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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00740
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
Creation Date: February 29, 2012
Publication Date: 04/18/2012
Frequency: semiweekly[1946-<1992>]
weekly[ former <1936>-1946]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
System ID: UF00028292:00740
 Related Items
Preceded by: Polk County record

Full Text

Visit us on the Internet at www.PolkCountyDemocrat.com


The


Wednesday
April 18, 2012


Polk county Democrat

Bartow's Hometown Newspaper Since 1931 750


Volume 82 Number 66


USPS NO 437-320


Bartow, Polk County Florida 33830


Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Community pool or Wet'n Wild?


Pool options big cost but city may


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Friday night at a public input session,
there was a struggle among people as to
whether it was better off to have a com-
munity pool or a version of Wet 'n Wild.
Monday night when a consultant
showed Bartow City Commissioners
three options for a community pool
to bring it up to date and have it be
usable, a lot of questions were raised,


including how the city would come up
with $1 million for the project.
One thing was clear, though, some-
thing had to be done if the city wants a
public pool because the existing pool
at the Bartow Civic Center that was
built in 1967 was eventually going to be
unusable. "It will reach a point where
it is not functioning anymore," said
Sam Elsheikh with OLC Architecture. "It
won't stop working tomorrow but there
are things that will break down and the


have no choice in doing something


costs will be too much."
Jeff King, the president of Ballard,
King & Associates who was hired to
come up with options, told commis-
sioners the current pool has outlived
its useful life and if nothing is done, the
city will need spend $500,000 to keep it
up to code.
On top of that, the city currently
spends $183,921 a year on the pool and
makes $21,062 a year. Under the options
the city, by the consultant's estimates,


would make money. But to do that
the city would have to spend between
$2 million and $5.6 million to make it
attractive and usable and possibly pre-
pare it for competitive swimming.
Friday night, there was some heated
input given to the consultants and the
city Parks and Recreation Department
to make it competitive. It was when it
was built in 1967, but when the codes
POOLI8A


Bartow ready

to Relay For Life

Friday Fest will
'Paint the 'Tow Purple'
By PEGGY KEHOE
PKEHOE@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
With Relay For Life, Friday Fest and an
art gallery show, April 20 could be billed as
Bartow's Big Friday.
This year's Relay should be the biggest
ever, with 67 teams, up from 52 last year,
Team Development Chairman Pat Ca-
landros said. "We've never had that many
teams. We've worked hard this year."
The signature fundraising event for the
American Cancer Society has been held in
Bartow since 2002.
"Ordinary Heroes Fighting Cancer To-
gether" is the theme Bartow Relay For Lifers
chose for this year's event, which is Friday
and Saturday, April 20-21 at Bartow Memo-
rial Stadium.
The event, which has become a huge
weekend party for Bartow, is held overnight
as individuals and teams camp out at the
stadium, with the goal of keeping at least
one team member on the track at all times
throughout the evening, because cancer
never sleeps.
Teams have been fundraising for months,
but those attending Relay will find lots of
food, some games, crafts, and all kinds of
creative fundraisers at Relay campsites
Friday and Saturday.
Relay For Life of Bartow received a banner
recognizing an earned rank of 15th in the
state in raising funds for ACS. The banner is
"a reminder of how much of a difference our
unique little town can make when we work
RELAY I8A


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW


Bishop Willie Watson delivers an opening prayer Saturday at Over the Branch during a rally for Trayvon Martin.


Community prays for justice


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW @ POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
A gathering of Bartow residents came
together Saturday afternoon mark-
ing the tragedy sweeping the nation
over the death of 17-year-old Trayvon
Martin. They wanted to pray for justice
and send the message that the kind
of disruption it has caused should not
happen here.
"It's about unity in our community,"
Sharon Holloway, a leader of the Bartow


Community Choir, told the crowd of
about 60 people who gathered at the
Over the Branch park on Polk Street
and under State Road 60, said. "We can't
be that way to one another. How can
we expect them (children) to be that
way if we can't be that way?"
After saying that, she shouted victory
three times as the crowd repeated it
back. Before speaking, the choir led the
crowd singing "Victory is Mine."
"We are the music for justice," she
said. "We are claiming the victory in


advance for justice."
And also the message was to bring
justice to the front without violence.
"What will go down in history is
one of the greatest demonstrations for
justice in American history," said Gerald
Johnson, sporting a red hoodie that
had crosses on the pocket zippers. "We
stand under the crossroad of Highway
60 but in a real sense America is stand-
ing at a crossroads of history. The hour
JUSTICE 15A


TODAY'S
CONTENTS



a 4 8 7 9 3 9 4 0 3
S 75 c
Polk County Democrat
Bartow, Florida


Editorial..............Page 4A
Obituaries ... Pages 5A-6A
Community .......Page 10A
Business ...........Page 14A
School Life..... ...PaeL 15A
7 Sports................Page 17A
Police Beat.........Page 19A
County Report .... Page 1B
Feeling Fit ..........Page 9B


-Hundreds
appear
to help
Summerlin
Equestrian
-- ., team


.st 12A


Legislation
deemed good
for the farming
.. industry




14A


i










Lane closures all over the place


The Bartow Northern Connector that
will connect U.S. 98 and U.S. 17 is to
get under way April 23, and continu-
ing through July there will be daily lane
closures on U.S. 17 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
the Florida Department of Transportation
reports.
On the week of April 23, the north-
bound inside lane will be closed for
curb/gutter and soil removal while
the southbound outside lane will be
closed for delivery of fill materials, DOT
reports. There will be delays.
On the construction work on U.S. 17
from south of Homeland/Garfield Road,
which is County Road 640, to South of
Bartow Road and at the railroad overpass
there will be northbound lane closures
from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and southbound lane
closures from 6 a.m.-4 p.m. There will
also be lane closures from 7 p.m.-6 a.m.
This should continue through the
spring, DOT reports.
There are no lane closures are sched-
uled onVan Fleet Drive or U.S. 98
through Saturday, April 21. However,
the segment of Wilson Avenue between
S.R. 60 and Old Bartow/Eagle Lake Road
will be closed to through traffic from


9:30 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Friday, April 20 to
Monday, April 23 for concrete paving.
Access to businesses, apartments and
the Fort Fraser Train entrance along
Wilson Avenue will be maintained while
the detour is in place, DOT reports.
Work on new travel lanes, turn lanes
and sidewalks continues behind bar-
rier walls along northbound U.S. 98
from S.R. 60 to south of Manor Drive,
and along westbound S.R. 60 from the
Walmart entry road to U.S. 98.
Because the Fort Fraser Trail en-
trance at westbound S.R. 60 is closed,
people can access the trail from an
entrance off of Wilson Avenue. Access
to businesses in the work zone is being
maintained.
This week on the work on U.S. 98
from south of Manor Drive to north of
County Road 540A and U.S. 98 from
Manor Drive to Old Bartow/Eagle Lake
Road the contractor will continue to
place sod and performing miscella-
neous activities throughout the project
corridor. This should continue for the
next two weeks, DOT reports.
For project information, visit www.
IdriveUS98.com.


The light is green but you couldn't go as Wilson Avenue was closed to traffic last weekend from
Van Fleet Drive to Old Bartow Road/Eagle Lake Road. The road won't be closed this week but will
close to traffic again Friday to Monday this weekend.



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April 18, 2012


Page 2A The Polk County Democrat





A 18 02TePl onyDmca ae3


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS BASED ON TRUST.


* eC *.-;


Nationally recognized heart care

is right here.


Ii


That's the Bostick advantage. .


V' '.-


4:I.~i 4lr a.-*
.1P


Winter Haven

Hospital

BOSTICK HEART CENTER

www.winterhavenhospital.org


AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


Winter Haven Hospital's Bostick Heart Center is
recognized by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons as
being in the top 10 percent of Heart Programs in the
United States, and ranked one of the nation's
Top 50 Heart Centers by a leading consumer
advocacy magazine. We give our heart patients every
possible advantage by combining the best clinical
experts with the latest technologies and the most
effective rehab services available. And it's all backed
by the hospital you trust, Winter Haven Hospital.

Learn more at www.winterhavenhospital.org or
call 863-292-4688.

Compassion. Innovation. Trust. We're your family's choice.



FIND A BORD CERTIIED DOCTO L0 T0HOME
Cal heWite Hve Hspta Pyscin efrrl in. 80- 416-6705.


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The Polk County Democrat Page 3A


April 18 2012


, -





Three months ago, a few conservationists
set off from the southern tip of Florida on an O
expedition intended to attract attention to
the value of preserving natural lands. They tech manner.
were, in a sense, following in the footsteps of are running w
Lewis and Clark, John Muir, George Perkins bio-trekkers a:
Marsh and Theodore Roosevelt, all of whom Web pages; th
left a legacy of American environmental social media s
stewardship. If you're curi
This year it was biologist Joe Guthrie, dawildlifecorr
conservationist Mallory Lykes Dimmitt and reach the end
photojournalist Carlton Ward Jr. who formed is Earth Day.
the core group of trekkers hoping to make a The point of
1,000-mile journey in roughly 100 days. They glades to the C
were joined along the way by a filmmaker, Refuge is to pi
journalists, property owners and politicians, connected lan
Their adventure an low-impact affair big-time head
involving walking, canoeing, kayaking and bears, but mig
camping is being documented in a high- mals large and

Letters to the editor


ur Viewpoint


Florida public radio stations
eekly in-depth reports. The
re posting photos and video on
ey are blogging and updating
ites.
ious, check it out at www.flori-
idor.org. The group expects to
of the trail this Sunday, which

the expedition from the Ever-
Okefenokee National Wildlife
publicize the importance of
dscapes for wild animals. The
liners are panthers and black
ration corridors benefit ani-
1 small.


Primarily, they maintain habitat for the
larger animals who need large spaces to
thrive. But conservation lands also safeguard
waterways by restricting development that
keeps water cleaner.
Humans also benefit from what is now
known as eco-tourism: hiking, bird-watch-
ing, hunting and fishing. And, since many
conservation easements are on large work-
ing ranches, they help sustain a historic agri-
cultural economy and a valued way of life.
For the most part this expedition through
the Heartland counties and the East Coast.
We expect Floridians' interest in preserva-
tion will continue to be strong.
Wildlife corridors aren't only for bears
and panthers, but for smaller creatures, for
things like clean water, for a healthy econo-
my and for us too.


Insurance cost too much


I have lived in a historic home in Ft.
Meade for 8 years. Our homeowner's
insurance company from our home in
Lakeland was glad to insure our new
old home for approximately $860.00
annually. Within the 8 years we endured
multiple hurricanes. We had no need to
file a claim, they don't make homes like
they did in 1912,
As so may people in Florida, our
property value plummeted. Our prop-
erty taxes fell too, but our home owners
insurance has skyrocketed to over
$4,000.00 annually and most insurance
company's will not insure old homes.
Isn't insurance based on value of the


item being insured? If property value
goes down why are the homeowners
premiums going up? I am writing this
letter in hopes you will publish this in
your newspaper so other historic ho-
meowners can share and compare and
ask why we are being discriminated for
keeping our history intact.
If there is not a change in how his-
toric homes are insured I am afraid they
will be left standing vacant or worse
case scenario demolished. This is our
history and we need to seriously con-
sider the consequences.
Tanga Calhoun
Fort Meade


There they go again at Bartow Re-
gional, manipulating numbers to their
advantage. Even using their less than
accurate numbers, the hospital has
documented over 45 cases that I have
been involved with patients admit-
ted through the ER. Dr. Booker has
informed me that he has has seen the
same number of patients or even more
than I have.
That being the case clearly demon-
strates that between Dr. Booker and I,
we have been involved, at the request
of the admitting physician and or the
ER physicians, well over 100 women,
without a doubt, this is not the number
that the "administrator" would like you
to be believe that have been seen or
consulted.


Obviously this first time administra-
tor does not have the same understand-
ing of the value of the "on call GYN
service" that those 9 physicians who
signed a petition asking to reconsider
the ER GYN on call.
It is an irresponsible decision on the
part of the administrator to dismiss
these physician's opinions, as they are
the ones who most frequently admit
for consultation and ER admission to
BRMC when related to women.
It is unfortunate that we do not have
the administrator from Heart of Florida
that believes in women and how they
are the responsible family member to
choose the hospital for their care.
Dr. Ralph J. Nobo, Jr. MD
Bartow


Tacky is as tacky does.
No, Forrest Gump didn't say that, but
he came close.
He said, "Stupid is as stupid does,"
and like Forrest Gump, I know that
using "stupid" indiscriminately is bad
manners. But sometimes, it just fits.
Perhaps "tacky" should be defined as
"stupid" practiced by people who are
smart enough to know better.
At any rate, I was comforted to
discover on Saturday that I am not the
only mortal on earth who thinks it is
super tacky to celebrate with expensive
social events the sinking of the Titanic
100 years ago, a naval tragedy that
killed 1,514 souls on the maiden voyage
of an "unsinkable" ship.
Yes, a century is a little late for grief.
Death is the inevitable final chapter of


S.L. Frisbie




S.L. Frisbie can be contacted at
slfrisbie@polkcountydemocrat.com


life.
And when it comes to funerals, I
staunchly support the trend toward "a
celebration of life" as the theme for this
final event.
I have often said that if people
cannot have at least three good
laughs at my funeral, I do not intend
to die. Smart money is on ihdIlaughs,
FRISBIE ISA


The Polk County Democrat
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
SAileen Hood General Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Peggy Kehoe Managing Editor


Published every Wednesday and Saturday at
190 South Florida, Avenue
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Lakeland, Florida 33805
and additional Entry Office
*Phone 1863i1 533-4183 *Fax 18631 533-0402
Postmaster: Send address changes to
190 South Florida Aienue
BarrowFL 33830


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six Months...................$25.68 One Year..........................$41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months...................$24.00 One Year.........................$39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
-S n Mn lhs . ... 40 ui One .ear ........................$65.00
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
'i\ Monnth . 4.00 One ',ear .. S72 00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Bartow area
can send letters and column submissions to letters@polkcoun-
tydemocrat.com or mail them to 190 South Florida Avenue,
Bartow, FL 33830


Bartow Regional decision


questioned by doctor


Tacky is as tacky does


April 18, 2012


Page 4A The Polk County Democrat


VIEWPOINT



Highlighting the value of conservation





April 18, 2012 The Polk County Democrat Page 5A







What is your opinion of the Stand Your Ground law?




.... . -











Lynn Brown Andrew Fowler Loretta Woods

"I'm from Canada where only hunters are registered to have "I think people should have the right to protect themselves. "It depends what part of the country you're in whether you
guns. We can't have a gun at the house in case someone I have two little girls and if someone were to break into my feel the need to protect yourself. My grandson works nights
broke in and stole it. We certainly don't have a Stand Your home and try to harm them then I would take every step up in Columbus, Ohio, and has a permit to carry a gun to feel
Ground law and I feel the states that do have it, it's causing possible to defend me and my family. I think the Stand Your more secure. There are a lot of shootings there, but Ohio has no
more harm than good. People should not be running around Ground law is very good." Stand Your Ground law. I know my grandson feels he and his
with guns. Kids are getting killed. It's senseless." family are safer now that he has a weapon. I think it's a great
thing Florida has this law."


FRISBIE
FROM PAGE 4A

not immortality.

That said, I share the view of Tampa
Tribune columnist Jeff Houck, who
lamented this week the number of
Titanic Last Supper promotions that
,celebrate and that is the word the
sinking of the Titanic on April 14, 1912.
In Hong Kong, he'reported, diners
could enjoy a 10-course meal mirror-
ing the meal served in the Titanic's
first-class dining room. The reenact-
ment included sips from a 1907 vintage
wine from a bottle salvaged from the
wreckage. Shame to let good wine go to
waste, right? -
SIn Houston, he said, a dozen diners


JUSTICE
FROM PAGE 1A

has come for justice to be done."
He questioned who will be next for
the "senseless act of bloodshed," saying
violence does riot have to be answer to
anything. Martin Luther King Jr. would
protest and march and "the fight is for
non-violence until justice rolls down like
water down the falls. Let us march on until
victory is met."
He said, to use Gandhi's words, that you
must be the change you want to see in the
world.
The messages expressed in the gather-
ing brought by the Bartow Deacons and
Stewards Alliance, were echoed Sunday
by comedian Bill Cosby, who downplayed
racism when he said the conversation
about the incident in which George Zim-
merman is accused in Trayvon Martin's
Feb. 26,death in Sanford, should be
focused on guns not race.
On CNN he said calling Zimmerman a
racist doesn't solve anything but the focus
should be on what was Zimmerman do-
ing with a gun and who told him how to
behave with it.
Speakers Saturday had a similar message
and they wanted to relay that to the youth
in Bartow, urging them to not jump to con-
clusions but to focus on the facts.
"We want to make sure justice reigns,"
Rev. Darrien Bonney said, giving a legal
update on the case. "Keep your eyes on
the news, because if we don't, something
could be swept under the rug."
He said the fight is not over until Tray-
von's parents, Sybrina Fulton and racy


could feast, for $12,000 each, on the
same dinner served in first class on that
fateful night. Presumably, that's plus tax
and tip.

Less well known than the sinking
itself is the heroism of the captain and
crew of the Carpathia, a liner which
responded to the Titanic's distress call
and rescued 712 passengers from the
icy waters.
Capt. Arthur Rostron, skipper of the
Carpathia, coaxed 17 knots of speed
from a vessel with a maximum rated
speed of 14 knots, in part by diverting
to the engine room the steam used to
heat passengers' staterooms.
In rushing to the rescue of the
Titanic's passengers, he had to brave
passage through the same icebergs that
sunk the Titanic.
For his skill and bravery he was
knighted by his native England, and


Martin, can breathe a sigh of relief, "but
today pray for his family, and as Christians
pray for George Zimmerman and his
family."
Bonney pointed out this is very early
in the process and while Zimmerman
has been charged with second-degree
murder, there could be more com-
ing. The U.S. Civil Rights Committee is
investigating whether Trayvon Martin's
civil rights were violated, and the Justice
Department is looking into whether the
Sanford Police Department acted prop-
erly. Bonney added that Zimmerman was
carrying a concealed weapon and it does
not appear he had a concealed weapons
permit.
'As we stand here, justice has not ar-
rived," he said. "The train has not yet
pulled in and it may be a long and
winding road."
Cliff Lewis, who offered a prayer of
healing, said having the ministers show
leadership to the youth is what is needed.
In answering a question brought up
earlier of where is the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, a group Martin
Luther King Jr. helped to found and served
as its first president, he said, "Perhaps the
Bartow Stewards and Deacons Alliance is
the new SCLC."
"This could be an outstanding day to
have persons help create a more faithful
'union," he said, saying we can expand
their interest and address social ills that
people suffer.
"Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. transformed
this nation but in some ways he did in
the world," Lewis said. "Today we pray for
peace and justice forI Tayvon Martin but
also pray for peace and justice for George
Zimmerman and his family."


awarded the Medal of Honor by the
United States.

(S. L. Frisbie is retired. Last year, he
and his friend Mary took a week-long


cruise off the coast ofAlaska. He did
not worry about icebergs. But he knew
where the life jackets were stowed in
their cabin. He also knew the location
of Lifeboat 8, the one to which they were
assigned.)


- 7 -



Howard Lee Cloyd
Howard Lee Cloyd, 89, died April 12, After the war he moved to Florida,
2012, in Lakeland Regional Medical Center. where for 35 years he was employed
The cause of death was kidney disease. in the phosphate industry, for Swift &
He had lived at Company and Estech General Chemi-
Florida Presby- cals in mines near Fort Meade. He
terian Homes in retired in 1984. He liked country music,
Lakeland since 'B NASCAR racing, and enjoyed a daily
2009, but was a '-s .- one-mile walk.
longtime resident His wife of 51 years, Leoma Jo Jennings
of Fort Meade. His Cloyd (they married in Fort Meade on
family is deeply ., Aug. 8, 1952), died in 2003.
appreciative of the Survivors include sons Daniel Lee Cloyd
many kindnesses of Los Alamos, N.M., andWilliam Howard
extended to Mr. Cloyd of Kathleen; stepson Phillip T. Smith
Cloyd by the staff of Houston; and four grandchildren.
and residents of Graveside funeral services were held
Florida Presbyte- Howard Lee Cloyd Tuesday, April 17, at 10 a.m., in Evergreen
rian Homes. Cemetery in Fort Meade. The family
Mr. Cloyd was bor into a large farm encourages that in lieu of flowers contribu-
family in Washington County, Tenn., on tions be made to the Loving Care Fund,
June 19, 1922. He was a 1942 graduate of Florida Presbyterian Homes, 16 Lake
Washington College Academy. AWorld Hunter Drive, Lakeland, FL 33803.
War II veteran, he volunteered for the Arrangements: McLean Funeral Home,
military after high school and served for Fort Meade.
the duration in the Army Air Corps in New Condolences to the family may be made
Guinea and the Philippines. at www.mcleanfuneralhome.net.




PUBLIC NOTICE


Planning & Zoning Board and City Commission Tour
of US Ecogen Site


NOTICE IS HEREBY given that the Planning &
Zoning Board and City Commission members will
inspecting the US Ecogen site on April 18, 2012 at
5:30 p.m. Further information may be obtained in the
office of the City Planner, located at City Hall, 8 West
Broadway, Fort Meade, Florida 33841, phone number
(863) 285-1176.





PD


Amanda Lenora
Culpepper, 93, -
passed away
Tuesday, April 17,
2012, at Bartow
Regional Medical
Center of heart -
failure.
She was born
on Sept. 16, 1918,
in Conway, S.C.
She was a long-
time resident of Lenora Culpepper
Fort Meade, resid-
ing the last few years in Imperial Lakes in
Mulberry.
Mrs. Culpepper was a member of the
First Baptist Church, Fort Meade, where
she was a longtime and faithful Sunday
School teacher in the children's depart-
ment, an active choir member and a
member of the Joy Club. Mrs. Culpep-
per was a member of the Fort Meade
Order of the Eastern Star where she
held several offices; a member of the
Fort Meade Garden Club; volunteer at
the Fort Meade Historical Museum; and
very active in the Extension Homemak-
ers. She attended Winthrop University in
Rockhill, S.C.


Ronald D.

Richardson
Ronald D. Richardson, 74, died
April 15, 2012, in Auburndale.
Arrangements: Whidden-McLean
Funeral Home, Bartow.


Mrs. Culpepper had an impact on so
many people in her lifetime. She reached
out and mothered many children
through her loving ways. She was always
ready to lend a hand to help anyone in
need and would never turn anyone away.
She was preceded in death by her hus-
band, R.J. Culpepper, Sr.; daughter, Joyce
Elaine Tabb; two brothers; sisters, Leona
Merchant and Margaret Whiteside; and
nephew, John Merchant.
Survivors include her sons, R.J.
Culpepper, Jr., and wife Glay of St. John's,
Fa., and David Culpepper and wife Jackie
ofAiken, S.C.; niece, Doris Merchant of
Winter Springs; great-nephew, Joel Mer-
chant; grandchildren, Richard Tabb, Ross
Culpepper, Michele Moses, Bill Culpepper,
Suzanne Culpepper, Ben Culpepper, Jon
Culpepper and Matthew Culpepper; and
six great-grandchildren.
Visitation: Thursday, April 19, from
6-8 p.m., at Hancock Funeral Home,
945 E. Broadway, Fort Meade.
Funeral: 10:30 a.m., Friday, April 20, at
First Baptist Church, 307 E. Broadway,
Fort Meade, with Rev. Kenny Slay officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in Lake Wales
Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to
the family at www.hancockfh.com.


Words of Comfort
It is only with the heart
that one can see rightly.
What is essential is
invisible to the eye. >
-Antoine De Saint Exupery


OBITUAR F I
rS i I I A r


Thomas M. '
Thomas M.
"Tommy" Driskell,
61, a native of Fort
Meade, passed
away on Sunday,
April 15, 2012. He
was born Oct. 14,
1950.
An insurance
agent, he had
been a partner at
Mitchell Insur-
ance Agency Tommy Driskell
since 1992. Mr.
Driskell was a member of Cornerstone
Church of God, Polk County Cattle-
men's Association and Florida Cattle-
men's Association.
He is survived by his wife, Donna
Driskell of Fort Meade; three sons, Ryan


Fort Meade Animal Clinic
*1' 711 E Broadway, Fort Meade/ 285-8652 '0r

c *. (3 *, V a .U Wi A-. I
One in three pets will get lost at least once in
their lifetime. We at Fort Meade Animal Clinic
are hoping to reduce that number. Right
now, you can get your pet a microchip ID,
and lifetime registration fee for the chip, for
just $39.95. Remember, many microchip fees :
don't include the cost of registering your chip. Ours
does, and there is no fee ever to re-register the chip
should you change your address. Now, there's no
I I I no reason to delay call us today at
Home Again 285-8652 to make an appointment

6.'~~ic~ se. a a;~~iE~i IT~~ *.. S CCE


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BEFORE THE CITY OF
FORT MEADE PLANNING & ZONING BOARD AND THE CITY COMMISSION
TO AMEND THE CITY OF FORT MEADE UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS, ORDINANCE NO. 97-2 AS AMENDED.
Notice is hereby given that the Planning & Zoning Board of the City of Fort Meade, Florida will hold a
public hearing on Monday, May 7, 2012 at 5:30 p.m., in the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 8
West Broadway, Fort Meade, Florida, for the'purpose of forwarding their recommendation to the City
Commission for a proposed amendment to Ordinance No. 97-2, the City of Fort Meade Unified Land
Development Regulations for text amendments.
Members of the Planning Commission will be present to receive public input and comments and to
make recommendations to the City Commission for amending said Ordinance.
Anyone wishing to offer input pro or con in regard to the above request may be heard at this time.
Interested parties may examine the documents at the office of the City Planner at City Hall, 8 West
Broadway, Fort Meade, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.


