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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00801
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
System ID: UF00028292:00822
 Related Items
Preceded by: Polk County record

Full Text

Visit us on the Internet at www.PolkCountyDemocrat.com


Wednesday
February 6, 2013


Polk County Democrat


Bartow's Hometown Newspaper Since 1931


Volume 83 Number 34


USPS NO 437-320


750


Bartow, Polk County Florida 33830


he


New at Brown festival is'old'

Friday is senior citizen day to focus on that group


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
A new wrinkle has been added to
the 13th Annual L.B. Brown Heritage
Festival, said Gloria McCoy, president
of the Neighborhood Improvement
Corporation. The event, which runs from
Friday through Sunday, Feb. 8-10, will
be expanding its appeal with programs


specifically designed to appeal to
senior citizens. It is a segment of the
population that has been overlooked at
previous festivals, said McCoy.
"Friday will be senior citizens day,"
she said. She added there will be a
number of activities, both informative
as well as fun senior citizens will find
helpful. "There will be health provid-
ers who will assist with information


on matters such as Social Security,
Medicare and other programs. Included
in that will be health care screenings,
such as blood pressure readings.
"There will also be games many
seniors find pleasurable, such as bingo,
and dominoes," she said of the planned
fun activities. "We're hoping to have
a lot of senior citizens and hoping to
cater to them."


As in years past, one of the most
popular features will be the Youth
Leadership awards. Nine students, a
mix of middle school and high school,
who hail from Bartow, Fort Meade and
Mulberry, will be recognized.
"We're honoring them for their work
in the community," said McCoy. These


FESTIVAL 6



.. i 4

",- i" "


Utility bill

source of

contention

Commission
candidate
questions board
By STEVE STEINER .. -
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS .COM
After an absence of more than a
month-and-a-half because he claimed
he was out of town, Gerald Cochran was
once again present at the Feb. 4 Bartow
City Commission regular meeting but
his absence did nothing to temper his
feistiness.
When at the podium, he takes
commissioners to task, and Monday's
session was no exception. This time his
wrath was about his utility bill, although
he did touch upon other topics.
"I think it's time to restructure utility
BILL 16


Going for the

bign time
Johnny Stash looking for your votes
ByMARYCANNADAY
MCANNADAY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
Those who sing the blues can't fake it. Blues comes
from the heart and soul, and that's what you'll hear when I
Johnny Day, aka Johnny Stash, plugs in and warms up hi .
gravelly, deep vocals.
"I grew up around music," Day says "with family
members who sing and played gospel in the church."
"My music is in memory of my father, who died when-
I was 10 years old," Day said. A vintage guitar case
protects his late father's acoustic in the corner of the
shed-turned-studio. Day, a friendly, mannerly bear of :
a man, wipes the tears that threaten to brim over as he
talks about becoming the man of the house the day his
father died in a car wreck, and being the one who had
to tell his mother about it.
STASH | 7
Connorsville blues musician Johnny Day, aka Johnny Stash,
plants a smooch on one of the three horses. Stash has
entered the Hard Rock Cafe Rising musicians contest and
wants your vote.
PHOTO BY MARY CANrJADAY'


BMS students get

'a million dollars'


Ryan Harbin, a
student in Beverly
Pawley's sxith
grade math class
concentrates on
filling out a check
register.
PHOTO BY MARY
CANNADAY


-
0o
0'
h0


By MARY CANNADAY
MCANNADAY@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
It's hard to decide what you would do
with a million dollars, much less how to
budget, track, and use the money wisely,
but thats what Beverly Pawley's sixth-grade
math class is learning to do.
Mid-Florida Credit Union donated
MILLION 16


Group aims to save water

Drive seeks signatures for amendment


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM
Inside the Bartow Civic Center
Saturday morning pancakes and
sausages were on the grill but
outside where the aroma made
it evident what was going on inside
- there were people looking for
signatures to put a constitutional


amendment on the ballot in Florida
to require money for water and land
conservation.
In order to get a spot on the ballot
in the 2013 election the drive that
started about two months ago has to
get 450,000 signatures. It proposes
to fund water and land conservation
management by protecting water
WATER 16


THE
WINNERS
ARE ...
Youth Fair
results


page8-9
Copyright 2013 Sun Coast Media Group. Inc.


DEDICATION SET


Sea Poacher submarine
dedication set next month
page


LOTS OF K iANIS


All about
the youth
fair and
pancakes



page513


JACKETS
SPLIT
TWO
Basketball team
win, lose in
Stinger Shootout

- page 12


Now---


~---






Page 2 The Polk County Democrat February 6, 2013


By PATRICK BRETT
CORRESPONDENT

A four-year effort by the Sea Poacher
Base, a member of United States
Submarine Veterans Inc., has culminated
with Polk County getting a submarine
veteran's memorial at Summerlin Academy.
Base Commander Jack Merrill, began this
effort shortly after forming the Sea Poacher
Base.
The Roy Holland Gallemore Submarine
Veterans Memorial will be about 20 feet
wide and 30 feet long. Roy H. Gallmore's
father, RoyTrent Gallemore, was also a
submariner, and Roy H. was the nephew
of the Honorable Spessard Holland. Both
the Gallemores were U.S. Naval Academy
graduates. Roy H. Gallemore rode the USS
Sea Poacher (SS-406) on all four of her war
patrols duringWorldWar II.
A submariner is someone who qualified
onboard a Navy submarine, which earned
them the SubmarineWarfare insignia- also
called Dolphins which are Gold for of-
ficers and Silver for enlisted personnel. The
surface fleet has a separate qualification for


their Surface Warfare insignia.
This memorial will be in tribute to all
submariners, past, present and future, men
as well as women. Most memorials of this
type are a salute of those lost duringWorld
War II. Indeed, there were 52 submarines
lost during that conflict, however there
have been 65 submarines lost throughout
our history.
The memorial will prominently display a
two-ton, 20-foot long Mark 16 torpedo, and
the replica of the sail portion of a SeaWolf
fast attack submarine. A local car dealer
recently completed restoration of the
torpedo. The groundbreaking ceremony
is scheduled for Saturday, March 24 at
9:45 a.m. on the grounds of Summerlin
Academy, located in Bartow. For details,
visit www.sub-vet-memorial.org.
The Sea Poacher Base meets every
fourth Saturday at 11 a.m. in Summerlin
Academy, a fantastic military-theme public
school in the Polk County School System.
Sea Poacher Base will, this year, fund
a $1,000 scholarship to a student at
this school to assist with their college
education.


Traffic at the intersection ofVan Fleet
Drive and U.S. 98 will be reduced to one
lane in all directions from this weekend
for the installation of concrete pavement
in the center ofVan Fleet from U.S. 98 to
east of Wilson Avenue.
This week work on new lanes, curbs,
sidewalks, signalization and drainage
will continue during daylight hours
behind barrier walls along eastbound
SVan Fleet from U.S. 98 to Walmart
Drive and along southbound U.S. 98
from south of Manor Drive to S.R. 60.
The entrance to Fort Fraser Trail on
westbound Van Fleet is open, while
the trail entrance on eastbound S.R. 60
is closed.
Access to businesses in the work
zone is being maintained.
... There will be intermittent lane
closures on U.S. 17 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
and from 7 p.m.-6 a.m. on the inside
northbound lane and alternating-
between the inside and outside
southbound lanes between Crossover
Road and State Road 60.
... On U.S. 17 from County Road 640 in
Homeland to 9th Street NE in Fort Meade,


crews are cleaning and reshaping ditches
and also reworking shoulders and me-
dians with possible lane closures. Also
on 17, from 9th Street SE in Fort Meade
to Tilghman Road, work continues
through to clean and reshape ditches,
rework shoulders and medians. There
should be some lane closures.
... On S.R. 60 from east of Alan Loop
Road to west of Peace Creek crews con-
tinue work and this week the contractor
continues to place sod along the right of
way shoulders throughout the project
corridor.
... On S.R. 60 from east of Peace Creek
to U.S. 27 crews continue resurfacing
the roadway from east of Peace Creek
4.7 miles to U.S. 27. Motorists should
expect lane closures.
... On State Road 37 at the Mulberry
Bridge and south of S.R. 60 over the
Alafia River crews will place traffic signs
and clear vegetation from areas where
roadway improvements will be added.
Crews will widen the existing two-lane
roadway to a four-lane roadway sepa-
rated with a median from Dean Street
north to SW 4th Street.


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donot qualify lo the iwncrlie or e e iperl adverfebo AnnmulPere-itage Rates (APRI liecuor.g ienut i is depos e.md to inewa ki nirou. Lo3n Ind mred.I c3r innmicem f e1 be rippled rta MI[LORIDA MetO PllVthnln Id.i Cad I yiu do no1 ht a MIODFaIRDA ViA PVlalnri aidta L d.
you musi apply lo one ID iofne lentwe. Of her rates and Imh nare aallable and e aed on Omd.t vi .i midfploj ti on oF ee m in .wociae to. l dta
I. Anyone woha hs held a dedung acmuntll wihMIDFLORIDA in ite past yea il not qualdy fo the lS7 ir eiave I'o .Adihtion to n pniqg a nea locking F int. ou mnist acept and openonllintbnlkn onrie bill patuienet talieff eLolxe, died d osit 550 mhinmm t mut
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55.00to~ 14.999rill eelwa 1SlOd100o In Eitilve t red oa newcoedi.llcardaIounots or.vnamr a minium creamlmtol .t 52 S Tre intloductor AR is njidable ownon-MIDfl0RltiA ulecalrd balanncetrairstiori lteit Imt 1 son neei accounts ony A balance nansi bewnllIap


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C E T R L L RI A an O La es uz la t~t -Ol sm r t. et rbug Ce rw te.


Submarine replica


dedication in March


Van Fleet reducing

to one driving lane


Federally
insured by
NCUA.


.LENDER


Page 2 The Polk County Democrat


February 6, 2013


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February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 3


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Page 4 The Polk County Democrat February 6, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Recreation: Doing more for ourselves


Doing more for ourselves In 1967, as the finish-
ing touches were being put on Bartow's "new" civic
center, the one that replaced the Depression-era
fieldstone building on North Wilson Avenue, this
newspaper proudly referred to it as "Bartow's million
dollar civic center."
We believed then, as we do now, that for a com-
munity with a population (at that time) of fewer than
13,000 residents to spend $1 million on such a quality
of life facility (with an Olympic size swimming pool,
eight lighted tennis courts, and many other ameni-
ties) without borrowing and without seeking federal
funds was nothing short of remarkable.
While we considered it a point of pride, one city
commissioner took exception to the figure.
"How much did the city spend on the building?"
Our managing editor asked him.
He replied "$950,000," the arrogance showing
clearly in his voice. "And what was the amount of the
bid the city awarded a few weeks ago for furnishings
and equipment?" The arrogance fading from his
voice, he replied, "Uh ... $50,000."
Some politicians and bureaucrats simply deny the
number they don't like, but adding up the numbers


Our Viewpoint
he himself had provided made it difficult to spin away
an obvious truth.

Historically, Bartow's budgets for parks and recre-
ation, or for the more inclusive term, "leisure ser-
vices," have reflected the community's commitment
to the quality of life it provides for its citizens.
There are three major community centers (the
Bartow Civic Center, Carver Recreation Center, and
the Polk Street Center) and parks ranging from small
neighborhood beauty spots to the 119-acre Mary
Holland Park and the 95-acre Bartow Park ballfield
complex on County Road 555.
Bartow's municipal library the fruit of the once
vacant "skeleton building" overlooking Mobil Lake
- offers a breathtaking view of some of Bartow's
parks, as well as an intellectual and social hub for the
community.

It is against that backdrop that we congratulate
the parks and rec folks on the creation of the Bartow


Parks and Recreation Foundation, Inc.
This foundation joins a growing number of citizens'
organizations that look to the community -.not to
government to provide some of the "extras" that
increase the functionality of public institutions.
PTA/PTO and equivalent organizations have done
this for public schools for decades.
Friends of the Library groups are ubiquitous.
The Polk County History Center Polk's old
courthouse which now houses the county's historical
museum and genealogical library soon will mount
a campaign for public support.
Those who study these matters say that about
three-fourths of the funding for local foundations
comes from individual contributors, not from corpo-
rate donors.
That says a lot about the willingness of people to
support activities they believe in, support that goes
beyond the limited resources provided by taxation.
We welcome the Bartow Parks and Rec Foundation
to that growing expression of community support,
and commend those citizens who are willing to pony
up to enhance government and quasi-government
services in which they take a special interest.


Scott's budget shows


he's campaigning


Gov. Rick Scott's announcement of a
record $74.2 billion state budget plan
had the unmistakable air of a re-elec-
tion campaign rally last week.
That's not his fault.
Governors always make a big splash
with their budgets, both to make a
public statement of their priorities
and to generate a little momentum
going into the legislative session. Even
a highly popular governor can't wait
until an election year to start running,
and when polls show your personal
popularity ranking somewhere between
sinkholes and citrus canker, everything
you do gets examined for its political
implications.
Had Scott proposed another year of
belt-tightening, his critics would have
accused him of solidifying his conserva-
tive base rather than reaching out to
voters who might be persuadable. By
proposing $4 billion in new spending,
Scott is suspected of trying to broaden
that base by appealing to "Florida
Families First," the slogan printed
on his lectern at the budget news
conference.
The man who announced his first
state budget at a Tea Party rally in Eustis
two years ago then signed the pared-
down spending plan a few months later
at another big gathering of applauding
supporters and school children at The
Villages stayed in the Florida Capitol
to roll out his new budget blueprint.
This time, Scott invited about three
dozen educators, ranging from univer-
sity presidents to classroom teachers to
applaud appreciatively.


Bill Cotterell
amfee3


He explained the proposed budget
increases two ways.
First, he said, the state needs it -
teachers deserve a $2,500 raise because
student achievement has risen. Schools
deserve $1.2 billion in added funding if
for no reason other than that the work-
force Florida needs tomorrow is in the
public schools today. Businesses should
get a sales-tax exemption on manufac-
turing equipment, and the corporate
income-tax exemption should rise from
$50,000 to $75,000 because money em-
ployers save will mean more employees
- who will send it ripping through the
economy. Besides, the catch-all answer
to every question is: "It's the right thing
to do."
Second, Scott spins these budget
decisions not as reversals but results. It's
not,that he's changed his past belief that
there's always more to be cut from state
spending; it's that painful reductions
made in 2011 and 2012 --coupled with
a generally improving economy have
produced the first revenue surplus
projection in several years.
Come to think of it, the Scott story
goes, we have that surplus and the


improving economy partly because
of the austerity budgets he laid out in
his first two sessions. So he contends
that those aren't spending increases,
those are "targeted investments" that
will pay dividends for fiscal years to
"come.
Democrats grumbled that Scott was
trying to buy his way back into the good
graces of working families, even school
teachers, by sprinkling the state's new
revenues among target audiences. But
ther6 are plenty of plums in there for
conservatives, too.
Like 3,647 fewer state job positions, a
3 percent reduction in the government
workforce. Like no general pay raises,
except for teachers, oh, and $1,200 one-
time "bonuses" for state employees and
renewed emphasis on performance-
based incentive pay. Like no money for
expansion ofMedicaid under the new
national health-care system because
Scott wants a lot more information
about its ultimate costs.


