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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00724
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
Creation Date: February 22, 2012
Frequency: semiweekly[1946-<1992>]
weekly[ former <1936>-1946]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
System ID: UF00028292:00724
 Related Items
Preceded by: Polk County record

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.PolkCountyDemocrat.com


Wednesday


SFebruary 22, 2012



Polk County Democrat


Bartow's Hometown Newspaper Since 1931


750


The


Volume 82 Number 51


USPS NO 437-320


Bartow, Polk County Florida 33830


Copyright 2012 Sun Coast Media Group. Inc.


Keystone close to construction


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
By this summer, construction could be
under way at a housing development for
low income people in Bartow, said Key-
stone Challenge Fund President Jeff Bagwell
told Bartow City Commissioners Monday.
"We're real excited about this," Bagwell
told commissioners at Monday's work ses-
sion. 'About 75 percent of the (old) complex
is down. When that's done we can put this
out to bid and make the changes."


In the area between Van Fleet Drive and
Baker Avenue where the Palm Air Apart-
ments once were located, Heritage Place is
planned. It willfeature homes for 17 people
earning less than 50 percent of the median
income, said Bagwell. Cottage-style units
in a closed courtyard will create "a sense
of place," said Steven Boyington, from Lake-
land's Wallis Murphy Boyington architects.
The units are all one bedroom aside from
three that are two-bedroom.
The Keystone Challenge Fund, in


partnership with Swan Development,
has a mission to improve the community.
This project is a partnership between Polk
County, the city of Bartow and a not-for-
profit company.
The units will have screened porches and
privacy gardens and will be designed with
energy efficiency insulation.
"Where people who might get $70-$80
electric bills per month now will see bills
from $40-$50 per month," Boyington said.
The housing complex will have one


entrance and a front unit
And, he said, it will be attractive, more so
than the Palm Air Apartments, which was a
place where homeless used to seek shelter
in the boarded-up complex.
"I think this will be a handsome addition
to the neighborhood," he said.
When the complex is finally built, Key-
stone Challenge Fund will seek an agency
to buy the development which will then
rent the units.
KEYSTONE 112A


Student


creates


foundation

By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
What started as a means to help him
raise money to go on a trip nowis intend-
ed to raise money to award a scholarship
to a Bartow High
School student.
On which
grounds to award
the scholarship is
still not decided.
Don'Tavius
Sanders, a senior
Sat Bartow High
School and the Yel-
low Jacket mascot,
started the Help a
DON'TAVIUS SANDERS Brother Founda-
tion to raise $500
to go on a field trip for which individual
students had to raise that much money.
Either through his salesmanship or the way
he has been as the mascot, it only took him
about two weeks to raise the money.
"When people see the name it grabs
their attention," he said. "And, then when I
was done with it I thought I'd keep it going
and give a scholarship. I don't have criteria
yet, though."
Sanders decided to become the mas-
cot because he said paying $5 to get into
football games was leaving him broke
every week and he wanted to get into the
games for free. Now that he's the mascot
he's shown he is.almost made for the part.
Shy in part, when he puts on the costume
he becomes a different person.
"The funny thing about Don'Tavius is
STUDENT112A


PHOTO BY CHRISTINE ROSLOW
Bartow Elementary Academy's annual Walk-a-Thon last year featured the usual guests from the high school
including Don'Tavius Sanders at the Yellow Jacket mascot. Here Cadeh Harpe gives him a high-five as Kaylee
Cail looks on.


Fleming

recalled

for humor,

dedication

By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@
POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Charles Alfred Fleming was
chief of police of Bartow for
eight years and was on the
Bartow
Police
De-
part-
ment
for 32
years,
but
he is
mostly
re-
called
CHARLES A.bFLEMING inter-
esting, intelligent, thoughtful
and funny by his friends and
relatives.
And, he was dedicated to his
profession of law enforcement.
In fact, before going to work
for the Bartow Police Depart-
ment in 1955, the WorldWar II
British veteran was a bobby in
London.
How dedicated was he?
"My sister reminded me
that my father gave her the first
speeding ticket sheever got,"
said his oldest daughter, Lor-
raine Johnson. She said it cost
$27 and she got it on Wood-
FLEMING 12A


TODAY'S
CONTENTS






7 I05252 '00025 8


Editorial..........P..Pages 4A
Obituaries............Page 6A
School Life....... ...Page 8A
Sports...............Page 10A
Calendar...........Page 13A
County Report....Page 1B
Feeling Fit..........Page 4B


*************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
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happening in March


-- --- INSIDE


James F Clements has served two terms
on the Bartow City Commission and this is
the third time he is running against Gerald
Cochran.
Also, Clements said he wants to see what
can be done about freight trains that run
at night through Bartow. These items were
incorrect in a story that ran Saturday in The
Polk County Democrat.
We regret the errors.


ns .; '


