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Perry news-herald ( July 12, 2013 )

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Title:
Perry news-herald
Portion of title:
Perry news herald
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Newspaper
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English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note:
William E. Griffin, editor.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID:
UF00028293:00443

Related Items

Related Items:
Taco times
Preceded by:
Taylor County news
Preceded by:
Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)

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Material Information

Title:
Perry news-herald
Portion of title:
Perry news herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Perry Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Perry (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Taylor County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Taylor -- Perry
Coordinates:
30.114444 x -83.5825 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 29, no. 32 (Oct. 9, 1958)-
General Note:
William E. Griffin, editor.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581379
oclc - 10545720
notis - ADA9537
lccn - sn 84007801
issn - 0747-0967
System ID:
UF00028293:00443

Related Items

Related Items:
Taco times
Preceded by:
Taylor County news
Preceded by:
Perry herald (Perry, Fla. : 1925)


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PAGE 1

By ANGELA M. CASTELUCCI Staff writer Compelling eyewitness testimony proved to be strong evidence in the murder trial of Lloyd Phelps, which came to a close Tuesday evening, July 23, with a guilty verdict handed down in less than one hour. Phelps was given a life sentence in prison, with no possibility of parole, just moments after the verdict was rendered. A plethora of voices was heard in the courtroom during two days of testimony, but it was perhaps the voice of the victim herself--Patricia Niece Knightwhich proved the most damning. Her communication with the jury--in the form of a bloodstain eerily formed in the shape of a human body-was an unavoidable specter that haunted the courtroom and clung to every word coming from the witness stand. The bloodstain was discovered in the master bedroom of the defendants former home. Expert testimony laid out three stark facts about the stain: (1) covering nearly half a sheet of plywood, the stain was made from blood; (2) the blood was from one individual; and (3) that individual was Patricia Knight. The odds of the samples tested coming from someone else numbered one to ve quadrillion (5,000,000,000,000,000), the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) expert testied. After the nal witness took the stand, the jury was left to judge the merits of the seemingly conicting facts presented by the prosecution and the defense. The prosecutions case was built around eyewitness testimony supported by physical evidence discovered only after receiving the rsthand account of the murder. The defense, notably Phelps himself in testimony offered during the trial, questioned the credibility of the so called eyewitness, along with the credibility of every other witness presented by the prosecution. Phelps said everyone was lying, the investigators were conspiring against him and he had no idea how the bloodstain ended up in his bedroom. Assistant State Attorney John Weed laid the building blocks of his case during opening statements Monday morning, with a narrative that began: The defendant killedLloyd Phelps killed Patricia Knight. He told jurors that Knight never let more than a day or two go by without contacting her mother. She especially never missed contacting her mother on her birthday, Jan. 16. But Knights mother, Carol Dean Lockett, did not receive a phone call from her daughter on her birthday in 2006. Or the next day. Or Inside todayInside todays Perry News-Herald, you nd our Healthy Living supplement, which features tips on healthy eating and more effective exercise as well as information on improving your heart health and sleeping habits.Crash eyewitnesses soughtThe Perry Police Department is seeking eyewitnesses to a crash that occurred at the intersection of U.S. 27 and Hampton Springs Ave. (near CVS) Thursday at 9:15 a.m. There were minor injuries in the crash. Anyone with information is asked to contact Ptl. Bill Murray at 584-5121. Serving the Tree Capital of the South Since 1889 Perry News-HeraldPerry News-Herald 50 Friday/ SaturdayJuly 26-27, 2013 0 Index One section 124th Year, No. 29www.perrynewspapers.com Weather Friday90 72 30% Saturday90 72 Sunday89 72 40% Perry News-Herald Perry News-Herald 20% Looking Back . ......... A-2 Living . ..................... A-4 Religion . .................. A-6 Sports . .................... A-7 Entertainment . ........ A-8 TV listings . .............. A-9 Classieds . ........... A-10 News Forum Lloyd Phelps, second from right, was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday evening for the January Phelps guilty of murder Family, friends and investigators took the stand days of testimony. An expert from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) crime Please see page 3 While the Taylor County Commission is continuing to try to nd ways to plug a $700,000 budget decit for next year, the board is set to approve its proposed property tax millage rates today (Friday), keeping them at current year levels. Property values are projected to drop by about one-half percent, resulting in a drop of $35,962 in tax revenues in the countys general fund if the board keeps tax rates the same, according to gures presented by County Finance Director Tammy Taylor. The current rates are 7.0113 mills in the general fund and 1.1215 mills in the MSTU fund (which is funded through a tax on property in the unincorporated area of the county for services duplicated by the City of Perry such as re protection). The commission will hold a special meeting today at 9 a.m. to set its proposed millage rates and to continue its budget discussions. The board has scheduled a pair of public hearings in September to approve its nal millage rates and budget. The commission held its second budget workshop Wednesday morning after kicking off the process last week. According to Taylor, the board began the process with $700,000 in increased expenses for the countys general fund, most of which was due to the 2013 legislature changing the countys required contributions to the Florida Retirement System for its employees. That move alone is expected to cost the county, including the constitutional ofcers, around $500,000 this coming scal year, which begins Oct. 1. Also included in the budget for next year is the additional $150,000 in annual emergency medical services subsidies for Doctors Memorial Hospital the commission rst approved last fall (after the 2012-13 budget was nalized) to continue funding a full-time ambulance in Steinhatchee. Not included in the budget, however, are raises for employees. Last year, the commission voted to give employees their rst raise in ve years. One of the rst moves the board looked at during its budget workshops was taking some $398,000 in cash carry forward money returned to the county from constitutional ofcers at the end of the last scal year on Sept. 30, 2012. Taylor told commissioners she typically advises against them using cash carry forward funds to balance their budget, but with the extreme nature of the increased expenses due to the state retirement changes, she was recommending they use those funds this year to help bring down the proposed decit. County Administrator Jack Brown concurred, County to hold the line on taxes? Please see page 3 School board eyes $37.6 million budget The Taylor County School Board will consider its $37.6 million tentative budget for the 2013-14 school year next week. The board will hold a public hearing during its regular meeting Tuesday, July 30, at 6 p.m. to consider the adoption of the tentative budget and tentative property tax millage rates. The board approved both for advertising purposes at its meeting Tuesday, July 23. As for the millage rates, they are set to stay the same, except for a very slight decrease in the required local effort millage, which is set by the state. The breakdown of the property tax millages are: required local effort, 5.015 mills (down from 5.019 mills), basic discretionary for capital, 1.5 mills; basic discretionary for operations, 0.748 mills; and critical need for operations, 0.25 mills. The last outlay, for critical needs, was approved by local voters in 2010 and will sunset after this coming school year. Superintendent Paul Dyal said he plans to talk with the school board about reaching out to voters to reauthorize the assessment, which is expected to raise about $307,000 this year. According to the budget, the district is expecting to have $586,000 in federal revenues, $17.4 million in state revenues and $11.6 million in local revenues. For expenses, $14.2 million is budgeted for instruction, $2 million for pupil transportation and $1.6 million for food service.