Like making top executives pay the
same for health insurance as regular
state workers. Like no new taxes or
college tuition increases.
Then there are the expenditures
that you can't really call conserva-
tive or liberal but go down well with
the voters. Like $75 million for the
Florida Forever conservation land-
buying program and $60 million
for Everglades restoration. Like $75
million for school safety.
These things fit well on bumper stick-
ers or into 30-second advertisements,
which live only in the present. When
touting a $1.25 billion increase for
schools, there's no need to mention that
Scott's first budget cut $1.3 billion from.
education or that the $398 million
more for universities in the next budget
makes up for $300 million cut from this
fiscal year.
Apart from the budget, Scott has ca-
joled state colleges into offering $10,000
COTTRELLI 5


The Polk County Democrat
Jim Gouvellis Publisher ...
*.Aleen Hood- General Manager *Paul Northrop Sales Manager leffRdslow Editor*SL Frisbie Editorial Page Editor


S- Published every Wednesday and Saturday at
190South Florida,Averiue.
-by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
S ; Peri6dic l postage paid at Lakeland, Florida 33805
Sand additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 533-4183 *Fax (863) 533-0402
:; Postaer-Send adds changes to
- 190'Souith Fiodida Avernie -
Baitow, FL 33830


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six Months...............$25.68 One Year.............. ..........$41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Monthd ....'.S..:..... ..$24.00 One Year...........................39.00
S--- SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
Six Months........;...$..,....$40.00 One Year.........................$65.00
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months................. $44.00 One Year.........................$72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An aidress
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Bartow area
can send letters and column submissions to letters@polkcoun-
tydemocrat.com or mail them to 190 South Florida Avenue,
Bartow, FL 33830


Page 4 The Polk County Democrat


February 6, 2013


I.-






February 6, 2013 The Polk County Democrat Page 5


The Inquiring


Photographer




What should be


done about school


safety here and


around the nation?


Rick Hodges


There definitely should be
a limitation to access to
schools during school hours.
Arming security guards is
not a problem but if you
arm teachers, you're only
asking for trouble.


I would only like for a
knowledgable person to
handle guns. It would have
to be a professional police
officer.


My child's safety is very
important and the care
about safety has to be in
the school. I think I'd want
to hear from the school
board and the parents
about what should be done.
I don't want a knee-jerk
reaction and we'd have to
proceed and think out the
pros and cons.


Don VanDemark


My thought is there should
be more safety in schools,
but having my sister, who is
a teacher, with a gun in her
desk isn't the way. There
should be a better way.


Nelson: Fair focused on youth not attractions


By STEVE STEINER
SSTEINER @ HEARTLANDNEWSPAPERS.COM

Among the proceedings that took
place Friday, Feb. 1 at the weekly Bartow
of Kiwanis civic organization was the
introduction of Bartow attorney Debra
Sutton, of the Sutton Law Firm, 325W.
Main St., as a member. She was sponsored
by Jim Mayer.
The program originally planned was
switched at the last moment, President
Craig Burke told members. The original
topic was going to be on the Florida State
Fair, but the guest speaker had to cancel at
the last moment as she had to undergo an
unexpected operation. As a result, Burke
was able to get in contact with Auburndale
Police Chief Chris Nelson, who was raised
in Bartow, and is extensively involved with


the 66th AnnualYouth Fair which was held
and concluded last week.
Nelson, who belonged to the Key Club
when he was a student at Bartow High
School, told the audience his involvement
with the Youth Fair stretched back to 1995.
He spoke on the benefits of participat-
ing (for youth ages 8-18), as well as what
makes the Polk CountyYouth Fair different
and special. The emphasis, he said, is on
the youth, not on attractions per se, that
create a carnival-like atmosphere.
"We have purposely stayed from that,"
said Nelson. "Youth Fair is a learning
experience."
This year, continued Nelson, there were
more than 3,000 exhibits in which more
than 1,700 youth participated. There also
was an addition to the fair.
"We created a commercial division," he


said. Five different producers, all in Polk
County, brought calves, which youths
could purchase at market price. A lottery
drawing was held, and as one's number
was selected, that youth would select a
steer.
In order to participate, the youth had
to also pay an entry fee of $30, as well as
find buyers after the steers were raised.
However, raising a steer was not as simple
as the above. There are other associated
costs attached, said Nelson, and not all
youth have the financial wherewithal.
In the past the BartowYouth Fair
Supporters was a very active participant.
Its members would raise money to help
defray some of the cost of purchase. Due
to the weak economy of the past several
years, the organization lay dormant, but
prospects for next year are not as glum.


Nelson said there is a potential patron who
wishes to restart the program.
During the question and answer seg-
ment, member Wayne Guest spelled out
some costs, which are rising.
"A bag of good feed is at least $12," said
Guest. "Corn is going for $8 a bushel.
Normally, it's $3 a bushel."
In addition to cattle, another livestock
raised, shown and auctioned were hogs.
Nelson said 325 hogs were entered this
year, and sold between $1.65-$6.25 per
pound (steers commanded on average
$205 per pound).
Nelson sounded a positive note as he
drew his remarks to a close.
"If you're worried about our state and
our nation, go to this fair," he said. "Go
watch the children. You'll say, 'Hey, we're in
pretty good hands.'"


Teacher, school-related employees of the year announced


Nominees for the top teacher and
school related employees were an-
nounced and winners will be crowned
at a ceremony Feb. 12.
The Teacher of the Year nominees
from this area include: Terry Stinson,
Alturas Elementary; Debby Pion,
Bartow Elementary Academy; Ted
Wright, Bartow High/IB/Summerlin
Academy: Nicole Huett, Bartow
Middle; Della Glandorf, Floral Avenue
Elementary; Melinda Alcox, Gause
Academy; Lynn Scarbrough, Gibbons
Street Elementary; Kimberly Grunden,
Jean O'Dell Learning Center; Craig


Hilgenberg, Spessard L. Holland
Elementary; Janet Bolinger, Stephens
Elementary; Jodi Pemberton, Union
Academy; Jennifer Mesanovic, Highland


City Elementary.
The School-Related Employee of the
year nominees from this area include:
Dayanize Jimenez, Alturas
Elementary; Helen Manear, Bartow
Elementary Academy; Cecelia Greear,
Bartow High/IB/Summerlin Academy;
Kristina Clark, Bartow Middle; John
Akin, Floral Avenue Elementary;
Michelle Osborn Gause Academy;
Dionne McGarr, Gibbons Street
Elementary; Classie Jones, Jean O'Dell
Learning Center; Malissa Armstrong,
Spessard L. Holland Elementary; Rita
Himebrook, Stephens Elementary;


Linda Eagan, Union Academy; Lee
Prosser, Highland City Elementary.
Financial aid seminar Monday
On Monday Kay Noble will be at the
Bartow High School auditorium to dis-
cuss with parents and students financial
aid that is available to them.
This is for juniors and seniors in
Bartow High, Bartow IB and Summerlin
Academy. It starts at 6:30 p.m.
For information, call Lisa Crawford at
534-7405.
Christine Roslow can be reached at
croslow@polkcountydemocrat.com.


COTTRELL
FROM PAGE 4

degrees. He abandoned his 2010


campaign promise of an Arizona-style
immigration crackdown but continues
to press for drug-testing of welfare
recipients and state employees, ideas
that go down very well with voters who
are not federal judges.


Scott's 2010 campaign slogan was
"Let's Get To Work," which is now
the name of his re-election finance
fund. "Florida Families First," the
theme of his new budget recom-
mendations, looks like a marketable


brand name for 2014.
Bill Cotterell is a retired Capitol
reporter who worked for United Press
International and the Tallahassee
Democrat. He can be contacted at
billcotterell@gmail.com.


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February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 5





Pae6Th okConyDeortFeray ,21


FESTIVAL
FROM PAGE 1

students, she said, are both good citizens
as well as students, with a number of
them excelling in school. "You would be
amazed at some of the things they do and
their dreams and aspirations.
There is one other aspect that has set
apart these students from their peers,
according to Geraldine Watson, who is an
active volunteer at Bartow High School.
"It's (their) leadership in the


BILL
FROM PAGE 1
bills," said Cochran, who then stated that
on his most recent bill his sewer charge
was more than his electric charge. He
questioned this and the fairness of being
charged for utilities he did not use, in the
process pointing out he was not in town for
a lengthy period of time.
In response, City Manager George
Long told commissioners Cochran's bill
was less than $75. He said Cochran had a
unique situation, and Cochran was one
of the lowest users of utilities in Bartow.
However, Long pointed out, there is a base
charge every Bartow resident has to pay to
maintain systems. Regardless whether a
person is at home, the city has to provide
these services, and in certain departments,
such as solid waste, employees still have to


WATER
FROM PAGE 1

quality in rivers, lakes and streams.
It would protect the beaches and
shores. It would protect and restore the
Everglades and other degraded natural
systems and waterways. It would,
improve fish and wildlife habitat, pro-
tect forests and wetlands and restore
conservation lands that are a part of
Florida's natural heritage, economy and
quality of life. It would manage existing
state and natural areas, parks and trails


MILLION
FROM PAGE 1
checkbooks and other materials to the class
at Bartow Middle School Assistant Vice
President of Community Relations Jeanette
Wallace visited on kick-off day, when the
students took out their checkbooks and
learned how to fill out the various sections
as well as recording transactions in their
registers, a skill Pawley emphasized would
help them keep track of their expenditures.
SPrior to the check-writing lesson, Pawley
wrote a number of vocabulary words
crucial to the world offinance, such as tax,
discount, simple interest, tip, balance and
credit
The class, in groups of three to four,


community, in the schools," said Watson.
The nine will be publicly recognized and
each awarded a plaque and a check. In
most situations, the presentation will be
made by the student's school principal.
Also on hand to witness the Youth
Leadership recognition ceremony will
be members of the Polk County Schools
System board of education. Watson said
she had heard back from the members
of the board, and there will be those
among them attending Friday. However,
although they are not listed as part of the
official ceremony, they will be invited to
participate. "We will ask them if anyone


run their routes, as well
Sas read meters. Long then
pointed out what the
basic charges per month
are $8 for electric, $9.35
for water (if a household
uses a 5/8-inch meter;
larger meters are charged
at a higher rate), $21.32
Gerald Cochran for sewer, $18.75 for solid
waste collection.
"It is indeed fair," Long concluded.
Cochran's complaints also included a
situation at Mary Holland Park There is a
leaking pipe and there are fire ant colonies.
The latter also provided Cochran the
opportunity to voice his opinion on the
municipal golf course, which he wants the
city to be rid of owning and operating.
"The parks are full of fire ants, where
children play," he said. "But doesn't appear
to be a problem at the golf course."


for water supply habitat and recreation.
To pay for this 33 percent of the net
revenues from the existing excise tax
on documents would go to this fund for
the next 20 years. In a document being
handed to voters this money makes up
less than 1 percent of the state's
$60 billion budget.
"This money would go to the land
acquisition trust fund," Hobson Strain
said who is volunteering on the drive.
Though only started recently there
are about 800 volunteers in the state
acquiring signatures. Strain said the
people he talked to Saturday were in
favor of this proposal and he's probably


brainstormed the meanings ofthe words,
and wrote these down on index cards.
Hands waved enthusiastically as answers
were tried out and many of them were
right on.
The "million dollar project," as it is
called, has a few ground rules. "You can't
have anything left over at the end, and you
have to spend it on others, not yourself."
Sure to be a fun lesson, while at the
same time teaching how to calculate tax,
how to calculate tips, and other percent-
age processes, the class will go to online
shopping sites, catalogues and magazines,
in their quest to make wise spending
decisions.
To kick things off, Wallace made a "de-
posit," a giant check for a million dollars.
All in fun, not real, but a great way to
learn how to handle money.


wants to say something, or help with the
presentation."
However, interim school superinten-
dent John Stewart might be absent, at
least at first.
"Dr. Stewart has a previous engage-
ment, but will try to make it at some
point at the ceremony." saidWatson, who
added she was informed of that by his
office.
As to be expected, enthusiasm is run-
ning high for this year's celebration, but it
is not limited to only this year.
"We get excited about it every year,"
said McCoy.


Cochran also expressed skepticism over
a program city employees will be partici-
pating in during 2013. The program, which
Long explained during the work session,
is for employees in either a supervisory
role, or those who are not supervisors but
are charged with supervisor responsibili-
ties. Approximately 60 city employees will
participate, in two segments, each lasting
six months. Cochran believed this to be
unnecessary.
"You shouldn't have to train somebody
to come to work and how to work," he said.
Long told Cochran, "The supervisory
training is not to train people to come to
work on time."
Cochran approached the podium a
second time and asked permission to
respond, which Mayor Leo Longworth
allowed. Cochran then said his meter was
cut off for using less than 1,000 gallons.
"So how do you explain that?" he asked,


gotten about 125 signatures that day.
There are plans for this volunteer
group to make more appearances. They
plan to set up a table at the pancake
breakfast this weekend at Tiger Town
that lasts from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. and they
will be taking signatures at other places
around the county, Strain said. Those
interested in getting involved or to sign
the petition, Strain said can call him


Also included throughout the festival
will be Black Seminole Re-enactors, Civil
War-era United States Colored Troops,
tours, bounce houses, games and more.
Want to go or learn more?
The 13th Annual L.B. Brown Heritage
Festival will be held on the grounds of
the L.B. Brown House Museum, which
was built circa 1892. The address is 470
L.B. Brown Ave. This year's theme is "The
Emancipation Proclamation 150th
Anniversary." For more information, call
863-534-0100, or visit: www.lbbrown.
com. You can also email: clewisl942@
yahoo.com.


looking in Long's direction.
Commissioner AJ. Jackson then drew
upon his military and private industry
experience.
"Professional training is of the utmost
importance," said Jackson. "You grow
professional employees through profes-
sional training."
CommissionerWayne Lewis also chimed
in. Over the past four years, he said,
positions that have been vacated, whether
through retirement or other means, have
not been filled. Those remaining in those
departments have taken over responsibili-
ties and work hard serving the community.
"I take offense at the blanket charge they
are slacking," said Lewis. The supervisory
training, he added, will enable city employ-
ees to be more effective.
Cochran filed to run for the District
3 seat against Jackson. Qualifying ends
Friday.

at 863-687-1606. He said he recalls the
day when people could go swimming
in Kissengin Springs and the waterways
in Florida used to be in better shape
and it's important to save and restore
those that have been degraded for the
betterment of Florida.
"I've got 10 grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren and I want them to
see Florida as I saw it."