I







Page 2A The Polk County Democrat February 22, 2012


Bartowans discuss art in public places


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW @ POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
There is a move afoot to put art along
the streets in Bartow to not only beautify
the city but to also attract people to
town and perhaps sell the art.
Friday 15 people met at JFD's Seafood
Restaurant on East Main Street in Bar-
tow to begin the discussion. Though it
was loud and hard to hear what people
were offering, the first steps were taken.
Bartow Community Redevelopment
Agency Executive Director Patrick Brett
told those attending that this meeting
was to see what interest there was in
pursuing the concept
"There are things that have to be
addressed to make a program," he said.
"In the art selection process we need to
have a vision and a goal."
Neither of those are established yet,
but after the meeting Friday, Brett set up
a website where discussions could hap-
pen about Art in Public Places.
Friday the discussions ranged from
the threat of vandalism to insurance and
the idea of how enforcement and main-
tenance would go on, since it would it


be up to the city or up to the artists.
"Regulation controls have to be dis-
cussed," Brett said.
Ikish Pfeiffer said there will always be
a problem of what people regard as art.
That could lead to a potential vandalism
problem.
"We're not going to please everybody
with what we choose," Pfeiffer said.
The city of Lakeland has set up a
couple of areas where there is art in
public places. Within two weeks of a
butterfly statue going up, the antenna
on the head were torn off.
"When you do it you should try to
make it vandal-proof," said Glenn Clo-
ver, Oak Square Consultants.
Pete Gardner, Eagle Lake city man-
ager, thought the public art displayed
there, which is around City Hall, might
help keep vandals from getting to the
artwork.
Brett's idea for Bartow goes a bit fur-
ther than displaying art just for beauti-
fication; he also suggests making it for
sale. This doesn't make the vandalism
any less serious, but it has more of a
pocketbook value.
"My concept is a little different. I want


to make the art piece for sale. My idea is
to put the piece on display for about 12
months and it would have a cycle."
The insurance issue probably
wouldn't be too much of a problem, said
Karen Guffey of Gibson &Wirt. She said
the city of Bartow has a policy that this
could fall under. It would just be a mat-
ter of setting it up.
And then there was the idea of where
to place the art. Brett said the artwork
would have to go where it's appropriate.
But there was also the idea of having
it places where it would and could be
seen.
Glenda Losh, the owner of tay-cho
Art Gallery, said in a previous discussion
both the courthouse and the post office
were mentioned. But the idea of placing
pieces along Broadway where cars can
see it also came up.
Brett felt the opening of the discus-
sion was a wonderful start and set up
the discussion website. He said, though,
the process in creating this would prob-
ably not move too quickly.
"The process will probably be slow
because everyone will want their own
say," he said.


No deal out of Genshaft,
Alexander meeting

By KIM WILMATH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
University of South Florida President Judy Gen-
shaft and Sen. JD Alexander met for about an hour
Monday but failed to reach an agreement on the
university's proposed budget for next year.
Genshaft and Alexander both described the con-
versation as fruitful but failed to reveal many details
about the meeting.
It was the first time the two have met in months
and follows a tumultuous few weeks that started
when Alexander, the Senate budget chairman,
surprised university officials by supporting a bill to
immediately turn USF Polytechnic into the state's
12th university. Alexander later proposed massive
and according to the university dispropor-
tionate budget cuts for the school
Alexander and Senate leaders say USF's cuts
appear larger because the university is sitting on
nearly $100 million in available reserves.
Sen. Jim Norman, R-Tampa, who urged Mon-
day's meeting, says he is hopeful Alexander will
relent on some of the USF cuts.
Norman is working on a Plan B, a budget
amendment that would restore about $33 million
of the cuts originally proposed byAlexander. He
said he also wants the Senate to give USF the $18
million it needs to pay for USF Polytechnic faculty
and $6 million for the pharmacy school.


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Page 2A The Polk County Democrat


February 22, 2012


I






February 22, 2012 The Polk County Democrat Page 3A


Playing in the park


PHOTOS BY PEGGY KEHOE
Rick Gwinn sang and played country and other tunes at the Concert in the Park Thursday,
Feb. 9 in Fort Blount Park. Main Street Bartow presents the free concerts on the second
Thursday of the month during an extended lunch hour.


Strolling
or sitting,
visitors to
Fort Blount
Park
Thursday
heard
a free
concert
by Rick
Gwinn. The
lunchtime
Concert in
the Park is
presented
monthly by
Main Street
Bartow.


Out on Main Street


PHOTOS BY JEFF ROSLOW
Band students from Stephens and Floral Elementary schools entertained the Friday
Fest crowd last week. Before they played in front of the stage at Main Street and
Central Avenue, they practiced on the steps at the Polk County Historical Courthouse.
At right: Susie Hayes leads
students from Stephens and
Floral Avenue Elementary
schools Feb. 17 during Friday
Fest. The students played five
songs for the crowd that showed
up at the monthly event.


The Polk County Democrat Page 3A


February 22, 2012





Page 4A The Polk County Democrat


VIEWPOINT


Haridopolos fails to bully prison


privatization bill through Senate


By his own measure, maybe Senate President
Mike Haridopolos should demote himself after
he couldn't bully his pet prison privatization bill
through a chamber dominated by his fellow Re-
publicans.
Less than twoweeks after he relieved Republican
Sen. Mike Fasano from his committee chairman-
ship because he had "lost confidence in him" to
toe the leadership line, Haridopolos failed to get a
Senate majority to rubber-stamp his privatization
scheme.
The revolt represents a dramatic fracturing of a
heretofore solid GOP bloc led by the troika of Hari-
dopolos, Budget Committee Chairman JD Alexan-
der and former House speaker and current Rules
Committee Chairman John Thrasher.


