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Perry news-herald ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028293/00408

Material Information

Title: Perry news-herald
Portion of title: Perry news herald
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Perry Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-23-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates: 30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note: William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID: UF00028293:00447

Related Items

Related Items: Taco times
Preceded by: Taylor County news
Preceded by: Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028293/00408

Material Information

Title: Perry news-herald
Portion of title: Perry news herald
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Perry Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-23-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates: 30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note: William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID: UF00028293:00447

Related Items

Related Items: Taco times
Preceded by: Taylor County news
Preceded by: Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)


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Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1889 Perry News-HeraldPerry News-Herald 50 Friday/ SaturdayAugust 23-24, 2013 Index One section 124th Year, No. 33www.perrynewspapers.com Weather Friday90 72 50%Saturday90 72 Sunday89 72 60% Perry News-Herald Perry News-Herald 50% Looking Back . ......... A-2 Living . ..................... A-4 Religion . .................. A-5 Sports . .................... A-6 Entertainment . ........ A-7 Playground ............. A-8 TV listings . .............. A-9 Classieds . ........... A-12 Crews have been working the past two weeks to deploy some 120 concrete cubes on the Buckeye Reef site. The GPS coordinates for the deployments will be released in the fall. The project was underwritten by a grant from the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission and the county. 120 cubes deployed at Buckeye Reef Some 60 sixty concrete cubes (3 x 3 x 3) were placed on the Buckeye Reef site last week, with an additional deployment of another 60 cubes planned this week. This project was funded by a $60,000 grant received from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, with a $3,000 match provided by the Taylor County Board of County Commissioners, Marine & Natural Resources Extension Agent Geoff Wallat said. Members of the Taylor County Reef Research Team assisted with marking of sites and monitoring AMTEC Less-Lethal Systems, Inc., (ALS) held a dedication ceremony Wednesday morning at its new facility located on U.S. 19 just north of Perry. The company, which currently employs 43 people, announced last year that it was relocating its headquarters and manufacturing operation from Arkansas to Taylor County. During the ceremony, Taylor County Commission Chairperson Pam Feagle (center) presented a proclamation declaring the week of Aug. 18-24 as AMTEC Less-Lethal Systems Week, to ALS President Rick Gardner (right) and National Presto Industries CEO Maryjo Cohen.AMTEC dedicates new Taylor County facilityBy MARK VIOLA Staff writer Just a year after AMTEC Less-Lethal Systems, Inc., (ALS) announced it was relocating its headquarters and manufacturing operations from Arkansas to Taylor County, the company held a dedication ceremony at its new facility located on U.S. 19 just north of Perry. The ceremony was held Wednesday morning and featured representatives from ALSs parent company, National Presto Industries, Inc., along with those from local and state government agencies who assisted with ALSs decision to move to Taylor County. Weve certainly done a lot in a little bit of time in this facility, said ALS SRWMD partners with city for Spring Creek lake project, donates $350,000 Please see page 3The Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) is providing about $350,000 in cost-share funds to assist the City of Perry with improvements to Spring Creek as part of the districts Regional Initiative Valuing Environmental Resources (RIVER) program. Current plans call for the fashioning of a lake that will cover much of the area between Washington Street and Center Street. The lake will extend into the area between Washington Street, crossing under Jefferson Street, ending next to the new Rosehead Park splash pad location. The Perry City Council will consider closing a portion of Washington Street to encompass the lake and will hold a public hearing on the issue Thursday, Sept. 12, starting at 5:30 p.m. The lake will be approximately eight to nine feet deep at its lowest point and will be stocked with sh. The plans also call for a winding walkway around the lake as well as seating/ picnic areas. Spring Creeks base ow comes from Rose Spring, which is located off Center Street. Natural system enhancements to the downtown portion of Spring Creek will be made by removing invasive species and by establishing native plants to help improve water quality through natural ltration. Additional Please see page 13 The new lake, stocked with sh, will boast walkways and seating areas Please see page 14 Teens injured in crash Thurs. Two Taylor County High School students were injured in a three-vehicle crash that happened around 7:30 a.m. Thursday at the intersection of Green Street and Center (near First Baptist Church). A third injured person was also transported to Doctors Memorial Hospital by ambulance. A fourth individual was taken to the hospital by a private vehicle. Two teens were traveling east on Green Street when they ran the red light at the intersection and hit another car that was traveling north on Center Street. The resulting impact forced the second vehicle into a clear lot, narrowly missing a power pole and (natural) gas junction. It came to a stop after striking a tree while the rst car came to a stop further down on Green Street, Perry Police Department Capt. Jamie Cruse said. A third vehicle was hit by the second vehicle as it was forced out of the intersection. The rst car struck the second vehicle on the left front wheel, resulting in major damage to both vehicles. Both airbags were deployed in the car driven by the teen and a tire was knocked completely off the second car. The teen driver, whose identity was not released, was cited for violation of right-of-way. Cruse noted there were school-age children in both the second and third vehicles involved in the crash. Construction is underway on a new Tractor Supply Company store in Perry, the companys 50th Florida location. The Perry Tractor Supply store will be located at 2500 South Byron Butler Parkway in the lot adjacent to Holiday Inn Express on Everett Way and will employ 12 to 17 full-and part-time team members. The store will include sales oor and support service space. A fenced exterior space will be used for storage and displaying items such as fencing, sprayers and livestock equipment. Tractor Supply is the largest retail farm and ranch supply store chain in the United States and has been operating in Florida since 2000. Tractor Supply looks Tractor Supply breaks ground Please see page 14Buckeye merger with GP nalized Buckeye Technologies Inc. has announced that it expects to nalize its merger with Georgia-Pacic today. In a brief press release issued Thursday, the company said that the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice granted termination of the waiting period required under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvement Act of 1976, as amended, for the previously announced proposed Please see page 3 Montford: Taylor leads the way State Sen. Bill Montford said he will be pointing to Taylor County in the future as an example of how various government agencies can work together to land industries in Florida. The senator, who represents Taylor and other counties in North Florida, was in town Wednesday to participate in the grand opening of AMTEC. He Bill MontfordPlease see page 3