I P A r S u 0 0iS t e ol e e P s n s


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SFSC Theatre for the Performing Arts
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Tickets: $33, $36, $39
Sponsors:
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Gene Brenner Pottery & Craft Gallery (Bronze)
Affordable Air, Inc.
by John and Carol Giordano (Bronze)
Eighteen East... a restaurant and bar (Bronze)


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Monday, Feb. 18 7:30 p.m. -:
SFSC Theatre for the Performing Arts
The finest singers. dances. ano
musicians rhe Emerala Isle has to other.
Tickets: $36, $40, $43
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Dr. Richard and Elina Campbell (Bronze)


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Sponsors: Drs. Abe and Carmelita Lim (Bronze)
S Drs. Mintoo and P.J. Patel (Bronze)
Dr. Andrew and Mrs. Beth Kulick (Bronze)


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February 6, 2013


e gaP 6 The Polk Count at





February 6, 2013 The Polk County Democrat Page 7


STASH
FROM PAGE 1

Day, who has worked in surface
mining projects as "day jobs" says he
is ready to take the next step, entering
a number of local competitions and
auditions online.
He's currently in the running for
Hard Rock Rising, The Global Battle of
the Bands 2013, in the blues category.
Day is the band representative on the
site; having jammed with a number of
friends. The winners, who go on to the
Hard Rock Cafe competitions through-
out the country, are chosen by online
votes, so if you go to the site and decide
he's got what it takes, friends, neighbors,
and even perfect strangers are welcome
to cast a vote. But it has to be soon; the
cutoff.for local votes is Monday, Feb. 11.
His original song, named "What
you've done to me," is currently ranked
No. 1 on the Reverbnation site, Day
learned Tuesday.
Winners from the U.S. Hard Rock
Competitions, as well as those world-
wide, will go on to the final round in
London, England, where 95 musicians
will compete.
Fans will once again have a chance to
vote for from the finalists.
At.the end of the rainbow is the grand


prize, a paid, six city concert tour which
can take place at Hard Rock Cafes
throughout the world, at the sponsor's
discretion.
Day is fired up about the contest,
but he has also entered other contests.
Marketing your music is an expensive
proposition, but friends and neighbors
have helped him along the way. "One of
my neighbors paid for a Press Kit, which
is an extremely valuable tool, connect-
ing musicians' work with a multitude of
contest, audition and marketing sites."
The Connorsville homestead where
Day and his wife, Jennifer, and son,
Troy, live, is perfect for practicing and
for the peace and quiet needed for song
writing.
Black and white spotted chickens
and roosters peck contentedly around
the yard, as Day visits the horses in the
backyard stalls. He shares a kiss with
one, then introduces another, Rio, as
one the family rescued, after he was of-
fered for free on Craig'slist. Jennifer, says
they have been together for 20 years,
and as long as she can remember, he's
been into music, practicing three to four
times a day. Does he consult with her on
his music?
"Sometimes he'll call me out there to
see what I think about something new
he's written," she said. "I would like to
see him achieve his dream," she said of
the contest.






ii.


IrMulu tY MAI-IY uANNAUAY
Johnny Day, a local blues musician, has entered
the Hard Rock Cafe Rising musicians competition.

A nearby merchant, Mahmud (Mo)
Osmani, who owns the Connorsville
Bait and Tackle Shop, featured Day's
music on the store's Halloween float in
October.
"It was very good music," Osmani
said. "I support him in the contest and
would tell my friends to do the same."


Speaking of the Halloween parade,
there was an aspect to his participation
that Day can now laugh about. He is
an apt storyteller, and he recalls that
toward the end of the parade, "As we
neared the Chicken Shack on Main, it
started raining. I was worried about
my amps and equipment, so started
unplugging everything from the
generator." Next thing he knew, he
was literally electrified, volts from the
equipment coursing through his body.
"I finally managed to break free," he
said.
The equipment in his studio was
given to him by the family's church,
First Baptist of Bartow, whom he
praises frequently for their support.
A local business gave him a pair of
boots to complete his western perfor-
mance outfit, and he thanks people
for the help they have offered along
the way.
"Even if I don't win," he said of the
Hard Rock competition, "at least I'll
know I put myself out there and took
that extra step."
To vote:
Go to Facebook. In the search bar,
type in Hard Rock Cafe Tampa and
look for a small blue icon, Hard Rock
Rising 2013. Scroll to Day's stage name
Johnny Stash. If you wish to be a
sponsor, he can be reached by email at
hot_rod1179@yahoo.com.


February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 7












2013 Polk County Youth Fair Champions


Listed by name, chapter, contest and award in
alphabetical order by last name.

Erista Albritton, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Jr. Speed Showmanship, 1st Place
Johnny Almallah, Road Ends 4-H Club, Cake
Auction, Winner
Johnny Almallah. Road Ends 4-H Club,
Ioods-Old Fashioned Pound Cake, Ti-Color
Winner
Shadiya Almallah Ridge Cnmmunirt FFA,
Cake Aucuon. Winner
Samantha .shwill. Auburdale Senior FFA.,
Marker Hog Eagle .ward. Wiuner
Tebin Ashwood, McLaughlin Middle FFA,
FFA Middle School Livestock Judging, 1st Place
Team
Alissa Averill, George Jenkins FFA, Foods-
Duck and Water Lilies, Tri-Color, Winner
Mark Aycock, Top Notch 4-H Club, Open
Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Mark Aycock, Top Notch 4-H Club, Open
Market Steer Show, Grand Champion
Bailey Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Food
Preservation-Corn Relish Tri-Color, Winner
Bailey Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Jr.
Tablesetting, Best Holiday or Celebration, 1st
Place
Bailey Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Dog Show,
Jr. Sub-Novice Agility, 1st Place
Bailey Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Dog Show,
Jr. Sub-Novice A Obedience, 1st Place
Mackenzie Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Food
Preservation-Chow Chow, Tri-Color Winner
Mackenzie Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Food
Preservation-Red Raspberry Jam, Ti-Color
Winner
Mackenzie Barber, All Stars 4-H Club,
Photography- Keeping Guard, Best in Show
Mackenzie Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Int.
Tablesetting, Judges'Choice, 1st Place
MacKenzie Barber, All Stars 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Intermediate Sub-Novice Agility, 1st Place
Elise Barfield, All Stars 4-H Club, Photography
- Dance Portfolio, Best in Show
Christina Barnelli, Lake Gibson High School
PFA, Market Hog Class Sixteen, 1st Place
Evan Bamett, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
Horticulture; Blueberry Plant, Tri-Color Winner
Savannah Barnett, Westwood Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Justin Barthle, Haines City Sr. FFA, Cake
Auction, Winner
Justin Barthle, Haines City Sr. FFA, Home
Fumishings-SPCA Basket, Tri-Color Winner
Justin Barthle, Haines City High School FFA,
Commercial Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Justin Barthle, Haines City High School FFA,
Commercial Market Steer Show, ReServe Grand
Champion
Richard Baxley, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Horticulture; Blueberry Plant, Tri-Color,
Winner
Tyler Bazemore, Great Oak Pioneers 4-H
Club, Poultry Show, Champion Turkey
Ginna Bell, Ft. Meade Middle School FFA,
Rabbit Show; Best of Breed
Lexie Bennett, Bartow Middle School FFA,
Market Hog Class Five, 1st Place
Claire Bibby, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Clare Bibby, Lake Gibson Sr. FFA, Home
Furnishings-Ornaments, Ti-Color Winner
Jesse Bibby, Hoof n' Horn, 4-H Club ,
Commercial Heifer Jr. Showmanship, 1st Place
Jesse Bibby, Hoof n' Horn 4-H, Club 4-H Jr.
Livestock Judging Contest, 1st Place Individual
Amanda Bolin-Goode Bartow High
School FFA, Horticulture; Citrus Tree, Ti-Color
Winner
Charity Bowe, Kathleen High School FFA,
Open Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Michael, Bracewell, Polk County 4-H Youth
Council, Dog Show, Sr. Novice B Obedience, 1st
Place
Donovan Brady, Bartow High School FFA,
Horticulture; Citrus Tree, Grand Champion
Payton Brown, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Horticulture; Ornamentals -Viburnum
Suspensum, Tri-ColorWinner
Bailey Buchanon, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Open Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Rylee Buckley, Westwood Middle School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Taylor Bunch, Bits n' Bridles 4-H
Club, Intermediate Horse Grooming and
Conditioning, 1st Place
Taylor Bunch, Bits n' Bridles 4-H Club,
Intermediate Walk Trot, 1st Place
Taylor Bunch, Bits n' Bridles 4-H Club,
Intermediate Costume-Horse, 1st Place
Chandler Byrd, Frostproof High School FFA,
Beef Breeding Herdsman Award, Team, Winner
Morgan Carlton, Hoof n' Horn 4-H Club, Chili
Cook Off, People's Choice Award, 1st Place
Shelby Carlton, Hoof n' Hor 4-H Club, Chili
Cook Off, People's Choice Award, 1st Place
Shelby Carlton, Hoof n' Horn 4-H Club, 4-H
Sr. Individual Poultry and Egg Judging, 1st Place
Quinn Carter, Haines City High School
FFA, Sr. Division Cattlewomen's Record Book
Contest, 1st Place


Quinn Carter, Haines City High School FFA,
Open Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Josie Chandler, Tenoroc High School FFA,
Beef Breeding Hersdman Award, Individual
Winner
Peyton Chandley, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Market
Steer Jr. Showmanship Contest, 1st Place
Taylar Chaney, Frostproof High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Team Herdsman Award,
Winner
Josalynn Christian, Home Grown 4-H Club,
FCS Clothing Category-Reversible Dress, Tri-
Color Winner
Josalynn Christian, Home Grown 4-H Club,
FCS Clothing Category-Apron, Tri-Color Winner
Josalynne Christian, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Sr. Tablesetting, Best Formal, 1st Place
Maggie Clark, Abundant Life 4-H Club,
4-H Int. Livestock Judging Contest, 1st Place
Individual
Kaitlyn Coatney, Bok Academy FFA, Egg
Show, Reserve Champion Dozen Brown Eggs
Grace Colston, Live arid Learn 4-H Club, Int.
Tablesetting, Best Formal, 1st Place
Laura Colston, Live and Learn 4-H Club,
Foods-Candy Chessboard, Tri-Color Winner
Laura Colston, Live and Learn 4-H Club, Jr.
Tablesetting, Best Informal Indoor, 1st Place
Amber Cooper, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
Speed Showmanship, 1st Place
Brittney Crawn, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st Place
Brittney Crawn, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st
Place
Brittney Crawn, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, FFA Middle School Horticulture Judging,
1st Place Team
Carlyne Crawn, Crystal Lake Middle School.
FFA, Rabbit Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st Place
Carlyne Crawn, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st
Place
Carlyne Crawn, CrystalLake Middle School
FFA, FFA Middle School Horticulture Judging,
1st Place Team
Erica Curtis, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H Club,
4-H Sr. Individual Rabbit Judging, 1st Place
Sabrina Davis, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Horticulture; Peach Tree, Grand Champion
Sabrina Davis, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Horticulture; Vegetables Swiss Chard, Tri-Color
Winner
Brandon DeMent, Lake Wales High School
FFA, Market Hog Sr. Showmanship, 1st Place
Misty DeVane, New Horizons 4-H Club, Jr.
Beef Breeding Showmanship, 1st Place
Cameron Dicks, Lucky As 4-H Club, Cake
Auction, Winner
Cameron Dicks, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Home
Furnishings-Quilt, Tri-Color, Winner
Cameron Dicks, LuckyA's 4-H Club, Home
Furishings-Sunflowers, Tri-Color, Winner
Cameron Dicks, Lucky As 4-H Club, Foods-
Chocolate-Covered Cherries Tri-Color, Winner
SCameron Dicks, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Market
Hog Class Ten, 1st Place
Cameron Dicks, Lucky As 4-H Club, Chili
Cook Off, Best Decorated Booth, 1st Place
Brynna Dierker, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Cake Auction, Winner
Brynna Dierker, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Home Furnishings-Floral Arrangement, Tri-
Color, Winner
Brynna Dierker, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Home Furnishings-Tea Time, Tri-Color, Winner
Brynna Dierker, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Foods-Lemon Crystal Blueberry Cookies, Tri-
Color, Winner
Brynna Dierker, Country Ridge 4-H Club,
Foods-Cranberry Pecan Scones, Tri-Color,
Winner
Madison Dvorak, Lake Gibson Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Samantha Dwan, Green Swamp 4-H Club,
Archery, Intermediate Sighted Long or Recurve
Bow, 1st Place
Walter Farmer, Frostproof High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Team Herdsman Award,
Winner
Matthew Fletcher, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Market
Hog Jr. Showmanship, 1st Place
Joseph Flood, Frostproof High School FFA,
Beef Breeding Hersdman Award, Team, Winner
Kathryn Flood, Frostproof High School FFA,
Beef Breeding Herdsman Award, Team, Winner
Kaitlyn Flowers, Lake Gibson Middle School
FFA, Market Hog Class Fourteen, 1st Place
Victoria Foard, Haines City High School FFA,
Sr. Division, Demonstration, 1st Place
Makenzie Foltz, Country Cousins 4-H Club'
4-H Sr. Livestock Judging Contest, 1st Place
Individual
Olivia Foreman, Polk Centennial 4-H Club
Egg Show, Grand Champion Dozen Brown Eggs
Trace Foreman, Bartow High School FFA,
Middle School Individual, Poultry and Egg
Judging, Overall High Point Winner
Trace Foreman, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Poultry Show, Champion Commercial
Hen
Clay Frisbie, Bartow High School FCCLA,


Chili Cook Off, Judges' Choice Award, 1st Place
S Reed Fussell, Bartow High School FFA,
Horticulture; Citrus Tree, Reserve Grand
Champion
Seth Fussell, Bok Academy FFA,
Woodworking-Traditional Long Bow, Tri-Color
Winner
Wes Fussell, Bartow High School FFA,
Horticulture; Citrus Tree, Tri-Color Winner
Wes Fussell, Bartow High School FFA,
Horticulture; Ornamentals Golddust Narrow,
Tri-Color Winner
Wes Fussell, Bartow High School FFA, Market
Steer Carcass Contest, Grand Champion
Jordan Futch, Hog Wild 4-H Club, Horse
Show, Overall High Point Winner
Jordan Futch, HogWild 4-H Club, Sr. Western
Showmanship, 1st Place
Jordan Futch, Hog Wild 4-H Club, Sr. Horse
Grooming and Conditioning, 1st Place
Jordan Futch, Hog Wild 4-H Club, Sr. English
Equitation, 1st Place
Jordan Futch, Hog Wild 4-H Club, Sr. Western
Pleasure, 1st Place
Jordan Futch, Hog Wild 4-H Club, Sr. Western
Horsemanship, 1st Place
Jordan Futch, HogWild 4-H Club, Sr. Trail-
Horse, 1st Place
Jessica Ganey, Mulberry High School FFA,
Sr. Individual, Poultry and Egg Judging, Overall
High Point Winner
Jessica Ganey, Mulberry High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Herdsman Award, Winner
Jessica Ganey, Mulberry High School FFA,
Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st Place
Jaime Garner, Kathleen High School FFA,
FFA High School Horticulture Judging, 1st Place
Team
Kate Garrett, Frostproof Middle School FFA,
Sr. Tablesetting, Best Informal Outdoor, 1st
Place
Emily Gipson, Thunderhooves 4-H Club, Sr.
English Showmanship, 1st Place
Sarah Grady, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Jr. Trail-Horse, 1st Place
Nicole Green, Kathleen High School FFA,
FFA High School Horticulture Judging, 1st Place
Team
Wesley Griner, Frostproof High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Team Herdsman Award,
Winner
Skye Guyette, Auburdale Senior FFA, Poultry
Show, Champion Male Bantam
Megan Handley, Dream Catchers 4-H Club
Food Preservation-Whole Cranberry Preserve,
Tri-Color Winner
Mikayla Harper,AIIStars 4-H Club, Dog Show,
Intermediate Novice Agility, 1st Place
Mikayla Harper, All Stars 4-H Club, Dog Show,
Int. Sub-Novice B Obedience, 1st Place
Mikayla Harper, All Stars 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Int. Novice B Rally, 1st Place
Dallas Hart, Kathleen High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best in Show, 1st Runner Up
Katie Harwell, Lake Gibson Middle School
FFA, Intermediate Westem Showmanship, 1st
Place
Kimberly Harwell, Hoof n' Horn 4-H Club, Jr.
Horse Grooming and Conditioning,lst Place
Sebastian Hathcock, Lake Gibson High
School FFA, Horticulture; Ornamentals-
Firebush, Grand Champion
Sebastian Hathcock, Lake Gibson High
School FFA, Horticulture; Ornamentals--Downy
Jasmine, Tri-Color Winner
Brianna Heath, Thunderhooves 4-H Club, Jr.
Western Pleasure, 1st Place
Brianna Heath, Thunderhooves 4-H Club, Jr.
Western Horsemanship, 1st Place
Brianna Heath, Thunderhooves 4-H Club, Jr.
Flags-Horse, 1st Place
Brianna Heath, Thunderhooves 4-H Club, Jr.
Hollow Log,.lst Place
Brianna Heath, Thunderhooves 4-H Club, Jr.
Barrels-Horse, 1st Place
Matt Henderson, Bullseye 4-H Club
Archery, Sr. Instinctive Compound, 1st Place
Anya Hockenberry, Home Grown 4-H Club
Int. Tablesetting, Best Holiday or Celebration,
1st Place
Corin Hockenberry, Home Grown 4-H Club
Storytelling, Jr. Division, 1st Place
Corin Hockenberry, Home Grown 4-H Club
Dog Show, Junior Age Division, Overall High
Point Winner
Corin Hockenberry, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Dog Show, Jr. Novice Showmanship, Ist Place
Corin Hockenberry, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Dog Show, Jr. Novice Rally, 1st Place
Kenny Hughes, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Archery, Intermediate Instinctive Long or
Recurve Bow, 1st Place
Ashley Jenningson, George Jenkins High
School FFA, FFA High School Livestock Judging,
1st Place Team
Dallas Johns, Kathleen High School FFA,
Rabbit Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st Place
Abigail Jones, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Storytelling, Intermediate Division, 1st Place
Destaney King, Frostproof High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Team Herdsman Award,
Winner


