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Perry news-herald ( July 12, 2013 )

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Title:
Perry news-herald
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Perry news herald
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Newspaper
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English
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s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
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Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note:
William E. Griffin, editor.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
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UF00028293:00455

Related Items

Related Items:
Taco times
Preceded by:
Taylor County news
Preceded by:
Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)

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Material Information

Title:
Perry news-herald
Portion of title:
Perry news herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note:
William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID:
UF00028293:00455

Related Items

Related Items:
Taco times
Preceded by:
Taylor County news
Preceded by:
Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)


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PAGE 1

Free Child ID program is this SaturdayPerry Masonic Lodge #123 will hold a Child ID program Saturday, Oct. 19, beginning at 9 a.m. at the Buckeye Community Federal Credit Union located on Jefferson Street. The service is free to any child up to the age of 19. All parents are invited to bring their children or grandchildren on Saturday for the event. The Masons will be on site from 9 a.m. until around 1 p.m. The kit includes digital photos of the child, a digital video, digital ngerprints and a full description, all on a CD. The program also provides a DNA sample and two laminated ID cards (one for the parent and one for the child). The kit is contained in a standard DVD case. All local law enforcement agencies contact information is provided and since everything is in digital format, all the information can be disseminated very quickly in an emergency, Mason Cline Moore said. No information is ever retained by the Masons and a single hard copy is provided to the parents. All digital records are destroyed before proceeding to the next child and papers shredded.Author to speak at library Oct. 28David J. Mather, author of One for the Road, will be guest speaker at the Taylor County Public Library on Monday, Oct. 28, at 5:30 p.m. One for the Road is a novel about Chilean family life through the eyes of a young Peace Corps volunteer. Mather grew up in Sarasota and was a volunteer with the Peace Corps from 1968 to 1970. He and his wife now split their time between Lima, Peru, New Hampshire and Horseshoe Beach. The program is free and the community is invited.Workshop to focus on management plan for museumA collection of more than 5,000 items helps Forest Capital State Park stay true to its goal of educating visitors about Floridas forests and many forest-dependent industries, including the production of timber, turpentine and other forestderived products. On Monday, Oct. 28, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks will hold a public workshop to review updates in the management plan for the facility. The workshop will be held at Forest Capital Hall, starting at 7 p.m. The public is invited to attend. For more information about the meeting, contact Park Services Specialist Debra Walker at the museum (5843227) or go online to: http:// sharepoint.dep.state.flus/ PublicNotices. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1889 Perry News-HeraldPerry News-Herald 50 Friday/ SaturdayOctober 18-19, 2013 Index One section 124th Year, No. 41www.perrynewspapers.com Weather Friday85 68 20% Saturday85 65 Sunday81 63 30% Perry News-Herald Perry News-Herald 30% Looking Back . ......... A-2 Living . ..................... A-4 Religion . .................. A-6 Sports . .................... A-7 Entertainment . ........ A-8 TV listings . .............. A-9 Playground ........... A-10 Classieds . ........... A-12News Forum Govt up-and-running; Taylors reps weigh-in The U.S. House and Senate both approved a last-minute agreement Wednesday evening to end the 16-day government shutdown and raise the federal debt limit before Thursdays deadline, which will buy time until early next year for Congress to work out a longer-term deal. The agreement passed in the Senate 81-18 and in the House 285-144. Taylor Countys representatives in Congress voted two to one against the deal, with U.S. Representative Steve Southerland and Sen. Marco Rubio voting no and Sen. Bill Nelson voting yes. All three released statements this week explaining their positions