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Perry news-herald ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028293/00408

Material Information

Title: Perry news-herald
Portion of title: Perry news herald
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Perry Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 09-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates: 30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note: William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID: UF00028293:00449

Related Items

Related Items: Taco times
Preceded by: Taylor County news
Preceded by: Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028293/00408

Material Information

Title: Perry news-herald
Portion of title: Perry news herald
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Perry Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 09-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates: 30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note: William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID: UF00028293:00449

Related Items

Related Items: Taco times
Preceded by: Taylor County news
Preceded by: Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)


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PAGE 1

Smile! Baby photo contest now accepting entriesOctober is just around the corner and with it Taylor Countys annual month-long salute to forestrythe Florida Forest Festival. Entries are now being accepted for the 58th annual Florida Forest Festivals Baby Photo Contest. The deadline to enter is Friday, Oct. 11. Photos must have been taken after April 1, 2013. The contest is divided into four age groups: 0-6 months; 7-11 months; one year; two years; three years; and four years. Entries will be judged on the following criteria: uniqueness of photo, capturing the moment, baby showing personality and photogenic quality. All entries must be amateur photos (not professional or studio), an enlarged 5x7 with a matted border (not framed) and only one photo per child. Entries should be turned in at Photos & Frames (located at 102 E. Main Street). Entry fees are $9. Winners will be announced at the 2013 Little King & Queen Pageant Saturday, Oct. 12.Author to speak at library Sept. 30Author Ashton Lee will be the featured guest at the Friends of the Taylor County Public Library program on Monday, Sept. 30. Lee is the author of The Cherry Cola Book Club, a novel about a Southern town with a avorful plan to save its precious, but woefully underfunded library. The program will begin at 5:30 p.m. and the community is invited to attend.4-H club registration underwayTaylor County 4-H is offering a variety of handson educational programs through positive youth and adult partnerships and enrollment is now underway for 4-H clubs scheduled for the 2013-2014 school year. Through 4-H clubs youth learn a variety of life skills such as, gun and archery skills, culinary and nutrition skills, clothing construction, equine care, livestock showmanship, physical tness and Parliamentary procedures, 4-H Extension Agent Abbey Tharpe said. This volunteerled organization equips youth to be leaders in their community and promotes healthy lifestyles that will last a lifetime. The clubs planned for this school year include the 4-H Horse Club, 4-H Livestock Club, 4-H Sewing Club, 4-H Cloverbuds Club and 4-H Culinary & Nutrition Club. For more information, contact the Taylor County Extension Ofce at 838-3508.Developmental screenings offered Sept. 11Parents of children six months to ve years are invited to participate in upcoming developmental screenings Wednesday, Sept. 11, from 1:30 until 4:30 p.m. in the Child Development Center. Please call Taylor County Pre-K at 838-2535 for more information. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1889 Perry News-HeraldPerry News-Herald 50 Friday/ SaturdaySeptember 6-7, 2013 Index One section 124th Year, No. 35www.perrynewspapers.com Weather Friday93 72 30% Saturday92 71 Sunday91 70 Perry News-Herald Perry News-Herald 30% Looking Back . ......... A-2 Living . ..................... A-4 Religion . .................. A-6 Sports . .................... A-7 Entertainment . ........ A-8 TV listings . .............. A-9 Classieds . ........... A-12 News Forum TAYLOR COUNTYCONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES Votes expected next weekCongressional reps take opposing stand on action in SyriaWith the U.S. Congress set to vote on approving military action in Syria next week in response to allegations that the countrys regime used chemical weapons in its two-year civil war, Taylor Countys representatives appear to be split two-to-one against. U.S. Senator Marco Rubio is the only one to have voted on the matter to date, voting against a resolution authorizing U.S. military action, which passed 10 to 7 in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee vote. The resolution, which is expected to go before the full Senate next week, authorizes President Barack Obama to use the U.S. military in a limited and tailored manner against legitimate military targets in Syria, only to: (1) respond to the use of weapons of mass destruction by the Syrian government in the conict in Syria; (2) deter Syrias use of such weapons in order to protect the national security interests of the United States and to protect our allies and partners against the use of such weapons; and (3) degrade Syrias capacity to use such weapons in the future. An estimated 100,000 people have been killed in the conict over the past two years, with 1,000 killed--mostly civilians--in the Aug. 21 chemical attack in the suburbs of Damascus. The resolution states there is clear and compelling evidence that Syrian leader Bashar al-Assads regime was directly involved in the attack. The use of chemical weapons is against the Geneva Conventions outlining the rules of war. The Senate resolution also specically states it does not authorize the use of ground troops in Syria and it only authorizes military action for up to 60 days, with an option for the president to extend the operation for an additional 30 days due to extraordinary circumstances and for ongoing and impending military operations against Syria. The United Nations, meanwhile, is awaiting the results of its scientists examination of samples Jubals Kin brings unique sound to Pickin in the Pines music festival on Sept. 27-28 Taylor County residents who utilize EBT cards are being warned that the state system will be down on Monday, Sept. 16, and purchases will not be available that day. The system will be down while the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) switches to a new vendor to process EBT transactions. Customers are urged to plan ahead and complete food purchases before Sept. 16, DCF ofcials said. To assist households receiving benets between Sept. 11-15, benets will be made available early on Sept. 10. Normal EBT purchases will resume the evening of Sept. 16. EBT users: system will be down Sept. 16The organizers behind the Pickin in the Pines Music Festival have announced folk group Jubals Kin will headline this years event, which will be held Sept. 2728 at Forest Capital State Park. We are honored to be able to announce the group Jubals Kin will be appearing on the stage this year at the Pickin in the Pines Music Festival, Coordinator Dawn Taylor said. The festival is going to have a variety of music genres from folk, blues, bluegrass and even a little bit of jazz to add to the mix. There will truly be something for everyone. In addition Jubals Kin, the festivals line-up include Delta Reign, The Florida State Bluegrass Band, High Cotton, Acoustic Messengers, Tallahassee Fiddlers and more. Tickets for the two-day festival are $15. On-site camping is also available for $25 per site per night (water and electricity only). Dry camping is available for $10 per night. For more information, contact the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce at (850) 5845366. Jubals Kin embraces both a strong roots tradition and fresh indie folk sound, an approach that has been called Appalachia-infused Cosmic Americana. The group consists of siblings Gailanne Amundsen (vocals, ddle, banjo, guitar), Roger Amundsen (vocals, guitar, dulcimer, mandolin) and Jeffrey Amundsen (bass). Their self-titled debut record, which was released in 2010, was recorded in Nashville, Tenn. The album was shortlisted for the Grammy Awards and had nominations in the Independent Music Awards (Americana Album and Album Design), winning the Album Design category. Since then, the groups extensive touring has led them to festivals of all shapes and sizes, sharing stages with the likes of groups such as Crooked Still and Over the Rhine. Please see page 3Canopy designsTaking another step forward in its Downtown Canopy Project, the city has released partial construction plans it has received from project designers. Shown here are depictions of a sidewalk bridge which will span the block between Drew and Ellis streets. An additional bridge is proposed to cover the sidewalk that leads to Rosehead Park. Additional designs for singlestory and two-story canopies have also been outlined.