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PROPOSITION 13 PETITION CIRCULATINGLocal voters were considering a petition for Proposition 13 currently being circulated around the county. Modeled after a California initiative, the proposed constitutional amendment would limit property tax increases to no more than 2 percent over the previous years assessment. The measure was expected to be warmly received here since some property values had increased 100 percent following a state-wide reassessment.CITIZENS BANK DOUBLING DRIVE-IN, CUTTING A RUGCitizens Bank was launching a $50,000 expansion increasing drive-in service from two windows to four, according to bank spokesman Henry Fulmer. The bank was also staging its invitational golf tournament and dance at the Perry Elks Lodge featuring Marty Glickman and Fahrenheit Fever, with dance admission extended to the general public for $5 per couple. Tom Moore, president of Citizens Bank, announced the addition of Hardee Ratliff Jr. to the accounting staff.WEDDING BELLS RINGMr. and Mrs. H.A. Moore of Perry announced the engagement of their daughter, Delia A., to Robert E. Patterson Jr. of Tallahassee. A Sept. 2 wedding was planned at Maclay Gardens. Evon Stanley of Steinhatchee and Bill Craft of Perry were married July 5 by Judge Declan OGrady. Chong Son Han became the bride of Samuel C. Jones in Eridus Mt. Gilead Baptist Church on July 19. The couple planned to live in Augusta, Ga., where Mr. Jones was stationed at Ft. Gordon. Mrs. Lucille Lester and Mrs. Gladyse Robinson announced the forthcoming marriage of their children, Tremmie Smith and Melville Robinson, on July 29 at 6:30 p.m. in the Skyland Banquet Room. LICENSED TO PREACHJeff Merritt was pictured in this weeks edition, after being licensed to preach by Midway Baptist Church. Merritt was the son of Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Clyde Merritt and Jane Merritt.WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT ALUMINUM FABRICATED PRODUCTS?Bobby Sayers, president of the company, shared his business history with the Perry Kiwanis Club, noting that the company currently employed 72 people and produced 75,000 fuel tanks annually.EDITORIAL COMMENTThirty-ve years ago, the complaints were the same. This weeks editorial declared: The people are tired of being ripped off by excessive hospital charges. They are tired of paying for social programs which make them pay the expenses of the lazy and shiftless. Theyre tired of outrageous postal rates and poor mail service. Theyre tired of government harassment in every form.Those who set the taxes had better start listening. The grumbling will inevitably turn into votes. A-2 Perry News-Herald July 26-27, 2013 Looking Back Perry News-HeraldPerry, Florida 123 S. Jefferson Street (850) 584-5513 The Perry News-Herald (ISSN 07470967) is published each Friday by Perry News papers, Inc., 123 S. Jefferson Street, Perry, Florida 32347. Subscriptions are $35.00 per year or $49.00 out of county. Periodicals postage paid at Perry, Florida 32348. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Perry News-Herald, P.O. Box 888, Perry, FL 32348. and views on the news. Please submit letters by Monday at 5 p.m. The Taco Times reserves the right to refuse publication of letters which are libelous or irresponsible. Name may be withheld if circumstances so require, but all letters submitted should We look forward to hearing from you! Our address is Perry, Newspapers, Inc., P.O. Box 888, Perry, Florida 32348. e-mail: newsdesk@perrynewspapers.comMember Perry/Taylor County Chamber of Commerce. P.O. Box 888 DONALD D. LINCOLN Publisher SUSAN H. LINCOLN Managing EditorANGELA M. CASTELUCCIStaff Writer/Advertising Sales DEBBIE CARLTON Business Manager CAROLYN DuBOSE Advertising Director MICHELE ARNOLD Graphic Arts MARK VIOLA Staff Writer TAMMY KNIGHT 2013 Perry Newspapers Inc. July 26-27, 2013 If someone said it, I believed it. There were times when I should have been a lot more skeptical, but as a child I didnt spend a whole lot of time doubting what people said, especially if the person was an older family member or friend. When my Uncle Mike said that anytime it rains while the sun is shining the devil is beating his wife, I believed him. So, whenever raindrops began falling from a sunny sky, I would shake my head and wonder, What did the poor soul do now, burn the cornbread? When he told me that I could dig a whole in the back yard and come up in China, I grabbed a shovel and started digging. An hour later, after digging only two feet, I put the shovel away and decided that knowing I could dig to China was good enough for me. When my friends warned that stepping on a crack meant breaking my mothers back, I took heed and watched my step. I still try to avoid stepping on cracks. Sometimes I had no choice but to believe what was said had to be true. When my grandmother said it was a sin to tell little white lies because they were still lies, I had no choice but to believe her. So when my mother told me to tell the caller she wasnt home, I had to tell the truth. She said tell you she wasnt home, I informed the caller. My mother was livid, but she was all too aware