on the deal. Southerland said in his statement: With each passing day of this stalemate, I shared the growing anger of my people toward a broken Washington. Thats why I fought tooth and nail from day one to avert a shutdown, prevent a debt default and level the playing eld between the American peoples health care and that of their government. Unfortunately, as the Senate rejected nearly every House-passed bill to fund essential services and keep the government open, it became clear to me that some in Washington were more interested in scoring political points than nding real solutions. I had no choice but to oppose Senator Reids bill because it provides short Please see page 3 Trial dates pending for Frazier, six othersThe Taylor County criminal court docket has three open murder cases on its calendar, with the suspects set for pre-trial dates in November. Raymond Lee, accused of murdering Derek Lamont Dixon, 44, is slated to appear in court Monday, Nov. 18. Johnny Flowers, recently indicted for his role in the death of Patricia Niece Knight, and Jason Wall, charged with DUI manslaughter in the September 2011 death of Erin Walker Lawless, are both on the Nov. 18 case list as well. Notices are pending for upcoming jury trials slated the last week of this month, with a list of cases that includes one misdemeanor charge and four felony cases. The misdemeanor case involves local businessman Michael Frazier, who was arrested in 2012 and charged with operating a bottle club without a license. The felony cases include a driving under the inuence (DUI) charge and an armed robbery suspect. The driver of this 1994 Ford was airlifted to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Tuesday afternoon after crashing her vehicle head-on with another truck. The wreck happened around 3:53 p.m. near the Hospital for treatment. Head-on collision Commission, city council support draft permit for Buckeye pipeline The Taylor County Commission and Perry City Council have agreed to submit letters of support to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) for a draft permit that includes numerous improvements at Buckeye including a 15-mile pipeline to discharge the mills efuent near the Gulf. The FDEP will host a public meeting at the Catholic Parish Hall on Tuesday, Oct. 22, starting at 5 p.m. Agency personnel will be available to answer questions about the permit and to accept oral and written comments. The permit, known as Questions outnumber answers as district readies for Common Core By MARK VIOLA Staff writer Although the 2013-14 school year is not yet half complete, questions and concerns are continuing to grow over next school year, when Florida schools and others around the country are expected to fully implement the new federal Common Core educational standards. And so far, it appears the questions outnumber the answers. Although the state is moving forward with Common Core, just how students will be tested and assessed on those standards is very much in the air. Gov. Rick Scott announced last month his intention to pull Florida out of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), which received a $186 million grant through the U.S. Department of Educations Race to the Top to support the development and design of the nextgeneration assessment system. According to Sen. Bill Montford, who is vice chair of the Florida Senates Education Committee and CEO of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents, said the governors decision removed Florida as a scal agent of PARCC, but the state has not necessarily pulled out of using the PARCC assessment. Montford told the Taylor County School Board Tuesday evening, however, that he has serious reservations over whether the test will be ready for use next school year. Its not a question of whether or not were going to implement Common Core, he said. Weve already been doing it. Weve been doing that for two years. The question is, do we stop? He went on to say that the vast majority of school superintendents in the state support Common Core, which will allow Florida to compare its results with other states using the same standards. We believe they are good for our children, good for this state and good for the country, Montford said. The main question confronting the state now, he said, is how will students progress be assessed? One of the difculties we have with the FCAT is it is a Florida test, he said. We know how districts compare to districts, but we dont know how Florida compares to the other states. This is a national effort. The PARCC test is slated to be used in a majority of the states in the country, but it is not certain Florida will still be among them. The question is, will we continue to go down the road with PARCC or will we look for another assessment Please see page 14 Please see page 3