Notice is hereby given that the City Commission of the City of Fort Meade, Florida will hold public
hearings on Tuesday, May 8, 2012 and June 12, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Commission Chambers, City
Hall, in said City, for the purpose of adopting a new Ordinance as follows:
Amend Ordinance No. 97-2, by amending the City of Fort Meade Unified Land Development Regula-
tions by adopting text amendments.
The proposed Ordinance is entitled: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLOR-
IDA, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 97-2, THE UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT REGU-
LATIONS OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA, BY ADOPTING CHANGES IN THE
UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS OF THE CITY; INCLUDING THE AMEND-
MENTS THEREIN; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR A COPY TO BE
KEPT ON FILE, REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Any interested parties may inspect the proposed Ordinance at the Office of the Deputy City Clerk in
City Hall of the City of Fort Meade, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.
At said hearing any person, his/her agent or attorney, may appear and be heard. If a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the Planning & Zoning Board or the City Commission with respect to any
matter considered at such hearing, he/she will need a report of the proceedings, that, for such purpose,
he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based (F.S. 286.105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and F.S. 286.26, persons with disabilities
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the City Clerk prior
to the proceedings at (863) 285-1100, x-233 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone the Florida
Relay Service numbers (800) 955-8771 (TDD) OR (800) 955-8770 (voice) for assistance.
Deputy City Clerk's Office
Dated in Fort Meade, Polk County, Florida, this 16th day of April, 2012.


S POLK

STATE
T COLLEGE




accredited


local


awesome


polk.edu
2722827


Fommy' Driskell
Driskell and wife Terra ofWauchula,
Trenton Skinner of Eatonton, Ga., and
Jacob Driskell of Fort Meade; a daughter,
Lindsey Kay Driskell of Winter Haven; his
father, Walter Driskell and stepmother
Lessie of Lakeland; his mother Helen
Driskell of Fort Meade; a sister, Susan Can-
non and husband Wayne of Fort Meade;
four grandchildren, Alyvia and Destiny
Driskell, Hunter Scranton and Colby Skin-
ner; nieces, Suzanne and Brittany Cannon;
and nephews, Brian and Brett Hamilton.
The family will receive friends from
5-7 p.m., on Wednesday, April 18, at
McLean Funeral Home.
Funeral: Thursday, April 19, at
2 p.m., at Cornerstone Church of God,
10 Seminole Ave. S., Fort Meade.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.mcleanfuneralhome.net.


Lenora Culpepper


April 18, 2012


Page 6A The Polk County Democrat


m






A~I 18 02TePl onyDmca ae7


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April 18, 2012


P~r 8A The~ Po-lk Counint fmrt


RELAY
FROM PAGE 1A

together for a common cause," Calandros
said.
Honorary chairmen for the 2012 Relay
are Bartow Middle School student Rissy
Bustos-Femandez and Tina Bryan Mc-
Guire, both recovering from leukemia.
This year's event chairman is Bartow
Police Chief Joe Hall, who accepted a
proclamation from the city commission
Monday night.
"Remember those we've lost to cancer
and those who survived," by coming out
to the stadium to support the Relay For
Life, Hall urged as he accepted the procla-
mation fromVice Mayor Leo Longworth
at Monday's commission meeting.
He also reminded people to sign up for
the CPS-3 study. The American Cancer
Society chose Bartow to participate in
the study that aims to have thousands
of people between 30 and 65 years who
have no personal history of cancer to be
studied over a 20-year period.
Registration will be at Relay from
5-9 p.m. Friday. Gail Murray and her reg-
istration team will have a booth set up to
register volunteers.
Study organizers seek to enroll at least
500,000 adults from various racial/ethnic
backgrounds across the United States.
"We're hoping that those interested in
participating in this study will contact our
community representative, Caellan Curtis,
before the Relay, to make sure we have
enough enrollment kits. By joining CPS-3,
volunteers can help the ACS to under-
stand how to prevent cancer," Hall said.
"The goal of the study is to help save lives
and give people more precious time -
more time with their families and friends,
more memories, more celebrations...
and more birthdays."


For local information about the CPS-3
research study, or to reserve your partici-
pation enrollment kit, people can email
Caellan.Curtis@cancer.org or call 863-688-
2326, ext. 5508.
Besides the serious business of raising
money to fight cancer, Relay offers lots of
fun, too, among moments of reflection
and remembrance.
The evening begins with the annual
Sticky Fingers Barbecue at 5 p.m. The
Survivors' Reception is at 6 p.m., followed
by opening ceremonies beginning at
6:45 p.m.. Musical entertainment is always
part of the evening, too.
Honorary chairmen will ride in a
convertible around the track, leading
the survivors' lap. The moving luminaria
ceremony is planned for 9:30 p.m.
Lest Relayers doze off, Brandon Pickard
and his team have come up with a number
of ways to stay awake. The Mr. Relay
contest judges which man best looks like a
lady. Then there's musical chairs, the Gong
Show, a big Twister contest, Best Christmas
Sweater Ever, and who knows what else,
ending with the 6 a.m. "Wake Up Bartow"
karaoke.
Closing ceremony is at 8 a.m.

Museum will be purple
Friday Fest's regular third Friday
event will go on as scheduled, with a 1950s'
sock hop theme and Relay's first off-site
booth.
The Relics will offer musical favorites for
the Downtown Bartow street party, and
organizers are planning a hula hoop and/
or a dance contest.
With Bartow's Relay For Life was
scheduled on the same night, Team Friday
Fest will have the cancer fundraiser's first
off-site booth. Some downtown businesses
count on the revenue generated by those
attending Friday Fest, so the monthly 'Tow
Jam will go on as scheduled.


PHOTO BY JEF ROSLOW

Police Chief Joe Hall accepts a proclamation Monday from Vice Mayor Leo Longworth (right) in
recognition of Relay For Life that will be held this weekend at Bartow Memorial Stadium. With
them are two who helped organize the event, Trish Pfeiffer (left) and Virginia,Condello, commu-
nications director of the Bartow Chamber of Commerce.


"We owe it to the businesses to help,"
Main Street Bartow Director Mikel
Dorminy explained.
With the slogan "Paint the 'Tow Purple,"
Team Friday Fest welcomes any business
that wants to help raise money for the
American Cancer Society. Even the Historic
Polk County Courthouse will be painted
purple but only with lights.
Cars entered in the Classic Cruise-in will
be able to join a procession to the Relay
site at Bartow Memorial Stadium at the
close of Friday Fest, which runs 6-9 p.m.
Bartow Police Chief Joe Hall, chairman of
this year's Relay For Life, will lead the pro-
cession, riding in a convertible. Once at the
BHS stadium, the cars will do a lap around
the track and park on the east side of the


high school stadium prior to the 9:30 p.m.
luminaria ceremony.
Relay participants can then pay to vote
on their favorite car until 11 p.m. to raise
money for ACS.

Faculty show set
The Polk State College Faculty Show
is featured at the monthly reception Fri-
day at Carolyn's Gallery and {tay'-cho}
from 4-7 p.m.
Wine and cheese, punch and cookies
will be served as patrons examine the vari-
ety of art photography, painting, collage
and more of the faculty show.
The galleries are at 395 E. Summerlin St.,
Bartow. Phone number is (863) 519-5215.


POOL
FROM PAGE 1A

changed the pool was no longer avail-
able for competition.
"The biggest thing about the Sam Gri-
ner Pool is gone," PaulWyatt said Friday
night at the public input session. "Now
you can't hold a meet here. We used to
have kids go to college on scholarships
and it was the pride of the city."
He said the number one priority
should be to make the pool have com-
petitions. Currently the swim team has
to go to another town to compete.
Though King took that into account
Friday, on Monday he told commission-
ers that competitive swimming in most
surveys he's seen regarding pools scores
low in the 5 percent range among
the public, while leisure swimming
ranks quite high.
To that end, two of the three options
the consultant presented do have com-
petitive swimming pools but are high-
lighted by zero-gravity areas, a lazy river
and playgrounds and an inviting entry.
King told commissioners their idea
and instruction was to design options
to build more participation and use.
He emphasized the options are general
and nothing is set is stone, but these
are ideas commissioners can consider.
He told participants Friday the same
thing and answered one question about
whether some designs from one option
and some from another can be used, to
which he said yes.
However, the bigger question among
the 50 people at Friday's meeting was
a choice of whether the Bartow pool
should be something that would draw
people from around the county or
should it be for the community.
"I don't want to be like the Orlando
area, with Wet 'nWild. I want it to be
user friendly for my family. Waiting in
line and dealing with the crowds in
Bartow? That's not Bartow," Lacy Em-
merling said Friday.
They also heard that on the third
option one with a large lazy river and


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW

Sam Elsheikh, the chief financial officer with OLC Architecture, shows Bartow City Commissioners
Option B Monday night during the work session on a remodeled city pool.


a zero-gravity pool for all age options -
there could be a waiting period to get in.
That didn't sit well with some people.
"If Option Three makes it more
crowded I'd rather have the pool we
have now then wait longer," one youth
said Friday.
Others thought what is current is
simply no good.
Kayla Soden, a Highland City resident,
said, "We don't come because it doesn't
offer us anything now. This would bring
us here."
Monday night, commissioners were
loaded with questions and in the end
were left with the options to choose
from. A final report from the consultants
will be presented to commissioners, but
King said he wanted public input and
the chance to present the options to
commissioners first. He didn't know how
long it would take for a final report, but
guessed it could be a couple of weeks.
Commissioner Adrian Jackson wanted


to know how balanced competitive
swimming was to leisure swimming,
and who would be the primary user of
the pool.
"What you see here is a commitment
to competitive swimming and we heard
that loud and clear (on Friday). But you
have less than 35 members on the team
and the season is relatively short and
they have to travel to compete," King
said, adding that leisure swimming is
quite high and is a trend in the swim-
ming industry.
The options also looked only at the
open season, something the consultants
were not in favor of expanding. The sea-
son, which generally runs from Memo-
rial Day to Labor Day, would have the
city make money and as they explained
Friday night to the public, there have
been cities that stayed open for more
months and scaled back because it
didn't work.
"You have to run the filter all week to


only have people use it on the weekend
when the kids aren't in school," he told
commissioners.
Jackson wanted to know if the city's li-
ability insurance would increase with the
new pool. City Attorney Sean Parker said
in his thoughts it probably would though
he doesn't know what the city pays now.
"I assume it probably isn't enough so
probably there'Would be a higher cost,"
he said. Another behind the scenes cost
could be the staffing level.
CommissionerWayne Lewis ques-
tioned what the costs would be. King said"
the fees would go up a few dollars $3
to $5 for current Bartow residents and
$3 to $4 for children. However, it isn't the
daily fees where the pool makes most
of its money. It's on the annual passes.
Those fees would rise from $80 to $100.
"The annual pass rates are where the
majority of the costs come from," Angie
Whisnant, Bartow's Parks and Recreation
manager. "Friday night when one woman
asked the annual price she said that was
cheap."
When questioned Friday whether
Bartow should compete with a place like
Legoland, King reminded people that
paying less than $20 for entry to the pool
doesn't compare to the entry price at Le-
goland that is more than $70 per person.
Lewis also asked whether the re-
vamped pool in Haines City is actually
making money now.
"It is new, but their director said it was
solvent and it is relatively small," King
said. He added that the attendance fig-
ures used in the study were conservative
when Commissioner James Clements
asked.
Commissioner Leo Longworth asked if
the pool that once existed at the Carver
Recreation Center could be afforded
under any plan.
The trend is to make a community
pool more centralized and bring the
community together. Because there are
so many options, a central location may
be to the city's advantage.
"With this, we would have something
for every age limit," Elsheikh said.
The study is available at the city of Bar-
tow's website at www.cityofbartow.net/.


1age y__1O.I H..MUII..IHUII IU L- I











NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE CITY OF FORT MEADE

PLANNING & ZONING BOARD AND THE CITY COMMISSION TO AMEND THE CITY OF FORT

MEADE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BY A LARGE SCALE AMENDMENT TO THE LAND USE MAP BY

RECLASSIFYING LAND FROM POLK COUNTY AGRICULTURE/RURAL RESIDENTIAL (A/RR) TO

FORT MEADE INDUSTRIAL (IND) FUTURE LAND USE CLASSIFICATION.


NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Planning and Zoning Board of the City of Fort Meade will hold a public hear-
ing on Monday, May 7,2012, at 5:30 p.m., in the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 8 West Broadway,
Fort Meade, Florida, for the purpose of recommending to the City Commission an amendment to the Com-
prehensive Plan of the City of Fort Meade, for a large scale amendment to the land use map by reclassifying
land from Polk County Agriculture/Rural Residential (A/RR) to Fort Meade Industrial (IND), future land use
classification for the following subject parcels:

Tax ID No.: 253108-000000-021010
S 100 FT OF N1/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PART THEREOF LYING WITHIN
VACATED RD R/WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436 LESS MINERAL RIGHTS ONLY FOR
OIL & GAS

Tax ID No.: 253108-000000-022010
S1/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PT THEREOF LYING WITHIN VACATED RD R/
WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436

Tax ID No.: 253109-000000-024010
ALL LYING W OF CSX RR R/W & S OF C/L OF VACATED TIGER BAY RD AS DESC IN OR 1324-231

Tax ID No.: 253116-000000-012040
ALL LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF HWY & LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF
ABANDONED TRACK & S OF HWY & LESS THAT PT LYING E OF RR R/W & S OF ABANDONED
RR TRACK & LESS RD R/W & LESS RR R/W & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FTTO POB OF DESC LINE; N 15
DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 1141.12 FTN 51 DEG 45 MIN 51 SEC W 129.44 FTN 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC
W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG
16 MIN 47 SEC W 155.27 FT N 71 DEG 42 MIN 54 SEC W 59.79 FT N 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W 93.72
FTN 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SEC W 153.47 FTN 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN 05
SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54 SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87
DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 19225 FT N 79 DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 115.54 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC
W 181.77 FT N 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC W 509.67 FT N 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEGW 226.09 FT N 78 DEG
43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG 33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FT S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84
FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN 56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86
DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W 817.68 FTW 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S
33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 2554 FT S 23 DEG 49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W
120.53 FTTO APT ON S LINE OF SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR
OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

Tax ID No.: 253117-000000-011020
ALLLESS NW1/4 & LESS BEGAT NWCOROFNW1/4 OFNE1/4 E200 FTSWLYTOPT200 FTS OF
POB N TO POB & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOLLOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE
COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FTTO POB OF DESC LINE;N 15 DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 114.12 FT N
51 DEG 45 MIN51 SECW 129.44FTN 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC
W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG 16 MIN 47 SEC W 155.27 FTN 71 DEG
42 MIN 54 SECW 59.79 FT N 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W 93.72 FT N 26 DEG 12.MIN 39 SEC W 153.47
FT N 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN 05 SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54
SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87 DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79 -
DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 11554 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC W 181.77 FT N 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC
W 509.67 FT N 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEC W 226.09 FT N 78 DEG 43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG
33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FT S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84 FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN
56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86 DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W
817.68 FT W 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S 33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT
S 23 DEG49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W 120.53 FTTO APT ON S LINE OF
SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT
OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

Members of the Planning and Zoning Board will be present to receive public input and comments and to
make recommendations to the City Commission for amending said Ordinance by amending the Compre-
hensive Plan, by adopting the large scale amendment to the Land Use Map by reclassifying land from Polk
County Agriculture/Rural Residential (A/RR) to Fort Meade Industrial (IND) future land use classification.

The City Commission will hear the Planning and Zoning Board's recommendations and hold a Public Hear-
ing on Tuesday, May 8, 2012.

Anyone wishing to offer input pro or con in regard to the above request may be heard at this time.

Interested parties may examine the documents and map at the office of the City Planner at City Hall, 8 West
Broadway, Fort Meade, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.

Notice IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Fort Meade, Florida will hold a public
hearing on Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Commission Chambers, City Hall, in said City, to
consider:

1. Amending the Comprehensive Plan of the City of Fort Meade, for a large scale amendment to the land use
map by reclassifying land from Polk County Agriculture/Rural Residential (A/RR) to Fort Meade Industrial
(IND), future land use classification for the following subject parcels:

Tax D]fo.: 253108-000000-021010
S 100 FT OF NI/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PART THEREOF LYING WITHIN
VACATED RD R/WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436 LESS MINERAL RIGHTS ONLY FOR
OIL & GAS

Tax ID No.: 253108-000000-022010
Sl/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PT THEREOF LYING WITHIN VACATED RD R/
WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436

Tax ID No.: 253109-000000-024010
ALL LYING W OF CSX RR R/W & S OF C/L OF VACATED TIGER BAY RD AS DESC IN OR 1324-231

Tax ID No.: 253116-000000-012040
ALL LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF HWY & LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF
ABANDONED TRACK & S OF HWY & LESS THAT PT LYING E OF RR R/W & S OF ABANDONED
S RR TRACK & LESS RD R/W & LESS RR.R/W & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOL-
SLOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FT TO POB OF DESC LINE; N 15


DEG 37 MIN 06 SECW 1141.12 FTN 51 DEG 45 MIN 51 SECW 129.44 FT N 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC
W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG
16 MIN47 SECW 155.27 FTN 71 DEG 42 MIN 54 SEC W 59.79 FTN 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W93.72
FT N 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SEC W 153.47 FT N 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN 05
SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54 SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87
DEG-31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79 DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 115.54 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC
W 181.77 FTN 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC W 509.67 FTN 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEC W 226.09 FTN 78 DEG
43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FTS 85 DEG 33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FTS 76 DEG 41MIN 12 SECW 151.84
FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN 56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86
DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W 817.68 FT W 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S
33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT S 23 DEG 49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W
12053 FTTO APT ON S LINE OF SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR
OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

Tax ID No.: 253117-000000-011020
ALL LESS NW1/4 & LESS BEG AT NW COR OF NW1/4 OF NE1/4 E 200 FT SWLYTO PT 200 FT S OF
POB N TO POB & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OFTHE FOLLOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE
COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FT TO POB OF DESC LINE;N 15 DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 114.12 FT N
51 DEG 45 MIN 51 SEC W 129.44 FT N 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC
W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG 16 MIN 47 SEC W 15527 FT N 71 DEG
42 MIN 54 SEC W 59.79 FT N 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W 93.72 FTN 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SECW 153.47
FT N 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN 05 SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54
SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87 DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79
DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 11554 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC W 181.77 FT N 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC
W 509.67 FT N 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEC W 226.09 FT N 78 DEG 43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG
33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FT S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84 FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN
56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86 DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W
817.68 FT W 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S 33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT
S 23 DEG 49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W 12053 FT TO APT ON S LINE OF
SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT
OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

The proposed Ordinance is entitled: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA, BY
A LARGE SCALE AMENDMENT TO THE LAND USE MAP BY RECLASSIFYING LAND FROM
POLK COUNTY AGRICULTURE/RURAL RESIDENTIAL (A/RR) TO FORT MEADE INDUSTRIAL
(IND) FUTURE LAND USE CLASSIFICATION. THE PROPOSED LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT
IS TO RE-DEFINE THE LAND USE OF THE PROPERTIES DESCRIBED THEREIN; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR A COPY TO BE KEPT ON FILE, REPEALING ALL ORDI-
NANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Any interested parties may inspect the proposed Ordinance at the Office of the City Clerk in City Hall of the
City of Fort Meade, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.

At said hearings any person, his/her agent or attorney, may appear and be heard. If a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Planning and Zoning Board or the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such hearing, he/she will need a report of the proceedings; that, for such purposes, he/she may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is based (F.S. 286.105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and FS. 286.26, persons with disabilities needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy City Clerk prior to the
proceedings at (863) 285-1100 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone the Florida Relay Service num-
bers (800) 955-8771 (TDD) OR (800) 955-8770 (voice) for assistance.

Deputy City Clerk's Office

Dated in Fort Meade, Polk County, Florida, this 16th day of April, 2012
LOCATION MAP


l1Hwed1)) ft.,
2531<0. 010(0-0(021010
2S3194WB-4Ktooo22O1
2tS3109M)OWo424010
2531164OOO00-012040
253117-0000W01 1020


I ,, I


The Polk County Democrat Page 9A


April 18, 2012





1g' AA" Th-IU PnLk C y moA 12


Shellie Trejo,


Ross Jeske to wed


Shellie Trejo of
Bartow and Ross Jeske
of Mattoon, Ill., have
announced their
engagement.
The bride-elect is
the daughter of Diana
Wilkinson of Bartow
and Nicholas Trejo
Hernandez. She is a
graduate of Bartow
High School and Flori-
da State University.
Her fiance is the
son of Rodney and
Cathy Morris of Le-
rna, Ill., and Patrick
and Patricia Jeske of
Valley Cottage, N.Y.
He graduated from
Mattoon High School
and Eastern Illinois
University.
Both are teachers
at Bartow Middle
School.
Their wedding is
planned for June 9,
2012, in Winter Park,
followed by a honey-
moon at the beach.


Ross Jeske and Shellie Trejo


Bartow church events


First Baptist Church
Equipping University is held on
Wednesday evenings at 6 p.m. following
Family Dinner at 5:30 p.m.
Three classes are featured: Daniel:
Facing Life's Challenges, taught by
Pastor Ron Burks; Leadership 101,
taught by Marvin Pittman; and Have a
New Look by Friday, with videos by Dr.
Ralph Leman, led by facilitator Mary
Brooks.
Choir rehearsal follows the classes.
The church is at 410 East Church St.;
phone 863-533-9055.
First Born Church of the Living God
District revival services will be held
Wednesday-Friday, April 18-20, at 7:30
each night. The church is at 2051 Macon
St., Bartow.


Asbury United Methodist Church
A rummage sale is planned for Saturday,
April 21, from 7 am.-1 p.m. to raise funds
for church programs and projects.
Household items, collectibles, clothes,
shoes, purses and food will be sold.
The church is at 1650 S. Jackson Ave.,
Bartow; phone 863-533-2301.
Judah DeliveranceTemple
"Unity makes a difference; we are
one" is the theme for Family and Friends
Week, April 18-20 and 22. Scripture for
the event is Ephesians 4:3-6.
Nightly services at 7:30 p.m. will
feature preaching and singing toward
the goal of being "one in the Spirit and
united together."
The church is at 1275 Martin Luther
King Blvd.


Lighthouse Ministries, Inc., earned
a four-star rating from Charity Navi-
gator, which is the highest possible
rating it gives.
The four-star rating recognizes
exceptional performance exceeding
industry standards and outperforming
most charities in its cause.
Based on information provided
on IRS Form 990, Charity Navigator


analyzed LMI's performance in seven
financial metrics: program expenses,
administrative expenses, fundraising
expenses, fund-raising efficiency, pri-
mary revenue growth, program expens-
es growth, and working capital ratio.
It also evaluated the ministry in several
accountability and transparency perfor-
mance metrics, giving the ministry an
overall rating of 65.88 on a scale of 0-70.


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April 18, 2012


aP e 10A The Polk Coun t








Boring buys


Till Office Equipment There's something


Boring Business Systems has pur-
chased the copier division of Winter
Haven-based Till Office Equipment,
which for many years had a store on
North Broadway in Bartow.
As a Polk County-based company,
this acquisition expands Boring Busi-
ness Systems presence in East Polk. Both
Boring and Till share similar backgrounds
as long-standing, third-generation family
owned companies.
Moving forward, Dick and Rich Till and
their entire service division will join the
Boring Team.
Boring Business Systems grew


Tuscan Lodge No. 6 will offer a chili
dinner Friday, April 20, at the lodge,
beginning at 5:30 p.m.
A $5 donation is asked for dinners;
uniformed first responderg, Boy Scouts


S11 percent in 2011.
f ) "This acquisition is a
S .,' tremendous opportunity to
add to last year's growth and
(. to expand our service offer-
S. ings to the East Polk busi-
?. ness community," said Dean
Boring, president of Boring
DEAN BORING Business Systems.
Founded in 1924, Boring Business
Systems offers Managed Print Services.
Boring's processes allow clients to get out
of the business of managing their docu-
ments and allows them to focus on their
core competencies, he said.


and Girl Scouts are $1 each.
Dinners will be available until sold
out. Tours of the Lodge Room are
available on request. The lodge is at
320 South Florida Ave., Bartow.


Zonta fundraiser is Thursday


Patrons of Beef O'Brady this Thursday
night between 6 and 10 p.m. may drop
their guest checks in a special box at the
entrance for the benefit of the Zonta
Club of Bartow.
Beef's will donate 10 percent of the
amount of the checks in the box on Thurs-
day to the Zonta Club, President Mary
ii, :i . .. _.- ---. . -.^g ,.


