Perry news-herald

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Title:
Perry news-herald
Portion of title:
Perry news herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note:
William E. Griffin, editor.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID:
UF00028293:00462

Related Items

Related Items:
Taco times
Preceded by:
Taylor County news
Preceded by:
Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)


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Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1889 Perry News-HeraldPerry News-Herald 50 Friday/ SaturdayDecember 6-7, 2013 Index One section 124th Year, No. 48www.perrynewspapers.com Weather Friday80 61 Saturday 77 62 Sunday79 57 Perry News-Herald Perry News-Herald 20% Looking Back . ......... A-2 Living . ..................... A-4 Religion . .................. A-6 Sports . .................... A-7 Entertainment . ........ A-8 TV listings . .............. A-9 Classieds . .......... A-12 News Forum Welcome to the mansion Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce Director Dawn Taylor, right, was the special guest of Floridas First Lady Ann Scott, left, at a Community Leaders Dinner held at the Governors Mansion. Taylor joined a select group of attendees who traveled to the event from all across the state, including Panama City Beach and Miami. Hot dog lunches for sale todayPentecostals of Perry will be selling hot dog lunches today (Friday), offering free deliveries with orders of ve or more. The lunches include two hot dogs with your choice of chili or slaw for $5. The church is located at 3379 North 221.Fair is Dec. 7; do you have blankets? Comforters?Subway Dixon Rescue Fund, Inc., will hold its annual Christmas Fair on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on the sidewalks adjacent to WinnDixie. Miscellaneous items for Christmas, as well as homemade baked goods, will be offered. This year, the sanctuary is in need of blankets, comforters and recycled dog beds. Volunteers will be on site to accept these and/or monetary donations.Boat parade planned Dec. 7 in SteinhatcheeThe second annual Light Up the River Boat Parade will be held Saturday, Dec. 7, in Steinhatchee. Sponsored by Fiddlers and Roys restaurants, the parade will feature cash prizes for rst ($125) and second ($75) place winners for the best decorated boats. Third and fourth place winners will receive gift certicates. Participants are asked to meet at Fiddlers dock at 5:30 p.m. to start the parade. Organizers ask all boat captains to make sure their vessels have all required safety equipment onboard. The parade will end at Roys Restaurant, where prizes will be awarded. Entry fees are $5 per boat with proceeds going to the Steinhatchee Food Bank. Applications are available at Roys and Fiddlers. Rafe tickets will be available for a chance to win a large screen television with proceeds benetting the American Legions Secret Santa program. First Coast Satellite donated the television and tickets were printed compliments of Susan and Mike Williams. The winner will be announced at the boat parade.Toy Run is this SaturdayThe 12th annual Toy Run to benet Guardian ad Litem will be held Saturday, Dec. 7. Participants are asked to bring a new unwrapped toy or make a $20 donation to take part in the run, which will begin at Java Connection (located in the Historic Perry Station/Old Depot) at 11 a.m. Riders will end the run at Econna Resort where lunch will be served. Steel Bridge will perform from 12-3 p.m. Event sponsors are Advanced Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, Michael Lynn, Inc., and Parrotheads in Perry-dise. For more information, contact Wendy Cruce at 838-5190. Downtown revitalization efforts are beginning to return dividends to local residents with more retail opportunities available in the historic district than ever before, local ofcials note. The City of Perrys DREAM (Downtown Revitalization Economic Appearance Motivator) grants really helped make it possible for some building owners to spruce up the exterior of their buildings, which in turn, encouraged others to take advantage of the grant themselves. We certainly have seen a better occupancy rate than weve had in years. All the buildings on the Main Street block across from the courthouse are full for the rst time in memory and most of the buildings on the Green Street side are occupied or under renovation, City Manager Bob Brown said. There has also been a lot of work done along Toast the season tonight in historic downtown Perry Please see page 3 Taylor County workers currently earning minimum wage will see a 14-cent increase in their hourly pay Jan. 1, when Floridas minimum wage jumps to $7.93. This follows a 12-cent increase this year and a 36cent