PHOTO BY MIKE CREECH

Kathryn Flood from the Frostproof Middle-
Senior FFA, shows her angus female. She won .
the Beef Breeding Hersdman Award at the 66th
Annual Polk County Youth Fair.
Kaitlyn King, Top Notch 4-H Club, Market
Hog Class Four, 1st Place
Mattie King, Frostproof High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Team Herdsman Award,
Winner
Michael Kramer, Ft. Meade Senior FFA, Cake
Auction, Winner
Kandace Ladd, Road Ends 4-H Club, Open
Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Kaitlyn Lally, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
Horticulture; Blueberry Plant, Tri-Color, Winner
SSeth Lamb, Southern Variety 4-H Club,
Market Hog Class Three, 1st Place
Brooke Lang, George Jenkins High School
FFA, FFA High School Livestock Judging, 1st
Place Team
Elijah Lasseter, Hog Wild 4-H Club, Home
Furnishings-Wall Hanger, Tri-Color Winner
Kyle Lay, Dream Catchers 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Brace, 1st Place
Kyle Lay, Dream Catchers 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Sr. Open Showmanship, 1st Place
Kyle Lay, Dream Catchers 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Sr. Novice A Obedience, 1st Place
Kyle Lay, Dream Catchers 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Sr. Novice B Rally, 1st Place
Kate Leonard, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
Tablesetting, Best Informal Indoor, 1st Place
Katie Leonard, Bartow Sr. FFA, FCS Clothing
Category-Garment Bag, Tri-ColorWinner
Katie Leonard, Bartow Sr. FFA, Photography-:
Spring Flowers, Best in Show
Katie Leonard, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
Division, Scrap-Off, 1st Place
Matthew Lewis, Bartow Middle School FFA,
Dog Show, Intermediate Basic Showmanship,
1st Place
Matthew Lewis, Bartow Middle School FFA,
Dog Show, Int. Basic Obedience, 1st Place
Michaela Lindley, Thunderhooves 4-H Club
,Sr. Poles-Horse, 1st Place
Michaela Lindley, Thunderhooves 4-H Club,
Sr. Barrels-Horse, 1st Place
Kendall Locke, Lake Gibson Middle School
FFA, Jr. Division Cattlewomen's Record Book
Contest, 1st Place
Kendall Locke, Lake Gibson Middle School
FFA, Market Steer Int. Showmanship Contest,
1st Place
Rachel Locke, Bartow High School FFA,
Horticulture; Citrus Tree, Tri-Color, Winner
Tori Locke, Polk Centennial 4-H Club, Rabbit
Show, Best of Breed
Payge Lundy, Great Oak Pioneers 4-H Club
Jr., Horse Show Quiz, 1st Place
Payge Lundy, Great Oak Pioneers 4-H Club, Jr.
Western Showmanship, 1st Place
Payge Lundy, Great Oak Pioneers 4-H Club, Jr.
-Poles-Horse, 1st Place
Nathan Maddox, Top Notch 4-H Club, Market
Hog Class Six, 1st Place
Nathan Maddox, Top Notch 4-H Club, Market
Hog Show, Reserve Grand Champion
Jocelyn Martin, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Horticulture; Omamentals-Silverthom,
Tri-ColorWinner
Cody Martinez, McLaughlin Middle FFA,
FFA Middle School Livestock Judging, 1st Place
Team
Cody Martinez, McLaughlin Middle FFA,
FFA Middle School Livestock Judging, 1st Place
Individual
Hunter Massey, Lake Wales High School FFA,
Egg Show, Grand Champion Dozen White Eggs
Hunter Massey, Lake Wales High School FFA,
Commercial Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Hunter Massey, Lake Wales High School FFA,
Market Steer Competition Eagle Award,
Winner
Megan Maxwell, Frostproof Sr., FFA, Cake
Auction, Winner
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof Sr. FFA, Sr.
Individual Sew-Off, 1st Place
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof Sr. FFA, FCS
Clothing Category-Duffle Bag, Tri-ColorWinner
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof Middle School
FFA, Sr. Tablesetting, Most Creative, 1st Place
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof High School
FFA, Commercial Market Steer Show, 1st in
Class
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof High School

YOUTH 9


Page 8 The Polk County Democrat


February 6, 2013






Feray6- 03TePl Cont DeortPg


YOUTH

FROM PAGE 8

FFA, Commercial Market Steer Show, Grand
Champion
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof High School
FFA, Market Steer Carcass Contest, Reserve
Grand Champion
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof High School
FFA, Market Steer Gain-In Weight Contest, 1st
Place
Moriah McCullers, Frostproof High School
FFA, Beef Breeding Herdsman Award, Team,
Wihner
Jennifer McGuire, George Jenkins High
- School FFA, FFA High School Livestock Judging,
1st Place Team
John McLauchlin, Dream Catchers 4-H Club,
Dog Show, Sr. Basic Showmanship, 1st Place
John McLauchlin, Dream Catchers 4-H Club,
Dog Show, Sr. Basic Obedience, 1st Place
SJohn McLauchlin, Dream Catchers 4-H Club,
Dog Show, Sr. Basic Rally, 1st Place
Kayla McPherson, Kathleen High School FFA,
Horticulture; Ornamentals-Spathiphyllum,
Tri-ColorWinner
Kayla McPherson, Kathleen High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Elizabeth Medlin, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Rabbit Show, Best in Show 2nd Runner Up
Ben Mercer, Hoof n' Horn 4-H Club, Chili
Cook Off, People's Choice Award, 1st Place,
Maegan, Meredith, Tenoroc High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Sr. Showmanship, 1st Place
Katlynn Mesmer, Lakeland High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Katlynn Mesmer, Lakeland High School FFA,
Dog Show, Sr. Sub-Novice Agility, 1st Place
Savannah Miller, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Home
Furnishings-Recycle Cross Tri-Color, Winner
Trace Miller, Berkley Middle School FFA,
Market Hog Class One, 1st Place
Vanessa Miller, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Home
Furnishings-Lamp, Tri-Color, Winner
Mason Neller, Southern Variety 4-H Club,
Foods-Hershey's Perfectly Chocolate Cake,
Tri-ColorWinner
Cole Newman, Frostproof High School FFA,
Beef Breeding Herdsman Award, Team, Winner
Kaylee Norris, Frostproof High School FFA
Beef Breeding Eagle Award, Individual Winner
Kaylee Norris, Frostproof Middle/Sr. FFA,
Market Steer Competition, Herdsman Award,
Winner
Madison Norris, Mulberry High School FFA,
Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st Place
Payton Ogbum, Lucky As 4-H Club Egg
Show, Reserve Champion Dozen White Eggs
Zuriel Orlando, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Poultry Show, Champion Female Standard
Zuriel Orlando, Home Grown 4-H Club, Sr.
Poultry Showmanship, 1st Place
Abigail Parmer, Top Notch 4-H Club, 4-H Jr.
Individual Poultry and Egg Judging, 1st Place
Abigail Parmer, Top Notch 4-H Club, 4-H Jr.
Horticulture Judging, 1st Place
Jonah Patrick, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Jr. Costume-Horse, 1st Place
Katherine Patrick, Ridge Riders 4-H Club, Sr.
Costume-Horse, 1st Place
Micah Patrick, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Poultry Show, Champion Female Bantam
Hope Peavey, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Team, 1st Place
Hope Peavey, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Intermediate Flags-Horse, 1st Place
Hope Peavey, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Hope Peavey, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Intermediate Age Division,
Overall High Point Winner
Hope Peavey, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Int. Sub-Novice A Obedience,
1st Place
Hope Peavey, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Int. Novice Rally, 1st Place
Hope Peavey, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H Club,
Intermediate Poultry Showmanship, 1st Place
Toni Pendleton, Green Swamp 4-H Club,
Foods-Cowboy Brownie Mix in a Jar, Tri-Color,
Winner
Shelby Petersen, Dundee Ridge Middle
School FFA, Sr. Horse Therapy, 1st Place
Shelby Petersen, Dundee Ridge Middle
School FFA, Sr. Horse Therapy Barrels, 1st Place
Robert Pettypiece, Camo Country 4-H Club,
Archery, Sr. Sighted Long or Recurve Bow, 1st
Place *
Cassidy Polston, Polk City 4-H Club,
Intermediate Beef Breeding Showmanship, 1st
Place
Delanie Potteiger, All Paws In 4-H Club, Dog'
Show, Jr. Basic Showmanship, 1st Place
Delanie Potteiger, All Paws In 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Jr. Basic Obedience, 1st Place
Delanie Potteiger, All Paws In 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Jr. Basic Rally, 1st Place
Hope Potteiger, All Paws In 4-H Club, Dog
Show, Int. Basic Rally, 1st Place
Amy Powell, Polk Centennial 4-H Club, Int.
Division, Scrap-Off, 1st Place
John Prescott, Polk Centennial 4-H Club,
Educational Exhibit-Keep the Earth Clean,
Tri-Color Winner
Alanah Pruitt, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.


Horse Show Quiz, 1st Place
Vanessa Puentes, McLaughlin Middle FFA,
FFA Middle School Livestock Judging, 1st Place
Team
Brianne Pueschell, Fort Fraiser 4-H Club,
Commercial Heifer Eagle Award, Winner
Elizabeth Putnam, Polk Centennial 4-H Club,
Jr. Tablesetting, Best Formal, 1st Place
Emma Putnam, Polk Centennial 4-H Club, Jr.
Tablesetting, Judges' Choice, 1st Place
Robby Putnam, Polk Centennial 4-H Club, Jr.
Division, Demonstration, 1st Place
Robby Putnam, Polk Centennial 4-H Club, Jr.
Division, Illustrated Talk, 1st Place
Carlos Rangel, Mulberry High School FFA,
Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st Place
Savannah Rau, Independent 4-H, Dog Show,
Sr. Basic Agility, 1st Place
Samuel Reeder, All Stars 4-H Club, Archery, Jr.
Instinctive Long or Recurve Bow, 1st Place
Kassidy Rewis, McLaughlin Middle FFA, FFA
Middle School Livestock Judging, 1st Place
Team
Emily Rhiness, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
FFA High School Horticulture Judging, 1st Place
Individual
Shelby Ritchie, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
Horticulture; Vegetables Onions, Tri-Color
Winner
Shelby Ritchie, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Horticulture; Ornamentals -Xanadu
Philodendron, Reserve Grand Champion
Shelby Ritchie, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Horticulture; Ornamentals Confederate
Jasmine, Tri-Color Winner
Shelby Ritchie, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
Horticulture; Ornamentals Spider Plant HB,.
Ti-Color, Winner
Shelby Ritchie, Lake Gibson High School FFA,
Horticulture Department Premier
Horticulture Exhibitor
Kiersten Robbins, Bartow Middle FFA, Cake
Auction, Winner
Lexi Rodden, Polk County Sea Stars 4-H Club,
4-H Jr. Individual Rabbit Judging, 1st Place
Meagen Rodden, Polk County Sea Stars 4-H
Club, 4-H Int. Individual Rabbit Judging, 1st
Place -
Lisa Rodgers, Bartow High School FCCLA,
Chili Cook Off, Judges' Choice Award, 1st Place
Tabitha Rowell, Ft. Meade Middle/Sr. FFA,
Open Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Garrison Russell, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Garrison Russell, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st Place
Garrison Russell, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st
Place
Garrison Russell, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, FFA Middle School Horticulture Judging,
1st Place Team
Dugan Rust, Frostproof High School FFA,
Commercial Heifer Team Herdsman Award,
Winner
Lexie Sanchez, Kathleen High Sthool FFA,
Rabbit Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st Place
Lexie Sanchez, Kathleen High School FFA,
FFA High School Horticulture Judging, 1st Place
Team
Jesse Sansom, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
DivisionWhip Popping Contest, 1st Place
Hannah Scionti, Lake Gibson Middle School
FFA, Market Hog Class Fifteen, 1st Place
Cheyenne Sharp, Bartow High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Cheyenne Sharp, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
Beef Breeding Showmanship, 1st Place
Phillip Shaske, Polk City 4-H Club, Poultry
Show, Champion Male Standard
Phillip Shaske, Polk City 4-H Club, Poultry
Show, Overall Grand Champion
Phillip Shaske, Polk City 4-H Club, Jr. Poultry
Showmanship, 1st Place
Jordan Sherer, Lake Wales Sr. FFA, Foods-
Hummingbird Cake, Tri-Color Winner
Logan Sherrod, Thunderhooves 4-H Club,
Horticulture; Blueberry Plant, Reserve Grand
Champion
Missy Shipley, Kathleen High School FFA,
Horticulture; Ornamentals Aglaonema, Tri-
ColorWmner
Missy Shipley, Kathleen High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Missy Shipley, Kathleen High School FFA, Sr.
Individual Rabbit Judging, Overall High Point
Winner
Missy Shipley, Kathleen High School FFA,
Rabbit Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st Place
Rebekah Sikes, New Horizons 4-H Club,
Home Furnishings-Hand Crochet Flag, Tri-
Color Winner
Rebekah Sikes, New Horizons 4-H Club, Int.
Tablesetting, Best Informal Outdoor, 1st Place
Harley Skinner, Lake Wales High School FFA,
Rabbit Show, Best in Show, 3rd Runner Up
Emily Skipper, LuckyA's 4-H Club, Foods-
Junk in da Trunk Cookies, Tri-Color, Winner
Emily Skipper, Lucky As 4-H Club, Chili
Cook Off, Best Decorated Booth, 1st Place
Kenny Slay, Ft. Meade High School FFA,
Market Hog Class Seven, 1st Place
Tayla Smalls, Bartow High School FCCLA,
Chili Cook Off, Judges' Choice Award, 1st Place
Erin Smith, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
Flags-Horse, 1st Place
Erin Smith, Bartow High School FFA, Sr.
Hollow Log, 1st Place