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PRETTY GIRLS IN A ROWA front page picture showed the line-up for the 1978 Forest Festival Queen Pageant. The contestants included: Katie Hingson, June Holley, Duwanna Courtney, Jogie Brown, Kathleen Holley, Kathleen Woodward, Kathy Moore, Yvonne Shefeld, Lisa Shaw, Angela Oliver, Leslie Beaty, Beth Parkey Pam Trofemuk, Lisa DAntonio, Jeanettte Turner and Gina Martin. (Not present for the photograph were Jackie Webb and Tonja Sparks.)100 NEW STUDENTS IN SCHOOL DISTRICTIn 1978, an additional 100 students were expected to be welcomed when the doors to the eight schools here opened, according to Superintendent Cecil Carlton. District-wide, he said, 3900 were enrolled with highest numbers at Perry Primary (816) and Taylor County High School (979).SO THERES CONTROVERSY?The two local printing companies learned that the Forest Festival Queen Pageant chose an outof-town printer for the program and controversy followed. It seems odd to me that local rms were not even given a chance to bid on the jobespecially when they ask for so much in the way of free publicity from local papers, and seek nancial support from every other local business. Every bit of festival business which goes out of town is money that ought to be spent in Perry, said Miller Holland, editor of the Perry News-Herald. Its something the Citizens Committee for Economic Development might well look into. Taylor County Printing, Inc., and Taylor County Publishing Company were the two local printers; the job was awarded to JimBob Printing in Madison.CHOO-CHOO AND OTHER NAMES IN THE NEWSBuckeye Cellulose Corporation paid for a quarter-page advertisement featuring a picture of ChooChoo Justice, the school security ofcer, reminding all to obey speed zone limits and drive carefully since school was back in session. Beverly Lynn Galloway of Pamplico married James Leslie Mann of Perry in a July 14 ceremony. Cuts n Curls welcomed Martha Cone as hairstylist. Mr. and Mrs. Willie Washington announced the birth of their son, Willie Jr. on Aug. 21 at Doctors Memorial Hospital. He weighed 7 pounds, 9.25 ounces. Sue Killen was proled as chairman of the upcoming Florida Forest Festival Art Show. Called an accomplished artist, Killen listed the galleries in which her work had been displayed and also expressed an interest in forming a Taylor County Artist Guild. Frank Bump Faircloth spoke to the Perry Rotary Club, showing a lm entitled, The World of Ford. He was introduced by Joe Roberts. Bobby Sayers was the speaker at the Perry Kiwanis Club, giving the history of Aluminum Fabricated Products which would mark its 10th anniversary on Sept. 1. James H. Redd accepted his 19-year service pin from Bob Meissner on behalf of Buckeye Cellulose. Redd began his career in the woodyard but retired from the mechanical department. Taylor County High Schools Pam Trofemuk and Renee Pruitt were among the 259 bandsmen and 16 majorettes assembled from across the state for the 1978 All-Star Marching Band.A-2 Perry News-Herald August 23-24, 2013 Looking Back Perry News-HeraldPerry, Florida 123 S. Jefferson Street (850) 584-5513 The Perry News-Herald (ISSN 07470967) is published each Friday by Perry News papers, Inc., 123 S. Jefferson Street, Perry, Florida 32347. Subscriptions are $35.00 per year or $49.00 out of county. Periodicals postage paid at Perry, Florida 32348. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Perry News-Herald, P.O. Box 888, Perry, FL 32348. and views on the news. Please submit letters by Monday at 5 p.m. The Taco Times reserves the right to refuse publication of letters which are libelous or irresponsible. Name may be withheld if circumstances so require, but all letters submitted should We look forward to hearing from you! Our address is Perry, Newspapers, Inc., P.O. Box 888, Perry, Florida 32348. e-mail: newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comMember Perry/Taylor County Chamber of Commerce. P.O. Box 888 DONALD D. LINCOLN Publisher SUSAN H. LINCOLN Managing EditorANGELA M. CASTELUCCIStaff Writer/Advertising Sales DEBBIE CARLTON Business Manager CAROLYN DuBOSE Advertising Director MICHELE ARNOLD Graphic Arts MARK VIOLA Staff Writer TAMMY KNIGHT 2013 Perry Newspapers Inc. August 23-24, 2013 My grandmother didnt mind me inviting friends over for dinner when I was growing up as long as they knew there would not be a place at the table for them. With six adults and 14 children in the house, there was never a place at the table for guests. Or, even for the kids most of the time. I was always amazed at my grandmothers, mothers and aunts ability to prepare and serve dinner to a house full of hungry children and starving adults on a daily basis. dinner, it is usually a pack of meat (beef or pork) or a chicken, a small pot of rice or pasta, two or three servings of a vegetable, and a drink to wash it all down. However, for my grandmother, mother and aunts, preparing dinner was a Herculean task. After a long day of work at Howard Johnsons Restaurant, my grandmother, who was the the smorgasbord of food that was required to feed a household that included my moms three sons, eight of my Uncle Charles children, and three of my Uncle Archies children. If fried chicken was on the menu, she would begin the task of cutting up the feed all of the children and adults living in the house. If spaghetti was on the menu, sauce and season the 20 pounds of ground beef before my mother and aunts made it home. If the menu was pork and beans and wieners, then she would go ahead and cut up the three or four packs of hot dogs and open I still have a problem grasping the fact that my grandmother loved cooking big, elaborate famous for. My grandmother and mother argued constantly whenever they were in the kitchen together. One of the main points of their arguments was my mothers ability to You cook too fast, my grandmother told my mother on an almost daily basis. Food doesnt taste right when you cook it too fast. After cooking for this many people every day, my mother responded, I dont care what it tastes like. My grandmother and my Aunt Ann argued a lot while preparing dinner because Ann liked her food a little spicy. You dont need to put hot sauce in everything you cook, my grandmother often told her. If you put it in everything, then all your foods are going to start tasting alike. I cant help it, Ann would reply. I just love hot sauce. And when Ann wasnt being too generous with the hot sauce or red pepper, she was following my mothers lead. Youre just like Lois, my grandmother you can even turn the burners on. However, unlike my mother, Ann tried to adapt to my grandmothers way of cooking and doing things. My mother, on the other hand, didnt feel the need to adapt to my grandmothers ways. Whenever my grandmother argued at her about the way she cooked, she simply took off her apron, handed it to my grandmother, then walked out of the kitchen. Thats why you cant learn how to cook, my grandmother would tell my mother, who was halfway out of the door. You dont know how to listen without getting upset. My Aunt Boot was the only person who my grandmother felt could keep up with her in the kitchen. Yall aint nothing like Boot, she would tell my mother and Aunt Ann. She takes her time when shes cooking and she doesnt try to take shortcuts and mess up the whole meal. If it was left up to me, you two can stay out of the kitchen and let me and Boot do all of the cooking. aunt. If I wanted a job cooking for an army, I would have gone to the Army, my mother would reply, making sure we heard her and my grandmother didnt. So, if we ever wanted to have friends over for dinner, I made sure I wanted them beforehand. If my grandmother is cooking, youre somewhere to sit. If my mothers cooking, then its Remember when...By ANTHONY L. WHITE anthonylamarwhite@yahoo.comBring your own dinner THE PERRY NEWS-HERALD August 24, 1978 Riding with LOP&G The Live Oak, Perry & Gulf Railroad (LOP&G) has a lasting legacy in Taylor County. The photos here give us rare glimpses not only of the trains that ran the rails, but also the men behind the machines. (Top photo) A Live Oak, Perry & Gulf Railroad train crosses the Suwannee River at Dowling Park, July 3, 1945. (Bottom photo) Three LOP&G employees are shown in passenger seating in this 1948 photo.