Frisbie said. Takeout orders are also eligible.
Zonta International is a women's
service organization whose mission is
to improve the status of women. The
Bartow club was founded in 1959. Lo-
cally its chief service projects are the
Young Women in Public Affairs Scholar-
ship and the Women's Care Center.
. . . .. ." -- .-


10or everyone at

Eagle Ridge Mall


DILLARD'S
JCPENNEY
SEARS


AEROPOSTALE
BON WORTH
BODY CENTRAL
HIBBETT
SPORTING GOODS
SHOW ROOM
BELLA BRAZIL
NICK'S FOR MEN
VICTORIA SECRET
LIDS
CHARLOTTE RUSS
MONICA'S
CRYSTAL PLACE
SUNGLASS HUT


676-7646
679-9611
679-2000


679-9198
679-8709
676-4242

679-8013
679-9899
676-8844
678-2989
676-4931
676-5659
678-3686

678-1272
676-9532


PRETZEL MAKER
HERSHEY'S
ICE CREAM
STARBUCKS


676-2730

676-0099
679-8928


SBARRO 678-9405
TACO BELL 676-3101
SUBWAY 679-3100


CHINA EXPRESS
STEEL CITY GRILLE
CHILI'S
BOB EVANS
GOURMET GOODIES


AMY'S HALLMARK
SPENCER GIFTS
KARLEY'S GIFTS
LOU LOU'S GIFT


679-9190
407-754-4054
676-9500
679-2971



678-1951
676-1904
676-7653


2; LL.


*Prices not inclusive of tax, title, license and dealer doc fees. Advertised inventory available at time of
Dispatch. May not be combined with any other offer and not applicable to prior sales. Dealership not
6 responsible for typographical errors. See dealer for details. Offers expire 5/5/12. DCW17766-0412


We've Moved!
Visit us at our new location
116 West Broadway
Fort Meade

Jewelry Diamonds Earrings Necklaces
Bracelets Rings Watches Tools
Computers Televisions Collectables
Power Chairs Lawn Mowers .
W' BtLs Q I


R&S
.> II,


863-285-6400


-, ,," www.rspawnsmoke.net
ll- 21.


AT&T
GAME STOP
FYE
RADIO SHACK
KIOSK
REGAL 12 CINEMAS
IMPERIAL LANES
& KINGS BBQ
T-CELLULAR SPRINT


KINGS OF KINGS
BARBER SHOP
ARMY RECRUITING


679-3904
676-0607
676-5924

679-6621
678-1606

949-4830
676-3131


949-4815


OFFICE 679-311
LEE NAILS 676-08(
NATURAL NAILS 676-407
OPTICAL OUTLETS 676-091
REGIS HAIRSTYLES 676-49(
SEARS AUTO 679-202
ZEEBA'S HAIR
SALON 676-09(
MOBILE
ACCESSORIES 585-235
STAR ACADEMY OF POLK COUNTY


CLAIRE'S
ELEGANT JEWELERS
SPECIAL TIME
JEWELRY EXPRESS
KAY JEWELERS
PIERCING PAGODA
TREASURE ISLAND
JEWELRY
CRUSH
CRUSH TOO
SHINE COLLECTION


FOOT LOCKER
PAYLESS
RACK ROOM
FOOT ACTION
JOURNEYS


BATH & BODY WORKS


16
)0
75
11
O0
28


)9 CIGAR GALLERY
DOLLAR STORE
55 GNC
VITAMIN WORLD
PERFUME PLAZA
ARTISTIC PHOTOS


Chili dinner

Friday at Tuscan Lodge


678-0443
.678-3201
678-0630
676-9511
679-8197
676-4668

679-8989
676-4600
679-9310


679-9314
679-4242
676-8719
678-3801
676-4240


676-2730
679-9291
678-3178
676-1912
679-1440
679-6900


The Polk County Democrat Page 11A


April 18, 2012


E t


45.1 E iih R IX e i egm S A.-l0 W\ ale: Fio:'ida






Pae1ATePl ony eortArl1,21


Celebration of the Horse


Summerlin Academy Equestrian teammates Jacob Scarborough and Tasia
Habershaw ride for those who attended the Celebration of the Horse
Saturday at High Gait Farm.


- i "
-. ? -- C.-:.: '.-,-.'. ; : ".'-i "" '""- ' ...
'. :"*; i^ ^ ^ : -: F .. ..: ,,- ..
.. ... ., .... .; ^- . ... .. ;-r .. .';. -
" '- .;-*- .," "-- : ... ." .- '^ "...-- ..
... .* 3 -' ..> .." - ,- ,, ,^-,. * -. ..


PHOTOS BY JEFF ROSLOW


The Summerlin Academy Equestrian team performed Saturday at a fundraiser at High Gait Farm. About 300 people
attended the third annual Celebration of the Horse at the Aliens' ranch in Homeland.



W Annabelle
Crandall, 5,
gets her face
painted by
Summerlin
IAcademy
Equestrian
rider Pamela
Tinton. Anna-
belle's mother,
Kim Crandall,
helps hold
her daugh-
ter's head in
place for the
artwork.


-,'. ..



'-_.-- .- ', a d- -" -. ,a-


4-:






Jessica Garber, a member of the Summerlin Academy Eques-
trian Team, stood with her fellow team members during Satur-
day's Celebration of the Horse fundraiser at High Gait Farm.
day's Celebration of the Horse fundraiser at High Gait Farm.


Legacy, a 12-year-old Lipizzan, rises up on her hind legs during a
demonstration at the third annual Celebration of the Horse. The
fundraiser at High Gait Farm in Homeland raises money for the
Summerlin Academy Equestrian team.


Magic takes a jump Saturday during the Lipizzan Stallion perfor-
mance at the Celebration of the Horse at High Gait Farms. Ally
Hobbs rides Magic in this performance.


Marie Fussell pets Dreamcote and talks to Summerlin Academy Eques-
trian member Jacob Scarborough Saturday at the Celebration of the
Horse at High Gait Farm in Homeland.


In a switch, Pamela Tinton paints her own face while Halie
Phelps, 9, holds the mirror for her. Pamela, a student at
Summerlin Academy, had painted Halie's face and neck earlier,
then did her own at the third annual Celebration of the Horse at
High Gait Farms in Homeland.


Madline Sanders, 5, pets Boswell at the Celebration
of the Horse Saturday at High Gait Farm in Homeland.
The third annual event was to raise money for the
Summerlin Academy Equestrian Booster Club.


April 18, 2012


Page 12A The Polk County Democrat





NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Fort Meade will hold a public hearing on
Monday, May 7, 2012, at 5:30 p.m., in the City Commission Chambers, City Hall, 8 West Broadway, Fort
Meade, Florida, for the purpose of amending Ordinance 97-2, the Land Development Regulations, by amend-
ing the Zoning Map of the City of Fort Meade, Florida, as provided for in Article 7 of the Land Development
Regulations. The proposed Zoning Map Amendment is to re-zone from Polk County Agriculture/Rural Resi-
dential to City of Meade M-2, Industrial Park District. Said property is legally described as follows:

Tax ID No.: 253108-000000-021010
S 100 FT OF N1/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PART THEREOF LYING WITHIN
VACATED RD R/WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436 LESS MINERAL RIGHTS ONLY FOR
OIL & GAS

Tax ID No.: 253108-000000-022010
SI/2 qO SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PT THEREOF LYING WITHIN VACATED RD R/
WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436

Tax ID No.: 253109-000000-024010
ALL LYING W OF CSX RR R/W & S OF C/L OF VACATED TIGER BAY RD AS DESC IN OR 1324-231,

Tax ID No.: 253116-000000-012040
ALL LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF HWY & LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF
ABANDONED TRACK & S OF HWY & LESS THAT PT LYING E OF RR R/W & S OF ABANDONED
RR TRACK & LESS RD R/W & LESS RR R/W & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FT TO POB OF DESC LINE; N 15
DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 1141.12 FT N 51 DEG 45 MIN 51 SECW 129.44 FT N 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC
W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG
16 MIN 47 SECW 15527 FTN 71 DEG 42 MIN 54 SEC W 59.79 FT N 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W 93.72
FTN 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SEC W 153.47 FTN 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN 05
SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54 SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87
DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79 DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 115.54 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC
W 181.77 FTN 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC W 509.67 FTN 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEC W 226.09 FT N 78 DEG
43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG 33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FT S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84
FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN 56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86
DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W 817.68 FT W 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S
33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT S 23 DEG 49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W
120.53 FTTOAPT ON S LINE OF SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR
OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

Tax ID No.: 253117-000000-011020
ALL LESS NW1/4 & LESS BEG AT NW COR OF NW1/4 OF NE1/4 E 200 FT SWLY TO PT 200 FT S OF
POB N TO POB &LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOLLOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE
COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S'1260.82 FT TO POB OF DESC LINE;N 15 DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 114.12 FT N
51 DEG 45 MIN 51 SEC W 129.44 FTN 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC
W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG 16 MIN 47 SEC W 155.27 FT N 71 DEG
42 MIN 54 SEC W59.79 FTN 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W93.72 FT N 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SECW 153.47
FTN 52 DEG 24 MIN 43SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN\05 SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54
SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87 DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79
DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 115.54 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC W 181.77 FT N 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC
W 509.67 FT N 56 DEG -j!LN T' SEC W 226.09 FT N 78 DEG 43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG
33 lIIN 51 SEC W 217.8A S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84 FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN
.56 SEC \W 379 4-1 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86 DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W
: '817.6 FT \\ i2'9.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S 33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT
S 23 DEG 49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W 12053 FT TO APT ON S LINE OF
SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT
OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

The proposed Ordinance is entitled:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 97-
2, BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE CITY BY RE-ZONING PROPERTY FROM POLK
COUNTY AGRICULTURE/RURAL RESIDENTIAL (A/RR) TO CITY OF FORT MEADE M-2, IN-
DUSTRIAL PARK DISTRICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR A COPY TO
BE KEPT ON FILE; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

Any interested parties may inspect the above proposed Ordinance at the Office of the Deputy City Clerk in
City Hall of the City of Fort Meade, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.


Notice IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Fort Meade, Florida will hold a public
hearing on Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., in the Commission Chambers, City Hall, 8 West Broadway,
Fort Meade, Florida, in said City, to consider amending Ordinance No. 97-2, the Land Development Regula-
tions, by amending the Zoning Map of the City of Haines City, Florida, as provided for in Article 7 of the
Land Development Regulations. The proposed Zoning Map Amendment is to re-zone from Polk County
Agriculture/Rural Residential to City of Fort Meade M-, Industrial Park District. Said property is legally
described as follows:

Tax [D No: 253108-000000-021010
S 100 FT OF N1/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PART THEREOF LYING WITHIN
VACATED RD R/WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436 LESS MINERAL RIGHTS ONLY FOR
OIL & GAS

Tax ID No.: 253108-000000-022010
S1/2 OF SE1/4 LESS W 200 FT INCLUDING THAT PT THEREOF LYING WITHIN VACATED RD R/
WS AS PER OR 2339-1577 & OR 1970-1436

Tax ID No.: 253109-000000-024010
ALL LYING W OF CSX RR R/W & S OF C/L OF VACATED TIGER BAY RD AS DESC IN OR 1324-231

Tax ID No.: 253116-000000-012040
ALL LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF HWY & LESS THAT PORTION LYING N & E OF
ABANDONED TRACK & S OF HWY & LESS THAT PT LYING E OF RR R/W & S OF ABANDONED
RR TRACK & LESS RD R/W & LESS RR R/W & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOL-
a LOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FTTO POB OF DESC LINE; N 15


DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 1141.12 FT N 51 DEG 45 MIN51 SECW 129.44 FT N 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC
W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG
16 MIN 47 SEC W 155.27 FT N 71 DEG 42 MIN 54 SEC W 59.79 FT N 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W 93.72
FT N 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SEC W 153.47 FT N 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FT N 84 DEG 34 MIN.05
SEC W 43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54 SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87
DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79 DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 115.54 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC
W 181.77 FT N 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC W 509.67 FT N 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEC W 226.09 FT N 78 DEG
43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG 33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FT S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84
FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN 56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86
DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W 817.68 FT W 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S
33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT S 23 DEG 49 MIN43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W
120.53 FT TO APT ON S LINE OF SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR
OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

Tax ID No.: 253117-000000-011020
ALLLESS NW1/4 &LESS BEGATNWCOROFNW1/4 OFNE1/4E 200 FTSWLY TO PT200 FTS OF
POB N TO POB & LESS THAT PART OF SEC LYING S OF THE FOLLOWING DESC LINE:COMM NE
COR OF SEC 21-31-25 S 1260.82 FTTO POB OF DESC LINE;N 15 DEG 37 MIN 06 SEC W 114.12 FTN
51 DEG 45 MIN 51 SEC W 129.44 FT N 86 DEG 42 MIN 06 SEC W 106.99 FT S 65 DEG 21 MIN 13 SEC
W 204.61 FT S 54 DEG 29 MIN 51 SEC W 67.85 FT S 81 DEG 16 MIN 47 SEC W 155.27 FT N 71 DEG
42 MIN 54 SEC W 59.79 FT N 31 DEG 20 MIN 11 SEC W 93.72 FT N 26 DEG 12 MIN 39 SEC W 153.47
FT N 52 DEG 24 MIN 43 SEC W 52.73 FTN 84 DEG 34 MIN 05 SEC W43.61 FT S 82 DEG 52 MIN 54
SEC W 1570.99 FT S 86 DEG 03 MIN 54 SEC W 44.62 FT N 87 DEG 31 MIN 53 SEC W 192.25 FT N 79
DEG 25 MIN 18 SEC W 115.54 FT N 72 DEG 22 MIN 11 SEC W 181.77 FT N 69 DEG 58 MIN 35 SEC
W 509.67 FT N 56 DEG 54 MIN 09 SEC W 226.09 FT N 78 DEG 43 MIN 27 SEC W 31.97 FT S 85 DEG
33 MIN 51 SEC W 217.83 FT S 76 DEG 41 MIN 12 SEC W 151.84 FT W 362.12 FT N 88 DEG 24 MIN
56 SEC W 379.44 FT S 88 DEG 57 MIN 16 SEC W 662.42 FT N 86 DEG 47 MIN 29 SEC W 223.37 FT W
817.68 FT W 1929.99 FT S 63 DEG 14 MIN 25 SEC W 20.94 FT S 33 DEG 52 MIN 59 SEC W 25.54 FT
S 23 DEG 49 MIN 43 SEC W 63.59 FT S 31 DEG 09 MIN 37 SEC W 12053 FT TO APT ON S LINE OF
SW1/4 OF SEC 17-31-25 SD PT LYING 1748.08 FT FROM SW COR OF SEC 17 SD PT BEING POINT
OF TERMINATION OF DESC LINE

The proposed Ordinance is entitled:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 97-
2, BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE CITY BY RE-ZONING PROPERTY FROM POLK
COUNTY AGRICULTURE/RURAL RESIDENTIAL TO CITY OF FORT MEADE M-2, INDUSTRIAL
PARK DISTRICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR A COPY TO BE KEPT ON
FILE; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

Any interested parties may inspect the above proposed Ordinance at the Office of the Deputy City Clerk in
City Hall of the City of Fort Meade, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.

At said hearings any person, his/her agent or attorney, may appear and be heard. If a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Planning and Zoning Board or the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at such hearing, he/she will need a report of the proceedings; that, for such purposes, he/she may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record iilude. ninr, r: and
evidence upon which the appeal is based. (F.S. 286.105)

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and F.S. 286.26, persons with disabilities needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the Deputy City Clerk prior to the
proceedings at (863) 285-1100 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone the Florida Relay Service num-
bers (800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice) for assistance.

Dated in Fort Meade, Polk County, Florida,
this 16th day of April, 2012.


LOCATION MAP


Parcel ID #s:
253108-000000-021010
253108-000000-022010
253109-000000-024010
253116-000000-012040
253117-000000-011020


The Polk County Democrat Page 13A


April 18, 2012


NOTICE OF INTENT TO AMEND ZONING MAP

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE FORT MEADE

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD AND CITY COMMISSION TO CONSIDER

AMENDING CITY OF FORT MEADE ZONING MAP






Page 14A The Polk County Democrat


BUSINESS


Session was good for the farm


Three bills highlighted in annual legislative luncheon


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

Monday's gathering of some 80 people
from the Polk County Farm Bureau
thanked legislators, and legislators them-
selves bragged about how good the ses-
-sion was to the farm industry, this year.
"This was the best session we've had
in a long time," said Ben Park, the chief
lobbyist for the Florida Farm Bureau Fed-
eration, at Monday's Polk County Farm
Bureau legislative luncheon at Bartow's
Stuart Conference Center. "You couldn't
ask for anything more. This has been the
most pro businesses legislature we've
ever had," he said, referring t6 delega-
tion that took the stage to summarize the
session and take a handful of questions
from the audience.
The only Polk legislator not present
was Sen. Paula Dockery, but appear-
ing instead was Rep. Denise Grimsley,
R-Sebring, who does not represent Polk
voters but she is running for the seat be-
ing vacated by Sen. JD Alexander. Those
who represent Polk voters on stage were
Republicans Sen. Alexander, Rep. Ben
Albritton Rep. Mike Homer Rep. Seth
McKeel Rep. Kelli Stargel and Rep. John
Wood.
Alexander started the presentation
saying how reapportionment was the big
issue this year. He and others repeated
that since the balanced budget did not
raise taxes it was a huge victory.
However, it was the three big agri-
culture bills that shine brightly for the
industry that made the session success-
ful for the farming industry.
Those three bills included a
$2.3 million tax break for packinghouses,
$2 million in research money for IFAS to
study HLB, also known as citrus green-
ing, and $16 million in tax credits for
renewable energy sources.
"These flew in right under the radar,"
Parks told the crowd.


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Sen. JD Alexander gives members of the Farm Bureau and others an update on the recently finished legislative session Monday at the Stuart Center
in Bartow. Also at the annual legislative luncheon were, from left, Rep. Ben Albritton, Rep. Denise Grimsley, Rep. John Wood, Rep. Kelli Stargel,
Rep. Mike Horner and Rep. Seth McKeel.


And while Albritton was particularly
proud this was passed, he also pointed
out that goat trucks that use on-road die-
sel and drive on the road that were previ-
ously at risk of getting a ticket can now
drive on the road after this session. They
are the vehicles that transport orange
bins from the groves to citrus haulers.
"Goat trucks were at risk of getting a
ticket and now everything is legal," he
said.
What it comes down to is letting the
legislators know what is on your mind,
he said, and they likely can get some-
thing done.
"Everyday you go through and in your
business you deal with regulations and
hurdles, be thoughtful and bring those


thoughts to us," he said. "We've got to
know about them so we can deal with
them. It's like those packinghouses. It
took five years but the we got it done."
It was the same way with energy bill
and getting it moved the Commission of
Agriculture's Office, McKeel said.
"This was the first time we passed
an energy bill and moved energy to the
Commissioner of Agriculture's Office," he
said. This renewable resource, he added,
impacts your industry.
Among the questions Larry Black,
the president of the Polk County Farm
Bureau, gathered from members and
read to the crowd was whether central
Florida would ever have its own water
management district.


"Hopefully it would be very good.
Having an identity in Central Florida
would be very good," Albritton said.
"This part of the state is very important
to Florida. I think it would be interest-
ing to most people here, but it's a diffi-
cult task and it would take some time."
Outgoing legislator Alexander said
he wouldn't be so confident of such an
entity: "I have to say I don't agree with
Ben. If you think starting a university is
tough, this would be very tough."
On whether the $2 million to fight
citrus greening is secure, Alexander
said that money is not up to being
vetoed. "As long as the university (of
Florida) is up to doing this, we're in
good shape."


EcoGen official excited about potential in Polk County


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
The vice president of develop-
ment for U.S. EcoGen is excited
about what's going to take place
in this area.
This summer ground will be
broken for the 1,163-acre plant
in Fort Meade. The company
,expects with its sale of electricity
to Progress Energy, a new step
will be taken in green energy and
the start of a new project.
A company that has been in
existence since 2009, EcoGen's
$240 million plant in Fort Meade
is the first of four it is planning to
build, Paul Quinn told members
of the Bartow Committee of 100
Friday. It will bring 350 construc-
tion jobs to Polk County to build
the plant, which will offer 30-35
blue and white collar manage-
ment jobs when it opens. He
said he is also excited because
Polk County seems to be excited
about it, making it work both
ways.
"I am extremely excited about


being in Polk County," he said.
"We've gotten a tremendous
reception from the county."
April Brown, Fort Meade's city
planning director, who was at
the Committee of 100 meeting,
showed that excitement when
she said prior to the presenta-
tion, "I'm greatly excited about
the number of jobs coming to
Polk County (with EcoGen)."
In recent months Fort Meade
City Manager Fred Hilliard said
this operation could more than
double the city's tax base, which
has dropped in recent years
mostly due to the slumping real
estate market.
This 60-megawatt plant,
Quinn said, could generate
about an $11 million posi-
tive economic infusion to Polk
County over the life of the
contract, according to a study
by the Central Florida Regional
Planning Council. The contract
it has with Progress Energy is for
29/2 years and starts when the
plant starts operating, planned
for June 2014.


PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW
Paul Quinn, the vice president of
development for U.S. EcoGen, LLC,
speaks Friday to the Committee of
100 members in Bartow.
"It will be pretty good and
have a significant impact on Polk
County," he said.
Mark McDuff, senior business
development manager for the
Central Florida Development
Council, had said previously
this project is one of the most


significant and largest economic
development projects for Polk
County.
Though Quinn wouldn't get
elaborate on the types of jobs or
the pay range involved, there are
other jobs this plant could cre-
ate. EcoGen has started working
with Ruck's Citrus Nursery in
Frostproof, which plans to start a
eucalyptus tree nursery.
Quinn said Rucks will develop
seedlings the company needs
for growing eucalyptus trees.
He added the company has also
been in contact with orange
producers in the area, too.
"We've been talking to orange
producers about their dead
wood," he said. Any kind of dead
wood would be sufficient for the
plant to use, he added.
The wholesaler of electric-
ity operates by having electric
companies as customers; those
companies then sell electricity to
homes and businesses. The plant
building, he said, will be well-
hidden so that people probably
won't see it and won't smell any


waste. It should provide electric-
ity to 4,000-5,000 homes and
businesses.
The plant is a "green" opera-
tion because it makes electric
power by using eucalyptus tree
bark. He said using this type of
bark is part of what is remark-
able.
"The beauty of eucalyptus is it
grows so fast," he said. "It grows
from a seedling to 48-50 feet long
in two years."
The plant will have 10,000
acres to grow these trees but
when asked how many trees per
acre could fit, he said that was
proprietary information and he
couldn't reveal it.
One of the advantages of
the plant's location off
U.S. Highway 17 on land that
has been annexed into Fort
Meade's city limit is because
Progress Energy power lines
are near it, there are CSX rail
lines in the area and there is a
proximity to major highways,
allowing ease for transporta-
tion of goods.


April 18, 2012









SCHOOL


Union archery team golf tournament to help team go to nationals


he Union Academy Archery Team is
raising money for the nationals. One
of the fund raisers is a golf tourna-
ment scheduled Saturday, April 28 at the
Bartow Golf Course.
The tournament will be a scramble
format of four team members with a tee
time at 1 p.m.
The entry fee is $60 per person, which
includes a chicken barbecue dinner, prizes,
and a raffle. Hole sponsors are being sought
for $100. Checks should be made payable
to Union AcademyArchery Boosters and
returned to the Bartow Pro Shop.
For information and to sign up call Tour-
nament Chairman Susan Prevatt at (863)
537-3718 or the Bartow Pro Shop at (863)
533-9183.
Schools earn top honors
Polk County Public Schools was
selected as a first place winner in the


O Our Schools



cIOil~ ot,_pol(oun!) dtm'iat ml.
American School Board Journal's 18th
annual Magna Awards program.
The Magna Awards recognize districts '
in the United States for programs that
advance student learning and encourage
community involvement in schools. ASBJ
initiated the Magna Awards in 1995 to
recognize school boards "for taking bold
and innovative steps to improve their edu-
cational programs." Polk County Public
Schools earned its award in the more than
20,000 enrollment category.


Public County Public Schools was recog-
nized for improving educational programs
and provide access to digital learning
tools. School district officials established
partnerships with neighborhood commu-
nity centers and local Internet providers
to bridge the digital divide in low-income
areas located within the school district.
The Internet service companies provide
either low-cost or free Intemet access to
community centers. Polk County Public
Schools donated refreshed computers to
the community centers to create com-
puter labs for students and local residents.
Teachers provide computer skills training
for residents seeking job opportunities and
after-school help for students.
An independent panel of school board
members, administrators and other
educators selected the winners from 300
submissions. This year's nominations
came from 44 states.
Magna Awards are supported by


Sodexo School Services. Each grand-prize
winning district will receive $4,000 in
scholarship money during a special pre-
sentation at the National School Boards
Association's Annual Conference, sched-
uled April 21-23 in Boston.
Summer registration
under way
Polk State College is registering stu-
dents for the summer semester. Classes
begin May 9.
Students currently enrolled may
register for the summer term online
through the College's Passport. Prospec-
tive new students should first submit
an online application at www.polk.edu.
After doing so, they will be scheduled
for an orientation session, during which
they will register for their first classes.
Registration for dual-enrollment stu-
dents will begin April 17.


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April 18, 2012


The Polk County Democrat Page 15A





Pag 16 h okCut eortArl1,21


Cleaning up Bartow


PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE
Tom and Jean Adams brought their golf cart
and some trash-stabbing sticks they put
together to help make cleaning up Mosaic
Park a little easier. They were part of the
Floral Lakes team taking part in Bartow's
annual Keep Bartow Clean & Beautiful/Great
American Cleanup Event, sponsored by the city
Solid Waste Department and Keep Polk County
Beautiful on Saturday.
PHOTO PROVIDED
Some members of the Bartow
Chamber Leadership Cleanup
T- eam (from left) Aaron
Medley, Tyler Medley, Wayne
Lewis, Shannon Medley, Jennifer
Hall Sturgis and Jessamyn
Gwydir helped make Mary
SHolland Park more attractive
during the annual Keep Bartow
Clean & Beautiful/Great
American Cleanup Event on
Saturday, April 14. Not pictured
are team members Jarrod Bogan
and Jason Yates.


PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE
Tyler Medley has this area of Mary Holland Park all
cleaned up. The 16-year-old son of Aaron and Shannon
Medley took part in Bartow's annual Keep Bartow Clean
& Beautiful/Great American Cleanup Event, sponsored by
the city Solid Waste Department and Keep Polk County
Beautiful on Saturday.


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April 18,2012


Page 16A The Polk County Democrat


IT


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I


!~~*1=~~,7a= ;E.i~Plm~l~
. ~ ----






Apri- 18,202TeP-ConyDmcaPge-


SPORTS
T Thearmoeniu tha
Take me out to the ballgame..
Take m e out to the ball am e ....... ,,w..,.,,,


Spring training is behind us. The
major league teams who train in
the region have headed north to try
their luck at a new season. While many
of us may have spent an afternoon or
two watching the big leaguers, it's heart-
ening to know that baseball still thrives
even when the stars are gone.
Minor league professional baseball is
nothing like it used to be when nearly
every community had a farm team, some
in Class D leagues, but a feeder system
nonetheless. Now, professional teams
will draw their talent from as few as four
minor league clubs on varying levels. The
Detroit Tigers rely on the Lakeland Flying
Tigers as a developmental point. More
than a few players who are on the major
league roster, including Rick Porcello and
Drew Smyly, wore the Lakeland uniform
in their career.
If you are looking for affordable
family fun, a night at the ballpark is
tough to beat. Those of us in the region
are blessed with a fine facility and a
team organization that is community-
oriented. As far as the Lakeland Flying
Tigers are concerned, it's the fans who
are the stars.
Located just about 15 miles from
downtown Bartow, Joker Marchant Sta-
dium, the home of the Flying Tigers, is
considered one of the finest facilities in
minor league baseball. Built in 1966, the
stadium went through a major renova-
tion and stands right with parks built in
the 21st century.
Zach Burek is the general manager of
the Lakeland Flying Tigers. As the 2012


Ljrr, .jn be contacted at
buar, ffr@gmail.com.


season was getting under way, Zach
caught us up on what we can expect
to see this season. "We just had our
first Monday dollar night," he said. "On
Monday, tickets are a dollar, hot dogs
are a dollar and small sodas are a dollar.
We'll have a surprise item at some of the
Monday in the future."
Parking is free. We get you involved
when you come to a game."
Whilethe team is headquartered in
Lakeland, Burek knows there is a lot
of interest in the outlying communi-
ties like Bartow. "We're very active with
the civic organizations," he said. "We
try to stay involved with the schools.
There are two games that are played
at 10:30 a.m., which allows schools to
bring the kids as a group. More than
half the schools that take part in those
activities are from outside of Lakeland.
We go to the surrounding communities
and see a lot of interest in the Lakeland
Flying Tigers. People know who we are."
Complete details, schedule
and information can be found at
www.lakelandflyingtigers.com.


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The Polk County Democrat Page 17A


ADril 18, 2012





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April 18, 2012


Page 18A The Polk County Democrat


-.- J -,


I


K ^





Ani 1.21ThPokCutDeortPg1A


POLICE
.
EO. I P


The information is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records.
Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or Innocence is determined by the court system.


A 69-year-old Bartow man was
charged Monday with lewd molestation
on a child younger than 12, the Bartow
Police Department reports.
Robert Droz, of 220 W. Vine St., Bar-
tow was arrested Monday afternoon
after admitting to inappropriately
touching the youth, police report.
On Monday, police were notified by
family members of a 12-year-old girl that
Droz allegedly had been "inappropriately"


touching the girl.
Detective Bill Lawson and the Child
Protection Team interviewed the girl,
and she said the inappropriate touching
had been going on for about a year.
Lawson then went to Droz' house and
interviewed him where he admitted to
the "inappropriate touching," police re-
port. Lawson then arrested the suspect.
Bartow Police report under Florida
statute this charge is a life felony.


Border agent

charged with battery
A 45-year-old Department of Customs and threw it, the sheriff's
and Border Protection employee was. office reports. He then
charged with one count of battery in approached her in an ag-
a domestic violence incident, the Polk gressive manner, and she
County Sheriff's Office reports. threw a drink at him to
On Saturday, April 14, deputies arrested .., protect herself.
RobertW White of Highland City and White responded by
booked him into the Polk County Jail. allegedly striking her in
According to the affidavit, late Friday, ROBERT her face with his open
April 13, White was engaged in an argu- WHITE hand. This altercation was
ment with his wife at their home when witnessed by the couple's
he snatched a phone out of her hand 13-year-old son, the sheriff's office reports.


ARRESTS
March 31
Stephen Satterfield, 43,1410 Greentree
Avenue harassing phone calls, resisting
arrest without violence, stalking and violation of
probation.
Donald Alex, 35, 550 N. Restwood Avenue -


possession of methamphetamines with intent to
sell and possession of paraphernalia.
Julia Dease, 29,3820 S.R. 60 East posses-
sion of a controlled substance without prescrip-
tion and possession of paraphernalia.
Michael Skidmore, 31, 3820 S.R. 60 East -
possession of a controlled substance without a


prescription and possession of paraphernalia.
Michael Hemby, 39,435 Heather Court -
reckless driving and violation of probation.
Latasha Green, 28,2924 Wheeler Street -
driving with a suspended license.
Gilberto Martinezdominguez, 48,4810 Mark
Way --driving with an expired license.


April 1
Shakier Mathis, 34,2414 Gerties Road -
driving with a suspended license.
Rodney Burnham, 18,2975 Warfield Drive
-robbery.
Willie Robinson, 26,790 Childs Avenue -
driving with a suspended license.


John Simpson, 44, 990 E. First Street -
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and
battery.
April 3
Mariana Lopez, 32,1185 E. Summerlin Street
-driving without a valid license.


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COUNTY REPORT


Bicycles to trek from Lake Wales to Orlando


2012 Bike MS: The Citrus


Tour to


kick off from Bok


Tower April 20


ByJEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM

Got your breath? How are
your legs?
Well if you've answered in
the positive to those two ques-
tions, you may want to join in
the muscular dystrophy Citrus
Tour. It's a bicycle ride from
Bok Tower to Orlando and one
of the two biggest fundrais-
ers for the Multiple Sclerosis
Foundation.
It is planned for Friday and
Saturday, April 20-21, when
cyclists can choose a 50-mile,
75-mile or 100-mile route that
will go through orange groves
and pastoral terrain. They will
stay overnight at the Caribe
Royale Resort in Orlando
where they will participate
in a dinner. On the second
day, they will ride back to Bok
Tower Gardens where there
will be a finish line victory
parade.
Meagan Mills with the
National MS Society said she
expects at least 1,500 cyclists to
take part in the event.
"This is our 25th year and
we've got a goal of $966,000
for the (Mid-Florida) chapter.
We also do the walk event and
these two are the biggest fund-
raising events we have."
Registration for The Citrus
Tour is open up to taking-off
time. The current fee is $310
for individuals and $300 for
a member joining a team. It
includes a $250 fund-raising
minimum.
The walk-a-thon, which
was held in various cities in
mid-Florida last month gener-
ates quite a bit of money for
research but the Bike MS: The


Citrus Tour raised $921,569
last year. Last year the two
fundraisers together which
includes eight walk-a-thons -
raised $1.3 million.
The amount of participation
and money being raised for
research has the president of
the society excited.
"This is an exciting year for
Bike MS as we celebrate the
25th anniversary of the event
for the Mid Florida Chapter
and the third year of our in-
creasingly popular Citrus Tour
route," said Carroll Franklin,
president of the Mid Florida
Chapter.
"With every dollar we raise,
we are one step closer to end-
ing MS."
Multiple sclerosis is an
incurable, chronic disease of
the central nervous system. It
interrupts the flow of informa-
tion between the brain and
body, causing unpredictable
symptoms that can include
numbness and blurred vi-
sion, as well as paralysis. Most
people are diagnosed between
the ages of 20 and 50, with
twice as many women as men
affected.
Those who can't or don't
want to take part in the bicycle
fundraiser may make dona-
tions or volunteer by going to
www.nationalmssociety.org/
FLC or contacting Cody Yerian
at (813) 889-8363, ext. 201.
For information about the
riding event visit http:/ /bike
flc.nationalmssociety.org.

PHOTO PROVIDED
The 2012 Bike MS: The Citrus Tour is
set to kick off this weekend from Bok
Tower Gardens.


Lashman to challenge Judd in sheriff's race


By BILL ROGERS
CORRESPONDENT

Michael Lashman's philosophy about
law enforcement could be summed
up as a combination of old school and
today's technology.
"I believe in old school; it works,"
said Lashman, who is running for Polk
County sheriff.
The 49-year-old Lakeland resident
has several changes in mind if he can
defeat the incumbent, Grady Judd, in
this year's election that is scheduled
Aug. 14.
Lashman is seeking signatures on pe-
titions in his bid for sheriff. According
to the Polk County Supervisor of Elec-
tions, he will have to collect 3,256 valid
petitions by the May 7 deadline.
"The reason I'm running for sheriff is
I just see what is going on here is so ass
backwards ...," Lashman said.
Lashman thinks community polic-
ing is important and that it is not being
done in Polk.
"I was always told 'high profile, less
violence," he said. "You keep criminals
on their toes by doing high profile."
Lashman said he understands that
Polk has a large land area that has to


be covered.
"We have a lot
of rural areas,
houses can be sev-
eral miles apart,"
he said. "We have
enough money in
our budget to put
out business cards
or a flier... 'I'm
your deputy, and
I patrol this area.
My counterpart
who works the
night shift also Michael Lashman
works here. You
have a problem in
your neighborhood, call us.'
Lashman believes the county needs to
have 200 more deputies to adequately
serve the population.
"It's a high turnover agency," he said.
"You go there, you get trained. Once you
get probation, you're evaluated and you
go to bigger agencies."
Lashman claims that morale is low
and that deputies have not had a raise
in a couple of years.
He contends the agency needs to be
modernized, saying, for example, that
its laptops are outdated.


"We have technologies here that are
so far behind Hillsborough County and
Orange County," he said.
The salaries can be improved as well.
"Look at the tax base," he said. "Stop
giving money back to the county."
Something else Lashman said he would
do if he became sheriff is conduct an
audit of the police academy. He wonders
if those entering the academy are being
taught everything they need to know.
"I want to make sure they are being
trained properly," he said. "They may
be passing the exam but are they being
taught the right skills?"
On the administrative side, Lashman
questions why the agency has, accord-
ing to him, four executive aides. He
also wonders why so many non-sworn
civilian employees of the agency take
home cars.
Iashman was asked why he thinks he
can beat Judd, who is running for his
third term as sheriff.
"I think people are getting tired of the
showboating ... about the frivolous law
suits," Lashman said.
He added that Judd appears on TV
"for the most idiotic things." Lashman
used a bust a few years ago at the North
Lakeland Sam's Club over baby food


theft as an example.
"He was on Bay News 9 for 90 min-
utes over baby food theft," Lashman
said. "We're the meth capital of the
United States and baby food took
precedence over meth."
Lashman, who has lived in the county
for 12 years, said he was born in California.
His family moved to Florida settled in Bro-
ward County. He is a 1981 graduate of Fort
Lauderdale High School and earned the
rank of Eagle Scout while in high school.
He said he went though the Lake
Worth Police Academy. His law en-
forcement career included spending
three years with the Belle Glade Police
Department in Palm Beach County,
worked for Palm Beach Gardens Police
Department and the Department of
Juvenile Justice in Martin County. He
also said he worked as a volunteer spe-
cial deputy in Manatee County.
He said he applied to become a sheriff's
deputy in Polk in 2000 but was not hired.
Lashman was a write-in candidate for
sheriff in 2008. According to the Polk
Supervisor of Elections, there were 1,981
votes with Lashman's name on them.
There were a total of 8,561 write-in votes
for sheriff. Sheriff Judd received more
than 207,000 votes in that election.










Senate women find unexpected clout


By BRITTANY ALANA DAVIS
TAMPA BAY TIMES

TALLAHASSEE On the final day of
the 2012 legislative session, Sen. Paula
Dockery worked the Senate chamber,
counting "no" votes on a bill to turn
failing public schools into private char-
ter schools.
She and fellow senators mostly
women had rallied against the con-
troversial proposal for weeks.
"Are we still good?" asked Sen. Nancy
Detert, R-Venice, as Dockery walked by.
"As of now, we're still good," Dockery
replied, worried about possible swing
votes.
By Dockery's count, the bill should
go down on a tie vote (there are no tie-
breakers in the Florida Senate). But she
stood tense at the vote screen, biting a
nail. The computer tallied the vote, and
her hands swung over her head.
20-20.
Success.
The tie was another proud moment
for Dockery, a Lakeland Republican, and
her ragtag caucus of Senate floaters.
Together, they defeated a massive ex-
pansion of private prisons, blocked an
omnibus anti-abortion bill from debate
and prevented unregulated, out-of-
state companies from taking over state-
sponsored homeowners insurance.
The unexpected force of unofficial
leaders and whips had crossed party
lines to build moderate coalitions
aimed at thwarting priorities of Senate
President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, and his deputies.
The Senate's 13 women didn't always
vote together in fact, a woman spon-
sored the so-called "parent trigger"
education bill. But there was enough
camaraderie among them, enough
powerful voices to influence nearly
every close vote of the session.
In the 40-member Florida Senate,
where three men hold the most power-
ful positions, another group came into
their own.
The women of the Senate.
The coalition wasn't premeditated
or organized. And it often included
men like Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New
Port Richey, and Sen. Dennis Jones,
R-Seminole.
"It was spontaneous combustion,"
Detert said. "We all hated the same bills."
The rebellion grew out of frustration
in both parties that Republican leaders
were using their super majority to force


divisive bills,
ignoring the more
moderate voices,
Dockery said.
"They didn't
really care where
we stood on is-
sues," Dockery
said. "When you
combine the
12 Democrats
with us unhappy
Republicans it be- Sen. Paula Dockery
came a matter of
getting just one or
two more votes."
In a cramped Capitol office, six
female senators gathered for an im-
promptu interview. The subject: their
underestimated clout.
"None of us have been shrinking vio-
lets," said Nan Rich, the Senate Demo-
cratic leader and the only woman in a
top political slot.
These women characterize them-
selves as self-appointed leaders. They
get by on charisma and discipline,
refusing to be intimidated, studying ev-
ery bill, asking pointed questions, and
being more prepared than their male
colleagues.
The Senate is known for its indepen-
dent streak. But backbone has a price
in a chamber where loyalty is rewarded
with privilege and leaders keep control
with intimidation.
Regardless of gender, lawmakers who
cross leadership see their bills disap-
pear from agendas.
After Dockery antagonized Senate
leadership during her 2009 crusade
against SunRail, her bills seldom made
it to committee calendars, let alone to
the floor for a vote.
Dockery was punished further,
relegated to offices on the second floor
with members of the minority party
and excluded from the powerful Senate
Budget Committee.
Dockery lost one of her hardest
fought battles against Sen. JD Alexander,
R-Lake Wales, who pushed through a
measure to immediately break off USF
Polytechnic in Lakeland into its own
university, bypassing an approved incre-
mental plan for the branch's indepen-
dence. The bill passed the Senate 36-4.
"It was the best example of political
muscle I could think of," Dockery said.
Politics is still a boys' club, the women
say, and rather than follow the fraternity
rules, they've created their own.


Detert recalls
that when she i:
was elected to the
House in 1998,
a colleague said
that if she aspired '
to be a part of
leadership, she
would have to
follow the lead of
current leaders.
Detert chose an-
other route. While en an e
eno i leaed Sen. Nancy Detert
not a "leader,"
Detert has been
instrumental in
landmark legislation to offer assistance
and scholarships to foster children and
prevent child abuse in day cares.
"Women usually don't think that
way," she explained. "We don't wait un-
til we're leaders. We just start right in."
Sen. Ronda Storms, R-Valrico, agreed.
"If you wait until you're the leader,
you'll never get it."
The disparity between women and
men in elected office is well known.
Six women are serving as governors
in 2012. Women make up 17 percent of
Congress and about 25 percent of legis-
latures, according to the Rutgers Center
for American Women and Politics.
Rich is the Senate's first female mi-
nority leader.
Twor women former Sen. Toni
Jennings and Sen. Gwen Margolis -
have served as Senate presidents. The
House has never chosen a female as its
speaker.
The Florida Senate, in some ways, is
a tug-of-war of cultures.
Leaders frequently travel to sport-
ing events linked to fundraisers out
of state. And they turn to their male
friends, instead of the females, to raise
campaign cash and publicity, said Sen.
Evelyn Lynn, R-Ormond Beach.
"The women, even though they get
involved in the fundraising and they
are excellent at it, they're not involved
in the various events where the guys
get together and they do big things,"
she said.
Put another way, it's a man's
Legislature.
In February during a bitter fight
over who would become Senate presi-
dent in 2014 Bradenton Sen. Mike
Bennett bought neckties for five of his
male colleagues.
The ties repeated a phrase in Latin: "Non
illegitimi carborundum." Translation: Don't


let the bastards
grind you down.
Sen. Garrett
Richter, R-Naples,
joked that Ben-
nett couldn't
afford ties for all
40 senators, so
he gave them to
the chamber's
male Republican
leadership.
The Florida Sen. Ronda Storms
Senate steers
women toward
family issues,
Detert says, while men focus on issues
of money and power.
Health and Human Services, for
example, was considered a women's
issue until health costs skyrocketed and
swelled to nearly one-third of the bud-
get. Then men wanted to chair those
committees, Detert said.
"As a woman, you can do the touchy,
feel stuff the guys have no interest in,"
said Detert, who chairs the Commerce
and Tourism Committee. "That is until
it becomes a big money issue, then the
guys want it."
The women laughed as they de-
scribed the reaction of Sen. Jack Latva-
la, R-Clearwater, when he found out he
was "the token male" on the Children,
Families and Elder Affairs Committee.
Latvala said he's not the "warmest,
cuddliest guy," but he learned a lot
from that committee and is glad he was
placed there.
Incoming Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, said he believes the
male-female divide is fading.
Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lau-
derdale, for example, chairs a budget
subcommittee on civil and criminal
justice and Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto,
R-Wellington, chairs the budget sub-
committee on tourism, transportation
and economic development.
It's too early to decide who will chair
the Senate's top committees next year.
But Gaetz said it should include an
equal share of men and women.
"I think about what people's interests
are and about which senator has the cour-
ageto carry an issue through a firestorm
of opposition," he said. "The women in
this Senate are as capable, if not more
capable, than the men in that area."
The women of the Senate know that,
of course.
They showed it in 2012.


Saunders wins awards


Coldwell Banker Commercial
released its annual sales recognition
awards and for the third time since
affiliating with Coldwell Banker Com-
mercial in 2006 and three out of four
years running, Dean Saunders earned
the 2011 number-1 Global Sales Pro-
fessional Award.
Saunders is the founder of the land
real estate brokerage firm, Coldwell
Banker Commercial Saunders Real
Estate and is a partner in the com-
mercial real estate brokerage, Coldwell
Banker Commercial Saunders Ralston
Dantzler Realty, both in downtown
Lakeland.
For the 2011 sales year, he contin-
ues his standing in the top 2 percent
category for sales worldwide for six
years, every year since affiliating. The
category has an elite membership
recognized from the 3,000 brokers and
agents worldwide, the organization
said. The Top 2 percent is based upon
the year's sales numbers. Saunders
also placed for the fifth time in the
Circle of Distinction Platinum.
"As John D. Rockefeller once said,
'the major fortunes in America have
been made in land.' The variable mar-


ket challenges
will only shift the
buyer's demo-
graphics but
not the ability .
to get land sold.
Right now, strong '. .
commodity pric-
ing is affecting
farmland and
is where inves-
tors are placing Dean Saunders
their money.
A real estate
broker needs to know their market as
it relates to the repositioning of buyer
demographics to be successful in all
economic times," Saunders said.
Saunders also led the company over-
all to its fifth win of the "Commercial
Elite Office" award. This is bestowed
upon companies with sales numbers
in the top 15 of all companies
worldwide.
In 2011, the firm's year-end totals
were $107 MM in land sales, 79 trans-
actions, and 22,771 acres sold. The
company's success rests in the expert
knowledge of the 15 broker associates
and agent land professionals.


The U.S. Department of Agriculture
reduced its orange crop forecast for
the 2011-12 season by 2 million boxes
last week, estimating Florida will now
produce 145 million boxes.
"It's truly amazing Florida growers
can once again produce such a quality
crop in the face of immense challenges
such as HLB, or citrus greening," said
Michael W. Sparks, executive vice presi-
dent and CEO of Florida Citrus Mutual.
"This is a testament to the resiliency of
our growers and the fact they are the
best in the world, bar none."
The USDA makes its initial forecast
in October and then revises it monthly
until the end of the season in July.
During the 2010-12 season, Florida
produced 139 million boxes of oranges.
The 2011-12 April decrease was seen
entirely in Valencias, with the estimate
dropping from 73 million to 71 million
boxes. Early and mid-season variet-
ies remained at 74 million boxes. For
Florida specialty fruit, the USDA pre-
dicts 1.15 million boxes of tangelos and


4.3 million boxes of tangerines. Those
numbers are unchanged from March.
The yield for from concentrate orange
juice (FCOJ) decreased to 1.62 gallons
per 90-pound box from the previous
estimate of 1.64 gallons per box.
The USDA predicts Florida will har-
vest 18.8 million boxes of grapefruit in
2011-12, showing a minor rise from the
March forecast of 18.7 million.
The Florida citrus industry creates
a $9 billion annual economic impact,
employing nearly 76,000 people, and
covering about 550,000 acres.



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Wednesday, April 18, 2012


Page 2B SCMG Central Florida






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SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


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Page 4B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, April 18,2012


Queen tribute to rock SFCC


One Night of Queen with Gary Mullen
and The Works takes the stage at
7:30 p.m. Monday, April 23, in the SFCC
Theatre for the Performing Arts.
In 2002, Mullen's career as Freddie
Mercury began, and One Night of Queen
was formed along with his band The
Works. Since then, One Night of Queen
has gone from strength to strength and is
one of the hardest working bands in the
land. For the last five years, it has consis-
tently performed more than 150 shows
each year all around the world.
Fans of Queen will hear "Bohemian
Rhapsody," "We are the Champions,"
"Killer Queen," "You're My Best Friend,"
"Crazy Little Thing Called Love," "Radio
Ga Ga," "Under Pressure," "Another
One Bites the Dust," to name just a few
Queen hits.
Widely known as the most in demand
Queen tribute group, this large scale
production is complete with a world-class
vocalist, musicians, sound, and lighting.
Queen's Freddie Mercury was one of
rock's essential front men, thrilling
crowds with his flamboyant stage persona
and that staggering four-octave range.
"There are very few people out there
that have the range that Freddie had
- to go from low to high and just the
power that he had but also the softness
and the purity of tone," Mullen said.
SAs he grew into his late teens, Mullen
began fronting bands and often heard
the words, "You sound like Freddie Mer-
cury," but didn't think too much about
it until the year 2000 when he won the
most votes ever on Stars in Their Eyes,
a British reality show on which contes-
tants impersonate their favorite stars.
He, of course, impersonated Mercury,
singing "A Kind of Magic."
In 2002, Mullen assembled The Works,


PHOTO PROVIDED
Gary Mullen and The Works plan a tribute to
the rock group Queen at South Florida Commu-
nity College on April 23.
his backing band, around guitarist
David Brockett.
"I had known him for a number
of years because we're both from
Glasgow," Mullen said. "He was very in
demand as a session player and had
been in several bands;"
Mullen worked on becoming Mercury
onstage.
"I guess from watching Freddie over
the years, I had subconsciously picked
up a few of the moves. But when I
started actually going out and people
started paying money to come see me,
I thought, 'I really need to actually look
a bit harder and see what he actually
does' because Queen fans are very true
to the memory of Freddie."
Tickets range from $20 to $30 and may
be purchased online 24 hours a day, seven
days a week, at performances.southflorida.
edu. Tickets may also be purchased by
calling the SFCC Box Office at (863) 784-
7178 or by visiting the SFCC Box Office
located in the front of the Theatre for the
Performing Arts, Monday, Wednesday, and
Thursday, Y11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 600 West
College Drive, Avon Park.


