-
ised America's low-income
seniors their Social Security
money is safe.
That still may not be
enough here in Venice, where
many people forget there are
low-income seniors who can-
not afford a place to live.
Not every person over 65
years old has a large bank
account, and following the


death of a spouse along
with his or her additional in-
come a once-affordable
condominium or apartment
suddenly turns into a finan-
cial black hole. An indepen-
dent older person has to
count on someone for help.
The Venice Housing Au-
thority believes it has the
answer right off of Grove
Street. Board members ap-
proved hiring a financial con-
sultant in a race to win state
grants next year and attempt
to build as many as 200 new
low- and moderate-income


apartments.
If it's successful, VHA Ex-
ecutive Director Peter Lopez
said the first redevelopment
phase would be a five-story
building with 36 units dedi-
cated for low-income seniors
who qualify for housing assis-
tance.
"There is nothing for them,
unless you can pay some
ridiculous amount of money,"
Lopez said.
All of this is part of a grand
plan by Lopez to reshape and
rebuild the image of Grove
Terrace Housing Complex, a
more than 35-year-old public
housing community that's
fallen into disarray through
mismanagement and under-
funding. '
On the job for just more


than 15 months, Lopez start-
ed with cleaning up financial
debt that had piled up and
buildings that were racking
up city code violations. From
a new coat of paint to bal-
anced financial ledgers and
now a new roof-- about to be
installed the past is getting
cleaned up.
Now Lopez is looking to
the future.,And while his far-
reaching plans have had to be
scaled back, he believes prop-
er funding will allow him to
replace the 50 existing units
with at least 120.
Lopez also has his eyes on
a pair of properties next door.
One would let him build
another 80 units, while the

Please see STAYING, 15A


SUIN PHOTO B. JEFF TAVAPES javares.i..enic-gondohier.com
VHA Executive Director Peter Lopez explains some of the chal-
lenges low-income seniors face in locating affordable housing
in the Venice area. He hopes to be able to add apartments at
Grove Terrace to help meet the growing number of low-
income seniors needing affordable housing.


Scrub jays, plovers thrive near Venice Beach


Dredgers renourishing the beach must work
around a plover's nest and sea turtle nests while


SUN PHOTOS BY JJ. ANDREWS
This close-up photo shows the female Wilson's plover incubat-
ing her eggs. The nest is nothing more than a handful of sand
scooped out by the male bird.


adding the million cubic
calls for.

BY JJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR

Every day IackTaylor walks
the nearly 3.5 miles of beach
from South Jetty to Brohard
Park. .
The retired marine biolo-
gist is looking for, shoreline
birds that have nested in
areas where the city and U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers are
about to dunp more than a
million cubic yards of sand.
These long walks have
made him a familiar site
among other daily beach
walkers, many of whom Eve
in beachfront condominium
developments. They too keep
an eye out for nesting birds. A
few days. ago, Carol and Bill
Newnan rushed out waving
their arms at Taylor.
"She flagged me down one
day and said, 'I think I found a


yards of sand the project


sand piper nest.' he said. "I
told her, 'I bet it's a plover.' "
Turns out Taylor was right.
A Wilson's plover has nested
at the beach near Bermuda
Sunset Condominiums, just
north of ServiceClub. Park.
Two to three eggs are in the
nest. From the day eggs are
laid. it takes about 45 days for
the young birds to hatch and
leave the nest.
So when engineers start
pumping out sand a couple of
weeks from now, they'll have
to pile it up well away from
the nest and wait to bulldoze
it across the beach. Taylor has
marked a 300-foot perimeter
around the nest to prevent
anyone from disturbing the
rare bird.
Bird counts
The southern portion of
Venice island is teeming with


This sign marks off the 300-foot perimeter required for an con-
firmed Wilson's plover nest. Dredgers restocking Venice's.
beach with sand must work around the nest until the two to
three hatchlings leave about a month from now.


rare wildlife, especially birds.
A pair of bald eagles is nesting
in a radio tower at the airport,
there's at least one pair of
nesting Wilson's plovers, a
pair of SnoWvy plovers and
scrub jays.
Lots of scrub jays.
Venice resident Ellen King
just submitted her report to


Sarasota County after moni-
toring and counting the en-
dangered Florida scrub jays
for nearly a full year, from
May 2004 through this Feb-
ruary. The census numbers
will help form a proposed
scrub jay habitat protection

Please see THRIVE, 6A


FCAT writing: Disaggregating the data Bank robber arrested


Now that the scores are in, what does it all mean?
School districts have experts to help them inter-
pret the'data and develop and implement appro-
priate changes in their curriculum.


BY GREG GILES'
STAFF WRITER


Cross w(
Get fitter fast
varying your t

DE1TEI 13A
Helen Hill
Diane Nichols
Robert Opsatnick
Kim Pluchino

COMOMS
A Barber Plus
Christies Hearing....
CoCo's Cones
Durango

Bob's Carpet Mart
Sun Coast Health


It will take weeks, if not
months, to analyze data re-
B =-a leased onWednesday for 2005
FCAT writing scores and give
)rds it meaning, say school offi-
cials.
rr by District and school level
raining. educators are poring over the'
scores to see where they
improved and where educa-
tors need to focus their ener-,
Marvin Schlatter gies.
Kenneth Snyder In addition to FCAT writing
scores, reading, math and sci-
ence scores are scheduled to
be released in the coming
weeks. To prepare for the data
overload, the district employs
SA a small army of analysts who
................. 98 methodically- disaggregate
11B information to pinpoint
9B strengths, weakness and sta-
tistical anomalies within dif-
ferent student demographic
population, including race,
sex, ESE (special education)


and ESOL (those whose pri-
mary language is other than
English):
Leading the team of dis-
trict disaggregators is Terry
Schamberger, student assess-
ment supervisor for Sarasota
County School District.
"We get the raw data at the
same time as the public, so
we haven't run all the infor-
mation through our various'
programs and analysis," said
Schamberger.
He estimates it will take a
month.to put the information
into a usable format for par-
ents, citizens and educators,
alike.
"This first go-round of tests
includes all students tested. It
has little relation to the infor-
mation that will ultimately be
utilized under federal No
Child Left Behind guidelines
to determine whether schools
are making adequate yearly
progress," Schamberger said.
Schamberger said he won't


receive the data disks until
late May. Final school grades
for each student arrive in the
district office the first or sec-
ond week of June. Only then
will Schamberger's team be
able to merge test scores with
demographics files and com-
plete the final data analysis.
Massaging data
Massaging the data begins
with matching FCAT writing
tests received from the state
with student identification
records at the district office.
Schamberger said up to 2,000
test identification numbers
typically will not match with
the correct student name,
either because the wrong
identification number was
entered into the database, or
for another reason. District
administrators will manually
add, those scores into the
database.
. Also, AYP requirements
only accept test data from
students who physically at-
tended school on predeter-
mined head count dates.
Those student records will
have to be separated out from
others when it comes to pro-
Please see FCAT, 6A


Fingerprints and a Kansas City Royals baseball
cap led to the man suspected of robbing banks in
Sarasota and Venice.


BY TOMMY MCINTYRE
STAFF WRITER

Venice Police Detective
Eric Hill said it best.
"We got our guy," Hill said,
"it's him."
The "guy" is alleged bank
robber James E. Garvey, 47,
1900 block Rita St., Sarasota.
Garvey is accused of robbing
Bank One, 1320 E.Venice Ave.,
April 1.
He is being held in the
North County Jail without
bond.
Garvey was arrested Friday
about 2 p.m. just north of the
Sarasota Square Mall. He is
charged by Venice police with
bank robbery and planting a
hoax bomb.
"This is a good example of
how a bunch of law enforce-,
ment agencies can work to-
gether," Hill said. "We couldn't
have done it without each
other."
Deputies from Sarasota
and Hillsborough counties,
Punta Gorda Police Depart-
ment and Sebring Police De-


apartment participated in the
investigation. Special agents
from the Federal Bureau of
Investigation also were in-
volved, Hill said.
Charges also are pending
against Garvey in connection
with the bank robbery of the
Flagship National Bank, Sara-
sota, April 15, and the South-
Trust Bank, on Taylor Street,
Punta Gorda.
Likes collecting
baseball caps
Nobody ever accused bank
robbers ofbeing smart. If they
were, they would not rob
banks.
But you would think one'
would be smart enough to (a)
not wear a baseball cap with a
well-known team logo on it
while he robbed a bank, and
(b) if he did, to ditch it when
he got away.
I "He was wearing the same
(KC Royals) hat for ours (Bank
One) and at least one more,"
Hill said. "He had more base-
ball caps with team logos he
Please see ROBBER, 7A


Good morning, Gondolier
Sun subscriber,
LISA MAASS
~ I "4


FSo 1 SKEi ilM.: OU ROWUSACIOW ALSO IN THIS EDITION 11
SBOBVEDDER .. . 11A LOTTO. ; .:...::,. ., OOSSV ORb :.' ". :... 11B,, PHOTOES5Y . 14B CLASSIFIED
CDRATES . . ..14A OPINION ..' ... A -.-. IA'CQFEE BREAK-.... .. 2B SENIOR SCENE ... .. .6B COMICS .
CRIME STOPPERS .. 13A POLICE BEAT .... 13A DEAR ABBY .'. ... ..... B. TRAVEL. .: . . .. 8B COUPONS
mm LEGALS ... 10A SPORTS .'.' ... .dA FRESHAIR..... ., .5B VENUE . . 38 TVBOOK l
LET'EM HAVE IT ., 12A WEATHER .. ...- 7A GREEN SHEET .... 9B WELL BEING . .. 4B USAWEEKEND .
s ', .. . .-. ,,- ,. . ..


ramE


THIS,
Z-01TION













New scrub jay habitats identified in North Port


On new county maps more land appears
to be potential scrub-jay habitat, which makes
building on it less certain.


BY GEORGE MCGINN
STAFF WRITER

When Sarasota County
recently updated its GIS maps,
local real estate professionals
and property owners saw red
literally.
The updated maps show
expanded locations of Florida
scrub-jay habitats, and from
looking at the map, almost 40
percent of North Port appears
to be scrub-jay habitat.
However, according to a
county official, it is habitat on
the ground and occupation
or use by scrub jays that de-
termines .which regulations
apply. The GIS map doesn't,
said Amy Meese, manager of
Sarasota County's Natural
Resources Resource Protec-
tion.
"The map is an informa-
tional guide to areas amen-
able as habitat, not a defini-
tive identifier of where scrub
jays are. Please note also that
the map isn't accurate at the
parcel level of detail. It is
provided as an informational
layer based on ground-level
field work for primary habi-
tat in red, and a mathemati-
cal buffer in yellow," Meese
said.
Public demand
According to Meese, as part
of developing the county's
Habitat Conservation Plan for
the Florida scrub jay, the
county conducted a supple-
mental scrub-jay survey and
habitat. assessment to verify
and update the data from
2000. The 2004 data indicated
a 22 percent'decline in the
total number of scrub jays.
The habitat assessment con-
firmed already-mapped habi-
tat areas as well as some earli-
er unmapped areas.. i, :
North Port was one of the
previously unmapped-areas.
"The updated maps ,are
designed to meet the public
demand for information to
avoid surprises previously
encountered during develop-
ment review," Meese said.
However, biologist Con-
stance L. Cassler of the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
wrote in an e-mail statement
that "the Fish and Wildlife
Service were unaware that
any modification to the
existing maps was going to
occur, and we are currently
working with the county
(Sarasota) to be brought up
to speed on the reasons for
the changes."
Signs of habitat,
The first indication people
will have is typical scrub oak
vegetation, which consists of
any or all the following: sand
live oak, Chapman's oak, myr-
tle oak and scrub oak.
"If you require greater cer-
tainty, you can request an
environmental consultant
conduct a site visit to give you
a preliminary assessment,"


$500,00(

$400,00(


$300,000

$200,000

S$ $100,000
$50,000








t..Unibed Way
United Way of South County
Serving the People of Venice,
g Englewood, North Port, Nokomis,
Osprey and Laurel


Meese said. "They will charge
you a nominal fee. If you want
to know if your property is
used by the Florida scrub jay,
the consultant could conduct
a survey but they will charge
you a fee and, even if a scrub-
jay survey is done on the site,
the survey is only valid for one
year."
While lots with scrub vege-
tation or scrub jays must be
evaluated by the USFWS,
the agency has stated "from
the federal-permitting stand-
point, all lots remain poten-
tially buildable, and the Fish
and Wildlife Service remains
dedicated to working with
others, throughout the per-
mitting process, to conserve
and protect species."
According to Meese, pri-
mary habitat is of better qual-
ity relative to the needs and
preferences of the Florida
scrub jay and is therefore,
more likely to be utilized by
the jays. However, not all
red-zone properties will be
occupied by scrub jays.
Mitigation process
Mitigation fees are de-
signed to compensate for
impacts to protected species
and provide revenue for a
governmental agency to ac-
quire and manage replace-
ment habitat for the benefit
of the species an applicant
will impact. Mitigation is
worked out on a case-by-case
basis with the USFWS based
upon their use of a matrix
that includes:
Quality of the habitat to
be affected.
Importance of the lot rel-
ative to the territory of a
scrub-jay flock.
Area of impact.
Property value.
According to Nleese, the


", : : a *
SUN PHOTO BY GEORGE MCGINN
Colorful and unique, the Florida scrub jay is protected under both state and federal laws. Its presence on land targeted for devel-
opment can derail construction plans. .


red zones are areas where the
scrub jay is more likely to oc-
cur and yellow zones where
the scrub jay may occur but
is less likely to be found. Only
those properties "actually oc-
cupied by scrub jay" require
mitigation and a federal per-
mit.
Uncommitted
Currently the USFWS says
the mitigation process can
take from six to 24 months,


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699 S, Indiana Avenue 700 US 41
Englewood, FL Venice, FL
941-474-3271 941-488-6
Member SIPC 2004 A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc.


north
H N. Bypass
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4242 S: Tamiami Trail
Venice, FL
941-408-8797.


with six to 12 months being
more typical. So Sarasota
County is developing a
Habitat Conservation 'Plan
for the Florida scrub jay and
intends to submit an applica-
tion for a federal permit to
address the protection re-
quirements of the Endan-
gered Species Act on a coun-
ty-wide level.
"If the HCP and the
Incidental Take Permit for
Sarasota County are apz-,


proved, the time frame will
be reduced to however long
it takes for a project to com-
plete its development review,
typically a matter of weeks,"
Meese said.
North Port has been invit-
ed to participate in the HCP
but it hasn't yet committed
to participate in the plan, so
Meese couldn't speak about
the process within the munic-
ipalities.
In an e-mail from Nleese


to County Administrator Jim
Ley, Meese said, "the service
is looking to schedule joint
meetings with the county
and both the city of North
Port and the city of Venice
regarding HCP participation
and the requirements/what
the cities could bring to the
table."

You can e-mail George'
A cGinn at: gmcginn@
siun-herald.com. .


Sarasta Cunty Government]a


County Calendar
* Board of Zoning Appeals May.2, 7
p.m., Sarasota County Administration
Center, Commission Chamber, First Floor,
1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call 861-
6086
* Cititzens Advisory Committee for
Public Transportion May 2, 4 p.m.,
Administration Center, First Floor, Training
Room, Review of Transit Development
Plan (TDP), 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Call 861-1003.
* Environmentally Sensitive Lands
Oversight Committee May 5, 2:30
p.m, Woodmere Park, Conference Room
C, 3951 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice.
Call 861-6230.
* Mechanical Contractors Licensing &
Examining Board May 5, 3 p.m.,
Development Services, Building A,
Conference Room, 1301 Cattlemen Road,
Sarasota., Call 861-6126.
* Nominating and Membership
Committee of the Community Alliance
of Sarasota County May 3, 9 a.m.,
Sarasota County Health Department, Room
2063, 2200 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. 861-
2561.
* Planning and Outcomes Work Group
of the Community Alliance of Sarasota
County May 6, 2 p.m., Sarasota County
Health Department, Room 2063, 2200
Ringling 31vd, Sarasota. 861-2561.
' Planning Commission May 5, 6:30
p.m., Administration Center, First Floor,
Commission Chamber, 1660 Ringling Blvd.,
Sarasota. Call 861-6666.
* Sarasota Tree Executive Council -
May 5, 12:15 p.m., Law Office of Nelson,
Hesse, 2070 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. Call
861-0844.
* SCAT Routes 5, 6, 15 and 17 Pro-
posed Changes in the Gulf Gate and
Westfield Sarasota Mall Areas May 4,
4 p.m., Gulf Gate Public Library, 7112
Curs Avenue, Sarasota. Call 861-0927.
* Seniors Advisory Council Meeting -
May 5,3 p.m., Center for Healthy Aging,
,First Floor, Conference Room, 1900
Brother Geenen Way, Sarasota. Call 861-
2564.
* Tourist Development Council Grant
Panel May 2, 9 a.m., The Arts Council,
First FloorConference Room, 1226 North
Tamiami Trail, Sarasota. Call 365-5118.
* Water and Sewer Advisory
Committee May 5, 9 a.m., Bee Ridge
Water Reclamation Facilities, 4001 lona,
Road, Sarasota. Call 861-0574.




SartaCountr


Planning Commission Comprehensive

Plan public hearings scheduled for May
The Sarasota County Planning Commission will hold a
series of public hearings during May and June to receive
input on the draft updates to the Comprehensive Plan. The
following hearings are scheduled in May. All hearings start
at 6 p.m.
Intro, overview for EAR-based Comprehensive Plan
amendments; Historic Preservation Chapter; Public
Buildings and Related Facilities Chapter
6 p.m., Wednesday, May 11; Robert L. Anderson
Administration Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice.
Capital Improvements Chapter; Intergovernmental
Coordination and Citizen Participation Chapter;
Recreation and Open Space Chapter
6 p.m., Thursday, May 12, Sarasota County Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Watershed Management Chapter (formerly Public
Facilities Chapter); Environment Chapter
6 p.m., Wednesday, May 18, Sarasota County
Administration Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Transportation Chapter
6 p.m., Wednesday, May 25, Robert L. Anderson
Administration Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail, Venice.
Transportation Chapter; Economy Chapter
6 p.m., Thursday, May 26, Sarasota County Administration
Center, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.


Advisory Council Vacancies
CLOSING DATE: May 11,2005
Advisory Board: Emergency Medical Services Advisory Board
Advisory Board: Fire and Rescue Advisory Board
Information: Karen Beisler, Emergency Services Business
Center, 861-5473.
CLOSING DATE: May 13.2005
Advisory Board: Building Code Board of Adjustments & Appeals
Information: Planning and Development Services Business Center
(PDSBC),
Cheryl Swenney, 861-6637.
CLOSING DATE -July 16. 2005
Advisory Board: General Contractors Licensing & Examing
Board
Advisory Board: Mechanical Contractors Licensing & Examing
Board
Information: Kim Kintz, Planning & Development Services,
861-6126.

This listing is published weekly by Sarasota County Government Public
Communications. Board of County Commission agendas are available at
www.scgov.net; to subscribe to agenda via e-mail, at scgov.net click "The Sarasota
Weekly Calendar" under Links and subscribe. For more information, call (941)
861-5900.


AG Edwards Smitl
Bank One Soutl
Bank of Venice Sun I
Boone, Boone, Boone Targe
Koda & Frook TJX(
Bradway and Assoc. Venic
Caldwell Trust Wach
Colonial Bank Wal-I
Crane Environmental Wate
Crow's Nest / Bogey's SRQ
First National Bank SRQ
FPL SRQ
Harbor Chase SRQ
Jacaranda Trace SRQ
MCC SRQ
Merrill.Lynch City4
Northern Trust City
Publix
Raymond James
Robert's Nationwide Insurance
Sarasota Herald Tribune


h Barney
h Trust
Trust
et
Companies
ce Gondolier Sun
hovia Bank
Mart
erford
Clerk
Comm.
Schools
Sheriff
Tax As .
Tax Coll.
of Venice
of N. Port


Business Campaigns


CONTACT
United Way of South Sarasota County, Inc.
7810 S. Tamiami Trail, #A4, Venice, FL 34293
Ph: (941) 408-0595 Fax: (941) 408-8795
Email: uw.ssc@verizon.net


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


2A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN






VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 3A


County tepid on expanding, g public art program



County tepid on expanding public art program


The Sarasota County Arts Council wants
private developers to pay for sculpture and
other displays, and Sarasota County politicians
Warn the arts community to play a lead role
in selling the idea.


BYJACK GURNEY '
PELICAN PRESS


Any initiative to further
shake up Sarasota County's
public arts program by requir-
ing developers of privately
financed commercial build-
ings to pay for sculpture,
murals and other works will
have to come directly out of
the arts community.
On Tuesday,, the county
commission gave the concept
a tepid endorsement, and
stopped short of playing a
lead role.
"This is going to get every-


one livid," commissioner
Nora Patterson said. "One
developer asked me 'What
else do you want us to pay
for?' This is
not good tim-
ing."
In recent
years, the
county has -
spent about
$500,000 from i
its capital pro-
ject budget to
purchase art Patterson
pieces for dis-
play at new public buildings,
such as branch libraries,


courthouses, administration
centers and
other govern-
ment facili-
ties. But pri-
vate develop-
ers don't have
to.
"This issue
was brought
to me by arts
Thaxton advocates,"
said commis-
sioner Jon Thaxton. "The
county program has been fab-
ulously successful; I'd like to
see .our staff research extend-
ing arts in public places into
private buildings. Other com-
munities do it."
Commissioner David Mills
agreed.
"I thought we already had
this," he said. "The city of
Sarasota has a public-private
requirement, and I think it
tremendously adds to the


community. I was recently in
Philadelphia,
where art i's
displayed
all over the
downtown
area.
The formula
In fact, the
city of Sara-
sota requires Mills
private-sector
developers to display art
works in an overlay zone
known as the Community
Redevelopment Area. But the
additional cost for sculpture
and other works is not im-
posed on all city developers.
Commissioner Shannon
Staub put a damper on. the
suggestion.
"I will have to vote against
this," she said. "It would be
very time consuming and we
only have so many people,


on staff. This should be initi-
ated by the Sarasota County
Arts Council."
The county recently
changed its funding formula
for public art
purchases so
enou gh
money is gen-
erated for dis-
playing pieces
at both exist-
ing public
buildings and
new ones. It
had previous- Staub
ly been 1 per-
cent of the budget for new
buildings only.
Under the current policy,
.85 of 1 percent of the capital
budget for construction pro-
jects is set aside for art, with 75
percent of the money for new
projects and 25 percent for
existing buildings. The maxi-
mum that can be spent at any


one building is $300,000.
In addition to approving a
new funding formula, the
county commission recently
endorsed the purchase of
existing sculpture and other
art items rather than just
new pieces for display at
both new and existing govern-
ment facilities.
A volunteer Committee for
Art in Public Places that over-
sees the selection process pre-
viously limited its choices to
new pieces. The tedious proc-
ess required a call to thou-
sands of artists on an ap-
proved list and interviews with
finalists.
The commission's new di-
rection was directly influ-
enced by the Sarasota Season
of Sculpture public display
along the Sarasota bayfront
in downtown Sarasota, which
is modeled on the much larg-
er Pier Walk in Chicago.


Correction
In the city-provided photo of
employees' children who ac-
companied their parents to
work Thursday, the' name of
Jordan Keefe, son of Executive
Assistant Raeanne Keefe, city
manager's 'office, who was in
the back row at right, was
omitted.




A division of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.,
publishers of the Sun Herald Newspapers


PUBLIC MEETINGS


City of Venice meeting
times, dates and locations
are subject to change.
If you are disabled and
need assistance,. please
contact the city clerk's office
at least 24 hours prior to
the meeting by calling 486-
2626.
Many of these meetings
post their agendas online at
venicegov.com under the
public meetings link.


MAY
May 3
* Planning Commission, 1:30
p.m., council chambers, city
hall
May 5
* Municipal Code Enforce-
ment Board, 9 a.m., council
chambers, city hall
May 6
* Hurricane Seminar, 8 a.m.,
council chambers, city hall


May10
* City council, 1:30 p.m.,
council chambers, city hall
* Envision Venice Scoping
Meeting, 10 a.m., community
hall, city hall
May11
* Airport Advisory Board, 2
p.m., council chambers, city
hall
May 12
* Architectural Review Board,'
9 a.m., council chambers, city
hall
S* Envision Venice Open
House, 4 p.m., community


hall, city hall
May16
,* Parks and Recreation Ad-
visory Board, 3 p.m., council
chambers, city hall
May 17
* Planning Commission, 1:30
p.m., council chambers, city
hall
* Hurricane Seminar for
Small Businesses, 6 p.m.,
council chambers, city hall
May 18
* Committee on Senior Liv-
ing, 9:30 a.m., council cham-
bers, city hall


May 19
* Hurricane Seminar for Small
Businesses, 6 p.m., council
chambers, city hall
May24
* City council, 1:30 p.m.,
council chambers, city hall
May 25
* Venice Historical Com-
mission, 9 a.m., council
chambers, city hall
* Youth Advisory Board, 4
p.m., council chambers, city
hall
* Accessibility Advisory Com-
mittee, 7 p.m., council cham-
bers, city hall


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DIRECT PHONE NUMBERS:
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Circulation 207-1300
Advertising 207-1220 Classified 207-1200
Editorial/Welcome Home/Newsroom Fax 484-8460
Classified/Advertising Fax 485-3036
Toll Free 1-866-357-6204 Sunline Internet Services 888-512-6100
Community Web Site http://www.venicegondolier.com
DayStar Communications 207-7800
0 Publisher: Robert A. Vedder, Editor: Bob Mudge
President: Derek Dunn-Rankin


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USPS (221-700) ISSN (1536-1063)
The VENICE GONDOLIER SUN, an edition of The Sun, is published
every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday by The Sun.
200 East Venice Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285.
Periodicals Postage paid at Venice, Florida and additional mailing centers.


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US NDAY MAY 1 2005


J







SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


4A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


Planning commission considers its first variance


Last week council officially dissolved the Board of
Zoning Appeals because of too few variance
requests, and planning commission already has a
case.


BYJJ. ANDREWS
ASSISTANT EDITOR

A lack of variance requests
caused the Venice Board of
Zoning Appeals to go nearly a
year without ever holding a
meeting.
Oddly enough, not even a
full week after the board was
disbanded by city council and
its duties shifted to the Venice


Planning Commission, a vari-
ance petition already is on the
agenda.
Public outcry and ques-
tioning of planning commis-
sion decisions most likely will
not happen with this request
to be heard at 1:30 p.m.
Tuesday. A mobile home
owner is asking for a few extra
feet so he can build a utility
room.


The property is located in
the Harbor Lights Mobile
Home Park, 19 Port Drive, just
north of the Hatchett Creek
bridge. Glen Ballinger is ask-
ing for a variance to add a
utility room to the front of an
existing manufactured home.
Code requires a 10-foot
setback in the front yard for
mobile homes and other
structures, and a separation
of 10 feet between structures.
The applicant is requesting
that he be permitted to
reduce the required front set-
back from 10 feet to 3 feet, 7
inches, and also that the
required separation from the


subject property to the adja-
cent structure be reduced
from 10 feet to 9 feet, 8 inches.
The variance request will
not further reduce the front
setback of the current struc-
ture that is within 3 feet, 5
inches, of the edge of pave-
ment, according to the staff
overview.
Also on the agenda
East Gate Park The
city wants to rezone this exist-
*ing park from residential,
multi-family to government
use. East Gate Park at the
intersections of Poplar
Avenue, Cherry Street and


East Gate Drive and is about
0.33 acres. The city acquired
the property in June 1956 as
part of the final plat for the
East Gate subdivision. In the
mid 1960s, the area was
established as a walk-to park
with no parking areas. The
park has a playground, picnic
shelter with picnic tables, a
bike rack and a drinking
fountain and is a dedicated
park on the Venice Master
Park Plan.
Venetian Golf & River
Club Site and develop-
ment plan approval is sought
for the more than 25,000-
square-foot golf club facility


for Venetian Golf & River'
Club. This will be a two-story
building with snack bar, lock-
er rooms, offices, pro shop,
golf cart storage, indoor din-,
ing area and open-patio din-
ing area. The 7,000-square-
foot golf cart storage area also
is designed to serve as a hurri-
cane shelter, as previously
required by the city.
The staff report concludes
the proposal matches all re-
quirements, and recom-
mends approval without any
conditions.

You can e-mail J.j
Andrews at: jandrews


County seeks second ENERGY STAR rating


Upgrades to the Criminal Justice Center could
qualify it for the federal government's energy effi-
ciency award; the Sarasota County Judicial Center
already has the rating.


STAFF REPORT


With the emphasis on sus-
tainability and environmen-
tal responsibility, Sarasota
County is pursuing ENERGY
STAR status for the Criminal
Justice Center at 2701 Ring-
ling Blvd. in downtown Sara-
sota.
A -retrofit to bring the
building into compliance
with the program's strict re-
quirements is currently under
way said Gary Patton, the
county's energy coordinator.
Patton expects to have the
retrofit completed by the end
of the year, making the
Criminal Justice Building one
of only 27 ENERGY STAR-
rated buildings in all of
Florida, and one of only 2,009
in the entire United States.
"The ENERGY STAR label
has become the national
symbol for energy efficiency,"
Patton said. "Receiving it
demonstrates to the county


and public that we are good
stewards of taxpayers' mon-
ey."
ENERGY STAR is a pro-
gram developed by the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency and Department of
Energy to help businesses
and individuals protect the
environment through superi-
or energy efficiency. Accord-
ing to the program's literature,
Americans adhering to its
standards have saved enough
energy to power 24 million
homes and avoid greenhouse
emissions equivalent to that
created by 20 million cars
since the program was creat-
ed in 1992.
Second place
The Criminal Justice Cen-
ter will be the second build-
ing in Sarasota to earn an
ENERGY STAR rating.
The Sarasota County Ju-
dicial Center at 2002 Ringling
Blvd. became the first in


November 2003, when it
scored 83 out of a possible
100 points, placing it in the
top 20 percent of the most
efficient buildings in the
United States. It is currently
one of four, government
buildings in Florida to be
rated by ENERGY STAR. The
only other one in the Tampa
Bay area is the Hillsborough
County Water Department
Administration Building in
Tampa.
To be eligible for the rating,
the county is upgrading the
ventilation system in the
Criminal Justice Center to
bring outside air into the
building and improve humid-
ity control, and installing a
system that will allow the
facility to create heat and hot
water generated by reclaimed
waste heat. The upgrade will
bring the facility up to current
indoor environmental stan-
dards and surpass conditions
in most public and private
buildings.
Because they are rated on
their ability to meet ENERGY
STAR requirements in energy
performance, physical and
operating characteristics, and
current indoor environmen-


tal standards, ENERGY STAR
buildings are generally 40
percent more efficient. En-
ergy savings at the Judicial
Center alone amount to
$54,000 a year. Seven other
county facilities have re-
ceived ENERGY STAR-rated
roofs, reducing air condition-
ing costs by a total of $70,000.
ENERGY STAR-rated com-
puters and monitors are sav-
ing the county an estimated
$86,000 annually.
Pioneer
Sarasota County has been
a pioneer in environmentally
friendly construction, joining
the Florida Green Building
Coalition in 2000, and making
sustainability and energy effi-
ciency public policy in 2002,
when county commissioners
approved a plan requiring all
existing public facilities to
meet the highest level of high-
performance building certifi-
cation feasible.
The policy requires any new
facility to incorporate Leader-
ship in Energy and Environ-
mental Design standards, as
set forth by die U.S. Green
Building Council, into the..
planning and construction.


CI NOTES
ARB standards
being loosened
Architecture Review Board
members have endorsed
loosening rules that govern
building appearance in
themed districts.
At least a little bit.
The "trigger" that forces an
existing structure to come
into appearance standards
will be increasing from $2,500
to $7,500. ARB members en-
dorsed the proposal at this
past week's meeting.
Complaints had come in
that even basic, minimal ren-
ovations in either the Historic
Venice or Venetian theme dis-
tricts triggered the standards,
requiring major overhauls.
Raising the amount by $5,000
should allow someone to
repair or replace doors and
windows without having to
renovate an entire building.
The Venice Planning Com-
mission must hear the pro-
posal before it reaches coun-
cil. An agenda date has not
been set.
Venice holds
humcane seminar
The city of Venice will host
, a hur-icaneinformation sem-
inar from 8 to 11 a.m. Friday,


SMay 6, in council chambers at
Venice City Hall, 401 W. Ven-
ice Ave.
ABC Channel 7 Meteor-
ologist Bob Harrigan will
speak about what everyone
can do o prepare for hurri-
canes. Hurricane season be-
gins June 1.
Other speakers include
Venice Fire Chief Mike John-
son, City Engineer Nancy
Woodley, Building and Code
Enforcement Director Hans
Behrens, American Red Cross
Director .of Community Edu-
cation Cindy Desmond and
Sarasota County Emergency
Management Director Gregg
Feagans.
Johnson will speak about
the city's hurricane response
program. Woodley will ad-
dress flood mitigation and
stormwater management., ;
Desmond will describe the
Red Cross shelter program.
Behrens will discuss building
codes and the permit process.
Feagans will provide informa-
tion about the county's emer-
gency planning.
The event is free of charge i'
and open to everyone. Res-
ervations are not necessary.
Refreshments will be served'
Please see CITY, 7A
^ ^ ":


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 5A


I IMIDAV YMAY 1 200


Friend backs dog breeder



in criminal theft case


A man who has owned two of her dogs
said Sue Modlin has an impeccable
reputation as a breeder..


BY TOMMY MCINTYRE
STAFFWRITER

A trial date is expected in
the case of aVenice dog breed-
er charged with stealing a
dog friends say she merely
"repossessed."
"She did not steal the dog,
she repossessed her property,"
friend Pat Sisbaro said. "Just
like anything else you don't
pay for it, it gets repossessed.
She got a raw deal."
Maureen E. "Sue" Modlin,
54, was charged with grand
theft after a buyer of one of her
dogs claimed Modlin dog-
napped his Golden Retriever
named "Zepplin."
Modlin entered a not-guilty
plea March 15. A case man-
agement hearing is scheduled
for May 25.
Modlin's attorney, Matthew
Rheingans, could not be
reached for comment.
Sisbaro said Modlin has
an excellent reputation as a
breeder, a person and an ani-
mal lover.
"She would not do any-
thing to jeopardize her busi-
ness or, let's face it, her life,"
Sisbaro said, "because her


dogs are her life."
What happened
According to the police
report, Timothy D. Thomas, of
Sarasota, told authorities he
bought the Golden Retriever
puppy "Zepplin" from Modlin
in June 2002.
He stated he paid Modlin
$100 down and made ad-
ditional payments in the
amount of $200.
Modlin agreed to let Thom-
as power wash her home as
payment for the remaining
$100.
Thomas admitted he never
did the power wash. He also
said that in repeated contacts
with Modlin, she never told
him to complete the work or
return the dog.
"She said she had tried to
contact him numerous times
about payment," Sisbaro said,
"but he never had money."
According to the statement,
Modlin finally got in touch
with Thomas and asked if he
would let Zepplin come over
to her house and play with
the other dogs.
Thomas agreed but several
days later when he tried to


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get the dog back,, he
unable to reach Modlin.


was


Dead or alive?
Weeks later, Thomas talked
to Modlin.
She told him that Zepplin
was killed by a car.
"I think the dog is still
alive," assistant state attorney
Jason Kelly said recently.
Sisbaro said as far as he
knows, the dog is alive and
living with a family.
"I think she made a mistake
lying about it," he said, "but
she did what I would have
done, I don't think I would
have told him anything dif-
ferent."
Sisbaro said Thomas could
not afford to keep the dog
and the animal's living condi-
tions with him were "not satis-
factory."
He said the dog suffered
because of improper care.
"The dog ended up with
mange from the neck over the
face and down back of his
neck," Sisbaro said. "She's
adamant about not giving this
dog back to this guy because
he can't take care of it."
Sisbaro said he has had two
dogs from Modlin.
"Her reputation is so
good," Sisbaro said, "that
future litters, dogs that are
not even born yet, are sold."