Our Viewpoint
The Senate rebels included two former county
sheriffs who questioned the efficacy of privatiza-
tion and the impact on communities that stood to
lose thousands of corrections jobs to downsizing
and millions of dollars to salary and benefits cuts.
While the failure of privatization in the Senate
represents a victory for corrections officers, it also
represents a win for good governance.
Haridopolos abused his power more than once
during his push to privatize prisons to reward gen-
erous campaign benefactors.
He tried to squeeze the same measure into the
massive appropriations bill in the waning days of
the 2011 legislative session, a gambit ruled uncon-


stitutional by a Tallahassee judge.
This time around, he bypassed proper Senate
oversight by channeling the bill through Alex-
ander's and Thrasher's friendly budget and rules
committees instead of Fasano's former judiciary
committee, which is charged with overseeing the
state's corrections system.
It didn't work. Despite a tightly controlled time-
line designed to limit public input virtually the
same bill that was tacked onto the budget last year
wasn't even introduced by the rules committee
until three weeks ago news stories, editorials
and op-ed columns around the state began high-
lighting the role campaign donations played in the
process.
Good riddance to a bad idea.


Letters to the editor


Helping older Floridians

maintain good nutrition


In today's economy, individuals are
finding it difficult to make ends meet.
In fact, many older adults in our com-
munities lack the basic needs of life,
including enough food.
According to the Food Research and
Action Center, 8.1 percent of the house-
holds with elderly members are food
insecure.
Lack of basic nutrition negatively
impacts health and increases the risk of
illness.
Many older adults may be eligible for
food assistance through the Supple-
mental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP). Formerly known as food
stamps, this program can provide vital
assistance by helping seniors buy the
food that they need. However, many
eligible older adults do not receive this
assistance because they don't know

Traffic ligh

Bartow Hos]
If traffic lights are put at the Bartow
hospital entrance the 3 and a half mile
stretch of U.S. 98 from Lyle Parkway to
SR 540A would have three traffic lights,
one at the hospital, the new bypass to
U.S. 17 and at the Spessard Holland
School.
What we would have is a six lane
street instead of a highway. The pur-
pose of a highway is to move as much
traffic as possible from point A to point


t


p


about the program or find the applica-
tion process daunting.
Additionally many are faced with
transportation, mobility or technology
issues, so many older adults just do not
apply. Lastly, many older adults may
feel embarrassed that they need help.
A pilot program in severalcounties
(including Hillsborough, Polk, High-
lands, Hardee and Manatee Counties)
overcomes those barriers and allows the
application to be completed by tele-
phone, using a telephonic signature. If
you, or an older adult that you know,
needs assistance please call the Elder
Helpline at 1-800-963-5337.

Maureen Kelly
President and CEO
West Central Florida Area Agency on
Aging, Inc.

in front of

)ital wasteful
B in the most expedient and safe way as
can be designed in a highway system.
Putting a traffic light every mile or
less is not good planning. And spend-
ing several million dollars to upgrade
a highway to six lanes to handle the
increased load safely and then putting a
traffic light at every access is a waste of
money.
Ivan Richardson
Bartow


The right me
Back when I was a little kid, walking
five miles to elementary school through
the snow (in Central Florida), uphill in
both directions, and doing my lessons
on a slate by the light of a kerosene
lamp, we celebrated two presidential
birthdays, both in February Lincoln's
on Feb. 12, Washington's on Feb. 22.
George Washington, our first presi-
dent, was known as the Father of Our
Country. He is reported to have es-
chewed the title of monarch in favor of
that of president.
Abraham Lincoln was about a century
ahead of his time, and though seldom
recognized as such, was (in my opinion)
the Father of the Civil Rights Movement.
Both were the right men in the right
place at the right time.
As little kids, we learned something
about them, thinking that these two
holidays only 10 days apart were an oc-
casion for celebrating the greatness of
two of our forefathers, not an occasion
for merchandising events publicized
by goofy caricatures of them prancing


for the job


around in TV commercials.
Of course, back then, TV was unheard
of.
Somewhere along the line, Congress
did the unthinkable: it reduced the
number of federal holidays.
The birthdays of Washington and
Lincoln were consolidated into Presi-
dents Day, celebrated on a meaningless
Monday to create another three-day
holiday weekend.
The celebration became a plain

FRISBIE 5


The Polk County Democrat
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
* Aileen Hood General Manager.* Jeff Roslow- Editor Peggy Kehoe Managing Editor


Published e\ery \Wednesday and Saturday at
190 South Florida. Avenue
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office..
Periodical postage paid at Lakeland, Florida 33805
and additional Entrr Office
*Phone 1863) 533-4183 *Fax 1863) 533-0402
Postmaster: Send address changes to
190 South Florida Avenue
Banow.FL 33830


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTn
Six Months..................$25.68 One Year..........................$41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months....................$24.00 OneYear..........................$39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
Sil Months.. ......$0.00 One Y ear ....... 565.001
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
SL\ Months ......... ..$44.00 One Year... ... .. ...... .:2.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Bartow area
can send letters and column submissions to letters@polkcoun-
tydemocrat.com or mail them to 190 South Florida Avenue,
Bartow, FL 33830


--~-





February 22, 2012






February 22, 2012 The Polk County Democrat Page 5A


FRISBIE: The right rr
FROM PAGE 4
vanilla, one size fits all (presidents)
holiday, which deems Harry Truman to
have the savoir faire of Jack Kennedy,
and Bill Clinton to be the moral equal
of Gerald Ford.
It has been suggested that the great-
ness of America lies in large part in the
happenstance or Divine Providence
- which saw an aggregation of great
intellects and leaders in one place at
the time of the formation of a new na-
tion. There is merit in that observation.
Can you imagine a group of wealthy
men assembling today to pledge their
lives, their fortunes, and their sacred
honor to declare the independence of a
fledgling nation?
Can you imagine a group of today's


political leaders writing a Constitu-
tion that more than two centuries later
would remain the world's standard for
representative government, complete
with a Bill of Rights that is the envy
of oppressed people throughout the
world?
We are indeed inheritors of a nation
founded by Washington and other great
leaders, followed by an exceptional few
of the caliber of Abraham Lincoln.
God bless America? He already has.