of my grandmothers declaration about little white lies. My grandmother also thwarted lying by cautioning that a lie bump would appear on my tongue whenever I told a lie. Again, I had no choice but to believe this which started my absurd (former) habit of looking for lie bumps on peoples tongues as they were talking. And then there were times when I believed what I heard just for the sake of believing. When a friend, who I will allow to stay nameless, said he had found $20 in the path as he walked from the store, I believed him because there was a behind our neighborhood. Come on, he said. We can go to the fair now. And so we went. for going to the fair without permission and for spending money my friend had taken from his mothers pocketbook. Did you know he took the money out of his mommas pocketbook? she asked. I told her what he told me. He said he found it in the path when he was coming from the store. With her lips drawn tight and her eyebrows raised, she asked, And you believed him? Yes, maam. W.h.y? she took her time asking in three syllables. It was impossible to lie when my grandmother used this truth detractor, so I had no choice but to tell the truth. Because I wanted to. So it never crossed your mind that he might have got the money from somewhere else? No, maam. Are you sure it didnt cross your mind? she asked. No, maam, I answered with my mouth agape. It didnt. O..k.a..y, she said with a illusory smile then reached for her belt. She must have seen the lie bump. Remember when...By ANTHONY L. WHITE anthonylamarwhite@yahoo.comIm a believer THE PERRY NEWS-HERALD July 27, 1978 Looking for a bargain? Do you need a few items to complete your summer wardrobe? In the Aug. 6, 1953, edition of the Taylor County News, the above ad urged readers to take advantage of rare crashing bargains, since the sale only lasts eight days. Tis the season for Vacation Bible Schools and wed love to see vintage scenes from VBS sessions of years past. Old photos are welcome at newsdesk@perrynewspapers.com or stop by our oces located downtown.

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the day after that. She became worried, so worried that she contacted the police department just a week later to report her daughter missing. Initial investigation efforts established that the last time anyone had seen Knight was Friday, Jan. 13. The weekend of Jan. 1415 (2006) Patricia was with the defendant at his house. The evidence will show that and the defendant will admit thatthe defendant says he was alone with Patricia and she just left, just disappeared. Weeks turned to months, months to years and still no one knew what happened to Patricia, Weed said. Kimberly Hockaday knew what happened to Patricia. While in jail, she had nightmares about what happened to Patricia. When rst approached by investigators about what she might know about Knights disappearance, Hockaday rst refused to talk, to say anything. Over the course of several months, investigators returned to interview Hockaday again and again. Eventually, she began talking with them, sharing an incredibly violent story about the nal night of Knights life. Hockaday told investigators she was with Knight when Phelps longtime friend, Johnny Flowers, picked her up and took her to the defendants home. Hockaday said she herself went to Phelps home a short time later because Knight had asked her to check on her. When she arrived at the mobile home on Glenn Street, she said she heard a commotion from the defendants bedroom. Going to the doorway, Hockaday related she saw Phelps on top of Knight--striking her, hitting her and tearing at her clothes. She attempted to enter the bedroom to help Knight, but Flowers stopped her, holding her back, Hockaday said. Then, Hockaday told investigators, she saw Phelps begin to stab Knight over and over again. Hockaday said that at this point Flowers knocked her out. When she regained consciousness, she could hear Phelps and Flowers talking about getting rid of (Knights) the body. When she went in search of Knight, she found her body lying in the master bathroom (which adjoined the bedroom). When the men realized Hockaday was awake, Phelps began threatening her. It was Flowers who talked Phelps into not killing Hockaday, Weed related in his opening statement. Investigators were able to locate the mobile home (which by then had been repossessed) at a retail lot in Panama City. While the carpet had been replaced, when they pulled back the new layer of oor covering, they discovered the bloodstain. They cut out that section of plywood and sent it to lab, which conrmed it was human blood. DNA was gathered from Patricias mother and father. Tests proved that the blood was Patricia Knights blood, Weed said. Pointing to a photo of the stained plywood, he said That is whats left of Patricia Knight. That is her blood. Patricia Knight was killed that weekend, at the defendants home. Only the defendant could have killed her. The huge bloodstain was created that weekend in his bedroom. That stain is her, truly gone. She was killed and she was killed by the defendant, Weed concluded. Countering Weeds opening statement and account of events, defense attorney