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Perry news-herald ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028293/00408

Material Information

Title: Perry news-herald
Portion of title: Perry news herald
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Perry Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-09-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates: 30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note: William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID: UF00028293:00445

Related Items

Related Items: Taco times
Preceded by: Taylor County news
Preceded by: Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028293/00408

Material Information

Title: Perry news-herald
Portion of title: Perry news herald
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Perry Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-09-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates: 30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note: William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID: UF00028293:00445

Related Items

Related Items: Taco times
Preceded by: Taylor County news
Preceded by: Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)


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Free school supplies will be given away SaturdayPerry Alliance of Ministers and Pastors (PAMP) will hold a Back to School Rally this Saturday, Aug. 10, from 10 a.m. to noon, at Jerkins Community Center. Free school supplies will be distributed to all schoolage children and/or parents. Superintendent of Schools Paul Dyal will be on hand to answers questions regarding the upcoming year. A free lunch will also be provided to all participants.County commission to hold strategic planning workshopThe Taylor County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a strategic planning workshop today (Friday) at 8:30 a.m. at the Administrative Complex located at 201 East Green St. arrangements workshops plannedThe Taylor County Public Librarys remaining adult workshops for August include the following: materials fee); Floral Arranging & Bow Tying Whiteld, Layering & Grafting at 6 p.m. for more information or to register. Space is limited.Walmart to host blood drive todayOneBlood will hold a blood drive today (Friday) from 3:30 All donors will receive a $10 Walmart gift card, a at Outback Steakhouse and a wellness checkup, including a cholesterol screening. Those who donate blood two times between June 1 and Sept. 30 will receive a free steak dinner courtesy of Outback Steakhouse.TCHS student schedules to be released Aug. 14-15Taylor County High School students will be able to pick up their schedules Aug. schedules Wednesday, Aug. 14, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Sophomores and juniors can pick up schedules a.m. to 12 noon, followed by freshmen from 1 to 3 p.m. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1889 Perry News-HeraldPerry News-Herald 50 Friday/ SaturdayAugust 9-10, 2013 0 Index One section 124th Year, No. 31www.perrynewspapers.com Weather Friday93 20% Saturday94 Sunday94 30% Perry News-Herald Perry News-Herald 30% Looking Back . ......... A-2 Living . ..................... A-4 Religion . .................. A-6 Sports . .................... Entertainment . ........ A-8 TV listings . .............. A-9 Classieds . ........... A-10 News Forum By MARK VIOLA Staff writer For the past several months, Jeff Bryson has been a regular xture in downtown Perry for those driving along Jefferson Street as he worked to make improvements at Katies Courtyard. With the City of Perry emphasizing downtown revitalization, one of the most noticeable revivals has been the work done in this courtyard, located between Johnsons Bakery and Pinstripes & Polka Dots, which is owned by Bryson and his wife, Debbie. Bryson recently purchased the courtyard, which now boasts an iron gate and stage, along with new tables and umbrellas. The space remains free to the public to use to eat lunch or simply relax for a spell, although Bryson will also be renting it and Pinstripes connected banquet hall for special events such as weddings and parties. Of course, during the day, anyone can use it if they want to buy a sandwich from a restaurant, sit down, eat lunch and listen to music, he said. The main thing is we want people to use it. Iris Parker, a former president of the Perry Womans Club, remembers the beginnings of Katies Courtyard which is named for her husbands mother, Katie Davis Parker, a fourth generation Taylor Countian. Rudolph purchased the lot for our club project, and then we had many community partners who helped establish the courtyard, she said. Jeff Byers is credited with the architectural design as well as construction. It was dedicated Dec. 15, 1995, and used for downtown Christmas events, a fashion show or two, and other few special occasions, but it just became difcult for the club to maintain, she said. There was painting that had to be done, shrubs that had to be trimmed. We had to deal with grafti and vandalism. So the club voted to give the courtyard back to Ruldoph and he, in turn, sold it to the Brysons. Isnt it beautiful? she then said. I think the gates just look wonderful and Im glad Jeff has the interest and motivation to make the courtyard something the community can be proud of. We want people to use and enjoy the courtyard, said Debbie and Changing of the guard 4 charged with cocaine sales, 2 remain at large New owners inject new life in downtown gem K aties ourtyard Please see page 3 FREE Historic park vandalized Tony Jackson Jaworski Upshaw Four alleged drug dealers were arrested in the latest round-up conducted by the Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce Drug Task Force. The arrests were part of on-going investigations spearheaded by the task force, Capt. Ron Rice said. Two alleged dealers remain at large and are being actively sough for arrest. Christopher M. Collier, 24, and Jimmy L. Crim, 47, both have active warrants for charges of sale of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a church. The four suspects taken into custody include: Clyde Miller Jr., 25; Tony C. Jackson, 45; Clarence Bernard Williams, 56; and Jaworski S. Upshaw, 33. All four are charged with sale of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a church. Each also faces enhanced penalties due to the proximity of where the sales took place in relation to a church, Rice noted. Anyone with information regarding the whereabouts of Collier or Crim is asked to contact the TCSO dispatch center at (850) 584-2429. County awarded for Mandalay boat ramp upgradesTaylor County has received a $178,000 state grant for improvements to the Aucilla Rivers Williams Fish Camp Landing boat ramp, more commonly referred to as the Mandalay boat ramp. County Grants Coordinator Melody Cox made the announcement earlier this week that Please see page 3