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WHO WERE THE LITTLE KING, QUEEN CONTESTANTS IN 1978?They included: Timothy Murphy, Wendi Edwards, Bradley Slaughter, Chad Thurman, Janna Hill, Elisha Davis, Madeia Murphy, Laurie OQuinn, Sheri Snow, Katrina Spradley, Jay Tolley, Christopher Turner, Rebecca Whitehead, Jennifer Walsingham, Erin Turner, Jodie Ezell, Salenna Merry, Shawn Lollis, Lovie Jones, Kristie Lilliott, Tory Fletcher, Amanda Hindsman, Michael Hreha III, Clay Huff, Darri Jones, Vanessa Burdette, Mark Chambers, Arthur Cochran and Chris Haworth.BEN GLICKMAN DIES AT AGE 83A native of Russia, Ben Glickman settled in Perry 53 years ago and established himself as a Mason, Elk, businessman and charter member of the Temple Israel in Tallahassee. He died at the age of 83 in River Garden Hone in Jacksonville. He was survived by three daughters and one son, Hymie Glickman.PARADE OF BABIESSuzannah Brown was born to Mr. and Mrs. Mike Brown on Oct. 8 in Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 9 pounds, 9 ounces. Mr. and Mrs. James Kent Cruce announced the birth of their son, Joseph Lee, on Oct. 12 at Doctors Memorial Hospital (DMH). Marcus Denton Floyd was born to Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Ford on Oct. 12. He weighed 8 pounds, 2.5 ounces. Allyson Latrelle Langford was the new daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Glen Langford, born Oct. 14 at DMH. Mr. and Mrs. David E. Bishop welcomed a daughter, Jennifer Delores to their family on Oct 14. She arrived weighing 7 pounds, 11 ounces. Emily Susan Hathcock was born to Mr. and Mrs. Lamar Hathcock on Oct. 9. Dr. and Mrs. Gurusami Lakshmin announced the birth of their son, Shyam Kumar, on Oct. 13 at DMH. He weighed 7 pounds, 6.25 oz.JEWELRY TRENDSAt Wells Jewelers, monogrammed stick pins were the must have for the season. Described as delicate accents for your sweater, your scarf or your blazer, the pins were unmistakably you.STILL FISHING AT 96Berger Chaires, 96 years old, was pictured with a string of 11 speckled trout which she caught on her birthday.BULLDOGS DEFEAT MADISON 18-15The Taylor County Bulldogs scored twice in the fourth quarter to avert a win by the Madison Cougars. Quarterback Sammy Williams and James Barryon were credited with the touchdowns.48 OUNCES OF PROTECTIONOfcers with the sheriffs and police department received 48 ounces of protectioneachwith the presentation of bullet-proof vests and grant funding.A-2 Perry News-Herald October 18-19, 2013 Looking Back October 18-19, 2013 THE PERRY NEWS-HERALD October 19, 1978 Remember when...By ANTHONY L. WHITE anthonylamarwhite@yahoo.comNever say good-bye I usually dont say good-bye, even when I know its the last time Ill see someone. In June 1982, I graduated from high school, and instead of saying good-bye, I said, See you around, to the friends Id made during the previous 12 years. This past year, complete with three reunions, has proven that I was right for not saying good-bye. Two months after leaving high school, I moved into Rawlings Hall at the University of Florida and said, Its a pleasure to meet you, to a group of new friends. Well, all of them werent new. Bernard, a 1981 Taylor County High School graduate, was waiting in the lobby when my mother and I walked in the dorm. The next day, while sitting in the lobby watching television, I met Rosalyn, who was from Hollywood, Fla. Two days later, while hanging out in the lobby, I met roommates Denise and Nova, who were from Fort Lauderdale. That same night, I met Clarence from Tampa at a dorm party and we party hopped on frat row until the sun came up. I didnt meet upperclassmen and roommates Sylvia and Carolyn until classes started the next week. Rosalyn introduced me to Arnette, who was from Hobe Sound, that same week. Twins Ronald and Donald, who were 1981 TCHS graduates, didnt stay in Rawlings Hall, but they practically lived there. My homeboys, Bernard, Donald and Ronald, along with my group of new friends, were responsible for making my freshman year of college one of the most memorable and exciting years of my life. Having turned 17 that year, I was the youngest one in the group, so they all felt somewhat responsible for me. Bernard told everyone I was his little brother, which basically meant, If you mess with him, youre going to have to see me. Donald and Ronald simply warned that, Hes from Perry too! Nothing else needed to be said. My mother and grandmother didnt have to worry about whether I was eating right because of Rosalyn, Denise and Arnette. Each week, we went grocery shopping together and split the bill four ways. Every evening around 6, the four of us met in the meals and ate dinner. Since Rosalyns one-year-old son was living with her mother while she attended college, I became the recipient of her motherly nurturing. When I started skipping class to play cards in the lobby and going out through the week instead of studying, she put me in check. Once, when she didnt approve of the company I kept, she told me, I cant pick your friends, but I want you to know that I dont approve of those friends. And when my roommate and I began having problems, she channeled my mother then stepped in and told my roommate, If you have a problem with Anthony, then you need to move, and I mean quickly, because hes not going anywhere. Clarence, my running partner, felt his mission was to polish me up and rid me of my country ways. And Sylvia and Carolyn were there to offer their advice and steer me past the pitfalls of my freshman year. I havent seen Rosalyn since the end of our freshman year when she transferred to a college closer to home so she could be with her son. I havent seen Nova, Sylvia or Carolyn since 1984, when we all moved out of Rawlings Hall. The last time I saw Clarence and Denise was in 1986, when I took a semester off to work at the local newspaper and they graduated. Through the years, Ive run into Bernard, Donald and Ronald during their visits home. It has always bothered me that, with the exception of Rosalyn, I didnt get a chance to say good-bye to any of my old friends when we parted ways. However, time has proven that good-bye would have been inappropriate. Last week, I received an email from Rosalyn. She said that she, Denise and Sylvia were planning a reunion of our Rawlings Hall friends. Count me in, I wrote back. This time when we part, Ill make sure tell each one of them, See you around. Howards Jabo The Historical Society program Monday, Oct. 21, will be presented by Oscar Howard Jr. who will spin a few yarns about Taylor County. Howard is a native of Taylor County and a longtime educator who last served as school superintendent before his retirement. Howard to spin a few yarns at Monday meeting Did you know? Did you know? named John E. Jenkins drove an ox-team the entire distance from his home near the rise of Rocky Creek to California during the gold rush of 1848. He was not successful in his quest for gold in the western Eldorado, but he did make money. Somewhere near the mid1850s he returned to Taylor County and a built a nine-room house that was later commandeered by Confederate Col. Campeld during the Civil War. from the Union, Taylor County was four years old, having been created from Madison County on Dec. 23, 1856. commissioners meeting is thought to have been held Oct. 2, 1857. post ofce at the county seat was established in 1869 and was called Rose Head. The name was changed to Perry early in 1875, but Florida maps carried both names for at least six years.