Katelin Smith, McLaughlin Middle FFA, Cake
Auction, Winner
Olivia Smith, George Jenkins High School
FFA, FFA High School Livestock Judging, 1st
Place Team
Skye Smith, Polk Centennial 4-H Club,
Intermediate English Showmanship, 1st Place
Solomon Smith, Home Grown 4-H Club,
Archery, Jr. Sighted Compound Bow, 1st Place
Alex Snell, Lake Gibson Middle School FFA,
Archery, Intermediate Sighted Compound, 1st
Place
Dakota Soria, Home Grown 4-H Club, Sr.
Tablesetting, Judges' Choice, 1st Place
Logan Soria, Home Grown 4-H Club, Int.
Tablesetting, Best Informal Indoor, 1st Place
Dolan Sprout, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Overall High Point Winner
Dolan Sprout, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Top Showman Award
Dolan Sprout, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Team, 1st Place
Dolan Sprout, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Sr. Novice Showmanship, 1st
Place
Dolan Sprout, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Intermediate Advanced
Agility, 1st Place
Dolan Sprout, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Sr. Advanced Rally, 1st Place
Austin Spurlock, Frostproof Middle/Sr. FFA,
Archery, Sr. Sighted Compound, 1st Place
Nick Steele, Auburdale Senior FFA, Open
Market Steer Show, 1st in Class
Herman Stephens, Bartow Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Show, Best in Show'
Chelsey Summerlin, Country Ridge 4-H
Club, Market Hog Class Eight, 1st Place
Tucker Sweeney, Be A Champ 4-H Club,
Market Hog Class Twelve, 1st Place
MacKenzie Tackett, Tenoroc High School
FFA, Sr. English Pleasure, 1st Place
Marisol Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Cake Auction, Winner
Marisol Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club Intermediate Horse Show Quiz, 1st
Place
Marisol Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Intermediate Trail-Horse, 1st Place
Marisol Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Intermediate Hollow Log, 1st Place
Marisol Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Intermediate Poles-Horse, 1st Place
Marisol Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Intermediate Barrels-Horse, 1st Place
Marissa Tarango, Ft. Meade Community 4-H
Club, Horticulture; Ornamentals Begonia HB,
Tri-Color Winner
Marissa Tarango, Ft.-Meade Community
4-H Club, 4-H Int. Individual Poultry and Egg
Judging, 1st Place
Robert Tate, Pure Country 4-H Club, Jr.
English Showmanship, 1st Place
Robert Tate, Pure Country 4-H Club, Jr.Walk
Trot, 1st Place
Robert Tate, Pure Country 4-H Club, Jr.
Horse Therapy, 1st Place
Luke Tefoe, Crystal Lake Middle School FFA,
Rabbit Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st Place
Luke Tefoe, Crystal Lake Middle School FFA,
Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Jr. Team, 1st
Place
Luke Tefoe, Crystal Lake Middle School FFA,
FFA Middle School Horticulture Judging
1st Place Team
Luke Tefoe, Crystal Lake Middle School FFA,
FFA Middle School Horticulture Judging, 1st
Place Individual
Luke Tefoee, Crystal Lake Middle School
FFA, Middle School Individual, Rabbit Judging,
Overall High Point Winner
Mollie Tew, Hoof n' Horn 4-H Club,
Horticulture; Peach Tree, Tri-Color Winner
Jacob Thomas, Southern Variety 4-H Club,
Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Destinee Thompson, Mulberry High School
FFA, Poultry and Egg Judging, FFA Sr. Team, 1st
Place
Jenna Thompson, Hoof n' Horn 4-H Club,
Commercial Heifer Int. Showmanship, 1st
Place
Alyssa Tilson, George Jenkins High School
FFA, Market Hog Class Nine, 1st Place
, Morgan Turneey, Country Ridge 4-H Club, Sr.
Tablesetting, Best Holiday or Celebration, 1st
Place
Madeline Umsheid, St. Paul Lutheran 4-H
Club, Jr. Division, Scrap-Off, 1st Place
LaiurenVandermaas, Bits n' Bridles 4-H Club,
Intermediate English Pleasure, 1st Place
Lauren Vandermaas, Bits n' Bridles 4-H Club,
Intermediate English Equitation, 1st Place
Austin Vargas, Bartow High School FFA,
Market Steer Sr. Showmanship Contest, 1st
Place
Austin Vargas, Bartow High School FFA, Open
Market Steer Show, Reserve Grand Champion
SophiaVera, Bok Academy FFA, Rabbit Show,
Best of Breed
Czerise Villiers, All Stars 4-H Club, Jr.
Tablesetting, Most Creative, 1st Place
Dion Villiers, All Stars 4-H Club, Jr.
Tablesetting, Best Informal Outdoor, 1st Place
Chelsea Waldman, Bullseye 4-H Club, 4-H Sr.
Horticulture Judging, 1st Place
GraysonWaldman, Bullseye 4-H Club,
Intermediate Division Whip Popping Contest,
1st Place


Bok Academy student Kaitlynn Coutney, from
Lake Wales, receives her medal for for reserve
grand, dozen brown eggs from John Small
during the parade of champions at the Polk
County Youth Fair. Small is the Polk School
District's Sr. Dir. of Workforce Education

Josiah Waldman, Bullseye 4-H Club Jr.
Division, Whip Popping Contest, 1st Place
Ryan Waldman, Bullseye 4-H Club, Archery,
Sr. Instinctive Longor Recurve Bow, 1st Place
Tristen Walling, Be A Champ 4-H Club,
Market Hog Class Two, 1st Place
JohnnyWalton, Frostproof Middle School
FFA, Rabbit Show, Best of Breed
Kathleen Wann, All Stars 4-H Club, Int.
Tablesetting, Most Creative, 1st Place
Kathleen Wann, All Stars 4-H Club, Dog Show,
Intermediate Novice Showmanship, 1st Place
Dallas Warrick, Kathleen High School FFA
Horticulture; Ornamentals -Anthurium, Ti-
ColorWinner
Dylan Webb, Top Notch 4-H Club, Market
Hog Class Eleven, 1st Place
Dylan Webb, Top Notch 4-H Club, Market
Hog Show, Grand Champion
Dylan Webb, Top Notch 4-H Club, Market
Hog Intermediate Showmanship, 1st Place
ShelbyWeihmeir, Thunderhooves 4-H Club,
Intermediate Speed Showmanship, 1st Place
Tucker West, Kathleen Middle FFA, Market
Hog Herdsman Award, Winner
Dawson Westbrook, SouthernVariety 4-H
Club, Archery, Jr. Instinctive Compound, 1st
Place
Dawson Westbrook, Southern Variety 4-H
Club, Market Hog Gain-in-Weight Contest, 1st
Place
Devin Westbrook, Southern Variety 4-H Club,
Archery, Intermediate Instinctive Compound,
1st Place
Hunter Westmoreland, Bartow High School
FFA, Horticulture; Citrus Tree, Tri-Color Winner
Jacob White, Frostproof High School FFA,
Beef Breeding Herdsman Award, Team, Winner
Leslie White, Polk Centennial 4-H Club, Int.
Division, Illustrated Talk, 1st Place
Allison Williams, George Jenkins High School
FFA, Market Hog Class Thirteen, 1st Place
BaileyWilliams, Haines City High School FFA,
FFA High School Livestock Judging, 1st Place
Individual
Caleb Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Team, 1st Place
Caleb Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Int. Novice B Obedience, 1st
Place
Caleb Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Int. Advanced Rally, 1st Place
Hannah Williams, George Jenkins FCCLA,
Home Furnishings-Etched Vase Series, Tri-Color
Winner
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Reserve High Point Winner
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Senior Age Division, Overall
High Point Winner
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge
4-H Club, Dog Show, Trial, Overall High Point
Winner
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Team, 1st Place
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Sr. Novice Agility, 1st Place
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge 4-H
Club, Dog Show, Sr. Sub-Novice A Obedience,
1st Place
Katelyn Williams, Clovers on the Ridge
4-H Club, Dog Show, Sr. Novice A Rally, 1st
Place
Brooke Winslow, Lake Gibson High School
FFA, Horticulture; Blueberry Plant, Grand
Champion
Rachel Wise, Lucky A's 4-H Club, Chili
Cook Off, Best Decorated Booth, 1st Place
Bradley Wooten, Bartow High School FFA,
Horticulture; Peach Tree, Reserve Grand
Champion
Johnathan Young, Ft. Meade Community
4-H Club Food Preservation-Hot Pepper Jelly,
Tri-ColorWinner
Gilbert Zamor, Mulberry High School FFA,
Storytelling, Sr. Division, 1st Place
Ace Zorr, Dundee Ridge Middle School FFA,
Intermediate Western Pleasure, 1st Place
Ace Zorr, Dundee Ridge Middle School FFA,
Intermediate Western Horsemanship, 1st Place


February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 9






Page 10 The Polk County Democrat February 6, 2013


Thomas "Buddy" Waldrop, 63, passed
away Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013, in Lakeland.
Born Nov. 16,1949, in Bartow, he was
the son of the late James D. Waldrop and
BettyWaldrop of Bartow.
Buddy was aVietnam veteran, serving
in the U.S. Marine Corps.
He worked as an electrician for C.E.
Construction in Mulberry.
Buddy is survived by his mother, Betty
H. Waldrop of Bartow; his brother, David
Waldrop (Grace) ofAtlanta, Ga, his two
sisters; JimmieWaldrop of Bartow, Betsy
Landry (Gary) of Lakeland; and two neph-
ews, Michael C. Mooneyham of Gainesville,


loving family.
Gentry Morrison Cremation Center is
in charge of arrangements.


Ga., and Andrew R. Landry of Lakeland.
Friends and family are invited to a
memorial service that is scheduled for
Saturday, Feb. 9 at 2 p.m. at the Antioch
Baptist Church, 4335 Transport Road,
Bartow.
Inurnment will take place at Florida
National Cemetery in Bushnell.
In lieu of flowers, memorials can be
made Good Shepherd Hospice, 105
Ameson Ave., Auburndale, FL 33823.
Condolences at www.whidden
mcleanfuneralhome.com
Whidden McLean Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.


Inmate dies at Bartow

Regional Medical Center
SRobert Droz, 70, an inmate in the Polk sheriff's office reports.
County Jail since last April, died shortly On April 16,2012, Droz was charged on
after midnight Tuesday at Bartow Regional two counts molestation of victim under 12.
Medical Center, the Polk County Sheriffs During the investigation into the molesta-
Office reports. tion, more than 400 counts of possession
Droz, who's most recent address was of child pornography were added. Droz has
220. WVine St., Bartow, was taken to been in the jail on no bond since last April,
the hospital on Feb. 1 due to respiratory with 475 total charges, the sheriff's office
distress. He has been jailed in the infirmary reports.
in the Central County Jail since he was first No foul play is suspected, the sheriff's
incarcerated. He had been taken to Bartow department report. An autopsy will be
Regional Medical Center six times. He had conducted to determine his exact cause of
filled out a do not resuscitate order, the death.




y









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Howard R. -
Stevens, 78, passed
away Friday.
Dec. 14, 2012, in.
Mr. Stevens was a
born Oct. 4. 1934,
in Bartow. Fla. He
was the fourdL son un
born to Joseph and
Grace Stephiens.
Mr. Ste\ ensi
attended Union Howard R. Stevens
Academy from
elementary through high school, graduat-
ing in 1952.
Mr. Stevens accepted Christ at an early
age and was instrumental in starting the
Sunday School Department at the 5th
Avenue Church of Christ in Bartow
He attended Florida A&M College for
two years before enlisting in the United
States Air Force in 1955 and served until
1963.
Upon completion of his enlistment, Mr.
Stevens began full-time ministry working
with Churches of Christ inWest Texas and
Colorado. In 1969 he secured employ-
ment with Mountain Bell Telephone
Company in Colorado Springs, Colo., as
an installation service person. By 1970
Mr. Stevens was promoted to the Public
Relations Department of Mountain Bell
and transferred to Denver, Colo., thereby
becoming the first African American in
that department.
When Mountain Bell became U.S. West
Communications, Mr. Stevens served as
Facilitator/Trainer at the management
training center. He completed 21 years
of service retiring in 1990 as a second-
level manager. While working with the
Bell system Mr. Stevens continued his
involvement in the ministry on a part-
time basis.
Retirement provided the opportunity
for him to returnmto fulltime ministry, from
which he retired in 2001.
Mr. Stevens expanded his community


service participation which started in
1972 with Optimist International, "Friend
ofYouth," and continued this effort for
40 years. He served multiple times as
club president and Lt. Governor. He
completed several terms as district
chair for various committees. In 1997
Mr. Stevens became the first African
American to serve as District Governor
of the Colorado-Wyoming District which
comprised 105 clubs and 3,600 mem-
bers. Most recently, Mr. Stevens was a
volunteer on the "Green Team" for Senior
Source of Dallas and a participated in the
annual MemoryWalk of the Alzheimer's
Association of Greater Dallas.
Along with his parents, Mr. Stevens
was preceded in death by three broth-
ers Clarence Vickers, Joe Jr. andWillis
Stephens.
He is survived by a loving family that
includes his wife of 51 years, Dorothy
(Anthony) Stevens, of Desoto, Texas;
two daughters, Erika Stevens, Cedar
Hill, Texas, Jody Stevens, Lancaster,
Texas, Craig (Alesia) Stevens, Newport
News, Va., two granddaughters, Cresia
and Jamila Stevens, Newport News
Va.; three sisters, Marian Montague,
Tampa; Sylvia McRae, Lake Wales; Althea
Holmes, Lakeland; four brothers, Clyde
Stephens Sr. (Doristene), Miami, Edward
Stephens (Lillie), Williamsville, NY., James
Stephens, Tallahassee, Ernest Stephens
(Margery), Jacksonville. In-laws include
Eucille Steven-Scott (Noel), Haines City,
Carrie Vickers, and Parthenia Stephens-
Brown, Bartow, and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Memorial Service is Saturday, Feb. 16,
2013, 1 p.m. at the West Orlando Church of
Christ, 1825 Mercy Road, Orlando.
Memorial Contributions may be
made to the Union Academy Reunion
Scholarship Fund, PO. Box 1092, Bartow,
FL 33831. Attention: Mr. HarnyWilliams.
Messages of Condolences may be made
to the Guest Book at Legacy.com, Howard
Stevens, (past six months).