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BUCKEYE PREPARES FOR SHUTDOWNThe 1,130 employees of Buckeye Cellulose were making preparations for the annual maintenance shutdown planned for Sept. 1827. Another 300 to 1000 personnel from Watkins were also expected to be on site, about half coming from out of the county. Buckeye isnt going to go out-of-date because were constantly modernizing, said a spokesman for the company. The swelling employment for the shutdown was likened to the community having a convention of 1100 afuent people for 12 days. Watkins was the second largest industrial employer in Taylor County, just behind Buckeye.MEET THE QUEENS!The contestants for Forest Festival Queen featured on this weeks front page included Kathy Moore, Gina Martin, Katie Hingson and June Holley. The Rotary Club welcomed the candidate it was sponsoring, Duwanna Courtney, as guest speaker for its rst meeting in September.COUNTY GIVES $5,180 TO JERRY LEWIS MARATHONResidents in Taylor County contributed just over $5000 to this years Muscular Dystrophy Telethon sponsored by Jerry Lewis. Pictured manning the phones were Jaycee President Chip Aiken, Jacyette Kay Aiken, Roger King, Steve Patrick and Shannon McCranie.WEDDING FAL-DE-RAHMr. and Mrs. Sidney A. Russell announced the engagement of their daughter, Martha LaJean, to Larry Wilson Wall. A Sept. 16 wedding was planned at the First Baptist Church. Mr. and Mrs. James R. Moody announced the engagement of their daughter, Mary Kathryn, to Donald Wayne Downing An Oct. 21 wedding was planned. Joseph Abel Turner and Thelma Bohannon announced their forthcoming marriage on Sept. 30 at Athena Baptist Church.THREE ARE NEWBilly King Johnson III was born to Mr. and Mrs. Billy K. Johnson Jr. on Aug. 31 in Doctors Memorial Hospital (DMH). He weighed 7 pounds, 9.5 ounces. Nicholas Michael Fabisiak was born to Mr. and Mrs. Terry M. Fabisiak at DMH on Aug. 30. He weighed 9 pounds, 5.5 ounces. Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Freeman announced the birth of their daughter, Chastity Nicholle, on Aug. 28 at DMH. She weighed 6 pounds, 8.75 ounces at birth.PERRY GIRL COMPETES FOR MISS WILD WATERS TITLEJogie Brown of Perry was named second runner-up Editors Note: In February 1945, downtown Perry saw the most destructive re in its history. The blaze claimed the three-story Masonic building that housed the Masonic Lodge, Temple Theater and numerous business ofces. The following account of the re was reported in the Feb. 8, 1945 Taylor County News: Spectacular Fire Destroyed the Masonic building here Friday Perry Fire Equipment and that from Army Air Field ght ames in vain The three-story Masonic building here, occupied by the Temple Theater, Dr. G. H. Warren, Dr. Wilson T. Hendry, the Welfare Board, and the various fraternal groups of Perry, was destroyed by re last Friday morning. A heating stove exploded on the second oor and hot stovepipe fell the entire length of the hall on that oor, causing the most destructive re in Perrys history. Somewhat less than half a million gallons of water were pumped into the burning building, but due to the headway the re had gained and the inammable nature of the interior, four re trucks, throwing from ve to seven streams of water into the blazing second oor could make no headway against the roaring ames. The alarm sounded shortly after nine oclock Friday morning, and the 500-gallon pumper of the Perry Fire Department was rushed to the northwest corner of the square. A second call brought the seven hundred and fty gallon pumper to the corner of Main and Washington streets. Three lines of hose were thrown from each, the nozzles manned by volunteers. A call for help to the Army Air Field brought a ve hundred gallon pumper to the post ofce corner and a tank with a pump which located on Washington Street at the rear of the old bank building. The combined efforts of all those great pumps could make no visible effect in the progress of the great blaze, though without question they saved the bank building now owned by the county and occupied by