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A-3 Perry News-Herald October 18-19, 2013 term spending without addressing the long term drivers of this shutdown, including an exploding national debt and glaring inequalities under the Presidents health care law. I simply cant justify to my constituents a system where corporations and labor unions deserve a one year compliance delay and government ofcials get special premium subsidies while average American families receive neither. I hope both parties in Washington learned a lesson from this shutdown and we get serious about addressing these issues before again bringing the nation to the brink. Meanwhile, Nelson issued the following statement: Thank goodness, not just for the thousands and thousands of Americans who have been hurting because of the disruption in government services, but thank goodness for our nations economic wellbeing. Im relieved about this shutdown being over and certainly relieved that we have avoided a default of the nancial integrity of this country, but this never should have happened in the rst place. A couple of senators and a handful of House extremists have managed to embarrass America in front of the world. And with this government shutdown and coming right to the precipice on a default, they showed a lack of compassion but they also showed a lack of understanding about what it means to be a public ofcial and what it means to represent and serve the interests of all, not just a few. A public ofce is a public trust. And no public servant should ever deny government services to people in need. No public servant should ever take his own country hostage to advance his own narrow, selsh ideology. So for now, we can breathe a sigh of relief. But this is going to crank up again, starting in December, January and February--the deadlines of this agreement. We just cant continue putting our country in situations like this. Weve got to nd a way, right soon, to govern ourselves without being at the mercy of a few partisan extremists. Congress has a responsibility to cast aside extremism and reach out to nd common ground, reason and common sense. We owe no less to our people in this country. Finally, Rubio said the following: This debate has never been about whether to have an open federal government, but about whether we are going to x it so that it stops spending more money than it takes in. To save the American Dream, we need decisive action to create millions of middle class jobs and stop Washington politicians from wasting taxpayers money on a government we cant afford. I cannot support this deal because it postpones any signicant action on pro-growth and spending reforms and does nothing to provide working class Americans even one shred of relief from ObamaCares harmful effects. Until we tackle the real threats to the American Dream, we are going to continue nding ourselves in these kinds of messes. America is better than this, and the American people deserve better. the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit, is required for all point-source surface water dischargers. The Perry/Taylor County community wants a resolution of the issues that 1) restores the Fenholloway River to Class III, shable/ swimmable standards, 2) creates conditions supportive of further seagrass recovery to their natural range in near-shore Gulf waters, and 3) protects the economic viability of the countys forest industry, including the Buckeye manufacturing facility, the commissions letter states. The FDEP-proposed permit and associated administrative order provide a clear path to achieving these goals. Buckeye spokesperson Dan Simmons said the draft proposed permit will require signicant changes to the plants manufacturing, wastewater treatment and disposal processes, and includes a comprehensive plan to address dissolved oxygen, nutrients, salinity and transparency issues. According to an informational brochure provided by Buckeye, the plant has invested $74 million in new technology to restore the Fenholloway River and is committed to investing an additional $101 million. The purpose of the proposed pipeline is to remove the plants salty efuent from the freshwater portion of the Fenholloway to the brackish portion of the lower river where the efuents salt content will not be an issue, according to the brochure. The pipeline was initially proposed in the early 1990s. Once the current NPDES permit is issued, Buckeye will have seven years to complete the project. SHUTDOWN Continued from page 1 TAYLOR COUNTYCONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES Rubio: Deal does nothing to provide one shred of relief from ObamaCare BUCKEYE Continued from page 1 Chamber also endorses pipeline permit Community HappeningsRetired educators meet MondayTaylor Retired Educators Association (TREA) will have their regularly scheduled meeting Monday, Oct. 21, at 10:30 a.m., at Rosehead Junction. Sharon Hathcock, director of instruction, will discuss the districts C.O.R.E. and S.T.E.M. programs.Hillbilly HitchinThe Taylor Gymnastics Booster Club will present a dinner theatre Hillbilly Hitchin Friday, Oct. 18, at 7 p.m., at the Perry Elks Lodge. Tickets are available at the Chamber of Commerce, Taylor Gym, Cheer & Dance or from any Booster Club member. Eagles vs. All-Stars Point of Grace Christian will host a Homecoming Game tonight (Friday) at the sports complex. The Christian Eagles will play a local All Star team, starting at 5 p.m. Party on the hill!Birthdays & anniversaries all around... Best wishes to you allGuess who? Erlaine Hughes Jacobs