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A-3 Perry News-Herald August 23-24, 2013 also spoke at the Perry Kiwanis Club following the ceremonies. Congratulation to your community. Its a tremendous stone in your crown. Few communities are landing businesses right now and I understand it was very competitive getting this company to relocate here out of Arkansas, Montford said. The senator said in addition to a quality education system, there are three things that companies look for when trying to locate a business--can the potential employees get to work on time, are they able to learn and do they get along with other people. Montford touched briey on what he is expecting in the next legislative session. He said most lawmakers are cautiously optimistic that budgetary funds will be improved and that he will try to get more money for North Florida communities. He also said education will once again be a big issue in 2014. Were heading toward a disaster in because we dont have all the pieces together, the senator said regarding common standards in school testing. Montford said many of his colleagues are suggesting that Florida pull out of the federal program until schools are ready. The senator, who chairs the Senate Agriculture Committee, said water issues will be the top priority for his committee the next few years. Weve all seen where foreign concerns have taken over banks and other industries in our country. God forbid they take over agriculture, he said. acquisition by merger of Buckeye by GP Cellulose Group LLC, an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of GeorgiaPacic LLC. Accordingly, the condition to the consummation of the merger with respect to the termination or expiration of the applicable waiting periods under the act has been satised. In the merger, GP Cellulose Group LLC would acquire all of the outstanding shares of common stock of Buckeye for $37.50 per share net to the seller in cash without interest and subject to any withholding of taxes required by applicable law. The merger is expected to close today (Friday, Aug. 23, 2013), subject to customary closing conditions. Georgia-Pacic originally announced plans to acquire Buckeye in April, but changed its plans to a merger in June. The deal has been valued at around $1.5 billion. the deployment of the cubes. D&L Contracting of Suwannee County constructed the cubes and deployed them from their barge. The GPS numbers for the new deployment will be available this fall on the Taylor County Extension website, under the marine and natural resources tab, Wallat said. Articial reef systems have shown to have positive impacts on natural sh populations by providing additional habitat for marine life. The articial reefs support new reef communities of marine life, which serves to promote the conservation and management of several recreationally important sh species such as gag grouper and red snapper. The articial reefs also provide increased angling and diving opportunities, which have positive economic impacts for local businesses in Taylor County. A third deployment of approximately 70 tons of concrete culvert pipes donated by the Florida Department of Transportation is scheduled for late August or early September. BEAT Two arrested for prostitutionReports of suspicious activity in the area of Woodridge Apartment early Friday morning, Aug. 16, led the arrest to two individuals on prostitution charges. When an ofcer was dispatched to Church Street around 2:30 a.m. to investigate the report, he discovered the two suspects in a parked vehicle. As he approached them, he recognized the passenger, Rose Mary Juday. The male subject (later identied as Travis Dennis, 29, of Greenville), had his pants unbuckled and his clothing was in disarray, Perry Police Department (PPD) Capt. Jamie Cruse said. Based on statements from the individuals as well as other evidence, both were arrested for prostitution. Dennis was charged with solicitation of prostitution and Juday, 32, of Perry, was charged with prostitution. She was also charged with possession of drug paraphernalia after she was found to be in possession of a crack cocaine pipe as well as other items used for the consumption of cocaine. Rose Mary Juday Travis Dennis The community of Shady Grove celebrated the grand opening of its new Village Post Ofce located inside Rockys Thursday morning. Representatives from the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce were on hand for the ceremony. Postal Service District Manager Charley Miller, who is charge of the Gulf Atlantic District covering North Florida and South Georgia, was on hand to cut the ribbon. According to Miller, the Village Post Ofce Program began two years ago and there are currently just under 500 facilities nationwide with around four in North Florida, although more are expected to open by the end of the year. The facility will house post ofce boxes and offer basic services such as stamps and at-rate shipping. There are 68 total boxes and to date, 41 have been rented. Taylor County Commission Chairperson Pam Feagle thanked those in attendance for working to restore postal services to Shady Grove. Earlier this year, the Postal Service did not renew its lease for the former post ofce building and vacated the facility May 28. Since then, post ofce box customers have had to receive their mail either in Perry or Greenville. USPS applauds grand opening of Shady Groves village post ofce BUCKEYE REEF Continued from page 1 GPS numbers will be available this fall Taylor County High School seniors, as well as homeschooled seniors, interested in participating in this years Distinguished Young Women (formerly Junior Miss) program still have time to register. The nal deadline for candidates is this Saturday, Aug. 24, at midnight. For online registration, visit www.ajm.org. DYW deadline is Saturday BUCKEYE MERGER Continued from page 1 Merger valued at $1.5 billion Heading toward a disaster regarding common standards in school testing MONTFORD Continued from page 1 With classes back in session, trafc around district schools has reached an all-time high and the Perry Police Department encourages drivers to remember the following safety tips; particularly dangerous in the last decade across the nation, more than onefourth of child pedestrian fatalities occurred between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. in school zones are reduced for a reason. A pedestrian struck by a vehicle traveling at 25 mph is nearly twothirds less likely to be killed compared to a pedestrian struck by a vehicle traveling just 10 mph faster. Research shows that more than one-third of drivers roll through stop signs in school zones or neighborhoods. Always come to a complete Schools in: Drive safely! Please see page 13