Baya Harrison said he respectfully disagreed with the recounting of events. The evidence will show that there is, in fact, very little credible evidence to convict Lloyd Phelps in this case. I think the evidence you have been shown is not as clear-cut and dry as (Weed) suggests. Ms. Knight was a troubled individual at this time and had her own very serious issues with drugs, and associated every day with people who could do her harm, Harrison said. Evidence will show there was a lot of gossip in the community about who Patricia Knight was withevidence will show Lloyd Phelps never said he didnt want to talk with investigators. Lloyd Phelps fully and openly discussed this case time and time again. Harrison also called into question the credibility of Hockadays story. Credibility is very important in this case. Evidence will show that you have a real reason to question whether to believe Hockaday. Evidence will show she had a cocaine addiction and that very day had been on crack cocaine. There are serious questions about her ability to recollect what happened. Addressing Flowers alleged role in the case, Harrison said he (Flowers) had stated during repeated interviews that Hockadays version was simply false. We dont know when the bloodstain got there. Someone else easily could have done harm to Ms. Knight. Listen carefully to the evidence and when you have heard all of it, youll nd that the state of Florida will not prove Lloyd Phelps guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, Harrison concluded. With the stage set, the prosecution then began calling its witnesses. First to take the stand was Kimberly Sierra Hockaday. When asked why she rst refused to talk with police ofcers about Knights disappearance, her answer was swift and clear: I was scared. Weed then initiated a series of questions that laid out the same series of events he spoke of in his opening statement. Hockaday testied that Knight was scared to go to Lloyd Phelps home and that she asked her to go check on her later. Describing what she witnessed, Hockaday said she saw Knight and Phelps ghting. He (Phelps) was choking her, beating her and snatching at her clothes. He kept beating her up and stabbing her. Hockaday said she struggled with Flowers, who wouldnt let her go into the bedroom to help Knight. Then he knocked me out. When I came to, I saw all the blood and went looking for her (Knight). She was lying on the oor and I could tell she was dead. But I still tried to give her CPR. I knew how to check for her pulse from ROTC. They (Phelps and Flowers) noticed I was awake, Hockaday said. When Weed asked where Phelps was stabbing Knight, Hockaday replied, In the stomach and chest. As he asked for further details following her discovery of the body and overhearing the men discussing where to dump the body, Hockaday related that from that point on, I remember just bits and pieces. I dont know if I went into shockI dont remember the next two days. However, despite the memory lapse following the killing, Hockaday never wavered on what she had seen: I know he killed her. I know how I got there (at his house) and I know why I went there. Further questioning revealed that Hockaday did not initiate contact with investigators. I had been told if I said anything I would be killed. I was scared. But she couldnt control what she said in her sleep and fellow inmates at the Taylor County Jail reported hearing her talk about the murder during nightmares. Those reports led to ofcers contacting her during the course of their investigation; at rst she did not respond to their questioning. Lloyd threatened me and two other people threatened me, she said. Are you still scared? Weed asked. Yes, she replied. Under cross-examination, Harrison focused on Hockadays admitted drug use and felony record. He questioned why she did not seek help from law enforcement and why it took her so long to cooperate with the investigation. Hockaday did not waver in maintaining her belief that if she spoke, Phelps would kill her. Arent you looking for a trade off? Isnt that why youre testifying against Lloyd Phelps? To help yourself? Harrison said. No, she replied. Thats not why I told. In calling the next witnesses, Weed worked to establish the last time any of her family had seen Knight with testimony from her niece, her mother, her sister and her father. Each spoke of the close relationship Knight had with her family, reiterating howno matter where she wasshe never missed calling her mother on her birthday. The court, not the prosecution nor the defense, then called Johnny Flowers to the stand where he testied that he last saw Knight the weekend in question with Phelps at his mobile home on Glenn Street. He stated the two were drinking and getting high on powder cocaine. Flowers said he stayed at the home only 15-20 minutes before leaving. The last time I saw Patricia was at Lloyds house and she was well, Flowers said. He denied ever telling a fellow inmate that Phelps had killed Knight. (Flowers has been convicted of 14 felonies and been sent to prison ve times.) I never told anybody that, he said. Perry Police Department (PPD) Det. Dwight Norris was then called to