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WONDERS IN WOODAndy Bethea won second place in the Individual Arts division of the State 4-H Events Program held at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Using the theme, Wonders in Wood, Bethea spoke on the many uses of cypress lumber in home construction, showcasing cypress knees for home furnishings and decorations. Before proceeding to the state competition, he had won rst place in both the county and district competitions.BANK GETS APPROVAL FOR STEINHATCHEE BRANCHTom Moore, president of Citizens Bank, announced that the bank had gained nal approval from state ofcials to open a branch in Steinhatchee. No date for that opening was announced but Moore insisted, Soon.$100,000 ERROR MAKES OFFICIALS SCRAMBLECounty ofcials were scrambling to nd the cause of a computer error which could cost Taylor more than $100,000 in tax revenue. It occurred because the countys computers were not programmed to account for a new state law which funded a portion of taxes on tangible personal property. State ofcials said $1.5 million in exempt personal property was added to the tangible personal property amount, giving an inated tax base picture. Commission Chairman W.D. Wilson criticized the property appraisers ofce for failing to discover the error. With corrected accounting, the county would now be short $90,717 in tax revenue, while the City of Perry would miss $4136 and the school board, $8.314.KIWANIANS PLAN SEAFOOD TREATThe Perry Kiwanis Club announced plans to kick off the seasonal opening of Roy Deals Oyster House with a Seafood Treat. Roy and Rachel Deal were making their restaurant available for the event, with all proceeds benetting the projects of the local club. Kiwanis President Dave Fraser also noted that deliveries were available.2 WEDDINGS, 4 BABIESJerri Elizabeth Jackson became the bride of Glenn Scott Curtis in a July 29 ceremony at Grace United Methodist Church with Judge Royce Agner ofciating. Monica Duty married Henry Barney Smith Jr. in June 15 ceremony in the First Assembly of God Church. Christina Louisa Knowles was born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Michael Knowles on Aug. 3 at Doctors Memorial Hospital (DMH). She weighed 7 pounds, 8.5 ounces. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas R. Hart announced the birth of their son, Robert Douglas, on Aug. 2, at DMH. He weighed 9 pounds, 7.5 ounces. Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. King welcomed a daughter, A-2 Perry News-Herald August 9-10, 2013 Looking Back Perry News-HeraldPerry, Florida 123 S. Jefferson Street (850) 584-5513 The Perry News-Herald (ISSN 07470967) is published each Friday by Perry News papers, Inc., 123 S. Jefferson Street, Perry, Florida 32347. Subscriptions are $35.00 per year or $49.00 out of county. Periodicals postage paid at Perry, Florida 32348. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Perry News-Herald, P.O. Box 888, Perry, FL 32348. and views on the news. Please submit letters by Monday at 5 p.m. The Taco Times reserves the right to refuse publication of letters which are libelous or irresponsible. Name may be withheld if circumstances so require, but all letters submitted should We look forward to hearing from you! Our address is Perry, Newspapers, Inc., P.O. Box 888, Perry, Florida 32348. e-mail: newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comMember Perry/Taylor County Chamber of Commerce. P.O. Box 888 DONALD D. LINCOLN Publisher SUSAN H. LINCOLN Managing EditorANGELA M. CASTELUCCIStaff Writer/Advertising Sales DEBBIE CARLTON Business Manager CAROLYN DuBOSE Advertising Director MICHELE ARNOLD Graphic Arts MARK VIOLA Staff Writer TAMMY KNIGHT 2013 Perry Newspapers Inc. August 9-10, 2013 I bet you dont remember this. I hear this all the time from family members. With younger members of the family, this usually precedes the recollection of something they think I should remember because I participated or was there. In fact, it is one of my niece Kennadies favorite lines. Uncle, I bet you dont remember when we used to cook together all the time, Kennadie said a few weeks ago. Do you? Yes, I do, I answered. What did we used to cook all the time? she inquired, still testing my memory. Cornbread, I responded. We used to cook cornbread nearly every day. She smiled and nodded her head in agreement. Well, when are we going to cook again? she asked. Soon, I answered. I bet you dont remember, is an often heard phrase with the older nieces and nephews too. With them, it is used most often to remind me of something I said or was supposed to do. However, there have been instances when it has been used to try and fool me into thinking I said or was supposed to do something. I bet you dont remember telling me you were going to put a few dollars in my pocket before I left, my nephew Tony told me before leaving for college last week. Did I say that? I replied. Yeah, you said it, he assured me. You just dont remember. I still dont know whether I said that or not, but I am getting a little older and a lot more forgetful. With older family members, I bet you dont remember this, usually precedes the retelling of a memory that I should not remember because it occurred before my time. You have to have been there or been a part of something to remember it, right? I thought so too. Earlier this week, I heard this phrase more times than I can count during a trip to Columbus, Ga., with my uncles Willie and Moon, and my cousin Stella. As I drove the car along Highway 27, they steered me down their memory lane. Antmar, I bet you dont remember when we were children how Daddy used to let us play with our toys for a few minutes on Christmas morning and then we would have to pile in the car and go to Middleburg to see Grandma, Willie wagered. If you were children then I the blank. I bet you dont remember the little store that was in front of Mrs. Thelma Johnsons house when we were children, Moon placed his bet. It was right across the street from Mrs. Ponders house. Again I countered, If you were children Ant, I bet you dont remember the time when Lois was begging Larry to cry so Momma would stop beating him, Willie ventured. the blank, I asked, How old were yall? We were children, he replied. I nodded knowingly then pointed out, Well, Lois is my momma, so So what? Then Stella, who is older than both, chimed in. Moon and Willie, I bet you dont remember when Uncle Bean, Aunt Doris and yall lived with us, she recalled. I was born and raised on Bacon Street, Moon replied. So how am I supposed to remember something that happened before my time? I glanced over at Moon and said under my breath, My point exactly. Remember when...By ANTHONY L. WHITE anthonylamarwhite@yahoo.comDo you remember this? THE PERRY NEWS-HERALD August 10, 1978 Quotable QuotesI wish I could have known earlier that you have all the time youll need right up to the day you die. --William WileyWe cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered. --Tom StoppardWe are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. --Francois De La RochefoucauldWe are all but recent leaves on the same old tree of life and if this life has adapted itself to new functions and conditions, it uses the same old basic principles over and over again. There is no real difference between the grass and the man who mows it. --Albert Szent-Gyrgyi C&J Food StoreWhen Sandra Cruce saw this photo on last weeks Looking Back page, she recognized the place in an instant...the former C&J Food Store once located in the Rawls building (located at the corner of Washington Street and Green). My momma worked there and I used to stand on a Coca-Cola crate and wash dishes. The older man is T.R. Coggins, I think. There was a lunch counter on one side and a dry goods store on the other, she said.Please see page 3 As beloved as the late James Bloodworth was by his community, so too was his father, P.F. Bloodworth, as evidenced by this letter sent to him in 1929 by Perry Mayor C.L. Brandon. The letter was found--remarkably intact and preserved--among a collection of family memorabilia.Town Father