Sharky's co-owner


arrested for DUI


BYTOMMYMCINTYRE
STAFF WRITER


Sharky's restaurant owner
Mike Pachota was arrested
last month for drunk driving.
According to a Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office arrest
card, Pachota, 52, 200 block
The Esplanade, was arrested
at 2:09 a.m., April 21, and
charged with DUI with a pre-
vious conviction and DUI .20
or higher.
He was released on $2,500
bond.
Pachota was arrested at
Lakewood Ranch Boulevard
and East Professional Park-
way.
The DUI arrest report states
that Pachota's Ford van was
stopped "headed southbound
in the northbound lane of
travel on Lakewood Ranch
Boulevard."
The reportt further states
that the front passenger-side
tire was gone and the van
rested with the right front on
the grass and the rest of the
vehicle in the roadway.
The deputy stated that the
front rim of the vehicle ap-


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peared to be shredded and
the metal torn off. He also
wrote that there was a can of
Miller Lite beer on the road
under the driver's door.
'In trouble'
When deputies stopped
Pachota, according to the re-
port, he had bloodshot eyes,
slurred speech, strong odor of
alcohol, inability to maintain
his balance.
"The defendant had almost
fell (sic) as he attempted to
walk," one deputy wrote in the
report.
Pachota told the deputies
he felt he was in trouble for
being drunk.
He said he had two beers
as he drove to Tampa, several
drinks at the Hardrock Casino,
and two more beers since
leaving Tampa.
When it came time for
deputies to give Pachota the
"one-leg stand" part of the
field sobriety test, "The de-
fendant stated that he was
to (sic) intoxicated to per-
form this test," the report
states.
According to the officers'


report, Pachota was coopera-
tive.
Pachota was taken to the
North County Jail where he
registered a .217 on the
breathalyzer.
Impairment is .08 or above.
Robert Harrison, Pachota's
attorney,
would not
comment on.
Pachotin five Pachoa's
case.
Speaking
general y,
ly mean five years," Harrisonsaid
a second DUI
conviction
within five Pachota
outside of the five years means
a five-year driver license revo-
cation.
"The five years doesn't real-
ly mean five years," Harrison
said. "Sometimes you can get
a hardship license after one
year."
A second DUI conviction
outside of the five years means
a revocation of between six
months and one year.
You can e-mail Tommy
McIntyre at: tmcintyre@
venicegondoliercom.


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6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005


THRIVE from page 1A


plan county officials hope will
save the bird that's slowly dis-
appearing from existence.
At least, disappearing every-
where except Venice island.
King monitored from Airport
Avenue south, which runs
along Harbor Drive to Cas-
persen Beach Park, and found
37 scrub jays making up 10
families.
Previous estimates had on-
ly three scrub jay families liv-
ing in this area.
The Venice resident was
unaware what her research
was for. She got involved
because it sounded like fun
and would take her mind off
of having become a widow
just six months earlier.
'Anyone who has gone
through that (losing a spouse)
knows there is a lot of trauma,
readjustment and even be-
wilderment," King said.
"When I started doing this, it
was a real restorative healing
thing."
Her year of volunteering is
up, but King plans to contin-
ue her morning and after-
noon walks to see how the
scrub jay families she's gotten
to know are doing.


"I was able to get out and
touch nature, to get back to
where green things are grow-
ing," she said. "It's how they
say, 'It's all part of God,' how-
ever you conceive of that to
be. It's essential to my con-
cept of life."
Protecting habitat
The birds nesting on the
beach create a temporary
issue, as will sea turtle nests
identified by other profes-
sionals like Taylor. Beach
renourishment workers will
have to work around and
strictly comply to state guide-
lines or else risk environmen-
tal fines.
As for scrub jays and the
county's pending habitat
plan, some people are afraid
of that ordinance's potential
impact. Developers or prop-
erty owners who want to
build a house fear they.could
suddenly lose that right.
City Manager Marty Black
supports the concept of Sara-
sota County's plan. To his
understanding, it would not
prevent construction. Rules
would have builders work
around the scrub-jay habitat,
only build during certain
times of the year or establish a


L OOK FORTHE
NEXT VENICE

CITY COUNCIL
AGENDA


IN THE VENICE

GONDOLIER ON SUNDAY
MAY 8, 2005


new scrub-jay habitat some-
where else.
A good example would be
the 125 acres of vacant Venice
Municipal Airport property
where the city hopes to one
day build a marina and busi-
ness park.
Scrub jays identified by
King as living on this land
would not preclude develop-
ment. Venice could, poten-
tially, designate and plant
scrub habitat area at the old
sewage plant that's about to
become a park;' that would
allow construction at the air-
port.
In order to protect the
birds, Venice needs to sign an
interlocal agreement with
Sarasota County once the
protection plan is approved
by commissioners, much like
Venice will do with the mana-
tee habitat protection plan,
Black said.
"Unfortunately, these spe-
cies do not recognize jurisdic-
tional boundaries," Black said
with a smile. "These animals
will not stop at the city line, so
we do need to support these
efforts."
You can e-mail J.J.
Andrews at: jandrews ,
@venicegondolier.com.


S *

Stop Smoking Reduce
Control: Stress Anxiety
Feqrs Phobias Insomi
Call Venic 492-41 1


FCAT from page 1 A


during AYP reports for each
school. Once that's done, the
data are downloaded into a
program that creates Edu-
cation Quality Improvement
Profiles reports sorting scores
by population, race, ESE and
ESOL populations that show
how well students in each
school performed.
Schools use the informa-
tion to develop improvement
plans for next year.
For the last two years the
district has employed data
coaches at the school level,
often the part-time duty of a
school educator, to help
schools use the information
constructively.
The primary role of a data
coach is to assist administra-
tors and teachers. They meet
in small groups to dig deeper
into the data, and look at
Sunshine State Standards to
see where students are having
difficulties, Schamberger
said.
A critical tool at the school
level is a computer program
called Test Tracker. It gives
educators the ability to review
test data classroom-by-class-
room, and help pinpoint
where a problem may exist.
Preliminary results
In the meantime, the dis-
trict is celebrating prelimi-





4 BILL BAUERS. C.H.


nary results that show a "tre-
mendous" increase in per-
formance by fourth-graders
districtwide.
The percent of fourth-
grade students who scored at
4 or above (scale of 1-6) was
12 percent higher than last
year.
"We were well ahead of the
state's averages," said Scham-
berger. "It has a lot to do with
what's happening in the
classroom and instruction
those students have been re-
ceiving."
Sarasota County' School
District fourth-graders tied
for the number one spot with
Martin County, with a district
mean writing score of 4, up
from 3.6 in 2001. The percent-
age of fourth-graders who
scored above the minimal
competency (3 or above)
increased from 87 percent in
2001 to 91 percent in 2005.
While eighth-grade writing
scores stayed at the same
level as last year, the percent
who scored 3 or above in-
creased 3 percent. But the dis-
trict mean score is still below


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that of eighth-graders from
2001-03.
Tenth-graders earned high-
er writing scores on average
(3.9) than last year (3.8) or the
year before (3.7), but not as
high as in 2001 (4.0) or 2002
(4.0).
Was an increase in scores
due to a change in focus or
programs at the district level
or school level? An emphasis
on reading? Teacher training
programs?
Could a change in scores in
a school be the result of a
handful of experienced
teachers in the math depart-,
ment retiring? Or an influx of
students for whom English is
a second language? Or simply
a smarter group of students
passing through the eighth-
grade?
These and many other
questions will be addressed
by educators over the coming
months as FCAT and other
school test results trickle in.

You can e-mail Greg Giles
at: ggiles
@venicegondolier.com.


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6A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN









SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


SARASOTA COUNTY BRIEFS


Water conservation
efforts recognized
When the Sarasota County
commissioners declared April
as Water Conservation Month
last Tuesday, they recognized
two local citizens for out-
standing efforts in conserving
water.
Through partnerships with
county and regional water
managers, Venice Golf &
Country Club manager James
Schell saves about 125 million
gallons of water annually. He
spearheaded a project to col-
lect stormwater runoff from
his community and then
recycle it for irrigation. The
club also has been awarded
Audubon International certi-
fication for its golf courses
and for preserving and creat-
ing wildlife habitats while
reducing the quantity and
improving the quality of
stormwater runoff.
In Venice, Lakeside Woods
South Homeowners Associ-
ation, through the leadership
of Lamont Andrews, was in-
strumental in making chang-
es in the operation of the irri-
gation system, resulting in a
4-million-gallon reduction
annually. It achieved this by
calibrating the irrigation sys-
tern to apply a half-inch per
watering cycle, using a soil
probe to check soil moisture,
using a rain gauge to check
rainfall, and capping irriga-
tion wells. Andrews, who
became a master gardener in
2003, also volunteers his time
removing invasive exotic
plants along the Venice
Intracoastal Waterway and
other locations.
Statewide, local govern-
ments are declaring April as
Water Conservation Month.
Gov. Jeb Bush signed a state-
wide proclamation April 19 in
Tallahassee.
th.-


ROBBER frompage 1A
used for still other jobs."
Surveillance tapes from
Bank One and other banks
being robbed clearly showed
the robber wearing the team
hats.
Fingerprints are key
The robber told a Bank
One teller that he had a bomb
in a box.
No bomb was found.
On his way out of Bank
One, the robber pushed the
doors open and left investiga-
tors a present: fingerprints.
Hill said the prints imme-
diately went to Bill Dunker,
the sheriff's fingerprint ex-
pert.
Hill said they were able to
match the prints with Garvey.
Hill said the prints were not
from other bank jobs but
from different crimes Garvey
had been involved in, accord-
ing to his criminal history.
"We thought first he might
just be a customer but the
investigation showed nobody
by that name had an account
at the bank," Hill said. "That
narrowed the focus and
widened our interest in him."
The noose tightened
Hill said once they match-
ed the prints, the rest of the
puzzle began to take shape.
From various sources, they
knew where he lived and the
car he drove.
"We started concentrating
on this individual," Hill said.
"We worked with the sheriff's
office and set up a surveil-
lance north of the mall. We
hoped he'd show up."
Then shortly before the ar-
rest, deputies got a call re-
garding a disturbance at a
Siesta Key motel. Garvey's
name came up because ap-
parently the room had been
rented to or by him, according
to Hill.


Police swarmed the neigh-
borhood, but Garvey was not
there.
Deputies in the area north
of the mall recognized his car
shortly after.
They took him out at gun-
point.
Police said Garvey was un-
der the influence of drugs
when arrested.

You can e-mail Tommy
McIntyre at: tmcintyre
@venicegondolier.com.


Described videos
at Jacaranda library
Sarasota County residents
with visual impairments have
a new resource for enjoying
feature films.
The Francis T. Bourne Jaca-
randa Public Library in Venice
now has a circulating collec-
tion of "described" videos
housed in its Low Vis-
ion/Hearing Room, and will
begin showing films from the
collection at 2 p.m. on the
third Saturday of each month
in the library's meeting room.
Described videos are fea-
ture films and television pro-
grams with audio descrip-
tions of visual elements (such
as costumes, gestures, and
settings) woven into pauses
and scene breaks. They are
ideal for mixed-sighted and
low-vision audiences,
because the descriptions do
not intrude on spoken dialog.
The J4caranda library's
LowVision/Hearing room has
98 such films on VHS video-
tape,. The tapes may be
,checked out, and the follow-
ing films will be shown in May
and June in the library's meet-
ing room (all showings are at 2
p.m.):
The FrancisT. Bourne Jaca-
randa Public Library is locat-
ed at 4143 Woodmere Park
Blvd., Venice. Call 861-5000
for more information.

Volunteers needed
for bike race
The Sarasota County Parks
and Recreation Department
is looking for volunteers to
help with the Suncoast Criter-
ium bicycle race and arts and
crafts festival.


THE WEATHER


FLORIDA LOTTERY


VEIC OTOO


CTi~


Sunday
High 85, Low 69
Increasing clouds with
scattered rain.
Monday
High 86, Low 69
Mostly cloudy with
scattered rain.
Tuesday
High 87, Low 70
Sun and clouds, warm
and humid.
Wednesday
High 87, Low 69
Partly cloudy and
warm.


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs:
(Including Sarasota and Charlotte counties)
Southeast winds at 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 1 to 2 feet, light chop.
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola:
Southeast winds at 15 to 20 knots.
Seas 5 to 7 feet, choppy.


The event will take place 7
a.m.-9 p.m. May 14 on West
Venice Avenue in downtown
Venice.
Volunteers are needed dur-
ing the event in four-hour
shifts to assist with the race
course, registration and hos-
pitality. ,
ree T-shirts, food and bev-
erages are available for all vol-
unteers.
For more information, or
to volunteer, contact Jon-
athan Poyner at (941) 232-
3415 or e-mail jpoyner@scgov
.net.


High Saturday
Low Saturday
Rainfall
Total this
week 0.00
Total this
year 9.55
Normal
YTD 9.38
Rainfall totals
are for a 24-
hourperiod


Nomnal
for
May




May
rain
00.00


Sunrise/set


Tonight's sunset-
Tomorrow's sunrise
Moonrise/set
Moonrise
Moonset


8:03 p.m.
6:50 a.m.

2:41' a.m.
1:32 p.m.


DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME
DATE HIGH HIGH LOW LOW
A.M. P.M. A.M. P.M.
SUN 1 ----- 6:06 2:03 -----
MON 2 10:20 7:48 3:03 2:30
TUE 3 10:27 9:23 3:51 3:58
WED 4 10:41 10:41 4:30 5:03
*STRONG TIDE
a-A.M. p-P.M.


Apr 29........529
Apr 28........817
Apr 27........913
Apr 26........048
Apr 25........103


Apr 29 ......... 5-6-8-25-32
Apr 28 ...........15-19-25-26-28
Apr 27 .......... 1-2-6-32-35
Apr 26 ............ 9-10-16-21-34
Apr 25 ......... 9-12-18-27-29
Payoff for April 28
1 5-digit winner............. $216,044
286 4-digit winners.........$121.50
9,690 3-digit winners.............$10
2-digit winners...........Quick Pick ticket


Apr 29......9553
f'i Apr 28......9860
of Apr 27......6684
* Apr 26......8472
Apr 25......4354


Apr 29.............. 3-10-28-29
M egaBall ..... ................ 21
Apr 26............5-28-29-37
MegaBall.........................10
Drawings occur Tuesday, Friday evenings
Payoff for April 26
0 4 of4 + MB .................... $-
4 4 of 4................. $2,452.50
62 3 of 4 + MB.......... $346.50
1,144 3 of 4........ .......... $56
1,848 4 + MB................... $24


S S


Apr 27 ...... 2-25-26-27-30-37
Apr 23 ...... 9-12-14-18-19-23
Apr 20 ........ 1-7-25-30-41-46
Apr 16 ...... 5-11-23-31-39-48
Apr 13 ....... 8-9-10-31-47-50
Apr 9 ...... 10-15-23-28-35-49


Payoff for April 27
0 6-digit winners .................. $ -
66 5-digit winners .......... $4,989
3,540 4-digit winners ...... $75.50
74,777 3-digit winners ........... $5
Drawing occurs Wednesdays, Saturdays


Estimated jackpot $12 million.


CITY from page 4A


8-8:15 a.m.
For more information, call
Public Information Officer
Pam Johnson at 486-2626,
Ext. 2003.
Road closing
The Rialto in Venice, from
Palermo Place to Sovrano
Road, will be closed to traffic
6-9 a.m. Wednesday, May 4,
because of work being done
at Venice Regional Medical
Center.
In other road work news,


Sarasota County will have
intermittent lane closures in
Laurel on Old Trail and Forest
Road during construction of
sidewalks that will connect to
Laurel Road. The project will
allow residents to safely
access Laurel Community
Park, and make it safer and
more convenient for parents
to access the Learning Kastle
preschool.
The project also will in-
clude construction of five off-
site parking spaces in front of


the preschool. and minor
drainage work. The entire
project is expected to be com-
plete by the end of June.


\ _,.. -... f
A division of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.,
4 publishers of the Sun Herald Newspapers j


~MTAL1ON


mFE INHM CONSULTATei IS.]~i~'iE ~IO[N]S
OU DECOR-ATORSAVERAGE2 YARSEXEIEC-f.


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I ALMANAC


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7A


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


NO ONE DOES PLANTATION

SHUTTERS'BETTER,.'
I I ...j








Venice Gondolier Sun


8APORTS
SUNDAY
MAY 1, 2005


CONTACT US
CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR
(941) 207-1107
lewis@venicegondolier.com


Indians drop regular season final


CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


Lady


Indians


will play

Estero

The Venice High Lady
Indians are once again district
softball champions.
Now, it's on to regionals.
Venice lost in the first
round last year. The Lady
Indians are hoping to go fur-
ther this time around.
The region quarterfinal will
be played at 7 p.m. Thursday
at Venice High. The opponent
will be Estero, which lost in
Friday's District 12 final, 6-1,
to Fort Myers.
Estero (18-7) had just two
hits in its region final both
by shortstop and leadoff bat-
ter Christin Carson.
The Wildcats starting
pitcher Lori Moore got
banged around by a potent
Fort Myers attack. Jami Whit-
comb relieved and threw
four shutout innings for
Estero, allowing only one hit.
Venice won the District 11
title with a 10-0 victory over
Port Charlotte. The Lady
Indians take a 22-4 record into
region action.
CLASS 5A DISTRICT 11
TOURNAMENT
at Venice High
MONDAY
Port Charlotte 1, Manatee 0
WEDNESDAY
Venice 3, Charlotte 0; Port
Charlotte 1, Lakewood Ranch 0
THURSDAY
Venice 10, Port Charlotte 0

The Venice High girls bas-
ketball program held its sea-
.son-ending banquet Wednes-
day at the Ramada Inn in
Osprey. Prime rib was served
and enjoyed by all.
The varsity celebrated an
outstanding season that saw
'the Lady Indians lose by just
three points in the state
championship game.
Head coach Joe DiGiacomo
handed out awards to players.
The Co-MVP Awards 'went
to Lisa Hough and Natalie
Gaudreau. Coaches Award
went to Vickie Mitchell. The
Hustle Award went to Kailey
Dettmann. Defensive Awards
were garnered by Jessica
Enander and Dana Nostin.
Hough also received awards
for scoring 1,000 career points
and 1,000 career rebounds.
DiGiacomo's lovely wife,
Liz, made keepsake books for
each of the girls on the team.
Team Mom Lisa Callaghan
made photo galleries for each.
Superfan Jim Richardson
was also recognized.
Assistant coach Gary Hal-
bert received the Ken Stabler
Award. The other assistant -
Cayll Smith received the
Vince Vance Award.
VHS Softball Boosters
to meet May 2
The next Venice High Soft-
ball Booster Club meeting is
set for Monday, May 2 at 6:30
p.m. in theVHS Media Center.
Anyone interested in the Lady
Indian softball program
should attend this important
meeting.
Little League meeting May 3
The Venice Little League's
Board of Directors meeting
has been rescheduled to 7
'p.m. on Tuesday, May 3. The
meeting will take at the Chuck
Reiter Complex. For more
information, call 408-0944.


Venice hosts district tournament
this week, plays in semifinal Tuesday night.


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR

The Venice High baseball
team came up flat in, its final
regular season game in Tam-
pa Friday night, falling to
Jesuit, 9-0.
The Indians head into the
district tournament with a
record of 12-13.
"We had been playing
some pretty good ball lately,
but we didn't come ready to
play (Friday)," Venice head
coach Craig Faulkner said.


The Indians will have to
be ready to play in its Class
5A District 11 semifinal at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Venice,
which is hosting the tourna-
ment, is the top seed and
will play the winner of
Monday night's game be-
tween fourth-seeded Mana-
tee and fifth-seeded Port
Charlotte.
There is no margin for er-
ror. A loss would end Venice's
season. A win would put the
Indians in Thursday's district
championship game and as-


JV softballers


were impressive


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR


It's no wonder Venice High
varsity softball has recorded
five straight 20-win seasons.
The staff down on the



-- ----i










Kayla Ellingsen

farm has been organizing
and shaping the talent com-
ing out of Miss Venice Fast-
pitch and other various travel
ball teams in the area.
The 2005 Venice -High
junior varsity softball team
put together an awesome
19-1 record this spring. The


lone loss to Riverview High
was avenged later in the
night as the second part of a
doubleheader.
The team was strong in all
areas pitching, hitting and
defense.
In fact, separating junior
varsity from varsity cuts a
fine line at VHS.
"We tell the girls that they'd
probably make varsity at
most other schools," said
head coach Darrell Brandow.
"We try to keep their morale
up and have fun. We also
want them to play at a high
level to be prepared to move
up to-varsity."
Brandow was blessed with


:;mm


Cory Jones


three fine pitchers all
freshmen. Kayla Ellingsen
was 9-0 with an ERA of 0.73.
Amanda Harvey was 6-0 with
an ERA of. 0.54. Maureen
Sandidge was 4-1. with an
ERA of 1.22 before being
.......- called up to varsity in mid
season.
Sandidge also swung an
amazing bat during her half'
season on JVs. She had 19 hits
in 25 at bats for a sizzling
.760 average. Fleet-footed
S Nikki Clark batted leadoff
and hit a hot .659. Cory Jones
batted .464. Megan Watson
'. checked in at .435 and
Heather Flagler-Beck at .431.
Megan Clipse hit .419, Harvey
: ~'l'1'll was at .407, Maddie Jones at
.A" .357 and Ellingsen at .255.
SClark led in runs scored.
Watson was tops in RBIs.
Amanda Harvey Harvey had the. most extra


Mitchell qualifies


for state meet


STAFF REPORT

For the second straight
year, Vickie Mitchell will be
the lone Venice High athlete
at the FHSAA Class 4A Track
and Field Finals.
Mitchell qualified for the
finals by fin-
ishing fourth
in the shot
put at Fri-
day's Region
2 Meet held
at Osceola

The top four
in each event
Mitchell qualify for the
finals, which
will be held Saturday, May 7,


at Coral Springs High.
Mitchell also qualified for
state in the shot put last year,
finishing third in regional
with a toss of 35 feet, 5 inches.
Mitchell's throw Friday was
37-4.
Venice girls coach Brenda
Clark believed she had a 4 by
100 relay team good enough
to win, region. The Lady
Indians were seeded first in
that event and were on their
way when a bad handoff cost
them big time.
"Itwas the third exchange,"
said Clark, who had Jessica
Votour, CarlaValor, Sarah Ellis
and Mitchell running the

Please see MITCHELL, 10A


sure a berth in the regional
tournament.
"It will be a battle for us,"
Faulkner said. "Nobody's that
much better than anybody
else."
Venice split its two games
with Manatee during the
regular season. The Indians
defeated Port Charlotte twice.
Faulkner said that senior
right-hander Andrew Tilka
would get the starting nod
Tuesday night.
"There's no clear No. 1,"
Faulkner said. "Nobody's
stepped up."
Tilka has thrown well at
times this season, as have
Greg Koehler and Jeremie


652 E. Venice Ave. 488-9156
www.bogeys-venice.com


Cook. Joel Schmehl and Jason
Staszewski have thrown well
in relief.
The Indian bats also need
to zero in. Leading hitters this
season include Staszewski,
Matt. Kindell, Joel Ehrhart,
Trevor Pelletier, Joe Salomone
and Brett Holte. Shortstop
Jordan Lucas has been com-
ing on of late.
There wasn't a whole lot
of good news coming out of
Tampa Friday night.
The Indians didn't get a
hit until the seventh inning,
when Staszewski and Lucas
broke the ice.
Cook was the starting
pitcher for Venice but he


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wasn't in top form. Faulkner
ended up using six different
pitchers.
Jesuit, ranked No. 4 in the
state in Class 3A, improved to
21-4.

CLASS 5A DISTRICT 11
at Venice High
(Seeds in parentheses)
MONDAY
Manatee (4) vs. Port Charlotte (5),
7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
Charlotte (2) vs. Lakewood Ranch
(3), 4 p.m.; Venice (1) vs. Manatee or
Port Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Championship game, 7:30 p.m.


Spring grid practice starts Monday


BY CLAUDE LEWIS
SPORTS EDITOR

Nick Coleman and his
staff have been waiting five
months for this.
Coleman will finally get
the chance to get his new
football team on the practice
field when three weeks of
spring workouts begin Mon-
day afternoon.
The players will hit the
field at roughly 2:50 p.m. each
weekday.
"We'll put it all in place
the first week and start rep-
ping and working on funda-
mentals," Coleman said.
Venice is coming off a 5-4
record in 2004. The Indians
lose a lot of that team to grad-
uation. The line was hit hard
with Aaron Stahl and Russ
Harris taking their games to
college., Running, back Cory
Eskew and receiver/defensive
back Adrian Platt are also
graduating. Venice will also
need to find a new quarter-
back.


The Green vs. White Scrim-
mage will be held Friday
night, May 13. The FHSAA
Spring Classic against South-
east will be held at Powell-
Davis Stadium Saturday.
night, May 21.
Venice has a tough sched-
ule in 2005, including a sea-
son opener at Lakeland and
a trip to Miami Pace the fol-
lowing week.
Coleman has compiled a
record of 47-24 since taking
over the head coaching posi-'
tion at the end of 1998., His
first full season was in 1999.
The Venice High football
program will hold its annual
Lift-A-Thon on May 13 before
the Green and White game.
The Lift-A-Thon acts' as a
fund-raiser for the Indian
grid program. Each football
player along with other stu-
dent athletes will collect
,pledges from family, friends
and the business community.
They will then do their maxi-
mum bench press before the
Green vs. White game.


base hits.
Defensively, Sandidge
played first. Also there were
Ellingsen and Katelynn Al-
bert. Clipse nailed down the
second base job. Flagler-Beck
was at shortstop. Third base
went to Harvey. In the out-
field, Clark1 patrolled center-
field. Cory Jones was in left.
Maddie Jones, Albert,
Casey Garner and Jessica


. .. .. ..


Maureen Sandidge


Megan Clipse

Konecnik were reserve out-
fielders.
Behind the plate was
Watson.
"Megan did a fantastic job
running the .team," Brandow
said.
Watson was one of four
sophomores on the squad.
Clipse, Flagler-Beck and Cory
Jones were the others. All of
them were called up to varsity
when the season ended along
with freshman Clark.
Since Brandow took over


The program is asking
support from the community
- to collect pledges and par-
ticipate as guest lifters.
The lifts will take place
from 6-7:20 p.m. May 13. The
Green vs. White game will
begin at 7:30 p.m.
For more information and
pledge forms, call either Pete
Dombroski or Wayne Skelton
at the school at 488-6726.
Spots are still open in the
Venice Touchdown Club's
annual fund-raising golf
scramble, which will take
place on Saturday, May 7 at
Lake Venice Golf Club.
The' cost is $240 per team
or $60 per golfer. The price
includes range balls and a
barbecue lunch.
First place earns $100 per
person. Second place is $75
per person. Third place is
$50 per person.
Football players will be
selling raffle tickets for the
chance to win $1,000.
To get in on it, contact
Mike Bartlett at 504-9510.


as head coach in 2003, the
JVs have compiled an amaz-
ing combined record of 55-3.
Steve Brownfield has been
an assistant for four years.
Bill Madden just came
aboard this year.
Brandow previously
coached Miss Venice and with
the Vipers travel team.
Daughter Mallory is a former
VHS player who graduated
while Molly will be a senior
next year.


"' ~.


Nikki Clark


VENICE HIGH _


SCHOOL'S


Athlete of the Week
Sophomore Felicia Taylor was red-hot at the
plate in the Lady Indians district championship
game against Port Charlotte Friday, getting
four hits in four trips to the dish. Taylor, a left-
handed hitting outfielder, is the lead off batter
and one of the top hitters on the team average-
wise.


Felicia Taylor


Food & Fun
*Burqers .Winqs .Pizza
Pizza Specialties:
Roman' Club
Calzone White Pie


*NASCAR *NBA *MLB

NFL Draft Day

Saturday
Follow your teams picks/









SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


High perch at Bird Bay


Let the drafting begin


The 2005 club champions at Bird Bay Golf Club are Bill MacDonald and Lois Hammond.
Other winners were Pat Crowe, men's first flight; Jack Jacques, men's second flight; Dottie
MacDonald, women's first flight; and Bernice Hubbard, women's second flight.




GOLF RESULTS


MISSION VALLEY
COUNTRY CLUB
LADIES
BEAT THE PRO
1 BEST BALL
PROS AND CHAMPS
64 Mary Gick, SusarnRubes. 64
- Dottie Kuhlman, Kathy Gallo. 65 -
Rene Valentini, Bobbie Parker. 65 -
Tricia Eales, Joy Ann Lang. 66 Gerri
Carroll, Jane Goris. 66 Sue Beharrell,
Carole Radlinski. 66 Joy Ann Lang,
Marcia Hoeffel. 67 Joan Craven,
Bunny Raabe. 67 Marge Flynn,
Judy Brown. 67 Toni Marsden,
Addy Griffith. 67 Carol Narkewicz,
Impy McGloon. 67 Jessie Meek,
Gerry Purcell. 68 Kay Ponder, Marg
Hook.
LADIES CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP
CHAMPION Rita Bicknell. RUN-
NERUP Cheryl Hornberger.
FIRST FLIGHT 1. Carol Fritsch; 2.
Jinx Walcott.
SECOND FLIGHT 1. Jeanne
Brown; 2. Eileen Britt.
THIRD FLIGHT 1. Gerry Purcell.
WEDNESDAY GAME
INDIVIDUAL-LOW NET
WHITE TEES Richard Womack
72.
BLUE TEES Don Basil 65,
Whalen Dunn 65, Wait Hahn 70,
Charlie Wolohan 71, Bill Kissel 71, Jack
Greenwald 72.
VENICE GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB
MEN'S BLUE TEES
INDIVIDUAL QUOTA POINTS
1. Rod Stewart, plus 2. 2. Dave
Good, minus 2.
MEN'S WHITE TEES
QUOTA POINTS
FLIGHT 1 1. William Schmidt,
plus 3; 2. Jim Murray, plus 1.
FLIGHT 2 1. Chuck Gast, plus 8;
2. Gary Felfoldy, plus 4.
FLIGHT 3 1. Bob Keillor, plus 8;
1. Joe Orzechowski, plus 8.
FLIGHT'4 1. Orvis Kinney, plus
7; 1. Samuel Zehner, plus 7.
BIRD BAY GOLF COURSE
LADIES LEAGUE
THROW OUT MYSTERY HOLE
FLIGHT A Phyllis Pratt 49; Betty
Murray 50; Bernice Crowe 51.
FLIGHT B Marsha Henderson
50; Sharon Simpson 50; Dorothy Mohr
52; Dottie MacDonald 53.
FLIGHT C Jan Hirschler 42.
BLIND BOGEY Phyllis Pratt 55.
LAKE VENICE GOLF CLUB
MEN'S 18 HOLES
QUOTA POINTS
CLASS A Jim Stortz plus 5; Noel
Michal plus 4; Don Hummel plus 3.
CLASS B Jim Thorpe plus 7; Al
Semmelrock plus 7; Al Ouellet plus 6.


CLASS C Joe Budnik plus 8; Bim
Wilder plus 5; Pete Krebiehl plus 3.
CLASS D Bob Klotz plus 11; Geo
Pate plus 8; Jack Allen plus 7.
MONDAY GROUP
QUOTA POINTS
PLUS 6 Tom Buckwalter, Jon
Stortz; PLUS 6 Chuck Stevenson,
Alex Simon; PLUS 6 Bob Favor,
Tom Parker. PLUS 5 Bim Wilder,
Glen Zingler; PLUS 5 Pete Krebiehl,
Dave DeJohn; PLUS 5 Neil Clauser,
Gerry Chascin.
INDIVIDUALS Glen Zingler plus
6; Jim Stortz plus 6; Jim Smith plus 5;
Ed Fleish plus 5; Pete Krebiehl plus 5.
MEN'S 18 HOLES
INDIVIDUAL POINTS PLUS
HANDICAP
A Moe Marceau 43; Alex Simon
40; Dick Candelmo 39.
B Larry Bany 44; John
Harrington 43; Ted Dickerson 40.
C Casey Deignan 43; Art
McManus 42; Tony Moreira 40.
D Joe LaDu 44; John Crescenzo
44; Norm Beck 43.'
VENICE GARDENS MEN
TEAM QUOTA POINTS' 7
PLUS 6 Wayne Cadrette, Tom
Ordway, Roger Kramer, Jim Keller.
PLUS 4-- Ed Holka, Bill Thackara,
George Chatfield.
PLUS 2- Don Hummel, Walt
Schatner, Al Punkar.
JACARANDA WEST
COUNTRY CLUB
SHOOTS AGE
SFrank Rodriguez, 81.
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TEAM
MINUS 22-- Mark Trotter, Missy
Cerrito, Royal Smith, Joe Proud.
MINUS 21 Dave Dickens, Ethel
Molezzi, Bud Plageman, John Greenup.
MINUS 21 Dave Columbell,
Linda Frey, Dick Lindstrom, Jack Smith.
MINUS 21 Jay Engstrom, Dot
Mulreed, Herb Coffey, Frank
Christman.
MINUS 20 Wahoo Jacobs, Julie
Clifford, Joe Renshaw, Lou Haughey.
MINUS 20 Cal VanSlyke, Sharon
Finlayson, Jim Richards, Bob Howard.
LOW PRO
Eddie Rodriguez 71, Rob McCoy 71,
Will Frantz 71, Jack McFaul 72, Brad
Lanning 73, Brian Higgins.73, Kevin
Paschall 74, Cal VanSlyke 74, John
Wolfe 74, Dave Hronek 74.
PRO-PRO
Will Frantz-Rob McCoy 65; Jason
Winslow-Kevin Paschall 69; Brad
Lanning-Eddie Rodriguez 659; Mike
Domalske-Jacques Panet-Raymond 69;
Bob Morrow-Dave Hronek 69.
SKINS
Will Frantz, birdie 2; Joel King,
eagle 6; Eddie Rodriguez, birdie 7.
MEN'S DAY
INDIVIDUAL QUOTA POINTS
A FLIGHT J.D. Powers plus 7;
Ron Bauerle plus 6; Dave Good plus 4;
Hal Loud plus 4; Jay Hartman plus 3;
Don Dumas plus 1; Joe Renshaw plus
1.
B FLIGHT-- Rich Heardman plus


Last week I promised you
the Ultimate Golf Mock Draft
and this week I deliver.
I have chosen my 16 all
time greatest players and
we're almost ready to get on
the clock.
First though, I would like
to point out that this is MY
list. If you don't agree with
me, you can go check out the
other sports on the previous
page or better yet ... get your
own column.
The logical first step is to
choose captains for the four
teams in this draft. So here
they are Tiger Woods, Jack
Nicklaus, Ben Hogan and, of
course, Bobby Jones.
After throwing their names
in a hat, this will be the draft
order. Jones will pick first fol-
lowed by Nicklaus, Hogan
and Woods.
The draftees are as follows
- Greg Norman, Tom Wat-
son, Seve Ballesteros, Lee
Trevino, Arnold Palmer, Gary
Player, Billy Casper, Nick
Faldo, Byron Nelson; Sam
Snead, Gene Sarazen and
finally, Walter Hagen. On
with the picking.
Round One:
1. Bobby Jones selects
Walter Hagen. While ,they
were very different on the
golf course, these two had
some great .matches and
Jones needs someone to

5; Bob Wood plus 5; Herb Coffey plus
5; Rudy Hutter plus 2; Earnest Spangler
plus 2; Bob Reigeluth plus 2; John
Diohep plus 1; Bill Mathis plus 1.
C FLIGHT-- Bob Keiller plus 8;
Richard Miller plus 7; Joe Skrabak plus
6; Ron Neault plus 4; Jim Greensfelder
plus 1.
D FLIGHTs- Mark Stautzenbach
plus 11; John Greenup plus 8; Don
Joyce plus 8; Joe Kuzma plus 5; Bob
Brauneker plus 5; Francis Przybylski
plus 3; Gordon Curnow plus 3.
LADIES
CLOSING LUNCHEON
2 BEST BALLS OF 4
MINUS 25 Vonnie DeBrine, Evie
Marino, Betty Kiernan, Ellen Dempster.
MINUS 23 Mary Ann Porter,
Donna Johnson .lean Renshavw. Kathy
Earley.
MINUS 20 Jackie Wells, Gail
Pedersen, Alice Lindstrom, Mary
Mahoney.
MINUS 20- Christine Evering,
Estelle Scanlon, Ruth King, Laquita
Herren.
MINUS 19 Phyllis Linck, Ethel
Noll, Marie Padden, Doris Halliwell.