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A-4 Perry News-Herald October 18-19, 2013 Living Pop-tops Please save yours for the Ronald McDonald HouseiWinner Andrew Hall was the winner of this iPad awarded during the Fields of Faith event sponsored last week by the Taylor County chapter of Fellowship of Christian Athletes. The event was called a wonderful success, attracting more than a thousand participants. If you arent saving aluminum pop-tops, will you begin now? Thats the plea from the womens committee of Taylor County Farm Bureau which has taken on this project for the next ve months. We ask for your help in collecting pop-tops from aluminum soft drink cans so we can collect a full, 5-gallon bucket before Food Check-Out Day which is in February. Taylor has joined the 10 counties in Farm Bureau District II hoping to collect 10 5-gallon buckets for delivery to the Ronald McDonald House Charity in Tallahassee. We have been partnering with this charity for the past 15 years, said Helen Houck, county president and womens chairmen. Every year to celebrate Food Check-Out Day, the 10 counties in District II pool their money and purchase more than $1,000 worth of fresh, Florida-produced meats, fruits and vegetables and dairy products to donate to this worthy cause. Houck explained that the Ronald McDonald House offers lodging for families whose small children are in a Tallahassee hospital for an extended period of time. Naturally, these folks need food to eat while they are staying there, and that is where Farm Bureaus women come in. We usually ll up at least two upright freezers, she said. Across the state, people donate aluminum pop-tabs to the Ronald McDonald House and when they sell the tabs to aluminum buyers, this is the money they use to pay their electric bill-totally by selling the tabs, Houck said. For the project in Taylor, a 5-gallon bucket has been placed at the Farm Bureau ofce, and your contributions are encouraged. We announced this project at the annual meeting and several people have already placed their tabs in the bucket, so it is already nearly onethird full. If we ll the rst bucket soon, dont worry, we will buy a new one. Using the mantra, One persons junk is another persons treasure, the Sandy Toes Red Hats recently conducted their fall auction at Fiddlers Restaurant in Steinhatchee, and report that everyone came home with treasure. Auctioneers included Alice Lengle, Anne Basch and Cookie Workman. Two new members were welcomed to this September event, Carolyn Faircloth and Mary Carter, as well as seven guests. Appreciation was shown for the new treasurer, Cheryl Hinthorne. Birthday wishes went out to Hinthorne and Carolyn Fairchild. You dont have to be a Red Hat to recognize that friends are the hats in the wardrobe of life, said Sandy Coleman. The next auction will be held in the spring, tentatively planned for the month of April. We think its a great idea--to get of new and unwanted gifts, while going home with something new-to-you. Red Hats hold auction at Fiddlers Recycled pop-tops actually cover the electric bill for Ronald McDonald House in Tallahassee. Need a pumpkin? The youth of First United Methodist Church remind the community that all sizes and shapes of pumpkins are available in the church courtyard for fall decorations and baking. Proceeds from this pumpkin sale go to youth projects so your patronage is encouraged.