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A-3 Perry News-Herald August 9-10, 2013 Bryson said he has several free events planned for the courtyard, the rst of which will be a gospel sing on Saturday, Sept. 21, featuring Rudolph Parkers own group. A second sing is set for October. Additionally, the courtyard will be decorated for the Christmas season and will feature Elf Magic during the annual downtown open house, celebrating the evening with storytellers and more. We just felt it was a great addition to downtown, Bryson said. CHANGING OF GUARD Continued from page 1 Free gospel sing planned Sept. 21the county was awarded a Florida Boating Improvement Program (FBIP) grant for the project. The commission held two public hearings in January on the grant and subsequently agreed to pursue funding for the boat ramp. The $237,000 project will fund the removal of the existing boat ramp, construction of a new two-lane, concrete boat ramp and a handicappedaccessible parking area as well as the installation of a new gangway and dockage. The grant will also include boater safety signage to be installed at the site. The $44,000 match, which includes $15,000 of in-kind match services for engineering and grant administration, was included in the countys 2013-14 budget, which will be approved next month. Cox said she hopes to receive a grant contract from the state by this fall with work commencing this winter. The boat ramp is owned by the federal government as part of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and managed by Taylor County as part of a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Cox said representatives from the refuge were very helpful in assisting with the grant application, approving a new memorandum of agreement with the county to meet the grants requirements. The county currently has two open grants with FBIP in the amount of $100,000 and $175,000 which are being used to construct parking facilities at Keaton Beach Coastal Park for truck and trailer parking overow for the adjacent Keaton Beach boat ramp. MANDALAY Continued from page 1 Work may begin by end of yearSalley to their family on Aug. 5. She was born at DMH, weighing 6 pounds, 8.25 ounces. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Rouis announced the birth of their daughter, Miyah Tranesha on Aug. 6 at DMH. She weighed 6 pounds, 8.5 ounces. COLLINS HONORED ON RETIREMENTLocal teachers and friends gathered to honor George Collins who retired on June 30 as principal of Gladys Morse Elementary School. At the time of his retirement, Collins was the only principal the school had ever had; he served in that capacity for 19 years. Collins had also served in Foley, Quincy and as principal of Shady Grove. Previously, he had completed a three and a half year tour of duty in the U.S. Army during World War II.NAVY HONORS BORKLUNDEdward R. Borklund Jr. was named Sailor of the Quarter at the Key West Naval Hospital for his exceptional degree of achievement. His selection marked the rst time in four years that the honor went to a non-medical worker.3 RETIRE FROM BUCKEYEOlin R. Granthum received his 24-year service pin from Buckeye, while Adolph A. Peterson was recognized for 31 years and Fate Wilson retired after 22 years service. GLANCE AT PAST Continued from page 2 Collins served 19 years as elementary principal ALS construction update AMTEC Less-Lethal Systems (ALS) President Rick Gardner (left) was the guest speaker at the July 31 meeting of the Perry Kiwanis Club. Gardner said his company is currently under construction on U.S. 19 North near the wayside park and plans to have 50 people employed by the end of the year. He is shown with Kiwanian Don Lincoln. Although state and federal ofcials are continuing to work with private insurance providers to prepare new plans to comply with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly referred to as Obamacare, only one company to date is set to offer individual insurance plans to Taylor County through the forthcoming federally-facilitated exchange, which is expected to go online in October. Last week, the Florida Ofce of Insurance Regulation (OIR) released several documents summarizing products that have been accepted by the ofce that comply with the PPACA for sale in the individual health insurance marketplace beginning Jan. 1, 2014. Taylor is one of 21 counties with only one company providing plans. The others include Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Glades, Gulf, Hamilton, Hardee, Highlands, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Putnam, Union, Wakulla and Washington. The insurance plans are broken down into four categories based on their terms and cost, ranging from bronze to platinum. According to the OIR data, one company is set to offer seven different plans in Taylor County, with two falling into the bronze category, two in the sliver, one in the gold and two in the platinum. When asked this week which of the nine companies so far qualied to offer plans through the exchange in Florida will be selling insurance in Taylor County, an OIR spokesperson said, We do not have the specic company information by county available yet. In addition to the plan breakdowns by county and company, OIR also releases its predictions on rate increases Florida residents purchasing individual insurance policies can expect to see. Ofcials did note that due to the increased coverage requirements of PPACA, direct comparisons with existing plans were not possible. Although the form and rate review process is ongoing, we have released this information to help the public and our state policymakers understand the full extent of federal health care reform and its imminent impact on our state, Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty said. In the document titled Individual Monthly Health Insurance Premiums Before and After PPACA, OIR utilized two separate methods for calculating potential premium increases. The rst method utilized a hypothetical mid-level silver plan created by OIR using adjustments to a standard plan in Florida, and compared this pre-PPACA silver plan to actual silver plans led with the ofce; this resulted in an average 35.2 percent increase with a range of 7.6 percent to 58.8 percent. A second method compared company projected premiums to a marketplace average for policies without the 2014 PPACA provisions; this resulted in an average 39.3 percent increase with a range of 14.3 percent to 55.3 percent. OIR ofcials added that it is important to note that neither of these methods incorporated any potential federal subsidies or credits that might be available to individuals. Subsidies will be offered to individuals who purchase insurance plans through the exchange depending on income and the number of dependents. There are several lawsuits, however, challenging the federal governments authority to offer subsidies through exchanges not established by a state itself. Florida is one of 27 states which have not set up their own exchanges and will instead by covered by a federallyfacilitated exchange. OIR ofcials noted that the information released last week is for products accepted by the ofce as of July 31. The documents will continue to be updated as more plans are reviewed and accepted by the ofce. The Taylor County Small Business Outreach Center, housed at the Taylor County Chamber of Commerce ofce, has announced it will hold a Small Business Loan Opportunities Workshop Thursday, Aug. 15, at noon, in the chamber ofce. Lunch will be provided for the two-hour event. Invited speakers include Fred Crispen with Celtic Bank. This lending institution is designed to help new and existing businesses with low interest loans. Celtic Bank offers three different SBA loans ranging from $5,000 to $150,000. Also slated to speak is Percy Goodman with Community Enterprise Investments, whose lending institution offers SBA loans ranging from $5,000 to $100,000. In addition, a representative from Florida First Capital Finance Corporation will be present to discuss the 504 Loan Program (loans ranging from $100,000 to $2 million), Director Dawn Taylor said. To learn more about loans, loan requirements or to nd out if your business qualies for one of these loans, sign up today. Seating is limited, so you need to pre-register at the chamber by calling (850) 584-5366. There is no cost for this workshop, but you must pre-register. Need a small business loan? How will Obamacare impact Taylor residents? Taylor County Emergency Management will be conducting live tests of the outdoor warning sirens along the coastal communities of Steinhatchee, Keaton Beach and Dekle Beach Thursday, Sept.12, between 10 and 11 a.m. Also, as part of its routine maintenance, Emergency Management will conduct routine live testing of the siren system on the second Thursday of each month between 10 and 11 a.m. Emergency management to test sirens monthlyMembers of the county commission are expected to attend the next meeting of the local VFW chapter, Tuesday, Aug. 13. Discussions will include the possible placement of ag poles at incoming and outgoing points in the county. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m.VFW meets