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THE ZONE


teach these whippersnappers
about gamesmanship.
2. Jack Nicklaus selects
Arnold Palmer. Palmer and
Nicklaus had some monu-
mental battles, but Jack picks
the man he took the mantle
away from.
3. Ben Hogan selects Byron
Nelson. The fellow Texan
most notably once won
eleven tournaments in a
row.
4. Tiger Woods selects
Tom Watson. Watson is one
of the greatest clutch players
ever.
Round Two:
1. Jones selects Sam Snead.
The barefoot boy from West
Virginia. Seems Bobby likes
the old timers.


JACARANDA JILLS
1 BEST BALL PAR 5s
2 BEST BALLS OF 4
1 BEST BALL PAR 3s
MINUS 10- Margie Smith, Arlene
Goldberg, Barb Greenup, Zena
Rodriguez.
MINUS 6 Marian Zitnyar, Claire
Johns, Sue Ayers, Pam Piper.
MINUS 4 Adele Naugle, Sarah
Davis, Louella Schweitzer, Barb Miller.
MINUS 4 Marcia Franson, Joann
Warren, Shirley Warren, Nancy McCoy.
JACARANDA JILLS
STEP-A-SIDE SCRAMBLE
62 Elaine Robinson, Donna
Johnson, Alice Lindstrom, Doris
Halliwell.
S,62- Eileen Stortz, Gail Davey,
Marie Mastroignni, Ellen Dempster.
63 Jennie Ohlson, Audrey
Smith, Jean Renshaw, Mary Ann
Porter.
JACARANDA JILLS
BETTER BALL OF PARTNERS
29 Louella Schweitzer, Flo
Moynihan. 30-- Marcia Franson,


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" LANDSCAPING & GARDENING 1
Q. What is the most controversial subject when maintaining a garden,
lawn or shrubs in Florida?
A. Learn how, where and when to apply water. Most nursery people
will advise you that it takes about 90 days before a plant can be
established, therefore it must receive adequate amounts of water
almost everyday. This can be done if one uses a hose when waterin
so that,the water is not wasted when watering. Your lawn requires at
least 1 inch of water weekly. Using that rate, water will be absorbed
at 5 to 6 inches in the soil.This is adequate for lawns. However trees
and shrubs require more water and most sprinkler systems will not
deliver the amount required. For instance, shrubbery
requires at least 1/2 gallon of water per square foot. This
will provide 12 inches of soil water. Trees & shrubbery will
do fine with this application at a minimum of once a week.
Watering is very important to plants & trees survival; don't
make a costly mistake. Call us! We at DUKE GARDEN WINNER
CENTER will try to help you.
Don't forget the latest shipment of roses are in and
Mother's Day is just around the corner. We have a
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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 9A


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


2. Nicklaus selects Gary
Player. Jack knows the South
African is as tough as a $2
steak.
3. Ben Hogan selects Nick
Faldo. Maybe they can get
together on the driving range
and ignore each other.
4. Tiger Woods selects Seve
Ballesteros. The Spaniard in
his prime was as good as
they get. Besides, Tiger will
need someone to keep Hagen
honest.
Round Three:
1. Jones selects Gene Sara-
zen. The Squire rounds out
an impressive foursome.
2. Nicklaus selects Lee
Trevino. The Merry Mex is
Jack's answer to Seve and
Hagen.
3. Hogan selects Greg
Norman. Heartache is noth-
ing new to Norman. But he
perseveres, just like Hogan
did.
4. Tiger Woods selects Billy
Casper. Casper is still under-
rated. One of the best putters
ever.
Well there it is. You can
make up what happens next,
but my guess is they had
one heck of a time and there
were plenty of stories to be
told. See ya.

Mike Lamond writes a
weekly golf column for the
Gondolier Sun.

Marian Zitnyar. 31 Jennifer Boyd,
Mary Murphy. 31 Pat Paull, Barb
Greenup. 32 Sara Peterson, JoAnne
Warren.
MEN'S DAY
2 BEST BALLS OF 4
MINUS 30 J.D. Powers, Robert
Davies, Joe Skrabak, Joe Kuzma.
MINUS 29 Vito Laudicina, Gary
Felfoldy, Don Paull, Gordon Curnow.
MINUS 28 Jay Hartman, Richard
Miller, Jack Dempster, Don Joyce.
MINUS 25 Harold McReynolds,
Elmer Malecha, Walt Joslyn, proxy.
MINUS 24 Mack Warren, Conrad
Rousseau, Ron Neault, Bill Hunt.
MINUS 23 Carl Weist, Bob
Keiller, Steve Davis, Charles Oskutis.










I OA VENICE GONDOLIER SUN SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005


SUMMER CAMPS


Long Skinny
Boat Camp

The Sarasota Scullers row-
ing organization will hold its
Long Skinny Boat Camp late
spring and early summer..
There will be three two-
week sessions running from
May 31 through July, 8. Each
session is Monday through
Friday from 8 a.m. to noon.
No experience is required. It
is a prep course for high
school varsity rowing,
The camps are open to
students ranging from ,6th-
12th.grades.
The cost is $250 per ses-
sion. Snacks are included.
The Sarasota Scullers are
based at 8(0 Blackburni Point
Road,. sprey.
For 'more information call
966-2244 or visit sarasotas-
cullers.org.
There will be ,an open
house from 8:30-11 a.m. May


21.

Boys hoops camp
The Venice Community
Boys Summer Basketball
Camp will take place for four
weeks in June in the high
school's north gym.
It will unfold Mondays
through Thursdays starting
June 6 and ending June 30.
It is for boys entering
grades 4-8. It will take place
2-4 p.m. each day.
The .cost is $125. Players
will also receive a T-shirt.
Monday and Wednesdays
will feature individual in-
struction, camp skill develop-
ment, drill stations, inter-
camp league games and team
contests. ,
:Tuesdays and Thursdays,
will also have 3-on-3, 2-on-2,
1-oni-l and free-throw com-
petitions.
The camp is directed by
new Venice High coach Steve


MITCHELL from page 8A


event. "It was so heartbreak-
ing."
Venice came close to top
fours in several other events.
Sophomore Carla Valor
was fifth in the 400. Freshman
Samantha Seeley was sL\th in
the shot put. The 3200 meter
relay was sixth. The 1600 relay
,ran eighth. Freshman Chelsea
Rose was eighth in the 1600.


Jessica Enander was eighth in
the high jump. Stephanie
Korszen was 11th in the 3200.
"I can't say anything," Clark
said. "There were a lot of per-
sonal bests. We've come a
long way. We'll have to work
with them to make them see
where they need to improve."
Clark will have most of her
team back next year.


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Cavallaro. Cavallaro previous-
ly coached at Sarasota High
and in Maine.
For more information, call
408-0661.

DiGiacomo's summer
hoops school coming
Joe DiGiacomo's Summer
Basketball School will run on
Monday and Tuesdays from
mid-to-late June.
It is for girls entering
grades 9-12. The cost is $150.
It starts on Monday, June
13, and runs through Tuesday,
June 28. The school will be
between 7-9 a.m. each day
at the VHS north gym.
The top talent will com-
pete in a summer league
beginning Wednesday, June
29. Games will be held
Monday and Wednesdays
through July.
DiGiacomo is the highly
successful girls basketball
coach at Venice High.
, For more information, call
DiGiacomo at 232-5626.

Venice Pitching Clinic,
The ninoh annual Venice
Pitching Clinic will be held
June 6-9 at the Venice High
Baseball Complex.
There are two sessions -
one for kids ages ,6-11 years
old and another for those
ages 12-18. The 6-11 year olds
will meet 9:45-11:45 a.m.
daily and the 12-18 year olds
from 12:45-2:45 p.m.
The cost is $80 per player.
Players will be taught the
proper mechanics along with
fielding the position. Camp-
ers will be taught two- and
four-seam fastballs, breaking
ball (12 and up) and change-


up. Also covered will be
holding base runners, cover-
ing bases, arm strengthening
and mental preparation.
The camp is directed by
Venice High pitching coach
Jeff Callan, a graduate of
Trevecca University and a
member of the 1993 Cana-
dian Olympic team.
To reserve a spot in the
clinic, call Callan at 492-4001:.

Time Out
Sports Camp
The School's Out Sports
Camp is being revived this
year.
It covers volleyball and
basketball skills. It is for kids
ages 8-14.
There will be two sessions
- May 31 through June 3,
and June 6-9. The camp runs
from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. each
day.
It will take place at the
Pine View School.
The, cost is, $130 for one
session or $225 for both.
I The camp will be instruct-:
ed by 'Gary'Halbert, Cayll I
Smith and Joe DiGiacomo.
To get on the list, call
232-5626 or 928-3433.

Wheatley
Volleyball Camp
The 12th annual Wheatley
Wild, Wild West Volleyball.
Camp will be held May 24-27
at Venice High north gym.
There are two sessions -
one for girls heading into
grades 8-12 and another for
girls going into grades 5-7.
Session 1 for grades 8-12 will
meet from 2:30-5:15 p.m.
daily. Session 2,for grades 5-7
will camp out from 6;15-9


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music for your senses to soothe die mind.,
SOtffer epires Fri. NMa) 6. 2005

Mother's Day is Sunday, May 8th
Our office will be closed Sat., May 7th
530 UIS 41 By -Pass S., Venice, FL 34285 m9803
485-4334 Hrs: Thes-Fri 10-5, Sat. 10-3


NOTICE OF ADMIN.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
STHE TWELFTH JUDICIAL.
CIRCUIT, SARASOTA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE GLAZER,'
Deceased, .
'File No. 2005-CP-25P1-NC
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
h 3.f.iiinilrain ,:.1 iA h es'131e (l
ROSE GLAZER, deceased, Case
No. 2005-CP-2501-NC, whose
date of death was September 30,
2004; is pending in the Circuit
Court for Sarasota County, Flori-
da, Probate Division; the address
of which is'2000 Main Street, Sara-
sota, Florida 34237. The names
and addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below .
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against. decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served, ,
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this'court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. .
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S' DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The' date of first publication of this
notice is May 1, 2005.
Personal Representative:
/s/ MAXINE TRIELOFF
1800 Goldenrod Street
Sarasota, FL 34239
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
/s/ James L. Essenson
James L. Essenson, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 0359033
2071 Main Street
Sarasota, FL 34237
(941) 954-0303
PUBLISH: May 1, 8, 2005

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'I
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The cost is $85 per camp-
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ort Venice, Florida 34293
H n Telephone: (941) 408-8555
f Court Fax: (941) 408-8556
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Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9am-5:30pm *,Tues. & Fri. 9am-8pm
493-0025


NOTICE TO CREDIT


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
The i.:.Iowri nveh.,:ie re-iellil .il' The following vehicle/vessel(s) will vs.
:., iu,'nr,,r ,,,.j ur.rai ra,:'n ,w,. be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS storage charges, only,. per FS ALAN T. OWENS and '.
713.78 Vehicle @ 7 1378 Vehicle @ ELAINE OWENS, et al.,,
Jerrus Enterprise, Inc Maley Brothers Automotive Defendants.
3620 NE 47th PI. 20020 Tamlami Trail E
Ocala, FL Naples, FL AMENDED
1. 1991 EagI, Talon, 2D, Bge, 1. 1992 GMC, C1500, Pk, Whi,, NOTICE 'OF ACTION
4E3CS44R1ME133844 1GTDC14Z1NZ527328
'On 5/18/2005 at 9:00 a.m. at On 5/18/05 at 9:00 a.m. at r TO: Dener,,jants ni.Au I
106 Corporation Way, Venice FuLorporat on Way, verce d, EL'iird E OwElr'!
PUBLISH: May 1, 2005 PUBLISH: May 1. 2005 .
YOU ARE NOTIFiED ins,
NOTICE OF' PUBLIC AUCTION .CplaintU maF.acl '3 11 i, ul
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION The Following vehicle/vessel(sl will has been filed against you
Tre il,:,uri.g ,,,e ve e .-;elli l.n be auctioned i.or unr, ,,d n parties claiming interest
a,.:1,,:.ne, ir ur,,,d l.),, storage charge u,,, pe. t through, under or against
,lr '.:r.hrges oni, perr 713.78 A....i ALA nT. OWENS and I
FS713.78. I 1994 oo Ca 'r,,r JD., Whi, OWEJ a u
1. '1992 Isuz, Trooper, Ut, Sil,. 4TI'1 lE :t'3 e,1iniu34u n he any rean
4S2CG58Z3N4340742 2 I'49 Dodg, Er,a.iwv,8 Bin spouse, hei(s, personal repr
2. 2001 Suzu, Vitara, Ut, Grn,. 3B3XP45K7MT589618. .t h ,en." "" r
2S3TC52C416100525 3. 1998 Ford, Explorer, Ut, Bk, or ,irer camr, r ,i:,rI
On 5/18/05 at 10:00 am at 1FMZU34E9WUC76113 : through, 'under or agpinst'A
Jim's Auto Repair & Towing 4. 1998 Niss, Frontier, Pk Whi, OWENS and ELAINE OWEN
5693 Sarah Ave. 1N6DD21S7WC354569 are not known to be dead o
Sarasota, FL 5. 1996 Dodg, Ram 1500, Pk, and a prayer contained will
PUBLISH: May 1, 2005 Red, 1B7HC16Y9TS504293 Complaint demands that, t
6. 1997 Pont, Grand Prix, 4D, Biu, quieted in the Plaintiffs to t
N 1G2WP52K6VF203968 lowing-described property:
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION .7. 1992 Buic, LeSabre, 4D, Blu,
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will 1G4HP53L5NH568055 That certain boat basin a
be auctioned for unpaid towing & 8. 1991 Toyt, Camry, 4D, Gry, mately 70 feet wide and 1
storage charges only, per FS 4TISV24EXMU419222 feet long, adjacent to Lot 4,
713.78. Vehicle @ 9. 1991 Niss, NX1600, 2D; Red, T. OWENS SUBDIVISION, acc
Jimmie's Firestone JN1EB34CXMU002927 'the Plat th, -f recorded
Rt# 1, Box 3329-F 10. 2002 Dodg, Neoni,. 4D, ii;, s. : 5, Page 110, of the
Madison, FL 1B3ES46C72D505412 Recoro: I Sarasota County
1. 1999 Dodg, Stratus, 4D, Tan, 11. 1992 Plym, Voyager, Sw, Gry, -da (hereinafter referred to
1B3EJ46XOXN568696 2P4GH253XNR558856 BASIN").
2. 1986Pont, TransAm, 2D, Mm, On 5/18/2005 at.9:00 am at
1G2FW87H7GL221871 106 Corporation Way, * YOU ARE REQUIRED to si
On 5/18/05 at 9:00 a.m. at Venice, FL 34285 copy of your Answer to'the
106 Corporation Way, Venice Vehicle @ plaint on STEPHEN .H. KI
PUBLISH: May 1, 2005 North Collier Collision, Inc. ESQ., 7 South Lime Avenue
16210 Old 41 S. Bonita Springs sota, FL 34237, on or befoi
;.,... OF PUBLIC AUCTION PUBLISH: May 1, 2005 10, 2005. If you failed to
The following vehicle/vessel(s) will Judgment by Default will be
be auctioned for unpaid towing & NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION against you for the relief derr
storage charges only, per FS The Following vehicle/vessell(s) will in the Complaint.
713.78. Vehicle @ be auctioned for unpaid towing'&
Johnson's Towing storage .charges only, per FS THIS NOTICE shall be 'put
604 N. Tamiami Trail,' 713.78 once a week for four (4) co
Nokomis, FL On 5/18/2005 at 9:00 am at tive weeks in THE VENICE G
1. 2002 Jeep, Liberty, Ut, Sil, 106 Corporation Way, Venice LIER.
1J4GK58K12W232905 1. 2002 Isuz, Trooper, ut, Gm
On 5/18/2005 at 9:00 am at JACDJ58XO27JO7118 Dated this 6th day of April 2C
above address. vehicle @ Superior. Towing & Sarasota, Florida.
PUBLISH: May 1, 2005 Auto transport N E. RU
136 Tonney Penna Dr.; KAREN E. RU.S
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION Jupiter SARASOTA Cl
Publish: May 1, 2005 '
y. inargerns rW. i


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


y: Margaret r. i
Clerk of


S PUBLISH DATES: : aru"i y , a, u
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APRIL 10; 2005
THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL APRIL 17, 2005 NOTICE OF SALE :
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR: APRIL 24, 2005
SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA MAY 1, 2005 NOTICE OF SALE
Case No. 2004-CA-010766-NC IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
ase N. 004-CA10766NCSARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA Notice is hereby given to the
WILLIAM E. ZUK and PROBATE DIVISION following people and unit for
FRANCES M. ZUK, IN RE: ESTATE OF rent not paid and storage
Plaintiffs, fees.


... ..' : 1' ;. .. :",'.



ORS NOTICETO CREDITORS NOTICE OF SALE
ZORA E. COX
a/k/a ZORA ELIZABETH COXE, Venice Real Estate Holding
Deceased. Estate Hding
,' e1 ,' Company
File No. 2005-CP-003968-NC Myakka River RV Park
10400 S. Tamiami Trail,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS V: enice, Florida 34287
hi: ji3ida ',;]r TI ,', .:. .15, i: ,f
N 'ZORA E.. COXE. a k a ZORA U, #21
ELIZABETH COXE, e- I:..Unit #21
jmEir ',hose date of death was March VIN #iEH4L3424J7900936
3 1 2 0 0 5 z p r i., i i. if. .i i i ,: .r.-: u i i K e v i n ij l e i h. : ' I'
Couri 0o Sarasota ,:..urry Fr, H:iJeF,,oIi, goods & unit,
Corr A. ''Pr:.r.i Di.v ..:.n; in s Addr: ':s
T TITLE 0i rMacr. h 'C00 o1 ia'r,i.T., he unit and housed goods
and all Trail, Venice, Florida 34293, The nit an ousehold goods
s by, names and addresses of the per- will be auctioned on May, 19',;,
Defen- sonal representative and the per- 2005, at 10:00 a.m.
ELAINE :,.sIl rere,',ilai,,e ; attorney are Terms: Cash.
known :e ..rh ti. el'.rl .
esenta- All creditors of the decedent and PUBLISH: May 1, 8, 2005
eli,,:.r., other persons having claims or
,. t,, demands against decedent's NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
LAN T. estate, on 'whom a copy. of this
S who notice is. required to be served, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
r alive mustfile their claims with this court THE PERSONAL PROPERTY CON-
hin the WITHIN THERE LATER OF TENTS OF THE FOLLOWING
title be MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF RENTAL UNITS WILL BE OFFERED
the fol THE'FIRST PUBLICATION OF. FOR SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION,
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS HELD BY STORAGE PROTECn0N
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE HELD BY: STORAGE PROTEC11ON
AFTER THE DAT A COPY OF THIS NOTERVICE ONAUCTION SERVICES, LICENSE
pproxi- OFCOPYOFTHISNO #593, TO SATISFY STORAGE
40.12 THEM'S LIEN, AT STORAGE USA,
, ALAN All other creditors of the decedent 1266 USA'S41 BY-PASSTON MAY 12,
cording and other persons having claims or 2005 41 BY-PASS ON MAY 12.M TER
in Plat demands against decedent's estate CASH. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT
Public must file their claims with this court T JECT ALL BIDS. A $50.
, Flori- WITHIN MONTHS AFTER THE TOREJECT FUNDABLE DEPOSIT WILL
'BOAT DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- CASH REUNDABLFOR EACH DEPOSITLL
TION OF THIS NOTICE. BE 'COLLECTED FOR EACH
A, ,I ,r AI e rOr eS O ,rn SOLD..


UNIT 2003 CHARLES SOWA -
H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 3162- CARY SELLING ,
H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 1161 TIFFANY POST -
H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 1329 SCOTT COLEMAN
- H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 2131 DEBRA CAMINm.
- H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 3001 -CHRISTOPHER
SPENCER H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 3014 LARRY KINSEY.-,
H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 3158- SEAN STOVER -
H'HOLD ITEMS
UNIT 4008 MIKE WILSON .
H'HOLD ITEMS
PUBLISH: APRIL 24, MAY 1,
2005

Seize the sales
with Classified!


W. GRADY HUIE

Attorney At Law

Joint .....$600
Living Trusts Joint. 00
(.. Single ...$500

-y Simple Will ..............$75
Probate & No Consultation
Incapacity Fee

143 East Miami A\e. Venice, FL 34285
488-8551
= at, b~ dr> .ru Flanp. at l .h.:.uld A...1 ba.- d up,. dti'tlrtn* BL|....


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serve a WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
e Com- NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
URVIN, PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
, Sara- ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
o YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
re May DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
do so, IS BARRED.
Taken The date of first publication of this
notice is May 1, 2005.


Queen Sets Starting at $299
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Personal Representative:
KELLY ROPP-AMILCAR
3412 Clark Road, #235
Sarasota, Florida 34232


The Following vehicle/vessel(s) will
be auctioned for unpaid towing &
storage charges only, per FS
713.78
1. 2000 Ford, Mustang, 2D, Whi,
1FAFP4046YF178493 .
On 5/18/2005 at 9:00 AM at'
106 W Corporation Way, Venice
Vehicle @
L & T Towing, Inc.
100 Tonney Penna Dr.
Jupiter, FL
Publish: May 1, 2005


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


I


1 OA VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


IUMR AP








EDITOR
BOB MUDGE
PHONE: (941) 207-1101
FAX: (941) 484-8460
bmudge@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun




OPINION


PUBLISHER
ROBERT A. VEDDER
PHONE: (941) 207-1000
FAX: (941) 484-8460
11A
SUNDAY,
MAY 1, 2005


OUR VIEW



Don't let law on DNA testing sunset in Florida


went years ago, a rape victim pointed
out the wrong man in a lineup. That
man, Wilton Dodge, spent 20 years of
his life locked up in Florida prisons for a
crime he never committed.
Dodge was freed last year when DNA test-
ing proved he did not commit the crime. He
is 42 years old, his youth stripped from him
by a case of mistaken identity.
Dodge insisted for years he was innocent.
He asked for DNA testing when it became
popular but was denied until 2000 that
opportunity to prove he was innocent.
Finally, tests were allowed on hairs taken
from the scene evidence that was not
destroyed. The DNA test allowed Dodge to


escape his prison cell legally- albeit 20 years
older and wiser in the ways of prison life.
The state has agreed to pay Dodge
$200,000 $9,000 a year for the time he was
locked up. If you're searching for the defini-
tion of the word "pittance," you could start
there. That is another story, however.
What we would bring to lawmakers' atten-
tion today is the fact innocent people are
convicted. DNA testing is often their only
hope for salvation from the ultimate punish-
ment.
If legislators and Gov. Jeb Bush do not act
soon, the law that allows DNA testing to be
done on death row inmates will sunset Oct. 1.
Dodge, who visited Tallahassee recently to


push for extending the availability of this last-
resort defense for convicted felons, calls the
decision a "no-brainer."
We agree.
In a state where thousands protested
pulling the feeding tube from Terri Schiavo,
there should be strong support to allow inno-
cent men and women the opportunity DNA
testing provides to escape a death sentence.
What lawmaker could rightfully declare
we should not worry about killing innocent
people?
If the provision to allow DNA testing
expires, that is exactly what could happen.
Several legislators are working now to tack
an amendment onto an existing bill to


extend the postconviction DNA testing pro-
gram. We believe they should make the pro-
gram permanent.
Those who might protest the cost should
be aware there is $34 million in federal fund-
ing available to pay for such tests under the
Justice for All Act signed into law by President
Bush in 2004. Even if Florida did have to
shoulder the costs, it would be a small price
to pay to spare the life of an innocent person
- someone who has already had to bear the
burden of a trial, conviction and imprison-
ment for a crime he or she did not commit.
Write or call your legislators and urge
them to make postconviction DNA testing
permanent.


lose we


BOB VEDDER
COLUMNIST

The Gondolier Sun teamed
up with the South County
Family YMCA to see if we
could improve the health.and
fitness of the people in the
Venice area. To give a little
incentive, the Gondolier Sun
.torew in some prize money,
knowing that sometimes a lit-
dte incentive is all-it takes.
'The' contest was divided
between those who wanted to
lose weight on their own and
those who joined the YMCA
for classes, coaching and
access to its wellness center.
It was no surprise that the
people who shelled money
out to do it right did better
than those who did it on their
own.
Only 12 percent of the peo-
pie who signed up to do it on
their own, including me,
made it to the end, while 47
percent of those doing the Y
program made it. Of the eight
prizes we gave away for most
weight, fat and inches lost,
only one came from the
group that did it alone: Rev.
Chris Grey, who had higher
powers on his side. Bill Ward
was the overall top winner.
It was interesting' that
those who stuck with it in
either program lost similar
amounts of weight: 7 pounds
on average with the voluntary
group and 9 for the Y bunch.
So, if you are committed it
matters not how you do it, but
it is a lot easier to get commit-
ted when you invest in your
health and get help to achieve
your goals. A friend of ours
was told by her doctor that
she needed to lose weight or
she would not live as long as
she would like. That was
incentive. I wish more doc-
tors got a tougher with their
patients about their weight.
How did I do? Well, 10
weeks after I started this
weight loss, I weighed exactly
the same'as when I started.
When I get committed I
can lose weight with the best
of them; I just. haven't been
able to get it in gear. I would
love to do as well as Mayor
Dean Calamaras has done,
losing more than 40 pounds.
He looks great. I wondered if
he was getting ready to model
another ladies' outfit in a
fashion show like he did last
year for the woman's group at
the hospital.
My pediatrician son, Todd,
was running a health fair in
Naples and one of the dis-
plays showed how much


sugar different foods and
drinks had. How they got the
point across was to show how
many packs of sugar each
product contains. For in-
stance, there are four packs of
sugar in a package of M and
M's, five in a Reese's Peanut
Butter Cup, one pack in two
Life Savers, three packs in a
tablespoon of maple sugar
and 10 packs in a 12-ounce
Coke.
Needless to say, these kind
of things don't help us lose
weight.
******

By's Crack: Doctors
first attacked smoking,,
then charcoal-broilgd
Steaks, then bacon,-then -
-ArVicks VapoRub, then artifi-
cial sweeteners .and now
coffee. The point they are
trying to make is that birth
can'be hazardous to your
health.


*******
The Gondolier Sun has
enjoyed sponsoring the Pigs
in Paradise event with some
other wonderful corporate
sponsors. This morning many
people now own a pig as a
result of the auction held at
the Venice Yacht Club last
night.
It is, nice that they can
remain out another year for
those that want them left out.
They have been a popular
attraction. Visitors love to
make the tour to see the pigs.
The Venice Art Center is
the big winner, garnering lots
of money to outfit new addi-
tions to its building.
****** *
The Muses awards were
given out Tuesday to those
people who have excelled in
the arts. Bonnie Kaiser and
Jean Trammell gave out
awards to many people, in-
cluding Lynn and Paul
Moseley, the Pigs in Paradise
champions; the Gondolier
Surl's Kim Cool; Kathleen
Weiner; and Jean Trammell
herself for her public arts
works, one ofwhich will be on
the back of the Gondolier Sun
print center sometime this
year.
The award that received
the most applause was the'
Venice High Band Boosters,
who raised $60,000 to help
the hurricane victims.
The Relay For Life last
weekend was the best ever,
with more than $135,000
raised. David Joyner has done
a wonderful job as president
of the local unit run by Amy
Tougaw. Elliott Dibbs was a
great chair of last weekend's
event.
Many teams raised a lot of
money. The Joyner team,
Laurel Nokomis School,
Waterford and Montgomery

Please see VEDDER, 12A


/ "Copyrighted Material


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Available from Commercial News Providers'
I I R3It;_ fI ILX \I


LETTERS FROM OUR READERS


It's almost like the circus never left


Editor:
When I first came here we had a real circus. Then we looked
for a corporate welfare subsidy of $1 million to repair the train
tracks so they could railroad the circus to winter in Venice. We
couldn't find money.
Then they railroaded us into buying the vandalized depot
with more zeros attached to a dollar than I ever fathomed,
earned or was taxed for. It looks nice and depicts the historic
railroading that created this town, but we could not create a
better depot use either.
Now, the railroad had the useless track left, narrow, with no
purpose whatsoever, and the big money actually found big--
zero politicians, who negotiated this overgrown, inflatable,
unusable property into an imaginary linear bike/jogging/hik-
ing trail yet to be built with more zeros borrowed.
When we paid the 1-cent sales tax for mandated land pre-
serve purchases, I thought we would create circular people
trails with peanuts, rather than clearing and paving useless,
abandoned RR land. We would actually not have to backtrack
to linear parking lots.
The preserve's scrub jays would like the peanuts and the idle
environment would retain its value through useful interaction.
You can't go into this fire-hazardous land, nor take your dog
along, even on a leash. Maybe we could now build a circular
dog trail on the old three-ring circus grounds.
This newspaper is an endless, wonderful exchange of enter-
taining ideas. Let'em have it. Keep the Gondolier Sun news
coming on stronger and weaker days.
Egan Tancre
Venice


Bush has been
great for America

Editor:
GeorgeW. Bush is the pres-
ident that is looking out for
us. Not only did he defend us
against those who attacked us
on Sept. 11, but he also went
on to stop a dictatorship that
would have seen our demise
down the road and start
democracy in an area that will
help us in that part of the
world. If we don't win the war
on terrorism, nothing else
really matters!
Unlike the previous ad-
ministration, which looked
the other way as our em-
bassies: were bombed, the
first attack on the World Trade
Center in 1993 and the sui-
cide bombers who attacked


the Cole in 2000, this presi-
dent didn't wait for another
. Sept. 11 or another Pearl Har-
bor.
President Bush inherited a
falling economy that started
near the end of the Clinton
administration. Quoting the
words of George Gilder, "Rea-
gan's economic policies prov-
ed to be so popular that they
were extended, for the most
part, under President Clinton
and a Republican Congress.
"As Reagan understood,
high tax rates do not stop
someone from being rich:
Those who are already rich
can move their money to pro-
tected havens. High tax rates
stop poor people from getting
rich."
' It appears President Bush
also realized that and our


economy is recover
Protecting us fr
ists, so we continue
life of liberty, a purse
piness and a recover
omy. What more co
for?
Lilliar


Nothing a few go
rods couldn't fix
Editor:
In times past
knew "spare the roi
child." Today we
reward for repeE
process. Students:
at home and teac
insufficient control
rooms.
Dan Parrett is sa
run a loose ship
High School. It is r
that more drug bus
ducted there than i
county schools c
Under Dan, one te,
"no one had to g
and no one failed."
At Venice Pr(
Church's ECC the,
likely the following
ciplined parents d
undisciplined ch
morning. Experien
ers attempt to shoi
one how to beha
plaint! Naturally th
were the villain's
. fired at once by an
enced cleric.
Pity the poor I
today who are witi
pline at home and i


. EDITOR'S NOTE: Th
attorney is considering
against four former an(
rent employees of the
Childhood Center in 29


ring.
om terror-
o t enjor a


Venice Police Department. The
investigation continues.


suit ofhap- When good
ring econ- water goes bad
uld we ask Editor:
Several years ago all-new
water lines were installed in
n lannarone the South Venice area. Every
Englewood homeowner was contacted
and advised that anyone with
od ;well water or a swimming
pool was required to have a
backflow valve installed to
everyone prevent any contamination
dsote from the well water or the
reaspoil the swimmingpool.
alig that Homeowners were advised
ing have at that time that you did not
hebs have have to install a backflow
he hcav valve unless you had well
Sn clas water or a pool; that's why
aid to have many homes in Venice
at Venice Gardens do not have one
ao surprise installed.
ts are con- If the city of Venice is
in all other pumping good, filtered water
combined. into our homes through our
acher said, city water meter, why does it
o to class, consider the water to be con-
t c taminated once it comes
esbyterian through the meter into our
scenario is homes? Common sense
g: Undis-o should tell us if the city
rop off an pumped good, filtered water
>ild each into our homes, only good,
ced teach- filtered water should return
w the little back through our city water
ve. Com- meter.
e teachers Why is the city so intent on
and teacher forcing us to have these back-
in experi- flow valves installed or be
1inexpen-fined?
little ones Who really stands to bene-
hout disci- fit by all these backflow valves
in society being installed?
I Our Auburn Woods Circle
Dan Farley is a beautiful, landscaped
Venice community that stands to be
destroyed by all these ugly
ie state pipes being exposed 12 inch-
charges es above groundwith a brass
d tw cur- backflow valve.
Stwo cur- Every homeowner in Ven-
Early ice should be concerned and
9 instances


of child abuse documented by the


Please see LETTERS, 12A


It's


hard to







1 2A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005


LET 'EM HAVE M IS THERE TOO MUCH PROTECTION OF
SCRUB JAYS? CALL 207-1111.


Height restrictions are a joke


Horse is gone. Height restrictions where? I just returned
to Venice after a few years' absence and the first thing that I
noticed when approaching the island from the north bridge
was several rather homely and overbearing condos sitting
along the Intracoastal. I couldn't believe my eyes. Why would
anyone allow the construction of buildings so out of place
aesthetically? To add insult to injury, I understand there will be
three of those towers. A few days later I was reading in the local
paper that everyone was concerned about the height of build-
ings being constructed in Venice. It appears that the horse is
already out of the barn and the damage has already been done.
How can the city restrict any type of construction in the future?
Shame on the city of Venice, city council and anyone who
would be willing to destroy the charm of once-beautiful Venice


just for the sake of money.