increase in 2012. Once the new rate goes into effect, Floridas minimum wage will be 68 cents above the national minimum wage of $7.25. Florida law requires the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity to calculate a minimum wage rate each year. The annual calculation is based on the percentage increase in the federal Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers in the South Region for the 12-month period prior to Sept. 1. Please see page 3Minimum wage will jump to $7.93 starting on Jan. 1 United Way seeks best return on donations made to local groups More than 20 volunteers and concerned community members joined together Wednesday morning for a community conversation as the United Way of the Big Bend (UWBB) works to ensure the agency delivers the greatest possible return for the money invested by organizations and citizens in Taylor County and across the Big Bend. At Wednesdays session, UWBB President & CEO Heather Mitchell said the organization has been holding community meetings in all of its counties, with the process set to culminate in January with a goal-setting summit. In the past 71 years, UWBB has delivered $131 million to community agencies in the Big Bend, she said. At the Taylor meeting, those in attendance included United Way volunteers, representatives from many of United Ways 20 local participating agencies and other community leaders. The discussion centered on what was perceived to be the communitys most pressing issues and how well those needs were being met. Some of the issues highlighted were homelessness, parental involvement and teen pregnancies. Mitchell stressed that the problems noted during the meeting were not isolated to Taylor County and Please see page 3City of Perry Code Enforcement Magistrate Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson did not sanction former code enforcement board member Tonya Holton for having horses on her property within the city limits, but granted her an additional 30 days to arrange matters where she would not be in violation of current city codes. The action was taken during a Code Enforcement hearing Monday; however, McMillan-Fredrickssons written order was not released until Thursday. Holton and her husband, Stacy, currently have horses located at their property located within the city limits; however, the property is currently zoned residential (horses are allowed on property which is zoned agricultural).Please see page 3Magistrate gives horse owners addl 30 days to address code violation

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FOOTBALL, STILL IN THE AIRIt was time for Christmas preparations, but the community was still enjoying football season as the 1978 Bulldogs prepared to host Milton for the state quarter-nals. Coach Elmer Coker prepared the team and the town for the visiting panthers: It will take a superhuman effort on our part to beat them, he said, but the team which makes fewer mistakes will come out on top. He and the rest of the readers hoped that meant Taylor County High School.TAX COLLECTIONS COMING IN FASTTaylor County Tax Collector Peck Smith said his ofce was collecting money faster than it could count it. According to Smith, 80 percent of the 1978 real estate taxes due had been paid during November.NICE CATCHTilford Register and Larry Goodman were pictured with a stringer of bream, catsh and bass caught in local waters. Everyone agreed: Nice catch. Also pictured was Wayne Connell who bagged an eight-point buck in the southern part of Taylor County.DORMAN, NORRIS WED ON NOV. 16Miss Debra Dorman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gary Dorman, married Mark Norris in a Nov. 16 ceremony at the brides home with the Rev. Kirby Thompson performing the ceremony.WOODS FEATURED IN POWER LINESFlorida Powers Joyce Woods was featured in the companys magazine, Power Lines, for her handicraft work on wood, featuring tole painting to preserve boards of sentimental value or to pay tribute to the woods which dene Taylor County.SIMPSON SOLOSSteve Simpson of Perry completed his solo ight at the Perry Foley Airport, with his instructor, Bill MacDougall, among the rst to congratulate him. Simpson, a Buckeye employee, was originally from Sweetwater, TennDIAMONDS ARE A GIRLS BEST FRIENDAt Wells Jewelers, a 1.07 carat solitaire was priced at $2600 as Christmas shopping began. For the season, Wells welcomed a million-dollar diamond display, just for the weekend. Friends and neighbors were invited to come see.EVERYBODY LOVED VAN H. PRIEST!Santa Claus shopped rst at Van H. Priest, and the A-2 Perry News-Herald December 6-7, 2013 Looking Back December 6-7, 2013 THE PERRY NEWS-HERALD November 30 1978 Remember when...By ANTHONY L. WHITE anthonylamarwhite@yahoo.comRebel with a cause Im going