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A-4 Perry News-Herald August 9-10, 2013 Living Fabulous figs... grow them, harvest them, eat and enjoy By KAREN FALICON Taylor County Master Gardener If youre fortunate enough to have a g tree in your backyard, you can enjoy not only the sweet fruit but the realization that youre cultivating one of the oldest fruits known to manthe edible g, Ficus carica. It is thought to have been around for 6000 years, a native of the Old World tropics, Asia Minor and the Mediterranean. It is a member of the mulberry family and (thankfully) grows well in this area. Figs are not grown commercially in Florida because they are so perishable, but they are enjoyed as a dooryard fruit. The tree (with three to ve lobed, rough green leaves) usually grows from a large shrub if knocked back by a cold winter, to a 30-foot tree. A brous root system makes deep cultivation undesirable. It is usually quite drought tolerant and prefers well-drained soil but does need adequate amounts of water in the fruiting season. Heavy mulch will help to retain moisture and a top dressing of organic material is also considered benecial. While there are several types of gs, only what is known as the common type is suitable for Florida. Other varieties have special requirements (such as a g wasp needed for pollination). Preferred characteristics include: a closed eyeto prevent water and insect entry; a long stem which allows fruit to droop and again keeps water out; a green skin because birds are more attracted to dark-colored fruit; and nally, a g grafted on a nematode resistant rootstock if available. If you would enjoy a tree of your own, there are several g cultivars best-suited to our area and they are generally available. They include: with a closed eye that is ripe from mid-July to midAugust. medium eye, ready to harvest from the end of July through fall. ready from late July through early August. The g fruit is unique because it is actually a hollow eshy fruit stem or peduncle. Special cells in the plant produce a latex that contains cin, an enzyme similar to papain which may cause dermatitis on your skin. It is advisable to wear gloves when working with or harvesting the fruit. Fresh gs must be fully ripe to be of good quality. Ripeness cannot be judged by size or color. A mature g is rather soft and should be picked just as the skin begins to to spoil more rapidly. Overripe gs will have a sour odor and should be avoided. Since fresh gs are highly perishable, try to pick fruit daily and use the same day. If gs must be stored overnight, place them in a single layer in a shallow container in the coldest part of the refrigerator. They may also be frozen for up to 6 months, dried, candied, canned in syrup or dehydrated. Garrett Allen, Tessa Myers Myers, Allen to marry Sept. 28 Jeff and Teresa Myers of Perry announce the engagement Allen and Tina Allen also of Perry. Local grandparents of the couple include Walt and Lucille A Sept. 28, 2013, wedding is planned at 5:30 p.m. in will be issued; all friends and relatives of the couple are cordially invited to attend.Foster-Sparks vows planned for Saturday Dewayne and Kimberley Foster of Perry announce the Sparks. The couple will be married Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013, Street. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Please see page 5