testify by the prosecution and he was able to give a roadmap of how the investigation developed, including how the bloodstain was discovered at Phelps repossessed mobile home. When you asked Lloyd Phelps about the blood stain, what was his explanation? Weed asked. He said he didnt know how it got there. Was he surprised? Shocked? No. Norris testimony capped off Mondays proceedings. When court resumed Tuesday morning, Weed worked to establish Phelps actions following the weekend of Knights death. One witness testied that she had regularly engaged in sex with Phelps in his bedroom at the mobile home, but following the weekend of Jan. 14-15 (2006) their subsequent intimate contact occurred in the homes living room. The door to the bedroom was shut. He was agitated, the woman said. Hockadays sister testied she witnessed Phelps threatening her sister. PPD Inv. Mike Anderson then relayed his role in the investigation, working to establish whether or not Knight could still be alive. His work had him checking area hospitals, delving into Knights nancial records and interviewing numerous family members and friends. The weekend of Jan. 14, 15 and 16, 2006no one had seen her since, Anderson said. Under cross-examination, defense attorney Dave Collins queried: You dont know when the bloodstain got there? I do not know when the bloodstain was placed on the plywood; however, I know through my investigation when she went missing the 14, 15th and 16th of January, Anderson said. Do you know what motive Mr. Phelps might have for hurting Patricia? Collins said. You dont need a motive to prove a murder happened, Anderson said. Still, do you have a motive? I know from my interviews that when Lloyd Phelps gets drunk, gets high, he gets violentparticularly with women. Some of the most colorful testimony came from Oscar Glenn, an 11-time convicted felon who is currently being held on a number of drug charges. He stated that Flowers indirectly told him Phelps had killed Knight during a time when the two were fellow inmates. Under cross, he said he hoped to get some consideration for his testimony. Id want a little more than a transfer, Id want help to get out (of jail). I was on crack so bad I needed a rest, so I pretty much put myself in jail. I just got charged for dealing, but Im not a drug dealer. Im a drug user. I didnt ask to help nobody. I was subpoenaed here. I cant say nobody killed nobody. I just know what was told to me, Glenn said. The states nal witness was an expert from FDLE, who stated she processed the bloodstained plywood for evidence. Her ndings showed the stain (in its entirety) was Knights blood. Presenting their defense, Phelps attorneys called a witness who said he heard Hockaday complain about being housed in Dixie County while Phelps was allowed to remain at the Taylor County Jail. He stated than when the pair were in a transport van together, she said if they wanted her to testify against Lloyd Phelps, he should be the one going to Dixie County. However, under crossexamination it was brought out that Hockaday had, indeed, been returned to Dixie County and that at no time during her statement in the van did she indicate she would be untruthful (in testifying). The defense recalled Hockaday to the stand and sought to discredit her story, but she continued to maintain the truth of what she testied. The defenses nal witness was Phelps himself, who related that he loved Knight dearly. She was like a niece to me, he said. (The two were, in fact, second cousins.) She would call me to come to her rescue. Bartenders would call me to come get her and look after her. She would always stay with me at my house then because she said she didnt want to go home (to her mothers house) like that, Phelps said. By his account of events, Knight came to his house the weekend of Jan. 14-16 because she was messed up and upset. She stayed at the home Thursday night, Friday and Saturday, Phelps testied. She took off around 1 a.m. Sunday morning, he said. She walked out the back door and I never seen her again, he said. I am innocent of these charges. I feel the state and investigators have had time to plot up their witnesses against me. Everything Hockaday said was made upshe was never in my house, he said. The jury was informed that Phelps had been convicted of eight felonies; they were not given any information as to the nature of those felony charges. However, records indicate that at least two of those charges involved violent crimes against women. In one instance, he was charged with, and served time for, attempted murder; he had a second arrest for felony battery on his wife. Testimony wrapped up around 2:30 p.m. and closing arguments were completed by 4:20 p.m. Judge Greg Parker issued instructions to the jury and members were dismissed to begin deliberations at 4:40 p.m. Tuesday. Less than an hour later, they returned a guilty verdict. The courtroomlled with family and friends on both sides of the aisleremained mostly quiet. The only audible whisper came from Knights mother, Carol Dean. Im so happy. Im so happy. A-3 Perry News-Herald July 26-27, 2013 GUILTY Continued from page 1 Eyewitness never wavered in testimony murder.