the Red Cross and the county health department. At 10:30 the great timbers supporting the third oor of the Masonic building burned in two, the oors collapsed and the north, east and west walls, a great expanse of brick, swayed for a moment and then sagged straight down in a great crash. An average of about fteen feet of the wall still stands. The re was practically over by noon, but the local re engines remained at the scene the rest of the day to pump more water on the scattered blazes inside A-2 Perry News-Herald September 6-7, 2013 Looking Back September 6-7, 2013 THE PERRY NEWS-HERALD September 7, 1978 If youre going to retire, make sure you do it while youre at the top of your game. I did. In 1980, after winning the National 4-H Gardening competition in Chicago, I put my garden hoe in the shed, took off my gardening shoes and then I washed the potting soil and dirt off of my hands. I was done with gardening. However, my early retirement didnt leave Taylor Countys 4-H gardening program in the dust because my fellow 4-Hers, Charles Ellis and Clay Bethea, were waiting to take the reigns. The 4-H project that led to Taylor County 4-Hers three-peating as the National 4-H Gardening competition winner was the Taylor County Community Garden, which was located where the health department is next to the old hospital. I was trying to come up with a 4-H gardening project in order to compete at the state competition held each year at the University of Florida in Gainesville. I spoke with my 4-H leaders, Leola Glenn, Mildred Alexander and Mary Williams, who headed the Jerkins Heights 4-H Club. Mrs. Leola suggested I speak with Mr. Henry Davis, the county extension agent, and Carol Mott, who was the countys 4-H agent. Mr. Davis and Mrs. Mott suggested that I organize and manage a community garden. I may have been the organizer and chairman of the community garden, but Mr. Davis and Mrs. Mott were the driving forces behind my effort. the garden. There had been a similar project at the site next to the old hospital, so Mr. Davis and Mrs. Mott helped me to secure the location. They then called in horticulture and gardening experts from Florida A & M University and the University of Florida to advise me on how to organize and manage a community garden. After several meetings with the universities experts, Mr. Davis, Mrs. Mott and Mrs. Leola helped me recruit local businesses as sponsors for the project. Earl Williams, a manager at Buckeye, came aboard as my community leader. His role was primarily to teach me how to manage a community project involving a diverse group of families and gardeners. Mr. Davis and Mrs. Mott also helped me to recruit other 4-Hers and 4-H clubs to assist in the project. Charles Koski Ellis was a member of the Jerkins Heights 4-H club, and he and I were demonstration partners and members of the horticulture judging team. Koski was my right-hand man on the project. Clay Bethea, and his brother Andy and sister Marilyn, were also involved in the project. Clay became the co-chair of the community garden and head of the 4-H County Council plot, which grew fresh vegetables and donated them to Doctors Memorial Hospital. Although my grandfather had spring and fall gardens and made me and my brothers work daily in the gardens, there was still a lot that I had to learn. Mr. Davis taught me how to take soil samples at the beginning of the project. He also helped me to plow Mrs. Mott helped me recruit local gardeners and conduct organizational meetings for the gardeners. She also show me how to set up records for each of the nearly 30 families who purchased plots at the garden. Mrs. Leola convinced other members of the Jerkins Heights 4-H Club to be part of the project. She also drove me to and from the garden site each day, helped plant seeds, pull weeds and harvest the vegetables we grew. Part of my gardening project was to plant a 4-H Remember when...By ANTHONY L. WHITE anthonylamarwhite@yahoo.com3-time national champs Please see page 5 Please see page 5Most destructive re in Perrys history Please see page 3