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A-6 Perry News-Herald August 9-10, 2013 Religion The family of Deacon Frankie Holmes would like to thank everyone for their prayers, owers, thoughts and every act of kindness we were shown during our time of loss. To the class of 1971, heartfelt thanks your support. God bless each and everyone of you! The Holmes Family Card of Thanks Olive Jackson Mrs. Olive Jackson, 83, a lifelong resident of Perry, died Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013, at her residence, with her family at her side. Mrs. Jackson was born Nov. 11, 1929, in Perry, to James Judge Faulkner and Seay (Padgett) Faulkner. She graduated from Foley Junior High School, Taylor County High School, and received her AA degree from North Florida Junior College. Mrs. Jackson worked at Buckeye Community Federal Credit Union for 31 years, and while there she completed The Certied Union Executive, working in all phases of the credit union. She was a member of Lakeside Baptist Church where she held numerous ofces and teaching positions. She was preceded in death by her parents; three brothers, Willard Lawrence Faulkner, James Faulkner and Donald Nelson Faulkner; and a sister, Kathleen Faulkner Brumley. Survivors include: her husband of 65 years, Ernest Jackson; her children, Andrena J. Knicely and her husband Joseph, Dale E. Jackson, Tina J. Patterson and her husband Glen, Patricia J. Mason and her husband Craig, Jean J. Crews and her husband Terry; grandchildren Kimberly Lindsey, Eric Jackson, Olivia and Steve Simpson, Britnee and Darrell Cash, Candace and Ken Morath, Courtney and Jason Blando, Michael Mason, Hannah Mason, Katie Crews, Abby Crews; great-grandchildren Rachel Quinlan, Dylan Jackson, Madison Jackson, Kevin Carly, Nicholas Ethan, Sarah Claire Simpson, Jackson and McKenzie Cash, and Kennedy Cash; her sister-in-law, Sarah Jackson, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10, at Lakeside Baptist Church with Pastor Darrell Jones ofciating. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m. today, Aug. 9, at Joe P. Burns Funeral Home. which is in charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to Lakeside Baptist Church. Obituaries TIDBITS: Dont forget the value of a hug to those who are sick, in distress BY SARAH HALL Do You Know The Value Of A Hug? How many hugs have you had in your life time? Would it make any difference if you could number them? Were they good hugs or bad hugs? Well, none of that matters as long as its a hug. Hugs say the unspoken words that we often forget to say. Like, I like you, respect you and I care about you. Hugs warm the heart. Even cold hearted, unassuming people are sometimes moved by a friendly hug. Children deliver hugs the best. They welcome them and dont mind giving them in return. Friends rekindle old friendships with hugs. Family members welcome other family members with a hug. And how precious a hug becomes when youre feeling lost, made a mistake or just feeling bad. Wow! What a joy a simple hug can deliver. Come on, try it, hug somebody today and see what a difference it can make in your thinking. If youre one of those people who dont know believe in hugging, you dont know what youre missing. Tell you what, when you meet me, open your arms and your heart and gimma one. Remember even a dog welcomes hugs!Prayer requestsSpecial prayers are offered for those in bereavement including the families of the late Frank Holmes. Special prayers for those who are sick or in distress: Nadine Mango (home), Mary Alice Williams (home), Ron King (home), Essie Mae Spanks (DMH), Leroy McBride (Tampa), John Big Jake Williams (Lake City, hospice), William Monroe (home), Amy Roberts (home), Sherrie Baskins Wiggins (Gainesville), Rosemary Mary Maxwell (home). Choir anniversary Sunday The Antioch Senior Choir Anniversary will be Sunday, Aug. 11, at 3:30 p.m. with Trinity House of Praise as special guests. Antioch M.B. Church and Pastor/Teacher Tony O. Graham cordially invite you to attend. Back-To-School Rally is Saturday at Jerkins Lunch provided The Perry Alliance of Ministers and Pastors (PAMP) will sponsor a Back to School Rally on Saturday, Aug. 10, from10 a.m. until 12 noon at Jerkins Community Center. School supplies will be offered to all school-age children (or parents), free of charge. At the event, school information will be provided by Superintendent Paul Dyal and TCES Dean Terra Simmons, with the opportunity for questions and answers. A free lunch will be provided. The Rev. Robert M. Butler, president of PAMP, encourages students and their families to take advantage of this opportunity to prepare for the new school year.30th Homecoming in SalemSalem Baptist Church will celebrate its 30th annual Homecoming next Sunday, Aug. 18, at 11 a.m. The Purvis Brothers of Monticello will sing and play for the 11 a.m. worship service which will be followed by lunch. Evening worship will begin at 5:45 p.m. with the Rev. Ben Reams from Midway Baptist presenting the message. Everybody is invited.Citywide Mission meets Sunday Citywide Mission will meet at Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church on Sunday, Aug. 11, at 2:30 p.m. President Geraldine Sparrow encourages all missionaries to attend.