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A-5 Perry News-Herald October 18-19, 2013 Thousands gather (Photos by Amanda Clark)The inaugural Trek for Tech at Taylor County Elementary School was a huge success, said new Principal Chuck Finley with 85 donning their athletic shoes to raise funds to enhance technology at the school. We are off to great start raising money to equip our classrooms with student computers, and we had a lot of fun doing it. I would like to thank all of our staff members for the work that was put into this event and all of the local businesses and individuals that donated to this great cause. According to Finley, local running groups are already inquiring about the next run, so we are actively planning another 5K for the spring and will begin advertising it to the community soon. The run/walk was followed by the schools annual fall festival. Inaugural Trek for Tech a huge success Dont let your advertisingget skipped in the DVR shufe. Plug into the power of print and online newspaper advertising today. Newspaper advertising gets attention, and it gets results. In fact, 77% of readers acted on a newspaper ad in the last month. Perry Newspapers

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A bounce house will be among the treats at the Fall Festival and Celebration planned by First Baptist Church on Sunday, Oct. 27. Food and door prizes will also be part of the celebration which begins at 5 p.m. Young and old are invited. The church is located at 102 N. Center Street. More information on all events is available on the website: www.fbcperry. org. New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church will observe Annual Fellowship Day on Sunday, Oct. 27, at 3 p.m. Minister Catherine Murphy of Madison will be the guest speaker. Also, all choir members of sister churches are invited to sing with the Community Choir; rehearsal is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24. The Rev. Izell Montgomery, Jr. is pastor of the church. A-6 Perry News-Herald October 18-19, 2013 Religion By SARAH HALL Plan to get your lunch Friday and Saturday at New Brooklyn Church. Fridays sh fry will be held from 12 noon until 3 p.m. Fish, hush puppies, coleslaw, baked beans, tea and peach cobbler will be served. Donations of $8 are requested by King Chance Glanton and Queen Journey Williams. On Saturday, fried chicken will be served with collard greens, potato salad, macaroni and cheese, corn bread, tea and dessert. You have a choice of two sides. New Brooklyn thanks you for your support of the Sunday School king and queen contest. Bro. Moncrief Ervin is superintendent and the Rev. D. L. McBride is pastor. Think about it... If you look...inside yourself...you will nd a better me and a better you. Birthday wishes Happy Belated Birthday to Mrs. Kitty (Virdie Lee Dobson) Sept. 29. The seniors at the Taylor County Senior Center enjoyed a super meal, ice cream and cake, and Mrs, Kitty dancing for joy! (in her own way). We thank God for allowing Mrs. Kitty to enjoy her life with us. Happy Belated Birthday (Oct. 12, 2013) to Theodis Miller. Prayers Please pray for those in bereavement: Josephine Grifn and the families of the late Willie James Brannen, Valdosta, Ga., and Perry. Also remember: John Collier (home), Nobie Roberts (home), Leroy Goston (home), Dannie Lee Clayton (home), Ruby Neal (TMH), Theodore Pete Ingram (surgery), Brenda Spain (home), Fred Richardson III (home), and also Janice Miller ( of Ohio) who is the daughter of James and Viola Miller. TIDBITS: Somebody will be cooking today & Saturday at New Brooklyn Mary Ann Prevatt Mary Ann Prevatt, 54, of Perry, died Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013. Mrs. Prevatt was born Sept. 21, 1959, in Orlando. She was a graduate of Oviedo High School and worked for many years in the x-ray department at Jess Parrish Memorial Hospital. A licensed EMT and x-ray technician, she also worked at several doctors ofces in Sanford, Old Town and Perry. She was a volunteer with Big Bend Hospice in Perry. She is survived by her husband, William Preston Prevatt of Perry; a son, Philip Prevatt of Perry; her mother, Joan Dresser of Mims; a brother, Michael (Jacqualin) Dresser of Hay Market, Va.; father-in-law and mother-in-law, Jimmie and Nancie Prevatt of Mims; and sisters-in-law and brotherin-law, Mary Butcher, Candice Prevatt and Bo Redman. She was preceded in death by her father, Ernest Dresser. Visitation will be held from 6-8 p.m. today, Oct. 18, at North Brevard Funeral Home in Titusville. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19, at the funeral home with Father Michael Farrell ofciating. Interment will follow at Oaklawn Memorial Gardens. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 216 West Main St., Perry, FL 32347. Obituaries Moore leads revival services at WestsideThe Rev. Tommy Moore will be guest speaker for revival services at Westside Baptist Church this weekend. Worship begins at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday nights, with services on Sunday, Oct. 20, scheduled for 11 a.m. and also 6 p.m. Pastor Tim McDonald cordially invites the community to join the church for spirit-lled preaching. Westside is located at 3255 U.S. Highway 98 West. For additional information on the revival or any of the churchs activities, please call 838-5041. Come bounce with Baptists Community Choir forms for Fellowship Day here Church news is due by 11 a.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays

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r fntbftbrbb rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrbbbb bb bb b bbnbfrr bbfrrb bb btntn ttbtbtbbbbbbrbb fbbbbbbnbbbtbbbbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbfrfrfrfrrfrrrbb rrb b rrffntbntbbbb nt tn bb bb rfnt bn b bbbb nbbbtn n tbbnntnt bbnbnnbnnbnnbnnr nbnt b tt bbttbbnbrfb b t tbtnt t t tf tt bft bbt b nt bt n ttnnbfntnfntnnb t nb t rrffnnnnnntb t trfntb ntnb nb bf bb ttt tb bb nn t b n btrft nrnnb nrrnnb n t btttnb bb b nnnb nb nb bbntbtnb tbb b t n t ntbntb tn rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrb b rfnrt bb rt n frffff r b nnft ntr rfnffnt bnffftf rr rr bb b t fnrt rfb b bn tr bb bnt r bb b bt bnt bbrtb bnt b b b r r t b r b bb b rrffnnnnnntb t t n rf t ntbf ntbtttt nn nttt bb rf t t n t f bbf bb ttt b nf nf bbn t bbbbbt bnf tnf f rn nfr t nbtf rrffnnnnnntb rf t b nt t b nt nrtbntn brbtttrtt nnnnnn n nt bbbtbrf bbtn t n bbb b b b t nnnrbb b b b r f n n t rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrbb r rtfntb b rr rrrtrtr bbtbbbb br f nt nnbb b brr b trrr bbbbb b b b b t n frrrr nfn rttr n rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrbb b b rf fbrtrtbntbtrtr b bb f b trtr br t bb r f b n t br brbb rt b r b b b b tr t frrr bbb rr bb