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A-3 Perry News-Herald September 6-7, 2013 taken by the U.N. chemical weapons inspection team sent to Syria in an attempt to determine who was behind the attack. The U.N. Security Council is currently deadlocked over the issue, with Russia opposing action in the war torn country. Citing the chemical attack, Floridas other Senator, Bill Nelson, has expressed his support for military intervention in Syria. The senators website states: There should be moral outrage over the use of chemical weapons on innocent civilians in Syria. At this point, Sen. Nelson believes its appropriate to take military action with NATO and our regional allies. Inaction would only lead to greater suffering and instability in the region and would further embolden Assad. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland said this week percent of the some 300 people who have contacted his ofce about the Syrian issue are against involvement. When making decisions that impact global security and military readiness, I have a solemn obligation to be purposeful in my approach and attentive to the concerns of the people I represent, Southerland said. After gathering input from my constituents, I take great comfort in knowing they overwhelmingly agree with my opposition to a conict in Syria that lacks any clear objective or apparent American security interest. The U.S. House is also expected to take the issue to a vote next week. Proper process dictates that I receive a classied brieng and study the evidence before rendering my nal decision, but its highly unlikely that Ill be compelled to believe any differently about this mission next week, Southerland said. The Taylor County Commission will hold a pair of public hearings over the next two weeks to nalize its 2013-14 budget. The hearings will be held Tuesday, Sept. 10, and Monday, Sept. 16, at 6 p.m. at the Courthouse Annex on Green Street. The commission balanced its budget and approved its proposed property tax millage rates, keeping the levels the same as the current years rates in July. At the rst hearing, the board will approve its tentative budget and millage rates and, at the second, it will approve the nal versions. As for the millage rates, state law prohibits the commission from raising them above the proposed rate. The commission held three workshops in July to discuss the budget, beginning the process with a $700,000 general fund decit, most of which was due to the Florida Legislature changing the countys required contributions to the Florida Retirement System for its employees. That move alone is expected to cost the county, including the constitutional ofcers, around $500,000 this coming scal year, which begins Oct. 1. Also included in the budget for next year is the additional $150,000 in annual emergency medical services subsidies for Doctors Memorial Hospital the commission rst approved last fall (after the 2012-13 budget was nalized) to continue funding a full-time ambulance in Steinhatchee. Not included in the budget, however, are raises for employees. Last year, the commission voted to give employees their rst raise in ve years. The commission ultimately balanced the budget by requesting additional cuts from the constitutional ofcers and then offsetting the rest by utilizing cash carry forward funds from the previous year to help make up the difference. The current property tax millage rates are 7.0113 mills in the general fund and 1.1215 mills in the MSTU fund (which is funded through a tax on property in the unincorporated area of the county for services duplicated by the City of Perry such as re protection). Due to property value decreases, general fund tax revenues are expected to drop $36,000 compared to the current year, while MSTU fund revenues are projected to fall $5,000. Shown at the award presentation are: (left to right) Pam Langford; Sheila Salyer; Everett Yarbrough; Congressman Steve Southerland II; Barbara Borderieux; Nanette Schimpf; Lisa Bretz; Amber Tynan and Evelyn Cunningham. Congressman Steve Southerland was presented with the Summer 2013 Champion of Seniors Award by The Grange, a national, nonpartisan grassroots organization that advocates on behalf of Americas rural seniors, for his outstanding leadership on behalf of seniors. Criteria for the award included: leadership in Congress to protect Medicare, which is critical to millions of American seniors and their families. the-board cuts made by un-elected boards. affordable prescription medicines for seniors through the Medicare Part D program and opposing any efforts to implement price controls or similar measures that would lead to increases in premiums for seniors. continued commitment to protect the doctor/patient relationship for seniors and opposing any efforts that might weaken it in any way. of health care options for seniors so that they may choose the best plan for themselves and their families. constituents with individual issues before government agencies so that they receive the benets and services they have earned. services and necessary funding for senior programs in the Representatives district. Southerland received the award for his unwavering efforts to protect the health benets and security of Floridas seniors and citizens with disabilities, presenters said. He was presented the award during a ceremony at the Tallahassee senior center, along with Barbara Borderieux, president of The Florida Grange; Pam Langford, president of Sheila Salyer, director of Tallahassee Senior Services; of the Westminster Oaks Conservative Club; Nanette Schimpf, vice president of Moore Communications Group and member of the Florida State Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Lisa Bretz, executive director of the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida; Amber Tynan, director, Development and Care Services, Inc.; and citizen. Southerland has exhibited outstanding leadership in Congress to protect Medicare and ensure access to affordable prescription medicines and health care choices for seniors. He has denitely earned this award and deserves our thanks, said Grace Boatright, legislative director for The National Grange. The National Grange is the nations oldest nonprot, nonpartisan rural advocacy organization that advocates and educates on behalf of Americas farmers, ranchers and other rural Americans. Southerland recognized for outstanding leadership on behalf of Floridas seniorsBudget hearings for county start Tuesday, Sept. 10 demonstration plot, where I experimented with various planting methods, varieties of vegetables, fertilizers, insecticides and mulches. Mr. Davis and the university experts were essential to this part of the project. The community garden started during the early spring, and by the time summer rolled in, I had completed my 4-H gardening record book which chronicled my work in the community garden and other 4-H projects. I competed in the state 4-H competition at UF and was selected as the state winner. In November of that same year, I was chosen as the national winner in Chicago. The next year, Koski competed in the state 4-H gardening competition and won. A few months later, he was chosen as the national winner in Chicago. Clay was chairman of the community garden during its second year. He competed in the state 4-H gardening competition the year after Koski and won. He went on to win in the national competition later that year. All three of us received college scholarships for winning the national competition. I dont know whether or not Clay continued gardening after he contributed to Taylor Countys three-peat, but Koski, like myself, retired from gardening after his win. Over the years, Ive been invited back into the garden a few times, but I didnt accept any of the invitations. Ive seen enough retired champions enter the ring again after retirement to know that you cant always come back and pick up where you left off. Mother nature and time have seen to that. SYRIA Continued from page 1 Southerland said 95% of calls he has received oppose involvement in Syria REMEMBER WHEN... Continued from page 2Retired champion has no plans to return to garden The garden was located where the health department stands today.