to be a rebel with a cause this Christmas. Instead of only giving gifts that require gifts that will get them up and out of the for mine too. and streets on Christmas morning. Children everywhere were missing in action. Instead laughing so hard and so loud their bellies houses with the electronics and indoor gifts Santa left them. wrong with giving electronics and indoor put outdoor gifts at the top. made sure that if they only gave their see their yards and neighborhood streets mostly spent outdoors. up with my mother guiding us past the football uniforms and pads and turning the would put on a pair of her brothers tennis football. Some of the girls would line up along showed no interest in the game and pushed their doll carriages up and down the street. women in the neighborhood would spend games. of transportation for Christmas. Whether it by midday we were racing up and down the streets throughout the neighborhood. sure we adhered to the rules they gave us which they usually did before the day was over. move inside and we got to play our indoor testers. spent day. I can barely remember what I which is why Im rebelling. you to rebel too and put some real playing The Graham-Paige facility covered some 25 acres here and processed Taylor County timber which ultimately ended up in automotive factories in the northern states. ( Photo courtesy of the Florida State Graham-Paige Dimension Mill and Wilson Lumber Company were great assets to Taylor Co. Editors Note: The following article was rst published in The Perry Herald on Nov. 29, 1928, and spotlighted two great industrial enterprises just established in Perry. Floridas rst big contribution to the manufacture of motor cars by Dec. 15 will be a continuous stream of virgin hardwoods passing from the forests of Taylor County through two great industrial enterprises of Perry and over freight lines to two body manufacturing plants at Wayne, Mich., and Evansville, Ind. About 4,000,000 feet of lumber from the great forests of Taylor County are already stacked behind the saws of the Wilson Lumber Company plant, the rst of the two to begin operations, and soon this same air-dried dimension lumber will be passed through huge kilns of the Graham-Paige Body Corporation and rushed to the factories in the northern states. Dry kilns of the latter corporation are nearing completion to face the yards of the Wilson Lumber Company. To make a start in the air curing, the DetroitFlorida company already has about 4,000,000 feet of ne hardwoods in stacks in the great yards. Changes are to be made so that all the dimension lumber as it comes from the Wilson companys mill will be stacked on trucks, riding elevated tracks running to every part of the yards and over leads direct into the big drying kilns of the GrahamPaige plant. By this very rapid and modern system not less than 4,000,000 feet of lumber will be moving from the mill of the Wilson Lumber Company through the yards, curing the desired time, and thence on to the kilns for the next step in the process. The hardwood logs come into Perry and the Wilson mill from the timber tracks under a contract for a 10-year supply, over the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Live Oak, Perry and Gulf Railway. The logs are being hauled now a distance of about 17 miles and about 20 cars a day received. The cars are unloaded direct to the dog chains that carry them to the saws, the surplus going into the log stack being built up to maintain continuous operation 10 hours a day. A. G. Wilson of Detroit is president of the company. The general manager is John Shippen, secretary of the company, and the assistant manager Edward S. Shippen. The company will get electric current from the Taylor County Power Company and operates the plant with steam power generated in a ne plant with two 200-horsepower boilers. A high water tower gives water and re protection. This water is of superior quality. The Graham-Paige Body Corporation, W. H. Neeley of Detroit president; takes the lumber as it comes from the Wilson mill, controlling the air drying process from then on. Its operations with the yards cover about 25 acres. In the yards at this time, awaiting completion of the kilns, are immense stores of the hardwoods of the nest red gum, black gum, white oak, magnolia, bay, elm, ash and hickory. Much of the red gum, with its beautiful grain, in boards measuring 30 inches in width, it is readily observed, would bring fancy prices in the manufacture of Victrolas, radio sets, furniture of high quality and in the interior nish of ne residences, banks and ofce buildings. These beautiful woods bring a sigh to some who look upon them and understand that they are to be hidden away under the metal nish of motor cars, the world never to see and appreciate the beauty in the rare woods of Florida. Please see page 3