Too much. I'm another
reader that much preferred
getting the Gondolier Sun two
days a week rather than three
as you have it now. If you have
to have it three days a week, I
agree with the majority of
your readers that I would pre-
fer it any other day than Sun-
day. If you did it Tuesday,
Thursday, Saturday or Mon-
day, Wednesday, Friday -
anything besides Sunday. It's
just too much reading mater-
ial on a Sunday morning.
Rave for Lorraine. Lorraine
Coccaro, I want to congratu-
late you for your columns in
the paper. You're very truthful,
and being that I'm from the
greatest generation this coun-
try has known I can see exact-
ly what you're talking about.
And I hope you convince
some of these baby boomers
or whatever they are that lis-
ten to the garbage about
communism in this country
- they're the ones that are
trying to break the Consti-
tution. So keep up the good
work and God bless you.
Seats will fill up. The six-
screen Regal Venetian Cin-
ema on 41 bypass served


Venice-area moviegoers well
until it was demolished last
year. The movie house was
rarely crowded, even after
half the 12 screens at Sarasota
Square were closed a few
years ago. Now we are told
that the Venice area will short-
ly be blessed with two new
theaters with 32 screens. The
entire crowded area of Sara-
sota-Bradenton is served by
eight theaters with a total of
about 80 screens, including
the six screens at Sarasota
Square. Only a huge popula-
tion gain in our region could
make 32 screens profitable in
the near future. But developer
Mike Miller is building the
two theaters, and you can be
sure he knows the population
will be available, even if your
local government leaders
don't.
Begging. Please, please,
pretty please give us back our
Saturday Gondolier Sun with,
the TV book and a sneak peek
at the ads.
Not so eager. The unmerci-
ful cruelty of the people who
participated in the efforts to
extend the nightmare that life
became for Terri Schiavo was


GIVE US A CALL
The Let'em Have It line allows readers to sound off on issues of
local interest Opinions expressed here are solely those of the callers
and do not necessarily represent the views of this newspaper.
Options or~aoments that are personal attacks on people; attacks
ptel commercials for businesses; political endorsements; br other-
Wise unfit for publication'will not be printed. If you would like to par-
ticipate, call the line at 207-1111. Call no more than once a week.
Please keep your comments brief. The line is available all hours. Caller
identification is not required.


disgusting. These Christians,
one would think, if they really
believed in heaven would
surely wish for Terri Schiavo
to be there instead of in the
prison her body had become.
But no, the truth is for all their
claims of the bliss heaven will
be, I have never yet met one
Christian who was eager to
depart this life on Earth to get
to heaven.
Save the trees. It's the first
time I've ever called. Please
put the paper back just to two
days a week, on Wednesdays
and Saturdays, like it used to
be. We can't afford any more
trees to print papers that are
not necessary. I think if you
took a poll, most people
would find this better than
what it is. Please put it back to
two days a week.
No right. I'm reading the
paper today and I see that
someone who lives in Bella
Costa or Costa Brava com-
plaining about a new building
that's right next door to them.
That is the most ridiculous
thing I've ever heard in my
life. What do you think all the
residential people did when
they were building Costa
Brava? They were complain-
ing about them. If you live in a
tall building you have no right
to complain about another
tall building being built right
next to you. It's ridiculous.
Bad spell. When are you
going to hire more proofread-
ers?The spelling in your paper
is getting worse all the time.
Thanks, council. The ap-
proach to the island from the
Circus Bridge is beautiful. The
palm trees really set off this
whole area. City council
should be thanked for putting
in those beautiful trees.
Jets out. It's a damn shame
what the airport is doing to
Venice and surrounding
areas. Another crash into the
gulf the next time it could
be a home schQol or condo.
What used to be a nice, quiet
community is now so, noisy
with the Lear jets. Who is in
charge, to let this happen to
us? Let's band together and
get the jets out of here quick.


LETTERS -rom pag'!A
voice their opinion.

Michael F. Komisarz
Venice
Pay the price
or pay the price
Editor:
Last year at this time (April
11-May 8) I was happily dri-
ving around Europe paying
between $5.75-$6.25 a gallon
for gas. I drove 8,000 kilome-
ters (4,800 miles) at about 25
miles per gallon. Gas com-
plaints by Europeans were
really low compared to us
Americans in 2005.
Europe has thousands of
modern windmills all over
and many solar energy de-
vices, plus the new atomic
energy plants and new re-
fineries mine a lot of coal and
pump oil from the North Sea.


Many of these new energy
sources were developed or
built since the 1980s.
In Florida and the United
States we have very few new
power sources. There are no
new oil refineries since 1970.
The only energy windmills I
have seen were in the deserts of
California. The last atomic
energy plant built in the United
States was Fermi in Michigan
in 1980, which took more than
10 years to build because of the
environmentalists.
What percentage of Florida
residents would permit a new
refinery to be built within 3
miles of their home, or a new
atomic energy plant within 5
miles, a bank of 10 windmills
on the nearest beach, or drill
for oil God forbid in the
Gulf of Mexico off the coast of
Venice or Sarasota to save
them 50 percent on the cost
of gas and electricity? I would


wager less than 15 percent.
So suffer with the costs. You
are asking-no, begging-for
them to keep going higher and
have less availability

Rob Rebholz
Sarasota

MISSION STATEMENT
To be the superior quality, low
cost provider of information
and advertising in the local
communities we serve. We
will continuously improve: the
value of information provided
to our customers; the value
and results for our advertisers;
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ees.


VEDDER from page llA


Carpets were fabulous, as
were all the teams that set the
milestone.
The Sons of Italy once
again generously provided
the survivors dinner. The very
talented Lynn Lewis and Don
Hay handled the emcee
chores with their usual talent
and aplomb.
***** *
Today's Ism (while Sue and
I were out on the Thursday
night stroll downtown we saw
this on one of many hand
towels at 2 for Me and 1 for
You): Best way to get a man to
do something is suggest he is
too old for it.

The Venice-Nokomis Ro-
tary Club and Sertoma Club
honored the girls basketball
team andthe wrestling team
at a joint meeting Thursday.
Those programs are more
examples of, the wonderful
athletic programs we have at
Venice High School.
The boys baseball team is
seeded first in the district and
will play inVenice on Tuesday,
and the girls softball team
Will be playing Thursday, also
in Venice, in hopes of winning


the region title. Both serve
good hamburgers and hot
dogs have dinner and
watch our teams; they are
very good.
******
Everybody wants to know
what in the heck is going on
with the Pinebrook Road
extension. Nothing has hap-
pened there in a long time.
. When I asked a county
commissioner, I was remind-
ed that this project is being
done by the developer. But on
investigation I found that the
project has been stalled by
further design work, changes
and approvals. The county
has been processing all that
and expects the job resumed
in a few weeks. I have heard
that before; hope it is true.
Someone involved in a
fund-raiser in Charlotte
County told me of a great auc-
tion items that fetched some
good money: The county was
offering one-day permitting.

Someone suggested, now
the Venice Community Cen-
ter is nearly fixed up, that the
next project in that area is to
make a nice park setting, with


a fountain and benches and
walkway between facilities in
the middle of the complex
where the huge oak and re-
tention pond are now. Mak-
ing the drainage go under-
neath that area could be quite
expensive but may be doable.
It's a nice idea.
I walked through the com-
munity center. The lobby
looks like it will be really nice
and there certainly are a lot
more rooms for meetings of
all sizes. They have the wall
board up but have not put the
ceilings in yet, which looks
like it may be the next thing.
******
Today there is a lunch at
Sharky's with proceeds going
to the Literacy Volunteers of
America, thanks to Greg No-
vack and Mike Pachota. It is a
good way to enjoy the view,
have good food and help a
great cause. The cost is $20 for
all-you-can-eat hamburgers
and chicken.

Bumper sticker: Always
remember you are unique ...
just like everyone else.
Bob Vedder writes a regu-
lar column for this page.


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Center for Innovation
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SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


12A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


I


-


I


I








OBITUARIES


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 13A


Helen V. Hill
Helen Veronica Hill of
Venice died Wednesday, April
27,2005. She was 81.
She was born Jan. 7, 1924,
in Newport, R.I., and moved
to the area five years ago from
Indianapolis, Ind. She was a
homemaker and mother and
was of the Catholic religion.
Survivors include two
daughters, Diana J. Bewley of
Indianapolis and Nelene
Reisinger of Venice; a son,
James Jr. of Indianapolis; a
brother, Joseph B. Armstrong,
Jr. of San Diego, Calif.; four
grandchildren; and seven
great-grandchildren.
Services: Memorial services will
be private.
Diane M. Nichols
Diane M. Nichols of Noko-
mis died Tuesday, April 26,
2005. She was 66.
She was born April 13,
1939, in Chicago, Ill., and
came to the area 32 years ago
from Lombard, Ill. She was a
homemaker, and attended
Our Savior Lutheran Church.
Survivors include her hus-


band, Chuck of Venice; a
daughter, Lisa Nichols of Port
St. Lucie, Fla.; a son, Jon of
Venice; a sister, Gloria Felcyn
of Nokomis; a brother, Don
Jud of Orange Park, Fla.; three
grandchildren; and one great-
grandchild.
Services: Memorial services will
be private. Ewing Funeral Home
is in charge of arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial-dona-
tions may be made to the
American Cancer Society, South
Sarasota County Unit, 2100
South Tamiami Trail, Suite A,
Venice, 34293; or Hospice of
Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238.
Robert M. Opsatnick
k Robert M. Opsatnick
of Osprey died Friday,
April 29, 2005. He was
61.
He was born April 4, 1944,
in Hazleton, Pa., and moved
to the area in 2003 from
Omaha, Neb.
He was a retired IBM engi-
neer and a member of VFW
Post 15010 inVenice. He was a
U.S. Air Force veteran of the


Vietnam War and a Roman
Catholic.
Survivors include two
daughters, Anne of Venice
and Noelle Peterson of Knox-
ville, Tenn.; two sons, Jeff of
North Port and Jeff Burton of
Omaha; two brothers, Joseph
of Sharpsburg, Ga., and
Thomas of Allentown, Pa.;
and four grandchildren.
Services: A celebration of life
will be private.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to the
American Cancer Society, 2801
Fruitville Road, Suite 250,
Sarasota, 34237.
Kim Pluchino
Kim Pluchino of Venice
.died Tuesday, April 26, 2005.
She was 47.
She was born Oct. 26,1957,
in New York, N.Y., and moved
to Venice eight years ago from
Whitestone, N.Y. She was
employed as an office man-
ager for Science 80 magazine
in NewYork.
Survivors include a daugh-
ter, Jessica of Venice; her par-
ents, Anita and John Boyajian


of Venice; and a sister, Steph-
anie Stein of East Greenwich,
R.I.
Services: Services will be pri-
vate for the family. Ewing
Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to the
American Cancer Society, 2801
Fruitville Road, Suite 250,
Sarasota, 34237.
Marvin A. Schlatter
Marvin A. Schlatter of Ven-
ice died Wednesday, April 27,
2005. He was 88.
He was born July 6,1916, in
Detroit, Mich., and came to
the area in 2004 from Sara-
sota. He was a retired engi-
neer in the automotive and
aerospace industries and was
a member of the Society of
Covered Bridges. He was a
Seventh-day Adventist.
Survivors include his wife,
Marianne; two stepdaugh-
ters, Rose Miller of Sarasota
and Nickolette Lakins of Ven-
ice; two sons, Warren of Med-
eotel, Calif., and Stanley of
Cookville, Tenn.; a sister,


Merian Hughes of Westland,
Mich.; a' brother, Howard of
Elsworth, Mich.; six grand-
children; two step-grand-
daughters; and one great-
grandson.
Services: A memorial service
will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday,
May 7, at Venice Memorial
Gardens.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice
of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, 34238.
Kenneth E. Snyder
k Kenneth E. Snyder of
Venice died Thursday,
April 28, 2005. He was
80.
He was born Feb. 19, 1925,
in Xenia, Ohio, and moved to
the area in 1986 from Dela-
ware, Ohio.
He retired as president of
1st National Bank in Dela-
ware after starting with the
bank in Springfield, Ohio.
He served in the U.S. Army
Air Corps as a 1st lieutenant
in World War II. He was a
member of the American Le-
gion in Venice, the Sarasota


Chapter of Chorus of the Keys
and Waterford Golf Club. He
attended the Venice Church
of the Nazarene.
Survivors include his wife
of 20 years, Luella; a daughter,
Lucinda Cimino of Delaware;
three sons, Donald of Tampa,
Stephen of Urbana, Ohio, and
Bruce of Valrico, Fla.; two;
stepdaughters, Cheryl Cullen
of North Brook, i., and Lyn-
nea Amweg of Columbus,
Ohio; two stepsons, Greg
Page of Glenwood, Wash.,
and Joe Page of Lima, Ohio; a
sister, Majorie Lauver of
Schaumberg, III.; 11 grand-
children; eight step-grand-
children; 13 great-grandchil-
dren; arid seven step-great-
grandchildren.
Services: A memorial service
will be held Thursday, May 5, at
the Church of the Nazarene.
Contributions: Memorial dona-
tions may be made to Life Path
Hospice & Palliative Care, 3010
W. Azelle St., Tampa, 33609; or
the Sarasota Chapter of the
Chorus of the Keys, c/o Dave
Frantz, Treasurer, 5750 Old
Ranch Road, Sarasota, 34241.


POLICE BEAT


Venice Police
Department arrests
Vicki L. Conner, 40, 500
block Kumquat Court, Sara-
sota. Charge: battery on a law
enforcement officer. Bond: no
listing.
*i Cameron B. Williams, 26,
S100 block E. Airport Ave., Ven-
ice. Charge: simple battery.
Bond: $750.
Galldenco Gorgonia, 47,
400 bloc k E. 58th Ave., Bra-
denton. Charge: no driver li-
cense. Bond: no listing.
Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office arrests
Max R. Hinkle, 54, 4300
block Olive Ave., Sarasota.
Charge: DUI. Bond:.$500.
Willis W. Chambers, 64,
600 block Coquina Court, No-
komis. Charge: DUI. Bond: no
listing. ,
Scott C. NIland, 38, 5000
block LUd.cjae Road. Venice.


Charge: driving while license
suspended with knowledge.
Bond: $1,500.
*William J.Vitch, 23, 16000
block N.W. Second Ave.,
Miami. 'Charge: trespassing
on a construction site. Bond:
no listing.
Dennis D. Stange, 44,
3200 block Carlton Arms
Drive, Tampa. Charge: driving
while license suspended -
habitual traffic offender.
Bond: no listing.
Lisa Gregorek, 30, 10000
block South Tamiami Trail,
North Port. Charges: posses-
sion of rock cocaine, posses-
sion of paraphernalia. Bond:
no listing.


Jose A. Pagan, 60, 1500
block Lakeside Drive, Venice.
Charges: possession of rock
cocaine, possession-of para-
phernalia. Bond: $1,120.
David P Pascht, 21,1300
block Piedmont Road, Venice.
Charge: no motorcycle en-
dorsement, racing on high-
way. Bond: no listing.
Thomas A. King, 44, 100
block Virginia Court, Engle-
wood. Charge: possession of
marijuana less than 20 grams.
Bond: $120.
Aurelio Salvador, 33, 5000
State Road 674, Wimauma.
Charge: no valid driver li-
cense. Bond: no listing.
Margarito Bautista-Fuen-


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DOB: 2/24/85
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MetLife Bank (941)366-0687x111 2.96/3.00 $5K 1.14/1.15-$1K '3.83/3.90 $1K 4.40/4.50 $1K

Peninsula Bank (941) 474-7734 2.25 / 2.27 $50K 3.00 / 3.04 -$1K 3.50/3.56 -$1K 5.00/5.12 $1K

State Farm Bank (941) 492-2400 1.49 /1.50 $1 K 3.00 / 3.05 $500 3.20 / 3.25 $500 4.26 / 4.35 $500

Tarpon Coast National Bank (941) 629-8111 1.06/1.07 $25K 2i05 / 2.07- $1 OK 2.54 / 2.57- $1 OK /-

Brokers
Edward Jones (941) 637-6787 1.96 / N/Q N/Q. 3.20 / 3.20 $5K, 3.65 / 3.65 $5K 4.45/ 4.45 $5K


Edward Jones, Port Charlotte (941) 624-2411 -/- -/- -/ -' -


Edward Jones, Venice (941) 485-6556 1.96 /1.96~- $500 3.20 / 3.20 $5K, 3.65 / 3.65 : $5K 4.45 /4.45 $5K


SRaymond James & Assoc. (941) 627-4774 /'- '-/- -1-, -/-


Smith Barney Venice (941) 488-3994 -/- 3.20 / 3.23 $1K 3.65 / 3.65 $1K 4.45 / 4.45 $1 K
This service is provided by The National Financial News Services. Figures are current as of April 28, 2005 and are subject to
change without notice. Call (610),344-7380 ext. 111 if you are interested in participating in this survey. N/A service is not
available. No Quote figures were not quoted this week.


BANKRUPTCIES
,he following have filed
petitions with the U.S.
Bankruptcy Court for the
Middle District in Tampa.
SARASOTA COUNTY
Myron Theolander Den-
nis, 2136 Penguin Lane, North
Port. April 20. Chapter 13. 05-
07694.
John Said Hilow Jr., 824
Linden Road, Venice. April 19.
Chapter 13. 05-07610.
James Joseph Jirik Jr., 202
Boulder Drive, Venice. April
19. Chapter 13. 05-07609.
Francisco Perez, 3237
Cake Terrace, North, Port.
April 14. Chapter 13. 05-
07132.
( Russell E Smith, 307 Argus
Road, Venice. April 15. Chap-
ter 13. 05-07168.
Barry Snider, 1732 Forest,
Road, Venice. April 17. 13.05-
07312.
Robert Suarez, 4057 Fouiin-
tainebleau St., North :Port.,
April 19. Chapter 13. 05-
07640.
Barbara M. Downie, 3250
Lullaby Road, North ,Port.
April 18. Chapter 7. 05-07455.
John J. Fellin, 832 Diane,
Circle, Englewood. April 15.
Chapter 7. 05-07239.
James R. Fuller, 2374
Briant St., North Port. April
19. Chapter 7.05-07488.
Dennis Charles Gradito,
'8150 LombraAve., North Port.
April 19. Chapter 7. 05-07635.:
Cheryl Ann Hurst, 6323
Sooner St., North Port. April
'20. Chapter 7. 05-07710.
SherriLynn Keene, 5191
Butterfly Lane, North Port.
April 19. Chapter 7. 05-07547.
Marie I. Laurie, 321 Grant
Road, Venice. April 15. Chap-
ter 7.05-07170.
Maria Morales, 1101 Pan-
acea Blvd. #302, North Port.
April 14. Chapter 7. 05-07128.
Chapter 7: inmmnediate
liquidation of assets, proceeds
to creditors; Chapter 11:
immediate.protection from
creditors, reorganization of
finances under court super-
vision; Chapter 13: debtor
promises to pay creditors on
a court-approved schedule
even though creditors don't


boider


AREA MORTGAGE RATES

Financial 15-yr. fixed 30-yr, fixed Adjustable Financial 15-yr. fixed 30-yr. fixed Adjustable
nstituon Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP. Rate/ LIP s Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP Rate/ LIP
Points Points Points Points Points Points
A 2 Z Home Loans 5.000 30 5.375 30 4.000 30 First Rate Mortgage Group 5.125. 30 5.625 30 No 30
941-629-3450 0 0 0 800-887-9106 0 0 Quote
Absolute Mortgage Co.' 5.000 5.375 3.375 Florida Mortgage Corp. 5.125 5.375 30 4.125 30
888-90-HOMES 0 0 0 FHA/VA 888-825-6300 0 0 0
Accountable Mortgage 5.125 30 5.500 400 30 Golden Rule Mortgage 4.625 30 5.125 30 2.500 30
FHANVA 800-840-8771 0 0 0 FHANVA 800-991-9922 1.38 1.25 1
All Fund Mortgage No 30 No 30 No 30 Guardian Mortgage 5.000 30 5,500 30 No 30
866-535-8987 Quote Quote Quote 800-967-3060 0 0 Quote
American Federal Mortg. 5.000 30 5,125 30 3.250 30 H.D. Financial 5.500 6.000 No 30
30 30 30 30 30 30
FHANVA 888-321-4687 .5 1.50 0 888-368-0655 0 0 Quote
American Home Finance 5.000 30 5.500 3.625 30 Home Finance of America 5.000 5.375 3.000
888-429-1940 0 0 0 941-929-9112 0 0 0
America's Best Mortgage 5.000 5.500 30 No 30 Homestead Mortgage No No 30 4.000
FHANVA 800-713-8189 0 0 Quote 888-760-6006 Quote Quote 0
Amicus Mortgage Group 5.250 30 5.500 30 No 30 Lighthouse Mortgage 5.125 30 5.500 No 30
VA 877-385-4238 0 0 Quote FHANVA 800-784-1331 0 0 Quote
Anmiru'i Fujrdi 5.000 30 5.375. 3 3.000 Sovereign Mortgage 5.125 0 5.500 4.875
IAA30 30 30 30 30 30
FHAVA 800-774-0779 0 0 0 FHANVA 800-996-7283 0 0 0
Borrower's Advantage 5.000 5.500 30 No 30 Stepping Stone Lending 5.000 30 5.500 30 No 30
VA 888-510-4151 0 0 Quote FHNWA 800-638-2659 0 0 Quote
Century Home Funding 4.500 5.000 30 3.375 30 Summit Mortgage No 30 No No 30
30 3030 30 30
FHNVA 800-224-7006. 3 3 2 80.j-377-0623 ., Quote Quote Quote
Eagles .1,rtgag 30 3l, r 3 Tipon Coasi Nal Ban. 5 37 3.2 3 30
3.30 330 30 30
FHNVA 941-496-9800 Quote Quote Quote 941-629-2884 0 0 0
Fast & Easy Mortgage No 30 No 30 No 30
,VA 813-404-7304, Quote Quote Quote
r 'i[ 1' [,, t, l, [' T rip ,h:.,',1 o ,,,i,',.,l [ii ... ,r, .'ii ,v i. ',i iro A s.i' Ap 'I' 2r 'I'., anc are subjectto change without,,l,,:e ,)uo ,i% ,p v w i ,:,, i, :'i, i i,'.iup i', w ,II,,, tI ir i ,tr. ],:,',
i, ;.- ,', j i, T:.] 0,i[ ',,' t l ,] s.. i riNI :.'i ,i i tr, iio: Contact lender directly for APR's, 'JA :iji. ,:, :.iO v i LI' .Lt, P .ia, d .u :(,a ,, C ': i i ). ij, I
j.. r. .. s-r,-,iui, ,:,:,,':,,) i,:,i i ir',: r,,,: .i. i L .i rr Ba" ri i l i A ie 31 81 : A1 For additional information on mortgages, goto: ww .SarasotaMortgageRates.com.


More wrinkles in the face; less wrinkles in the transaction!
Pill# Wheeler Real Estate of Venice, Inc.
MARY ANN FAHEY Office: 941-496-8700 Direct: 941-223-4905
CRS, GRI E-mail: maryannfahey@wheeler-homes.com Website: www.maryannfahey-homel.com


1-i


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wwww.colonialbank.com Member FDIC

F I NAN C IAL S T R E N G T H I N L O-C A L HAN D S

*Free for the first year. After first year, $5,000 average daily collected balance required to avoid $10 monthly service charge. **Loans are
subject to credit approval. Rates are subject to change. +The Investment Savings account is'a variable three-tiered interest-bearing account
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A.G. EDWARDS.
FULLY INVESTED IN OUR CLIENTS.



LOOKING FOR REGULAR INCOME?
CONSIDER BONDS.

By staggering your bond investments, you can receive
a monthly interest check instead of one check every
six months. You'll get a regular income stream, which
makes youroverall planning much easier. Call me to
find out more about monthly.bond interest checks.
;investors should keep in mind that as interest rates
rise existing bond prices of already-outstanding fixed-
income sectities tend to fall. Long-term bonds are
generally more exposed to interest rate risk than
short-term bonds.

Call John Holic or Kathryn Anderson 6
4242 S.Tamiami Trail .
Venice, FL ,
941-408-8797 .

20Wi4 ; G. Ldvard & S.:.n In< M rlembir _IP(:


I


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


14A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN







VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 15A


SUNDAY. MAY 1, 2005


STAYING from page 1A
other could become a city
park with nature trails, picnic
shelter and a pond on land
commonly known as the
Ham Property..
All this goes to changing
misperceptions about public
housing and what it can
accomplish, Lopez said.
'All in all, I think people
who saw this place 15 months
ago can actually see a differ-
ence," said Lopez, who is a
certified public accountant
specializing in public hous-
ing. "The ability to continue
the maintenance is because
the culture of public housing
(in Venice) has changed."
Cleaning up the past
There was only a 66 per-
cent occupancy rate when
Lopez took over last year,
despite an ever-growing wait-
ing list. All 17 of the vacant
units had living conditions
that prevented them from
being rented out.
Now, Grove Terrace is up to
a 95 percent occupancy rate.
Four units contaminated
with asbestos are no longer
figured into the rate, so that
leaves just two vacant units.
Roof leaks will keep those
two empty until work is com-
pleted. Just last week, VHA
board members approved the
roofing contract at the same
meeting at which they ap-
proved hiring the financial


consultant.
The roofing job will go to
GLE Construction Services of
Tampa for just more than
$176,000, though the final
price could be less. Exterior
wall work, including siding
replacement, will be evaluat-
ed once all of the roof leaks
are repaired.
Estimates have roof work
being completed within 12
weeks.
"Well, let's get them going
while they're still anxious,"
VHA board member Joe Dal-
ton said just before the vote.
Most of the apartment
interior improvements are
finished. Bare bathroom
sinks held up by metal poles
have been replaced with van-
ities; ventilation fans and
screen doors have been in-
stalled to help with air circu-
lation and mold complaints;
and loose debris on outdoor
patios has been replaced with
chairs, tables and residents
socializing.
Changing the image
A big part of the image
change came from outside
help, like a $20,000 grant from
Gulf Coast Community Foun-
dation of Venice. Lopez said
that grant paid for a full-time
resident services coordinator
who's "been instrumental to
helping our residents change
their lives."
Lopez also is looking to in-
volve Goodwill Industries, as


well as other organizations,
with job training. A portable
classroom was donated to
VHA by Sarasota County
Schools to help with this.
In his own words, the
"slacker" stereotype of public
housing residents no longer
applies to those living at
Grove Terrace. Walking through
the parking lot, he points to
units and lists what people do
for a living: hospital cafeteria
worker, accountant, mechan-
ic, restaurant manager.
Most people work, which
wasn't always the case.
A year ago, only 12 out of
29 occupied units had at least
one resident working full
time. Now it's up to 28 units
out of 44 with at least one full-
time worker more than
double.
That, however, does not
remove the need for housing
assistance in Florida, accord-
ing to Lopez.
Instead, those statistics
simply prove people who
need a hand are regular, hard-
working folks trying to eke
out a living.
Their salaries simply can-
not keep up with property
values. And when it comes to
rental units, few Venice area
properties cater to a family of
four that makes $50,000 or
less a year.
"People who were at the
low end of home ownership,
just on the edge, are now in
this (workforce housing) mar-


ket. ... Bottom line is, they're
now poor or at least need
housing assistance when at
one time they could've owned
their own home," Lopez said.
Future of Grove Terrace
Those thoughts are the fuel
behind Lopez's vision of mix-
ing low-income housing with
moderate incomes. Public
housing needs to change so it
no longer looks like public
housing, so that's why he ask-
ed the VHA board to spend
$2,000 per month to hire a
financial consultant that spe-
cializes in winning redevelop-
ment grants.
The decision last week
finally puts action behind
months and months of rede-
velopment talk by Lopez. Tri-
dent Housing Corp. of Jack-
sonville will work' through
next February's filing dead-
line to compile VHA's tax
credit financing application.
Kristen Packard, head of
Trident Housing, helped ob-
tain financing for 312 units at
Riley Chase in North Port and
264 units at Noah's Landing in
Naples, according to Lopez.
. "She is one of the top three
in the state of Florida," Lopez
told the VHA board.
If the money comes
through, Lopez, wants to
build in phases. As one new
building is finished, current
residents are moved into that
and the old building is torn
down.


The belief is at least 120
units could be built on cur-
rent VHA land. Lopez also has
spoken with a local resident
about purchasing 5-6 acres of
neighboring vacant property,
which could provide another
80 units, but there are no pro-
posed deals as yet.
City park
All of this plays into future
plans by the city, which is
working on finalizing grant
applications to purchase 1.3
acres of land at 115 North U.S.
41 Bypass, commonly known
as the Harn Property, and
turn it into a park and storm-
water retention pond.
Before applying, City Man-
ager Marty Black neededVen-
ice Housing Authority's bless-
ing because the park would
cross VHA's property line.
The vacant boat yard, lock-
ed off from the public with
barbed wire around the fence,
would be demolished and a
stormwater retention pond
installed to relieve flooding
along Hatchett Creek espe-
cially at Grove Terrace.
The rest of the property
would be turned into a park.
There would be a small picnic
shelter, walking trails con-
nected to the city's sidewalk
system, 15 parking spots, a
canoe launch and a bike rack.
Lopez hopes Venice is
awarded the grant. Right now,r
a tall chain-link fence isolates
Grove Terrace from the creek


because it's overgrown with
vegetation and keeps out the
alligators that lurk in it.
A city-maintained park, how-
ever, could open the spot up for
the first time in many years.
"There is an image, a stereo-
type, you know, with chain-link
fences and public housing,"
Lopez said as he grabbed the
wobbly fence. "Something
needs to be done with this."
More room needed
No matter how many site
improvements are done,
those actions only answer the
needs of current residents.
Rebuilding is needed to
help the long list of people
waiting for a room they can
afford, and at the heart of the
list are low-income seniors.
Whether it's private or
public, affordable one bed-
room units hardly ever be-
come vacant in the Venice
area, mostly because seniors
are the ones who rent them.
Grove Terrace has four
one-bedroom units. There
were 25 people, most of them
older adults, on the waiting
list a year ago when Lopez
closed it and informed them
there are no units. As he ex-
pected, it's one year later and
none of those units has
opened up.
"To keep 25 people living
on hope like that is almost
immoral," Lopez said. 'And
that's just the elderly popula-
tion.


p- DR. SCOTT WALKER
Board Certified Optometrist
Eye Examinations Contact Lenses
Fashion Eyewear* Diseases of the Eye
Accepts Medicare Assignments
The Pattison Building
"The Eye Doctor 262 West Miami Avenue, Venice, Florida 34285
S on the Island" 485-2468






SOLAI IRRIGATION
Pump and Irrigation Servicps
QUick Response Competitive Pricing
Specializing in Maintenance & Repairs
Leonhard Sola, Owner Operator
20 years of Experience 941-484-3575
Free Estimates on Maintenance Agreements *




CHOOSING A TOOTHBRUSH.
It would seem that there is little consistency in the style and form of
recommended toothbrushes. Many dentists recommend a rectangular-
shaped soft nylon brush with curves and tufts. Others prefer a harder
brush that softens after use. The advantage of a soft brush is that it
can be used against the gums and teeth with less risk of abrasion. That
is why a soft nylon brush is better for children. However, a medium-
hard brush cleans the hard surfaces of teeth better. If your teeth do not
feel smooth when you run your tongue over them after brushing,
switch to a harder toothbrush. Although tuft design and head angle
may not be very important, a small head, a good handle grip, and a
rubber gum simulator on the handle are.
The toothbrush should be replaced before it has lost its shape and the
bristles are bent. If you use a natural bristle more than once a day, it is
a good idea to have two brushes. By alternating brushes the natural
bristles have time to dry out and become firm again.


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eI Dentalth Professionals I Davis Beyer Davis
Davi Beer avi


Located at Pinebrook Plaza, 834 Pinebrool


Tel: (941) 484-8107
Fax: (941) 484-5186 I

k Rd., Venice, FL 34285


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service Toaay ur it's -ree
lT:l .Mll I .lo] ;!.l"J:Mrl g.


National

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You can enjoy the short-
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Karastan carpet is on sale for
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485-3336







16A VENICE GONDOLIER SUN




Drop in on some of the locals


at Oscar Scherer State Park

BY FRAN PALMERI
GUESTWRITER

Think you know your
neighbors? All these can be
found just a few minutes
from Venice within the
confines of Oscar Scherer
State Park at 1843 South
Tamiami Trail in Osprey.

When you visit the Park,
which is open 365 days a
year from 8 a.m. to sun-
down, you might run into a
few of these animals. Some
are hard to see; others, like
the friendly scrub jays and
little blue heron, are often
around.












The gopher tortoise is one of
the protected animals in the
S .....park. You may see him ambling
down a sandy trail, sampling
A full-time resident of South Creek, the little blue heron is, grasses as he goes. He can live
there in all kinds of weather, fair or foul. An expert fisher- to be 60 years old.
man, he loves supervising folk casting for snook, redfish, or
mullet from the pier along the Lester Finley Trail.


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


PHOTOS COURTESYOF FRAN PALMER
A threatened species, some 20 scrub jay families live in scrub habitat, thickets of short bushy
oaks and pines, along some of the trails in the park. Working hard to increase their numbers,
the park uses prescribed burns to maintain habitat specific to them.


Often in late afternoon, you can hear the loud rattling call of sandhill cranes as they fly over the
park.













Southwest Florida's Guide To


T*,E^ W, N
THE:-SUN





Building & Remodeling Your Home .. .


Sunday, May 1, 2005


A section of the Sun


( Lll[F-2xK


orUI1Lo ". DT


TELhI


sets preview


sale date for their active-adult
community in North Port


NORTH PORT Centex Homes
announces its newest adult commu-
nity in North Port, located off of
Toledo Blade Boulevard.
Cypress Falls at the Woodlands is
preparing to host their first VIP sales
event May 21. The event will be held
at Venetian Falls in Venice, Fla. During
the event registered prospective
buyers participate in a drawing to
determine the order of pre-sales and
homesite selection, which will take
place immediately following the
registration. The much anticipated
event has proven very successful in
other Centex communities.
There are three types of home
designs being offered so that a
tailored home selection can be made


to fit your needs. Home selections
include single-family homes, paired
villas and garden villas in the 200,000
to $300,000s range. You can visit the
model homes at Venetian Falls to see
similar floor plans that will be offered
at Cypress Falls.
"Cypress Falls at the Woodlands
presents more than just a neighbor-
hood with a great location," said
David Lepow, Division Sales and
Marketing manager. "Cypress Falls
will... feature a 12,000 square-foot
clubhouse providing the latest in
fitness equipment, billiards, card,
rooms, Internet access and heated
resort-style pool, everything ... for
Please see CENTEX, page 3


GULFSTREAM
a i l: 'IlOIM I G,, i' (I ,P, L
The Sanibel Model has 3 bedrooms, 2 baths with a study and spacious
dining area off the kitchen with a total of 2,789 sq.ft. The master bath
features an amazing walk around shower and a deep Jacuzzi soaking tub.
' Gulfstream Development & Kane Realty is a full service real estate
company supporting operations of the Development Group. Gulfstream
A/ Development & Kane Realty also
S,/ .handles property management
investments and lot
purchases in addition to
the sale of home and lot
packages. There are
hundreds of lots available,
,.'r'. including waterfront,
standard and duplex. New
golf course condos are
currently being offered.
They have both title and .
mortgage companies on
hand to assist the buyer for
a full turn-key operation.
The Sanibel
Square Footage t
Living area 1o93? vF ft Model located at
0) 1056 Prowess Court
El,, Northport, FL
,, 941-429-4711
,, .I, ,,, www.northportflhomes.com
.. ," L .' = ." ): -.'. t~ f 4 '#,,," ,Ata"mii r : ''


EXAMPLES OF CENTEX HOMES [MODELS. ABOVE, REDWOOD: BELOW, BAYBERRY


Sun prciols by Paige Hall


Get Ready To

ACTIVATE


YOUR LIFESTYLE

Coming Soon
to North Port!
,. ..--V' CL pr Fall it tdih \\;,,:,dlands, an actie adult
S, "nmmtunit) so extraordinary that we've got to
,e : share it with you even before it officially opens.
H* Ideally located, just minutes from 1-75 on
Single-Family Homes Florida's fabulous Gulf Coast
Featuring a resort-style community clubhouse with
heated swimming pool, fitness center, activity areas,
and a whole lot more
Offering a variety of home styles and plans designed
to complement the lifestyles of those 55 years of
Paired Villas age and better
To learn more about
Cypress FaUs at the Woodlands,
call (941) 737-9538, or visit
Garden VilHas www.centexhomes.com NY '


0


Centex Homes








Sunday, May 1, 2005 The 4 Sun




siii) ~


Page 2 D/E/N/C/V


* *.*


&a *6


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Syndicated Content -
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-l e m


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-- --
--.d


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p
a -
- - S


- __


* -


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This is the house that


You don't need special talent to design your dream home. You need only your own life
and the thousands of options you'll find at KB Home. From neighborhood to floor plan to color palette to
countertops, what KB Home does is simply provide your lifestyle with all the possibilities to express itself.
Perhaps it's time to give your life aJiome.