(S.L. Frisbie is retired. Until his retire-
ment a couple of years ago, he made
it a practice to read the United States
Constitution once a year, to refresh his
memory on exactly what it says and
does not say. How many members of
Congress do vou suppose do the same?)


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The Polk County Democrat Page 5A


February 22, 2012







Page 6A The Polk County Democrat February 22, 2012


Polk sesquicentennial


closes at Cow Camp


By PEGGY KEHOE
PKEHOE@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Florida's early cattle industry comes back
to life Saturday during the closing event of
Polk County's sesquicentennial year. The
150th anniversary celebration ends with an
opening: the dedication of the Cow Camp
at Circle B Bar Reserve on Feb. 25.
Polk County Cattlemen's Association
(PCCA) volunteers built the addition to Cir-
cle B in the area where the former ranch's
original cow camp was, county Historic
Preservation Manager Myrtice Young said.
In keeping with the grassroots nature of
the year-long sesquicentennial celebration,
the PCCA approachedYoung about build-
ing the cow camp a few months ago, and
also provided some funding. The county
provided the materials for the camp, which
includes a cabin and corral. Polk County
brands will adorn one of the structures,
along with a brand made of-the Polk Proud
150 logo, Young said.
Designs for the camp were drawn by
local cattleman and artist Ned Waters,
who visited a 1905 camp in Northeast Polk
County, Young explained.
"In the 19th century the cattle drives
started in March and lasted until August,"
according to information shared by Maria
Tippe, Polk County Historical Museum as-
sistant, on the PCCA website. "Cow Camps
were scattered over the woodlands about
one day apart. They consisted of crude
shelters and log pens to gather wild cattle.
The animals had to be flushed from the
Florida palmetto scrub and swamps with
whips, dogs, and horses."
Early visitors to Saturday's event will see
a recreation of a cattle drive featuring long-
horn cattle similar in look to the original
Cracker cows.
The drive starts at 8:30 am., parade style
along the road from temporary pens to the
camp. Young said the cattle will actually
arrive at Circle B the night before and spend
the night so they have time to settle down.
The Cow Camp will preserve the heritage
and culture of one of Polk County's oldest
industries. An outdoor exhibit will educate
visitors about the history of the land, its
preservation and uses, and how it led to


PHOTO BY PEGGY KEHOE
Ned Waters (left) and Charles Cook (center),
president of the Imperial Polk Cattlemen's
Association, accepted a proclamation and
framed photos from Polk Commissioner
Edwin Smith at Tuesday's county commission
meeting. They were honored for their work in
building a cow camp at Circle B Bar Reserve.
where we are today in the cattle industry
and land use.
Dedication of the Cow Camp is at
11 a.m. Games and period music are
planned, and food will be available for
purchase. All of Circle B's nature trails will
be open for families to explore together.
Horseback riding trails are available at
Marshall Hampton Reserve.
Sponsors are Polk County Cattle-
men's Association and the Polk County
Commission.
Waters and the Imperial Polk County
Cattlemen's Association were recognized
for their service at Thesday's Polk County
Commission meeting "for their generous
commitment of time and support in con-
tributing to Polk County's Sesquicentennial
celebration."
"The financial contribution and excep-
tional efforts of the members of the Impe-
rial Polk County Cattlemen's Association
have made possible the Circle B Cow Camp
Exhibit" were acknowledged, was were
Waters' visionary guidance and selfless
acts of time and dedication... in creating
the concept and design of the cow camp
exhibit.
For more information call the Polk Coun-
ty Historical Museum at (863) 534-4386 or


Dorothy G.
Hendrix, 74,
passed away r
Feb. 18, 2012, in .
Tainpa.
Mrs. Hendrix
was born on
Feb. 16, 1938, in
Bartow, and was
the daughter of
the late Floyd
Duke and Grace
Hebb Duke. DOROTHY HENDRIX
She worked as a
Registered Nurse in newborn nurser-
ies of Winter Haven Hospital, Regen-
cy Medical Center and Polk General
Hospital in Bartow. She was a long-
time member of the North Jackson
Avenue Church of Christ.
She is survived by her children,


Mrs. Loyal Myra Olive Hass, 95,
passed away Feb. 19, 2012, at the Rohr
Home in Bartow.
Born on Feb. 19, 1917, in Bartow,
Mrs. Hass was the daughter of the late
Loyd Clyde and Maxie (Stansell) Olive.
Mrs. Hass was a loving homemaker
and member of Holy Trinity Episcopal
Church in Bartow.
She was the owner and operator of
The Studio, an art and frame store that
served the Bartow community from
1968 until 1997. Mrs. Hass was also a
longtime member of the Bartow Art
Guild. She was preceded in death by
her husband, John Martin Hass, and


Wayne E. Hendrix (Sharon), John
Hendrix (Linda), Wanda Hendrix
Powell, Jerry A. Hendrix (Alane) all
of Bartow; her mother, Grace Hebb
Duke of Bartow; a sister, Toni
Grayson of Bartow; nine grandchildren;
and 10 great-grandchildren.
Arrangements are being handled by
Whidden-McLean Funeral Home, 650
E. Main St., Bartow where the family
will receive friends Thursday, Feb. 23,
from 6-8 p.m.
Funeral services will follow Friday,
Feb. 24, at 11 a.m., at the funeral
home chapel.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the North Jackson Avenue
Church of Christ, 450 N. Jackson Ave.,
Bartow, FL 33830.
Condolences may be made to the
family at www.whiddenmclean
funeralhome.com.