Outdoor sculpture


competition winners on view


Ten sculptures are on display in the
Central Park area of Winter Ha en and
will be for the next year as part of the
12th annual Florida Outdoor Sculpture
Competition.
This is the seventh year that the
pieces selected in the Florida Outdoor
Sculpture Competition have been
displayed in Winter Haven.
The exhibition will be celebrated
from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 3,
at the Central Park Stroll, in the
Central Park area of downtown Winter
Haven.
"The presence of public art is an
asset to any community, attracting
visitors and potential residents alike,
stimulating civic dialogue and enliv-
ening the environment," said Claire
Orologas, executive director of Polk
Museum of Art. "Our partnership with
the city of Winter Haven is an impor-
tant example of the kinds of partner-
ships we hope to establish throughout
Polk County in order to integrate art
into the lives of its citizens outside the
museum context."
The 10 works come from artists
representing eight states. The selected
artists, their hometowns and their
sculptures are:
Jorge Blanco of Sarasota, "Easy
Run," 2011, aluminum and powder
coating, 15 feet by 7 feet by 3 feet.
Mark Dickson of Tallahassee,
"Messenger," 2011, welded and stain-
less steel, 10 feet by 6 feet by 4 feet.
Steve Durow of New Orleans,
"Levee Break," 2011, cast glass and
steel, 17 feet by 8 feet by 4 feet.
Kevin Eichner of Hilton Head


Island, S.C., "Modus Vivendi," 2011,
steel, 9 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 6 inches
by 5 feet 6 inches..
C.R. Gray of Hiram, Maine,
"Rock-ET Man," 2011, river stone,
6 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 8 inches by
6 feet 9 inches.
Judith Greavu of Dola, Ohio, "Arts
Spirit," 1989, bronze, 7 feet 5 inches by
3 feet by 3 feet 5 inches.
Hanna Jubran of Grimesland, N.C.,
"earth water fire," 2008-2009, steel and
paint, 14 feet by 6 feet by 24 inches.
Stephen Klema ofWinsted, Conn.,
"Hobbes Claw," 2011, wood and metal,
12 feet by 4 feet by 1 foot.
*Ana Lazovsky of Thousand Oaks,
Calif., and Israel, "Copacabana Wave,"
2010, fiberglass, cast aluminum, paint
and steel, 4 feet 9 inches by 7 feet
3 inches by 5 feet.
Adam Walls of Laurinburg, N.C.,
"weight and balance," 2011, painted
steel, 11 feet by 7 feet 6 inches by
4 feet.
The sculptures have been installed
and will remain on display through
early March 2013.


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Polk County Parks & Recreation


Good 01' Daqs Festival

Discover Polk's Pioneer Past


Saturday, April 21 2012

10:00 a.m.to 200 p.m.


Homeland Heritage Park


2qM Church Avenue, Homeland

Free admission! Some vendors will charge
10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
A kids zone featuring pioneer games, "Make Your Own"
Homemade Ice Cream and a leathercraft project
First person interpretation in the school and the log cabin
Historical Societies of Kathleen and Fort Meade
Historic craft demonstrations and vendors
Food Vendors


10:15 10:45 a.m.
Beautiful Day


Live Music
Live Music 11:00 11:45 a.m.
Jackson Creek String Band
1:00 2:00 p.m.


Pioneer dancing and square dancing featuring music by the Jackson String
Pioneer Band. Caller will be Roy Moye.


(863) 534-6911 or
Sparksandrec.polk-county.net
I E


Event sponsors:
T'ie Polk (Qunty Democrat
IuwK r Frostproof News
& : J -The Fort Meade Leader
The Lake Wales News
The Haines City Herald


Wednesday, April 18, 2012


Page 4B SCMG Central Florida


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USF Poly split leaves students out of mix


By JOHN ROMANO
TAMPA BAY TIMES

The fight is almost over, and the
grown-ups seem happy.
The bill that would turn USF Poly-
technic into the state's 12th university
has landed on the desk of Gov. Rick
Scott and needs only his signature to
become reality.
That means the political scheming
of Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales,
is almost complete. That means the
budget concerns of University of South
Florida leaders are close to being put to
rest. And that means legislators are all
sleeping soundly.
But has anyone stopped to ask what
that means for USF Poly students?
"I haven't found anyone on this cam-
pus who is in favor of that bill," said
Damon Dennis, the USF Poly student
government president. "Our office is
right next to the student lounge, and
I talk to people about it every day. No
one likes it."
The story has been told and retold
dozens of times, so I won't bother you
again with all of the details.
Basically what happened is this:
As Senate budget chairman, Alex-
ander had the muscle to threaten USF
with major funding cuts if he didn't get
his independent university. Fearing this
political blackmail, USF agreed to cut
its Lakeland campus loose in exchange
for budget concessions.
Sure it got a little messy, but every-
one wins in the end.
Unless you're talking about the 2,000


or so students on the Lakeland cam-
pus who lack the money and lobbyists
to persuade anyone in Tallahassee to
listen to them.
"I think that's a sentiment felt by a lot
of the students around here," said Sage
Stevens, a member of the student gov-
ernment executive council. "We kind of
got sold out."
Current students have been assured
they will graduate with accreditation
from USE but they fear they will be
marginalized as the campus moves
away from mainstream programs and
evolves into the math and science spe-
cialization of Florida Polytechnic.
They worry class options will shrink, and
they will be forced to travel to USF cam-
puses in other counties. They worry about
the quality of instructors plummeting.
Essentially, they worry that a Going-
Out-of-Business sign is about to be
taped to the front door of their univer-
sity, and everything will go downhill
from there.
"Going to Tallahassee to the House
of Representatives and watching them
vote on this was very disturbing," said
Jessica McLemore, secretary of the
student government. "Knowing how
misinformed they are when voting on
things as important as this? It stinks. It
makes you wonder about everything
else they're doing.
"They're spending millions of dollars
on a new university at the same time
they're cutting hundreds of millions
from the state university system. You
would think that's common sense. You
would think they understand that, but


TAMPA BAY TIMES PHOTO

University of South Florida students listen as the Senate Budget Committee discusses university
funding at a meeting in Tallahassee in February.


they don't."
Sen. Paula Dockery, R-Lakeland,
wrote a letter to Gov. Scott last week re-
questing he visit the USF Poly campus
and talk'to students before deciding
whether to sign the bill.
A spokeswoman for Dockery said
they have not yet heard from the gov-
ernor's office. A spokeswoman for the
governor said Scott was happy to listen
to the concerns of anyone involved.
As to whether Scott will visit USF
Poly? The governor's office had no
comment.


As to whether he will sign the bill
making the Poly the 12th independent
university is also not known.
SWhile Alexander said he thought the
meeting went well, he declined to charac-
terize Scott's response to the case laid out
by supporters. Alexander said he thought
most of the public input Scott was receiv-
ing was in favor of the measure.
And he raised the prospect that veto-
ing the bill could also delete funding
for the campus, meaning USF would
have to find the money to run the pro-
gram elsewhere.


Council of 100:


Veto Poly, sign tuition


By BRANDON LARRABEE
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA
TALLAHASSEE An influential group of
business leaders urged Gov. Rick Scott on
Friday to veto a plan that would accelerate
independence for the University of South
Florida's Lakeland campus.
In a letter, the Florida Council of 100
asked Scott to nix the proposal for Florida
Polytechnic University, already slated to be-
come the 12th university under a plan laid
out by the Board of Governors last year.
The bill in front of Scott (SB 1994),
sponsored by Senate Budget Chairman
JD Alexander, R-LakeWales, would alter
the board's blueprint and accelerate the
campus becoming a free-standing institu-
tion, though Chancellor Frank Brogan and
others have argued that it will take longer
for the campus to be accredited under the
legislation.
The organization also wrote Scott to
support a measure that would give the
University of Florida and Florida State
University more authority to raise tuition
by virtually unlimited amounts. Both letters
were signed by Steven Halverson, chairman
of the council.
In its letter about Florida Polytechnic,
the council said that the state can't afford
to start a new university at the same time
that utility tax revenues that fund construc-
tion are slumping and the state budget for
the coming fiscal year includes a one-time,
$300 million reduction for the 11 existing
schools.
The group also said setting up a 12th uni-
versity is "the slowest and most expensive
way to produce more STEM graduates in
the state," undermining the case for a school
that supporters say would focus on the
science, technology, engineering and math
degrees that will power the future economy.
"You have repeatedly and correctly stated
that the decision to invest taxpayer dollars
should be based on an objective analysis of
the return on investment," the letter said.
"Plainly, the case for Florida Polytechnic
University has not been made."
After meeting with Scott Thursday, Alex-


PHOTO PROVIDED
The University of South Florida Polytechnic
will remain a part of USF for now. The Board of
Governors voted 13-3 Wednesday to have it split.

ander said it would be easier to set up the
university than try to get an existing school
to focus on STEM and that the amount of
money being spent to get the institution up
and running is relatively small.
"It sure beats spending another $200-
plus million building parking decks," said
Alexander. "I'd rather build classrooms and
serve students."
In a separate letter, the Council of 100
endorsed legislation that would allow UF
and FSU to boost tuition rates beyond the
limits in state law. Other universities could
also do that if they meet 11 of 14 standards
set out in the legislation (HB 7129).
The council's letter argued that UF and
FSU lag behind the national average in
tuition for similar institutions.
"When 50-60 percent of graduates have
no debt, and average debt levels are again
below those of the nationally preeminent
institutions, it becomes a matter of person-
al responsibility in addition to access," the
letter says. "Market forces can't optimally
drive improved performance if students
don't have appropriate skin in the game."
Scott has been hesitant about the tuition
bill, in part out of his opposition to increas-
ing the cost of living in the state.
"You want to make sure that families in
this state can afford a great education," he
said Thursday. 'And you want to make sure
it's a great education."


D*ma AR cmr rantral Flnrida









SAR attends celebration of last Revolution Navy battle


Three Lakeland Chapter SAR mem-
bers attended the annual celebration
ceremony of the last naval battle of
the American Revolutionary War. R.
Hagerman, M. Sellers and W. Sharp
represented the chapter at the Veteran's
Memorial Center at Merritt Island.
The last battle of the Revolutionary
War was fought March 10, 1783, just
off the coast of Florida below Cape
Canaveral.
John Barry was commander of the
American ship Alliance which was
escorting the Duc de Lauzon, a ship
loaded with 72,000 Spanish silver dol-
lars. This money was on its way to the
Continental Congress for use in the war
effort.
Barry spotted a fleet of British ships,
the Sybil, the Alarm and the Tobago. To
protect the Duc de Lauzon and ensure
safe arrival of the silver, John Barry
engaged the Sybil.
The roar of the ship's cannons could
be heard on land and a furious 45-min-
ute gun battle ensued with Barry being
the victor.
Barry was born in Ireland but Phila-
delphia was his home and America was
his country.


He was the first naval commander
in the Revolutionary War to capture a
British ship, the Edward, and fought
the last naval battle of the war with the
Sybil.
Between his first victory capturing
the Edward and his last destroying the
Sybil, he captured more than 20 British
ships.. He helped General Washington
cross the Delaware River and fought
the battle of Trenton and Princeton
while waiting for his new ship to be
built. He was appointed the first com-
mander of the United States Navy by
President George Washington: his was
commission number 1 dated June 4,
1794. He is the true father of the United
States Navy.
The Florida Society of the Sons of the
American Revolution has organized this
patriotic event in an effort to remind
all Americans of the importance of the
American Revolution and to honor the
men and women that fought and died
for our freedom and way of life.
For more information or to become a
member of the SAR contact Bill Thorn-
hill at (863) 294-5730 or Joe Hill at (352)
523-1194 or P.O. Box 367, San Antonio,
FL 33576.


Three Lakeland Chapter SAR members attended the annual celebration ceremony of the last
naval battle of the American Revolutionary War. R. Hagerman, M. Sellers and W. Sharp (from
left) represented the chapter at the Veteran's Memorial Center at Merritt Island.The battle was
fought March 10,1783, just off the east coast of Florida below Cape Canaveral.


A town hall meeting to discuss trends
and give input on prevention needs in
the community is set for April 19.
Members of StandUP Polk, the Coali-
tion for a Drug-Free Polk, are present-
ing the program at 8 a.m. in the Fun
Town 4D Theater at Legoland Florida in
Winter Haven.


It is open to the public and free to the
first 200 registrants. Registration and a
light breakfast is set from 7:30-8 a.m.,
and the program will run about an hour.
Admission to Legoland Florida theme
park is not included with this event.
Advance registration is required by
calling StandUP Polk at (863) 802-0777.


Broadway the Ritz this weekend


Theatre Winter Haven has its 12th An-
nual Gathering of Angels, Broadway At
The Ritz, at the Ritz, 263 W Central Ave.,
Winter Haven on Saturday, April 21.
The gala begins at 6:30 p.m. with
cocktails and hors d'oeuvres catered
by Teri Lobb. At 7:45 p.m. there will be
entertainment furnished byWinter Ha-
ven's own Brass Heart Band. This will
feature songs from some of Broadways
best productions, including many by


Andrew Lloyd Webber.
Dancing and desserts will follow
from 9 p.m.
There will be a silent auction of
airline tickets, beach condo vacations,
art, jewelry and more.
Tickets can be purchased by calling the
Theatre Winter Haven Box Office at (863)
292-7469 (SHOW), by visiting the box of-
fice or by going on-line to www.theatre
winterhaven.com. Ticket price is $50.


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S(CMG Central Florida Page 7B


WednesdayApril 18 2 2







Page 8B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, April 18,2012


SPCA PETS-OF THE WEEK
S"Visit us at the SPCA, 5850 Brannen Rd. South, Lakeland.
Call 863-646-7722, www.spcaflorida.org, blog.spcaflorida.org.
-Adoption Center Hours: Monday Thursday, 11 a.m. 7 p.m.; Friday Saturday, 11 a.m. 5 p.m.
McClurg Medical Center Hours: Monday Sunday, a m. 7 p.m. Open 7 days a week.


For many years, the Society for the Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Animals in Lakeland
has been referred to as Lakeland SPCA
or the SPCA of Polk County, and even at
times the ASPCA, which is a humane orga-
nization based in NewYork City.
Through programs like the Wellness
Wagon, Therapy Dog International testing,
Healthy for the Holidays and outreach
efforts like World Spay Day 2012, the SPCA
has served Auburndale, Bartow, Haines
City and beyond.
McClurg Animal Medical Center has
treated patients from Fort Meade, Lake
Wales and Davenport, and people have
traveled from Lithia, Hudson and Apollo
Beach to adopt from the Adoption Center.
As people can see, the reach extends be-
yond Lakeland and even Polk County.
To convey this growth SPCA Inc. in
Lakeland has begun doing business as
SPCA Florida. SPCA Florida's brand launch
encompasses its future vision, which
includes increasing reach and impact by
re-activating cruelty investigation depart-
ment and creating a new medical trans-


port service program.
"The organization has made strides in
reaching people and pets throughout the
state with our community programs, and
our efforts are only going to increase as we
continue to grow and expand our services
and programs," said Executive Director
Warren Cox.
Beyond its current building expansion
project SPCA Florida's McClurg Animal
Medical Center intends to further develop
its services to reach homebound residents
and underserved populations that need af-
fordable veterinary care for their pets.
"We will continue reaching further into
communities throughout the state to
ensure all pet owners have access to qual-
ity, affordable medical treatment for their
animals," said Cox.
With this launch, SPCA Florida has im-
plemented a revised logo and introduced
a new user-friendly website filled with
additional resources for new pet parents,
youth interested in humane education
and much more. Visit www.spcaflorida.org
for information.


Woman killed in wreck near Mulberry


Dixon
Female, 2 months,
domestic medium hair,
black
Orphaned Since: Feb. 29
Dixon knows how to do
a couple of tricks. She
stands on her hind feet
to catch a ball and she
will sit down and bat it
back to you.


SPCA Florida kicks off 20th anniversary walk


.... SPCA Florida's 20th Anniversary Walk
for the Animals and SPCA 5K is Satur-
day, April 21, from 8 a.m.-noon on the
west side of Lake Hollingsworth near
Patten Heights and Lake Hollingsworth
Drive.
The 5K registration is $25 in advance
or $30 the day of the event. Runners
can register at 7 a.m. for the run that
begins at 8 a.m. Walk-a-thon regis-
(triaion begins at 8 a.m. followed by
the walk at 9 a.m. Walkers who have
raised $75 will receive T-shirts. Other
fundraising prizes include theme park
tickets and vacation stays.


The event will feature canine con-
tests including musical sit, hot dog
eating and a Barkaritaville costume
competition. Rescue dogs will be avail-
able for adoption.
There will also be a bounce house for
the children as well as pet supply and
food vendors.

Money raised from the event helps
SPCA Florida care for more than 6,000
homeless animals and thousands of pets
and people in the community. People
can register at http://walk.spcaflorida.
org or call (863) 646-2 722.


A 60-year-old Sebring resident was
killed in a wreck Wednesday on State
Road 60 east of Bonnie Mine Road, the
Polk County Sheriff's Office said.
At 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 11, a
blue 2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser driven
by Kathleen Diane Diamond of Sebring
was heading eastbound in the outside
lane of S.R. 60 just east of Bonnie Mine
Road when it drifted over into the inside
lane and struck the right rear portion
of a red 2001 Ford Taurus being driven
eastbound in the inside lane by 30-year-


old William Jesse Jacobs of Winter Ha-
ven. Jacobs had just left work at Mosaic.
The collision caused the PT Cruiser
to flip and roll several times. Diamond,
who was not wearing a seatbelt, was
ejected from the Cruiser. She died at
LRMC as a result of her injuries, the
sheriff's office reports.
Jacobs was wearing his seatbelt and
did not suffer any serious injuries. He
was taken to Bartow Regional Medical
Center where he was examined and
released. The investigation is ongoing.


SPCA Inc. transitions


to SPCA Florida


Wednesday, April 18, 2012


Page 8B SCMG Central Florida





By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT

Thirteen-year-old Bryce Duncan knew he had
some buddies, but he didn't find out he had more
than 10,000 until this past weekend when legions
turned up at the first annual Wingin' It Festival at
the Winter Haven Airport.
The Wingin' It Festival is the brainchild of
Bryce's mom and dad, Brandy and Shannon
Duncan, and featured wings, barbecue, beer
and bands. Midway vendors, children's activities
and educational booths and wing cooking teams
rounded out the offerings that filled the grassy
roadside field adjacent to the Winter Haven
Airport's new terminal.
"I started dreaming how cool it would be
to have a festival that planes could fly into,"
Brandy said. "It has a unique feel and I knew it
was something different that could draw a real
crowd."
Twenty teams entered to determine who made
the best wings and were joined by more than 27
vendors, selling everything from beer to barbe-
cue. According to Brandy, the bands were a big
draw on the first night of the festival.
"People love the bands and we were lucky to
get some good local and area bands to come
play." She added that most of those involved in
the festival either donated their time or reduced
their fees.
The Winter Haven Airport also donated the
use of the property, and parking was handled by
Winter Haven area boy scout troops. The founda-
tion and the scouts split the parking fees "That
was a real win-win situation. We both benefited,"
Brandy said. "And that was one other thing we


PHOTO BY AL PALMER
Brandy Duncan with son, Bryce, the catalyst for Bryce's Buddies
Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.
didn't have to worry about."
The seeds for the festival took root about four
years ago when the Duncans founded the Bryce's
Buddies Juvenile Diabetes Foundation to provide
education and support for youngsters diagnosed
with the childhood ailment.
Bryce was 9 when he was diagnosed, Brandy
explained, and as she researched ways to learn
about juvenile diabetes and how she could help
her son cope with his disease, she found that
many families were facing financial hardship in
trying to help their children.
"It's hard and it's very expensive," she said.
"We wanted to send Bryce to a diabetes camp
to be with other kids with diabetes so he would
realize he wasn't 'that different' and discovered
how expensive it was. We were lucky and got
some help to send him, but there are so many


others out there who can't find that help. Bryce's
Buddies seemed like a way we could reach out to
other families in that same position. And come
up with ways to help them." Bryce's Buddies was
born.
While dealing with their own child's problems,
the Duncans decided that Bryce's Buddies had to
make a real splash to draw attention to this issue.
"Sitting at. our table, we decided to form the
foundation, not knowing that it costs money to
even establish a foundation."
The Duncans started by holding garage sales
with donations from fellow Winter Haven and
Polk County firefighters.
"We drove around to people's houses and gath-
ered up stuff to sell. We raised enough money
with that sale to pay to establish the foundation.
Then we decided we had to kick it up, and came
up with the festival idea."
Even while planning a huge event, Brandy and
Shannon have stayed true to their purpose: edu-
cating and helping families with diabetic kids.
"We've found people through the media and by
word of mouth," she explains. "We tell them to
take a breath, shed the guilt, and do what we can
to help them learn and cope."
"Kids just need to know they are not alone and
are not the only ones that are diabetic," Brandy
adds. "They have to know they are a little different,
but there's no reason for the disease to rule their
lives. They just have to learn to be responsible."
And they've learned that they can have fun. The
festival was proof of that.
Anyone wanting to make a donation to Bryce's
Buddies can do so at www.brycesbuddies.org,
www.winginitwh.com or by mail to Bryce's Bud-
dies Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, P.O. Box 771,
Winter Haven, FL 33882.


Counties to sue over new state Medicaid law


Polk one offour counties joining organization in lawsuit


By BRITTANY ALANA DAVIS
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TALLAHASSEE The Florida As-
sociation of Counties Thursday said it
will sue the state over a new law that
requires counties to pay $323.5 million
in disputed Medicaid bills.
Pasco, Polk, Manatee, and Leon
counties vowed to join the suit in an
effort to reverse the law, which requires
counties to pay millions of dollars in
backlogged bills. Others may follow.
The counties blame the debt on glitches
in the state software system that led to
thousands of errors and duplicate invoices.
"From the outset, we've said that lo-
cal taxpayers shouldn't be forced to pay
for Tallahassee's accounting errors,"
said Chris Holley, executive director
of the Florida Association of Counties.
"And to ensure that they are not, we


will be pursuing legal action."
The board voted unanimously in
favor of the suit during a conference
call with attorney Ginger Delegal, who
discussed the counties' legal standing.
The call was closed to the press.
The problem stems from an agree-
ment between the state and the coun-
ties to split long-term hospital care
and nursing home bills for patients on
Medicaid, the health care program for
the poor and disabled.
The state has the authority to with-
hold its share of funding to recoup the
money it says the counties owe. The
law allows the state's 67 counties to
pay back only 85 percent of their debt
but will hold them responsible for the
entire bill if they contest.
Florida Association of Counties
Spokeswoman Cragin Mostseller said
the suit will likely pin on a provision


in the state Constitution that protects
counties from "unfunded mandates."
In other words, Florida can't reduce
the percentage of taxes it shares with
the counties without a two-thirds vote
in the House and Senate, a threshold
neither chamber achieved.
Florida counties and members of the
tea party lobbied hard against the bill,
accusing the state of refusing to fix its
own errors and balancing its budget on
the backs of counties.
Polk County commissioners voted
unanimously to join the suit at its
April 3 meeting at the recommenda-
tion of its attorney Michael Craig and
County Manager Jim Freeman.
Craig told commissioners this bill-
ing to county taxpayers will affect the
county significantly. Freeman said the
county has $12 million in back billing
and in his most recent look at revenue


sharing there is a concurring cost that
wold be $5 million and the current
budget is $5.9 in the Medicaid share.
"It's significant as far as back billing
and the source of funding is probably
the general fund," Freeman told com-
missioners at the April 3 meeting.
When Gov. Rick Scott signed the bill
two weeks ago, he took the unusual step
of submitting a letter to the secretary
of state and ordered officials with the
Agency for Health Care Administration,
which oversees Medicaid, to travel to
every county to discuss billing issues.
The letter does not allude to a spe-
cific plan to fix the billing system, but
Scott assured the counties that they will
only be required to pay what is due.
Some of the counties have money in
reserves, but others may have to raise
taxes or trim'expenses.
JeffRoslow contributed to this article.


Winter Haven
Hospital
BOSTICK HEART CENTER
S AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOMIa
. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCaE


Nationally recognized heart care is right here.


That's the Bostick advantage.
'?* -g:


SCMG Central Florida Page 9B


Wednesday, April 18, 2012


FEELING .