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A-4 Perry News-Herald September 6-7, 2013 Living Harris earns Outstanding Youth award from Workforce Barbara Hines was welcomed to Perry on Tuesday by the communitys Master Gardeners and others who wanted to learn more about The Native American Use of Plants. A registered professional archaeologist with the Florida Public Archaeology Network, Hines showcased many native plants familiar to area residents while explaining the uses that Native Americans had for these plants on a daily basis. About 20 gathered for the program at Forest Capital Hall which was presented at no charge to the public. Programs on the states history are presented throughout the state by the archaeology network.Archaeobotany What was this plant used for? Through a partnership with organizations in its six-county region, North Florida Workforce placed 66 youth in 61 worksites spread across Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor counties as part of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Summer Youth Work Experience Program. In addition to learning valuable on-the-job skills, youth also engaged in life skills workshops throughout the summer. These invaluable lessons will be carried by the youth as they progress, not only through the employment world, but through life. Over the summer, all 66 youth were certied in CPR, taught how to use an Automated External Debrillator, and received OSHA/MSHA credentials, said Diane Head, deputy director for Workforce. Each summer, one youth from each county is selected to receive an Outstanding Youth award for hard work and perseverance. A number of factors are involved in the selection process, Head explained, including timeliness, work readiness and professionalism. Youth must be nominated for the award by their worksite supervisor, and this year, each youth was required to write an essay summarizing their experiences. The Outstanding Youth award for Taylor County went to Dashalla Harris who was placed at the Taylor County Extension (IFAS) Ofce. She and the other ve award winners from surrounding counties were awarded laptop computers. The Summer Youth Work Experience Program could not have been successful without the diligence of staff members Kris Kuhl (WIA Youth Coordinator), Rachel Brinson (WIA Youth Career Consultant), and Katrina Armstead (WIA Youth Assistant), Head said. Franklin Delano Roosevelt once said that we cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future. That is the objective of this summer program which serves the communities in our North Florida region, Head said. For more information on any programs, please visit www.NFworkforce,org. Dashalla Harris, Taylor County Outstanding Youth, is presented her laptop by Sheryl Rehberg, Workforce Executive Director. Shady Groves huge yard sale underway; come now Shady Groves huge yard sale began Thursday and continues through Saturday near the community park. Members of the community council urge friends and neighbors to check out the wares at this three-day event. There is no charge to set up; if you are interested, please call 8434974 for more information. While youre in the area, the community urges you to purchase a ticket for the Mossberg Model 500 12-gauge Shotgun with wood grain 28 vented barrel. Tickets are $1.00 and can be purchased at Rockys Store in Shady Grove (as well as Perry Pawnbrokers, and Rockys Store Hwy. 98 West). All Community Council members have tickets, too. The winning ticket will be drawn on Dec. 21 at the 4th Annual Shady Grove Country Christmas. The gun can be seen at Perry Pawn. Class of plans reunion for October; you are invited! October brings many Forest Festival events and football celebrations to this community. This year, it will also bring a reunion for the Taylor County High School Class of 1953-54. Were hoping everyone can gather at the Elks Club for dinner on Oct. 11, said George Ann Holmes Thompson for the class. Afterwards, we will join the Spirit Line at the goalpost in Dorsett Stadium to cheer the entry of our team. Thompson urges interested class members to contact her by phone at 727-595-3097 or by e-mail at gannthompson@aol. com.