4 NEW-HOME COMMUNITIES TO CHOOSE

. ... --SARASOTA-COUNTY---. ..-----..--.--- -- CHARLOTTE COUNTY
North Port From the 4$240s Deep Creek From the $230s Creekside
Now open for sales. 5, 1- and 2- story flooi~lans tld-cioose Centrally located for commuting td both Ft. Myers and Sarasota, Choose from 6 1
from, with 1,960-3,578 sq. ft. Conveniently located near three this beautiful wooded community is just minutes from the Creekside is ci
airports, North Port is also close to many,area, ul1beiaches, Peace River and Charlotte Harbor. 9 floor plans from 1,711-3,232 dining and enter
40 minutes to Sarasota and I houriiFort Myers. The sq. ft, with, 3-6 bedrooms and 2-3 baths. Oversized homesites access to 1-75 n
semi-tr6fic,' climate and great weather conditions -;available. Public golf course and playground nearby. acti
contribute to North Port's leisurely style of living. To visit Deep Creek sales and model home center, take 1-75 to Exit To temp. sales office
To visat Nor rh Port sales and model home center, take 1-75 to Exit i 70, Kings Hwy., travel east .5 mi. to Sandhill Blvd. and turn right. Model east. Turn right on S
170iKings Hwy., travel east .5 mi. to Sandhill Blvd and turn right. Model homes on left at.24500 Sandhill Blvd. (941) 624:3315 1-75, take Exit 161/J


homes on left at 24500 Sandhill Blvd. (941) 624-3315
,-Burnt.5
Upscale
with bc
Sto cho
S 3-bay
From Pur
Burnt Stor
Island Rd
Village. I


Store Lakes From the $250s
l, rural, deed-restnricted community near Burnt Store Marina,
>ating and golf courses nearby. 9,1 and 2-story floor plans
oose from, with 1,822-3,613 sq. ft, 3-6 bedrooms, 2- and
garages and 2+ baths. Charlotte County School District.
tra Gorda, go soutl'.hr~,nS 41 and right on Burit Store Rd
ire Lakes approx. 6 mi. oh right. From Cape Coral, take Pine
. west to right on Burnt Store Rd. Travel 10 mi. to Burnt Store
lodel home center on right at 16240 Quesa Dr. 1941 639-2095


I mi. on left. (941)





Enter to wii


:. :.. ', -[. :...- s.: ., -


il il,.

L .- 1. r,'


it's all yours'


FROM.'
PUNTA:GORDA'..

I Ahc(2-story flooi.ianswiih'A'p 3. sq,,,
:onveni6ritly locited!66irikh-ools'i"sfioppit) g,,
:er ; taWnent. The ap'pealin'gl'16a"666 arid quick
make for an easy.-c.o mmut6 t6the beach6g:or
tivities in Sarasota and Fort Weis. ' .
ce at Deep Creeic From.1-75, taMe Exit 170 h6ading
Sindhill glvd. to sles Fkei: oin' reft..To site: Frorh
'Jones Loop Rd. turn left on Taylor Rd. to comirfunity
624-3315





in a Wls,(Awiri spa package.
Ufif


Venice Gondolier Sun


**


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ARNOW -as
.MIW -Am
AV AM,
410 -910.
-quo


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Visit kbhoifie.com to gqt detailed. OAAPIWIST. directions from your front door to oursl
"A MON ff IN=
Find vour npw hnmp tndav- WA


". . 1 11 -' `-1 'i&KVHOMES


VIIIU YWJUI IICVV IIUIIIC LUUdY.
Call Toval f, lplendl,RO-IqpAzed assistance. M u c I N

REAITO












Centex Homes enters North Port market


* CENTEX
From page 1

the active lifestyle."
Cypress Falls at the Wood-
lands is located off exit 179 at
Toledo Blade and Panacea.
boulevards. The sales event on
May 21 kicks off the newest
Centex Homes development.
Information and updates
are available by joining the
internet list online at
www.centexhomes.com or by
calling the Cypress Falls sales
team, Tara Dunfee, Tiffany
Kallevik or Marguerite
Campagna at (941) 737-9538.

Background
Centex Homes began in
Dallas in 1950 as a division of
Centex Construction Co., a
residential and commercial
builder. From the beginning,
Centex Homes has been on
the leading edge of technolog-
ical advances in construction.
In the 1950s, Centex Homes
began development of one of
the nation's first master-
planned community, Elk
Grove Village, Ill. This "new
city" debuted in 1957 with
such innovations as under-
ground utilities and phone
lines. It has since grown into a
mature, prosperous Chicago
suburb.
Centex Corp. was incorpo-
rated on Nov. 27, 1968. The
company began trading stock
publicly (NYSE: CTX) a year
later, and.Centex Homes
became a separate business
unit dedicated to residential
construction. This began
almost two decades of
aggressive growth, both
organic and through acquisi-
tion.
Centex Homes primarily
builds neighborhoods of
detached, single-family "move


up" homes. In recent years,
though, it has become
increasingly competitive in
various residential construc-
tion segments. These include:
value-oriented, entry-level
(primarily through its Fox &
Jacobs Homes brand); on-
your-lot (Wayne Homes
brand); active adult;
resort/second home (Marquis
Homes brand); and urban, in-
fill. Centex considers this
segment diversity, as well as
their geographic expansion, as
having been a key contributor
to their success.
To date, Centex Homes has
built more than 300,000
homes and expanded into
approximately 80 metropoli-
tan markets and 23 states. In
1998, Centex Homes expand-
ed into the United Kingdom
with the acquisition of
Fairclough Homes.
Throughout this rapid
growth, Centex Homes'
commitment to the customer
has remained the same.
Centex Homes has ranked
among the Top 10 on Profes-
sional Builder's "Giant 400"
list each year since its incep-
tion in 1968.
In most years, Centex
Homes has placed either first
or second, and in 1998 the
magazine named Centex
Homes its "Builder of the
Year." In 2001, Centex ranked
No. 1 for the second consecu-.
tive year on Fortune maga-
zine's list of 'America's Most
Admired Companies" in the
engineering and construction
category.
Centex Homes' more than
50 years of home building
experience and its commit-
ment to meet andexceed
home buyers' expectations are
key ingredients in the promise
of "Centex Certainty."


-FOR CENTEX HOMES INFO
.. AND UPDATES GO TO
.. -.WWW.CENTEXHOMES.COM.
FOR EVENT TIME CALL THE
CYPRESS FALLS SALES TEAM
.OF TARA DUNFEE, TIFFANY
,,KALLEVIK OR MARGUERITE
4 f CAMPAGNA AT (941) 737-9538.


Dining room in Centex Homes'
Redwood Model.


Inside the Bayberry Model, by Centex Homes, the light pours In from the
kitchen eating area bay window, which is an optional feature.


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

1. What is Centex Homes?
Centex Homes is one of the nation's
largest builders of single-family
detached housing and a leading devel-
oper of residential
neighborhoods. Nationwide, Centex
Homes delivered approximately 20,500
homes in its 2001 fiscal year.


2. When did Centex Homes begin
building homes?
Centex Homes began as a division
Centex Construction Co. in 1950. Since
that-time, Centex Homes has grown
significantly and is currently the largest
business unit of Centex Corp., a publicly
held company (NYSE: CTX), with
revenues approaching $5 billion.


3. How many people does Centex
Homes employ? .
Approximately 4,400 people are


Please see CENTEX, page 4


p ,~ j
i'*J~~ ~A!


Venice Gondolier Sun Sunday, May 1, 2005


Page 3 D/E/N/C/V


v
The 4404. Sun






Venice Gondolier Sun Page 4 D/E/N/CN Sunday, May 1, 2005 The ~ Sun


* CENTEX
From page 3
employed by Centex Homes.
4. Where does Centex
Homes operate?
Centex Homes, based in
Dallas, Texas, builds in more
than 400 neighborhoods, in
approximately 80 markets and
23 states. Among the places
where the company is among
the market leaders are
Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas;
Charlotte, N.C.; Orlando, Fla.;
Norfolk/Virginia Beach, Va.;
Orange County, Calif.; and


Portland, Ore.
5. Does Centex Homes
build outside the United
States?
Centex Homes builds in
England through an affiliate,
Fairclough Homes. Opportu-
nities to expand into Euro-
pean and Latin American
markets are being explored.
6. What distinguishes
Centex Homes from other
builders?
Centex Homes created the
concept of the master-
planned community. The first,
Elk Grove Village, Ill., debuted


in 1957 with such innovations
as the first underground
utilities and phone lines.
Centex Homes is also the only
builder to rank among the Top
10 on Professional Builder's
"Giant 400" list each year
since its inception in 1968.
Centex Homes is the largest
subsidiary of Centex Corpora-
tion, ranked as the most
admired company in the
engineering and construction
sector by Fortune magazine.
7. In what markets, other
than site-build homes, does
Centex Homes compete?
Centex Homes participates


in a number of segments of
the U.S. housing industry
including affordable single
family and multi-family (Fox
and Jacobs), active adult,
urban in-fill (City Homes), on-
your-lot (Wayne Homes) and
second home/resort markets
(Marquis Homes).
8. What kind of reputation


does Centex Homes have
within the industry?
Excellent. Professional
Builder named CEO Timothy
Eller the 1998 Builder of the
Year. In 2000 and 2001,
Fortune magazine named
Centex "'America's Most
Admired Company" in the
engineering and construction
field.


9. How can I get more
information on Centex
Homes?
You can check out
their Web site at
www.centexhomes.com.
or call The Cypress Fall sales
team at (941) 737-9538.
See features on page 5 & 6.


AVOID THE 30% INCREASES COMING THIS YEAR
DESIGN YOUR NEW HOME TODAY WITH 10% DOWN
PAY FOR IT WHEN YOU RETURN NEXT YEAR


Sun phoio by Paige Hall


-..:-rte. -Ho:ry~ i.z- 'jA. .jI1j.irr F.::.u tI7i*.lrr.ije


LAKE


.5010 Country Lakes Drive Ft. Myers, FL 33905-5110
www.crystallakesflorida.com 1-888-694-7454 (toll free)
4-7exit 139. East 1/4 mile on Luckett Road. Left on Country Lakes Drive.
;. One mile to gated entrance on left.


! *. Thinking Mortgage?? t
Think Brenda Peckham
"brenda.peckhanm@53.comn
941-916-4143 o

whodonthveimmdae fPr Fifth Third Bank
'-i. i ,,.. 14:i, ..i i.:., ,- [-, .:, r:., Proud to be part of our com munity.


--. -.- -t- --A.z- ________________________________________


Finan cial Lenders


of North Port


IOCAT


~1j~


AH CreJ it Lonidl~ed
COnrFvUCiOn PC-M LOan.
No %pp. Fec

Jennifer Watters


. '.r.rwageiAe Approval Services, Inc.
"Your Neighbor in Mortgage Lending"
2587 Toledo Blade Blvd. North Port, FL 34289
Toll Free 1-888-229-3573 xl09* Cell: (941) 223-9773
vwww.mortgageapprovalservices.com


I. CAPITAL
I-"'.i FINANCIAL
MORTGAGE
4'.l'ibn : Re ts 9 hl l
,,'.'. l.b i


' di r* he


Nora K. King
Branch Manager
Sr. Loan Officer
noraking,,-'caplin mor tgage.com
119 Tamiami Trail., Suite B
Pori Charlotte, Florida 34253


'IM -T I 11-"]ge?
Wre ha. e the loan ri lor Call Todla.
\\elI. Fargo H'ome N lortiuage
812 Tarnudmi Trad l Suite 2 e Port Cliancrltr. FL --3c,':.
t t--1-10',1-1 Ilione a* 044 1) 255i-6914 Fax~


'Buying, Building or Refinancing your home?)
'. nne Heinen, Loan Officer
SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.
18501 Murdock Circle. 2nd Floor
www.suntrustmortgage.com'aheinen --
,, $1 LSUNT L .ST
$unTrUsT rvqch 'IQ)I-


,.. ,. _,


SCountrywide
HOME LOANS


JPAMIRCd4A. PANJIM)fLLC
T3kANCH MANAGER


1931 T.,riil .i TRAIL #6
POCIRI CH.RLOrTE. FL 33948


(9411i 255-5530 opuon #1
19411 255-1591 Fai
(8001) 669-00075
. E-Mail- PaticialIannuci(aCountrx\'ide.coni
S941-255-5 5 3')0 opt ion #1


This Space

Available

Call: 941-429-3000

Ask for Sales
K


- ~ -. .-. ~


CRY STAL


Office
(941) 255-1111


- S


Peachland Blvd.

HillsbdtdllJilo Blvd


Midway Blvd


im


J ...........


i


MOM A


Sunday, May l,'2005 The Aikk Sun


Venice Gondolier Sun


Page 4 D/E/N/CN


4s








Venice Gondolier Sun Sunday, May 1,2005 Page 5 DIE/N/CA' The ~ Sun


SINGLE FAMILY

Neighborhood Features
A maintained community
Convenient to shopping, dining &
healthcare facilities
Minutes to beaches, shopping
and dining
Easy access to 1-75 and major
thoroughfares
Professionally landscaped
boulevard entrance
Consistent, decorative mailboxes
.throughout neighborhood
Neighborhood street lights and.
sidewalks
Neighborhood color palette by
professional designer
Site Characteristics
Fully sodded homesites with
automatic sprinkler systems
Professionally landscaped
homesite
Sarasota County water and
sewer systems
Concrete driveways and
sidewalks
Quality Home Features
High Flat ceilings
Knockdown ceilings
Ceramic tile flooring in foyer,
kitchen, laundry, baths and cafe
Corian window sills
Smooth Star exterior doors with
20-year warranty
Heavy-duty 8'tempered sliding
glass door
Colonial style raised panel
interior doors
Decorator level door hardware
and locks
Covered and screened lanai as
per plan
Interior laundry area with
Whirlpool Washer and Electric Dryer
Ventilated vinyl-coated closet
shelving
Continuous slide shelving in
master closet
Professional designs by Centex
architects
Centex Quality Warranty
*10-year structural warranty from
RWC
Home Security System
Tubes in the Wall and Tubes
Under the Slab Patented Pest
Defense System
Vapor barrier underPentire home
Steel reinforced poured concrete
foundation
Exterior walls of concrete block
construction on ground floor (frame
2nd story per plan)
Soil treatment under slab for
termite protection
Precast concrete window sills
and lintels
Decorative S-tile roof
Decorative coating on entry,
garage and lanai
Bronze aluminum. window frames,
soffits, fascia and screen enclosures
Quality wall to wall carpet in
designer colors
Tight mesh shelving in pantry
Colonial windows in some
locations
Extended 2 year fit and finish
warranty
1/2" thick stucco exterior with
textured finish
Gourmet Kitchen Features
Quality, recessed-panel maple
cabinetry with 42" uppers
Whirlpool radiant electric range
with self-cleaning oven
*Whirlpool top-mount refrigerator
Whirlpool microwave
Whirlpool dishwasher
Whirlpool continuous feed waste
disposal
Ice-maker line plumbed-in
Double compartment cast iron
sink
Tilt-out drawers at kitchen sink
Moen One-Touch faucet
Spacious pantry as per plan
Breakfast bar as per plan
SCorian kitchen counter tops in
Bone or White
Luxury Bath Features
Master bath walk-in shower per


plan
Cultured marble double sink
vanity top in master bath
Ceramic tile walls in shower and
tub areas
Raised 36" master bath maple
vanity cabinets
Full width vanity mirror, designer
strip lighting


STANDARD FEATURES

IN CENTEX HOMES VILLAS & HOMES


* Moen single-lever faucets
* 5'VikrellTM bath tub in guest


Large beveled-mirror medicine
cabinet
Laundry Room Features
Interior laundry area with
Whirlpool Washer and Electric Dryer
Whirlpool washer and electric
dryer
SLaundry Tub
Energy Saving Features
Wrap-proof, insulated front entry
door
High efficiency heat pump and
central 12 seer A/C unit with digital
non-programmable thermostat
R-30 ceiling insulation
R 4 masonry wall insulation
R-11 frame wall insulation
Insulated ductwork throughout
Vented soffits for added attic
ventilation
Electrical Features
Convenient outlets in every room
Prewired for telephone outlets in
all bedrooms & kitchen
Prewired for cable TV. outlets in
all bedrooms & family room
Prewired for ceiling fans in all
bedrooms, family room & lanai
Weather-p;roof exterior outlets
Smoke detector(s) throughout
home
Front door chime
Premium 200 amp service as per
plan
Upgraded Lighting Packages
Designer recessed lighting in the
kitchen
Automatic garage door opener
with 2 remotes
Coach lights on exterior of home
Decorative rocker switches
Plumbing Features
CPCV water supply with CPVC
gravity flow drain lines
Convenient exterior garden hose
bibs
Hydrostatically-tested plumbing
lines and air chambers
Moen single-level faucets
Water-conserving elongated


water closets
Optional Features
Consult your sales representative
for our extensive list of convenient,
personal options showcased at the
Centex Homes Selection Studio':
Model Presentations
Model homes are shown with
many optional ideas and upgrade
items. All furniture, accessories,
window treatments, draperies,
decorator built-in shelving, accept
paint colors, wall coverings, mirrored
wall treatments, plant shelf lighting
fixtures, appliance styles, landscap-
ing, irrigation system, fencing, layout
and textured finish of entry walks and
patios, security systems, lighting and
garage sales office .construction
requirements may be for model
display purposes and may not be
included. NO credit or substitutions
allowed. Please check with our sales
representative for details. We reserve
the right to change features, prices,
building materials and designs
without prior notice.


VILLAS

Neighborhood Features
A maintained community
Convenient to shopping
Minutes to beaches, shopping
and dining
Easy access to 1-75 and major
thoroughfares
Professionally landscaped
boulevard entrance
Consistent, decorative mailboxes
throughout neighborhood
Neighborhood street lights and
sidewalks
Neighborhood color palette by
professional designer
Site Characteristics
Fully sodded homesites with
automatic sprinkler systems.
Professionally landscaped
homesite
Sarasota County water and
sewer systems
Concrete driveways and
sidewalks


Quality Home Features.
High Flat ceilings
Knockdown ceilings
Ceramic tile flooring in foyer,
kitchen, laundry, baths and cafe
Corian window sills
Smooth Star exterior doors with
20-year warranty
Heavy-duty 8'tempered sliding
glass door
*Colonial style raised panel
interior doors
Decorator level door hardware
and locks
Covered and screened lanai as
per plan
Interior laundry area with
Whirlpool Washer and Electric Dryer
Ventilated vinyl-coated closet
shelving
Continuous slide shelving in
master closet
Professional designs by Centex
architects
Centex Quality Warranty
10-year structural warranty from
RWC
Home Security System
Tubes in the Wall and Tubes
Under the Slab Patented Pest
Defense System
Vapor barrier under entire home
Steel reinforced poured concrete
-foundation
Exterior walls of concrete block
construction on ground floor (frame


:: IatsFREE 2
2'.Installations .S


Blinds-
Measured and installed
in one to two weeks

FREE Shop.At
Home Service
Verticals Plantation
Horizontals Shullers
Wood Blinds Graber
Cornices/Top Hunter Douglas
Treatments Vista


2nd story per plan)
Soil treatment under slab for
termite protection
Precast concrete window sills
and lintels
Decorative S-tile roof
Decorative coating on entry,
garage and lanai
Bronze aluminum window frames,
soffits, fascia and screen enclosures
Quality wall to wall carpet in
designer colors


*Tight mesh shelving in pantry.
Colonial windows in some
locations
a Extended 2 year fit and finish
warranty
1/2" thick stucco exterior with
textured finish
Gourmet Kitchen Features
Quality, recessed-panel maple
cabinetry

Please see CENTEX, page 4


Sun Coast Homes
is a section of the SUN
Harborview Road
Port Charlotte
Florida 33980
(941) 206-1000

For editorial questions please call
Donna Davidson
Features Editor
(941) 206-1164

For advertising questions, please call:


Charlotte Sun
David Storks
Advertising Executive
Fort Myers, Cape Coral
(941) 206-1263

Account Executive
Port Charlotte
(941) 206-1257

Rachelle Pastorfield
Account Executive
Punta Gorco/Burnt Store
(941) 206-1256


North Port Sun
Steve Sachkar
(866) 562-6204

Englewood Sun
Lang Capasso
(877) 827-6204

Venice Gondolier Sun
Dave Cherry
(866) 357-6204

DeScto Sun
Richard Hitt
(888) 690-6204


t an IaffIartdab:le p rice.


w w w h o m ein a s t e r s c o n s t'ruc tion. c o m

Model Homes o oI e Mas rs 1.800.330.6132
Turk Pack Service s our reputation see 1985 1-941.423.6144
North ort, Florida State Cert. Lie. #CB C033157 1.941.492.4494


Debbie Dunn-Rankin
Advertising Manager
(941) 206-1500


Todays Window Decor, Inc.


370N cesR.,Englewood


2 ~2ft


The Sun


Venice Gondolier Sun Sunday, May 1, 2005


Page 5 D/E/N/C/V


I







Sunday, May 1, 2005 The ,E, Sun


Venice Gondolier Sun Page 6 D/E'N/CN


*CENTEX
From page 5


Whirlpool radiant electric range
with self-cleaning oven
Whirlpool top-mount refrigerator
Whirlpool microwave
Whirlpool dishwasher
Whirlpool continuous feed waste
disposal


Ice-maker line plumbed-in
Double compartment cast iron
sink
Tilt-out drawers at kitchen sink
Moen One-Touch faucet
Spacious pantry as per plan
Breakfast bar as per plan
Luxury Bath Features
Master bath walk-in shower per
plan
Ceramic tile walls in shower and


tub areas
Full width vanity mirror, designer
strip lighting
Moen single-lever faucets
5' VikrellTM bath tub in guest
bath
Large beveled-mirror medicine
cabinet
Maple bath vanity cabinet
Energy Saving Features
Warp-proof, insulated front entry


(b lOtN La rVerde by Ryland Homes


Ryland Homes is now offering an exceptional
selection of five single-family home designs in the
exclusive Creek's Edge neighborhood of Heron
Creek. The Costa Verde, shown above, is a two-
level homeplan with 5 bedrooms, den, bonus room,
3 baths and 3,572 sq.ft. of living area. It is priced
from the $540's. The other four home designs range
in size-from 2,597 to 3,176 sq.ft. of living area, and
are priced from the $440's, including standard
Shomesite. All models have 3-car garages, the choice
of two elevations, and golf, lake or preserve views.


For more information about Ryland
Homes, please visit the model center in *5 e
Heron Creek or call 941-429-2988. ,-




HERON CREEK

3401 S. Sumter Blvd. North Port, FL 34287 Between US 41 and 1-75 / Exit 182
(941) 423-6755 Toll Free: 877-334-3766 www.heron-creek.com


door
High-efficiency heat pump and 12
seer central A/Cunit with digital non-
programmable thermostat
R-30 ceiling insulation
R 4 masonry wall insulation
R-11 frame wall insulation
Insulated ductwork throughout
Vented soffits for added attic
ventilation
Electrical Features
Convenient outlets in every room
Prewired for telephone outlets in
all bedrooms & kitchen
Prewired for cable TV. outlets in
all bedrooms & family room


Prewired for ceiling fans in all
bedrooms, family room & lanai
Weather-p;roof exterior outlets
Smoke detector(s).throughout
home
Front door chime
Premium 150 amp service as per
plan
Light fixtures from Thomas
Lighting
Designer recessed lighting in the
kitchen
Automatic garage door opener
with 2 remotes
Coach lights on exterior of home


I--

Rriidenlial
('oniniercial

F '- : l _. _"I


SVictoria Lavoie Interiors
S .s s .'.' i : .i.:"' jl]'.':. irl:ii-r. L.r c :.,|II


Plumbing Features
CPCV water supply with CPVC
gravity flow drain lines
Convenient exterior garden hose
bibs
Hydrostatically-tested plumbing
lines and air chambers
Moen single-level faucets
Water-conserving elongated
water closets
Optional Features
Consult your sales representative
for our extensive list of convenient,
personal options showcased at the
Centex Homes Selection Studio
Model Presentations
Model homes are shown with
many optional ideas and upgrade
items. All furniture, accessories,
window treatments, draperies,
decorator built-in shelving, accept
paint colors, wall coverings, mirrored
wall treatments, plant shelf lighting
fixtures, appliance styles, landscap-
ing, irrigation system, fencing, layout
and textured finish of entry walks and
patios, security systems, lighting and
garage sales office construction
requirements may be for model
display purposes and may not be
included. NO credit or substitutions
allowed. Please check with our sales
representative for details. We reserve
the right to change features, prices,
building materials and designs
without prior notice.


Award


1 'If it Oil, A C: dj AW.71 W, Oki


Page 6 D/E/N/C/V


Venice Gondolier Sun


. J4






SUNDAY
MAY 1, 2005

CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com

RECIPES AND MORE 2B


Venice Gondolier Sun
SECTION




'101


MARTIAL ARTS FOR MOM 48


PHOTO ESSAY: AIDS ORPHANS EN


FRAN VALENCIC


Every day is

Earth Day

A few years ago Karen
Johns was the music teacher
at Taylor Ranch Elementary
School and created a spectac-
ular production to celebrate
the environment.
The theme was, "Every day
is earth day."
The melody runs through
my mind as I see the celebra-
tions of this year's Earth Day. I
hope everyone will consider
Karen's view.
Sertoma Pignic a
hog wild event
Bob Anderson and Rich
Appel know the art of barbe-
cue and the job of feeding a
few hungry folks.
The duo took care of the
vittles for Venice Sertoma
members and their guests at
the Myakka River Park Pignic.
Rick Tacy managed the set
up.
The Cry'n Shames got
plenty of rib roarin hollars
from the crowd. The band
members, Jim Clinch, Don
Hay, Bob Klingbiel, Marie
Wilson, Jason Johnson and
Gary Wilson, aren't ready to
quit their day jobs yet even
though they got an enthusias-
tic response from the crowd.
Frank and the Wannabes
had plenty of volunteers
wanting to sing a long with
their group. John Ryan, Dave
Cornish, Judy Wilcox, Bill
Willson and Debbie Law-
rence helped keep the party
swinging.
The pignic raised funds for
Fourth of July fireworks.
The club is sponsoring a
reverse raffle on June 4. If you
enjoy a zany time and want to
support the Venice Sertoma
call Jim Foubister, 441-1199
or Fred Hind, 485-3400.
Splishin and splashin
Can you imagine being
one of 20 children? Marie
Kilkenny is just that and 17 of
them are alive and get togeth-
er regularly. Marie is a mem-
ber of the Senior Friendship
Center's Monday morning
writing group.
Her family story is part of
the group's newly published
journal available at the Venice
public libraries. Marie wrote
about her family and titled
the story, "Four In A Bathtub."
Dreams do come true, and
Amy Miller is proof. This
Venice High graduate has
been saving her money to be
a white-water rafting guide.
Amy's dad, Ray Miller told
me recently Amy is in training
in Cleveland, Tenn.
Even though the training is
tough and Amy has nearly
drowned several times, she is
determined to succeed.
Happily ever after is real
I love love stories, especial-
ly when they are about people
from Cleveland, Ohio. Eu-
gene Fazekas from Cleveland,
and Mildred H. Edsall are
World War II Veterans.
Both were working in a
Navy hospital in England onV
Day. After the war, Eugene
and Mildred enjoyed life. Both
were married to other people.
In 1998, at a reunion of the
Navy hospital staff, Eugene
and Mildred met again and
discovered they were both
alone since their spouses
died.
The couple rekindled their
friendship, fell in love, mar-
ried, reside at Pinebrook Place
and are celebrating happily
ever after.


SUN GRAPHIC BY ROB BROYLES
Nesting sea turtles on Venice beaches will have to cope with the beach renourishment project this season. The project will replace 1 million cubic yards of sand
washed away by last year's hurricanes. The city of Venice has acquired a permit to relocate turtle nests, if needed, and plans to hire Mote Marine Laboratory for
official turtle nest monitoring during and after the project.




Turtles are in for an extra





challenge this year


T


STORY BY KIM COOL FEATURES EDITOR

he Venice beach renourishment project
may dash the hopes of sea turtle hatch-
lings this season.


Night lights may be the
least of the problems awaiting
nesting sea turtles during the
annual turtle season that
begins today, May 1, and con-
tinues through Oct. 31.
As the first turtles hit the
Venice beaches to lay eggs
over the next few weeks, they
may encounter more than
beachwalkers, birds and rac-
coons. The Army Corps of
Engineers recently announc-
ed the awarding of a $12.1
million contract to add 1 mil-
lion cubic yards of sand to the
Venice beaches, increasing
the beach width seaward by
160 feet near the jetties and
130 feet at the southern end
of the 3.2-mile project near
the Venice Municipal Fishing
Pier.
As part of the renourish-
ment project, 7.3 acres of off-
shore reef will be constructed
in three segments. The city
engineer intends to build
three 2.5-acre reefs covering
more than 80,000 square feet
of gulf floor in 12 to 14 feet of
water at a location to be
determined when design,
permitting and other ap-
provals are complete. Reefs,
as opposed to flat ocean floor,
are thought to help keep wave
action from pulling sand off
the shoreline.
The work will be per-
formed by Weeks Marine of
Covington, La., at a cost of
$12.1 million.
Loggerhead turtles tradi-
tionally return to the beach
where they hatched to lay
eggs and continue the cycle.
Turtle volunteers, trained
under the auspices of Mote
Marine Laboratory biologist
Jerris Foote and listed on a
federal permit in her name,
have been assisting the turtles
for several years.
Volunteers patrol the
beaches early every morning,


looking for large turtle tracks
coming out of the gulf waters,
signs of probably new nests.
When they find the tracks,
they follow them, usually
coming to a round semi-
mounded area from which
other tracks head back to-
ward the water. The volun-
teers dig down in the sand at
the probably nest site, looking
for eggs, to make sure it was
not a false crawl, and then
mark the spot. In places like
the Caspersen Beach area of
Venice, where there are many
natural predators such as rac-
coons, the volunteers also
cage each nest, placing a large
box of screening over the
nest, with side flanges de-
signed to deter digging preda-
tors.
Each marked nest is re-
corded with its location and
nesting date. When the hatch-
lings emerge some 50 days
later, the volunteers return to
inventory the nests, counting
broken shells, unhatched
eggs and any stray hatchlings
that might not have been able
to get out of the nest and into
the water.
Last year when I accompa-
nied volunteers Paul and Judy
. Kehoe and Bill Gallagher as
they counted eggs in three
hatched nests at the Cas-
persen Beach area, it was
obvious that the turtles have a
challenge even when condi-
tions are near perfect and
they do not have to deal with
night lights, hurricanes and
predators. Each of the nests
we checked that morning was
nearly 2 feet deep. After get-
ting out of their own shells,
the hatchlings must then
clamber over the other eggs
and broken shells and even
their siblings before working
their way up through the sand
to the surface where they
begin their dash to the rela-


tive safety.of the water. One of
the nests had been totally
decimated by raccoons. An-
other contained a dead
hatchling, 60 hatched eggs
and 42 unhatched eggs.
Another volunteer on the
beach that morning, John
Baranowski, told of yet an-
other nest in which 90 per-
cent of the turtle hatchlings
had headed east, away from
the water, disoriented by
lights. He did not find any live
turtles near that nest and was
hopeful that some hatchlings
made it into the gulf.
I was able to watch one
lone hatchling scamper into
the water. It had been found
in one of the nests, unable to
climb to the top. Bill Galla-
gher released it near the water
and we all watched it scam-
per west, twice being washed
back to shore and then even-
tually making it all the way
into the water where it swam
out of sight.
At night, guided by the
light of the moon on the
water's surface, and no other
lights, hatchlings have a rea-
sonable chance of reaching
the water. If light from homes,
cars or even from beachwalk-
ers with flashlights or ciga-
rette lighters, distracts and
disorients them, their chanc-
es diminish.
One million cubic yards of
sand could literally bury any
chance they have for survival.
To address that problem,
the city has acquired a permit
to relocate turtle nests, if
needed, and has planned to
hire Mote for official turtle
nest monitoring during and
after the project.
Lights remain a problem
In a continuing effort to
prevent disorientation of
nesting and hatchling turtles
because of artificial lights, the
city of Venice will again be
monitoring lights in the vicin-
ity of the city's beaches, send-
ing notices of violation to the
city's ordinance 95-07, Light-
ing Restrictions During Ma-
rine Turtle Nesting Season, to
any person or entity found to


New lighting technology

makes beach safer for

turtles and people


STAFF REPORT

With the highest density of sea turtle nesting on the Gulf
Coast of Florida during the May 1-Oct. 31 sea turtle season,
Sarasota County takes its commitment to sea turtle conser-
vation seriously. To promote safe nesting and hatching for
turtles, parking lot lights using advanced technology were
recently installed at South Lido Park. The new fixtures,
funded by the Florida Sea Turtle Grants Program, harness
100 percent of their energy requirements from sun and
wind. The red-orange LED light sources produce illumina-
tion levels comparable to standard high-pressure sodium
fixtures without negative effects on human night vision
while reducing the risk to sea turtles. Standard artificial
lighting causes hatchlings to become disoriented as they try
to make their way to the water and also deters female tur-
des from nesting.
Kenya Leonard, administrator of the county's Sea Turtle
Protection Program, attributes the successful completion of
this project to cooperation between county departments
and the state of Florida. The state Department of
Environmental Protectioh's Energy Office will evaluate the
performance of the new solar lighting as a potential model
for other lighting installations.
Selection of the appropriate lighting meant balancing
security requirements on beaches with nesting sea turtle
needs. The science of lighting specifically the wave-
lengths of various types of artificial light is key to achiev-
ing that balance.
"Wavelengths of true red light, like those produced by
LED sources, have proven to be one of the least disruptive
light sources to sea turtles and they actually improve
human night vision," Leonard said.
If the new fixtures meet staff expectations,-residents may
see similar solar-powered installations at other parks and
facilities throughout the county.
Although this is the first project of its kind in Southwest
Florida, it is not the first local project funded by the grants
program that distributes a portion of revenues from the sale
of the sea turtle license plate. Two other projects aimed at
making Sarasota County's beaches safer for nesting sea tur-
des were completely funded by the grants program: a light-
ing upgrade project along Siesta Key's Beach Road and an
educational message on- Sarasota County Area Transit
buses.


be in violation.
Last year several violation
notices were issued following
the nightime beach patrols
led by Foote. No fines were
levied.
Those who live near the


beach are required to close
curtains at night and to shield
any lights that might shine
toward the beach, whether
those lights are on or adjacent

Please see TURTLES, 13B







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2B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


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Bird ofparadise grows best in full sun


PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROL MOZIK


The exquisitely colored bird of paradise need lots of water and full sun.