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A-4 Perry News-Herald August 23-24, 2013 Living Sunday wedding to unite Jones, Olsen Teresa Jones and Richard Olsen will be married Sunday, Aug. 25, at 3 p.m. in the First United Methodist Church of Perry. Children of the couple cordially invite all friends and relatives to attend; they request no gifts, please. 50th anniversary takes couple to New Orleans James and Margaret Gross will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday, Aug. 24, prompting a return trip to New Orleans, La. The couple exchanged wedding vows at the Gentilly Baptist Church, located at 5141 Franklin Avenue in New Orleans, on Saturday, Aug. 24, 1963, at 4 p.m. We have been celebrating the occasion ever since, and this year, we plan to return to New Orleans to celebrate our rst 50 years together. Master Gardeners invite all to learn how Native Americans used plantsTaylor Countys Master Gardeners have scheduled a special guest speaker for Tuesday, Sept. 3. Barbara Hines, a registered professional archaeologist with the Florida Public Archaeology Network, will present a program on Native American Use of Plants. She will discuss the many native plants in the area and the uses that the Native Americans had for these plants on a daily basis. The program begins at 2 p.m. at Forest Capital Hall and is open to the public at no charge. Please mark your calendar and plan to attend, they urged. Barbara HinesOrganic How much difference is there in nutrient content, bacteria? By LORI C. WIGGINS Family & Consumer Sciences Agent III The term organic has specic guidelines set by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Organic Program (NOP). Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that have not been given any antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic plant foods are those which are grown without the use of conventional pesticides, fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge, bioengineering, or ionizing radiation. In order for foods to be labeled organic, a governmentapproved certier must inspect the farm to make sure the above standards have been met. There are also USDA standards for processing and handling organic food. There are three types of organic claims on food labels: organic or made of only organic ingredients and have a USDA Organic Seal. ingredients are organic and have a USDA Organic Seal. Organic Seal cannot be used. There is inconclusive evidence as to whether organic food has a higher nutrient content than conventional food. Some studies show that organic produce is higher in iron, magnesium and polyphenols, while other studies show very little difference in nutrient content. In one study of milk, there was no noticeable difference in nutrient content between organic and conventional milk, but conventional milk did show lower bacterial counts. More research is needed on organic vs. conventional produce, grain, meat and dairy products to determine nutrient differences. Another concern is the safety of organic and conventional food. It is important to remember that all foods are covered under U.S. food safety laws and regulations. The main safety issues between organic and conventional products are pesticide residues and foodborne illness. Pesticide residues tend to be lower for organic products, but reports of contamination of Escherichia coli (E. coli) show higher levels in organic produce. Overall, both conventional and organic foods have good food safety records. Generally speaking, organic foods tend to cost more than conventional foods. Organic foods typically have higher production and labor costs which contribute to a higher cost. However, when buying inseason produce, the difference in price between organic and conventional produce may be minimal. Ultimately, the choice is yours on whether you purchase organic or conventional foods. Regardless of your decision, eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, low-fat and non-fat dairy products, and whole grains to ensure a healthy diet. If you do choose to purchase organic products, choose milk, fruits and vegetables where you eat the skin (i.e. peaches, apples, grapes, berries, celery, etc.), beef, peanut butter and baby food. Research is still ongoing on the differences in nutrient content between organic and conventional foods, so it is best to read the food labels to determine the right products for your dietary needs. ere is inconclusive evidence as to whether organic food has a higher nutrient content than conventional food. Contest got underway Aug. 15. Please contact Wendy Slaughter at 838-3146 for more details. the park on Sept. 21; please make plans to attend. Country Christmas is slated for Dec. 21. It will be here before you know it! Juanita Worthy and Joey Ratliff will be married on Aug. 31, 2013, at 3 p.m. in the First Presbyterian Church of Perry. A reception for the couple will follow in the church fellowship hall. All friends and relatives are cordially invited to attend.Worthy, Ratliff to wed on August 31What happens next in Shady Grove?