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A-5 Perry News-Herald September 6-7, 2013the remaining portion of the walls. Nothing was saved from the building except the moving picture equipment that was housed in a reproof room at the front of the building on the ground oor. Debris amed up in this location at least twice after the re was thought to be extinguished. The second oor of the building was heated by a circulator placed in the hall, the hall having a partition near the stairs at the front of the building. Two pipes from the heater ran the full length of the hall. About seven-thirty Friday morning the janitor of the second oor arrived at the building and started the heater, and then began his work of cleaning the ofces. While at work in one of the rooms of the welfare ofce at the north end of the building he heard a noise. Opening the door, he saw the full length of the hall lled with ame and smoke. His exit by the front was closed and he was rescued by the re department placing a ladder against one of the north windows. Others outside the building saw the smoke and ames at the windows along the west side and turned in calls for the re department. The Masonic building was erected in 1923 and the builders used only the nest of heartwoods for the interior construction, this wood being covered with three coats of clear varnish. The vapors from the heated varnish near the exploded stove and the hot lengths of pipe were quickly ignited and the rich wood was instantly burning at a terric rate. The janitor was the only person in the building when the re started. Persons from the street and from the re department tried to enter the second oor, but were instantly driven back by the dense smoke and rush of ames. Loss of the building and contents was estimated at between $125,000 and $150,000. Amounts of insurance have not been made public. Temple Theater to be back in action George E. Porter, Kay Porter and others of the personnel in charge of the operation of the Temple Theater, are busy on plans involving the securing of some equipment, the reconstruction of some, and securing a location in which they may soon open the theater again. The projectors, sound equipment and most other items were saved with slight damage when re destroyed the Masonic building last Friday. The equipment was protected by the reproof room constructed several years ago. George Porter stated since the re that their chief difculty would be in nding seats for a new theater, but said he felt sure that in a few weeks they would again be in operation. During this week Perry movie fans have ocked to Foley by car and bus, where Mr. Porter has welcomed his friends from Perry. The series of pictures booked for Perry have been transferred to the program at Foley, and this will continue until the Temple is re-established in Perry. The rst arrangement for a theater here will be temporary, stated Mr. Porter, since the Masonic building will be reconstructed, with provision for a modern theater on the ground oor. Ofce Locations changed by re New locations for those who had ofces on the second oor of the Masonic building have presented a problem since the re last week. Practically all ofce space here was occupied before the re destroyed the largest single group of ofces in Perry. Dr. G. H. Warren transferred to the Blair building and will occupy the ofces of Dr. J. L. Weeks. Dr. Wilson T. Hendry will be located on the second oor of the Peacock building, as soon as changes can be made in room rearrangements there. The series of ofces of the Welfare Board, which occupied the major portion of the second oor at the Masonic building will be located on the west side of the second oor above the Bloodworth drug store. Masons move to re-build their building destroyed last Friday Plans provide for only two oors now, with third to be added Perry Lodge No. 123 Free and Accepted Masons is one of the best directed fraternal organizations anywhere, and it is a matter of civil pride here that the Masons began plans for reconstruction of their ne building before the re last Friday had been fully subdued. The regular meeting of the Lodge was held Monday night in the second oor of the ofce of the Florida Power & Light Company, and the members discussed ways and means, with plans and then voted to reconstruct the building as soon as possible and the matter was turned over to the building committee which happens to be a group of energetic and determined Perry citizens. The Lodge has sufcient money in the bank, with the proceeds from their insurance to rebuild without the necessity of going into debt, it was said this week by members of the Lodge. The building committee is at work upon plans for a two-story building to replace the burned building, with the xed idea that after the war the third story will be added. The ground oor of the burned building had been occupied by the Temple Theater since the building was erected. The second oor has been occupied by professional men and the Welfare Board here and the third oor, consisting of a lodge and a banquet room, was used for meetings of fraternal groups only. The building contemplated now by the building committee of the Lodge will be as nearly reproof as it is possible to construct. It is assumed that the rst oor will again be devoted to the theater, and the lodge rooms will occupy the second oor. When materials and labor are more plentiful, after the war, the third oor will be restored and second oor rearranged, much after the plan of the building destroyed last Friday. Members of the building committee state that they have sufcient labor now ready, and sufcient materials located that they will start work as soon as the adjustment of losses is made by inspectors of the re insurance companies. One member of the committee said: As soon as we get the insurance straightened out you may look for the brick to begin to y. in the Miss Wild Waters pageant held at Silver Springs. She received a swimsuit wardrobe, luggage and jewelry.KIWANIANNES AT WORK?The wives of Kiwanis Club members were pictured in the kitchen at Roy Deals Famous Oyster House, cleaning jumbo shrimp in preparation for the clubs Seafood Feast fund-raiser. Pictured were Nell Wilkes, Joyce Hunt Lola Bird and Nita Zeigler.HAMPTON CHRYSLER: NOW IN BUSINESS Hampton Chrysler Plymouth & Dodge announced that it was Open for Business! with 78 models on the sale lot. The business was located at 609 Highway 19 North. REAL ESTATE DEALS A tri-level home in Glen Ridge was selling for $49,000, complete with dishwasher and sprinkler system for the beautifully landscaped lawn. Forty acres at Andrews Lake was priced at $35,000, with 10 in land and the other 30 comprising the lake. PERRY-TAYLOR COUNTYChamber of Commerce Business of the Month GLANCE AT PAST Continued from page 2 40 acres at Andrews Lake for $35,000? DESTRUCTIVE FIRE Continued from page 2 Doctors relocate oces, Masons ready to rebuild 4 from Taylor named to Presidents Honor Roll Forty-eight North Florida Community College students, including four from Taylor County, were named to the Presidents Honor Roll at the conclusion of NFCCs Summer Term 2013. The Presidents Honor Roll recognizes outstanding academic achievement at the completion of each semester. Inclusion on the list is awarded to all fulltime students who, during a summer term, have earned a grade point average of 3.8 to 4.0 on course work of at least 12 hours. NFCC students recognized for academic achievement and named to the Presidents Honor Roll for Summer Term 2013 are: Caitlin J. Bogart, Marcy D. Freeman, Michael T. Gold and Madison C. Thomas. Twenty-two North Florida Community College students, including ve from Taylor County, were named to the Deans Honor Roll at the conclusion of NFCCs Summer Term 2013. The Deans Honor Roll recognizes outstanding academic achievement at the completion of each semester. Inclusion on the list is awarded to all full-time students who, during a summer term, have earned a grade point average of 3.50 to 3.79 on course work of at least 12 hours. NFCC students recognized for academic achievement and named to the NFCC Deans Honor Roll for Summer Term 2013 are: Dorie V. Cruce, Sheryl A. Curles, Terri B. Ellison, Justin S. Knight and Jharmara Q. Simmons. Five earn recognition on Deans Honor Roll New pilot