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A-3 Perry News-Herald December 6-7, 2013deals included: Tonka dump trucks for $10.98, plush teddy bears for $2.98 and up, bicycles beginning at $31.98, Christmas cards for 99 cents, footballs for $2.98 and Faberge Brut sets for $4.98. TRIPP SUCCEEDS FIKE AT STEINHATCHEE SCHOOLTim Tripp was named acting principal at Steinhatchee School, having served eight years at Taylor County Junior High. Dennis Fike the previous principal, assumed the top position at Taylor County High.SOUTHERLAND NAMED PRESIDENT OF FRIENDSThe Friends of the Taylor County Library congratulated Jim Southerland for assuming the presidency. We have one of the best library facilities of any town this size, Southerland said. many were heard during other conversations held in surrounding counties. The discussion also covered the United Way itself along with its efforts in Taylor County and what, if any, changes were needed to improve the organizations effectiveness. Taylor County United Way is in the middle of its current fund-raising campaign, which has a goal of $285,000. All of the money raised in Taylor County will be dispersed to local agencies providing human services to people in the community, organizers said. The Taylor County United Way supports more than 20 local organizations, including 2-1-1 Big Bend, Ability 1st, Alzheimers Project, American Red Cross, Americas Second Harvest, Big Bend Cares, Big Bend Hospice, Boy Scouts, Boys and Girls Club, Brehon, Childrens Home Society, Early Learning Coalition, Elder Care Service, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Girl Scouts, Healthy Start Coalition, Needy School Children Fund, Refuge House, Taylor County Extension 4-H Foundation, Taylor County Special Olympics, Taylor County Senior Citizens Center and Taylor Leadership Council. In 2004, Holton was cited for the same violation and, at that time, appealed her case to the city council. She produced minutes from the meeting whereby the council, by consensus, agreed to suspend the enforcement portion of the ordinance governing horses inside the city limits. No further action was taken by the council to readdress the issue. At Mondays hearing, McMillan-Fredricksson took into account that the Holtons may have reasonably relied on the actions taken by the council back in 2004. That consideration bore on her ruling to extend the amount of time the couple had to re-address the issue. They have 30 days in which to le a re-zoning request, re-locate the horses or seek other considerations regarding the issues, City Manager Bob Brown said. In 2004, Florida voters approved a constitutional amendment creating a state minimum wage, which applies to all employees in the state who are covered by the federal minimum wage. The states minimum wage was relatively static for several years after the federal government raised its own minimum wage to $7.25 in 2009. The Florida wage rose to $7.31 in June 2010 after the state lost a court battle over its interpretation of calculation methods. It jumped to $7.67 in 2012 and then to the current rate of $7.79 in January. Employers must pay their employees the hourly state minimum wage for all hours worked in Florida. Employers of tipped employees, who meet eligibility requirements for the tip credit under the Fair Labor Standards Act, may count tips actually received as wages under the Florida minimum wage. However, the employer must pay tipped employees a direct wage. The direct wage is calculated as equal to the minimum wage ($7.93) minus the 2003 tip credit ($3.02), or a direct hourly wage of $4.91 as of Jan. 1, 2014. Employees who are not paid the minimum wage may bring a civil action against the employer or any person violating Floridas minimum wage law. The state attorney general may also enforce the minimum wage through legal channels. Jefferson Street. We are pleased and glad people are taking interest in their property. Weve also seen a marked increase in trafc to the downtown area, even on days when there typically was not that many people out and about. Some of the businesses that owed through the Historic Perry Station (Old Depot) small business incubator are doing very well there and we have even had some that started there spawn other businesses downtown, Brown said. The community is invited to celebrate the holidays and see the changes for themselves tonight (Friday) at the annual Downtown Christmas Open House. Festivities will kick off at the Taylor County Historical Society, which will host the annual tree lighting ceremony at 6 p.m. with Mayor Daryll Gunter doing the honors. Elves from Northside Church have been working long hours to have Santas Winter