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A-5 Perry News-Herald August 23-24, 2013 Religion Williams The family of the late J.D. Williams (Big Jake) wishes to express heartfelt appreciation and gratitude to each of you for your many acts of kindness, evidenced at this time in thought and in deed. May the blessings of God continue to rain upon you is our earnest prayer. The Family Card of Thanks TIDBITS: Fire damages home; donations sought By SARAH HALL Special Prayer Please remember: Betty Lee Hughes (knee surgery), Nadine Mango (home), Frankye Sermons (eye surgery), Danny Lee Clayton (home), George Tack Williams Jr. (surgery), Theodore Taylor (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, surgery), Eric Scott (home), Arilla Sterling (prayer), Rose Mary Maxwell (home), Mary Alice Williams (knee surgery), Viola Woodfaulk (Marshall Health Care and Rehab) and DeVern Miller (home). In bereavement: the families of the late Roosevelt Jackson. Remember: Dreams blossom in the garden of ideas. Congratulations to Theodis Miller on his retirement from the Taylor County Senior Citizens Center! Springhill CemeteryIf you are interested in helping us with cleaning at the grounds of the cemetery, please contact: Kevin Britt @ 408-8130 or Angela Britt @ 371-1219. We will meet the second Saturday of each month starting at 8 a.m. Thank you and hope to see you there. Donations soughtSeveral weeks ago Freddie Johnson had a house re. His home did not burn down but it sustained inside damages from re, water and smoke. Mr. Johnson welcomes any donations you would like to make. Please keep him in your prayers, too, as you remember those in need in our community. Obituary Churches go back to school too; revival ends today Revival ends today At St. Peter Primitive Baptist Church, revival services began Wednesday, Aug. 21, and will end today, Aug. 23, with worship at 7 p.m. Elder James Baker is the guest speaker. Pastor Cedric Spradley invites everyone to attend. Family & Friends DayOn the heels of a three-day revival, St. Peter Primitive Baptist Church will observe Family and Friends Day at 11 a.m., Sunday honoring the oldest mothers of the church. Those to be honored include: Dannie Lee Clayton, Virginia Holley and Pearlie Mae Smith. A community-wide invitation is extended. AWANA kicks off WednesdayFirst Baptist Church will hold its AWANA kick-off and registration on Wednesday, Aug. 28, from 6-7 p.m. at the new splash pad in downtown Perry, located on Jefferson Street. The AWANA program is structured for age 3 through 5th grade. All children must be accompanied by an adult for the duration of the event.Usher Anniversary at New BethelNew Bethel M.B. Church will observe its Ushers Anniversary on Sunday, Aug. 25, at 4 p.m. The speaker of the day will be the Rev. Lenny Brown. We do look forward to you coming out, said a spokesperson for the church.New classes begin SundaySunday, Aug. 18, was Rally Day at First Presbyterian Church, with a shared breakfast marking the occasion. After a summer recess, Sunday School begins this Sunday, Aug. 25, at 9:45 with classes for all ages. Pastor Larry D. Neal and the congregation encourage members of the community to use this opportunity for spiritual growth and development. Everyone is welcome!Jena kicks off AWANA, too The First Baptist Church of Jena will begin its AWANA program on Sept. 4 at 6:20 p.m. We are serving pizza that night and inviting all the parents to join us for our kick-off celebration. If you have any questions about the event or this youthoriented program, please call Betty Beck at (352) 498-5766. Ready to read? Potters House Ministries will close out its Summer Book Club meetings by reading and discussing Kingdom Man and Kingdom Woman. If youre interested in participating, please contact Minister Linda Davis at (850) 251-6427. Roosevelt JacksonRoosevelt Jackson, 68, died Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013, in Tallahassee. Mr. Jackson was born to Jim and Emma Jackson. He was a native of Jefferson County but had lived in Perry more than 45 years. Mr. Jackson was a member of Potters House Ministry and a former employee of Frucon. Survivors include: two sons, Tyrone Jackson (Arletha) of St. Petersburg and Michael Beasley (Rita) of Ocala; two daughters, Latronza Glanton Robinson (Waymon) of Jersey City, N.J. and Vivian Beasley of Apopka; one brother, Joe Jackson (Betty) of Perry; one sister, Cora Howard of Greenville; one devoted grandson, Rodney Beasley (Lawanda) of Perry; as well as a host of other grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 24, at Stewart Memorial AME Church with burial following at Springhill Cemetery. Family members will receive friends from 5-7 p.m. today, Aug 23, at Trinity Funeral Home which is in charge of arrangements.