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r frfrntb ffrbbbtff rf fntb f fffftt ff ffffrff fff ffrf frf frf rffn trrbrfn fbn frr rfnr rff f n ff rrbf f frnrr n rf nbfr rnr fn ff frbnf bbf rrn nfrbr fbrrb nffrr bfnnnrbf brrrbf nrff rrrbrf frnn ffb ffrr nb fbbrf nf fn rrfn b frrbn brbf rnrr rrn f bff frrn trrrbfn f f rrn rffr fffr fffr f ffffrf ffrr fffrf rf frff rfffff fff ffffff ffrff fffrf ff ffrf ff ntnr rn f f f ff fffff frf ffr frffr rffr fff fbf ffff ffff ffffff ffff fffrfff ffbf tfrfff fffrf frfrf ffffr ff ffff rfffr f fff ff frf ft f bfff ffffff fffr ffffff frff fr fff frfr frft ff ffff ffff ffff rtf fffff fffffff ffbf fffrf ffff fff frrff ffff ffff ff fr fff ffff fff fff fff ffff fffff ffffftf ftf ftff f rf ff f f f rf f f f rfftf ff f fr f ffr fff ff r f r tf f bff ff ff ffr ff tff f t rf tf r f r f r f f fr f tf f fff fr r rf

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rf rfntbrbbnnfrfbrtfr rtf ftbfr rfbrr rfrb rnrfbrrfr rtnt rtrbrbnt tnrf rrnttrt bntbrr rfbrnfrrfr rtnrntbnt rr tb bftnrtf rnrtbrtfrtntb nrtbbrfff bbnrbrnt btbf ntrrfnntb rrtnnbnb rtnbfrb rbbntnbbrnn nbbrrnrtb brbnbrtnt rrnbtnttnb nrrnnb rtbntrbn rrf nfnrbnrrtf fn rfbrrfr rbnbrb frntbntnbb ffbbb fbrtfbnbrtb nb rnrfbrnfr rtnrtfrfr rtnbntb trrntnbrb fnnbbnbrtfb nbrtbnb rntrrfr rtnnn ntbt tbn rfrtfrnbrt rnnfrrfrtfr rrf btnbr r ntrrfr tnrtrff bnfrtf nbrtbnb rnt r rrtft rb rnbnnr rtfnbrtfbnr nfbr nbnr rn b ntrtrrtf nttnr rnbrtntb trnrtfr rntrrtfttt brrtrb rnrn r brrtfnnnt rtrrbbt trnfrrbr bnr frt rtbnt fntbb tnr tfr bntnfrnttnrf rrfrbnt rtfrfbnrtf tr tfr tnbrbrtfbn r ntnfr frnf nbf tbfbn ntrtftbnf rbrr brrnrrr ntntfft nffbn frnrntff t rn nr tnbfrtff rrtbt tffntnbr tttn rtftrrtfntr ntrtbr frbt ttfntntn fnttntrtb nr ftnbf rrtnnnbntfft btbntfbn r ftnbfrnnt tnnrrnnnbrtf brnntfftrf tnfttb bbn fbnr fntr ntrfr frbr fftrtf fbnrt r t frnt tnr fbnbbbntr ntftnfb nnnnt rrbrtfrffb tfrrfrrtf rfr rtfbtftr nt ttrbrtf fnbrrnr trt fbnrbntr nnftnb ttrnfnt tbnr frnb b r rntrnrntb frrtb trbftnttbn rtfbnnnbntff bbnttbn rbrtfbnb nrtbrntrrnr ntfrnrn bnt brbrrnr tnrnr nrrnt ntff frnt bnbfrn trntff t n rr rtr ntbtft rtf frnbt rtfntrft trntrntntrtf fntntbnt rbrbb r bbrn tbnffbnt frbr rtrtrf rftbrt r rbtbr rrtfbnbnt nfr r rnt bnbt rbtbrn r rtfrt nfrtfrn rfrbnrf rfbtntrtntrrnr rbr rtfb trtnbr rbtbr rrtfbnbnt nfr r rnt t bnbt rbtbrn r rbtb nnt t r t r t rfftbrntbb nrt ntrfftbrnt rfrntb rrrbrtfb r rbtbr rn t r rtnrf tnbtrtft rtfrtbnbbnt nbrbntr t b ntrntnt rbtbnntbrnt tntbbnt ntrntb nttfr