Wonderland ready to welcome visitors from 6:30-9 p.m. (located inside Roseheads banquet hall). Children will have the opportunity to meet Santa and Mrs. Claus, and there will be free cookies and hot chocolate for all. A live nativity scene, hosted by New Home Baptist Church, will greet visitors and strolling carolers will ll the square with the sounds of the season. Santa will be working double-duty, with a second appearance at Katies Courtyard from 6-8 p.m. The courtyard will also be the setting for special story times Friday and Saturday. Many businesses will also be hosting store Open House events that will extend to Saturday. Crews have been busy transforming downtown into a vision of twinkling lights and sparkling scenes, complete with a Christmas tree at City Park and holiday decorations brightening the spirits at City Hall. Rosehead Park is dressed for the season with oversized wreaths at the Grand Pavilion and lights decorating the adjacent picnic area. GLANCE AT THE PAST Continued from page 2 1978 prices: Tonka trucks for $10.98 On-call resident Florida State University (FSU) School of Medicine student Alexandra Rocha recently completed Taylor County School Board Chair Brenda Carlton will retain her position for another year after she was unanimously elected by the board during its recent reorganization meeting. The meeting opened with Superintendent Paul Dyal overseeing as nominations were opened for the chair. Board Member Danny Lundy nominated Carlton with a second from Board Member Darrell Whiddon. There were no other nominations and Carlton was approved unanimously. Board Member Kenneth Dennis then nominated Lundy as vice-chair with a second from Whiddon. He was also elected unanimously. The positions will run through November when the board holds its next re-organization. Both Carlton and Lundy will be up for re-election in 2014. The board agreed to maintain its meeting schedule on the rst and third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the Alton H. Wentworth Administrative Complex on Clark Street. Carlton noted that there would be one meeting during the year held in Shady Grove and one in Steinhatchee. The school board will hold only one meeting in December and January due to the holidays. The next meeting will be Tuesday, Dec. 10, with a workshop set for 5:30 p.m. to discuss the districts 0.25 mill critical needs property tax. The next item under discussion during the re-organization meeting was the re-appointment of Board Attorney Angela Ball. Board Member Danny Glover made a motion reappoint Ball and Whiddon seconded. The measure passed unanimously.Board re-elects Carlton as chair SEASON Continued from page 1 Festivities start at 6 p.m. with tree-lighting MINIMUM WAGE Continued from page 1Annual increases tied to constitutional amendment UNITED WAY Continued from page 1 HORSE OWNERS Continued from page 1 Former council suspended enforcement of ordinance Campaign goal: $285,000

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A-4 Perry News-Herald December 6-7, 2013 Living P oinsettiasthe ofcial plant of Christmas was nothing more than a weed in MexicoBY SHARON BURNS Taylor County Master Gardener Poinsettias are known for being the ofcial Christmas plant for the holidays but they used to be considered a weed in Mexico where, when planted in the ground, they can reach up to 10 feet tall! These plants create colorful holiday decorations for any home. After the holidays are over, they can be used as landscape plants. The distinctive, colorful part of the poinsettia is not its ower but its petal-like leaves, which are also called bracts. Different poinsettia cultivars come in many different colors and shapes. Contrary to popular belief, poinsettias are non-poisonous and non-toxic. True, they are a latex plant from the rubber tree family and they produce a milky sap that can trigger an allergic reaction to those who are sensitive to latex. But other than getting an upset stomach from eating the leaves, your pets should be ne. Besides, they are so bitter its doubtful your cat or dog could make it through one leaf. However, some people may be sensitive to the latex in poinsettia sap, so when used as an indoor plant, it should be kept out of reach of children and pets. With proper care, your poinsettias may stay colorful for many months. Poinsettias can retain their color until March if they are not exposed to freezing temperatures. However, getting them to re-bloom is a whole different challenge. Indoors, keep your poinsettias away from drafts and chilly air. They grow best in well-lit areas, direct sun or hot lights can dry out the plants. Water your poinsettia when the surface of the soil is dry to the touch. By placing a saucer under the pot you can keep the soil from