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rrfnrtb rfntb rfrn bb rtbrn bfnn nt bbf n nn nb n nn n rnr rnbb rnr rb rnr rnbb rnr rt rbn nrb f tbbn rfr tbn nrn nb nf fbfbn bb nn tbb nr nb rnt tbr bbbb b n b n btb rn b n nrb rb rnb bfbb bbb tbftb bnn rrnb bbb r tbnn rr brb bnbb r rnnn r frrnn nb bfn rrrf nn rbb bbn bn f ftb bbn ntb tbtbn n br nb bbr tnn bn n rfb btb ttbbb nbnrr b rn nn bbrnn nbnb n nnn b n n Ta O rf f ntf bb r tttf

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r fntbftbrbb rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrbbbb b bb b bbnbfrr bbfrrb bb bbtnbb bbttbtbtbtbtbbbbbbrbbbfbbbbbnbb btbbbbbbbbbbbbb bbbbbbbbbbbbb frrfrrrb b rrb b rrffntbrfn bbfn n fnn b nfn bbfn fnbn bftbn bbbbfn nbttbb bb fnbnbnnbnnbnnbn fnbrrt fn btbttrfbfn fn b n tntfn fn tt fn fnbbt fn fn bt n fn ttbnnbfn fn nfnbrr fn fnt b fn rrffnnnnnntbr ntbt fnntbrr rrb fbbbbffb ffb fb tbfb ttt n bfb rnn f fbr fnb ftb bnfb t nfnb fnbrbrr r bbf fb fbr fbr ttttfbfb tbbb ftbr tfb fb fb tnt n fb rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrb rr b b b rfntbf r rt rrrt b b b b b t r f rtn tr b br brt tff t rtn t f brr t r b b br b rr rrffnnnnnntbtb tr r tbtb tbb t nnrfnt tbftftnb brf b nf b t t n t b bnf bnfb tttnbbbbb n bbfnfffntbbb n r b n n n rrffnnnnnntbtb trtt rt ttt bb tbrfrntb tttnn t bbbn b t br nf t ntrt t rr rrb n bb b bfrb fr rn t rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrbb fr fr rfntbr rt bbtr tnrr trtrbb nr btnr fn bbrf nb b b b b bt fftr b tft rb f r b btfbbr frrrt b r rffrrnnrtrtrrttttrbb bfr frb rt brt bbrfntbbr bb btrtr b t r ntt rtnttf b b n t nbfr bbbbn rt r br r r f rrnfrtrrfrbf frrr b rrr