her daughter, Carolyn Hass Haviser.
Mrs. Hass is survived by her son, MarkA
Hass of Bartow; her brother, Bob Olive of El
Mirage, Ariz.; two grandsons, Jay Haviser of
St. Maarten, Netherlands Antilles, and
Mike Haviser of Bartow; two nephews,
Jack Booream of Babson Park and Dodsley
Schroter of Ponte Vedra; and a niece,
Betty Glasgow, also of Babson Park.
Memorial services for Mrs; Hass will
be held at a later date.
Arrangements: Whidden-McLean
Funeral Home, Bartow.
Condolences may be made to the
family at www.whiddencmcleanfuneral
home.com.


aunuay, ruoruary surn
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650 E. Main Street 306 East Broadway 7* *
Bartow, Florida 33830 Fort Meade, Florida 33841
863-533-8123 863-285-2333
Fax: 863-533-3010 Fax 863-285-6779
I.11ttiddeTIncleanimeralhome.cotnm itw.nicmleat.'iurallumie.ne6l


I When only the best will do.....


OBITUARIES


Dorothy G. Hendrix


Loyal Myra Olive Hass


Page 6A The Polk County Democrat


February 22, 2012






The Polk County Democrat Page 7A


CONVOY
CONSPIRACY


ROBERT P. SCHOCH JR.


Bartow man publishes fourth novel


Robert P. "Rob" Schoch, Jr., has
chosen for his fourth novel a subject
he knows well.
"Convoy Conspiracy" tells the
story of "the historic missions done
by combat airmen in Iraq during
Operation Iraqi Freedom II in 2004,"
the Bartow man said.
Schoch was the first airman to
receive the Bronze Star in Florida in
the 21st century for his participation
in gun truck missions during
Operation Iraqi Freedom II, he said.
Schoch has more than 21 years'
experience in law enforcement and
retired from the Air Force after 20
years of service. While in Iraq, he
was a fire team or squad leader


who led ground-oriented combat
missions and was responsible for
training airmen in combat tactics
and survival, according to the Author
House website.
Now a bailiff with the Polk County
Sheriff's Office, Robert currently
lives in Bartow with his wife and five
children.
He has an associate degree from
Columbia Evangelical Seminary, a
bachelor's degree from Luther Rice
University, and a master's degree
from Liberty University.
"Convoy Conspiracy" tells about
"the airmen who went into Iraq un-
trained under the control of the U.S.
Army for the first time since World


War II," Schoch related.
"However, they persevered and
overcame the many barriers they
were constantly faced with in a war-
ravaged country. Although these
airmen felt as if they were at times
abandoned by both branches of mili-
tary they were called to serve, they
pulled together and fought for each
other in hopes of returning home to
their country and loved ones."
Schoch's previous books are "One
of the Best," "The Last Prophet," and
"Bailiff."
They are available online at Barnes
& Noble, Books-A-Million, Amazon,
Amazon-Kindle, Nook, Author House
and Publish America.


No lane closures scheduled on Van Fleet this week


No lane closures are set up this
week for construction happening on
Van Fleet Drive, the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation reports.
Work on new travel and turn lanes,
as well as sidewalks, will take place
behind barrier walls set up along
northbound U.S. Highway 98 between
Van Fleet Drive and south of Manor
Drive, and along westbound State
Road 60 from the Walmart
entry road to U.S. 98.
With the Fort Fraser Trail entrance
on westbound S.R. 60 now closed,
access to the trail is being main-
tained through a nearby entrance off
Wilson Avenue.
Access to businesses in the con-
struction zone is being maintained
while the intersection improvement
project is under way.
This week activities continue on


the east side of U.S. 98 from Lyle
Parkway to Boy Scout Ranch Road to
widen U.S. 98.
Construction activities continue
on the west side of U.S. 98 from
Manor Drive to north of County
Road 540A and in the median area
from Manor Drive to Lyle Parkway.
There will be no impacts to traffic,
DOT reports.
Other construction activities
include work on the west side of
U.S. 98 between Manor Drive to Lyle
Parkway to prepare for the upcoming
road widening. These activities will
impact various driveway entrances,
but access will be maintained at all
times, DOT reports.
Weather permitting, these activities
are anticipated for about a month.
For more information on work on
U.S. 98 go to www.IdriveUS98.com.


Nichols finishes basic training


Army Pvt. Micah Nichols has
graduated from basic combat train-
ing at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla.
During the nine weeks of training,
the soldier studied the Army mission
and received instruction and train-
ing exercises in drill and ceremo-
nies, Army history, core values and
traditions, military courtesy, military


justice, physical fitness, first aid,
rifle marksmanship, weapons use,
map reading and land navigation,
foot marches, armed and unarmed
combat, and field maneuvers and
tactics.
Nichols is the son of Barbara
Nichols of Winter Haven, and grand-
son of Sandra Mosley of Bartow.