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A-10 Perry News-Herald August 23-24, 2013 Two local citizens received special awards when the Capital City Democratic Womens Club held it Ninth Annual Golden Recognition Luncheon at the Leon County Civic Center on Aug. 2. Sarah M. Sledge Hall and Lawrence Hughes Jr. were among the 24 honorees who exemplify the ne qualities of members of the Democratic party in the communities in which they live, said outgoing President Veronique Tolliver Hill. Patty Ball Thomas, chairman of the luncheon, echoed that sentiment and thanked the honorees for your hard work in making the counties of the Big Bend area strongly blue. Keynote speaker for the luncheon was Attorney Gwen Graham, daughter of former Gov. Bob Graham and his wife Adele. During the recognition ceremony, Hall was commended for being active in political affairs since registering to vote in the 1960s, among the rst African Americans to register in Taylor County. Hall was valedictorian of her graduating class from Jerkins High School. She remains active in community affairs at the Taylor Senior Citizens Center, NAACP, Taylor Leadership Council and AARP, as well as her church, New Brooklyn, and its many activities and outreach projects. Hall also serves as a community columnist for Perry Newspapers, Inc. Hughes, one of seven children, was commended for leading the way for his family in education. He and his wife of 51 years, Betty, have four children, nine grandchildren and one great grandson. He earned the rst Bachelors degree, but his extended family now has more than 32 degrees including a M.D. Since registering as a Democrat in 1961, Hughes participated in the 1960-61 student demonstrations in South Carolina and on the Executive Democratic Committee of Taylor County. He has been an active member and nancial supporter of the Democratic Partys local, state and national candidates. Other community honorees included Dr. Hines Boyd of Jefferson County, School Supt. Jackie Pons and State Attorney William N. Meggs of Leon County. God continues to bless Florida as we celebrate 500 years of existence, said Hill. We ask that He watch over all of our public servants in the United States of America.Democrats honor Hall, HughesCadet First Sergeant (C/1SG) Harrison T. Summerour, a rising senior at Riverside Military Academy in Gainesville, Ga., had a very busy summer attending the American Legion Boys State program and two U.S. Military Academy summer seminars. Summerour is the son of Mark and Charise (Williams) Summerour of Dawsonville, Ga., and the grandson of Betty Culbreath of Perry. Following an in-depth application process, Summerour was selected to attend Georgia Boys State June 9-15 at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro. He was elected mayor by his peers. The Boys State program, founded by the American Legion in 1935, is a comprehensive week-long leadership action course in state and local government that is open to rising male seniors who qualify for this signicant opportunity. Participants learn how local, county and state governments operate in order to develop a working knowledge of the structure of government and learn that our government is what we make it. Activities include legislative sessions, court proceedings, assemblies and recreational programs. Summerour was also accepted to the Summer Leaders Experience at the United States Military Academy (USMA) West Point, the United States Naval Academy (USNA) Summer Seminar, and the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA). He chose to attend the USNA program in Maryland and the USAFA program in Colorado during June and July. The summer seminars act as a weeklong immersion into the academic, military and athletic programs of each academy. Only the most qualied applicants gain acceptance to these prestigious leadership programs where they acquire rst-hand experience of cadet life at a U.S Military Service Academy. A day cadet at Riverside, he participates on the varsity football and wrestling teams, and is a member of the National Honor Society as well as a peer-elected member of Riversides Horton Society. He received the JROTC Superior Cadet Award for nishing the year in the top 10 percent of his class and exhibiting outstanding leadership performance. Summerour was also awarded the JROTC Rie Sharpshooter Badge. On Aug. 5, he completed his Federal Aviation Administration solo ight. Riverside Military Academy, founded in 1907, is a college preparatory academy for young men in grades 7-12. The RMA Corps of Cadets consists of 460 cadets from 22 countries. It is located one hour north of Atlanta.. You may visit www. riversidemilitary.com for more information. Harrison T. Summerour Summerour selected for Boys State Program, military academy seminars BCFCU touchdownBuckeye Community Federal Credit Union recently donated $500 to the Touchdown Club. The Registration is underway for a Fireghter I course at North Florida Community College in Madison. Classes for the fourmonth course will begin Monday, Aug. 26. This program is a comprehensive course including lectures, handson training and live re exercises. It will prepare students to become state certied reghters, Lead Instructor R.B. Lee said. Classes will be held every Monday and Wednesday from 5-10 p.m. as well as some Saturday sessions from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Mac Leggett, director of re and EMS programs, at (850) 9731673 or e-mail leggetta@ nfcc.edu. Fireghter course starts Monday The Taylor County Tourism Development Council is hosting a Fall Trout Tournament Saturday, Sept. 7, with a guaranteed $3,000 payout in cash and prizes. The entry fee is $30 per person with weigh-in stations at Keaton Beach Marina and Fiddlers Restaurant in Steinhatchee. A captains meeting will be held Friday, Sept. 6, at the marina, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Cash prizes will be awarded for the heaviest ve-trout stringer ($1,000 for rst place). For more information, please contact Capt. Ashley Mock at (850) 843-0566 or the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce at (850) 584-5513. Fish for $3,000 Florida Forest Festival pre-sale carnival tickets are now available at the festival ofce located inside the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce on North Jefferson Street. The carnival will be held the week of Oct. 2326 in conjunction with the 58th annual forestry celebration. Groups are encouraged to begin planning now to participate in the annual King Tree Parade set for Saturday, Oct. 26. This years theme celebrates the 500th anniversary of Floridas founding, Viva Florida Forestry. For more information, please call 584-TREE (8733). Viva Florida Forestry The Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce recently welcomed the addition of six new members, bringing its ranks to 345. The new members are: Senator Bill Montford; Perry Auto Salon, auto detailing; RealEstateAuctions.com; Run For Your Life, Inc., a running social group; Audibel, hearing aid center; and McHenry Upholstery. Upcoming September events for the chamber include a fall trout tournament Saturday, Sept. 7; board of directors meeting, Sept. 12; a puttputt golf tournament Sept. 20; and the annual Pickin In the Pines Music Festival Sept. 27-28.Chamber welcomes six new members