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A-4 Perry News-Herald July 26-27, 2013 Living TCHS students from 1969-1979 to gather Aug. 3 Scenes (above) are from the 2008 multi-class reunion of TCHS graduates which will be repeated on Aug. 3 for classmates from 1969-1979 On Saturday, Aug. 3, friends from 11 graduating classes at Taylor County High School (TCHS) will gather at the Perry Elks Lodge for a reunion to top all other reunions. Its a multi-class reunion for all those who graduated from TCHS between the years of 1969 and 1979, said Susan Snow Brafford, who is helping to organize the event. We got together ve years ago and had a blast, so were doing it again, she said. It was a party with a purpose, though. In 2008, we collected $3000 which we donated to the Taylor County School District for distribution among the schools, she said. The reunion will use the same approach this year, asking classmates to make a donation at the door. Hors doeuvres will be provided by members of the classes. For the previous reunion, The Exceptions presented a set of songs from the late 60s and the group will return by popular demand. My husbands brother, Ron Brafford, was in the group which played in the late 60s. They had not played together in 40 years, Brafford explained, but everybody enjoyed hearing them again in 2008. They did great, and theyll be back. The group also included (and will probably include again) Andy Tate, now of Memphis, Tenn., on lead guitar, as well as Steve Smith, Gary Beckman, Donnie Stephens and Eddie Whiddon. There may be others and I dont want to leave anybody out, she stressed. Other music will be provided by deejays from the range of classes, playing a host of favorites. Brafford, who graduated in 1976, encourages graduates from Taylor County High School (1969-1979) to enjoy an evening with former classmates. Doors open at 7 p.m. By FLORRIE BURROUGHS Shady Grove columnist Its all about the kids My motto these days, especially since I have been a Grandmother, is You cant make a mess that I cant clean up. Now my two sons are saying Where was that when we needed it? Sorry, but I didnt come to this bit of wisdom until too late for the two of you, but I wish I had. I have found in working with children as I do at church in the pre-school ministry and with my grandchildren, that spills can be wiped up, carpet and upholstery can be cleaned, broken items can either be glued or trashed. When you think about it, most of these trinkets we have in our home are just that . trinkets. And who doesnt wish they didnt have these when it comes to dusting! Now some may say I am too easy on the kids, but at my age, dont try to change me. I like my motto and I plan to keep it! I learned, later in life, that children are my ministry. It came about almost seven years ago when my granddaughter would not let me leave her in the Sunday school class, so I stayed and became a helper. When the teacher had to move away, I became the teacher and there I remain. In the nursery and toddler rooms where I work, we have newborn babies and children up to age 5. The following recipe was given to me by a friend many years ago. Kids love this treat and if you need a quick chocolate x, this should do it. Chocolate-Oatmeal No-Bake cookies2 c. sugar 4 T. cocoa 1 stick margarine 1/2 c. milk c. peanut butter (optional) 1 t. vanilla avoring Combine sugar, cocoa, margarine and milk in saucepan. On medium heat, bring to boil for 1 full minute. Remove from heat; add 1/2 c. peanut butter (if desired), 1 t. vanilla avoring, and 3 c. oatmeal toss until oatmeal is well covered by chocolate. Drop by teaspoonfuls on wax paper. Let cool for about 30 minutes.Aug. 3 yard saleThis will be my last opportunity to tell you about the upcoming Shady Grove Citizens Council Yard Sale. We are appreciative of all the donations and expect to have a big sale with everything priced to sell. So come to Shady Grove on Saturday, Aug. 3, and help us raise money for our community. The sale will be at Rockys old store at the intersection of Hwy. 14 and Hwy. 221 in Shady