getting too soggy by draining the water it collects. Too much water can kill a poinsettia. Placing your poinsettia on a gravel lled tray and misting them daily will help prolong the plants color and life. Do not fertilize your indoor poinsettias. Wait until you are ready to move them outside. When the weather starts to warm in spring, trim the fading bracts. Leave 4 to 6 inches of the stem on each branch. Begin using a well-balanced fertilizer, and move the plant outdoors to a somewhat shaded area. Poinsettias grow best in a full-sun location, but will need a week or two to adapt to the outdoor temperatures and increased light levels. Your poinsettia will need to be planted in an area that receives full sun most of the day. However, your poinsettias require 14 hours of complete darkness each day for 6 to 8 weeks before owering. Any interruption to this dark period can delay or prevent the plant from owering. Poinsettias grow best in moist, well drained, fertile soils. As long as the soil is well drained, your poinsettia will grow well in a wide range of soils, including sand, muck, marl and clay. Fertilize your outdoor poinsettias once a month. In central and south Florida, start fertilizing in March and continue until October. In north Florida, the plants should be fertilized between May and September. Prune your poinsettias in early spring after they are nished blooming, and the danger of frost has passed. Cut them back to within 12 to 18 inches of the ground. If the plants have been frozen below this point, cut them back to the live wood. Pruning during growing season will produce a compact plant at owering time. After four weeks or Perry rejoiced when Hudson Troy was born in Pittsburgh Eric and Holly Sponhaltz of Pittsburgh, Pa., announce the birth of their son, Hudson Troy, on Nov. 14, 2013, at 6:59 p.m. in Magee Womens Hospital in Pittsburgh. He weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and was 21.25 inches long. The babys maternal grandparents are Mike and Rene Heard of Perry. Maternal great grandmother is Carolyn Croft, also of Perry. Paternal grandparents are Dan and Mary Sponhaltz of San Antonio, Texas. Mark your calendar: Christmas tree lighting Dec. 13 in Shady Grove By FLORRIE BURROUGHS I hope everyone had a happy Thanksgiving. Many of our family gathered at my sisters home for all the traditional dishes and good fellowship. It was a very cold day but we managed to stay warm by gathering around an open re outside. It was a good day! So now its on to Christmas and all that we have scheduled for Shady Grove and surrounding communities to enjoy. Following is the schedule: Christmas Tree Lighting: Friday, Dec. 13, at 6 p.m. at the Shady Grove Community Park. The Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Choir will be on hand to sing from their Christmas Cantata. Light refreshments will be served. Country Christmas: Saturday, Dec. 21, at 10 a.m. at the Shady Grove Community Park. Craft booths will be set up so you can shop while waiting for the parade which will begin at 11. Among the craft booths will be Bill Holkham, local artist. After the parade hot dogs and chili, drinks and popcorn will be served. We are having a silent auction, games and music. Santa will have gifts for the children. There will be drawings for door prizes and a drawing for the Mossberg Model 500 12-gauge shotgun. Tickets for the gun are $1 and will be sold at the park during the festivities. Tickets are currently being sold at Rockys Shady Grove, Rockys Hwy. 98 in Perry and at the Perry Pawn Shop. You do not have to be present to win the gun. We still need cakes for the silent auction and chili for the chili cook-off contest. If you can provide either of these, please let us know. We also need volunteers and if you can help in any way, please contact us. (Claire 584-8370 or Florrie 584-6343). Finally, on a very personal note, I must tell you about my great-granddaughter Kylee Rose Cruce who was born Nov. 25. Just another blessing . and did I say she is beautiful. See for yourself! Lord willing Ill see you in two weeks. Kylee Rose Cruce Please see page 14One more space remains for the Master Gardener Class scheduled to meet on Tuesdays, beginning in January of 2014. If youre interested in pursuing this study of home horticultural practices, please contact the Taylor County Extension Ofce now at 838-3508. The cost of the course is $100, including hands-on materials and books. This amount is currently due. The class will be composed of 15 students.One more needed for Master Gardener class