Bryce finds 10,000 friends


Thousands attend fundraiser to help those fight diabetes











Prosthetics get the personal touch


By LEE ROMNEY
Los ANGELES TIMES
We can rebuild him. We have the tech-
nology. We can make him better than he
was. Better ... stronger... faster.
-Opening to "The Six Million Dollar
Man"
As a boy, Scott Summit was entranced by
that television show's premise. As an indus-
trial designer, he has made it his business.
Summit makes legs.
SChrome-plated legs. Leather-coated legs.
Legs, some laser-etched with tribal tattoos,
that mirror the shape of an amputee's
sound limb without pretending in the least
to be human.
Prosthetics long have focused on func-
tion. But the same design sensibility that
has come to influence practical items like
smartphones is turning synthetic limbs
into a platform for self-expression. As Sum-
mit helps fulfill that desire, he is influenc-
ing what it means to live with a disability.
Designer limbs must "represent person-
ality as well as physicality," Summit said
recently from his work space on the upper
floor of a light-dappled building near
downtown San Francisco.
"The thought was, if it was beautifully
sculpted and crafted, it would change ...
the way the person actually perceives their
own body and, hopefully, it would then
change the way society sees amputees."
Modem prosthetic engineering-
cutting-edge suspension hardware on
titanium rods and carbon graphite sprint-
ing legs -has done wonders for utility but
little to reference the human form. And to
some amputees, attempts to mimic the
real thing- flesh-toned silicone limbs,.
complete with fake veins just don't seem
right:
Summit's company, Bespoke Innova-
tions, takes off-the-shelf prosthetics with
the latest advances and surrounds them in
personalized fairingss," a term borrowed
from the shapely casings that reduce drag
on motorcycles.
His clients tend to be young and image-
conscious wounded military personnel
and injured motorcyclists are prominent.
To spread the word about the emerging de-
sign field, Summit is collaborating with ce-
lebrity amputees, among them Paralympic
record-setter Aimee Mullins, who changed
the conversation when she walked down
. a London fashion runway 14 years ago in
designer legs carved from solid ash.
"What Scott's onto is taking something
that was ... at best functional and elevating
it to something that is coveted by people
who have legs of flesh and bone," said Mul-
lins, 36, who was born without fibulae and
had both legs amputated in infancy.
'A prosthetic limb doesn't represent the
need to replace loss anymore. It can stand
as a symbol that the wearer has the power
to create whatever it is that they want to
create in that space."
The model and actress declined to spill


the design details of her collaboration with
Summit but promised that the newest legs
for her collection would be beautiful.
The earliest known prosthesis that
facilitated movement is the bendable
wood-and-leather "Cairo toe" discovered
on a female mummy dating between 1069
and 664 B.C.
In the Middle Ages, prosthetics were
made of armor. Pirate-style wood posts
and hooks followed. In the early 19th
century, wealthy amputees commissioned
hand-carved limbs with metal adornment
before assembly-line manufacturing took
hold.
During the Civil War, amputations were
performed on 60,000 or so soldiers, accord-
ing to Katherine Ott, medicine and science
curator at the Smithsonian Institution's
National Museum of American History.
Prosthetics for survivors were so crude that
Confederate army veteran James Edward
Hanger fashioned one himself from whit-
tied barrel staves and soon was commis-
sioned to produce more. (Hanger Prosthet-
ics & Orthotics remains prominent.)
Alloys and plastics developed in later
wars helped advance prosthetic devices.
Then carbon fiber propelled function to
new heights.
Designed by amputee Van Phillips, the
FlexFoot Cheetah leg was produced in 1996
- just in time for Mullins to race in the
Atlanta Paralympics. (South African athlete
Oscar Pistorius, also a double amputee,
currently is petitioning to compete with
them in the Olympics.)
Recent developments have included
advanced motors, myoelectric signals that
trigger muscle movement and even brain-
activated devices. Aesthetics, however,
were driven by "the medical model," Ott
said. "It was 'reconstruct the function that
was lost and don't worry about anything
else."'
Where aesthetics were emphasized, they
focused on hyperrealism, which typically
landed them in the realm of "the uncanny
valley" a term used to describe the
disturbing response people can have to
animated or robotic replicas.
Take the foam rubber feet Mullins
remembers from her youth: color-coded
"Caucasian," she said, they resembled
"nuclear peach."
Speaking at the 1998 International De-
sign Conference in Aspen, Colo., she called
on artists to dive into the world of prosthet-
ics so that form, function and aesthetics
could unite.
That year, the late fashion designer Alex-
ander McQueen created Mullins' ash legs,
carved with grapevines and magnolias.
Today, Mullins has more than a dozen pairs
of legs that allow her to range in height
from 5-feet-8 to 6-feet-1. A small cadre of
designers worldwide now creates prosthet-
ics as fashion statement.
Summit was in the Aspen audience
the day Mullins spoke. After she showed


PHOTO BY DON BARTLETTI/LOS ANGELES TIMES


Army veteran Matt Sullivan chose to have the logo for NFL team the San Diego Chargers stamped
on the polished calf fairing of his customized prosthetic leg made by Bespoke Innovations.


off two sets of legs one lifelike and the
other utilitarian he began to puzzle out
an alternative, "something with the grace
and fluid lines that came from the body,"
he said, "that is still visibly a product of a
designer."
Technology helped. A process known as
3D digital printing allows one-of-a-kind
designs that once would have been too
costly or complex to carve by hand or cre-
ate by injection mold to be produced with
a few computer keystrokes.
Summit's goal was lofty- to create a
fully functional personalized prosthesis
that could be printed from lightweight,
durable materials for ThirdWorld consum-
ers, whose good legs would be scanned
with a portable camera. By 2008, he devel-
oped one at a cost of $4,000, a sharp drop
from what would have totaled more than
$60,000 in machined parts. But the price
was still too high.
Summit said he was down to $1,000 in
savings drinking cheap beer at happy
hour two-for-one specials when he
teamed up with Kenneth Trauner, an
orthopedic surgeon and engineer. The pair
founded Bespoke in 2009 and last year
began to sell fairings.
The devices, which typically cost
between $4,000 and $6,000 make up a
small slice of Bespoke's activity (Summit
said he can't discuss what's coming next, as
patents are pending). But they have made
a mark in the design world.
First, designers have an intimate conver-
sation with the customer about his or her
sense of self. The fairing's shape is dictated
by a digital scan of the mirrored limb. In
the case of double-amputees, Bespoke has
used stand-ins. The form is "laser sintered"
in durable nylon and can suggest patterns
of lace, herringbone and more. Further


adornment comes with chrome plating,
leather sheathing, fabric coatings and laser
etching.
Their designs have matched customers'
tattoos, complemented the stitching on
a Channel handbag and referenced the
grill of one German amputee's beloved
Volkswagen GTI.
The company began marketing the
fairings last year, ramping up slowly with
word-of-mouth referrals and outreach to
veterans. Summit declined to release exact
numbers but said the company is on track
to produce hundreds annually by next
year. Although private insurers have largely
balked at covering the cost, Summit said,
a growing number ofVeterans Adminis-
tration hospitals are making the fairings
available.
When retired Army Sgt. Matthew Sul-
livan, whose foot was blown off by a land
mine inAfghanistan, showed up a few
months ago at the San Diego VAS prosthet-
ics lab to get his device adjusted, he said,
his jaw dropped.
Summit and Bespoke employee Chad
Crittenden who lost a leg to cancer and
was among the first to receive a fairing -
were there scanning soldiers for designer
prosthetics. They squeezed Sullivan, a
sports enthusiast who favors knee-length
shorts, into their schedule.
Sullivan's fairing mirrors the powerful
contours of his good leg. On the chrome-
plated calf piece is a laser-etched logo of
the San Diego Chargers.
"It no longer reminds them of some hor-
rific injury they had,"Wayne Koniuk, a San
Francisco prosthetist, said. "They think,
'That thing is way cool.'"
"Kind of in a weird way," Sullivan said,
"you feel like you've gotten a part of you
back."


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Wednesday, April 18, 2012


" Page lOB SCMG Central Florida





SCMG Central Florida Page 11B


Wake Forest offers epilepsy information


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I saw a copy
of your column in which a writer asked
about resources for epilepsy informa-
tion other than the Internet. I thought I
might let you know that I have operated
a nationwide, toll-free information line
on epilepsy, called the Epilepsy Infor-
mation Service, since 1979. We have
taken more than half a million calls dur-
ing this time and are available 8 a.m. to
5 p.m., Monday through Friday. We are
more than happy to discuss most any
aspect of epilepsy and its ramifications
with callers. When we don't have the
answers, we will do everything we can to
seek them out, if there are answers. We
also make referrals to other key agencies
or resources that may not be known to
the caller. If there is any way we can be
of assistance to those seeking informa-
tion or support, we are happy to do so.
Our toll-free number is 800-642-0500. -
P. Gibson, director, Epilepsy Information
Service, Wake Forest School of Medicine.
ANSWER: Thank you so much for
making my readers and me cognizant
of your services. I receive many ques-
tions from readers who have epilepsy
or have a relative or friend who has
it. They will be happy to learn of this
information center.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am 90 years


S I.


TO YOUR
GOOD
HEALTH


Dr. Paul
Donohue


old. Aside from my legs, I still have my
marbles and working parts. I had can-
cer of the prostate three times. I have
asked several urologists plus mine,
but don't get a sensible answer. I hope
you can offer one. Why can't they put a
stent in the prostate so it doesn't block
the flow of urine when it enlarges? The
VA gave me up at 80 and said I wouldn't
die from prostate cancer. Thank you.
- D.S.
ANSWER: You're talking about two
separate conditions: prostate cancer
and prostate enlargement. It's prostate
enlargement that's the usual cause of
an inability to empty the bladder. The
urethra, the tube that runs from the
bladder and through the penis, also
passes through the prostate gland. An


enlarged gland squeezes the urethra
so a full bladder can never completely
empty itself. Men with an enlarged
gland wake up several times a night be-
cause their bladders fill up with urine
in short order.
Your idea of using a stent to prop
open the urethra is a wonderful one. A
stent is a small metal coil that's self-
expanding. Stents are used to prop
Open heart arteries that have become
clogged from cholesterol buildup.
Stents have saved many from a heart
attack.
Urethral stents have been devised
and tried. Most urologists have aban-
doned their use. Minerals in the urine
often deposit on the stent and eventu-
ally block it. Secondly, in the urethra,
scar tissue adds to stent obstruction.
And finally, it is technically difficult to
remove a urethral stent.
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am a
71-year-old male in good health for the
most part. Just recently I had an experi-
ence that my doctor said was very un-
usual. One day I started experiencing
abdominal pain in the afternoon. By
6 p.m., it was so bad that my wife took
me to the emergency room. My blood
pressure was out of sight, and they dis-
covered that my intestine had wrapped


around itself and was choking off. They
also discovered that my abdominal
organs were reversed.
Have you ever come across this in
your practice? J.B.
ANSWER: Only last week a man in
his 70s wrote that he had had an ab-
dominal scan that showed malrotation
of his abdominal organs. Things that
should be on the right were on the left,
and vice versa. For him it had caused
no problems.
For you, malrotation led to emergen-
cy surgery. The transposed intestines
twisted on themselves and created an
obstruction. This is volvulus. It's a con-
dition that has to be rectified quickly.
No, I have never had a case of trans-
position of abdominal organs, or vol-
vulus. I have a surgeon friend who did,
and he insisted on talking me through
the case minute by minute.

Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable
to answer individual letters, but he will
incorporate them in his column when-
ever possible. Readers may write him
or request an order form of available
health newsletters at PO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Readers may
also order health newsletters from www.
rbmamall.com.


Keeping abreast with blood


One in eight women will be diag-
nosed with breast cancer during her
lifetime. Early detection boosts the
odds of successful treatment and
long-term survival, but current diag-
nostic technologies can be problem-
atic. Mammograms, for example, are
cumbersome, costly and in many cases,
detect cancer only at an advanced
stage. Scientists at McGill University
are working on what may prove to be a
radical new and faster way of diagnos-
ing breast cancer in a drop of blood.
For years, researchers focused on
perfecting a test that analyzed the pres-
ence of a particular, telltale biomarker
called carcinoembryonic antigen,
or CEA. But CEA is also found in the
blood of healthy people, and its level of
concentration varies by genetic back-
ground and lifestyle.
McGill scientists stepped back to get
a bigger and hopefully better pic-
ture. They want to create a molecular
portrait that simultaneously measures
multiple blood proteins and identifies
the combination of signature mol-
ecules that make up cancer's character-
istic "fingerprint."
No such test current exists, but


WELL NEWS
Scott LaFee



writing in the journal Molecular &
Cellular Proteomics, the McGill re-
searchers say they've developed the
beginnings of one. They tested an early
version on 17 volunteers already diag-
nosed with a type of breast cancer and
11 healthy controls. The test identified
a subset of six of 32 surveyed proteins
that could, in combination, reveal the
presence of cancer.
The next task is to expand the study
with additional markers and a greater
diversity of patients and cancer types.

BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
An adult human spine compresses
roughly 0.59 of an inch from morning
to night.

GET ME THAT. STAT!
A University of Michigan School of
Public Health study found that Cau-
casian patients were 1.52 times more


likely to be prescribed antidepressants
for major depressive disorders than
Hispanic or African-American patients
with similar ills. When prescribed, how-
ever, the type of medication chosen by
the physician did not vary by race or
ethnicity.
That was not true, however, when
study authors looked at Medicare and
Medicaid patients. In those cases, they
found Medicare and Medicaid patients
were 31 percent and 38 percent less
likely to be prescribed the newest gen-
eration of antidepressants compared to
patients with private insurance.

LIFE IN BIG MACS
One hour of sitting in a Jacuzzi burns
68 calories (based on a 150-pound per-
son) or the equivalent of 0.1 Big Macs.

COUNTS
Average amount, in dollars, Medicare
spends between the time a patient is
diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and
related disorders and the time the pa-
tient enters a nursing home $29,743.
Source:
Judith Bentkover, Brown University


DOC TALK
Pulsatile beating, as in a pulsatile
mass

PHOBIA OF THE WEEK
Atychiphobia fear of failure

NEVER SAY DIET
The Major League Eating speed-
eating record for cream-filled, glazed
doughnuts is 47 in five minutes, held
by Patrick Bertoletti.

OBSERVATION
"If the doctor cures, the sun sees it;
if he kills, the earth hides it."
Scottish proverb

CURTAIN CALLS
In 1987, Franco Brun, a 22-year-old
prisoner in Canada's Toronto East De-
tention Center, choked to death while
attempting to swallow a Gideon's Bible.
To find out more about Scott LaFee,
visit the Creators Syndicate website at
www.creators.com.


State to challenge autism ruling


ByJIM SAUNDERS
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

The state Agency for Health Care
Administration likely will appeal a
federal judge's ruling that requires the
Medicaid program to provide a type of
intensive treatment to autistic children.
AHCA refused to cover the treatment,
contending in part that it is experimen-
tal and not medically necessary. But
Miami federal judge Joan Lenard last
month ordered the agency to provide
the treatment, known as applied
behavior analysis.
"If these children do not receive (ap-
plied behavior analysis) in the primary
years of development up to age 6 and
then to 12 years of age, the children
may be left with irreversible language
and behavioral impairments," Lenard
wrote in a March 26 order.


AHCA has started carrying out Lena-
rd's order. But spokeswoman Michelle
Dahnke said in an email Thursday that
the agency "intends to appeal the rul-
ing" to the llth U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals.
Dahnke said she could not com-
ment on the grounds for the appeal.
But.among the issues in the case is the
state's discretion to determine whether
Medicaid services are medically neces-
sary and, in a related issue, whether
they are experimental.
"Federal courts have repeatedly
held that the states can define medical
necessity to exclude unproven and ex-
perimental treatments," the agency said
in a court document filed last month
before Lenard held a trial and issued
her ruling.
The lawsuit, filed in February 2011,
named three children as plaintiffs. But


Lenard's ruling applies to thousands of
children in the Medicaid program who
have been diagnosed with autism or
a broader classification of conditions
called "autism spectrum disorder."
Applied behavior analysis is a type of
treatment that can include such things
as one-on-one therapy sessions and re-
wards to help correct children's behav-
ioral problems. Miriam Harmatz,
a Florida Legal Services attorney who
represented the children in the case
against AHCA, disputed that the treat-
ment is experimental and said it is
already covered in many private health-
insurance plans.
By one estimate, including the treat-
ment in the Medicaid program would
cost $12.2 million a year though
AHCA said in the court document last
month that the cost could be "signifi-
cantly higher."


Harmatz, however; said Thursday that
providing the coverage would save money
long term because it would help children
go to school and later get jobs. That could
help prevent them from needing govern-
ment assistance in the future.
In the case, the two sides have battled
about studies and analyses that evalu-
ated applied behavior analysis. The
court document that AHCA filed before
the trial said it is "abundantly clear that
AHCA has not acted arbitrarily or
capriciously" in deciding against cover-
ing the treatment.
But Lenard flatly rejected that con-
clusion. She pointed to a "plethora" of
analyses and studies that shows the
treatment is "an effective and signifi-
cant treatment to prevent disability and
restore developmental skills to children
with autism and (autism spectrum
disorder)."


Wednesday A ril l8 2 2





Page 12B SCMG Central Florida


Diagnostic aid for Alzheimer's gets FDA approval


By LINDA LOYD
THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

A radioactive compound that
lights up plaques in the brain to
help diagnose Alzheimer's disease
has been approved by the Food and
Drug Administration for use in pa-
tients being evaluated for Alzheim-
er's and other causes of cognitive
decline.
The imaging agent, Amyvid, was
"developed by a Philadelphia biotech
start-up, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals
Inc., now owned by Eli Lilly & Co.
It can show amyloid deposits in the
brain that are visible on positron-
emission tomography (PET) scans.
The product got the green light late
Friday and will be available in June.
Spun out of research at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, Avid was
bought in November 2010 by Eli
Lilly for an initial $300 million. The
deal called for an additional $500
million if certain commercial and
regulatory milestones were reached,
including FDA approval of the
chemical known as florbetapir F 18
injection.
The dye binds with plaques that
are a marker of Alzheimer's disease
and that have been studied in sev-
eral thousand people and in three
clinical studies.
"We're excited. The approval
means that this product will finally
be available to the patients who
need, and can benefit from, this,"
said Avid Radiopharmaceuticals'
founder and chief executive officer,
Daniel Skovronsky, 39, a Penn neu-
ropathologist.


PHOTO PROVIDED


"The type of patient who will ben-
efit from this test are people who have
symptoms of cognitive decline, such as
memory loss," he said. "A physician can
order the scan, and it will give them
information about the presence, or ab-
sence, of amyloid plaques in the brain."
Amyloid plaques are a "hallmark
pathology" of Alzheimer's disease,
but the diagnosis is "sometimes
given inappropriately," Skovronsky
said. "Out of all the patients who
get a diagnosis of Alzheimer's, one
out of five turn out not to have it.
They had something else," such as
vascular disease, stroke, Parkinson's
disease, or "something as com-
mon as depression that can cause
cognitive decline in the elderly."


Amyvid could help doctors rule out
Alzheimer's in some patients with
memory problems. Avid's 75 em-
ployees are working with a team at
Eli Lilly in Indianapolis on the com-
mercial launch, sales and marketing.
"It's our desire to make this widely
available in the United States, begin-
ning in June," Skovionsky said. "It
will be up to individual physicians
and their imaging center to decide
whether they want to offer it."
Experts say as many as 5.4 million
Americans of all ages have Alzheim-
er's, a memory-robbing disease.
Before granting approval, the FDA
urged Avid to develop training for
physicians so that there would be uni-
formity in reading the scans and that


doctors could agree about what they
see. The company has devised online
training videos and in-person lectures.
R. Edward Coleman, a consultant
to Eli Lilly and professor of radiol-
ogy at Duke University Medical
Center, said, "This approval marks a
great advancement in nuclear medi-
cine practice."
Amyloid can be present without
symptoms of dementia. "That's why
we say this is not a stand-alone
diagnostic; this is just one test that
is an adjunct in helping physicians
come up with the diagnosis," Skov-
ronsky said.
Avid's technology was developed
after a decade of work by Hank
Kung, a Penn chemist, who worked
with Skovronsky. Kung remains a
consultant and adviser.
Pharmaceutical companies are
testing several new Alzheimer's
drugs aimed at reducing amyl6id-
plaque buildup in the brain.
"In the clinical trials that are test-
ing those drugs, they are also using
our compound in an investigational
manner to see if they can iden-
tify the right patients to treat and
monitor their response to therapy,"
Skovronsky said.
Avid raised $70 million before Eli
Lilly bought the company. Earlier
investors included Safeguard Scien-
tifics Inc. of Wayne, Alta Partners,
AllianceBernstein Venture Fund,
Pfizer Strategic Investments Group,
RK Ventures, and BioAdvance.
The company also is working on
diagnostic imaging agents for Par-
kinson's, diabetes and other neuro-
degenerative diseases.


A TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT PUT OUR


OWN CARE COORDINATOR BACK


IN THE SADDLE AGAIN.



S"My whole family is thankful that my knee
Replacement gave me my life back...especially
my horse, Hot 'Lil Badger."
Christene Griffin, RN
joint pRelaceent Care Coordinatar
SFlorida Hopital Center for Bone, j]int & Spine



Christene chose our Center because as an OR nurse, she
worked directly with the surgical team for five years. It was also
because she wanted the best technology with the most
-.". compassionate care. And it certainly was a plus that the Center
is ranked by HealthGrades, the leading independent health care
ratings organization, in the top 10% nationally for Orthopedic
.f iServices. Now, Christene is our Joint Replacement Care
-c....n Coordinator, sharing her knowledge, her insight,
: her compassion...and her new lease on life.


Take your first step toward a life free of joint pain.
Call (863) 402-362" or visit www.FHHeartland.org.

FLORIDA HOSPITAL ".
H.-, I D iv ) .N MlI:I ( A 1t C I N1. )R
Cenrerfi,,.- & rz e. bj i ri r o- PeeFC~


h
i.
?
i
-


Wednesday, April 18, 2012


'-''






REAL ESTATE


Wednesday, April 18, 2012


CLASSIFIED


BARTO W LAKE W ALES FO RT M EAD E FRp STPRO O F H A INES CITY LAKELAN D W INTER HAVEN


Lake Wales: 863-676-3467


Bartow: 863-533-4183


Autos
Auctions
Items for Sale
Homes for Sale
Homes for Rent
and More...


Should I use

a real estate

broker and why?
When selling or buying real estate, it is always best
to use a professional. If you need medical advice you
go to a doctor, or if you need legal advise you go to
a lawyer. It's no different when you need real estate
services, you should
always get the best ASK YOUR
advise you c4n. A REAL ESTAE
professional real
estate broker has PRO
the knowledge and David McLean
experience to guide Prime Plus Realty,
you through the Inc.
process of buying or
selling your home or
property.
How much money will I need to come up with to
buy a home? Does my realtor help me get my loan or
do I find financing on my own?
We always suggest you consult with your own bank
first to get the advice that fits your mortgage needs.
That should be the first step you take before you start
looking for a home. If your bank cannot help you,
they will refer you to someone who may be able to
provide you with a loan, such a mortgage broker. In
any case you should get pre-approved before you start
your home search. You and your realtor will need this
information in order to know the price range and type
of home you that will be able to purchase. If you plan
to buy a foreclosure, you will most likely need a pre-
approval letter from your lender in order to make an
offer on a bank owned foreclosure.


What's HOT in the marketplace?


1. 4-"
.P -~- ,4'~-
,,
b:~I,
s4''.:'.' I

-:' ~:-
--'--
,,....,
-- -
-Y --


The attached photo is of a home that recently sold for $160,000. The home is located on a canal to Lake Kissimmee.


2301 Cypress Gardens Blvd (WH) 842 Dawes Rd (TP): 725 N Lakeshore Blvd (LW) 23598 N US HWY 27
5 BR/4 BA 2 slory 3 BR/2Ba on 5 6 Acres 3BR14BA or Over 2 Acres ICommercial Property)
3 Car Garage Private Well Detached Garage 5.1T4 Sq Foolage
Hardwood,Carpet & Tile Fenced W/Frud Tree Enclosed Pool Large Parking Area
2BDI2BA CBS Rental Home Included Great Location


LEGACY REAL ESTATE CENTER


Convenient
Central Ave.
Recent Updates 3 BD/2 BA
Huge Patio / Porch
Walk to Town or
Lake \,\'.i
$89,900


700 State Rd. 60 East
Lake Wales, FI. 33853
863-676-7040


IRME

LU S REAL ESTATE INC.


"PRIME PLUS SERVICE YOU DESERVE!"


Beautiful
Country Setting
23.42 acres
Nice 3 BD/2 BA
Fenced Pastlres
$159,000


Lots of
Living Area
* Open Floor Plan 3 BD.2 BA
* Near Warner UIniversity
& Bok Academy
SLarge Fenced Yard
$79,900


CANAL FRONT TO LAKE WALK IN WATER-3BEAUTIFUL 3 BEDROOM 2
BATH HOME WITH 2,292 FT. OF LIVING ARI.:\, WLL MAINTAINED, SPA-
(ClO, LIVING ROOM, SPLIT BEDROOM PLAN WITH L\H(.F. MASTER,
GREAT FLORIDA ROOM ACROSS THE ENTIRE BACK OF HOME WITH
BREATH-T..KINtG VIEWS; COVERED BOAT DOCK, STORAGE-WORKSHOP.
LOCATED ON CANAL LEADING TO LAKE WALK IN WATER, ONE OF FLORI-
DA'S FINFsT FISHING AND BOATING LAKES, $189,900
STOP BY OUR OFFICE FOR A FREE LIST OF 1 (ORI L( )SURES!
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE i w.1r. iirntpielii, iles %al.cIim


To have one
of your homes
featured here, please call
863-676-3467
and find out
how easy it is


I I I I ~L ,







Page 2 CLASSIFIEDS April 18,2012


1000


REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."