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rf rfntbrrtnf nt f fnt brnfrbntbbrnf nrnf ttfr t ntfnnrb r ttfr tfnnr btntnfnn rf ttfr fbrrrnf btntntfft n ttrt frrfntrf ntnt ftttnnn nntfrtf rfbffrfn rfbrffr bfrrrttntnt rtrrfrr tbrtrbtn rtnbttnbrfnt bfrfrfb rfrffr rbtrtrt rbnnnfrnt tntfbrftrf ntrbbbbnt rffnttbrnf trfntrftr ftfr tftn nnffrt bnbnnfrnt rtftbrfnr rftffrbb nfft rftrrfnt tnnrftfn rttrft frntt bnnntnfr tbnttfn nrbr ttfr trftnf brtnttf tfbtnnbn frbrtb ffnfn nrftfr ttnn tfrtnnr nfrbbnftr ttfr tnr rnfbnf trtfrtrrbr ttbfbn trtfnt ntbnfn nrfnfrf tftrff bftftbrftbrt nt bntbrtfrn rbrt nttfrbrtff tntfrtrfb brtrbrnfrrftnn brtrnnfrtbrft tnrtnfrbrtf brnfbttnnr btrnbrf nt nnttnrfnf trtrnnt trnrrftftn nfnnrf nt brtr brfnnbf nnnbnt ntftr ftbntnrbbn fbnbnn ntrbnnt tnnnt fnrrrftt trffrfff rtrf ntrrf bnfrftbfbnfrrnf ntr ntntrbtn nnbnfrrnf ntrrnf r bt ff t f ntrr fn rntb trftn ttrrfrtntt nrffnbntnf fnftnf nnn nt nttftnn nrfnfrrtb fbftfrt nffbtr nr nttftnnn bnffrfnnfnft nffbtrnr bbrfrbrnfnt ffnf bbrtf nbtbnfrt tb ttr rfrrnfrfnntfr tnrtfnt f n n nnr nbbrfrbrnfnt tnntf fnfrfbnfr ftnrrrrfb nnnrfbftr tfnrt rbtfntrnfr brnfntrr nrf f rnn rn tfrftnn tfnttfn fbrtfrb ftfnnfnbntrt ffnfrf rfnft f nnrtn trfrfbntnf trtnr ntrrfb tnft f nnrnt tftrtntrbtn bttrf rfb rtnf rr nfrfb tnft r f nttftfrtnnn trrftnntr nrbfft ntrnnfnf nbrfrbrrrr frntnn nttfntfr rbrfbtftr rrrfr rfb btrnr nt nttftnn nff nrf rff ft nttftnnn nfbntftnfrnf fnf btrnrfbtr tnf nttfttnn tnnnntbft tttnn rfrtnbrnfn tnt rtbtr nf ntfbtt tnnnr ntfnr bfbtrttfb b nftrn f nttfbtnttfnf fbnbtrbft tfrtftt ntn nttftfrrffrb rtnf rrrf rrfb btrnr nt ntf tnn nrntf nrttf trfbrftf nftrn f rrnn ntbtnf tnnnrr bftrtf tnnnffn rfntb ntftrffbrfbt tbrfrtt rrrnfnfnbtnnt nfbrnfb bnff nfr tnn ntnbrnfbn nbnntfnfnf rfrntnn b nnttnn rnfbttn nnbrrfnf nbtt ntnftnr btfntbnfrrr tnnftnnrfb ftfrtrfb rttr btfrnnfnbtr brfrffbnnnt rffbrfnnft rbntn tr ffbf ntfbtn bnfnbnt r fntntf rntbfrtn ttbtnr tnftrffbrfr bnt f fnn nfbnfr f tnntrb nnfbtnnbrf rrnrffrntnn frf ntbn nnttnn trfrrftnnrfrf tnnrrtbrtnn rrtbrbft tnrbttbtrnf tnnrnnnft ntrrfbtntnt tnb tn frnf nt r nfn nfbrfrfb ntrbft frnf nnrfnt nf bnfnbnt tfntrbrf ntr ntbnt trft n rnf bnfnnr bnf n bnfn rrf f bnfnbnt r ftn nfrbrtrtn fntnf frntbtrbf nnf tftn f ntnttr rnttbr tfntnttrf rtbntntb rrbbnrb tntn f n nntbnnbtbnt ntfrrnffntf ntrfnnfnnn nnt bf tfbnt rnfnbn ntnfbnr bnrrnfrt tffbb ntr ntnfntnnf nrrnftttfn frfrftrrbrnf rtrtrftrfrf tntntrrtf frbfr rbrnft ntbnfnbn rtrbbnnntn ntnft tntrbbrfrbrnf ntnnrfbfnrrnf tbtrfb ntrntnf rfrrrbrnft nftrft rnnbrnfntt rnnft ntrffnn trfbrnbrtnf nf rbrfnntrt bnnbrtf rrntntbnn brtfbnnt trfrfntbrbtnttrf bbntfbnrrf tbfrbnttrfb ntrfrtbnnbrtfr ttt ftrbf bnfbntntb nt tnrb ntftnt trfrtrrb ntnfbnnnt rbrbrnfnt ftbrnffnf ftbrnfnrrnftnb nt fntrnfntnbtn nfnntfbtnnf nftbrnfntnf ftbrnfnf rbrnfntrbrnf ftftrtfrf rtrbrbnb nttttt ntnfbnnnt tnttntb nrbtrfr frtrtrt tn btfrfrfttrfrff btnfbbtrt ntrbfrfbt nttnrfntr nrrnfr nnf tnf bbnnrnftfnt rbrnftnb fnrnttnffrtbnt trfrbrnftrn ntrrfrr nftrnfnrrnfrfn rtrftnffntnfnt bbrnftrf bnrffrfnf bbrnfrntnf nnrftbttn tr nttn ftftn ftrf ttnf nrrnft rrfntnf trnt rfrrb frnfrfttntb ntnt rf nt rnf nnrf rftrbrnfftrt nrtrbnbnf ttrnf frftrb rfrnftb rntnf bfrfnfbt ntrf bfrfnnbn ntnnrf nf btnnfr nt fbn rnfb ntfftrb fbtrfttrrf tntbtrb ttnrfnnrft ntrtrffbn ftrb f trfrf ttrrf tn trn btb nrf ttrf trf t n nt tnff rbffft trrrbrr f trfrfnt tnrnftb trtftr tnfn ntrntrtr tffrfb rnntrfntntrb ftrttttr fb tr ttrbfft rbffrftt rntrf nrtnnnt trf ffnrt ttrfrfrf bnfbtnnbtrb rrfnnr nrnrt rtnt ftr r rfntb frn rf frnnfr n rfnfrnr rftb