Thomas Buddy' Waldrop


Page 10 The Polk County Democrat


February 6, 2013





February, 203TePlkCut eoca ae1


SPORTS


Transcending boundaries to become a team


The Super Bowl celebrations are still
going on. Throughout the course of the
game, there were a couple of mentions
about players who grew up in New
Orleans coming home for the big game.
The thrill may be just a little greater
for them for that reason, but it serves
to point out that players come from all
around to form a team. Those play-
ers, Baltimore safety Ed Reed as an
example, went off to college elsewhere
and played their professional games
elsewhere. In the meantime, they had
to form bonds with new team members
who also came from other places.
Boundaries disappear when it comes to
sports.
The growing popularity of "travel"
sports has increased the likelihood that
today's youth will be exposed to more
than the kids in their own neighbor-
hoods or school playgrounds. Just a
generation ago, all of your friends lived
within walking distance, but that's not
the case anymore. Your friends, your
teammates may live as far as 20 miles
away. In a big county like Polk County, it
could be even more.
In youth baseball, these travel teams
find similar squads throughout the local
area, the state and even the multi-state
region to hone their skills, on and off
the field. None of this development
could be possible with a great amount
of support, which comes from parents,
families and the community.
Team Avalanche is one such travel
squad. These players in the 9U (9 &
Under) classification spent last season
coming together as a unified squad.
The team, which is operated as a non-
profit entity based in Eagle Lake, has
brought players together from Bartow,
Eagle Lake, Dundee, Auburndale and
Lakeland. In some situations, they
could be opponents, but when they
wear the colors of Team Avalanche, they
are teammates. When the teammates
come off the field, they are friends,
regardless of where they get their mail.
While the sports side of it is impor-
tant, it's more than winning or losing
baseball games. The teammates/friends


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join together for community activities at
the different communities throughout
the county. they passed out cookies and
sang to residents of Life Care Center in
Winter Haven. They had fun dressing
up at Halloween time. They gathered to
celebrate a teammate's birthday. They
pull together often, knowing that their
strength on and off the field can come
from their unity.
With the new year under way, the
momentum gained by the team in 2012
has to continue. The way it continues is
through additional playing time. Team
Avalanche is currently taking steps to
increase community financial support
in hopes of getting a chance to play
more games and, in the process, gain
more lifelong experiences that mold the
youth in a positive direction. Plans in-
clude games in South Florida, lake City
and then Valdosta, Georgia in hopes of
getting enough success to qualify for
the World Series at Disney's Wide World
of Sports in August.
Think about how great it would be to
have a Polk County team win a World
Series where we could watch. It's just
like those players who grew up in New
Orleans winning a Super Bowl in the
town of their youth.
Community support can be directed
to Team Avalanche, 1155 Eleanore Ave.,
Bartow, FL 33830. Contributions are tax
deductible since the team is a non-
profit organization.
For the middle school students at
Bartow Middle School, a new season
got under way yesterday, part of the
school's athletic programs. Girls and
boys are hitting the soccer field for the
start of the latest competition, which


Lady Jackets


take pre-season classic
By DON STRATTON hosted this past weekend.
CORRESPONDENT The Jackets opened the event v


The Bartow High School Lady Jackets
put up 15 runs and allowed one in their
two games in the Pre-Season Classic they


10-0 victory over Tampa Jefferson. Pitchers
LaurenWest and Emily Delldonnee

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opened yesterday. Games are played at
Bartow High School's athletic stadium.
Bartow Middle is part of the "West
Cluster" in the county scheduling
process. The teams play all games
on Tuesday. Yesterday's games were
against Lake Gibson Middle School.
Girls' games get under way at 6
p.m. with the boys' games immedi-
ately following. Bartow will be hosting
Lakeland Highlands Middle School on
Feb. 12 before going to Auburndale


High to play Stambaugh Middle on
Feb. 19. The teams have a bye week
with no game scheduled on Feb. 26.
Bartow Middle returns to action on
March 5 at Mulberry with the Mulberry
Middle School utilizing the Mulberry
High School field. The Mulberry game
is the final scheduled game for the
Bartow boys team. The girls wrap
up their season on March 12 against
Rochelle School of the Arts (which only
fields a girls team).


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- I I I I I--, -- II


The Polk County Democrat Page 11


urbeF ary 6, 2013










Jackets split two Stinger Shootout


By NEAL DUNCAN
CORRESPONDENT
The Bartow High School Yellow Jackets
boys basketball team entered the annual
Mosaic Stinger Shootout Friday night with
a 21-2 record.
Entering their contest with the West
Oaks Academy Flames, the Jackets hadn't
faced many teams that were taller than
them. Early in the game the Flames pretty
much had their way and a woeful shooting
night for the Jackets spelled early trouble.
Bartow trailed from the opening basket
and found themselves down 19-8 after one
quarter of play.
The second quarter saw the Jackets
find their legs after being pushed
around and beat down in the first.


Bartow cut the deficit to nine points,
trailing 31-22 at the half.
The Jackets were 9-34 from the floor in
the first half. That included a shocking
0-9 from the three-point line. Would
Bartow regain that shooting form that
already helped win them 21 games?
That answer was a mixed bag as BHS
would hit 15-35 in the second half. They
only made two of their 12 three-point
attempts in the half, but those two threes
were made during a critical stretch in
the fourth quarter by Quincy Childs that
sealed the game for Bartow.
Those two threes along with a suffocat-
ing Jacket defense, led BHS to a 59-49 win.
West Oaks had scored 19 points in the first
quarter alone. After turning up the defen-
sive pressure, the Jackets only allowed 18


points the entire second half.
Remarkably, Childs only scored those
six points. The Jackets were led by Chris
Perry who had 14 points, 15 rebounds and
four blocks. Also leading BHS was Derrick
Brooks who had 14 points, 11 rebounds
and seven assists.
On Saturday, Bartow took on highly
ranked and defending state champion,
Tampa Prep. The team from Tampa came
in with a 22-2 record.
The game featured two future USF
Bulls as Bartow's big man Chris Perry is
headed there next year. Also headed to
play for the Bulls is Tampa Prep Point
Guard Josh Heath.
Both teams played aggressive defense,
holding the opposing team well below
their season averages. The score went back


and forth the entire contest. So much so
that overtime was needed with a 39-39
score at the end of regulation. Heath was
the difference in the overtime, going a
perfect six for six, giving Tampa Prep a
48-43 win.
Tonight, the district tournament begins
for the Jackets at 6 p.m. at George Jenkins.
Bartow earned a first round bye and will
play either Lakeland or George Jenkins.
Their game was played last night and
finished later than the print deadline.
The opponent will be known and the
Jackets will look to dominate the district
(9-1 ih regular season) as they did all
season. Win the first game and the Jackets
head to the Regional playoffs. Win the dis-
trict and the Jackets play that first Regional


CLASSIC
FROM PAGE 11

combined to face 17 batters allowing
one hit and one walk while striking out 6
batters.
Offensively the Jackets were led by
catcher Lexy Sims 2-for-2 with 2 RBIs and
StefanieWalls 2-for-2 with 3 RBIs. Deean
Davis added a home run and Cheyenne
Blaha, Tonee Fabrizi, Rachael Imig,
Meredith McGinnis, Alex Mace and Taylor
Sturgill added a hit each.
The final game of the tournament
featured a rematch of such as the Jackets
played Tampa Chamberlain who defeated
Bartow in last year's State Championship
9-8. The game started off as a pitchers
duel between Bartow Brooke Farrer and
Chamberlain's ace Rachael Dryer. The two
battled through three scoreless innings but
Bartow broke the ice in the bottom of the
fourth as Cheyenne Blaha reached on an


error followed by a hit by Tonee Fabrizi and
then Lexy Sims knocked them both in to
make it 2-0.
In the fifth Bartow added three more as
Taylor Pittman scorched a line drive down
left field line for a double. Deean Davis
singled, Fabrizi walked and then Sims
knocked in two followed by Rachael Imig
driving in Sims. Pitcher Brooke Farrer held
Chamberlain to four hits while walking one
and striking out 5.
Bartow's JV team opens their season
Thursday hosting LakeWales at 7 p.m. and
Friday they host McKellar. The varsity trav-
els to Mckell on Friday for a 4 p.m. game.
On Feb. 12 the varsity opens their home
slate hosting the Lake Wales Highlanders
at 7 p.m. The first pre season ranking came
out and Bartow is ranked third.
2013 Florida High School Softball
Preseason Top 10, Class 7A
1. Chamberlain, 2. Chiles, 3. Bartow,
4. Braden River, 5. Cooper City, 6. Lake
Howell, 7. West Boca, 8. First Coast, 9.
Winter Springs, 10. St Thomas Aquinas


While the two of you experience a
romantic dinner or outing, drop your children
(Kindergarten Age or Above Only Please)
off for a night of fun, food and creativity.
Cost is $20.00 per child and includes
pottery painting, food, drink and dessert!
Space is limited, so call today
to reserve your child's spot!
(863) 676-8573
S222 E Stuart Ave, Lake Wales, FL 33853


Be a BETTER MANAGER

tomorrow!
Books 6y Bartow Authors

Frisbie's Laws:
25 Surefire Rules for Successful Management
by S. L. Frisbie, IV

Yesterday's Polk County
by Louise K. Frisbie

Peace River Pioneers
by Louise K. Frisbie

Florida's Fabled Inns
by Louise K. Frisbie
Each book is $14.95 plus sales tax,
or order multiple books and SAVE!
Any two books, $26.90 (save 10%)
Any three books, $38.10 (save 15%)
Any four books, $47.85 (save 20%)
Offers expire 5 PM Dec. 20, 2012

Books may be purchased at The Polk County
Democrat, 190 South Florida Ave., Bartow, or
add $4 per book for mailing.
To order, email SLFrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com
or call 863-533-4183 or mail coupon below to Imperial
Publishing, 190 South Florida Ave., Bartow, FL 33830


YES: Reserve my copies of:
Frisbie's Laws
Peace River Pioneers


Yesterday's Polk County
Florida's Fabled Inns


Name_
Address


City
Phone_


State Zip_


Email


__ will pick up my purchase or Mail to above address
__ Payment enclosed $_ or _I will pay when I pick up my order


Bruce Tyndall who lives in Bartow,
has been subscribing to The Polk County Democrat since
he was-discharged from the Army in 1946.

That is 67 years ago!

He said he's been a subscriber for that long because he
likes to "keep up with the locals." Said he knew
SL when he was born.

If you too would like to subscribe to the newspaper
and "Keep Up With The Locals" call 533-4183
or fill out and return the form below.

--- -------------------- -- -----

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for 3 Mos. $12.84 Signature (required)
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Email


February 6, 2013


Page 12 The Polk County Democrat






February, 213 he Plk ount Deocra Pae 1


COMMUNITY



1,000 pancakes cooked

Members of the Kiwanis Club prob-
ably grilled up about 1,000 pancakes on
Saturday during the 37th Annual Pancake
Breakfast.
The 300 or so people who took part in it
were going toward helping the civic club
raise money to help the community in
what is probably their biggest fundraiser
of the year.
The money doesn't specifically go to
just one or two causes as the Bartow ` '
Kiwanis Club spreads its giving to what
ever needs help.
Among the areas where Kiwanis' giving
usually goes is toward scholarships to
Bartow High Key Cl ub members. It helps
places like the Achievement Academy,
Bartow girls softball, the Youth Fair, car
seats for kids, Christmas angels, Church Not all pancakes have-to be round. This one
Service Center, Church Youth Recognition stands for Kiwanis as they made more than 300
Day, Dixie Youth Baseball and Tianvica pancakes Saturday at the 37th annual Pancake
Riding Academy to name just a few. Breakfast at the Bartow Civic Center.


Kelly Bass and
her grandson
Logan
Goodrich, 2,
make faces at
each other at
the Pancake
Breakfast
Saturday at
the Bartow
Civic Center.
PHOTOS
BY
JEFF
ROSLOW


February 9, 2013 at 10 AM
To benefit the arts in downtown Bartow.
This event will benefit an outdoor arts project in downtown Bartow.
This is a project of the Bartow Rotary Club with the assistance of
Bartow High School Art Club.

iMMm Registration, start, finish and awards In Mosaic Park, at 11ol South Broadway Avenue, one block
north of the Bartow Civic Center.
8:30-945 A.M Checkn and late registration Mosaic Park
10:oo A.M. Adventure Run Start
Awards approximately 11:30 A.M.
(Mll This is a 2.7 rmle run through Mosaic Park and Mary Holland Park in South Bartow, on grass, paved
streets and walking paths. Various obstacles will be arranged to challenge the runners on their way through the
course.__
MlEflfW s2o if received by February 6, $s, ages t1 ad under. After February 6, fees are s,5 and s51 for ages
is and under.
*M Iifi See application below or at www.fltnessrevolufonnowlyeowlewlacketstomp enter online at
"signmeup.com" (adds service fee) or enter at Fitniche.
-lli- Pickup your packet at Fitniche on February 5th and February 6th from s.oo p.m. through closing OR at
race day registration.
1Mil Ist overall MIF, 1st overall masters M/F (40 and over) ist overall grandmasters M/F (60 and over).
ist through 3rd In Under to, 10-14, 1519, and In ten year age groups through 70o. Teams ist through 3rd (four
runners minimum per team).
t Shirts to all pre-regfstered by February and, race day shirts and sies "as available,"


Ra tcodrttt SteIe Glthem phone 86 )ig t6. hstevewgtthe insrUin.corm.
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February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 13


^^ZI 7
- M-If-Md-I4 FM





Page 14 The Polk County Democrat February 6, 2013


Bloomin' Bike Ride coming


It's almost time again for the Bloomin'
Bike Ride.
On March 2, the annual event 65 and
35 mile road tour and 17-mile family
fun ride bike tour takes off at 8 a.m.
with this companion event.
Main Street Bartow Inc. & Bartow Cycling
Events sponsors the event with Bartow's
Bloomin Art Show and Bloomin 5K It is an
on-road cycling tour along the back roads
of southern Polk County.
Additionally, this is a cycling event has
fully stocked rest stops with volunteers,
trailing vehicles for assistance and aid,
course photographer, goodie bags and food
provided by some of Bartow's restaurants.
Registration is at Active.com, or you
can download a registration form from
BartowChamber.com website or you
can register the day of the race.
The POWER PEDALERS program,
sponsored byWalmart and Heartland
for Children, gives bicycles to kids who
would like a bike but cannot afford one.
There are 60 bikes.
The staging area will be on the
southwest side of Fort Blount Park.
Registration opens at 7 a.m. and the
ride begins with a special presentation
at 8 a.m. of new bikes to the POWER
PEDDLERS. For information call ride
director Trish Pfeiffer at 863-640-1024 or
email Lillycat36@aol.com..

Adventure Run
registration available
The first Yellow Jacket Stomp
Adventure Run is drawing closer and
registration forms are now available.
Taking place at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
9, the run in Mosaic Park will be an
obstacle course which is a joint project
of the Bartow Rotary Club and the


Bartow High School Art Club and with
some help from the Bartow Chamber of
Commerce. The goal is to raise money to
fund public art sculptures in areas of
Bartow.
It will be a 2.7-mile run through
Mosaic Park and Mary Holland Park in
South Bartow, on grass, paved streets
and walking paths.
The entry fee is $20 if received by
Feb. 6, $12 for those 15 and younger.