To Benefit Heartland Horses & Handicapped, Inc. -
March 1,2012 LQ';' .::
Sun 'n Lake Island View Restaurant *
Social Hour & Silent Auction at 6:00pm ~'
Live Entertainment by Quick Fire L . ,
Cash Bar &Dinner .... '
Live Auction $60 per person or $100 per couple
A proceeds raised go towards he operation costs
SHeartlcrd Horse & Haricapped, Inc.A free equine -
Wsded t ig program tr chiden andadlts with speci
needs. Thi usque program offers cof dence, slf esteem
rrmolty & increased abity to p acipants in Hardee,
kH tHighkands, Okeedobee and ok Counties


www.heartlandhorses.org
To purchase tickets, please
call 863-452-0006 or
863-441-2139


This week on U.S. Highway 17 the
contractor is removing and installing
guardrails and making signalization
improvements. Lane closures are


expected from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and
from 7 p.m.-6 a.m.
The anticipated project comple-
tion date is spring of 2012.


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Page 8A The Polk County Democrat February 22, 2012





SCHOOL LrT i1


Hall of Fame nomination


deadline is Friday


Polk County Public Schools Hall of
Fame is seeking nominations from the
community and people have until Fri-
day to give their choices.
Nominees should be individuals who
attended a Polk County public school
and made significant professional and
career contributions in the arts, busi-
ness, clergy, education, entertainment,
government, law, military, media, medi-
cine, science, sports or other fields.
The Hall of Fame was started in 1985
and has 99 members.
Last year's inductees were Lakeland
Mayor Gow Fields, U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan,
education official Ron Jeffries and law
enforcement crime scene expert Edgar
Pickett Jr.
The nomination deadline is Friday,
Feb. 24. New members inducted into
the Hall of Fame will be announced in
May.
Contact the Polk County Public
Schools Community Relations Depart-
ment at.(863) 534-0699 or visit www.
polk-fl.net under the "Announcements"
headline to learn how to nominate
someone.

Holland earns
honor roll Status
Maggie Holland of Bartow, a member
of the class of 2013 at Washington and
Lee University, has earned honor roll
status for the fall term.
Honor roll status at Washington and
Lee represents a term grade-average of
at least 3.75 on a 4.0 scale.

Misch named to Dean's List
Benjamin Allen Misch of Bartow was
named to the Dean's List for the fall
2011 semester at Washington University
in St. Louis.
Misch is a graduate of All Saints Acad-
emy in Winter Haven and is enrolled
in the university's College of Arts &
Sciences.
To qualify students must earn a
semester grade point average of 3.5
or above and be enrolled in at least 14
graded units.

Gifted summer program
scholarships available
The National Society for the Gifted and
Talented is offering a $10,000 in scholar-
ships for Bartow area students to apply


Our Schools
[[wiMfA iggit!


(hri1nne can be No. raaed ut
c(o'o~k, .'poIAcounrtydemoa i corm


towards selected summer programs.
Ten scholarships are being offered
by the NSGT Board of Trustees six at
$1,000 each, six at $500 each and four at
$250 and will be used by the deserv-
ing student to help pay tuition for gifted
summer program of their choice. The
deadline April 1.
Each year, the award is given to
outstanding students who demonstrate
excelled ability in their field of interest.
Students can download and complete
the scholarship application at www.
nsgt.org/scholarships.asp. A team of ed-
ucators in the field of gifted education
will review the applications and choose
the scholarship winners. Winners will
be notified on April 15.
The Summer Institute for the Gifted
a not-for-profit program of NSGT and
renowned gifted summer program, has
welcomed several recipients of the Board
of Trustees Scholarships in the past. The
NSGT scholarships have also afforded
students the opportunity to participate
in such programs as iDTech, the Cam-
bridge College Program, Duke TIP and
Northwestern CTD, among others.
Interested students, parents and edu-
cators can apply online at www.nsgt.
org/scholarships.asp. Contact NSGT at
(800) 572-6748 or at info@nsgt.org.

Polk spelling bee
finals are March 8
The public is invited to the Polk
County Spelling Bee Finals at 6 p.m.,
Thursday, March 8, in the Highlands
Middle School auditorium at 740 Lake
Miriam Drive in Lakeland. There is no
cost to attend.
Middle school students will compete
to become Polk County's spelling bee
champion. The top three students from
each middle school competed in a
regional spelling bee event in October,
and 35 students from 22 middle schools
have qualified for the finals.


FFA chapters have



week of activities


Polk County Public Schools FFA
students are preparing for this year's
National FFA Week that runs through
Feb. 25. More than 500,000 nationwide
members are participating in local,
state and national activities.
Bartow High School Farm Day was
Feb. 17 when Floral Avenue Elemen-
tary students went to eight different
agricultural stations where they made
butter and ice cream, planted flowers,
and a saw the rabbits.
After learning about animals and
plants, FFA members demonstrated
whip popping.
On Wednesday, Feb. 22, Frostproof
Middle-High School FFA members
host a teacher appreciation breakfast.
On Thursday, Feb. 23, Tenoroc High
will hold a school farm fair, and Lake
Wales will conduct the Greenhand
ceremony.
Several activities are scheduled
Friday, Feb. 24. George Jenkins High
has faculty appreciation breakfast,
Kathleen High has a school farm day,
Frostproof Middle-High has a Food
for America Program and the state
officer candidate workshop will be
held at the FFA Center. The KHS Farm
Day is open to pre-K students to learn
about the diversity of the agricultural


industry. KHS is expecting about 175
pre-schoolers to attend from 9 a.m. to
noon.
On Saturday, Feb. 25, Lake Gibson
Middle and High schools have a barbe-
cue and auction, and the Frostproof
FFA alumni will hold a barbecue din-
ner and auction. Fertilizer, rolls of hay,
gift certificates, farming equipment,
plants, and much more will be auc-
tioned. Barbecue meals will be served
from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. during a silent
auction. The live auction will start at
1:30 p.m.
The barbecue and auction are open
to the public and tickets for the pork
or chicken dinner with beans, slaw
and roll are $8 for adults and $4 for
children 10 years old and younger.
Also, Lake Gibson High School's FFA
Chapter has a peanut butter drive to
help VISTE through March 2. The FFA
is asking all the students and staff of
Lake Gibson High to bring in 12-16
ounce jars of unopened peanut butter
to help restock the VISTE pantry.
Polk County's National FFA Week
activities culminate Sunday, Feb. 26,
with the FL FFA Leadership Summit at
the FFA Center. For information call
(863) 534-0518 or email david.byrd@
polk-fl.net.