Registration available

for summer camp

activities in Sarasota

County parks


Parents and students look-
'ing for summer camps and
other activities in Sarasota
County parks can now find
Ainfdrmation in print and on
the World \V.ide Web. The 2005
edition of Sarasota County
Parks and Recredion's Stum-
mer Camp Registration and-
Special Events & Recreation
Information booklet is now
available at any Saiasota
County recreation center or
public library. The Parks and
Recreation registration Web
site, parksonline.scgov.net,
may be accessed directly or
via the Sarasota County Web
site, scgov.net (follow the
links for Parks and Rec-
reation).
The 36-page booklet in-
cludes descriptions of camps,
special events and activities
to be held throughout the


summer; camp guidelines; a
financial aid application; and
a mail-in registration form.
The booklet is also available
as a file that can be down-
loaded fromscgov.net (click
on the link to Parks / Recrea-
tion on the right side of the
home page, then click on
Summer Camp Registration
and Special Events.
The site includes broad-
band and standard versions
of the booklet in PDF format).
Registration for summer
camps and other activities is
scheduled to begin Friday,
April 1.
The public may register
online or through the tradi-
tional mail-in process. For
more information, call the
Sarasota County Parks and
Recreation registration office
at 861-9870.


CAROL MOZIK
GARDENING COLUMNIST

One of the funniest gar-
dening stories I have ever
heard happened at one of our
Horticultural Society monthly
meetings. We have always
encouraged new members to
stand up, introduce them-

FREE
ONLINE
CLASSIFIED ADS
F. WWW.SUNFLEAS.COM
For Private
merchandise
under $500


selves, tell us a little about too. How they market the
where they're from, how long planting instruction card to
they've been here and what look exactly like a gardenia
they like about gardening. bloom. Many times I've taken
This lady stood up, intro- that "card" to my nose, and
duced her husband and her- been disappointed to see it
self from up North and told was plain cardboard.
about her first trip to the local Some important things
WalDepot. She was so anx- about bird of paradise. Small
ious to get started with her plants take a while to get big
tropical garden that she spot- enough to bloom: Be patient.
ted a whole end cap full of My expert friends tell me they
blooming bird of paradise. are VERY heavy feeders and
She just couldn't wait to get it need lots of water. Never
home and into the ground. plant close to the foundation
How dismayed she waswhen- of your house, .because .at
the metal rod fell out and'' maturity the base can spread
"pinged" on her driveway, the 4-5 feet in diameter. Full sun,
silk bloom falling to the is what they need; plant in
ground. How many of us have shade, and you're doomed.
spotted that end cap, know- They are temperamental
ing bird of paradise could bloomers, but when they get
never be blooming with that going are very showy.
little a specimen. You really do My mother always used to
a double take. tell me, if a plant is blooming,
I've always been amazed it's happy. Keep that in mind.
at the small gardenia plants, Never move anything that is


CREATE YOUR
OWN WEB
PAGE FOR
FREE! WE'LL
SHOW YOU
HOW.
WWW.SUNLINE.NET


LET US HELP
YOU GET
ONLINE
CALL.
941-483-4848
OR
941-629-8256


happy where it is. If you want
to divide but not move, take a
section out with a spade, try-
ing to leave the base of the
plant intact.
May gardening activities:
Get your new lawns growing
and trees planted before the
summer rains begin May 31.
This will save you the chore
of daily watering and will
boost success ratio. Watch
out for insects and treat
accordingly.
*. Carol Aozik is a Venice
" Gondoller Sun employee
(Church, Classified & Legal
Advertising Representative),
as well as past president, past
membership chair and long-
time board member of the
Horticultural Society of
Charlotte County. She can be
reached at cmozik@venice-
gondolier.com.





A disun ot Sun '
Co .ast Meria Group








CONTACT US
DEBBIE SHULMAN
VENUE EDITOR
(941)207-1106
dshulman@venicegondolier.com


Venice Gondolier Sun



VENICE VENTHE LOCAL
SCENES


SUNDAY,
MAY1
Author appearance
Wanda Toby visits Circle
Books, 478 John Ringling
Blvd., Sarasota, at 1 p.m. to
meet the public and sign
copies of "Drama Factor," a
romantic novel set in the
world of football. Call 388-
2850 to reserve a signed copy.
Legion entertainment
Larry Williams performs, 4-8
p.m. at the American Legion
No-Vel Post 159, 145 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.
Art reception
Unity Gallery holds an artist
reception at 11:30 a.m. at
Unity of Sarasota, 2023 Proc-
tor Road. The work of Kathy
Cyrus, who has exhibited her
watercolors in Venice, Hous-
ton and Farmington, Conn.,
will be on display through
June 2.. Gallery hours are
Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-2
p.m. and Sunday mornings.
Call 955-3301.
Concert
The Suncoast Concert Band,
under the direction of Leo
Laier, performs at 7:30 p.m. at
Payne Park Auditorium, 2100
E. Laurel St. in Sarasota. Call
955-9452.
Sorority event
Delta Delta Delta Sarasota
Area Alumnae Chapter holds
its Spring Cocktail Party on
Sunday, May 1 at the Armi-
tage home in Sarasota. Mem-
bers are asked to bring hearty.
hors d'oeuvres for 12. Spouses
and guests welcome. RSVP to
922-4994.

MONDAY,
MAY2
Taxpayers meeting
The Venice Taxpayers League
meets at 1:30 p.m. in the.
Community Room at Venice
City Hall, 401 W. Venice Ave.
Visitors are welcome. Call
488-1448.

Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0052
* 10 a.m., Mondays, Camera
Club.
* 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Mon-
days, Dancercise with Carole
Coffey. Dancing for fun and
fitness, including upper- and
lower-body stretches. Call
584-0075.
Enameling class
The Venice Art Center offers
an ongoing enameling class,
Monday, 1-3:30 p.m. at 390 S.
Nokomis Ave. Call Marine at
493-9685 or the art center at,
485-7136.
Food bank
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services and All Faiths Food
Bank distribute free USDA
commodities to eligible Sara-
sota County residents, 10
a.m.-1 p.m., at the St. Mark's
Episcopal Church, 508 Riviera
St., Venice. Call 379-6333.
Cinco de Mayo
The Venice Senior Friendship
Cafe, 2350 Scenic Drive, cele-
brates with a fun Mexican
holiday gathering (no bingo),
Tuesday, May 3. Activities
begin at 11 a.m., lunch at
noon. Suggested meal dona-
tion, $3. Reservations requir-
ed 24 hours in advance by
calling 584-0031 or 584-0090.
Music events
* The Venice Gondoliers Men's
Barbershop Chorus rehearses
Monday at 6:30 p.m. at
Venice-Nokomis United
Methodist Church, 208 Palm
Ave., Nokomis. All men who
like to sing are welcome. Call
484-6333 or 484-3966.
* Hear live acoustic music at


Books-A-Million, 4230 South
Tamiami Trail in Venice, every
first and third Monday, 7-9:30
p.m. Call Richard Brobst at
408-9515.
Computer grqup
The Venice Area Computer
Users Group meets at 6 p.m.


at the Island Community
Church, 652 South Tamiami
Trail in the Rialto Plaza, just
south of the hospital. Lexmark
International's Chris Spero
and Dave Gerber will demon-
strate the latest technology in
home printing. Guests wel-
come. Dues for one year are
$35 per person, $45 for a cou-
ple. Members may take an
unlimited number of SIG
classes. Call Sandra at 492-
5555.
Author appearance
Claire Matturro visits St.
Armand's Gifts & Winery, 466
John Ringling Blvd., at 1 p.m.
to meet the public and sign
copies of "Wildcat Wine," her
newest mystery set in Sara-
sota. This launch party in-
cludes an afternoon of Florida
wine tasting. Call 388-2850 to
reserve a signed copy.
Orchids
The Sarasota Orchid Society
holds a beginners class at 7
p.m., followed by a meeting at,
7:30 p.m. at Marie Selby
Botanical Gardens Activities
Center, 811 S. Palm Ave.,
Sarasota. Ken Roberts speaks
on. the new Phapiopedilum
species. An orchid raffle'and a
show table will be featured.
The public is welcome to this
free event.
Family class
The Child Protection Center
hosts a 12-week Nurturing
Program for Parents and Chil-
dren, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Mon-
days, May 2-25. The free class-
es, for families with children
ages 5-11, takes place at the
Child Protection Center office
at 2210 South Tamiami Trail in
Venice. To reserve a spot, call
Jeni at 365-1277, Ext. 126.

TUESDAY,
MAY3
Live music
The Tin Pan Alley Band with,
,Les Gowan performs at the,
Senior Friendship Center in
Venice, 2350 Scenic Drive,
each Tuesday, 1-3 p.m.
Elks dinner
The Venice-Nokomis Elks
Lodge hosts a pork dinner, 5-7
p.m. at 119 E.Venice Ave. Cost:
$6. Call the lodge at 486-1854.
Rule Brittania
The Daughters of the British
Empire HMS Phoebe Chapter
holds its monthly meeting of
the season at 1 p.m. at Jacar-
anda Trace in South Venice.
Women of British birth or her-
itage welcome. Call Sheila at
493-7273.
VHS reunion
The Venice High SchoolAlum-
ni Association holds a general
meeting at 7 p.m. at the Venice
Chamber of Commerce, 597
South Tamiami Trail, to dis-
cuss the All-Class Reunion,
July 1-3. If you are interested
in helping with the reunion or
just want to know the plans,
you are welcome to, attend.
Call the alumni hotline at 207-
1212 to leave a message.
Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0052
* 10 a.m.-noon, Beginners
Basket Weaving with Barbara
and Chris.
* 10 a.m., Pine Needle Weav-
ing. All materials supplied for
first session.
* Afternoon Cinco de Mayo
Party music and munchies.
Wear your bright colors and
celebrate!
Tuesday bingo
Venice Gardens Civic Center,
406 Shamrock Blvd., doors
open at 11 a.m., bingo starts at
noon. Hot dogs and snacks
available. Public welcome.
Call 493-6541.
Good sports


* Certified Pilates instructor
Randi Green teaches a six-
week beginner Pilates class
Tuesday, at Serenity Gardens
in the Brickyard Plaza in
Venice. Cost is $75 or $15 for
walk-ins; bring a mat. Call
486-3577.
* The Coastal Cruisers Bicycle


BEST BETS
THE LOCAL SCENE MAY 1 3


GRAPHIC COURTESY qFTHARPA.COM
Buddha Avalokiteshvara, the Comfpassion Buddhia, is
the embodiment of the universal compassion of all
enlightened beings. By relying on him, Buddhist
thought teaches, we naturally increase our own com-
passion.

Buddhist meditation
Kelsang Donwang leads a beginners Buddhist meditation,
Monday, 7-8:30 p.m., at Woodmere Community Center, Room
2-B, 3951 Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice. 'Donation: S5-$9. Call
373-1600 or visit meditationinflorida.org.

SPARCCle on the links
*A Golf Tournament to benefit Safe Place and Rape Crisis
Center takes place Thursday, May 5 at 12:30 p.m. at The
Plantation Golf and Country Club, 500 Rockley Blvd. in Venice.
Three categories of competition: mixed foursome, all women,
all men. Cost is $75 per person, including greens fee, cart,
snacks, buffet dinner and prizes. Dinner only: $25, Proceeds
provide free services to victims of domestic violence and rape.
For an entry form, call Carol at 493-6079 or Maureen at 496-
-7784.

Club meetings
Venice Lodge 2747 of the Sons of Italy holds its monthly
membership meeting Monday, May 2 at 7:30 p.m. at Park
Place Retirement Residence, 200 N. Nassau St., Venice. The
public is welcome.
The Englewood/Venice Sew Much Fun group meets every
first Monday, 1-3 p.m. at Jacaranda Public Library, 4143
Woodmere Park Blvd., Venice. Call Joyce at 492-6675 or e-mail
strbngrjoy@cs.com.
Venice Council #301 F & AM meets Monday at 7:30 p.m. at
the Venice Masonic Lodge, 118 E. Venice Ave. All members of
the order welcome. Call 484-0311.
Venice Shuffleboard Club meets at 9 a.m. every Monday,
' Wednesday and Friday. Lessons available. Call Barbara at 485-
1678.
* Seniors Without Partners meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E. Venice
Ave., Mondays, 12:30-3:30 p.m. for a meeting And cards. Call
485-8739.


Club holds its First Watch Ride
(15-20+ mph pace), Tuesdays;
meet the group at 8:20 a.m. at
Shamrock Park in Venice (50
miles round trip). A 50-mile
group departs from behind

McDonald's on North U.S. 41
Bypass at 8 a.m. Call Ron at
697-3100 or Wanda at 484-
5501.
Fossils lecture
The Environmental Collection
at Selby Public Library spon-
sors "Florida Fossils from the
Ice Age," an audio-visual lec-
ture at 2 p.m. at 1331 First St.,
Sarasota. Elaine Dunkleber-
ger, president of the Manatee
Fossil Club, speaks about fos-
sils from Florida's ancient
past. Free and open to the
public. Call 861-5000.

WEDNESDAY,
MAY 4

Bell'ltalia
The Italian American Club of
Venice presents a 7 p.m. video
tour of the Etruscan towns of
Tuscany, including Cortona,
Arezzo, Montalcino, Monteul-
ciano, Pienza, Populonia,
Monteriggioni and more.
Come to 1375 Ringling Drive
in Venice for .this free event.
The public is welcome; re-
freshments will be served. Call
Peter DiVecchio at 966-6879.

Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0052


* Yoga In/Around a Chair,
Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
* Wednesday Walkers, 9 a.m.
* Italian, Wednesdays, 2:45
p.m.
* Attorney consultations, Wed-
nesday 9:30-11:30 a.m. with
Elizabeth Weis, Attorney Eme-
ritus with Legal Aid of Mana-
sota. Reserve your time slot by
calling 584-0075.
SFC-Epiphany Parish Hall,
305 W. Tampa Ave., Venice
* Quilting with Liz, 9:30 a.m.
Call 493-3065.
* Beginners Spanish, 1-3 p.m.
Call 584-0052.

Orchid auction
The Venice Area Orchid Socie-
ty holds its annual orchid auc-
tion at the Venice Masonic
Lodge, 118 Miami Ave. Enter
on Miami Avenue, opposite
Babe's Hardware. Preview at
6:30 p.m., bidding starts at 7
p.m. Free admission 'and
refreshments. The public is
invited to see healthy and
beautiful orchid plants in bud
and in bloom from the best of
the area's commercial grow-
ers. The auction supports the
society's annual Orchid Show,
taking place in February 2006
at the new Venice Community
Center. For more information
about the auction or theVAOS,
call 923-7706.
?
Watercolor class
Sarasota artist Carolyn Meren-
da teaches Fun with Water-
color, Wednesdays, 2:30-4:30


p.m., May 4-25 at the Nokomis
Community Center, 234 East
Nippino Trail. Fee: $60 plus
supplies. Adults of all skill lev-
els welcome. Supply list avail-
able at the center during office
hours. Call 366-2866.
Showtime
Venice Regional Medical Cen-
ter offers free matinees for
those 55 and older at 3:30 p.m.
in Auditorium A, 540 The
Rialto. Call 486-6938.
Dancing
Lola Miller leads line dance
lessons on Wednesdays at Ve-
nice United Church of Christ,
620 Shamrock Blvd. Beginners
lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m.; inter-
mediate, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost:
$4. Call 493-9665.
The Senior Friendship Cen-
ter at Epiphany Parish Hall,
305 W. Tampa Ave. in Venice,
holds free ballroom dancing
Wednesday at 10 a.m. No
partner required. Donations
accepted. Call Kathie McMur-
rian at 584-0052.
Luncheon
An Amphibious Forces lun-
cheon takes place at 11 a.m. at
: the American Legion of Ven-
ice, No-Vel Post 159, 145 E.
Venice Ave. The group meets
the first Wednesday of each
month. Call 497-0345.
'Sherlock Holmes'
The University of South Flori-
da Sarasota-Manatee Senior
Academy presents '"An Even-
ing with Sherlock Holmes," an
illustrated lecture by Dr. Ar-
thur Liebman, teacher of mys-
tery and detective fiction at
New York University and
author of the prize-winning
book, "The Biographical Sher-
lock Holmes." The program
takes place at 7:30 p.m. at
Sudakoff Auditorium, 5700
North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota,
and is free for Senior Academy
members. Call 359-4296.
Kayaktrip
Enjoy a quiet-water kayak in
the Terra Ceia Aquatic Pre-
serve with ,the American Lit-
toral Society, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
See the wildlife on Tampa Bay
'and spend a day on the water.
Training and equipment pro-
vided. Bring sunscreen, water
and insect repellent. Cost: $30
for ALS.members, $35 for non-
members. Call John at 966-
7308.


'Drinking Alone'


PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMON BAY
PLAYHOUSE
Elaine,Levin and Dianne Brin
are featured when Lemon Bay
Playhouse, 96W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood, presents "Drink-
ing Alone," an adult comedy
about two siblings who reluc-
tantly reunite with their over-
bearing father after 15 years
apart. Running May 4-22, with
shows at 8 p.m. Wednesday-
Saturday and Sundays at 2
p.m. Tickets are $12. Call (941)
475-6756. -
Wednesday bingo
6 p.m. at the American Legion
No-Vel Post 159, 145 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.
Preliteracy workshop
A free workshop for teachers
and parents who wish to teach
preliteracy skills takes place
6:30-8:30 p.m. at Gulf Gate
Library, 7112 Curtiss Ave.,
Sarasota. Led by Sylvia Nissley,
R.N., M.S. Continuing Educa-
tion Unit credits available,
payable by $10 check.
Registration required. Call
861-5000.


THURSDAY,
MAY 5


Self-defense seminar
Shuman's ATA Black Belt Aca-
demy hosts a free women's
self-defense seminar, 1-4 p.m.
Saturday, May 7 at 1045 South
U.S. 41 Bypass, Venice. Taught
by 4th, 5th and 6th degree
black belt certified instructors
and school owners, the class
teaches situational avoid-
ance, escape methods, pres-
sure point control tactics and
more. No strength necessary
and no extensive training or
time commitment required.
Register by May 5. Call 486-
0330.
Club get-togethers
* The Venice-Nokomis Elks
Lodge hosts a spaghetti din-
ner, 5-7 p.m. at 119 E. Venice
Ave. Cost: $6. Call the lodge at
486-1854.
* LarryWilliams performs and
burgers and wings served, 5-8
p.m. at the American Legion
No-Vel Post 159, 145 E. Venice
Ave. Call 488-1157.
Music events
* The Chorus Department of
!,Venice High School hosts its
spring concert at 7 p.m. in the
VHS auditorium, 1 Indian
Ave. Admission is free. Call
412-0427.
* The Lemon Bay Chord Com-
pany, the Englewood Chapter
(P-038) of the Barbershop
Harmony Society, meets
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at
Christ Lutheran Church, 701
N. Indiana Ave. Call 493-6417
or visit harmonize.com/lbcc.
* The Players Theatre presents
its fifth annual Festival Latino,
May 5 and 6 at 838 North
Tamiami Trail in Sarasota.
Four musical groups perform
at 7:30 p.m. May 5 and 6.
Thursday features Los Rum-
beros, Rumba Flamenca and
Maria Elena Perez; and Fri-
day's performers are Rumba
, Flamenca, Hemando Bueno
and his Salsa Orchestra "TA
Buenos," and Maria Elena
Perez. Tickets are $17, $10 for
students. Two-night packages
are $28. Call 365-2494.
* The John and Mable Ring-
ling Museum hosts a court-
yard concert, 6-9 p.m. at 5401
Bay Shore Road in Sarasota.
Bring lawn chairs and blan-
kets for an evening of picnick-
ing and dancing under the
stars. Tickets: $5, $10 for
reserved seating near the
dance floor. Call 358-3180.

Senior Friendship Center,
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0052
* Quilting for Fun with Helen
Magan, Thursdays, 9-11:30
a m. Bring own materials.
* Beginner Bridge, Thursdays,
9 a.m.
Mac Users
The Englewood Area Macin-
tosh User Group meets at
Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W.
Dearborn St., with a begin-
ners session at 1:30 p.m. and
program meeting 2-4 p.m.
Featuring Photoshop Ele-
ments 3 with Will Bosch and
iMovie with Mike Volpe. Call
Mary Lou Dobson at (941)
432-2192.
Good sports
* Certified Pilates instructor
Randi Green teaches a six-
week beginner Pilates class
Thursday, at Serenity Gar-
dens in the Brickyard Plaza in
Venice. Cost is $75 or $15 for
walk-ins; bring a mat. Call
486-3577.
* Florida Wheelers Bowling
Association welcomes wheel-
chair- and standup bowlers,
Thursday at 3 p.m. at AMF
Venice Lanes, 1100 South U.S.
Bypass. No experience neces-
sary. Call Leon Thompson at
S475-1369 or Yola Levenson at
493-5849.
* The Women's Resource Cen-
ter of Sarasota County offers
beginners yoga Thursdays,
10-11:30 a.m. at 806
Pinebrook Road in Venice.
Men welcome. Fee: $5.


Thursday bingo
* 11 a.m. Senior Friendship
Center, 2350 Scenic Drive.

Please see VENUE, 12B


3B
SUNDAY
MAY 1, 2005






Venice Gondolier Sun





WEI LLBEING


CONTACT US
JEREMY ROTTGEN
WELL-BEING EDITOR
(941) 207-1143
jrottgen@venicegondolier.com


BY JEREMY ROTTGEN
STAFF WRITER


Mothers are hard-wired to
protect their children. Since
Mother's Day is always going
to have flowers and choco-
lates, this year get mom
something different in return
for all those years of protec-
tion.
A lesson in self-defense for
Mother's Day is a novel idea
and Shuman's ATA Black Belt
Academy is signing up moth-
ers for a free seminar to teach
them the basics of self-
defense.
So, if an attack were to
occur mom would be pre-
pared.
"We try to teach them the
ABCs of self defense," said Joe
Mirville, head instructor of
the Venice academy.
According to the academy,
the seminar will cover self-


defense techniques and pres-
sure point control tactics that
could help to save your life if
you're being attacked. The
academy encourages any
adults to enroll no matter
what kind of situations they
face day-to-day. They say at
some time in anybody's life, a
situation may occur where
they become vulnerable.
"You've got a lot of stuff
that's going on right now with
kidnapping and things like
that progressing; you've got to
be aware," Mirville said.
Mirville, 24, has been prac-
ticing for 14 years and the
instructors from Port Char-
lotte have more than 20 years
of experience. He is a certified
instructor with a fourth
degree black belt.
Psychological
He said participants will
learn how to be aware of their


surroundings in a part of the
seminar called "prevention
psychology." It's a profound
aspect of self-defense be-
cause it puts you in safer situ-
ations. The main purpose of
the seminar is to teach self-
awareness.
"People don't realize that
the biggest reason they get
attacked is because they look
like easy victims," Mirville
said. "If you don't portray
yourself as being a confident
and strong person, then
somebody will eventually try
to take advantage of you."
Mirville said little things
like making sure you have
your keys out and ready to go
when you're on your way
home from work is a good
idea. Parking in a good area is
also a good preventive mea-
sure to take. Mirville also said
joggers should make sure
you're not in a wooded area


SUN PHOTOS BY JEREMY ROTTGEN
Joe Mirville (middle) watches as his students pair up to learn a proper kicking technique.'


and to stay where there are
houses and street lights.
Physical
Participants will thenlearn
pressure points and little
things to be able to get out of
an easy situation or if some-
body is attacking them, then
they can be able to break free.
They get to work hands-on
and partner up after that and
learn more.
Afterward, combative me-
thods will be taught, which
uses elbows, the tip of the
knee or the palm of the hand
as a striking tool. Mirville said
all of it will be very basic and
will not include anything
strenuous.
"Basically we're just trying
to give them a quick overview
of doing things mainly to pre-
vent," Mirville said.. "They are
very basic skills that anybody
can do."
Mirville said there will be a
self-defense seminar for chil-


Members of the academy learn how to use weaponry.


dren in the future because of
all the recent abductions.
Experience
Andy Shuman, a certified
instructor with a fifth degree
black belt from the Port
Charlotte academy, will be at
the seminar to teach the
Venice women about self-
defense.
"A lot of people know the
general ideas, but they let
their guard down A lot of situ-
ations can get taken care of
before they even occur," Andy
Shuman of Shuman's ATA
said.
Shuman said one of the
women in his academy actu-
ally used what she learned on
her boyfriend to quickly
resolve a situation and put.
him in his place.
: Linda Shuman, a fifth de-
giee black belt and ce tified
instructor, will be at the semi-
nar as well. She said the sem-
inar is strictly for women


because that way they can
become comfortable and it
will be a safe and fun environ-
ment.
"We teach them a lot of
escape and stun-and-run
methods," she said. "We'll
teach them things that are
easy to remember."
The Shumans have been in
Porth Charlotte for 30 years
and have held previous semi-
nars where women had an
educational and fun experi-
ence.
The Venice branch of
Shuman's ATA Black Belt
Academy is located at South
1045 U.S. 41 Bypass. The sem-
inar is Saturday May 7, 1-4
p.m.
Registration is required
before May 5 to be enrolled in
the seminar. Call Shuman's
main office at (941) 255-KICK.
for more information
ADVERTISEMENT
WORDS WORTH


Free program for people who use sharps in their home


STAFF REPORT


The Sarasota County
Sharps Disposal program
provides residents a free, safe
and legal way to dispose of
sharps. Sarasota County resi-
dents who use sharps in their
home for administrating pre-
scription drugs may pick u'p
an approved sharps contain-
er at no charge at a participat-
ing community drop-off site.
All used needles and syringes
are placed in the container.
The participant secures the
top of the container when it is
two-thirds full and returns it
to the designated community
drop-off site during normal
business hours in exchange
for an empty container.
Sarasota County Health
Department officials an-
nounced that the Sharps pro-
gram site at the Robert An-
derson County Administra-
tion Center in Venice is now
open.
The program, which is free
for home use, is made possi-


ble through a partnership
between the, Health Depart-
ment, Sarasota County Envi-
ronmental Services, and par-
ticipating community drop-
off sites.
Safety reminders
* Do not recap or snap off the
needle.
* Place both the needle and
syringe into the sharps con-
tainer until it is two-thirds full
or reaches the designated
"full" line.
* Never place -your hand
inside the container.
* Do not pry or take the top off
the container.
* Keep sharps containers out
of the reach of children
* Never leave a full sharps
container at a drop-off site
when it is closed.
* Never place needles in the
garbage, regardless of how it
is packaged.
South County locations
* Sarasota County Health
Dept. Env. Hlth Office, Robert


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Anderson Administration
Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail,,
Venice, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Call (941) 861-
3310.
* Today's Dentistry, 1872
South Tamiami Trail, Venice,
Monday- Friday, 9- 5 p.m.
Call 493-4156.
* North Port Fire Department
Station 81, 4980 City Center
Blvd., North Port, FL 34286 9
a.m.-6 p.m., 7 days a week.
Call (941) 423-4355.
* North Port Fire Department
Station 82, 5700 North Port
Blvd. North Port, 9 a.m.-6
p.m., 7 days a week. Call (941)
423-4365.
* Heartland Home Health,
628 N. Indiana Ave., Engle-


wood, Call (941) 473-1519,
9a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-
Friday. Call (941) 423-4365.
*Sarasota Memorial Black-
burn Center, 929 South Tami-
ami Trail, Osprey, Monday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call
917-4900.
*Suncoast Communities
Blood Bank, 1097 North Tam-
iami Trail, Nokomis, Call 485-
4800 for hours of operation.
*Sarasota County Health
Dept. Environmental Health,
1301 Cattlemen Rd-Bldg A
Sarasota, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Call (941) 861-
6133.
*Sarasota County Hazardous
Waste Management, 8750
Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota, Wed-


nesday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-4
p.m., Call (941) 861-1530.
*Selby Newtown Goodwill,
1781 Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. Way, Sarasota, Monday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Call
(941) 359-0520.
* Senior Friendship Center,
1900 Brother Geenen Way,
Sarasota, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Call 556-3215.
*Suricoast Communities
Blood Bank, 1875 Arlington
St., Sarasota, Monday-Friday,
9 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Call 955-
2956.
*St. Armand's Pharmacy, 19
North Boulevard of the Presi-
dents, Sarasota, Monday-
Saturday, 9 a.m.- 8 p.m. Call
388-3604.


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By Vicki Connell,
M.A., CCC-A
Certified Audiologist


Q. My husband's hearing
aid often times "whistles"
or" squeals" when he opens
his mouth or turns his head.
Is there any way to stop this
without turning the hearing
aid down?
A. The largest cause of
whistling or "feedback" is
wax impaction in the ear
canal. The amplified sound
enters the ear" canal and
bounces off the wall of wax
and back out the ear canal
causing a whistle. Once the
wax is removed from the ear
canal the hearing aid will
return to normal functioning.
If this does not occur, then
this means a "leak" is present
between the hearing aid and
ear canal. This too can be
corrected with a reshell or
remake of the outer part of
the hearing aid. If the hearifig
aid is under warranty, this
remake is usually made at no
charge. If the instrument is
older, there may be a charge
for this service. Either way, it
is important to see an
Audiologist before under-
going a remake to insure that
the problem of feedback will
be resolved. Call the
Audiologist at Woodmere
Hearing & Balance Center at
492-4327 to schedule an
appointment to solve hearing
aid whistling today.
Jacaranda Office Park
4120 Woodmere Park Blvd,
Suite 8A
(across from Jacaranda
Public Library)


4B
SUNDAY
MAY 1, 2005


Martial arts for mom







Venice Gondolier Sun




FRESH AIR


NATURE BRIEFS


Oscar Scherer State Park, 1843
South Tamiami Trail, Osprey,
483-5956. Park admission is
$4.25 per vehicle and canoe
rental fee is $5 per hour.
* Thursday, 7:30 a.m., bird
walks.
* Friday, 8:30 a.m., ranger-
led walks.
* Sunday, 8:30 a.m., scrub
walks.'
Fossils lecture
The Environmental Collec-
tion at Selby Public Library
sponsors "Florida Fossils
from the Ice Age," an audio-
visual lecture at 2 p.m.
Tuesday, May 3 at 1331 First
St., Sarasota. Elaine Dunkle-
berger, president of the Man-
atee Fossil Club, speaks about
fossils from Florida's ancient
past. Free and open to the
public. Call 861-5000.
Kayak trips
Enjoy a quiet-water kayak
in the Terra Ceia Aquatic
Preserve with the American
Littoral Society, Wednesday,
May 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See the
wildlife on Tampa Bay and
spend a day on the water.
Training and equipment pro-
vided. Bring sunscreen, water
and insect repellent. Cost: $30
for ALS members, $35 for
nonmembers. Call John at
966-7308.
Explore Cockroach Bay
Preserve in Tampa Bay by
kayak with the American
Littoral Society, Sunday, May
8, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See birds,
wildlife of all sorts and marine
creatures. Training and
equipment provided. Bring
sunscreen, water and insect
repellent. Cost: $30 for ALS
members, $23 for nonmem-
bers. Call John at 966-7308.
Explore the Alafia Audubon
Bird Rookery. by kayak with
the American Littoral Society,
10 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Wednes-
day, May 11. You may see
brown 'pelicans, roseate
spoonbills and more nesting
on an inlet. Training and
equipment provided. Bring
binoculars and a camera if


you like, plus sunscreen,
water and insect repellent.
Cost: $30 for ALS members,
$35 for nonmembers. Call
John at 966-7308.
Ecosystem workday
I The American Littoral
Society leads volunteer work,
Saturday, May 7, 8:30 a.m.-
noon, at Caspersen Beach
and Palmer Point, clearing
nonnative vegetation and
planting native plants. If there
are enough volunteers, some
will work in the greenhouse
at Venice High School in pre-
paration for growing native
plants to be used at local
beaches. Bring sunscreen,
water and work gloves. For
more information, call John
at 966-7308.
Hibiscus meeting
The Gulf Coast Chapter of
the American Hibiscus Soci-
ety meets at 2 p.m. Sunday,
May 8, at the Venice Public
Library, 300 S. Nokomis Ave.
Refreshments will be served.
Call Cathy at 493-4209.
Garden club
The South Venice Garden
Club holds its spring lun-
cheon and installation of
officers Monday, May 9, at
noon at the South Venice
Civic Association, 720 Alli-
gator Drive. Members, friends
and guests are invited to
bring a casserole or salad to
serve 6-8, your plate and sil-
verware. Enjoy the punch
bowl at noon and a gourmet
lunch at 1:30 p.m. This is the
final club meeting until
September. Call 493-9035 for
more information.
Photography class
Eileen Maris Cohen teach-
es Travel Photography ... Not
Just a Snap, Tuesdays, May
10-31, 9:30-11 a.m. at the
Venice Audubon Center, 4002
South Tamiami Trail. The
class will focus on landscape,
architecture, wildlife, special
events and shooting on the
run. For more information,


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contact Cohen at 488-9123 or
Seacee@comcast.net.
Bay biocruise
Enjoy a hands-on learning
experience about the critters
on Sarasota Bay, accompa-
nied by a marine biologist
from the American Littoral
Society, 2-4 p.m. Tuesday,
May 10. Leave from Bayfront
Park. Cost: $10 for ALS mem-
bers, $15 for nonmembers.
RSVP with Carol at 923-5125.
Audubon Society
The May general meeting
of the Venice Area Audubon
takes place at 5 p.m. Tuesday,
May 10, at the new Venice
Aububon Center, 2002 South
Tamiami Trail, behind the
Robert L. Anderson South
County Administration
Building. Bring your. own
meal for a picnic supper at 5
p.m., then'at 6 p.m. take an
hour-long bird walk around
the Venice Rookery. The
evening's event concludes
with bird photographs by
Kevin Edwards 'at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting is free and open
to the public. For more infor-
mation, call 496-8984 or e-
mail veniceaudubon@veri-
zon.net.
Orchid class
The Venice Area Orchid
Society sponsors a class for
new orchid growers Wednes-
day, May 11, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Venice Masonic Lodge,
118 E. Venice Ave. Bring your
plants and have your ques-
tions answered. Open to the
public, no need to sign up.
Call Roy at 488-4845 or Ed at
966-4704.
Free trees
The Manatee-Sarasota
Chapter of the Sierra Club
meets at 7 p.m. Thursday,
May 12, at the Phillippi Creek
Estate Mansion, 5500 Tami-
ami Trail in Sarasota. Free
potted live oaks, maples and
bay trees will be available.
Call Mary at 752-3200.
Bike race needs


volunteers
Sarasota County Parks and
Recreation requests volun-
teers for the Suncoast
Criterium bicycle. race and
arts and crafts festival, 7 a.m.-
b 9 p.m., Saturday, May 14, on
Venice Avenue in Venice. The
competitive bicycle race is in
its third year in Venice, and is
an official event of the Florida
Cup Series. The race is sanc-
tioned by the United States
Cycling Federation. Volun-
teers are needed during the
event in four-hour shifts to
assist with the racecourse,
registration and hospitality.
Free T-shirt, food and bever-
ages are available for all vol-
unteers. For more informa-
tion, contact Jonathan at
(941) 232-3415 or jpoyner@
scgov.net.


Please see NATURE, 12B


Earth to Florida:



Clean up your language!