Pancake Supper
returns for 72nd year
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in
Bartow once again for the 72nd year
- has its annual Pancake Supper on
Shrove.
It is from from 4:30-7 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 12. Tickets are $5 for adults and
only $2 for children 12 and younger.
The menu will include pancakes, ham
or sausage and beverages.
The Pancake Supper began 72 years
ago and serves as a reminder the begin-
ning of Lent is the next day, which is
on Ash Wednesday. Profits benefit The
Church Service Center and The Women's
Care Center, both here in Bartow.
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church is at
500 W. Stuart, Bartow. Tickets can be
purchased from any church member, at
the church office or at the door.
For information, phone the church
office at 863-533-3581 or visit the
church's website at www.holytrinity .
lives.com.

Other IB students
show in science fair project
In addition to Andrew Noonan, 10th
grade, first place in Engineering, and


Annika Mulaney, 10th grade, first
place in Biochemistry, 12 other Bartow
IB students made showings at the
regional science fair.
They are:
Saher Kidwai, 9th grade, first
place, Computers Category; Riley
McDanal, ninth grade, firsi place.
Earth and Space Sciences; Divya
Ravinder, ninth grade, first place,
Environmental Sciences; Keegan
Schaal, second place, Mathematics;
Prajakta Kularni, ninth grade, third
place, Environmental Sciences;
Axita Patel, ninth grade, third place,
Environmental Sciences; Claire
Pincket, ninth grade, third place,


k


Botany; Kriyana Reddy, ninth grade,
third place, Chemistry; KylerVolakos,
ninth grade, third place, Computers;
Devin Dye, ninth grade, fourth place,
Computers; Kim Fullencamp, ninth
grade, fourth place, Engineering;
Courtney Lamoureux, ninth grade,
honorable mention, Zoology.
For the science fair, Andrew did a
project on a large parabolic reflector
that concentrates solar energy onto a
central focal point. Annika aimed at
pinpointing drugs that may effectively
screen for one of the root causes of
Alzheimer's, in this case, an overabun-
dance of the tau protein.
Mary Cannaday


Florida's Natural

Growers Foundation

Charity Classic 5-K

Nature Run/Walk <


Saturday,

irch 16th, 2013

at 8:30am


Florida's Natural Growers Foundation is hosting their
first annual Charity Classic 5-K Nature Run/Walk at
*the Grove House Visitor Center at Saturday, March
6th, 2013 at 8:30am with a Kids Fun Run for ages 8 and under at
9:30 am. The event will conclude with an awards presentation at 10 am.
On-site registration begins at 7 am and is $25.00 per race participant.
Each participant will receive a shirt and a race-day bag. To pre-register online, go to
www.FloridasFllaturalCharityClassic.com and click Register for the 5-K.
Registration forms are also available at the Grove House Visitor Center. Participants
registered by February 28th are guaranteed a t-shirt. Entry fees may be mailed to
ATTN: Florida's Natural Fun Run/Walk, PO Box 1111, Lake Wales, Florida 33859,
dropped off at the Grove House Visitor Center, or may be paid
on the day of the race. Children 13 and under free.
The course is a combination of off-road hills,
wetlands and natural Florida terrain. All proceeds
from this event will benefit the Florida's Natural
Growers Foundation. Since the Foundation was
created in 2008, nearly $500,000 has been
awarded to charitable organizations in the
Central Florida area.


For questions or additional information about participation or sponsorship opportunities,
please contact Amber Johnson at 863-676-1411 ext 3543
or via email at amber.johnson@citrusworld.com.


- .



The Bartow Rotary Club's Annual.Wild Game Dinner will be held
S turday, March 9, 2013 at Leland Young's barn in Alturas.
Event starts at 6 p.m.
SUPPORT COMMUNITY PROJECTS LIKE:
* Scholarships for Higher Education
* Dictionary Distribution to all elementary school students in the


If
s



.'


.n


*Speci l needs in th? community and many other programs
Each ticket includes:
Dinner Open Bar Door Prizes* 5 Eickets fo,- Chinese Aiuciion
Tickets are $50.00 and may be purchased from any member
or at Githens State Farm Insurance, 595 W. Main St.
For more information, please call
i 863-535'5132
THE BARTOW ROTARYICLUB PO. Box 14 Bartow, FL 33831
2013 W;i.D GAME DiNr'EP SPCt. iORS


ACT Erivironmental--
ArrmazCustom Chemicals
B BB & ..
.BartowFord
SBarto regional Medical Center
Boswel& Dunlap
Center tate Bank;..
C- I rown electric ''"-:


Lawrence Plumbing
SMosaic
Olson Construction
Pickett &Associates "
The PolklCounty Democrat Newspaper
Spath Jewelers
Stingray Chevrolet
Terracon consulting Inc.
able UPS Sto- 4
-W.: ,W.den ean-Funeral.Ho
.-.. .,,


Strawberry Patch of Fort Meade
FLOWERS, CARDS, GIFTS
109 West Broadway, Fort Meade 863-285-9444
strawberrypatchof fortmeade@hotmail.com
Brian and Jessica Cochrane


N.- -- IN Now I T1


February 6, 2013


Page 14 The Polk County Democrat


., ,a4
S.*"' *


' --









Permits are required


Periodically, we receive telephone
calls and complaints about door-to-
door solicitations in the city. While
this seems like a harmless situation,
it could be a violation of the law in
Bartow.
Many years ago, cities in Florida
began enacting ordinances to regu-
late such activity, and for very good
reasons. One never knows who may be
staking out your neighborhood, casing
your house or just trying to find out


ChiefJoe Hall

Ulpf t


if anyone is home, just so they can


break-in; all under the guise of being a
door-to-door salesperson.
Like other cities, Bartow does have
an ordinance that regulates solicita-
tions, and all with a few exceptions
must have a permit in their possession
while doing so.
Bartow's code 22-131 states, "No
person shall engage in business within
the city as a canvasser, solicitor, ped-
dler, or transient merchant without
having first been issued a permit by the


city manager". All of this notwithstand-
ing any business licenses that would be
required.
When a solicitor comes to your door,
ask to see.their permit. If they are not in
compliance, typically they will excuse
themselves. This will also demonstrate
to them that you know they are required
to be permitted by the City. If you are
concerned, don't hesitate to contact
the Bartow Police Department at
863-534-5034.


CALENDARand
WELCOME TO YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Want to see your event on this page? Call us at 863-533-4183 or email news@polkcountydemocrat.com.


*EVENTS
. THURSDAY, FEB. 7
Special School Board Work
Session, 8:30 a.m. All-day meeting.
Superintendent's conference room,
1915 S. Floral Ave., Bartow.
The Lakeland Metro Chapter of the
National Association of Women Business
Owners, 11:30 am. Building your
Personal Brand. $25 for members, $30 for
guests. Lakeland Yacht & Country Club,
929 Lake Hollingsworth Blvd., Lakeland.
To register www.nawbolakelandmetro.
cor or call 863-940-0070 by Feb. 4
LLL Senior Adult monthly covered dish
luncheon, 11:30 am., First Baptist Church,
410 E. Church St, in Administrative
Center. Public welcome -bring a covered
dish. Monthly speakers featured.


* FRIDAY, FEB.8
Special School Board Work Session,
8:30 a.m., All-day meeting. Superintendent's
conference, 1915 S. FloralAve., Bartow.
Spanish Pathways, 6 p.m. reception
and lecture. Free. Rosalyn Howard gives
lecture for opening of exhibit. Polk
County Historical Center, 100 E. Main
St., Bartow, 863-534-4386
* FRI. FEB. 8- SUN. FEB. 10
13th Annual L.B. Brown Festival.
9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Saturday and 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.
Representatives of the Civil War period
with United States Colored Troops,
Buffalo Soldiers and Black Seminoles
dressed as they did then and performing
demonstrations of what it was like then.
LB. Brown House Museum, 470 L.B.
Brown Ave., Bartow.


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Presale tickets available at City Hall, Fort Meade Community
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Charleston) on Saturday, Feb. 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.


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Join Our Winning Team.
Central Florida's fastest growing community newspaper group is seeking aggres-
sive salespeople to handle challenging and rewarding sales territories in the Polk
County area. The opportunity consists.of both outside and inside positions and
focuses on retail and category businesses. The ideal person to fill these jobs is
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We believe in developing strong relationships with our clients. Your ability to
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Advertising sales experience is preferred but not necessary.
If this sounds like the career opportunity you've been looking for, please send a
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Bartow, Florida 33831
or email: pnorthrop@lakewalesnews.com
The Lake Wales News,
The Frostproof News, The Polk County Democrat,
I The Fort Meade Leader and Your Haines City Herald
(M______________________________________________ _


The Polk County Democrat Page 15


February 6, 2013





Page 16 The Polk CountyDemocrat February 6, 2013


PA S'-, A


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Snakes
Snakes have been an interest of mine
since I was 8 years old.
It started with collecting local species
like garter snakes, watersnakes, and
rat snakes, and then evolved into large
collections of various species including


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as pets
boas and pythons. They were easy to
maintain, and provided a constant
stimulus for learning.
Ophiophobia, a fear of snakes, was
early on the learning curve. Some
people are very afraid of snakes. So


First, we don't sell acupuncture as some
kind of "miracle cure." It isn't. But, in many
cases, especially chronic cases that have not
responded as well as might be expected to
conventional treatments, acupuncture offers
a viable, safe and affordable alternative often
with very good results.
Treatment is available for issues of many kinds,
including lameness, skin condition, urinary
tract and kidney issues, and neurological and
respiration ailments. Dr. Shank is one of just a
handful of vets in all of Florida certified by the
renowned Chi Institute in both small and large .
animal acupuncture.
Pleape call us today your first consultation is
FREE to see if acupuncture treatments might
be right for your dog, cat or horse.


Thomas B. Schotman
MW~ff


far it is the strongest fear that I have
observed in people. As a result, I vowed
to never purposely scare anyone with
one of my captive snakes.
There are many species of snakes that
are very adaptable to being handled
and kept as pets. There are also species
that are not tractable and are not easily
kept in captivity.
Certainly, I do not recommend any of
the venomous species as pets, although
there are collectors that responsi-
bly keep poisonous snakes in their
collections.
Snakes reptiles in general do not
exhibit emotions. They can respond to
their owners, but do not show affection,
love, hatred ... etc.,as their brains are
rather small and function to provide


FORT MEADE ANIMAL CLINIC
Lori J. Shank, DVM
711 E. Broadway, Fort Meade
Call for appointment: 285-8652 Central Florida's Premier 24-Hour Emergency
Care and Specialty Referral Center
"Helping People by Helping Their Pets"





PET FESTIVAL L2imf
Presented by Polk County Parks & Recreation Emergency/Critical Care Referring Clinics
General Practice Boarding & Grooming Dog Park


Saturday, Feb. 9
Noon to 4 p.m.


DiOGi Dog Park at Loyce
500 W. Carter Road, Mulberry

Admission is free
For the ENTIRE family (pets
must be on a leash or in a cage)


Activities include:
Animal adoptions
Pet-related vendors & services
Information booths & demos
Interactive activities
Pet contests (best dressed,
biggest, and smallest)
Wiener dog races
Food vendors


Live entertainment
Kids Zone
And more!


E. Harpe Park


(4


3025 Dundee Rd, Winter Haven, FL 33884
(863) 324-3340
(863) 324-3340 Major Credit Cards and
www.vhavets.com Care Credit Accepted
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Call today to schedule an appointment!

[Suite Dreams
520 Mountain Lake Cutoff Rd.
Lake \-Vales.,, FL 33859
863-676-7297


www.lakewalesvets.com


VETERINARY HOSPITAL


-


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;.


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_


Page 16 The Polk County'Democrat


February 6, 2013


h;


them with an amazing adaptability
to survival in their native habitats.
They do not have vocal chords so they
are a quiet pet, and do not produce
dander or dust making them rather
hypo-allergenic.
As pets, they need a safe and ad-
equately large enclosure. Historically
the aquarium with a good lid has
worked well. Temperature should be
maintained and monitored according
to the needs of the specific species. For
example, most boas and pythons are
tropical and need temperature ranges
from mid 80 degrees F to 90 degrees E
A gradient is best.
Thermometers are a necessary part
of maintaining a snake. I prefer a heat
source that is not a light. Snakes do not
have eyelids that can close, so constant
light is a stress to the snake. A daylight
cycle with a basking light will help
mimic a natural environment.
A clean water source should be
available at all times, preferably large
enough for the snake to soak itself. This
really helps when they shed their skin
as they grow. A hiding box will provide

SNAKES 17






February 6, 2013 The Polk County Democrat Page 17


PASS ION fror I Pi.S
r.0


SNAKES
FROM PAGE 16

a secure place for the snake. Although
there are a variety of safe bedding ma-
terials available, I have always preferred
newspaper because it makes it easier to
clean the entire cage.
Carpet (indoor/outdoor) can work
well and can be washed with the
laundry. A branch of oak or citrus wood
can enhance the cage substrate and
help with the snakes shed.
It is important to keep the cages
clean. Most snakes defecate after they
have eaten, making their cage cleaning
predictable.
Because snakes eat whole "prey,"
,their diet is nutritionally balanced and
simple. Mice and rats for most species,
chicks or quail for some, and fish for
some of the watersnakes. Some species
of snakes can be trained to eat thawed
(frozen) prepared snausages. One of my
favorites is the hognosed snake which
exclusively eats toads in the wild. I usu-
ally trained them to eat mice scented
with toad. Most of the animals I kept


Why Advertise
On Our
Pet Pages?


Amy is the most
who gives


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of Po


in my collection fed readily on thawed
frozen food, which is available online
and was much easier than maintain-
ing live mice and rats, etc. Most snake
species can be fed at 1-2 week intervals.
One benefit of snakes is that they can
be left at home, alone, without issues of
separation anxiety or ill will, for weeks
at a time.
I have really enjoyed my experience
with snakes as pets. It is not a hobby for
everyone, but I encourage kids that are
interested to keep learning and to be
responsible.
A comment on the python situa-
tion in South Florida: The press has
distorted the problem with pythons
in Florida. There are not hundreds
of thousands of snakes and there are
very few really large ones. The January
prize hunt had yielded only 27 snakes
as of Jan. 23, with a significant number
of snake "hunters." I agree that these
snakes are an issue and need to be
controlled, but the perceived concern
with these snake has deterred a lot of
people from visiting the Everglades un-
necessarily. Exotic species, both plant
and animal, are a constant challenge to
our native natural balance. We should


II you would like


HERE ARE SOME STATISTICS:
Dogs: There are approximately 78.2 million owned
dogs in the U.S. 39% of US households own at least
one dog 28% of owners own two dogs.
Cats: There are approximately 86.4 million owned
cats in the U.S. 33% of US households own at least
one cat 52% of owners own more than one cat.


of ADOPTIONS '





adorable puppy Reagan is a happy and super excited Roscoe is a senior dog! He's good
great kisses. puppy who can't wait to find a home! with everyone and a little lover!





et little six week Bonnie is a three month old Clyde is the brother of Bonnie
I a cuddle bug! playful girl. and they love to play together!
1
If you would like to donate,
i please send your donations to:
SThe Humane Society of Polk County
MANE 555 Sage Rd., Winter Haven, FL 33881
ITY. 863-324-5227 863-325-8905 (fax)
Or you can donate online by going to:
Clk County ? wwwhumanesocietyofpolkcounty.org


Hours: Tues-Sat 10am 5pm Kennel closes at 4pm
.1


never release an exotic animal, snake
or otherwise, ever.
Questions or concerns, including


identification of species are welcome
by contacting me at the Lake Wales
Veterinary Hospital.