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A-13 Perry News-Herald August 23-24, 2013Editors Note: It is the policy of this newspaper to run the names of all those arrested and booked at the Taylor County Jail. All those listed below have been charged with a crime, but are considered innocent until proven guilty. May 17: Kisha Sherre Wood, 36, Live Oak, VOP, Deputy Owens, TCSO. Lewis Trotter, 53, Live Oak, DWLS/R, Deputy Cash, TCSO. Thomas Lynn Harrison, 55, Olustee, possession of less than 20 grams cannabis, possession of prescription (medicine) without prescription, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Amanda Louise Glenn, 33, 109 Poppell Dr., VOP, Ptl. Johnson, PPD. May 18: Joshua Gordon Gaines, 24, 9380 Robert Ricketson Rd., VOP (passing worthless checks), SGT. Tompkins, TCSO. Clyde Laron Miller, 25, no address given, possession of cocaine, DWLS knowingly, resisting without violence, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Falon Veal, 21, Steinhatchee, battery, Deputy Burford, TCSO. Ian Christopher Cannon, 34, 12564 Spring Warrior Rd., battery, Deputy Cash, TCSO. May 19: Joseph Stafford, 43, 701 W. Green St., disorderly intoxication, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Travis Anthony, 36, 3895 Oak Lane, DUI, DWLS, no vehicle registration, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. Timmesha Collier, 24, 212 N. Colson St., battery, Ptl. McKenzie, PPD. William Brunson, 41, Tidewater Apartment, 5-E, battery, kidnapping, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Darrell Deon Johnson, 38, Tallahassee, DWLS habitual offender, Ofcer Young, TCSO. May 20: Donald Allen Whitehead, Jr., 53, Mexico Beach, sentenced to 10 days county jail, Judge Blue. Robin Hilson, 31, 7400 Beach Rd., VOP, Sgt. Woods, TCSO. Olunda Bishop, 26, 1406 Martin Luther King Ave. disorderly conduct, Sgt. Woods, TCSO. Natalie Knowles, 41, 15066 Gulf Way, VOP, VOP (sale of controlled substance), Deputy Lundy, TCSO. May 21: Christopher Brunson, 37, 14590 Hwy 19 South, child abuse (intentional act), Sgt. Lee, TCSO. Debra Crumpler, 53, 3233 Lipscomb Circle, arson to dwelling, Sgt. Lee, TCSO. James Steven Hodges, 34, 4430 Waldo Circle, VOP (battery, burglary dwelling), Ofcer Hendry, P&P. Brian Lee Vinson, 22, Brooksville, VOP, Deputy Gulbrandsen, TCSO. Laura Barton, 34, 502 Hawthorne St., battery, Ptl. Ricketson, PPD. Steven Holmes, 44, 208 Kate Dr., aggravated assault, battery, Ptl. Bass, PPD. May 22: Ivan Jerome Curtis, 29, 607 S. Warner St., VOP, Sgt. Deeson, PPD. Gerald Lyle, 43, 917 N. Wilder, DUI, Deputy Shaw, TCSO. Leroy Williams, 24, 107 El Matador Dr., revoked weekends, Ptl. McKenzie, PPD. May 23: Richard D. Carlton, 44, Homosassa, possession of contraband substance, Deputy Cash, TCSO. Tyler Colton Brown, 18, 901 W. Wilcox St., concealed rearm, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. Shane Hathcock, 29, Lake City, eeing and eluding, DWLS habitual, revoke pretrial release, Sgt. Campbell, TCSO. Randel Smith, 46, Interlachen, writ of bodily attachment, Ofcer Basch, TCSO. Tichina Shaquiel Thomas, 20, 500 S. Warner Ave. Apt. H-1, warrant (disorderly conduct), burglary/battery, criminal mischief, Ptl. Cannon, PPD. May 24: Craig Allen Facer, 39, 2807 Dennis Howell Grade, disorderly conduct, resisting without violence, bond revoked, Ptl. McKenzie, PPD. May 25: Johnathan Charles Arnold, 26, Lake City, DWLS), Trooper Sleigher, FHP. Michael Dane Steverson, 51, 1892 Hwy. 173, aggravated assault on law enforcement ofcer with deadly weapon, DUI, Sgt. Lee, TCSO. Denise Padgett Pierce, 55, 601 Wilcox St., grand theft, DWLS knowingly, VOP, Ptl. Grifn, PPD. May 26: Garrett Holmes, 41, 600 Union St., writ of bodily attachment, child support, Deputy Blue, TCSO. Daniel Townsend, 25, 151 Leon Ward Rd., Lot 6, DWLS, Ptl. Cephus, PPD. At the Booking Desk water quality improvements will occur by installing collection devices in the stormwater system to prevent solids and petroleum runoff from entering Spring Creek, SRWMD Executive Director Ann Shortelle explained. Also, the project will provide more ood protection to homes and essential services downtown. SRWMD is partnering with the city on engineering and construction costs relating to natural systems, water quality and ood improvements to the creek system. We are delighted that SRWMD has come alongside us to support a project that will provide aesthetical and