BY DR. DARYL P. DOMNING
GUEST COLUMNIST


After many months of
postponing consideration of
a petition to downlist Florida
manatees from "Endangered"
to "Threatened" status under
Florida law, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWCC) has just
taken a step toward such
action. Although the Com-
mission's vote at its April
meeting did not directly affect
manatees, it preserved the


objectionable regulatory lan-
guage according to which
"Threatened" in Florida is
equivalent to what the rest of
the planet calls "Endan-
gered." The implication is
clear, and the stage. is now
set: Application of this lingo
to manatees will sooner or
later result in downgrading
the degree of state protection
for which they are deemed
eligible.
Even though federal pro-
tection for manatees remains
in place (for now), and any


move by the state to actually
downlist manatees is still
several months and. several
procedural steps away, it is
nonetheless disturbing that
the FWCC continues to
ignore the torrent of scientific
criticism provoked by its
idiosyncratic twisting of well-
established, globally accept-
ed terminology.
On its Web site, the FWCC
defends its language on the
grounds that "these names

Please see FLORIDA, 12B


++












o 3a







.7 41 ,11


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5B
SUNDAY
MAY 1,2005







Venice Gondolier Sun


6B SN R
SUNDAY
MAY 1, 2005


Skin cancer can be dealt with if caught early


Dear Savvy Senior,
Can you tell me about skin
cancer? My sister, who's 57, just
had two skin cancer spots
removed from her neck and has
been telling me I need to get
checked too. But the thought of
cancer bothers me so much I
don't want to know if I have it.
What do you think? Cancer
Phobic
Dear Phobic,
The word "cancer" is
unsettling for a lot of people
but you need to be aware
that most forms of skin can-
cer are easily cured, especial-
ly when detected early. Here's
what you should know.
Skin cancer, which is
mainly caused by UV radia-
tion from the sun, is the most
common type of cancer,
affecting more than 1 million
Americans each year, most of
which are over the age of 50.
Although anyone can get skin
cancer, the risk is greatest for
people who have fair skin
and freckle easily. Here are
the three types of skin cancer
you should be aware of.
Basal cell
Basal cell carcinoma


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(BCC) is the most common
form of skin cancer account-
ing for nearly 90 percent of
all skin cancers in the United
States. BCCs are slow-grow-
ing tumors that are most
often found on the face,
neck, hands, or other parts of
the body that have been
exposed to the sun. The good
news is that this type of skin
cancer is easily cured and
almost never spreads to
other parts of the body, but it
can grow and destroy other
tissues if it's not removed.
Here are some warning signs
of BCC you should watch for:
An open sore that bleeds,,
oozes, or crusts and won't
heal.
A red patch or irritated
area.
A smooth, shiny waxy-
looking bump or nodule.
A pink growth with an irri-
tated indentation.
A scar-like area that is
white or yellow.
Squamous cell
Squamous cell carcinoma
(SCC) is the second most
common form of skin cancer
that can appear anywhere on
the body but usually shows
up on the face or other
exposed areas. SCC typically
appears as a lump that grows
into a wart-like lesion, or it
may arise in patches of red,
scaly sun-damaged skin. This
type of skin cancer can
metastasize (spread) if it's not
removed.
Melanoma
The least common but


/ ~


most dangerous form of skin
cancer is melanoma. In its
earliest stages, melanoma
can be easily removed, but
left untreated it can spread to
other parts of the body and
can be fatal. Key warning
signs to watch for are
changes in the size, shape,
feeling or color of a mole or
other spot on the skin. Men
most often get melanoma on
their trunk, especially
between the shoulder blades,
or on their head or neck,
while women get it most
often on the arms and legs.
Detection
The cure rate for skin can-
cer could be 100 percent if all
skin cancers were brought to
a doctor's attention before
they had a chance to spread.
Therefore, it's a good idea to
periodically check your
entire body for new growths
or other changes in your
skin. And if you notice any
changes get to a dermatolo-
gist (skin doctor). People who
have already had skin cancer
should have a total body skin
exam by a dermatologist or
other qualified medical pro-
fessional every year.
Treatment
If caught early, the vast
majority of basal and squa-
mous cell skin cancers can
be surgically removed in a
simple, painless procedure
right in a dermatologist's
office. Treatment for
melanoma is more compli-
cated, but surgery is effective
for most early stage tumors.


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Savvy resource
American Academy of
Dermatology: Offers free
educational pamphlets on
skin cancer, a national der-
matologist locating service
and sponsors a free skin can-
cer screening program in
communities nationwide
(typically done in May). Call
888-462-3376 or visit aad.org.
Advance directives
Dear Savvy Senior,
I didn't actually know the dif-
ference between a "will" and a
"living will" until the Terri
Schiavo case made headlines
recently. It's amazing how legal-
ly complicated it can be to die.
My husband and I have both
found the Schiavo saga very
troubling and want to make
sure that doesn't happen to our
family. Can you give us some
information on living wills and
advance directives, without the
legal jargon, and how to go
about getting these done? -
Legally Ready
Dear Ready,
The Terri Schiavo case
sparked a huge interest on a
matter most people never
knew or thought much about
-living wills. Each year,
more than 80 percent of
Americans who die in hospi-
tals, hospices or nursing
homes are confronted with
decisions about whether to
continue or stop life-sustain-
ing treatment, but only about
25 percent actually have a
living will. Here are some
things you.should know.

Please see MILLER, 7B
/


CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


SENIOR BRIEFS


Senior Academy
Fifteen summer session
courses are now open for reg-
istration at the USF Sarasota-
Manatee Senior Academy at
5700 North Tamiami Trail. A
summer special of $75 enti-
ties you to sign up for all 15
courses, ranging from history
and literature to computers,
art or music. Classes meet
once a week for 90 minutes
between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Monday, Tuesday or Wednes-
day. Call 359-4296 for a cata-
log, or visit sarasota.usf.edu/
senioracademy.
Seniors group
Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-
3:30 p.m. for a meeting and
cards. Call 485-8739.
Grandparents group
The Grandparents Raising
Grandkids Support Group
meets the second Tuesday of
the month (May 10) at 9:30
a.m. in the Englewood Com-
munity Hospital Cafeteria,
700 Medical Blvd. Call Sandy
at (941) 475-3615.
Volunteers needed
The Foster Grandparent
Program of Southwest Flor-
ida, sponsored by the Dr. Pip-
er Center for Social Services
Inc., needs senior volunteers,
age 60 or older to become fos-
ter grandparents and tutor
and mentor children in Head
Start Centers in Sarasota
County Foster grandparents
serve 15-20 hours a week and
receive a tax-free stipend of
$2.65 an hour, plus mileage
reimbursement of $0.29 per


mile, plus an annual physical
examination. For more infor-
mation, call Joan at (800) 332-
5346.
Senior Friendship
Centers activities
Free; donations encouraged.
2350 Scenic Drive, 584-0052
* Camera Club, Mondays, 10
a.m.
* Dancercise with Carole Cof-
fey, Mondays, 11 a.m.-12:15
p.m. Call 584-0075.
* Beginners Basket Weaving
with Barbara and Chris,
Tuesday, 10 a.m.-noon.
* Pine Needle Weaving, Tues-
day, 10 a.m.
* Yoga In/Around a Chair,
Wednesday, 8:30-9:30 a.m.
* Wednesday Walkers, 9 a.m.
* Italian, Wednesdays, 2:45
p.m.
* Attorney Consultations,
third Thursday of the month,
1-4 p.m. Complimentary 30-
minute consultation with
Marcella Mika of Wilson &
Mika, PA. and every Wednes-
day 9:30-11:30 a.m. with
Elizabeth Weis, Attorney
Emeritus with Legal Aid of
Manasota. Reserve your time
slot by calling 584-0075.
* Quilting for Fun with Helen
Magan, Thursdays, 9-11:30
.a.m. Bring own materials.
* Beginner Bridge, Thursdays,
9 a.m.
* Duplicate Bridge, Fridays, 1
p.m.
SFC at Epiphany
Parish Hall
350 W. Tampa Ave.
* Quilting with Liz, Wed-
nesday, 9:30 a.m. Call 493-

Please see SENIOR, 7B


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SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN lB


AARP seeks Andrus Award for


Community Service nominees


STAFF REPORT


AARP Florida is seeking
nominations for its 2005
AARP Andrus Award for Com-
munity Service, which honors
those individuals who are
sharing their experience, tal-
ent and skills to enrich the
lives of their community
members.
"Volunteerism is clearly a
new way of looking at retire-
ment for older Americans.
Many are finding that they
want to remain active and
involved and that volun-
teerism fulfills this need and
the desire to help others," said
AARP Florida State Director,
Bentley Lipscomb.
"Through this recognition,
AARP encourages members
and prospective members to
use their skills and assistance
as a way to remain vital as
well as make a difference in
their community," said Lips-
comb.
The screening of nominees
will be performed by AARP
Florida and involves a range
of criteria, including positive


impact on the lives of individ-
uals 50 and older, improve-
ment of the community in or
for which the work was per-
formed, and inspiration of
others to volunteer.
The application deadline is
July 1, 2005, and the award
recipient will be announced
after Sept. 1, 2005.
AARP Andrus Award for
Community Service nomi-
nees must meet the following
eligibility requirements:
Nominees must be current
AARP volunteers or mem-
bers, or must have been AARP
volunteers or AARP members
within the time period de-
scribed below.
The accomplishments,
achievements or service on
which the nomination is
based must have occurred
during the period Jan. 1-Dec.
31, 2004.
The accomplishments,
achievements, or service on
which the nomination is
based must have been per-
formed on a volunteer basis,
without pay.
Call AARP Florida at (866)


595-7678 for more informa-
tion and a nomination form.
With more than 2.7 million
members in Florida- and 35
million nationwide AARP
is a nonprofit, nonpartisan
membership organization
that helps people 50 and old-
er have independence, choice
and control in ways that are
beneficial and affordable to
them and society as a whole.
It produces AARP The Mag-
azine, published bimonthly;
AARP Bulletin, the monthly
newspaper; AARP Segunda
Juventud, the bimonthly
magazine in Spanish and
English; NRTA Live & Learn,
the quarterly newsletter for
50 and older educators; and
the Web site, aarp.org. AARP
Foundation is the affiliated
charity that provides security,
protection and empower-
ment to older persons in need
with support from thousands
of volunteers, donors, and
sponsors.
There are staffed offices in
all 50 states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico and
the U.S. Virgin Islands.


MILLER


Advance Directives
This is a formal term that
describes two kinds of legal
documents that will spell out
your wishes regarding your
end-of-life medical treatment
when you can no longer
make or communicate deci-
sions for yourself. The two
documents are:
Living will: A document
that tells your doctor what
kind of care you want to
receive if you become inca-
pacitatedb
Durable power of attor-
ney: A document that desig-
nates your health-care proxy,
the person you've chosen to
make medical decisions for
you should you become inca-
pacitated. Most states recom-
mend that patients designate
a primary proxy as well as an
alternate.
Getting started
You can create your own
living will and appoint a dur-
able power of attorney with-
out the help of a lawyer. Here
are some good resources to
help you get started:
The National Hospice and
Palliative Care Organization:
Provides free information
and state-specific advance
directive forms with instruc-
tions on their Web site
(caringinfoorg) that you can
download. Or, you can call
their hotline at (800) 658-
8898 and they will mail them
to you and answer any ques-
tions you may have.
Aging with Dignity: An
advocacy organization that
offers an easy-to-use legal
document called "Five
Wishes" that covers all facets
of an advance directive that
will help you plan how you
want to be cared for in case
you become seriously ill. Five
Wishes is legally valid in most
states and costs $5. To get a
copy, visit
agingwithdignity.org or call
(888) 594-7437.
U.S. LivingWill Registry: A
service that electronically
stores your advance direc-
tives and organ donor infor-
mation and makes these doc-
uments available to your
family or health care
providers 24 hours a day via
the Internet or telephone.
They also provide advance
directive forms from all 50
states. Visit uslivingwillreg
istry.com.
Savvy tip
Research has shown that a
living will alone has limita-
tions and in many cases is
ignored and misunderstood
by both family members and
doctors. This typically hap-
pens due to complicated
medical situations, interfami-



SENIOR ..
3065.
* Beginners Spanish, Wednes-
day, 1-3 p.m. Call 584-0052.


ly conflicts or because many
living will documents are
vaguely worded and leave
everyone involved confused.
Be very thorough when you
create your living will and
durable power of attorney


documents and give copies
to your family and doctor.
And, have a direct, candid
conversation with your
health-care proxy and doctor
so they know exactly what
' you want.


Preventive action can help elderly live longer


STAFF REPORT


In celebration of National
Older Americans' Month dur-
ing May, the Sarasota County
Seniors Advisory Council
reminds aging adults and
their families of actions that
can help seniors remain
healthy and in their own
homes and engaged in their
communities well into their
later years. "Keeping older
adults healthy, independent
and engaged in our commu-
nity benefits everyone. Their
wisdom and experience as
well as civic leadership and
mentoring is essential to our
communities, workplaces
and economic wellbeing."
said Sarasota County Health
and Human Services execu-
tive director Bill Little.
The Seniors Advisory
Council has developed three
10- and 30-second public ser-


vice announcements (PSAs)
that were originally released
in 2004 that discuss medica-
tion safety, fall prevention
and physical activity. These
PSAs contain tips that rein-
force precautions to prevent
injury and illness while
encouraging people to stay
active and healthy well into
their sunset years.
Drug Interactions Can Kill!
Too many older adults are
hospitalized or die from mix-
ing the wrong medications.
Older adults can avoid life
threatening medication inter-
actions by adopting the sim-
ple steps in this PSA. Visit
http://scg.co.sarasota.fl.us/vi
deos/2004medPSA.asx.
Is Your Home a Danger
Zone? Too many older adults
are hospitalized, disabled or
die from complications re-
sulting from accidental falls.
Family members can help


older adults to avoid falls by
making simple changes in the
home as shown in this PSA.
Visit http://scg.co.sarasota
.fl.us/videos/2004dangerPSA.
asx.
Are You Relaxing Yourself
to Death? Too much sitting
and TV watching can lead to
obesity. Older adults who are
obese are more likely to
develop heart disease, dia-
betes, cancer and even arthri-
tis. These diseases can result
in costly hospitalizations and
even premature death. Fam-
ily members can encourage
each other to make dimple
changes toward a more active
lifestyle to prevent obesity as
shown in this PSA. Visit
http://scg.co.sarasota.fl.us/vi
deos/2004relaxPSA.asx.
For more information
about the Sarasota County
Seniors Advisory Council, call
(941) 861-2564.


LUNCH l '


Lunch is served at noon at
Senior Friendship Centers,
2350 Scenic Drive, Venice,
584-0090 or 584-0031. Res-
ervations required 24 hours in
advance.
Suggested donation: $3. All
meals served with bread and
milk.
MONDAY, May 2: Sliced
ham and fruit sauce, whipped
sweet potatoes, broccoli/car-
rot/cauliflower mix, apple-
sauce
Frozen alternative: Veal
patty with brown gravy,


mashed potatoes, carrot cuts
TUESDAY, May 3: Blended
fruit juice, stewed chicken
with veggies, yellow rice,
chopped spinach, oatmeal
raisin cookie
Frozen alternative: Beef
patty with onion gravy mash-
ed potatoes, whole corn
WEDNESDAY, May 4: Veg-
gie soup, Swedish meatballs
with mushroom gravy, whip-.
ped potatoes, peas and car-
rots, fresh banana
Frozen alternative: Maca-
roni and cheese, seasoned


carrots, green peas
THURSDAY, May 5: Turkey
chili, white rice, whole kernel
corn, vanilla pudding
Frozen alternative: Meat-
loaf with brown gravy, black-
eyed peas, turnip greens
FRIDAY, May 6: Baked roti-
ni casserole, Italian veggie
medley, tossed veggie salad
with French dressing, holiday
dessert
Frozen alternative: Fish
nuggets, mashed potatoes au
gratin, green beans, spiced
peaches


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 7B


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005








CONTACT US
KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
(941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


SUNDAY2005
MAY 1, 2005


Collier Ridge one of the most popular mountain biking loops


BY BOB DOWNING
GUEST WRITER

Collier Ridge is one of the
most popular mountain bik-
ing loops at Big South Fork'
National River and Recrea-
tion Area.
It's an 8-mile loop of most-
ly single-track pedaling
through the forests of the
Cumberland Plateau on the
Tennessee-Kentucky line.
The park was one of the
first in the national park sys-
tem to permit mountain
bikes.
Routes for mountain bikes
include old roads, horse trails
and a few trails like Collier
Ridge designed specifically
for mountain bikes with
the assistance of the Big
South Fork Bike Club.
The ride begins at the
Bandy Creek Visitor Center,
(423) 569-7275, on the
Tennessee side. That's about
15 miles west of Oneida.


The Collier Ridge Trail
begins with a 1.2-mile pedal
west on Bandy Creek Road to
the trailhead. You will pass
the historic Katie Blevins
cemetery and the Lora Blev-
ins Farmstead with a log
home from 1927.
A sign for Scott State Forest
appears on the left. That trail-
head marks the beginning of
the main 5.5-mile single-
track Collier Ridge loop. Go
left (south) into the woods.
It's an easy-to-moderate
pedal with plenty of ups
and downs and a few easy
stream crossings to keep
things interesting.
There are no major back-
breaking climbs and one
good downhill run.
The trail has jumps, bare
sandstone climbs and drops
and slalom runs through the
trees.
Veer left at one mountain
bike junction. You will return
on the trail on the right.


You will cross three
streams: North Bandy Creek,
King Branch and South
Bandy Creek.
You'll also pedal through
the old Billie Blevins farm site.
There is one technically
challenging single-track sec-
tion of 1 1/2 miles for more
advanced riders. It parallels
state Route 297.
There are some steep
climbs and drops with sharp
turns and log crossings over
small streams in the hollows.
You can pedal it. It's fun. Or
you can walk it. Or you can
jump on the road it's right
next to the tough stretch -
and avoid that section, if it's
too much for you.
The trail is marked by
white arrows on brown metal
signs or orange arrows on
wooden posts embedded in
the ground.
The trail seems to hold up
in wet weather.
Parts of the loop are shared


by mountain bikers and hik-
ers. Another mountain bike
option at Big South Fork is the
5.3-mile Duncan Hollow
Loop.
It also begins at the Bandy
Creek Visitor Center. It is an
easy-to-moderate ride with 3
miles on gravel roads and 2.3
miles of singe-track between
two bluffs above the Big
South Fork Cumberland
River.
It features some fun-filled
downhill'runs, one fairly easy
stream crossing and a moder-
ate climb at the end of the
loop. You will also pedal past
an experimental forest with
hundreds of American chest-
nuts, in a project by the
National Park Service and the
University of Tennessee to
develop a blight-resistant
strain.
The 1.5-mile West Bandy
Trail has been used for bike
races. It's not for beginners. It
is steep and narrow and off


Bandy Creek Road.
You can also pedal to
North White Oak Overlook.
That ride it's 3 miles out
and 3 miles back- includes a
great vista from an overlook
above the creek for a great
photo opportunity.
The ride begins off Blevins
Road about 3 miles west of
Bandy Creek Visitor Center
and Bandy Creek Camp-
ground. It's a double-track
route of packed sandstone.
There can, depending on
weather, be sand and mud
bogs on the trail.
Additional mileage is pos-
sible on the route.
Mountain bikes are not
permitted on hiking trails at
Big South Fork.
Bikers can pedal on horse
trails in the 123,000-acre fed-
eral park. Horses have the
right of way and bicyclists
should stop and pull over to
let horses pass.
Maps of mountain bike


trails are available at the
Bandy Creek Visitor Center.
Be aware that hunting is
permitted in the park in the
fall and spring. Wear orange
as a precaution.
Always wear a helmet.
Carry a first aid kit and know
how to use it. Big South Fork
is rugged and remote. Plan for
self-rescue.
The area suffered lots of
trees coming down in a 1998
snowstorm and some trails
are still affected.
For more information,
contact Big South Fork
National River and Recrea-
tion Area, Route 3, Box 401,
Oneida, TN 37841, (423) 569-
9778.
You can also go to their
Web site at nps.gov/biso.
A recommended map for
biking or hiking the park is
"The Big South Fork National
River and Recreation Area
Trails Illustrated Map"
(National Geographic, $9.95)


Chattanooga not short of attractions


No trip to Chattanooga would be complete without a ride aboard the Chattanooga Choo Choo.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CHATTANOOGA CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU
Get up close to sharks safely outside their tanks at the Chattanooga Aquarium.


STAFF REPORT


The Chattanooga Area
Convention & Visitors Bureau
recently issued this news
summary about what is hap-
pening in Chattanooga,
Tenn., through June 2005.
Check Out ChattaNEWga
- The 21st Century
Waterfront Project, a $120
million, 129-acre vision to
enhance Chattanooga's river-


The exterior of the
Chattanooga Aquarium.


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front, will be celebrating the
grand opening of events
throughout May.
The Tennessee Aquarium,
long known as the world's
largest freshwater aquarium,
unveils a spectacular new
experience with its new salt-
water adventure that explores
the mysteries of the ocean.
Association for Visual
Artists This unique, muse-
um-quality event showcases
more than 150 local, regional
and nationally recognized
artists. Visitors and amateur
art buyers will find a variety of
uniquely original artwork
ranging from contemporary,
traditional and whimsical fur-
niture and paintings, to stun-
ning jewelry and sculpture.
Bluff View Art District -
As a part of the 21st Century
Waterfront Project, the
Hunter Museum of American
Art will feature their $19.5
million expansion with
Georgia O'Keefe: Visions of
the Sublime in the new tem-
porary exhibits gallery, and

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Sea horses are some of the
smaller aquatic creatures to
be found at the Chattanooga
Aquarium.



Happy Heart Tours
484-7568 hhtours@aol.com
Hurry to be included for Mothers Day!
May 8 .................Diana Exhibition + St Pete Pier lunch
May 8.,....Mother's Day Broadway Palm Miss Saigon
May 8...... Off Broadway Palm Gettino ~ -a.:"-ed
May 13 ...............Broadway ShowTunes Lunch Cruise
May 15........ "CutThe Ribbons" Musical revue about
Mother & daughter relationships.Tampa + meal
May 17 Starlite Princess Dixieland Jazz lunch cruise
May 18 Ocean Jewel Casino Ship+free lunch buffet
May 19.............. Visit Fisherman's Village Inc. Lunch
May 21..........Disney'on Ice "Finding Nemo" + meal
May 22....... "Dames at Sea" Naples DinnerTheater
May 24..Hard Rock Cafe +Tribute to Broadway Show
May 26 ...Visit Orlando's "'Mall of Millenia" Inc. lunch
June 4.. Ft Myer Franklin Lock Lunch on JC Cruises
June 9..Yahala Bakery, Mission Inn lunch & Mt,. Dora
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FEATURES EDITOR
KIM COOL
PHONE: (941) 207-1105
kcool@venicegondolier.com


DINING
TRAVEL
ENTERTAINMENT!


OUR TOWN 1 9B
SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


Join One Book, One Community events


Venice Public Library
300 S. Nokomis Ave., 861-1330
http://suncat.co.sarasota.fl.us
One Book, One
Community events
* The library hosts a discus-
sion of Tracy Kidder's "Moun-
tains Beyond Mountains"
Thursday, May 12 at 2 p.m.
* Dee McStravick speaks at
the library on Monday, May
23, at 2 p.m. She and her hus-
band built an orphanage in
Haiti and adopted two Hai-
tian children.
* Kidder discusses the book
and holds a signing at Holley
Hall in Sarasota, Wednesday,
May 25, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
and at Venice Church of the
Nazarene on Thursday, May
26, at 2 p.m. Free tickets avail-
able at all Sarasota County
libraries.
Film festival
Thursday at 6 p.m.: May 5,


see "The Man Who Knew Too
Much" (1956) with James
Stewart and Doris Day.
Great literature
The Great Novels discus-
sion group meets alternate
Friday at Venice Public Li-
brary, 2-4 p.m. The group
looks at Nabokov's "Lolita"
May 13 and 27. The Con-
temporary Book Discussion
Group meets the fourth Wed-
nesday of each month at 7
p.m. and reads a variety of
new fiction.
The group examines
Jeffrey Archer's 'As the Crow
Flies" May 25 and Erik Lar-
son's "The Devil in the White
City" June 22. New members
welcome.
Book signing
Popular cookbook author
Frances Newton visits for tea
at 1 p.m. to discuss the new
edition of her recipe compila-
tion "Historic Spanish Point:


Cooking Then and Now."
Everyone is welcome.
Women on the Go
All women who want to
travel solo are invited to a
support and discussion
group that meets 2:30-4 p.m.
the third Monday of each
month.
Members share travel
experiences and trip-plan-
ning tips. Next meeting is
May 16.
Learn e-mail and Internet
Venice Public Library of-
fers weekly computer instruc-
tion at the public terminals
Tuesday, 9:30-10:30 a.m. A
VPL reference librarian teach-
es an introductory class on e-
mail and Internet functions.
Registration is necessary. Sign
up the Monday before the
Tuesday class at the Refer-
ence desk or call reference at
861-1340.
Explore the Library System


Web site at http://suncat.co
.sarasota.fl.us, where you can
use your library card to renew
checked-out items and re-
quest titles found in the
Sarasota County libraries.
The Web site also provides
free access to several sub-
scription databases and links
to other helpful Web sites.
Bugs be gone
Bring your gardening
questions to Venice Public
Library every Thursday, 9:30
a.m.-noon.
From pesky insects to alien
plants, the friendly experts
from the Sarasota County
Extension Service will help
you with your horticultural
problems.
Youth activities
* Dial-A-Story: Dial 486-2330
and enjoy a two-minute fairy
tale for children 5-10. The
story is changed every two
days.


* Preschool Storytime: Tues-
days, 10-10:30 a.m. for inde-
pendent 3- to 5-year-olds.
* Tot Time Storytime: Thurs-
day mornings, 10-10:30 a.m.
for birth to 3 years and a care-
giver. The themes for the
Preschool Storytimes and the
Tot Time Storytime will usual-
ly be the same: May 3 and 5: I
Love Mom!; May 10 and 12:
Little Critters; May 17 and 19:
Jungle Fun
* Doggie Tales Read to dogs
Tuesday, May 3, 10 and 17,
3:30-4:30 p.m. Read to trained
pet therapy dogs from the
Suncoast Humane Society.
Enjoy a craft while waiting to
read or visit with the dogs.

Selby Public Library
1331 First St., Sarasota
861-5000
Fossils lecture
The Environmental Col-


election at Selby Public Library
sponsors "Florida Fossils
from the Ice Age," an audio-
visual lecture at 2 p.m. Tues-
day, May 3.
Elaine Dunkleberger, pres-
ident of the Manatee Fossil
Club, speaks about fossils
from Florida's ancient past.
This program is free and open
to the public.

Gulf Gulf Gate Library
7112 Curtiss Ave., Sarasota
861-5000
Preliteracy workshop
A free workshop for teach-
ers and parents who wish to
teach preliteracy skills takes
place 6:30-8:30 p.m., Wednes-
day, May 4.
Facilitator is Sylvia Nissley,
R.N., M.S. Continuing Edu-
cation Unit credits available,
payable by $10 check. Reg-
istration required.


Want to see the real Texas? Head down to Washington County


BY MARYANN ANDERSON
GUEST WRITER


Giddyup, cowboy or
cowgirl, as the case may be -
and pack your bags for an off-
the-beaten-track destination
of Washington County, Texas.
The really cool thing about
Washinigton County is that
although it's just an hour's
drive from the maelstrom of
Houston, this is where the
real Texas begins. You're
talking' unique history, real
barbecue, cattle drives, and
bright starry nights, all mixed
in with generous portions of
arts and culture.
Yep, pardner, you might
want to begin your journey
under the wide-open Texas
skies at Washington-on-the-
Brazos State Park, where the
rich and colorful history of
the state comes alive. This is
where the Texas Declaration
of Independence was signed
in 1836.
"It's a very special place to
Texans, because it's the birth-
place of Texas," drawls park
superintendent Tom Scaggs.
"This is where we declared
our independence from Mex-
ico."
From a historical perspec-
tive, the park is brimming
with a cornucopia of activi-


ties. Its almost 300 acres
include Independence Hall,
where the declaration was
signed; Barrington living His-
tory Farm, a working 1850s
farmstead complete with crit-
ters and corncribs and that
was once the home of Anson
Jones, the last president of the
Republic of Texas; and the
Star of the Republic Museum,
a cultural and social tribute to
the people and land of Texas.
Next, two-step on over to
Brenham to historic Blue Bell
Creameries, since 1907 the
home of the world's best ice
cream (to this, I can attest -
yum, yum!). :
After a mind-boggling
behind-the-scenes look at
how the plant and its gregari-
ous, gracious employees
chum out the creamy, sweet
treat, you can wander
through the country store or
sample a Texas-sized scoop of
any number of flavors, in-
cluding their famous Moo-
llineum Crunch or No. 1 best-
seller Homemade Vanilla.
Sing yippee-i-o and skip to
Texas Ranch Life, a working
cattle ranch that offers every-
thing from trail rides to
chuckwagon meals to camp-
fire music. The down home
pleasantness of owners John
and Taunia Elick is so conta-


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gious that you may find your-
self helping to set the dinner
table, taking walks with the
family dog, or wanting to
plow the North Forty.
Texas Ranch Life offers
hands-on, down-in-the-dirt,
boot-stompin' fun, but if you
want more horseback rides
than cattle branding, you can
saddle up and enjoy an after-
noon traipsing the verdant
pastures and gently loping
hills of Shiloh Ranch. It does-
n't matter if you're a begin-
ning rider or an expert eques-
trian, under the guidance of
Tom O'Connor and his staff,
you'llU come away with a new
appreciation for horses.
If you're not a rider but still
love horses, then amble out to
Monastery of St. Clare, where
you'll find a stable of cute-as-
can-be miniature horses. The
monastery and farm, home to
a group of Franciscan Poor


Clare Nuns, is so popular that
it has been featured in South-
ern Living and National Geo-
graphic. The sisters, whose
lives consist of prayer, raise
the horses and make and sell
handmade ceramic items to
support themselves. The farm
is especially kid-friendly with
a smattering of playful dogs
and cats complementing the
herds of diminutive, sweet
ponies.
After that, you should mo-
sey on over to College Station
and the campus of Texas
A&M University, home of the
George Bush Presidential Li-
brary and Museum. The mu-
seum is a living testament to
George (H.W.) and Barbara
Bush's blend of kindness,
honesty, humor and courage.
The museum's exhibits, in-
cluding millions of pho-
tographs, papers, gifts, arti-
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the 41st president from a per-
sonal and "professional per-
spective.
And you may find yourself
face-to-face with the former
president, known around
these parts simply as Forty-
One, or his wife, both of
whom visit from time and
time.
While arts and culture may
not be the first thing you
think of when you think of
Texas, it simmers in Washing-
ton County. The International
Festival-Institute at Round
Top showcases orchestral and
chamber music concerts in a
grand European-style concert
hall that is reminiscent of
English gardens, the' French
countryside, and the great
castles of Germany. After a
concert, you might want to
catch a locally produced and
acted play or musical at the
.Unity Theatre, a professional


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theater located in a restored
warehouse in downtown
Brenham.
And for yet another incen-
tive to visitWashington Coun-
ty, loosen up your belt and
prepare to put on a few
pounds during your stay. The
pecan fudge pie at Bevers
Kitchen is by-gosh, melt-in-
your-mouth good, and'their
coconut pie is piled high with
a velvety 3-inch meringue.
The barbecue is oh-so-divine
at Tex's, the catfish at the leg-
endary Burton Cafe is fried
just right, and the sandwiches
at Funky Art Cafe are just,
well, downright funky. Throw
in authentic Mexican cuisine
at popular Mariachi's, with
even more dessert from Must
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10B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN


When in Amsterdam, look



past the sleaze for the treats


BY GARY A. WARNER
GUEST WRITER
Forget the canals. Forget
the coffeehouses. Forget the
acres of Rembrandts and Van
Goghs. Forget all that wooden
shoes and tulips and silly
SHans Brinker and his silver
skates stuff you ever heard,
read or saw.
Before you go to Amster-
dam, get your brain around
the other Amsterdam. The in-
your-face Amsterdam.
The central city shops that
sell postcards of genitals
painted to look like Santa
Claus. Where delivery boys on
pink bicycles deliver marijua-
na seeds. Where porn and
prostitution flourish in the
most picturesque red-light
district in the world.
Get ready for it, all of it,
because it is going to smack
you right in the head whether
you like it or not.
How you react will deter-
mine whether you see Am-
sterdam as the most liberal,
liberating metropolis in Eur-
ope or a beautiful old jewel
wrapped in an oily envelope
of sleaze.
For the better part of two'
decades, I fell in the latter cat-
egory. Four times Amsterdam
was penciled in on my itiner-
ary, and four times I found
reason to get out the eraser.
But when I realized I'd
been to nearly every major
European city I had been
to Brussels twice I decided
it was time to give Amsterdam
a shot.
I've always had a long list
of reasons not to go. But I
came away with more rea-
sons potential visitors should
not repeat my mistake of
waiting so long to experience
the Dutch metropolis.
Amsterdam has a great air-
port. You never get a second


chance to make a first im-
pression, and Amsterdam
gets off on the right foot.
With its one terminal that
has just two levels, Schiphol is
the easiest, most modem air-
port in Europe, a dream to
navigate compared with the
creaking facilities of London,
Paris and Rome. A high-speed
train leaves every 15 minutes
for the 20-minute ride from
the airport to the city center.
The morning after I arrived
in Amsterdam, I was fighting
jet lag. I stepped out of my
canal-side hotel and wan-
dered the quays for hours.
The heart of the city is the
Grachtengordel, the three
concentric canals that half-
ring the city center. The man-
sions of the Herengracht, the
bridges over the Keizergracht
and the houseboats fronting
the artists' lofts of the Prisen-
gracht are one of the most
popular strolls for visitors.
In all, there are 47 miles of
canals in Amsterdam, and
each mile seemed to offer a
postcard image.
When you get thirsty,
watch your language. Ask for
a "coffee shop," and you'll get
more than a caffeine buzz. It's
the popular term for places
that legally sell marijuana and
hashish. If you ask for a "cafe,"
you'll likely be sent to one of
the 1,000 or more bars in the
city. Go. Drinking is awonder-
ful pastime in Amsterdam.
Try a light-tasting Hoegaar-
den or a dark De .Koninck
beer.
There are the grand cafes
whose luxurious interiors will
seem familiar to anyone who
has walked into a fancy cafe
in Paris, Vienna or Budapest.
I prefer the old, small tav-
erns called "brown cafes" for
their stained-wood interiors
and dark, drapery-blocked
doorways. Press past the cur-


TEXAS from last Green Sheet


be Heaven, and you'll think
you really must be in heaven.
Nature has blessed Wash-
ington County with mild win-
ters and summers, which pro-
vide for a wealth of world-
renowned gardening activi-
ties. Shop for old-fashioned
roses at the Antique Rose
Emporium, buy seasonal lil-
ies or poinsettias at Ellison's
Greenhouses, wander the
herb and flower gardens of
Glasco's Gardens and Gifts, or
taste the fruit of the vineyard
at Pleasant Hill Winery.
Washington County, at its
heart a maze of small towns,
country roads lined with
patches of bluebonnets,
freshly plowed fields criss-
crossed with bubbling creeks,

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and fat longhorns grazing the
pastures, tells the story of
Texas and its rich history like
few other places in the state.
If you go
For more information,
contact Washington County
Convention & Visitors Bureau
toll-free at (888) BRENHAM
(273-6426) or visit the Web
site at brenhamtexas.com.


tain at Hoppe near the Spui
Square, and you'll go back
three centuries in time. It's a
cramped but cozy place that's
especially good in the off-sea-
son, when the hordes of sum-
mer tourists aren't trying to
elbow in for a seat.
Another good. choice is 't
Doktertje, which means "the
little doctor," another time-
worn spot where for less than
$10 you can get a drink and sit
for as long as you like. I
brought along my journal and
enjoyed wasting a couple of
hours in the corner.
My favorite of all was In De
Waag, a bistro and bar inside
the last remaining gatehouse
of the old city. This imposing
brick pile was once the weigh-
ing house for goods, and later
the site of the city's execu-
tions. I had a bowl of spliter
wtensoep, the traditional
stick-to-your-gut pea soup
with duck rillettes, washed
down with two haze-reducing
cappuccinos. Between bouts
of reading the International
Herald Tribune, I perused my
e-mail and watched a Web-
cast of the surf at Pipeline in
Hawaii from one of the cafe's
computers.
Make your pilgrimage to
the Rijksmuseum to see Ver-
meer's "The Kitchen Maid."
Take in "The Sunflowers" and
"Wheatfield With Crows" at
the Van Gogh Museum. Just
save time for some of the
smaller museums.
I enjoyed my visit to the
Amsterdams Centrum voor
Fotografile on a narrow street
just off Dam Square. The col-
lections change constantly at
the modernist glass-and-steel
show space. One day it may,
be large-format photos juxta-
posing cuts of meat or raw
animal parts with flowers.
Another day it might feature
military-installation still lifes
from around Europe.
If there is a must-see muse-
um in Amsterdam, it's Anne
Frank Huis, where the young
Dutch Jewish girl wrote her
famous diary while hiding
from the Nazi occupiers dur-
ing World War II. She and her
family were turned in to the'
police and she died in the
Bergen-Belsen concentration
camp just two months before
the war's end.
One of the great charms of
Amsterdam albeit a some-
times dangerous one is the
sea of bicyclists making their


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Sunday, May 8th
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way around the city. People
wheel wildly around the cob-
blestone and brick streets as if
they are invincible.
It's possible to rent a bicy-
cle and make your way
around the city as locals do.
Just be prepared for some kid-
ney-jarring old streets and
maniac wheelers especially
during the morning and
evening rush hours who
will be more than happy to
run you right off the road.
Until World War II, the
Dutch ruled Indonesia, and
one of the great treats of a trip
to Amsterdam is to enjoy a
rijsttafel "rice table" up
to two dozen small plates pre-
sented at the same time,
including fried rice with pork
called nasi goreng, and satay
skewers of chicken, pork and
beef with peanut dipping
sauce. Beware the spicy sam-
bal chili sauce. Two of the best
places to experience the
rijsttafel are Tempo Doeloe on
Utrechtsestraat and Kantjil &
De Tijger on Spuistraat.
For a more domesticated
taste, try patat, the local ver-
sion of what we call french
fries. The crisp, fresh, fried
potato strands are only a dis-
tant culinary cousin to' the
greasy slabs served up in
American fast-food joints.
They're served from outdoor
stands scattered all around
town. One of the best is Vle-
minckx, onVoetboogstraat.
There are a number of big
baroque barracks on the main
plazas and a few design-ori-
ented boutique hotels like
Blakes, the local branch of
Anouska Hempel's temple of
trendiness based in London.
But part of the charm of a stay
in Amsterdam is cozying into
a canal-side hotel that's been
sewn together from neighbor-
ing town houses.
I stayed, at the Pulitzer
Hotel, with its sparkling gold
lights outlining the roofs of
the 17th-century homes that
form its facade. Though it's
affiliated with the Sheraton
chain, there's none of the arti-
ficial feel of a business hotel.
I've already got a list of
what to explore next time. Yes,
there will be a next time.
For basic information,
check out amsterdam.nl. It in-
cludes everything from sight-
seeing to how to navigate the
seedier sides of the city.