Grove and will begin at 7:30 a.m. Work day Aug. 3, tooFellowship Baptist Church reports 16 people came out to the July work day. The next work day will be Saturday, Aug. 3, at 7:30 a.m. Bring rakes, blowers, etc. if you would like to help.Queen contest beginsShady Grove Queen Contest will begin in August. Entry forms can be obtained from Rockys Shady Grove store after the rst. Wendy Slaughter is the contact person and can be reached at 838-3146.Upcoming events:Aug. 3 Yard Sale Sept. 21 Fish Fry and crowning of Shady Grove Queen Dec. 21 Fourth Annual Country Christmas Thats all for now. See you in two weeks, Lord willing! Guys and dolls The Sandy Toes Red Hats traveled to the Ocala Civic Center on June 8 for a production of Guys and Dolls. After breakfast in Cross City, the group stopped for lunch at Horse and Hounds Restaurant for lunch and a meeting. Hostesses included Denny Balbaugh, Vera Edwards and Wendy Johnson. won the 50/50 drawing. After the musical, can you guess what we did? asked publicity chair Sandy West Coleman. Stopped and ate again. Saturday wedding will unite Martin, ClarkBryttany Michele Martin and Lloyd Bishop Clark IV remind friends and relatives of their wedding Saturday, July 27, at 5 p.m. in the First Baptist Church.

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A-6 Perry News-Herald July 26-27, 2013 TIDBITS: By SARAH HALL Lord, is it I? How often do we ask this question, and not nd a true answer. Most of us are content blaming everybody else. How shallow we have become! How selsh and wrong. Have we forgotten we are our worse enemy? Have we forgotten that we make our own choices? How soon we forget. Its our choices to do or not to do. We choose to go or stay. We make shallow and impulsive decisions. We forget that sure as we sow-we will also reap. Lord, is it I? Keep asking yourself that question in sincerity and God will show mercy and allow his Holy Spirit to give you an answer. Dont let past mistakes keep you from seeking the divine intervention of the Holy Spirit. Beware of despairing about ourselves. We are commanded to put our trust in God and not in ourselves. Seek to nd the true answer. (Proverbs 14:12) There is a way which seemeth right to a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death. Trust God, in all thy ways acknowledge him, lean not on our own understanding, and He will direct our path. (Proverbs 3:5-6) In Bereavement: the families of the late Pearlie Mae Lee, the late Sam Lee Hamilton Jr., and the late Beatrice Sloan from Monticello. Special prayer s for: Mary Alice Williams (home), Sarah Ingram Black (Tallahassee), George Williams, Jr. (DMH), Lillie Cooper (California), Mary Jones (home), Helen Irvine (Mayo), Hazel James Williams (Tallahassee), Rev. Joseph Francis (home), Robert Glanton Sr. (DMH), Nettie Miller (home), Gwen Gay (TMH), Jean Ester Lee and Nonie Jones (home). A Matter Of Opinion: Thank God that President Obama has not forgotten that he is a black man and how it feels to be a black man in a white America. Obituaries Kathleen Inez QuincyKathleen Inez Quincy, 53, of Perry, died Wednesday, July 24, 2013, at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee. Mrs. Quincy was born March 8, 1960, in Fairbanks, Alaska., to Robert and Barbara (Gulick) Birge. Mrs. Quincy was preceded in death by one sister and two brothers. She was a Baptist. Survivors include: her husband of 35 years, John Frank Quincy Sr., of Perry; two children, John Frank Quincy II and his wife Kellie, and Laura Schaired; eight grandchildren; one sister; two brothers; and numerous nieces and nephews. Memorial contributions can be made to Big Bend Hospice of Tallahassee. There are no services planned at this time. Burns Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.Keep asking yourself, Lord, is it I?St. Peter Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate the second anniversary of its pastor, Elder C. Spradley, on Sunday, July 28, at 11 a.m. with New Jerusalem in charge of services. Everyone is invited.Pastor honored

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