btft rtttbf rrnnt btfb brntrnntrnnt tnrntbnbrtr tnrr trfr ntrr rbntn tbntnr rtfntrb rtfnbntbf fbrnf n tnrnfr nbnnttrn bnbtffrn bnntntfnrnf nfrbr nrbntfnbrf bnbrtfnt tfrtnf tnrntbnbntnrt rntntfnr nfrbrnbb fntrrbnb r bb ntrfntnf ntrtbntntf rtrnbrnnrtf nnntnbrrbnt ntrbbnntbrrnrr rntrrnnnt rtnt nrnrtf brtfbrrt ntrtbntf bntrttf nnrbrt ttnrrr ntfbtbrnffrb rtfb nttr rrrtn rrrtnntr ntnttf tnnbnt ntr ntn trtf rfrnt fntrtbnntr brrbbnbrt tffrnb rntrtbnntnb tnntnnfrtfrnt ntrnbr nbnfr ntfftt tfbbt tnb brbntrtfnt brtft nrrtfnrtf nt nbnntt nbnr fbnntntnt nrntbb fnntbr bnntnrtbbr rbrbrnrn bfnrnrt nntrrfrtfbnr rrtfbbbbrrnfnb ntbnrtbbrbbr rtfntbnrntn ntfbrt ttnntbr nbfrtntnt rbbrttrnf fnbtrfnbrrt fbtnf rbtrffnntr nbfrttnnt fbnntnnb tnntr rbnrrftr rbrbrbnbtr ntnr ntrnt rtnbrf rrtnbrt rtn nrtrfrnt rnnrntrnrnt bntbbrbtr nntrnbtt nntrfrtrnt rtbrtfbbbrtb ntntt brrbnff rnfrrb rtfrtrfr fnnrbb ntnrbnt rrntn rfnb ntrntrn rntbtrrr rb nfrrt rtbrntrbrrrtnt rtnt bnntb bnnt ntnnr rnttrttnnrtr ntr bntr trbtrft rtnt bnbnfr trrbr nbr nrtbnntrrbtr rfrntrbfntf nrtbnnbrnnnb btnrtnnt rnrtfnb ntnnrnt nntrnbrfnt rfrtrbnntn nfrfrnt ntnntbrtfr rnfrntb rnrtrnntrtb trbrr bntftrnt r trr rrtnrtbrrbr nbntftrnt nbr rtrtbrnt bbrr rtfnbrtr tnnrnnt rtffbtr fnbnntrntntnt r trrtnntf nrntrbn rtfrnbrtftr rnttbnb ntrntrn rntbtrrr rb bbntrrbbbrtf rnnnt btrntbnbrtf rfbnttt tbnfrbbtrn brtfrbrt fbtrntnnrf tttr rnrtftntbnft trtfnbntb rntbnbnfb bbntnrrtf frbbnbrttr trtfrbrbrb r ntnrntb rfrtf fnrtfnntf nfbf ntbttrb t rnr ntfnt nnt r nbr b bnt rtfrnt bnrbrtf rrb rfr rtrt ntbfrtftbf nnfrnnrnb rtrrt trtfn nrnntnttfnttnt brtfnb ntbrtfnrb r bbnt t rtrnb rtb nbftf rfffrn

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rf ntb bb ttbf bt ffbbff bn n r tf bt f rbf bf bff n bbf fr bbnb b bnfb nffb b ff nn rfntb frr r r ff t r ttn tb n tbr r t tt rr tb ff nf bt bb bbb b ttttt r tb nn rr fr fn rr rr tt tb bb bfr r r brf rr f bfr rr frr rf r f rf r r nttb rfrf r frrf tt bb rr bb tt r tbt nr rr r r r tb tbt bb bfr r r brf rr f bfr rr frr rf r fr fr r ntttb rfrfr r frrf tt bb nbt nt n rr t bb rrr b ttttt r n btb r trr bb r t tnf tbr tr r bb r f tbtnb r ffr r tf r tt r fn rfntb rfbt bt fbf fft bbnfn nb b f rnbbntb t nrf btb rffr rf f rff rf rf ffb bfb f nff r r tbtt bb bf fft bb nt bfb fbb f f fbnrf t nbbb tbfb ff b fbnb f bb bb b nbtf r b fbbf nbtbt nfbtr rrn rrbr fff bfb bbnf fr bt rrrrf t fb bt b fttbrfntb t bf fb fnf rf f n

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rfntb tbnn btbbt rffntb fff fbn ff