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2005 Arthritis Walk/Run and Doggie Walk
To Benefit the Arthritis Foundation

Sat, May 7th at the Venice Wellfields Complex
in the tennis court area on Pinebrook Road at Lucaya
8 AM Registration
8:45 AM Warm ups by Southside Athletic Club
9 AM Walk/Run and Doggie Walk starts!


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Registration is free! Participants are encouraged to take
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Bring the kids! Bring the pets!
All pets will get a free doggie bandana!

This is a fun, family event for a great cause! Come
out and walk or run for those who can't. Register online at
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PHOTO COURTESY OF HUMANE SOCIETY OF SARASOTA COUNTY
Panda Bear is a 5-year-old black and white border collie mix.
Her former owner describes her as friendly, affectionate and
gentle. At the shelter, she's quite vocal as people walk past her
kennel. She wants to get their attention. Panda Bear has lived
with dogs and cats and gets along well with them. She's
housetrained and well behaved. Come by the shelter and see
how sweet Panda Bear is. Can you give her a home? Visit the
Humane Society of Sarasota County at 2331 15th St., Sarasota,
or call 955-4131.


Volunteer opportunities

at Doctors Hospital


If you have some time on
your hands and can spare a
few hours a week; if you
would like to touch lives, lift
spirits, make new friends and
be part of a great team, then
the Auxiliary Volunteer Pro-
gram at Doctors Hospital of
Sarasota is the place for you!
The auxiliary is seeking vol-
unteers to perform a variety
of functions in various de-


apartments of the hospital.
Volunteers provide an in-
valuable service to patients,
their families, hospital staff
and physicians. No experi-
ence is necessary and many
opportunities and varied
roles are available. Doctors
Hospital is at 5731 Bee Ridge
Road in Sarasota. For more
information, call the Auxiliary
office at 342-1003.


PET BRIEFS


Bird rescue class
The Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary, 1708 Ken Thomp-
son Parkway, Sarasota, holds
a free training class for wild
bird rescue, .10:30 a.m. Sat-
urday,' May 7. N registratidrin
required.
The sanctuary also seeks
volunteers for its welcome
center, gift shop, tour guides
and for its thrift stores in
Nokomis (484-5715) and
Sarasota (355-0229).
For more information, call
the numbers above or 388-
4444.
Baby bird shower
The annual baby bird
shower at Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary takes place 1-3
p.m. Sunday, May 15, at 1708
Ken Thompson Parkway on
City Island in Sarasota.


See some of the many
orphaned baby birds cared
for at the sanctuary during
the spring and summer each
year.
Admission is free, but gifts
'of the following 'are request"
ed:' heating pads, laundry
baskets, Beechnut chicken
and chicken broth stage 1,
towels (new or used), Eu-
kanuba chicken and rice kit-
ten formula (dry), paper tow-
els, sponges and more. Cash
donations graciously appreci-
ated.
For a complete list of need-
ed items, call 388-4444.
Adoption-fest
The Humane Society of
Sarasota County holds its fifth
annual Luv-In Adoption-Fest
10 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, June
11, at 2331 15th St., (off Lime


Avenue), Sarasota.
All adoption fees are only
$35. Come for food, pet-ther-
apy llamas, city of Sarasota K-
9 Division, music arid more.
For more information, call.
:955-4131. ,
Obedience classes
* The Greater Venice Florida
Dog Club offers classes in
puppy training ($50), basic
obedience ($70) and confor-
mation classes ($6 per night)
Tuesday nights at the South
Venice Civic Association
Building on Alligator Drive.
Class sizes are limited and are
offered in seven-week ses-
sions. Call Terri at 423-6945
for more information and
registration.
* Suncoast Humane Society
presents Angeldogs Dog
Training Classes for 2005,


using positive training meth-
ods no choke chains or
prong collars only treats
and praise. Classes include
Puppy Preschool, Basic Obe-
,dience, and Intermediate
Canine GpodCitizen. Call the
shelter at (941) 474-7884 or
Victoria Angeldonis at An-
geldogs at (941) 484-3647.
Animal Services
adoption program
Sarasota County Animal
Services has many cats and
dogs eligible for adoption.
The adoption program is just
one of the many services that
Animal Services provides to
Sarasota County.
,Animal Services aims to
find responsible homes for
the dogs and cats that are not
claimed or are unwanted by
their owners, or animals that


must be given up for one rea-
son or another.
To adopt an animal, call
861-9500 or visit 8451 Bee
Ridge Road in Sarasota. To
find the location, head East
, on Bee Ridge Road.
Animal Services is at the
very end of the road at the old
landfill site.
The new area is called
Rothenbach Park at High
Point.
To find out more about the
animals available for adop-
tion or about Animal Ser-
vices, visit sarasotasheriff.org.
Help the little
ones at HSSC
The Humane Society of
Sarasota County (HSSC) has
lots of puppies and kittens
who are just learning how to
eat solid food.


Canned and dry puppy
and kitten food for several lit-
ters is needed.
The shelter is also in need
of kitty litter, preferably un-
scented, nonclumping and
nonscoopable because it's
safer for the cats.
Please help the babies at
HSSC by donating; or meet a
new friend.
For more information, call
HSSC at 955-4131, or stop by
the shelter at '2331 15th St.,
Sarasota.


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CLUBS AND NOTICES


Obedience classes
The Greater Venice Florida
Dog Club offers classes in
puppy training ($50), basic
obedience ($70) and confor-
mation classes ($6 per night)
Tuesday nights at the South
Venice Civic Association
Building on Alligator Drive.
Class sizes are limited and are
offered in seven-week ses-
sions. Call Tern at 423-6945
for more information and
registration.

American Legion No-Vel Post
159, 145 E. Venice Ave.,
Venice, 488-1157.
* Monday: all day hot dogs,
$2; line dancing, 4:30-6:30
p.m.; third Monday: 10:30
a.m., executive board meet-
ing; fourth Monday: 7:30
p.m., 40/8 promenade.
* Tuesday-Friday: 11 a.m.-
2 p.m., lunch; Second Tues-
day: 7:30 p.m., auxiliary
meeting; third Tuesday- 7:30
p.m. Post meeting.
* Wednesday: 6-8 p.m. Bar
bingo, food available; first
Wednesday: 11 a.m., Amphi-
bious Forces meeting. For
more information, call 497-
0345; second Wednesday: 11
a.m., Waves meeting.
* Thursday: 5-8 p.m., wings,
burgers and fish; first Thurs-
day: 11 a.m., WACs meeting.
* Friday: 6-8 p.m., dinner;
7-10 p.m., dancing.
* Saturday: all day belly-
buster hot dogs, $2.

Men of all ages are invited to
sing with The New Venice
Gondoliers Barbershop Chor-,
us, Mondays at 6:30 p.m. at
the Venice-Nokomis United
Methodist Church, 208 W.
Palm Ave., Nokomis. For more
information, call 484-4526 or
408-1266.


NATURE from page 5B
Hibiscus show
The 40th annual hibiscus
show, sponsored by the Gulf
Coast Chapter of the Amer-
ican Hibiscus Society, takes
place 1-4:30 p.m., Sunday,
May 15, at Woodmere Park
Recreation Center,; 3951
Woodmere Park in Venice.
Admission and parking are
free. Anyone may enter
blooms for competition be-
tween 9 and 11:30 a.m. Help
is available for newcomers.,
A plant will be given away
every half hour during the
show. Useful information on
growing and caring for hibis-
cus will be available. For
more information, call soci-
ety president Sioux Hurley at
484-0728.
Nature walks

l 'j. ^


PHOTO COURTESY OF BROOKE ELIAS
* Environmental scientist
Brooke Elias (above) leads a
nature walk 8:30-10 a.m.,
Saturday, May- 14, at the
Manasota Scrub Preserve,
2695 Bridge St., Englewood.
Meet at the parking area at
Bridge Street and Manasota
Beach Road. Bring a light
jacket, walking shoes, a hat,
sunscreen, insect repellent,
water, water, binoculars,


Bingo
* Monday, 6 p.m. Disabled
American Veterans Chapter
101, 600 E. Colonia Lane,
Nokomis. Call 488-4500.
* Tuesday and Thursdays, 11
a.m. Senior Friendship Cen-
ter, 2350 Scenic Drive. Call
493-3065.
* Tuesday and Saturdays, 7
p.m. Fraternal Order of
Eagles, 621 Colonia .Lane,
Nokomis. Call 484-4470.
* Tuesday, noon, Venice
Gardens Civic Center, 406
Shamrock Blvd. Doors open
11 a.m., nonsmoking. Snacks
available. Call 493-6541.
* Wednesday, 6-8 p.m.,
American Legion No-Vel 159,
145 E. Venice Ave., Venice.
Doors open 5 p.m. Food
available. Call 488-1157.
* Wednesday, 11 a.m. Senior
Friendship Center at Epip-
hany Hall.
* Thursday, noon. The
Jewish Community Center of
Venice, 600 Auburn Road,
nonsmoking. Doors open 10
a.m. Hard cards available for
sight-impaired players.
Lunch available. Call 493-
7558.
* Thursday, 5-6:30 p.m.
Arby's 430 U.S. 41 Bypass.
Prizes are gift certificates.
* Sunday, 2-5 p.m., VFW, 832
E. Venice Ave. Call 484-8118.
* Sunday, The Knights of
Columbus, 512 Substation
Road, Venice. Doors open 1
p.m. Early Bird at 2 p.m. Free
coffee. Hot dogs and pastry
available. Call 485-1663.

Florida Wheelers Bowling
Association welcomes wheel-
chair- and standup bowlers,
Thursday at 3 p.m. at AMF
Venice Lanes, 1-100 South U.S.
Bypass. No experience neces-
sary. Call Leon Thompson at


camera and hand lens. Space
is limited to 25; RSVP to
861-5000.
* Explore the marine life of
Sarasota Bay at Blackburn
Point with the American
Littoral Society, Southeast,
Region,-9:30-1'1:30 a.m., Sat-
urday, May 14. Wear hard-
soled sneakers and sun-
screen. Cost: $3 for ALS
members, $5 for nonmem-
bers, kids free. RSVP to Ruth
at 366-9479.
* Enjoy a free walk on the
North Jetty, Casey Key with
an American Littoral Society
naturalist, 9 a.m. Saturday,
May 14. Learn to identify the
creatures of the shoreline,
including plants, birds and
shells. Reservations required
by calling Bud at 488-4158.
* The Manatee-Sarasota
Chapter of the Sierra Club
meets for a 4-mile moonlight
walk on Caspersen Beach in
Venice, 8 p.m. Sunday, May
21. Wear sturdy shoes, bring
a snack and water. RSVP to
Sally at 484-4113.
* The Manatee-Sarasota
Chapter of the Sierra Club
meets for a 5-mile walk at
Carlton Reserve in Venice,
7:30 a.m. Saturday, June 4.
Wear sturdy shoes and bring
12 oz. water and brunch.
RSVP to Sally at 484-4113.

Baby bird shower
The annual baby bird
shower at Pelican Man's Bird
Sanctuary takes place 1-3 p.m.
Sunday, May 15, at 1708 Ken
Thompson Parkway on City
Island in Sarasota: See orp-
haned baby birds cared for at


475-1369 or Yola Levenson at
493-5849.

Classics Club is an over-60
group that meets at area
restaurants for lunch Thurs-
days at 1:30 p.m. For more
information, call 493-3829 or
488-4150.

The Venice Florida Corvettes
Club meets at 7 p.m. the first
Tuesday at Jacaranda Trace,
3600 William Penn Way, Ven-
ice. Call 497-4590 or e-mail
vfcorvettes@sbcglobal.net.

HMS Phoebe chapter of the
Daughters of the British
Empire meets the first Tues-
day. Women of British birth or
heritage are welcome. Call
493-7273.

The Venice Doll Club meets
the first Monday at 10 a.m. on
the second floor at Jacaranda
Trace, 3600 William PennWay,
Venice. All are welcome. Cost
is $5, including lunch. Call
Barbara Williams, president,
at 473-3371.

Greg Byler teaches guitar
Thursday at the Venice
YMCA, 701 Center Road. For
times and cost, call Youth
Program Director Clare Riggs
at 492-9622, Ext, 133 or Byler
at 496-4398.

Gulf Coast Banjo Society
meets Thursdays at Snook
Haven, 5000 E. Venice Ave.,
Venice, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The
public is welcome. For more
information, call 488-3023.

The Gulf Coast Humanist
Association meets the third
Saturday at 1 p.m. at the
Family Table Restaurant,
14132 Tamiami Trail, North


the sanctuary during the
spring and summer each year.
Admission is free, but gifts of
the following are requested:
heating pads, laundry baskets,
Beechnut chicken and chick-
en broth stage 1, towels (new
or used). Eukanuba chicken
and fice kitten formula (dry),
laundry detergent (no per-
fume), facial tissues, paper
towels, Kaytee Exact hand-
feeding formula for baby
birds, 9-volt batteries, dry-
erase boards, Avi-Era vitamins,
plastic aquariums with lids,
brooms, sponges, sponge
mops, one-gallon zip lock
bags, tall kitchen garbage bags
(13 gallon) and dish liquid
detergent.
Also needed are a new
refrigerator, air filter system,
window air conditioners and
food processors. Cash dona-
tions graciously appreciated.
Refreshments provided; a gift
basket will be raffled. Proceeds
benefit the baby birds. call
388-4444.
Conservation
conversation
The Sarasota Conservation
Committee meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 17, at Selby
Library, second-floor confer-
ence room. Topics include
phosphate mining, Sierra
Club progress report, wildlife
corridor protection and
more. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, call
Gayle at 923-5903.

Efest
Sarasota County, the city of'
Sarasota and Friends of


Port. Lunch is available. Call
Rosemary Hagen at 475-4432.

The Heritage Trail Knitting
Guild meets the first Tuesday
of every month at 7 p.m. at
Venice Public Library, 300 S.
Nokomis Ave. All individuals
who knit, crochet or are inter-
ested in finding out more
about these crafts and the
benefits of membership are
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Jamie Killorin at
485-5196.

The Italian American Club of
Venice, 1375 Ringling Drive,
Venice, 486-1492.
* Monday: Italian language
classes. Free and open to the
public. Beginners: 5:45 p.m.;
Intermediate and ongoing:
7:15 p.m.
* Friday: Lotsa Pasta, 4:30-
7:30 p.m., $7. Take-out avail-
able.

The Kiwanis Club of Venice
meets for lunch at noon
Wednesday at the Holiday
Inn of Venice, 455 North
U.S. 41 Bypass. Visitors wel-
come. Call 484-6022.

The Knights of Columbus-
Venice, 512 Substation Road,
holds pancake breakfasts first
and third Sundays, 8-11:30
a.m., adults: $3.50, children
under 6: free with parent. For
more information, call 485-
1663.
Lola Miller leads line dance
lessons on Wednesdays at
Venice United Church of
Christ, 620 Shamrock Blvd.
Beginners lessons, 5:30-6:30
p.m.; intermediate, 6:30-8:30
p.m. Cost: $4. Call Miller at
493-9665.

Hear live acoustic music at


Sarasota County Parks spon-
sor Florida's first major com-
munity festival celebrating
the environment and sustain-
able living. Efest will be held
May 27-28 to celebrate the
environment and encourage
sustainable living to improve
'the health of our community
and the planet. Enjoy speak-
ers, all-day music and enter-
tainment, innovative prod-
ucts, a Kid-E-Zone and more.
Visit efest.us or call 861-5652.
Peace River cleanup
The Nav-A-Gator Grill at
the DeSoto Marina sponsors
the Peace River cleanup, 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, June 4,
at 9700 SW Riverview Circle;
Lake Suzy, Fla. Rain date is
June 5. Sunday, the Nav-A-
Gator holds a barbecue for
all registered participants,
2-3 p.m. The Yard Dogs per-
form 2-5 p.m. To sign up, call-
(941) 627-3474 or visit nav-a-
gator.com.

It's a zoo out there!
The Manatee-Sarasota
Chapter of the Sierra Club
sponsors a Zoo Nite at
Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo July
22 and 23. Bring your sleeping
bags and pillows and find out
what the zoo is like when the
sun goes down. The adven-
ture includes crafts, hikes,
behind-the-scenes with zoo-
keepers, animal encounters,
snacks and more. Cost is $40
for children and adults. Full-
day admission to the zoo is
$7. Deposits and reservations
due by June 15 to Gayle at
923-5903.


VENUE from page 3


Call 493-3065.
* noon, The Jewish Commu-
nity Center of Venice,. 600
Auburn Road, nonsmoking.
Hard cards available for sight-
impaired players. Doors open
at 10 a.m. Lunch available.
Call 493-7558.
* 5-6:30 p.m. Arby's, 430 U.S.
41 Bypass. Prizes are gift cer-
tificates.

FRIDAY,
MAY6
Golf benefit
The 13th annual Pat Lonsdale
Invitational Golf Tournament
takes place May 6 and 7 at
The Longboat Key Club and


benefits the Humane Society
of Sarasota County Inc. The
event includes two parties
and an 18-hole golf tourna-
ment. Festivities include a
Party with Pat, a round of golf,
games, lunch and awards.
Cost is $200 per golfer. Just
the Party with Pat: $100. Call
HSSC at 955-4131, Ext. 101 or
visit patsinvitational.com.

Senior Friendship Center,
2350 Scenic Drive, 58470052
Duplicate Bridge, Fridays, 1
p.m.
Pasta
Lotsa Pasta is available 4:30-
7:30 p.m. Friday at the Italian
American Club of Venice,


1375 Ringling Blvd. Cost is $7.,
Take out is available. Call 486-
1492.
Women's events
*The Women's Club of Sor-
rento East holds a luncheon
meeting at noon at the Plan-
tation Golf and Country Club,
500 Rockley Blvd., Venice.
Program features harpist Oli-
via Swan and installation of
officers.
*Kappa Kappa GammaAlum-
nae Association of Sarasota
and Manatee Counties meets
6-8 p.m. at the Sun and Surf
Colony, Lido Beach, 1145
Benjamin Franklin Drive in
Sarasota for a casual cocktail
social with guests. Call Betty


at 488-6021.
Comedy night
Pat Daux appears at 8:30 p.m.
at the Holiday Inn of Venice,
455 U.S. 41 North Bypass. The
comedian has recently
appeared in an HBO special
and has been seen in movies
and commercials. Admission
is $10.
Friday walk
The Burns Square galleries
and shops on historic South
Pineapple Avenue in down-
town Sarasota host their First
Friday Walk, 6-9 p.m. Enjoy
music, dining, shopping,
entertainment and more. Call
957-0002.


Books-A-Million, 4230 South
Tamiami Trail in Venice every
first and third Monday, 7-9:30
p.m. Call Richard Brobst at
408-9515.

'Visit the Farmer's Market
every Saturday, 8 a.m.-noon
downtown Venice in Cen-
tennial Park, at the comer of
Tampa and Nokomis ave-
nues. For information, call
484-3801.

Oscar Scherer State Park, 1843
South Tamiami Trail, Osprey,
483-5956. Park admission is
$4.25 per vehicle and canoe
rental fee is $5 per hour.
* Thursday, 7:30 a.m., bird
walks.
* Friday, 8:30 a.m., ranger-
led walks.
* Sunday, 8:30 a.m., scrub
walks. :

The Republican Club of South
Sarasota County, serving
Englewood, Laurel, Nokomis,
Osprey, South Sarasota and
Venice meets the second
Wednesday of each month at
the Venice Chamber of Com-
merce, 597 South Tamiami
Trail. 11:30 a.m. meet-and-
greet, with complimentary
snacks followed by program
and speaker at noon. All are
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Don O'Nesky (presi-
dent) at 497-6454 or Jerry
Woelfel (vice president) at
416-5510, or e-mail RCSSC@
att.net.

Area Navy Seabee veterans
meet the second Saturday
at 11:30 a.m. at the Family
Table Restaurant, 14132 Tam-
iami Trail, North Port. For
more information, call Tom at
497-5944.


FLORIDA from page 5B
are embedded in numerous
Florida statutes, FWCC rules
and local ordinances. ...
FWCC staff concluded that
changing this terminology
would be difficult, expensive
and could lead to unintended
problems with those statutes
that might, indeed, reduce
protections. In the end, staff
believes the focus should be
on identifying and protecting
imperiled species, not on
what the categories of imper-
ilment are called. ... Under
the current and proposed
processes, when a species is
reclassified it receives a
species-specific management
plan that prescribes the
actions and protections
needed to recover the species.
As such, even if a species is
de-listed, it will still receive
the protections necessary to
protect the species."
Begging your pardon, but
in the present political cli-
mate, this seems just a bit ...
well, nalve. We have legions of
lawyers and lawmakers who
are paid to get the language in
our laws right; haggling end-
lessly over words is their
bread and butter. Species-
specific management plans?
These are products of lengthy
negotiation among numer-
ous stakeholders, and as such
are not immune to political
influence. Even when a sound,
management plan exists, it
takes more than a paper plan
to ensure protection: the plan
has to be backed by political
support and political will, or it
will not be implemented as,
countless unenforced envi-
ronmental laws in developing
and developed countries bear
witness. Names and labels
are critical in galvanizing (or
undermining) political sup-
port, and when you see some-
one trying to rewrite the dic-
tionary in the midst of a po-
litical debate, you know it's
not an accident.
In the end, this is far from
being just a harmless quibble
over words. The Florida man-
atee's first line of protection is
the public's recognition that
this species is, in fact, precari-
ously balanced between sur-
vival and extinction, and
endangered by long-term
trends that will be difficult or
impossible to reverse.
Downlisting of manatees by
the state would significantly
weaken this line of defense; it
would undermine efforts to
implement additional protec-


Seniors Without Partners
meets at the VFW Hall, 832 E.
Venice Ave., Mondays, 12:30-
3 p.m. for cards and music.
Call Marie at 485-8739.

Sons of Italy Venice Lodge
2747 meets at Park Place
Retirement Residence, 200 N.
Nassau St. The public is wel-
come. Call 484-0746.

Venice Foxettes Sharon de
Marc and Maria Santagado
teach Tappercise (tap dance,
clogging and Irish step) at
Starz Choice Dance Studio,
348 S. Seaboard Ave., Venice.
Call 408-0019.
* Beginners Tappercise:
Tuesday, noon-1 p.m.
* Intermediate Tappercise:
Tuesday, 1-2 p.m.
* Beginners tap only, Friday,
4:30-5:30 p.m.
* Intermediate/Advanced
Tappercise: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
* Country dancing, 7-10 p.m.
the first Saturday at the South
Venice Civic Association
Center, 720 Alligator Drive.
Tickets are $5, $6 at the door.
* Clogging-only class: Tues-
days, 3-4 p.m. at the Senior
Friendship Center.
* Beginners/Intermediate
Tappercise, Thursdays, 3-4
p.m. at the Senior Friendship
Center.

Venice Area Computer Users
Group offers classes at the
Resource Center, 101 W.
Venice Ave. $30 per year, per
family and $2 per class. Call
228-2826.
* Wednesday: 10 a.m., begin-
ners basic Windows z
* Thursday: 9 a.m., absolute
beginners

Please see CLUBS, 13B


tion measures; even as threats
from development, boating,
and other human activities
increase without limit; and it
would hand manatee oppo-
nents a huge propaganda vic-
tory that would immediately
be used to mislead the public
about the manatee's true
status.
Those opponents under-
stand very well the signifi-
cance. of the designation
"Endangered," and they want
a public-relations label that
evokes less urgency, no mat-
ter what the actual data show.
Although the numerous
Florida statutes, FWCC rules
and local ordinances. ...
FWCC staff concluded that
changing this terminology
would be difficult, expensive
and could lead to unintended
problems with those statutes
that might, indeed, reduce
protections. In the end, staff
believes the focus should be
on identifying and protecting
imperiled species, not on
what the categories of imper-
ilment are called. ... Under
the current and proposed
processes, when a species is
reclassified it receives a
species-specific management
plan that prescribes the ac-
tions and protections needed
to recover the species. As
such, even if a species is de-
listed, it will still receive the
protections necessary to pro-
tect the species."
Although they have sig-
naled that they seek only to
block future protection mea-
sures and not overturn exist-
ing ones, don't bet they won't
change their minds once the
relabeling is done and the
state of Florida has "officially
certified" that manatees are
no longer "Endangered," but
merely "Threatened."
The threat level has just
gone up.

Dr. Daryl R Domning is
Professor ofAnatomy at
Howard University,
Washington, D.C. His Ph.D.
(1975) is from the University
of California at Berkeley. He
has long been active as an
advisor on manatees to the
federal government, the state
of Florida, and in other con-
servation efforts, and is secre-
tary of the Board .of Directors
of Save the Manatee Club. For
more information, see the '
Save the Manatee Club's Web
site at http://savethemana-
tee.org/petition.htm.


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


12B VENICE GONDOLIER SUN






SUNDAY, MAY 1,2005 VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 1 3B


Venetian Harmony Chorus

wins regional competition


STAFF REPORT


PHOTO COURTESY OF VENETIAN HARMONY
Women's barbershoppers Venetian Harmony won the Division AA competition in Orlando. The group has women vocalists from
throughout the area, including Venice and all points north and south.


CLUBS from page 12B


Venice Area Garden Club
meets at the South Venice
Community Center, 720 Alli-
gator Drive, the first Thursday
of the month at 10 a.m. For
more information, call 496-
4063.
Venice Area Toastmasters No.
5486 meets 7:30 a.m. Tues-
days at the Venice Area
Chamber of Commerce, 597
South Tamiami Trail, Venice.
,Call 412-9427.
Venice Duplicate Bridge Club
is the ultimate for competi-
tive bridge. Games every day
at 1 p.m.; Tuesdays at 7 p.m.;
and Friday at 7:15 p.m. at the
Rialto -Shopping Center.
Venice Nokomis Elks, 119 W.
Venice Ave. Call Eunice at
493-7624 or the lodge at
486-1854.
* Tuesday, May 3, pork dinner,
5-7 p.m., $6.
* Thursday, May 5, spaghetti
dinner, 5-7 p.m., $6.
* Saturday, May 7, Kentucky
Derby party, 3-7 p.m. Snacks.
Members and guests includ-
ed.
* Tuesday, May 10, Salisbury
steak dinner, 5-7 p.m., $6.
* Tuesday, May 17, ham din-
ner, 5-7 p.m.,-$6.- :
* Thursday, May 19, spaghetti
dinner, 5-7 p.m., $6.
* Saturday, May 21, Preakness
party, 3-7 p.m. Snacks.
Members and guests includ-
ed.
* Tuesday, May 24, baked
chicken dinner, 5-7 p.m., $6.
* Monday, May 30, Memorial
Day picnic, 4-8 p.m. Tickets:
$8.
Venice Regional Medical
Center, 540 The Rialto, Venice,
486-6938
The cafeteria offers spe-
dcially priced meals, 5-6 p.m.
daily to those age 55 and older
for $4.60. Garage and valet
parking available. Buy 10
meals and get the 11th free.


TURTLES from page 1B
to buildings or along walk-
ways near the beach. Drivers
must turn off car lights in
parking lots near the beaches
and people are asked to avoid
walking the beaches at night
and, specifically, to avoid
making bonfires, using flash-
lights or cameras with built-in
or attached flash capability.
Many of the condominium
and homeowners along the
beach have changed out their
lights to newer lighting
designed to be less of a dis-
traction to turtles and other
wildlife.
Sarasota County installed
new parking lot lights at
South Lido Park in Sarasota
prior to the beginning of the
current sea turtle season,
county spokesperson. Kenya
Leonard said.


AiSWRERS -


Wednesday matinees at 3:30
p.m. in Auditorium A.
Venice Shuffleboard Club
meets at 9 a.m. every Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday.
Lessons available. Call Barb-
ara at 485-1678.
Women of the Moose,
Chapter 2252, meets the sec-
ond and fourth Tuesdays at 7
p.m. at 4212 North Access
Road, Englewood. Members


I


welcome. For more informa-
tion, call 473-9446.
Women's Resource Center of
Sarasota County, 806 Pine-
brook Road, Venice, 485-9724.
.* Tuesday: 6-7:30 p.m.,
Women's Support and Em-
powerment, $5.
* Thursday: 10-11:30 a.m.,
beginners yoga, men wel-
come. $5.
* Peer counseling: Monday-


Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Evening
hours by appointment Mon-
day and Tuesday.
* Employment solutions:
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Evening hours by appoint-
ment. Scholarships available
to women pursuing educa-
tion.
* Challenge program: Learn
the job market, make life
changes. Free to qualified
applicants.


Venetian Harmony Chorus
won first place in Division AA
competition Saturday at the
Regional Convention of Sweet
Adelines International for all
choruses in the state of
Florida.
The chorus also placed
fourth when compared with
all 17 choruses who competed
in Orlando on April 16.
Veneti a Harmony Chorus,
under the direction of Polly-
Ann Nanfito, consists of 58
women from Venice, Engle-
wood, Sarasota, Nokomis,
North Port, Punta Gorda, Port
Charlotte, Longboat Key and
Bradenton.
The chorus performs
throughout this area for
clubs, organizations, confer-
ences, strolls and event pro-
motions.
The regional competition
was held under the auspices
of Sweet Adelines Inter-
national, a worldwide organi-
zation of women singers


committed to advancing the
musical art form of barber-
shop harmony through edu-
cation and performance.
Competition included all
chartered choruses in the
state of Florida. Choruses
range in size from 15 to 160
members. Division AA in-
cludes those choruses with 41
to 65 members.
Judging at this competition
is based on the chorus' exper-
tise in the areas of sound,
music, expression and show-
manship. It is a measure of a
chorus' growth in perfecting
the art of signing a cappella,
barbershop style. This is the
third year Venetian Harmony
has received the first place
Division AA award at regional
competition. Last year they
were named fifth place over-
all.
Membership in the chorus
is open to area women.
Rehearsals are held every
Monday at 7 p.m. at United
Church of Christ, 620 Sham-
rock Blvd., Venice.


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VENICE GONDOLIER SUN 13B


SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2005


I








"This benefit of seeing... can come only if you pause a while,
extricate yourself from the maddening mob of quick impressions
ceaselessly battering our lives, and look thoughtfully at a quiet
image ... the viewer must be willing to pause, to look again, to
meditate." Dorothea Lange, photographer (1895-1965)


When the 19 South African
children ran down the aisles
of the Church of the Nazarene
in Venice on Tuesday to sing
and dance for the assembled
audience, their parents
weren't there to enjoy their
children's performance.
All the parents of the 19
children died of AIDS.
Since 1979, 21.9 million
people 'have died of AIDS hi
Southern Africa; 12.1 "million
children ages 14 and under
have been orphaned by the
disease.
The "Kuyasa Kids," as the
group of .children has been
named for their perfor-
mances, are from the Kaya-
mandi Township in the city of
Stellenibosch, Western Cape
Province, South Africa, a
township of 28,000 people.
The orphaned children
were brought to the United
States by Horizon Inter-
national Inc., a ministry
based in Pendleton, Ind. The


Bob Pearson of Horizon International
group was begun by Bob
Pearson in 2001 and currently
sponsors 272 AIDS orphans in
four centers, two in South
Africa and two in Zimbabwe.
Pearson speaks to the audi-
ence prior to the perfor-
mance, explaining why he
began his ministry while on a
visit to Africa: "I remember
walking, it was a rainy and
stormy August day. I was
under an umbrella with a
woman named Joyce Jackson.
I told her the Church of Jesus
Christ has a moral and ethical
responsibility to turn this
around one child at a time.
Well, we started this organiza-
tion that came out of a dream,
and the reality of Southern
Africa."
As the children perform
vocals and percussive music
using sticks and soda cans,
they are under the co-direc-
tion of Cindy Nixon and
Mbongoni. Nixon moved to
Stellenbosch, South Africa,
three months ago from
Atlanta to work at one of the


Kuyasa Kids pertend to sleep during one of their dances.


PHOTOS BY
JEFF TAVARES
jtavares@venicegondolier.com

ministry centers and put
together the group of 19 chil-
dren to come to the United
States to perform. Mbongoni
lives in Stellenbosch.
The children are on a 23-
day tour of churches that will
take them through Georgia,
Florida, Texas and California.
Their parents will never see
them perform.
The World Health Org-
anization predicts that by
"The Church

of Jesus Christ
has a moral
and ethical.
responsibility

to turn this
around one child

at a time."
Bob Pearson
Founder of Horizon International

2010 the number of AIDS
orphans could rise to 30 mil-
lion or more.
For more information
about Horizon International,
see its Web site at www. hori-
zoninternationalinc.com.

Jeff Tavares is photo editor
for the Gondolier Sun. He
writes an occasional column
for this page.


Confidence Tobo, 9, a Kayamandi Township orphan.


Dance instructor Mbongoni on stage during the Kuyasa Kids performance Tuesday


Wie
41


SUNDAY
MAY 2,2005


BYJEFF TAVARES
PHOTO EDITOR




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