-. a -'1
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A- -_ ?







February 22, 2012 The Polk County Democrat Page 9A


POLICE BEAT


ARRESTS


The information is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records.
Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system.


Jan.30
Jody Murray, 42 possession of meth-
amphetamine, possession of paraphernalia
and contempt of court-violating a domestic
violence protection injunction.
Diana Tucker, 48,1285 N. Holland #52 -
possession of methamphetamine, possession
of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia.
Paul Thompkins, 29, 2116 E.F. Griffin Road
- possession of cocaine and possession of
paraphernalia.
Samuel Fabila, 31, 1510 E. Georgia Street
#313 driving with a suspended license.
David Allen, 27, 540 E. Lemon Street -
driving with a suspended license.

Jan. 31
Christopher Rivers, 19, 2313 Bowers
Road possession of marijuana and pos-
session of paraphernalia.
Octavio Baez, 33, 835 Forest Drive -
driving with a suspended license.

Feb. 1
James Powell, 39, 300 Lime Street


- driving with a suspended license,
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and possession of
paraphernalia.
Shandriah Davis, 30, 2448 Stow Place
- battery.
Christopher Green, 45, 2998 Stowe
Place, Apt. 6 battery.
Tommie McKenzie, 30, 1224 Hwy. 17
North battery on a person 65 years or
older.
Tiffany Hodges, 25, 4535 David Drive
- driving with a suspended license.
Jerrod Williams, 25, 950 N. Bee Avenue
- possession of marijuana.

Feb. 2
Marcus Enlow, 46, 1255 Gunn Ave. -
burglary and grand theft.
William Drasdo, 32, 1255 Gunn Ave.
- possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, possession of
marijuana, possession of paraphernalia
and violation of probation.
Bryan Carter, 29, 475 S. Ninth Avenue


- possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, possession of
paraphernalia and resisting arrest without
violence.
Gerald Johnson, 53, 1545 E. Hooker
Street trespassing.
Bobby Chin, 42, 823 Second Street -
driving with a suspended license.
Dontae Thompson, 20, 1295 N. Holland
Pkwy., #40 violation of probation.
Shaquille Rose, 16, 1430 N. Wilson Av-
enue, Apt. 112 second degree murder
with a firearm and firing a weapon in a
dwelling.
Quentin Smith, 26, 1185 Britts Lane -
aggravated assault, carrying a concealed
weapon and improper display of a firearm.
Susanna Johnson, 23, 4269 Bomber
Road possession of marijuana, posses-
sion of paraphernalia and maintaining a
vehicle for drugs.
Steven Jeffers, 27, 4269 Bomber Road
- possession of marijuana, possession of
paraphernalia and maintaining a vehicle
for drugs.


Feb. 3
Marty Pass, 46, 1225 S. Johnson Avenue
- violation of probation.
Feb. 6
Kenneth Jackson, 32, 1139 W. Ninth
Street failure to appear.
Feb. 7
Errol Miller, 42, 310 Sixth Avenue -
out-of-county warrant.
Charles Meeker, 22, 8507 Shreck Road
- driving under the influence.
Paul Williams, 41, 1095 Mizell Street -
trespassing and grand theft.
Larry Gilley, 38, 1250 Gordon Avenue
- trespassing and grand theft.
Vincente Fernandez, 31, 640 Crown
Avenue burglary, grand theft, resisting
arrest without violence and out-of-county
warrant.
Feb. 8
Dina Ramos-Hunt, 24, 4534 David Drive
- criminal mischief.
Michael Storm, 33, 260 W. Van Fleet


Drive #16 grand theft
David Boyette, 42, 665 S. Orange Street
- possession of a weapon by a convicted
felon, possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and possession of
paraphernalia.
Feb. 9
Carlos Prescott, 44, 3380 Gate Road
- resisting arrest without violence,
possession of marijuana, possession of
paraphernalia and violation of probation.
Dustin Horn, 24, 1455 E. Church Street
- driving with a suspended license.
Thavish Davis, 18, 890 S. Sixth Avenue
- robbery with a firearm and trespassing
on school property with a weapon.
Feb.10
Austin Williams, 18 possession of
marijuana and possession of paraphernalia.
David Contreras-Castanon, 28, 1060
Golfview Avenue Apt. 4 driving with a
suspended license.
Gerald Brown, 39, 1719 Laurel Street
- battery.


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--


The Polk County Democrat Page 9A


February 22, 2012


,' "







Page 1OA The Polk County Democrat February 22, 2012


Where have you gone,


Joe DiMaggio?