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CATS DOGS OTHER SMALL ANIMALS
Carol Thompson, VMD
General Medicine & Surgery Laser Surgery
Behavior Consultation Boarding 4
3631 Hwy. 60 E.. Lake Wales, FL 33898
863-676-5922 Fax' 863-676-7342
S EMERGENCY: 833-676-4677
r THOMPSON S
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gLu 6. iS..~A -I&176


Does Your Pet Hav

Bad Breath???? 4
Stop by Lake Wales Veterinary Hospital and
have one of our technicians check your pet's
teeth at no cost to determine if a dental
cleaning is needed. Receive a 15% Discount
Off a Dental Cleaning during January,
February & March. Call today to schedule
your appointment.
DON'T MISS OUT ON THE LATEST INFORMATION AND
i HEALTH NEWS FOR YOUR PETI "Like" us on Facebook
j Text- Like LakeWalesVetennaryHospital to 32665
Facebook.com/LakeWalesVeterinaryHospital
1'Ow


A. Fleet Ryland, DVM Thomas Schotman, DVM Michael Matthews, DVM
Jess Anderson, DVM Jennifer Waltman, DVM
520 Mountain Lake Cutoff Rd. Lake Wales, FL 33859 www.lakewalesvets.com


863-676-1451


2839486


Statistics were compiled from the American Pet Products Association 2011-2012 Natural Pet Owners Survey.


February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 17


FFLi WU At ......


I






Page 18 The Polk County Democrat February 6, 2013


FEELING


Pet Peace of Mind volunteers help patients with pets


Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative
Care started a Pet Peace of Mind program
with the goal of bringing peace of mind to
hospice patients who own pets by funding
pet food, litter and routine vaccines.
The program also provides pet-loving
volunteers to assist with dog walking and
transportation to vet appointments plus
visiting the pets' owners at home, nursing
facilities, hospitals, or wherever patients
maybe.
Jeff and Joyce Vose of Winter Haven
are volunteers for the Pet Peace of Mind
program. They hail from Pennsylvania and
have been Floridians since 1985, where
both worked for State Farm Insurance.
They love all animals, but have an affmity
for dogs, especially dogs that have been ill-
treated, displaced, homeless or discarded,
like Sugar, their 7-year-old female Lab mix
that was thrown out of a car. Sugar now
rules theVose household, commandeer-
ing the family golf cart as she loves rides
in the open. Jeff, Joyce and Sugar are one
of several volunteer households willing to
welcome and care for pets whose owners
are Hospice patients unable to care for their


pets due to their illnesses.
Bev Johnson, president of the Dynamic
Dog Club, had a list of 14 pet derapists in-
terested in becoming Cornerstone Hospice
volunteers. She teaches certification claust-
for therapy dogs at Dynamic Dog Club. Her
interest in a therapy dog program began
with an encounter in an Alzheimer's facility.
The final stages of this disease had left her
mom in a catatonic-like state, not speaking
for the past several months. During one
visit, Johnson saw a therapy dog visit the
parlor and watched as her mother's eyes
began to track the dog. When the handler
brought the dog up closer, her mother
reached out to pet its head and put her
arms around the dog's neck asking the
handler, "What's her name?" For a brief few
minutes Johnson saw her mother smile and
come back from her foggy far-away world.
Originally from California, Deb LaBelle is
a retired Air Force veteran with 22 years of
service to the nation. Deb's husband, Jerry,
is also a retired Air Force veteran with
28 years of service. Deb had lost herYorkie
10 months earlier and in 1998 while
stationed at Ramstein Air Force Base in


Germany, got a female Yorkshire Terrier
she named Mandy, who was 10 weeks old.
Mandy is now 14.
Once back in the U.S., Deb got Misty
another femaleYorkie born in Lakeland in
2000 and brought her home at one month
old. The LaBelle household with Misty and
Mandy are another volunteer household
waiting to help out with typical pet needs
that Cornerstone Hospice patients may
have.
The larger plan came together when
Cornerstone Hospice was introduced
to Banfield Charitable Trust's program
"Pet Peace of Mind." This program was
developed by Banfield specifically for not-
for-profit hospices to help keep patients
and their pets together longer.
In May 2011, Banfield awarded
Cornerstone Hospice a $5,000 grant and
Pet Peace of Mind program materials
needed to begin. Cornerstone is the first
hospice in Florida to be awarded this
program.
For those who want information or to
register for one of Hospice's volunteer
training classes call volunteer specialist


PHOTO PROVIDED
Female Yorkshire Terrier, Mandy, 14, and
Yorkie Misty, 12, are staying with Air Force
veteran Deb LaBelle. Mandy and Misty allow
Deb's husband, Jerry, to help around the
house. Mandy and Misty are eagerly waiting
to provide companionship and assistance to
pets of Cornerstone Hospice patients who may
require Pet Peace of Mind assistance.

Carrie Hess in Winter Haven at 863-291-
5567 or volunteer manager Lisa Gray at
352-742-6806 or 888-728-6234.


Use the KISS method in your kitchen


Half the people on antidepressant
medications in this country are on them,
most likely, because they attempted to
use their new, state-of-the-art electronic
kitchen devices. In order to use these
"miracle time-savers," they were forced to
study 17 pages of safety instructions, and
297 pages of operating and dismantling
instructions. Truth is, the machines are
the brainchildren of engineers who have
never cooked or washed dishes. The
gadgets require a great deal of time to
assemble, take apart after use, wash, dry,
re-assemble, and put away.
SA major reason for our nation's health
crisis is the fact that folks are over
scheduled and have taken a permanent
leave of absence from cooking, or they
never learned the art from their busy,
over scheduled mothers. Incidentally,
cooking does not mean inserting a
frozen "convenience dinner," loaded with
unhealthy additives, into a microwave for
two minutes; it also doesn't have to mean
slaving all day in the kitchen.
Preparing fresh, nutritious fare is im-
perative for good health. Basic, inexpen-
sive ingredients can be transformed in
minutes into hundreds of body and soul
nourishing dishes. 90 percent of cooking
can be achieved without a single ma-
chine. The remaining 10 percent can be
skipped. Keeping our kitchen equipment
streamlined, and using simple cooking
methods makes meal preparation enjoy-
able, speedy and rewarding. This is the


Judy E. Buss




Health Cirrespondeni


essence of the KISS Method, as in: Keep It
Simple, Silly!
The time we believe we save by not
cooking, and instead consuming "meals-
on-wheels" of impoverished takeouts of
junk, fast, canned, or frozen imitation
food, is spent suffering at doctors' waiting
rooms or undergoing costly and unpleas-
ant tests and surgeries. With each plate
of food we consume we are sicker or
healthier the choice is ours.
Most soups do not need to be uni-
formly smooth. They actually taste
better when left chunky or only partially
mashed. Use a hand masher: this wonder-
device doesn't even need a battery... Do
not buy exotic, often expensive ingredi-
ents, such as special oils, vinegars, sauces,
or condiments, if they will only be used
once or twice.
Limit your oil supply to two kinds of
olive oil: cooking (also labeled "pure olive
oil") and extra virgin. Olive oil is also
nutritionally superior to most other oils.


Likewise, wine vinegar and/or apple cider
vinegar are all the vinegar(s) needed.
The following is a list of some basic
kitchen utensils to coverall bases: large
Chef's Knife, serrated knife, paring knife,
peeler, four-paneled box grater for fine
to course grating, cutting board, hand
masher, strainer, measuring cups and


spoons, mixing bowls, vegetable steamer,
covered skillet, etc.
Great news: You do not need an elec-
tronic banana peeler or balsamic tuna
juice; use the KISS method -
Bon appdtit!
NUTRITION 119


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February 6, 2013


Page 18 The Polk County Democrat


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DVT is a large blood clot in leg or pelvis


DEAR DR. ROACH: Last February,
I had a massive DVT from my ankle
to mid-thigh. I had no pain at all
and walked three miles shortly be-
fore my regularly scheduled physi-
cal. I missed that my leg was very
swollen. My doctor stated that that
was one of the traditional reasons
for getting a DVT.
I have taken Coumadin for the
past 10 months. One doctor says I
should take this medication for the
rest of my life, since the clot was so
large and there was no reason for
my having gotten one. The other
says that since this was the first
clot I have ever had, I can stop
taking the Coumadin and observe
the leg for new swelling/pain. I am
otherwise in very good health. I
am totally indecisive about what to
do. What would you recommend?
- M.D.
ANSWER: A DVT (deep venous
thrombosis) is a blood clot in the
large veins of the thigh and pelvis.
These cause trouble by themselves,
by producing leg swelling that can
range anywhere from annoying to
.disabling, but more importantly,
they dan break off and travel up
into the lungs, called a pulmonary


NUTRITION
FROM PAGE 18

KALE WITH GINGER
DRESSING
(Serves 2)
5 cups raw kale
1 tablespoon ginger root, peeled,
finely grated
tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely grated
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds

Wash kale, remove stems; shred.
Steam the kale 10 minutes or until
wilted. When done, remove from
stove and briefly rinse with cold
water. Drain. In a bowl, combine
ginger, oil, garlic and soy sauce. Add
kale, mix well. Toss with sesame
seeds. Serve hot or cold.

APPLESAUCE
(Serves 3)
4 medium apples, cored, peeled
V2 cup water
1/ teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon honey (optional)

Cut apples into small pieces. In a
saucepan, mix apples, lemon juice,
water. Cook slowly for 15 minutes,


embolus. Pulmonary emboli can be
life-threatening, since large ones,
reduce blood supply to the lungs
and can even prevent blood from
coming out of the heart at all.
Most authorities recommend life-
long warfarin (Coumadin) only after
a second episode of DVT in a case
like yours, where there is no clear
reason for having had one. However,
clinical judgment may sometimes
cause a physician to advise lifelong
warfarin after a single event, es-
pecially one that's life-threatening
- say, a large pulmonary embolus.
Taking warfarin long term definitely
would decrease the risk of a serious
blood clot, either in the legs or the
lungs, but it also would increase the

or until softened, stirring occasion-
ally and breaking up the apple
pieces. Stir in remaining ingredients.
Cook one minute longer. If homoge-
neously smooth texture is desired,
use a hand masher.

RICE WITH ORANGE
(Serves 2)
1 cup uncooked brown rice
2 cups water
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon orange zest, finely
grated
4 cup orange juice
1 orange, peeled, sectioned
4 tablespoons cooking olive oil
1 tablespoon tarragon
Salt and pepper

Cook rice in water, until all liquid
is absorbed. In a covered skillet cook
onion and garlic in oil until onion is
translucent. Add orange zest, juice,
tarragon, salt and pepper and cook
3 minutes. Meanwhile, cut each
orange section in half. When rice is
done, add onion mixture. Gently mix
in orange pieces.

Judy E. Buss is a nutritional cook-
ing instructor. She is a member of
the American Nutrition Association,
and a columnist for and a member
of the American Holistic Health
Association.


You deserve personalized quality health care!

Benigno Feliciano, M.D
Diplomate of the American
Board of Internal Medicine


T' -I eating all
,' ,adult illnesses
and diseases:

1137 Druid Circle
Lake Wales, Florida
2000 Osprey Blvd., Suite 110
Bartow, Florida


* Cardiac Diseases
* High Blood Pressure
* Pulmonary Diseases
* Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthritis
* Hypo/Hyperthyroidism
* Diabetes
* Skin Diseases/ Cancer
* High Cholesterol
* Strokes
* Wound Care


Se habla Espahol
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863-533-1617
Accepting new patients 16 and older
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments
Internal Medicine Institute, P.A. ,,emo, Medicine nsu


risk of abnormal bleeding, some-
thing that can be serious.
In my opinion, because the initial
blood clot was not life-threatening,
I would probably agree with your
second doctor to not continue the
warfarin for the long term. However,
your doctors should look carefully
for some other reason why you had
the blood clot in the first place.
Please let me know what they find,
and what you decide.
DEAR DR. ROACH: Has modern
medicine come up with any remedy
for the loss of equilibrium and
balance that we elders encounter?
Surgery, perhaps? L.M.F.
ANSWER: Definitely not sur-
gery. Balance is a complex system
involving eyes, a sense of where
your limbs are proprioceptionn)
and where gravity is, through the
organ of balance in the inner ear.
Finding out which system might
be making you off-balance can be
tricky. Fortunately, balance exer-
cises ideally supervised by an
occupational or physical therapist


- almost always help.
DEAR DR. ROACH: My company
checks cholesterol once a year. My
level is 256. I know this is in the
high range, but what is the differ-
ence between fasting against non-
fasting? Would the level be higher
or lower if I were to do a fasting
cholesterol check? M.S.
ANSWER: Eating usually has only
a small effect on total cholesterol
- raising it a little, in most people.
What is more important is the result
of the HDL cholesterol. A healthy
diet with lots of vegetables, fruits
and little red meat can help choles-
terol level in almost everybody.
Dr. Roach regrets that he is
unable to answer individual let-
ters, but will incorporate them in
the column whenever possible.
Readers may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealthmed.cornell.edu
or request an order form of available
health newsletters or mail questions
to PO. Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health newsletters may
be ordered from www.rbmamall.com.


The Florida Hospital Heart & Vascular Center clinical
team is quick, efficient and focused on your heart care.
Our two interventional cardiologists, Dr. Roger Wittum
and Dr. Phillip E. Jones, have more than 60 combined years
of cardiology experience. Our center has performed more
than 1,700 heart interventions since early 2009.
Trust your heart to experience.


The Heartland's recognized leader
in Cardiovascular care.




FLORIDA HOSPITAL
HeaRTcAND MsEDICAL CENT
Heart &Vascular Center


February 6, 2013


The Polk County Democrat Page 19






Page20 he olk ouny Dmocat Fbrury 213


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS CONVENIENT.


Auburndale Family Health Center
2028 Highway 92 West
(863) 965-9327


Bartow Family Health Center
1625 N. Carpenter Ave.
(863) 533-1448


Dundee Family Health Center
5999 Dundee Rd., Suite 750
(863) 292-4656


Haines City Family Health Center
36245 Highway 27
(863) 421-9801


Lake Wales Family Health Center
201 SR 60 West
(863) 679-9644


Southeast Winter Haven
Family Health Center -
6035 Cypress Gardens Blvd.
(863) 324-4725


Winter Haven Family Health Center
100 Avenue I, N.E.
(863) 292-4077


If you are looking for family health care that's professional, friendly and convenient,
Winter Haven Hospital invites you to visit one of our seven conveniently located
Family Health Centers.
Your local Family Health Center offers a wide range of healthcare services
for children two years-of-age and older, adolescents and adults including:
school physical, immunizations, basic x-rays and laboratory tests, minor surgery
and routine gynecological exams.
When it's your family's health, you want the best doctors, the best nurses and next-door
convenience. Each of our Family Health Center offices is open Monday through Friday,
9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Compassion. Innovation. Trust. We're your family's choice.


S '

; ,''i '.



Winter Haven

Hospital

FAMILY HEALTH CENTERS

Compassion. Innovation.Trust.


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Page 20 The Polk County Democrat


February 6, 2013