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A-6 Perry News-Herald September 6-7, 2013 Religion Youre welcome at church this Sunday, but make sure you go back on Sept. 15 First Presbyterian Church would be delighted to ll its sanctuary, Sunday after Sunday. In fact, Pastor Larry Neal is giving friends and neighbors, newcomers and interested onlookers advance notice to mark Sept. 15 on their calendars and join the congregation for worship. This is a national, non-denominational emphasis on the importance of church, he said. We got involved after a summer recess of many of our church activities. As we were getting all our programs going for the new school year, we wanted to participate in this emphasis of going back to church. So we hope people in this community will consider this a cordial invitation to come and worship with us on Sunday, Sept. 15. Actually, they are invited for this Sunday, Sept. 8, and every Sunday...as well as the 15th. Worship begins at 11 a.m.; the church is located at 310 Plantation Road. If you want to come early for Sunday School, that would be great--well nd a class for you, said Neal. Sunday School begins at 9:45 with classes for all ages, as well as a nursery. A potluck luncheon will follow the worship service. If youre looking for a church home, or havent even considered it, please set aside Sept. 15 to go Back To Church, he added. First Presbyterian will welcome you this Sunday, on the 15th and every Sunday, he said. Westside Baptist will show you...How big was Noahs Ark? So, how big was Noahs ark? The Bible says, And this is the fashion which thou shalt make it of: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits, the breadth of it fty cubits, and the height of it thirty cubits.-Genesis 6:15. Westside Baptist Church would like to invite you to come by the church to see how big the ark was and perhaps learn some interesting facts about the ark. The size of the ark will be staked out with yellow ribbon. Dont forget to check out how tall it was. (Hint: Look up into the pine trees for a yellow ribbon.) The exhibit will be up for two more weeks. Westside is located approximately two miles out Highway 98 West. Free hotdogs, drinks Saturday No man left revival begins todayEveryone is invited to come and enjoy the fellowship at the No Man Left Behind Tent Revival which begins today, Friday, Sept. 6, at 7 p.m. The location of the tent is adjacent to Big Bend Marine on Highway 19 South. All are welcome, said a spokesperson for the revival. Come expecting, and see what the Lord has for you. On Saturday, Sept. 7, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., free hot dogs will be provided with drinks. We want the community to come and enjoy the fellowship. Our location is easy to nd and you will be welcomed. Anniversary prompts days of celebration at New Jerusalem New Jerusalem Primitive Baptist Church invites everyone to join with their congregation in prayer for their pastoral family, as the church begins its pre-anniverary pastoral services for Elder Floyd Miles and Mother Felicia Miles. The Seventh Day Blessing Celebration will begin Saturday, Sept. 7, at 10 a.m. with a prayer breakfast featuring Elder James Edwards of New Hope Primitive Baptist Church as guest speaker. Minister (Ricky) William Lamar Bolden of Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist will be in charge of the service. No tickets will be sold for the breakfast. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy, and breakfast will follow. The celebration continues on Sunday at 4 p.m. with Elder Robert Johnson and the New Bethel Primitive Baptist Church in Madison leading services. The community is cordially invited. Precept studies to begin TuesdayYard sale Saturday; dinners on Sunday Radical Nation will hold a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 8 a.m. until. On Sunday, dinners will be sold from 10 a.m. (until) to benet the building fund. Please call 843-8952 or 843-2749 to place orders or for more information. The next Precept study will feature the book of Matthew, and a cordial invitation is extended to all women in the community. The study will explore The King and His Kingdom, a study of Jesus, king of all kings Classes begin on Tuesday, Sept. 10, at 9:30 a.m. and again at 6:30 p.m. The morning class will meet in the First Baptist Please see page 14

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