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rf ntrbtrbbbtr bbrbrf bfnfbrn bbbf brf brrrf brr rrbrbrfb nrbbrfnr brfbfnb rnr rrbfbnbbrf brnftr rfnrfrfnbtr brfnrbbrf nrbrfb fnb rnrrrtr rfnrfrfnbtr frbrtnrbbrf brn rrbbb rr bb b fb rfrfr nfrfrfr brf b brnfttr rbnrbbrfr frbrfrb brfrnb rfr btntr bbt nrbr brb r tr b rf nttb f n btb rf ff ff n tbt tb n t n f t f b r nn tt r b ntn t r t btfn r n r r f tb r f f t b fntb r nf n n b tbtt fnb rr rrn f f t f n ntn t ttbbbt rrfntb tfrrnntf rtftrr ttftt ftrrtf bffb btrtb nt fr trt ftt brbf bfn ftt brbf t ftt brbf ttrt brnfr tr ttnf rf r ttrf tbtr fnr nf tfr rf f tr ttn btn ttr rr rttbtn rf ftr rb bb ftrf nt bf tntrrrrt rbfbn t frtnfbf ftnrt ntrrrrttbtt rrbntrrrrtt nnfntrrrrtt tbtr frt rr nf rrrt tbtb rttbt ntnr frtnfr r ntrrrrttbtbf trt frrr ntt tnft brbf t r fttrt tbtnf fbr tbt ntrrrrtt rrfrbr nfr tttr ntrrrrtt btftntrrrrtt nnft btbftr tntrrrrt trrfrt brntrrrrtt nnft fbt t nfr tr nfr fr rt tr trbfbrn trrttn tr tt nfrb rbfbrt fr rbtr bfntrrrrt tnnf ntrrrrttbtt rrbntrrrrttrr frtbr ttntf frtnft fbft brbf fr tft ntrrrrt tnnf nf ft rrbt rnr trrftrr tttbtbtt brt nfr nbrt rftnr t rrn b ftr btt nfr ttr rtbtb n fr bftrbrt ttb ftrtr n trbr nfr fr tf brrtr n fr frtnft rt t trtt bfbfrnnt bbt r trtrrft tb ftr f fntn ttntr brb tf t btrr nb fbr br ttttn bttrn ft rft nb frrrt rftn b tfftrr r tnr ftbf rt rbnr fttr fbfft fbnf bb t nrf btr ftt brbf tt btnfr nbttf tn ttr trrn fr btbf fbfn fr t bt r rtrf frrtt btbt