1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
4 BR, 4 BA. POOL HOME
ON AN ACRE, Beautiful
home with plenty of room
inside and out, fully enclosed
pool and lanai, large utility
laundry room, family room
with fireplace, master suite,
spacious family room, located
on a nice lot with big oaks,
$144,900 ID# 115, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
BARGAIN! 3 Bedroom 2 Bath,
just listed, great price on this
home located just east of
Lake .Wales, this is a foreclo-
sure and is has been reduced
to $39,900 HURRY this won't
last long! PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
ID # 118 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
CARLSBERG ESTATES, 2
BR. 2 BA. Nice community
with lake access, clubhouse,
pool, Home built in 2006, has
2 car garage, ID# 241, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
JUST REDUCED, NEW
LISTING LOCATED IN
CROOKED LAKE PARK,
great condition and a perfect
starter home for the first time
home buyer or winter resi-
dent; 2 Br. 1 Ba. $49,900
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040 ID #
4801 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE JUNE POINTE
ESTATE 5 Bedroom, 3 Bath
Custom Home in a Gated
Community with screened
pool. Front and back porches
with 1.43 acres of beautiful
landscaped property including
fruit trees. Lots of room to
roam, inside and out with
plenty of parking. Only
$334,900. Debra Ann Worley
Real Estate 863-465-0123
Lake Wales, near L.W.M.
Center. 4Bd/3Ba, 2C/g,
FI/Rm w/h Fire PI. Liv/r, Laun-
dry rm, pool w/h lanai.
$180,000 863-676-2492
LOCATED NEAR LAKE
PIERCE AND GREAT FISH-
ING, this 3 Br. 2 Ba. Home
has a lot to offer, Built in
2000, this is a great buy for
only $59,000 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
NEAR KISSIMMEE CHAIN
OF LAKES, East Lake Wales,
3 Br. 1.5 Ba. 2 lots, neat and
clean, move in ready, bring
your boat and fishing poles, 1
block from Lake Rosalie, mari-
na and boat ramp, near state
park, reduced to $59,000
OWNER SAYS MAKE OFFER!
id# 10755 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


1020 HOUSES FOR SALE
NEAR WARNER UNIVERSITY, 3
BEDROOM 2 BATH, located in
crooked lake park, spacious
split-floor plan, home has
recently been updated, has
detached garage with RV
parking, screen porch,
$98,500 id# 4918, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
SEBRING FORECLOSURE, 3
Br. 2 Ba. just the house for
investment or rental or a bar-
gain price for a potential
homeowner, block home in
good condition, just reduced
to $49,500, PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 id# 1730 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
WATER-FRONT BEAUTIFUL
HOME ON CANAL LEADING
TO LAKE WALK IN WATER,
Move-In condition, 3 Br. 2 Ba.,
cathedral ceiling, spacious liv-
ing room, large Florida room
with view of canal and lake,
formal dining, plus eating
space next to kitchen, all
appliances, washer and dryer,
2 car garage, workshop,
large covered dock on deep
water canal, just seconds
from the lake, $189,900 id#
6616 PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE www.primeplus-
realestate.com

1030 WATERFRONT HOMES
Waterfront Home For Sale
Lake Clay-Ski-Fish-Fun, Sand
Bottom Lake, 3 Bedroom 2
bath, Beautiful Oaks, Fenced
Yard, Spectacular Sunsets.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123

1040 CONDOSNILLAS
FOR SALE
CONDO @ LAKE WALES
COUNTRY CLUB, Beautifully
furnished 2 Bed 2 Bath 1st
floor unit new carpet and
paint. Located in Golf Com-
munity. Family room/lanai
Overlooks Fairway and
Lagoon. Many Community
Amenities. $79,900 id# 6204
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
GREAT PRICE ON THIS FUR-
NISHED 2 BEDROOM 2 BATH
CONDO, 1,184 ft. living area,
screened porch, convenient
location to shopping in the
city limits of Lake Wales.
$29,900, PRIME PLUS REAL
ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
id # 130 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
LAKE WALES COUNTRY
CLUB 2nd. Floor Condo,
Fully Furnished, Screened
Balcony, Great View Of Golf
Course And Lagoon,
$102,000 id# 9202 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC.
863-676-7040 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com
1070 DUPLEXES FOR SALE
INCOME PRODUCING
PROPERTY FOR SALE
INCOME, Duplex-2 DBed-
rooms 1 Bath each side-Rent-
ed $1,050 mo. Walk to
Schools, Library, Shopping,
and Lake June Lakefront Park
and Ball Fields $84,900.
Debra Ann Worley Real Estate
863-465-0123

1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
2 BEDROOM 2 BATH ON 2.45
ACRES, all fenced with large
barn and workshop. Home
has screened porch, open
floor plan, lots of storage
space. Small pond and stor-
age shed on property.
$45,000 (short sale)o PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. id #
17379 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m


1090 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH ON
APPRX. 4.86 ACRES all
fenced with workshop, Home
built in 2005, 2,108 ft. living
area, located just east of
Lake Wales. $79,900 PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. id#
17389 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
3 BR. 2 BA. MOBILE HOME
ON 1 ACRE, NICE WELL MAIN-
TAINED HOME WITH STOR-
AGE BLD. Located just east of
Lake Wales near Lake Ros-
alie, Great Fishing and boating
lake, $65,000 ID# 2188
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE
INC. 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
ALMOST 2 ACRES WITH 3 BR.
2 BA. MOBILE HOME, built in
2009, good condition, move
in ready, all fenced located in
country setting near lake Ros-
alie, $85,000 PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. 863-676-
7040 ID # 2002 www.prime-
plusrealestate.com

1095 MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE

BRAND NEW HOMES
FOR SALE
Great Specials
Reduced Prices
Beautiful Manufactured
Home Community
863-439-7418

1110 OUT OF AREA HOMES
37 ACRE MIDDLE TN FARM
with 13 acre lake, nice home.
Selling at Absolute Auction,
Memorial Day. Van Massey
Auction Lic 1711. (931)433-
8686 Visit vanmassey.com
DEVELOPER FORCED LIQ-
UIDATION Smoky Mtn. Lake
Property Priced @ Foreclo-
sure/Short sale. Up to 100%
Financing/5% interest. Hurry-
Only 30 Reservations avail-
able! (877)551-0550 ext 100
Mobile Home with
acreage, ready to move in,
great for pets, lots of space
for the price, 3/2 serious
offers only, no renters.
(850)308-6473.
1210 HOMES FOR RENT

129 Stevenson Rd, Winter
Haven. 3 bd/2 bath w/1 car
arage & small shop.
900.00 month + security.
No pets. Call 863-678-1498
or 863-605-0473

BARTOW
755 E. Blvd Street
2 bedroom/1 bath
$550/monthly
$500/security deposit
1 yr. lease.
863-603-7715 or 863-
533-4482
BARTOW, 3Bd 1 Ba Family
home r- :ril, remodeled
family room fireplace large
fenced yard $850. Mo 863-
533-4594
LAKE WALES House for
RENT 2Bd/lBa, $550 /
monthly $450/deposit, will
work with you Call 863-676-
5066 NO CALLS after 9pm

Seasonal
Job
Opportunities


1210 HOMES FOR RENT

Over 10,000 square feet
available for lease. Fenced
back corridor. Roadside park-
ing. Building has several
rooms including a kitchen.
Located in downtown.
$2000/month, SD neg. Call
Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863-
676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Lake Wales- 2BR/2BA with
granite counters in kitchen
and baths, tile throughout.
Washer/dryer included. Large
covered porch on back of
house. Directly across from
Lake Wailes. $695/month,
SD $695. Call Maggie Stohler
at Legacy Leasing Services,
Inc 863-676-0024 or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com
Lake Wales- Spacious
3BR/2BA home with separate
living and family rooms, large
kitchen and screen porch.
Huge kitchen. Indoor utility
room with washer/dryer. No
pets. $990/month, SD $990.
Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863-
676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com
Ft Meade- Cozy 3BR/1BA
home on corner lot with lots
of privacy. New interior paint.
Large front porch.
Washer/dryer hookup.
$650/month, SD $650.
Available March 1st. Call Mag-
gie Stohler at Legacy Leasing
Services, Inc 863-676-0024
or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com
Lake Wales- 3BR/2BA with
den and screened porch.
Large shaded yard. Interior
laundry room. Detached
garage with lots of storage
space. $725/month, SD
$725. Call Maggie Stohler at
Legacy Leasing Services, Inc
863-676-0024 or visit
www.LegacyLeases.com
Lake Wales- Updated, spa-
cious 4BR/2BA. Fenced back-
yard. Tile and laminate floors
throughout. Certain pets ok.
$1100/month, SD $1100.
Call Maggie Stohler at Legacy
Leasing Services, Inc 863-
676-0024 or visit www.Lega-
cyLeases.com











1285 COTTAGES FOR RENT

LAKE WALES, lbr/lba
lakeside cottage for rent.
Non-smoker. No Pets. Ref-
erences. 863-676-6201.

1300 DUPLEXES FOR RENT
FORT MEADE, St Patrick
Day Special 2bd Iba, fur-
nished appliances, garbage,
trash and lawn service. 863-
559-7035.
1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
BARTOW, Ibd, Ilifhi.l, remod-
eled, w/stove & refrig. 584
Mooselodge Rd, 1 mi. E. of Bar-
tow. 533-0146 or 512-0453.
COLONIAL SQUARE
APARTMENTS
SPRING SPECIALS !
1 and 2 Bedroom apts with
central a/c and heat, large
floor plans, abundant clos-
et
space & FREE WATER
Starting at $465/ month
Move-In Specials too
Call 24/7: 866-485-
4961
Or visit us online at:
ColonialSquareBartow.com


1320 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
FORT MEADE lbd, furn.
apartment, clean, utilities
furn. $140/wk Deposit $100.
No pets. 863-285-9422.
FORT MEADE. lbr/lba,
small, clean, quiet. No pets.
Near Patterson Park.
$400/month, $200 security.
Call 863-512-7326.
LAKE WALES 1Bedroom
apt., no smokers or pets.
$135 wk, $270 to move in.
Water & Elect included. 863-
632-7013
OAKWOOD MANOR
APARTMENTS
PRICES REDUCED FOR
LEASE UP!
Our updated villa-style
apartment homes provide
comfortable living at a
great price. Rates include
water.
Studio from only $405/mo
1 BR. from only $475/mo
2 BR with w/d hookups
from only $595/month
Convenient location,
Walk to shopping.
Call 24/7 866-485-
4977
Or visit:
OakwoodManorApts.co
m

1340 MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
BARTOW, very clean, good
cond., 2bd, 2ba, mobile
home. Washer dryer hook-up,
walk in closet. S. E. Bartow,
on 1-1/4 acres C/H/A, no
pets, references required.
$625./mo., $600. dep. (863)
285-6166.

1350 EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
417 E Tilman Ave, Lake
Wales. $450 month, includes
water, sewer and garbage.
863-605-2030
1390 VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
FLORIDA KEYS Marathon.
Luxurious Oceanfront vaca-
tion homes. 4-6 Bedrooms.
Private Pool, hot tub, docks &
more! Start Planning Your
Spring & Summer Vacation
Now! 1-888-564-5800
american-paradise.com


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
5 ACRES NEAR LAKE ROS-
ALIE, Located in a gated com-
munity in a rural setting;
wildlife galore, near county
boat ramp and access to
Lake Rosalie, Deed restricted
to single family homes only,
beautiful wooded parcel,
$49,900 id# It 11, PRIME
PLUS REAL ESTATE INC. 863-
676-7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com
BOTTOM LINE PRICES -
NORTH FLORIDA PROPERTIES
1/2 acre to 100 Acres. Call
1-800-294-2313 ext.2873
For information and pictures 7
days a week 7-7, A Bar Sales
Inc.

COUNTRY LIVING -
WHERE YOU CAN
HAVE IT ALL!!!

THE COUNTY IS DROP-
PING THE IMPACT
FEES FOR THE NEXT
SIX MONTHS AND NOW
IS THE TIME TO BUILD
A NEW HOME!!! SAVE
$$$THOUSANDS BUY-
ING AND BUILDING
NOW!!

ALTURAS, 14 acres
(more or less) for sale.
Will divide into mini-
mum of 5 acre tracts.
High and dry. Suitable
for building home, small
grove or raising cattle
or horses. Big enough
to build a home & sepa-
rate mother-in-law suite
or 2 homes! Close to
Alturas Elementary.
Enjoy country living at
its finest! Just 10 miles
to Bartow, Lake Wales
or Winter Haven. For
more information or to
schedule an appt. call
863-512-0041.
HOME SITE, Nice half Acre lot
located in Beautiful Area of
Homes. Growing Region Cen-
trally Located between Winter
Haven and Lake Wales. Par-
tially Cleared and ready to
Build your First Home.
$27,900 id #cc PRIME PLUS
REAL ESTATE INC. (863) 676-
7040 www.primeplus-
realestate.com

Classified Works!


Li,

:r r


Page 2


April 18, 2012


CLASSIFIED







Page 3


April 18, 2012 DECLASSIFIED


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
LAKE FRONT ON LAKE WALK
IN WATER, Just Over 5 Acres,
Partially Wooded, Private
Location, Dead End Street.
Great Price! $79,900 id# It22
PRIME PLUS REAL ESTATE,
INC 863-676-7040
www.primeplusrealestate.co
m
Waterfront, land or citrus?
www.marvadsit.com
Mary L. Adsit, Realtor
863-285- 7118

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


1500 LOTS & ACREAGE
MIDDLE GEORGIA Land Prices
starting at $995 per acre.
Thousands of acres available.
Call for list 478-552-5681

NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS
Seeking Developer to Pur-
chase Beautiful 18 Lot
Approved Subdivision. Under-
ground Utilities Was
$810,000 Now $495,000
OBO Terms -Will Divide Mon-
eymaker, Owner 706-374-
1136

Advertise in
The Classifieds!


1500 LOTS & AC
WESTERN CAROL
ESTATE Offering ur
deals on homes a
the beautiful NC
Call for free broch
closures, and are
tion. 800-924-263
WOODED HOME SI
of Beautiful Wood
restricted common
your new home! N(
from Public Boat
Lake Rosalie. Own
ed and will look at
able Offers! $39
11209 PRIME PL
ESTATE INC (863)
www.primeplusreale
m


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 As yet
6 "Atlas Shrugged"
writer Ayn
10 WWII carriers
14'60s-'70s Twins
star Tony
15 Sauteing
acronym, a la
Rachael Ray
16 Ear-related
17 "Doesn't bother
me!"
19 Zapata!":
Brando film
20 Harbinger of
lower
temperatures
21 Man on a misi6n
22 Biblical mount
23 More than
hesitant
24 Sign of puppy
love?
25 Ben & Jerry's
purchase
26 Spice gathered
by hand from
crocus flowers
30 Leave no escape
route for
33 Aquamarine, e.g.
34 Carol syllables
35 After "on," relying
mostly on hope in
desperate
circumstances
39 Stinky
40 Floor cleaner
41 _fit: tantrum.
42 "500" race-
sanctioning
group
44 Boxer Max
46 Fed. property
agency
47 Prefix
suggesting
savings
49 Sox, on
scoreboards
52 Creep
54 Deli sandwich
56 Brit of Fox News
57 "Shake!"
58 Most draftable
59 Fortitude
60 Cardiologist's
concern
61 Cold War initials
62 Year, on
monuments
63 Small fry


By Norm Guggenbiller


DOWN
1 Puccini opera
2 Butterlike
products
3 Bohr of the
Manhattan
Project
4 Ancient Roman
poet
5 Hemming and
hawing
6 Apply more
varnish to
7 _-garde
8 Waters between
Great Britain and
Europe
9 Fawn's mom
10 Chick flick
subject
11 Dangerous
bottom feeders
12 DVR pioneer
13 Battle reminder
18 Wrinkle remover
21 Personal ad abbr.
25 Schoolyard
handshake
27 Sound system
part
28 Cheers for a
torero
29 Not a one
30 Mata


EL/60/t, 'oul'soninJaSBIpeUya


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pa^loS alzznd s,Aepsaup


31 Obi-Wan
portrayer
32 Psychological
tricks
33 Econ. yardstick
36 Org. with a much-
quoted journal
37 Like beer cans
before recycling
38 Dimming gadget
43 Lo- : lite
44 Mackerel-like fish
45 Pre-med subj.


48 Replace
dancer,
49 Paper-p
50 Gold rus
storytell
51 "Don't ge
52 Dynasty
Confucil
53 Legs it
55 Hail in a
57 Sports to
organize
short


REAGE
INA REAL
believable
nd land in
mountains.
ures, fore-
a informa-
5.
TE! 2 Acres
s in deed


1515 WATERFRONT
North Carolina Mountain
Lakefront lots. New gated
waterfront community. Dock-
able lots with up to 300' of
shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now
(800)709-5253

1520 OUT OF TOWN LOTS


ity to build 20 Acres-Live on Land
qot too far NOW!! Only $99/mo. $0
Ramp into Down. Owner financing. NO
er Motivat- CREDIT CHECKS! Near El
all Reason- Paso, Texas. Beautiful Moun-
,900 id# tain Views! Free Color
LUS REAL Brochure. (800)755-8953.
676-704 www.sunsetranches.com
estate.co
NC mountain property
must go. 4.5 acres with out-
standing views and privacy.
$25,000 OBO, great for
home or cabin. (828)394-
9298. Ask for Richard
12 13 New York State Land Sale
Discounted to 1990's
prices! 3 Acre starter camp
$17,995. 5 acres w/farm-
house $49,995. 52 acres,
stream, 2 ponds, beautiful
woods & views. Access to
road front, utilities and state
land limited offer. Call
28 29 Christmas & Associates
-- (800)229-7843 or visit
landandcamps.com
1620 COMMERCIAL/
- INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY
OFFICE FOR LEASE, State Rd.
60 E., Lake Wales, New
o0 5' Office Building offers great
S exposure on Major Highway,
open floor plan available,
approx. 820 sq.ft. RENT
NEGOTIABLE, Cill For details,
S-Also larger space available if
needed, PRIME PLUS REAL
S ESTATE INC. 863-676-7040
OR 863-632-0272 (ask for
4/18/12 David) www.primeplus-
realestate.com
unqilj LO(3o)
Ss s n 1650 FARMS/RANCHES
S W. KENTUCKY 3 Premier
IN wnH Hunting / Investment Farms.
Sv u 0 Wildlife Managed, Income,
SO N0 Excellent Building Sites, Tim-
a NI ber, Road Frontage, Water &
l N v H Electric, Beautiful Views.
M I From $1,300/ac Owner
I IN H 270-556-3576

02000
1 0 0

A I 1 0

3aM
ea EMPLOYMENT
perhaps
usher
;h 2001 HELP WANTED
er Bret
et any A Few Pro Drivers Needed
/during Top Pay & 401K Great Equip-
us'time ment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (877)258-
harbor 8782 www.meltontruck.com
our ACT NOW! New Pay Increase!
er, for 37-46 cpm. New Trucks in
2011. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
ach row, Train for high paying Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
difficulty gram. Financial aid if qualified
Housing available. CALL Avi-
ation Institute of Maintenance
(866) 314-3769.
t p Employ Classified!


*


I
AU'


2001 HELP WANTED
ASAP! New Pay Increase!
34-46 cpm. 300 Newer
Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A
Driving Experience. (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com
CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay!
Excellent Benefits. 300 New
T660's. Need 2 months. CDL-
A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
CDL DRIVERS Great Pay!
Tons of Texas Frac work!
Great company! Company
paid benefits! Must have bulk
pneumatic trailer experience.
Call today! (800)491-9029.
CDL-A Drivers Relocate for
Tons of Great Paying Texas
Oilfield work! Great compa-
ny/Paid benefits! Must have
bulk pneumatic trailer experi-
ence. Call today! (800)491-
9029
CDL-A DRIVERS. Central Flori-
da company seeks Solo &
Team Drivers. Tank and Dry
Van positions offering some
regional. lyr OTR/ Good MVR
required. (877)882-6537 or
www.oakleytransport.com
CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
NEEDED due to active Storm
Season. JEL's 5-day Boot
Camp, Nations #1 hands-on
trainer can prepare you. High
Income www.JELTraining.com
- Companies waiting
CYPRESS TRUCK LINES
Home Weekends! Southeast
Regional, Top Pay & Great
Benefits! 6 Months TT exp
CDL with clean MVR. Call
(800)545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
DRIVER- Not getting enough
miles? Join Knight Transporta-
tion and increase your income
with our steady freight. New
Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience. (800)414-
9569. www.driveknight.com
Driver- Recession Proof
Freight. Plenty of miles. Need
refresher? No out-of-pocket
tuition at FFE. $1000 Bonus
for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for O/O's.. recruit@ffex.net.
(855)356-7121
Driver-Drivers choose
from Weekly or Daily Pay.
Regional, OTR or Express
Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-
A, 3 months recent experi-
ence required. (800)414-
9569 www.driveknight.com
Drivers No Experience -
No problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to
$.49 per mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
Drivers Earn Up to 396/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-
5489 Susan ext. 227 Joy ext.
238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC.
Drivers Earn Up to 390/mi
HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS &
WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed
exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Joy
ext. 238 Susan ext. 227 SUN-
BELT TRANSPORT, LLC
Drivers: New Flatbed Freight
Lanes! We Offer: No Tarp-
ing!!! Great Miles, Pay-up to
.60cpm, Benefits & Home
Time. CDL-A, lyr OTR Exp,
Good MVR Frank Donnelly at:
1-888-567-4969, x22.


)NS


w I 0 "I A 0


2001 HELP WANTED
Drivers Wanted-OTR Food
Grade Tanker Drivers Needed
Competitive pay, Benefits,
Guaranteed time off Class A
CDL-w/tanker endorsement
Prefer 2yrs experience
(800)569-6816 otterytrans-
portation.com
Drivers- No Experience-
No Problem. 100% Paid CDL
Training. Immediate -Benefits.
20/10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 49C per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778 www.Join-
CRST.com
Earn Up to $.51cpm!!! CDL-
A Drivers, Tanker & Dry Van
positions available. 1 year
OTR experience, Good MVR &
work history needed. Call
(877)882-6537 or apply
www.oakleytransport.com
EXPERIENCED window tin-
ters and audio installers need-
ed. Call owner at 863-223-
8087.
Fort Meade Child Develop-
ment Center is now accept-
ing applications for a child
care teacher and food service
position. No phone calls. 15
South Pine Ave., Fort Meade.
EOE.
FRAC SAND HAULERS with
complete bulk pneumatic rigs
only. Relocate to Texas for
Tons of work. Great compa-
ny/pay. Gas cards/Quick Pay
available. (800)491-9029
Freight Up = More $ 34-46
CPM 2Mos. CDL Class A Dri-
ving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com
FT, LPN for ESE elem. Char-
ter School in LW, full benefits,
sent resume' to:
dori.loyd@ourchildrens.org or
fax 863-679-3944.
GRACE HEALTHCARE OF
LAKE WALES HAS AN IMME-
DIATE OPENING FOR A DIREC-
TOR OF NURSING. MUST BE
AN RN WITH LONG TERM AND
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
EXPERIENCE. PLEASE FAX
RESUME TO 863-676-6315
ATTENTION PATTI SPEARS,
ADMINISTRATOR.
Heat & Air JOBS Ready to
work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environ-
ment. Nationwide certifica-
tions and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! (877)994-
9904

JUST GRADUATE? Play in
Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New
York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid
expenses. Signing Bonus. Call
(877)259-6983
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED! Hospi-
tals & Insurance Companies
hiring now! No experience?
Local Training & Job Place-
ment Assistance available!
(888)219-5161.
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Hospitals & Insur-
ance Companies hiring now!
No experience? Local Training
& Job Placement available! HS
Grad or GED & Computer
needed. (888)589-9677.
Medical Management
Careers start here Get con-
nected online. Attend college
on your own time. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
PERSONAL ASSISTANT, is
needed urgently with/good
salary. He or she must be 18
plus. Applicant should con-
tact: bendaton@live.com


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in e
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process of elimination to solve the puzzle. The
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

7 4 2 5 Rating: GOLD
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SApr 21, 2012-:- 10:00 AM
3 Farms Totaling 308 Acres
Colquitt County, GA
For Detailed Inornion Qa00-323-8388
Visit RocellAuctions.comiOUU'O 3 J'OOO
E Rowell Auctions, Inc.
CTIONS 10%Buyer'sPremium GALA-0ROWE094
CTIONS 10% Buyer's Premiui GALAU-C002594 AUCTI(


CLASSIFIED


I


April 18, 2012


By Norm Guggenbiller






e 4 AS ri


Call 863-676-3467 to place your ad


A A A A Ao


CENTRAL FLORIDA'S COOLING SPECIALISTS

POWELL
A/C & HEATING
SALES. SERVICE INSTALLATION
All Makes/Models Residential & Commercial
Financing available on new & replacement units
FREE ESTIMATES on installations & replacements
INSURED STATE CRIFIEDCA( 1i1S459
863-293-5046


ree n"-iR66ms 'Room Additions ,., "
~,~SG^ utters Carports Awnings
SWindows Roof Overs .
/--- SoffitlFacia ... ".


K,. vEP


III


A A A A


eorgetown Square Apartments


oakwood Manor
S""Apartments
3 UPDATED FLOOR PLANS!
Contemporary & Open Studio with Full Kitchen,
and Ceramic Tile throughout, from $405/month.
Spacious 1 Bedroom starting at $475/month.
Large 2 Bedroom Residence with washer/dryer
hookups + utility room. from $595/month.
www.OakwoodManorApts.com
_^ 1285 N US 17 Bartow (Aside WalMart)
r i (863) 533-5600


'u) AV i.bhJf~, '.'i '~;j
3 ;cr:,-i~l~e,





loday! 67


A_ *A *a2' S


First Thme
Advertisers Get
STwo Weeks FREE
The First Mnda th.

Cal Jim at 676-3467

Today!


CO MPABTY
PUBLIC AUCTIONS MONDAY, THURSDAYS
& SATURDAYS 6:30PM
We handle Portable Warehouses &Amish Furniture
23660 US 27 N., Lake Wales
863-227-7598
SOUTHERNAUCTIONCOMPANY@GMAIL.COM
AB2730 AU3820


A 5- 5 A A 5 A


J.T.
863-269-6556
Jimmy '
863-430-6700
Jimmy Lee
863-877-8952


AU

WHOLE
WFI~AKNAN ISRYUBW


TO I
SALE *
CONDITION


PERFECT OR NOT SO PERFECT
Any Make -Any Model
Lost Title No Problem y
Bank Lien No Problem


We pay up to $30,000
All motor vehicles, RV's,
motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, etc.
ou can also call [813] 531-4289
or [305] 763-1924


~frgj Th;1;
C.9j~.
if~''''~~
LF. AJ~~~~'~ '4.qF ~;p


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* I',


- : ,. ,
,be -, -
. A' i


*'Deep Cleaning-S
* Rental Cleanups
* Licensed & Insurn


WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ANY


Colonial Square
Apartments


~c~ '~s
". I i
: r
II-(
L1


NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
Immediate Availability Upon Approval
1 & 2 Bedroom Units. Affordable housing for low to
middle income families. Rent starts at s352 and $395.
All units have W/D hookups & kitchen appliances.
TDD 800-955-8771 Phone/Fax 863-676-9213
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-Noon
401 Winston Ave., Lake Wales, FL 33853
Accessible This institution is aon equal opportunity provider/employer.