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By SARAH HALL Proverbs 4 reminds us, Hear ye children, the instruction of a father...we have forgotten, as humans do, that we are not born knowing. We have to be taught what is right and what is wrong. Once we are taught (instructed) we must (attend to) pay attention to--look after, apply-ourselves to what we have been taught. We hear but do we understand? We hear but do we apply it to our lives? When we have learned what we have been taught, we learn discretion and our lips will not speak evil of others. We keep the words that we have learned in our heart, for they are life to those that nd/use them and health to all our esh. A wise man will hear, and will increase learning; and a man of understanding shall attain (listen to, accomplish) wise counsels. The things we dont know, let some that know, teach us, Humble yourselves, believers. God has provided a means for us to learn, but we must make ourselves available! God gives wisdom, freely to those who seek (ask) for it. When we make excuses, we hinder our progress. Let no other agenda come before being about our Fathers business, saving souls and building Gods Kingdom. Our purpose in life is to love and put God rst and foremost. One God, one faith, one baptism. Be ever mindful of the words we hear, the words we speak and the message we convey to others. Mission Awareness Day at New Brooklyn M.B. Church is Sunday, Dec. 8, at 3:30 p.m. A special fellowship for special people! Homecoming at New Bethel Church is Sunday, Dec. 8, at 11 a.m. A special invitation is issued to all former members and their families to come and join in the celebration. Dinner will be served. City Wide Mission will convene with Little Bethel A.M.E. Church. Sunday Dec. 8, at 2:30 p.m. The holidays are approaching. So lets fellowship as often as we can. This is the season for praise, thanksgiving and celebrating the birth of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! Special Prayer List: Theodore Underwood, Tampa; Jimmie Topsy Washington, Orlando; Tyon Fifa, TMH; Macilla Bailey, Marshall Rehab; Nadine Mango, April Brannon, Sandy Hall, May Francis Gillispie, Nobie Roberts, Katrena Morgan and Helen Flowers, all at home.A-6 Perry News-Herald December 6-7, 2013 Religion If you wish to hear young voices singing, Ocome, Ocome Emanuel then please join the congregation of New Home Baptist Church on Sunday. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. and everyone is welcome. TIDBITS: We must apply Bibles teachings ObituariesMatha Lee HockadayMartha Lee Hockaday, 65, died at her home on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2013. She was born to James Clayton Parker and Eva Lee Morgan in Taylor County. Mrs. Hockaday was predeceased by her parents; and her husband of 44 years, Buddy Hockaday. She worked as a clerk for Prudential Insurance Company in Jacksonville for 30 years before returning to Perry in 2000. Mrs. Hockaday was a member of the Lighthouse Revival Center. Survivors include: two sons, Clay Hockaday of Trenton and Dustin William Hockaday of Perry; one daughter, Jaimee Lee Hockaday of Perry; ve brothers Wayne Parker, Larry Parker, Gilbert Parker, Willie Parker and Jimmy Parker, all of Perry; and two sisters, Glenda Thomas and Joann Mitchell of Perry, as well as two grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7, at Beggs Funeral Home in Perry, which is in charge of all arrangements. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service on Saturday. Live Nativity downtown tonight, at New Home Dec. 10, 17 To deepen your appreciation of the Christmas story, New Home Baptist Church will present a Live Nativity at the Downtown Christmas Celebration planned for tonight, Dec. 6. The cast will gather again on the church grounds Tuesday, Dec. 10, and Tuesday, Dec. 17, from 6-8 p.m. The community is cordially invited. Church observes 103rd anniversary this SundaySt. Peters Primitive Baptist Church will observe its 103rd anniversary this Sunday during the 11 a.m. worship hour. The Rev. Chester Davis and the Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church will lead the service. Pastor Cedrick Spradley invites everyone in the community to attend.

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rfntbtt frffnrrt ftn tffnfft fff ttrr tn fntf ffr t f t ftrrtrt rffrn rt rtf rtf r r rtfrrr ftrttrt ftrrtrtt ftrfr rftr ftrfft rn ttff rnff rrrn nrf ttrtfn tttr ttfrr frnnn trtn ftrt frrfrn ntt nrttrtn nn frtn rfrfnrft ffftnrfnr n rfrrf nrtrftn tftrbtnt tfftrnt rtft fttrnrf rrrft frtt fttnr ftrft rr rrtfn trrt ntt rtrtnt ftffnr rtrrt ntrttfr n fft ft ttfft nrt ftr rfnft frr nnfft nt f frnft tnfnt tfr fffff frt rbtttrr rbtft nrfnr ffrftn nnf nnn rf fn f tf rn tb ft nnnrnrrf ttrt ntt tttfnft ftfrrf fnfttftt nftnrrt tfftr tt rt f rfnt btt r fb nr t r btt b brb b r r r br t r tr f rr rt fr r tr r b rrbt t b tr r r tt b t frb t r b t rr t rfntn

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