environmental improvements to our community, said Perry City Manager Bob Brown. Not only will these efforts provide recreational opportunities, they will help alleviate ooding to many areas downtown and clean up stormwater before it enters Spring Creek. We are pleased to assist the City of Perry with the Springs Creek project to benet natural systems, improve water quality and provide ood protection to the downtown area, Shortelle said. SRWMD set aside nearly $1.5 million in costshare funds for Fiscal Year 2012-13 to assist local governments with water conservation, alternative water supplies, ood protection, ecosystem restoration and water quality improvement projects as part of the RIVER program. Perry was one of 14 local governments that were approved for the funding through a ranking process based on various criteria, including the effectiveness of the proposed project to protect, conserve, or restore water resources. The city hopes to have the project completed by summer of 2014. SPRING CREEK Continued from page 1 r frntbbr r r fr f ff rr fr rrr rbrb bbrnbtb ttbbtrrtb trtbt bbbrrtb nbbb rf r f rrf f rf bbb tbtbbrr tbttbbnb tbbtbbb bnt btbb ttr b bb bb t b rrrr bbnt ntbb b btbbr bbbr rtbb bbbtb btb rrrb bbtbb bbr bbbbt tbbbbtb tbbbbb tbtb bbr t btbbb btb tbtbbr frtb nbtb bbbb r ff rfr r r f f ff rf f f f fff ff rfr r r ff rff f f f f ff ff bnr b b bbb b r bn bbnb bb btbrbrr ftbbnn b nbbb ntbb bbbnt bbtb bbbtbb tbt bb bb fr bttr rbbtb f r frf fr r r f f bb ff bbt fb fbbbr rbbbb rtb tb rff r r f f b bbnbtb ttbbbt f r ffr rfr rtbt brrtbn bbbbt fbrn rffr r fr rrf f rf f ff ff bbb tbtbbrr tbttbbnb tbbtbbb bnt btbb btr b bb bb tbb bb bnttb bntbr bbnt ntbb bbt bbrbbbr r bbbb tb bbbbr frbrfrtb ntn bbtb bbtb br bbbr fbbb b tbbr bbrb rf b btb bbb bbbbb btbb fb Adoption ADOPT:A childless couple seeks to adopt.Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security.Expenses paid.Regis & David (888)9861520 or text (347)406-1924; www.davidandregisadopt.comAdam B.Sklar FL# 0150789 Auctions Public Auction, Online & Onsite, A ugust 27 @ 10am, Preview: 08/26 10-4pm, 7575 NW 70 Street, Miami, Fl 33166, Cigarette & Tobacco Manufacturing/Packaging Equipment, Forklifts, Unprinted P aper & Foil, Tools, Racking, Servers, Electronics & Accessories.15% -18%BP, Bankruptcy Vehicles:2007 Nissan Altima 2.5 S & 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 10% 13% BP (Case #13-12543 / Case #13-18780)Visit www.moeckerauctions.com for Details, Photos and Catalog, Moecker Auctions (800) 840BIDS, $100 ref.cash dep.Subj to confirm.AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin. Education MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-374-7294 Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No e xperience needed! Local CDL Tr aning.Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded.$1000 sign on to Qualified drivers.Home most w eekends.Call:(843)2663731/www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 W eeks Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators.Lifetime Job Placement Assistance.National Certifications.VA Benefits Eligible.1-866-362-6497 Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students.Job placement assistance.Call AIM 866-3143769 A-9 P erry News-Herald A ugust 23-24, 2013 Lake project done by Summer 2014? Street to Center Street. The map here is oriented north to south, with the main thoroughfares stop, checking carefully for children on sidewalks and in crosswalks before proceeding. ( ( Research shows that taking your eyes off the road for just two seconds doubles your chances of crashing. And children can be quick, crossing the road unexpectedly or emerging suddenly between two parked cars. Reduce risks by not using your cell phone or eating while driving, for example. Children on bikes are often inexperienced, unsteady and unpredictable. Slow down and allow at least three feet of passing distance between your vehicle and a bicyclist. If your child rides a bicycle to school, require that he or she wear a properly tted bicycle helmet on every ride. crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States, and more than one in four fatal crashes nationally involving teen drivers occurs during the after-school hours of 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. DRIVE SAFELY Continued from page 3 Driving? Do not use your cell phone

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