. .' ,


*BI*~i~II141~I1LPII-Bs~~BB~


April 18, 2012


CLASSIFIED


Page 4


.~- -1


I'


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i., '

$P- rarrs s- i I


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ril 18,1 SIF Pe 5


Call 863-67(






CONCRETE SPECIALIST
r
OUR GUARANTY
NO MONEY DOWN- I
PAY WHEN JOB IS .
COMPLETED!












B-t Located in Bartow and Plant City -I FIlE CABINETS, 10CKERS
(813) 361-5821 -I TRAINING TABLES, WORKSTATIONS
SWill begin registration for the-,
upcoming fall session on M ay Ist
Accepting ages 4 18 PRE-OWNED, DESKCHAIS.



Located in artow and Plant City CKER
(813) 361-5821 TRAINING TABLES,WORKSTATIONS
AIIAND H MOREIl






Ad----'-vert---ses e A
S Underground Drain fTWO (V S FREE
S" Variety of Colors ml' ICa A^.s4
S* -Senior Discount o rI rst IVI rir.
"Forget the Rest, Go With the Best" Call Jo|ai0 at 5 $ 4 1 $
863858-1368

lakelandgutters.com winterhavengutters.com



-.


COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL


S-. . ." Licensed & Insured



Lawn Maintenance -_M R __o
S Residential & Commercial U. Mw CO'
p r iFull Lawn Care Service Flower Bed Cleanup
Landscaping Shrub Trimming Tree Pruning
* Lawn Reconditioning Residential & Commercial
* Pressure Washing a 863-557-7121

S863-224-2651 Free Estimates '
QUALITY YOU CAN DEPEND ON! TS (ill l1T'TTh
COMMERCIALLY


3-3467 to place your ad


E~r


O NEWSCONSTRUCTION
SNEW CONSTRUCTION GARAGES/CARPORTJ
*ADDITIONS *AWNINGS
T E REMODELING ROOF OVERS
% J 3T "n" ;;. ALUMINUM/CONCRETE SCREENED ROOMS
www.constructlonandremodellngpolk.com LIC. #RB0041377

Gator Construction offers improvement
and remodeling of commercial and residential
properties We are family owned and
operated with over 29 years of experience.





q, T.- -I '",-
,. '^ "





today


Everything you need...
Just in time for the ses
VISION


ACE
The helpful place.
320 N. Charleston Ave.
Ft. Meade
863-285-8158


'I'


Ju7?


,.7


CLASSIFIED


Page 5


April 18, 2012


; ::







eIS Ai


Call 863-676-3467 to place your ad


(i


'I
* '


I MANUFACTUR EH E MANUFATURE H E I


JACOBSEN HOMES
F A CTO RY O U T L E T
Finance Specials Land/Home Chattel Land-In-Lieu
FHA, VA, Prvate Finance
i Also offering
S* I Park Models
Trade-Ins
--.- Repos
$54,900 $49,900 Wepayshfor
'86 or newer!
863-537-6063
145 S. Hankin Rd. Bartow, FL
(5 mi. E. of Bartow on Hwy 60)




~- -. -, -,- 4-.
.: ..- .- .





CallKl ey at 417

today


'FarqstVArtY of es B isMantressaes in lk"


28TH ANNIVERSARY
ALL MATTRESSES YEAR ..
AMERICAN MADE LOU XAWLY0 A+BETAffIIE
.r- '- i
23999M 940) OVER
1806 First St. S.* Winter Haven I IR
Cypres Gardn Blvd First St UP T
BehirnI bosl.n ar, M krel
,ib 50% OFF
CATALOGCENTER LOVESYOU L. .. ...



LO V--SYO


; -g e "4





. ._8 -.
e;a:ui ,a.,, at -

I,~Y 7.


I i- --- -m.....-- -.I -n I


Do you know the difference between
a short sale and a foreclosure?
Do you know someone that needs to
short sale their home? Ican help


WEB: 4 REALTY

Carla J. Meeks, Realtor
WEB PRO REALTY, LLC.
863-604-9287
http://homesbycarla.net


* Septic Tank Installation Drainfield Installation
* Storm Sewers Plumbing Repairs
RESDENUTAL & COMMERCIAL
863-644-4033 Fax 863-937-5713
David Shoupe-Owner
40 Years experience
asapsepticl@yahoo.corm n
SR0451201 L '


3AN
AOSEOL


r.
A': I' ~ :~
*~ iL .qK,; ;,=' ~


- T A


'1 .
A, . .


This Barn Installed
From ONLY $2635


Delivered & Insta
From ONLY $5W


863-978-8586


2 CAR
GARAGE
From only
$4985
13 Colors


wwrw.usabarnsandgarages.com


CARPORTS FROM
ONLY $695


Raised Center Ai
Barns FROM $4


diled
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Eileen Belanger
Sales Associate
Property Manager

Ar YOUR SERVICE REALTY
1400 Chalet Suzanne Road
Lake Wales, FL 33859 (
Cell 863.221.0229
Business 863.676.4448
E-Mail: eileenb@century21.com
Please vist my Web Site foryour
Real Estate or Rental Needs at
wwwarthC.ntranloidaPropertisom W A& JOT


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SEWING .l-,
MACHINE -
REPAIR
Expert
Service & Repairs on
all Makes & Models
HOURS: 3655th l ,eF .. H L:
MON.-FRI. 9AM-5PM
TUES.9AM-8PM (863) 299-3080
SAT. 9AM-4PM www.heartfeltquilting.com
SCheck our website for all the latest schedules, specials and events


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April 18, 2012


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April 18, 2012 CLASIFESPg7


2001 HELP WANTED
Medical Management Careers
start here Get connected
online. Attend college on your
own time. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (800)481-9409
www.CenturaOnline.com
MOMS WORK FT/PT, no
experience necessary, -we
train. New Swarovski Crystal
Jewelry by Touchstone Crys-
tal. $500 TO $5,000/MONTH
(407)295-1522 kontactkelly-
now@aol.com
MOVIE EXTRAS Earn up to
$250 per day To stand in the
backgrounds for a major film
production experience not
required. All looks needed.
Call NOW!!! (877)435-5877
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses, www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
Need CDL Drivers A or B
with 2 yrs recent commerical
experience to transfer motor
homes, straight trucks, trac-
tors, and buses. www.mamo-
transportation.com (800)501-
3783
NOW HIRING: Companies
desperately need employees
to assemble products at
home. No selling, any hours.
$500 weekly potential. Info.-
1-985-646-1700 DEPT. FL-
820
Office assistant needed for
Real Estate firm, experience
required. Skills needed; effi-
cient in typing, general office
work, and computers. Call for
appointment and application
information. Prime Plus Real
Estate Inc. Lake Wales 863-
676-7040
OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade
Tank Drivers. CDL-A w/tank
endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days
required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incen-
tives & benefits. (877)882-
6537 or www.oakleytrans-
port.com

2005 SERVICES

ADOPTION
Give your baby a loving,
financially secure family.
Living expenses paid.
Call Attorney Charlotte
Danciu 28 years experi-
ence. 1-800-395-5449
www.adoption-surroga-
cy.com FL Bar #
307084
American Auto Transporters
Reliable Shipping of Your Car
Member BBB, Guaranteed
Rates, Pick up date and satis-
faction Daily trips from Flori-
da to NorthEast 1-800-800-
2580 www.shipcar.com
JEWISHH SURROGATE
NEEDED
for Orthodox Couple
Please help us have our
baby! Generous Com-
pensation Paid. Call
Attorney Charlotte Dan-
ciu 1-800-395-5449
FL Bar # 307084


PUT

CLASSIFIED


YOU!


FIND A JOB!

BUYA HOME!

BUYA CAR!


2005 SERVICES
Abortion Not an Option? Con-
sider Adoption. It's a Wonder-
ful Choice for an Unplanned
Pregnancy. Living/Medical
Expenses Paid. Loving, Finan-
cially Secure Families Await.
1-877-341-1309 Atty Ellen
Kaplan (#0875228)
ADOPTION GIVE YOUR
BABY THE BEST IN LIFE!
Many Kind, Loving, Edu-
cated & Financially Secure
Couples Waiting. Living &
Medical Expenses Paid.
Counseling & Transporta-
tion Provided. Former
Birth Moms on Staff!
FLORIDA ADOPTION LAW
GROUP, P.A. Attorneys
who truly care about you.
Jodi Sue Rutstein, M.S.W.,
J.D. Mary Ann Scherer,
R.N., J.D. Over 30 Com-
bined Years of Adoption
Experience. 1-800-852-
0041 Confidential 24/7
(#133050&249025)
ADOPTION 866-633-0397
Unplanned Pregnancy?
Provide your baby with a
loving, financially secure
family.
Living/Medical/Counsel-
ing expenses paid. Social
worker on staff. Call com-
passionate attorney Lau-
ren Feingold (FL
Bar#0958107) 24/7
ADOPTION 888-812-3678
All Expenses Paid. Choose
a Loving, Financially
Secure family for your
child 24 Hrs 7 Days Car-
ing & Confidential. Attor-
ney Amy Hickman. (Lic.
#832340)
*DIVORCE* BANKRUPTCY
Starting at $65 *1 Signature
Divorce *Missing Spouse
Divorce "We Come to you!"
1-888-705-7221 Since1992
DIVORCE $50 $240* Cov-
ers Child Support, Custody,
and Visitation, Property,
Debts, Name Change... Only
One Signature Required!
*Excludes govt. fees! 1-800-
522-6000 Extn. 300 Baylor
& Associates
KILL ROACHES & PALMETTO
BUGS! Buy Harris Roach
Tablets. Eliminate. Bugs -
Guaranteed. Available at Ace
Hardware, The Home Depot &
Home Depot.com
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Talk with caring
adoption expert. You choose
from families nationwide. LIV-
ING EXPENSES PAID. Call
24/7 Abby's One True Gift
Adoptions. 866-413-6298.
License #100013125
ROOF REPAIRS ROOF
OVERS Mobile Home Roof
Specialist & Flat Roof.
Free Insurance Inspec-
tions. Lic/Ins
CCC1327406. All Florida
Weatherproofing & Con-
struction. 1-877-572-
1019
SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY
BENEFITS. You WIN or Pay Us
Nothing. Contact Disability
Group, Inc. Today! BBB
Accredited. Call For Your
FREE Book & Consultation.
888-903-1353
2030 MEDICAL
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! No experi-
ence needed! Job training &
local placement assistance.
HS Diploma / GED & PC /
Internet needed.
(888)374-7294


2100 GENERAL
Class-A FlatBed Drivers$
Home EVERY weekend, run SE
US. REQUIRES 1 yr. OTR F.B.
Exp. & pay UP TO .39/mile.
Call (800)572-5489 x227.
Sunbelt Transport, LLC.
Drivers-New Freight for
Refrigerated & Dry Van
lanes. Annual salary $45K to
$60K. Flexible hometime. CDL-
A, 3 months current OTR expe-
rience. (800)414-9569.
www.driveknight.com
FREIGHT UP Equals More $
2 Mos. CDL Class A driving
exp. (877)258-8782.
www.meltontruck.com/drive

3000








NOTICES

3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
ADVERTISE IN OVER 100
PAPERS throughout Florida
for One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
ALLIED HEALTH career train-
ing-Attend college 100%
online. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(800)481-9409 www.Centu-
raOnline.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Paralegal, *Comput-
ers, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (877) 203-
3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com
BANKRUPTCY, FORECLO-
SURE DEFENSE, Consumer
Rights. Peter Kelegian, Attor-
ney at Law, Gainesville, Flori-
da. Free no obligation consul-
tation. Serving counties
throughout North Florida.
(352)672-6444. peter@kele-
gianlaw.com #702706
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
FREE VACATION VOUCHER UNIT-
ED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE Towing, Fast,
Non-Runners Accepted, 24/7
(888)468-5964.
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE FREE VACATION
VOUCHER UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Can-
cer Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Fast, Non-Runners
Accepted, 24/7 (888)468-
5964.
SClassified Works!


3010 ANNOUNCEMENTS
GET YOUR AD NOTICED
HERE And in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida for
One Low Rate. Advertising
Networks of Florida, Put us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.
HORSE LOVERS MAKE $$
FOR YOURSELF OR CHARI-
TY. HOLD A COMPETITIVE
TRAIL CHALLENGE. CALL
ACTHA AT (877)99-
ACTHA(22842) OR VISIT
WWW.ACTHA.US GREAT FUN,
GREAT $$$
Huge Discounts when you
buy 2 types of advertising!
'120 community newspapers,
32 websites, 26 daily news-
papers. Call now to diversify
your advertising with Advertis-
ing Networks of Florida
(866)742-1373.
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
Financially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
YOU ARE INVITED TO
WORSHIP WITH US AT
LIGHTHOUSE
BAPTIST CHURCH
307 ABC RD. LAKE WALES, FL
AN INDEPENDENT, FUNDAMEN-
TAL BAPTIST CHURCH
IF YOU MISS USING THE KING
JAMES BIBLE AND SINGING THE
OLD GOSPEL HYMNS FROM A
SONGBOOK, WE LOOK
FORWARD TO SEEING YOU.
WORSHIP SCHEDULE
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE
10:30 AM
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP
SERVICE 6 PM
WEDNESDAY BIBLE STUDY AND
PRAYER MEETING 7 PM
3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
"Can You Dig It?" We will
train, certify & provide lifetime
assistance landing work. Hir-
ing Florida. Start digging as a
heavy equipment operator.
(866)362-6497.

IT'S NEVER
BEEN EASIER!



I .\a-' ^ 0


Searching for a new car, home or just something
to do this weekend? Make it eosy on yourself.
Subscribe to The Polk County Democrot
and get o wealth of information available
at your fingertips every day.
The Polk County Democrat
863-533-4183


3060 SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for hands on Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Mainte-.
nance 866-314-6283
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Busi-
ness, *Criminal Justice, *Hos-
pitality. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call 888-
203-3179 www.CenturaOn-
line.com

AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICS Graduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved; finan-
cial aid if qualified. Job place-
ment assistance. Call Nation-
al Aviation Academy Today! 1-
800-659-2080 or NAA.edu
Earn your high school diploma
at home. Work at your own
pace. First Coast Academy,
nationally accredited. Call for
free brochure, 1-800-658-
1180, ext. 77. www.fcahigh-
school.org
EARN YOUR HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA! Educators Inc.
High School over 25 years of
experience. Fully accredited.
Use for College, Military,
Trade School or Job. 1-800-
590-9611 www.Eduhigh-
school.com
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
From Home 6-8 Weeks
Accredited Get A Diploma!
Get A Job! Free Brochure 1-
800-264-8330 www.diplo-
mafromhome.com Benjamin
Franklin High School
3090 LOST & FOUND
FOUND. Male Lab-Mix,
Nurtered, with White Chest
and Throat. Found in Master-
piece Rd and Rolling Hills Ct E
area. Call 863-678-3879.

4000







FINANCIAL

4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
$150,000 +/yr. Potential
Turn Key Online Sales & Mar-
keting Wealth Creation Sys-
tem. No Selling to Family &
Friends Start In 24 hrs.
www.thel50Kgameplan.com

Advertise Today




Real Results.


4010 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN
A DAY? Your Own Local
Candy Route 25 Machines
and Candy All for $9995.00
All Major Credit Cards Accept-
ed (877)915-8222
AINB02653
FREE Program on How to
Get Rich. Go to www.Your-
WishisYourCommand.com for
FREE offer. It's the Secret
Behind The Secret, today's
Think and Grow Rich!
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
Equipment leasing for oilfield
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029
Investors Outstanding
and immediate returns in
equipment leasing for frac
industry. Immediate lease out.
Tax benefits and high returns.
We need more equipment!
(800)491-9029

4020 FINANCIAL/MISC.
CASH NOW! Cash for your
structured settlement or annu-
ity payments. Call J.G. Went-
worth (866) 494-9115. Rated
A+ by the Better Business
Bureau.
FREE DEBT SOLUTION. End
Foreclosure and Debt Collec-
tions within 90 Days. No Pay-
ments, No Bankruptcy, and
No Settlements. Guaranteed
Since 1993. (800)477-926
www.zerodebtguaranteed.co
m

LAWSUIT CASH
Auto Accident?
All cases Qualify Get CASH
before your case settles!
Fast Approval. Low Fees.
(866) 709-1100 or
www.glofin.com
OWNER WILL FINANCE. Bank
or seller won't finance? We
help! No qualifying. No cred-
it! Low Down. Call Today! 1-
800-563-2734
kanthony@cigrealty.com
4080 LOANS I MORTGAGES
Access Reverse Mortgage!
Florida-based: Application &
closing in your home. Experi-
ence: almost 1,000 reverse
mortgages funded. Award-
winning customer servi'ee.
BBB A rating. NMLS #4566.
1(800)806-7126



Need a job?

Check The

Classified!


.-r
A


N EmployFlorida.com
S. a 1-866-FLA-2345
Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxliary aids and services are available '
upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ lorida telephone may be reached by
persons using TTY/fTO equipment via the lorida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.


CLASSIFIED


Page 7


April 18, 2012







April 18,2012


Page CLASIFIED


5000






BUSINESS SERVICES

5115 LEGAL SERVICES
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING ADOPTION? A childless
energetic, spiritual, commit-
ted couple seeks to adopt.
'fnancially secure. Healthcare
professionals. Expenses paid.
Gil & Dave (888)580-ADOPT
(2367). FL Bar#0150789
5120 MEDICAL SERVICES
ATTENTION DIABETICS with
Medicare. Get a Free Talking
Meter and diabetic testing
supplies at No Cost, plus Free
home delivery! Best of all,
this meter eliminates painful
finger pricking! Call 888-377-
3536
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order pharma-
cy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 90 percent on all
your medication needs. Call
Today 888-372-6740 for
$25.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping. Pre-
scriptions Dispensed from
canada are Dispensed by:
Health One Pharmacy.
License Number: 21791
TAKE VIAGRA/ CIALIS?
Save $500.00! Get 40
100mg/20mg Pills, for
only-$99! +4-Bonus Pills
FREE! #1 Male Enhance-
ment. Discreet Shipping.
Blue Pill Now. Call 1-888-
800-1280

5230 MISCELLANEOUS
$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen
on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit
Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.lawcapi-
tal.com

Need Cash?
Have A
Garage Sale


5230 MISCELLANEOUS
AT&T U-Verse for just
$29.99/mo! SAVE when you
bundle Internet+Phone+TV
and get up to $300 BACK!
(select plans). Limited Time
CALL NOW! 866-944-0906
Bundle & Save on your
CABLE, INTERNET PHONE,
AND MORE. High Speed Inter-
net starting at less
than$20/mo. CALL NOW!
800-306-1733
DIABETIC TEST STRIPS
WANTED!!! Get the Most
Cash, up to $27 per box!
Shipping Paid! Must be
Sealed & Unexpired. Call
Tony 813-528-1480 tonytest-
strips@hotmail.com
DISH Network. Starting at
$19.99/month PLUS 30 Pre-
mium Movie Channels FREE
for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask
About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL- 888-418-9787
Every baby deserves a
healthy start. Join more than
a million people walking and
raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk
starts at marchforbabies.org.
MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW!
FastStart engine. Ships FREE.
One-Year Money-Back Guaran-
tee when you buy DIRECT.
Call for the DVD and FREE
Good Soil book! 866-674-
4644
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone. Packages start
at $89.99/mo (for 12
months.) Options from ALL
major service providers. Call
Acceller today to learn more!
CALL 1-888-903-2647
SWIM SPA LOADED! Brand
New with Warranty, 3 Pumps,
LED lighting, Ozone Deluxe
Cover, maintenance free cab-
inet. Retails for $18,900.
Sacrifice $8995. Can deliver.
727-851-3217
WANTED UNEXPIRED DIABET-
IC TEST STRIPS Up To
$26/Box. Pr ePaid Shipping
Labels. Hablamos Espanol! 1-
800-267-9895 / www.SellDia-
beticstrips.com
$$$ We Buy Diabetic Test
Strips $$$ We pay TOP $$$
Get paid fast in 24 hours! Visit
Traderjackproducts.com/strip
s. Call today free quote! 772-
263-0425


6000
1< %.


MERCHANDISE

6012 GARAGE SALES
BARTOW Friday/Saturday 9-
4 1801 Imperial Blvd off
Gandy Rd Peace River Estates
1. Items we have not used
for a year
Girl Scout Yard Sale; infant
boys-2T, girls, boys, adult &
maternity clothing, toys,
books, furniture and more.
323 Jackson St Lake Wales
4/20 & 21 7:30-1:30.
MOVING SALE Sat. April
21,
8- 1. Antiques, collec-
tables,
household goods, cook-
books, furniture, tools, 2001
Solara. 512 Water Oak
Court, Fort Meade
6020 AUCTIONS
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net
LAKEFRONT HORSE FARM 5-
Bedroom Home, 3-Stall Barn,
Large Workshop, Garage,
Scenic Lake Frontage, Dock,
Pier. Price reduced
$799,000. Owner Financing.
Lake Tillery, East of Charlotte,
NC. Iron Horse Properties.
(800)997-2248. www.iron-
horseproperties.net

6030 HOUSEHOLD GOODS

LAKE WALES ESTATE
SALE, 2 dinette sets, couch
w/recliner, formal 9 pc. din-
ingroom set, Lowery Lincoln
wood organ w/bench,
loaded. 407-301-6681.


Need ajob?
Check The
Classified!


6180 HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -
SPRING SALE Cut lumber
any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE
MONEY In stock ready to ship.
Starting at $995.00
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N
6190 TOOLS/ MACHINERY
10 INCH Craftsman Table
Saw. Hardly Used. $100.
call 863-223-8333
6232 CATS
FOUND KITTEN, (female) in
the vicinity of Lila & George &
Mann. Call: 533-7432.
6260 MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE

AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified. Housing avail-
able. Call Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.
ATTEND COLLEGE ON
LINE from home. Medical,
* Business, Criminal Jus-
tice, Hospitality. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165.
www.CenturaOnline.com
BARTOW FOR SALE brown
triple dresser with mirror, 7
drawers. Asking $100. Call:
(863) 533-3457
6270 WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE

BUYING
GOLD, SILVER,
COINS, JEWELRY
Highest Prices In History!

ANY CONDITION
WE BUY IT ALL, and Pay So Much
We Almost Want to Cry. You, of
Course, Will Laugh With Glee!!
See PHIL at the former
HOLLY'S ARMY NAVY STORE
3440 Ave G NW
Winter Haven
Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm
Call first to confirm I'm there
863-299-6031
Our 33rd Year.

Seize the sales
with Classified!


7000






TRANSPORTATION

7140 MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS
2000 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
less than 55k miles. Pearl
white w/camel vinyl top. Nice
leather interior. Fully loaded.
Exc. cond. $7,200 863-559-
6935
2010 DODGE WHEEL-
CHAIR VAN, 10 inch lowered
floor with tie downs & wheel-
chair ramp. $31,995. 727-
492-1630
7260 AUTOS WANTED

CASH FOR CARS!
We Buy ANY Car, Truck
or Van! Running or Not.
Get a FREE Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer NOW!
1-800-558-1097 We're
Local!
CASH FOR CARS: All
Cars/Trucks Wanted. Run-
ning or Not! Top Dollar Paid.
We Come To You! Any
Make/Model. Call For Instant
Offer: 1-800-871-9638
We buy unwanted car,
trucks, vans with or without
title any condition,
year,make or model. We pay
up to $20,000 and offer
free towing call 813-505-
6939

7333 MISC. BOATS
2 Kawasaki Jets Skis w/trailer
1997 Model 750. Both in
good condition/will run for
their age. $2800.Please call
for more info. 863-696-
3247
JON BOAT, 14ft. 6hp John-
son w/ galvanized trailer. 28#
thurst trolling motor. Live well.
$1200 Call 863-899-2648.
7360 CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
2001 Honda CBR F41 600
motorcycle. Runs great 17k
miles
863-285-8705. $2,800

Classified = Sales


7370 CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
TRAVEL TRAILER, 33ft
Cougar 302RLS, double slide,
queen bed, rear living room.
Like new! Lots of extras! 231-
633-0024. (Haines City)


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Customer
service
is our #1
priority.


When you need to
see a physician or
consult an
attorney, you donEI
choose just
anyone. You
choose a
professional you
can trust. When
you need to
advertise your
products and
services, why not.
do the same and
go with us, the
pros you can trust?
We know how
important your
business is to you,
and whatever your
advertising needs,
we will listen
closely and use
every resource
necessary to get
the
job done right and
on time.

CALL
TODAY!


863-676-3444
The Lake Wales News
The Fort Meade Leader
The Polk County Democrat
FrostproofNews


Page 8


CLASSIFIED