The sports news around the country
will soon start talking about baseball, more
than just what free agent signed with what
team and how many gazillion dollars that
player will be putting in the bank.
Many who have been in the region for
some time can remember the days when
Spring Training was kind of a big deal
around here. The Detroit Tigers stand as
the lone remaining Major League club to
use a Polk County training facility. Their off-
season signing of Prince Fielder is going to
generate a buzz for the next few weeks and
make tickets a little harder to get
Spring training in Florida actually began
in 1889 when the Phillies opened camp
in Jacksonville. It really took off when two
teams opened up in 1913, then two more
arrived the next year to start the Grapefruit
League. As quickly as it started, it stopped,
thanks to WorldWar I, but the teams came
back from that post-war period to re-start
what we know as the pre-season today.
For Polk County, the current trend of
teams going to Arizona has gutted spring
training. The funny thing about that is the
Detroit Tigers were actually the first team to
use Arizona as their spring home. I'm sure
the recent attraction to go to Arizona was
strong, but the renovation of Joker March-
ant Stadium and the loyalty of the Tiger
ownership had a hand in the fact that this
will be the 47th consecutive year for the
team to train in Lakeland.
In the '50s, '60s and years beyond, the
superstars were here, eating in our restau-
rants, watching movies in our theaters and
entertaining our residents and visitors. The
Reds left Plant City in adjacent Hillsbor-
ough County in 1997, leaving Plant City
with a big stadium to convert into a softball
mecca.
When the Kansas City Royals departed
the Circus World/Boardwalk and Baseball
property at U.S. 27 and Interstate 4 in 2003,
they headed to Arizona. The latest was
the Cleveland Indians who headed west a
few years back to leave the Winter Haven
complex without a spring tenant. The Tigers
stand alone.
Of course, it's still a short drive to see the
Braves or the Yankees, but it's clearly not like
it used to be. Fortunately for us, we have
strong collegiate, high school and youth
teams in the area that give us a connection.
The Bartow High School varsity boys'
team opened their season last week Their
Tuesday game put them on the short side
of a 3-2 contest with Lakeland Christian
before getting a 5-4 Thursday night Win.
Coach Robbie Harris' squad showed
a lot of grit in clawing back from a two-
run deficit and only gets better with each


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game played. Team members for this year
are Travis Brown, Stephen Cassick, Mat-
thew Covington, Timmy Delph, Rashon
Denegall, Matt Martin, David Miller, Gavin
Murphy, Jared Schley, Joey Starling, Daniel
Till, Chad Tomlinson, AndrewWhitaker,
Jimmie Whitfield, Caleb Williams and NJ.
Williamson.
The Bartow junior varsity squad is
coached by Kelvin Clark Team members
for this year include Tyler Branam, John
Calandros, Tony Gibson, Franklin Heman-
dez-Lopez, Ryan Hidle, Mason Jones, Aus-
tin Lee, Chase Matthews, Coy McLaughlin,
Brett Nettles, Michael Quinn, Nicholas
Weyrauth and Willard Wooten.
Many of the players listed on the junior
varsity roster were part of the "Honey Bad-
gers" squad from this past summer. This
Dixie Youth BaseballAll-Star team compet-
ed in the state tournament. For the young-
sters who want to follow in their footsteps,
the process is under way.
Dixie Youth Baseball opening ceremo-
nies will be held Friday, Feb. 24, at the Civic
Center fields.
The activity will kick off at 6 p.m. to be
followed by exhibition games. The regular
season starts the week of March 5. Teams
play in levels such as T-ball and machine
pitch, working up to full pitching and field-
ing as the ages levels progress.
This is a pivotal year for the Bartow Dixie
Youth Baseball program. Bartow will serve
as the host of two divisions for the annual
World Series. A website has been construct-
ed at www.2012dixieyouthworldseries.
com. The effort is in need of volunteers and
sponsors, so sign-ups and information are
available at the site. Organizers are hop-
ing to have all of the pieces in place well
in advance of the August event. Last year,
Wilson County, N.C., as hosts of the 2011
event, needed nearly 2,000 volunteers to
conduct their program. Bartow's successful
bid indicates a confidence in the group's
ability by the national board. The local
organizing committee is working tirelessly
to see that Bartow provides a top quality
experience for the competitors and visitors
from throughout the Southeast.


Michell Githens, Agent
595 West Main Street
Bartow, FL 33830
863-533-8119
michell.githens.p2sz@statefarm.com



statefarm.com
State Farm Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois


Sign up for soccer
The final sign-up for Bartow Soccer
Club's Spring League is Saturday. The 3
versus 3 season will start March 3 and
run through May 19 with two bye week-
ends due to school breaks. All games
are played on Saturday and there are


no practice days. Games are played on
smaller fields with no keepers.
The games will be played at Mary
Holland Park and Lake Wales Soccer
Park on a rotating basis. The 3-year-
olds will play at Bartow. Sign up runs
from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Information can be
found at www.bartowsoccerl.com.


III


Page 10A The Polk County Democrat


February 22, 2012











Bartow beats Bunnell; stands at 4-0


By DON STRATTON
CORRESPONDENT
Bartow High School's Lady Jackets
traveled to Auburndale on Monday,
Feb. 20, to make up the game that was
rained out the previous Friday and beat
them to improve to 4-0 on the season.
The first two innings were quiet for
both teams as Bartow had two hits and
Auburndale three. In the third inning
speedy Deean Davis reached on an
error then on the first pitch she stole
second. Danielle Yost then knocked her
in with a line drive to left..In the bottom
of the third Auburndale scored two runs
on three hits and an error giving them a
2-1 lead
That woke up the Bartow batters as
they plated three runs in the fourth as
Taylor Pittman started off the inning
with a walk.
Coach Glenn Rutenbar then inserted
Mackenzie Brown to run and she scored
on another hit by Yost. Wandy Darby
drove in Davis and Shelby Duncan
scored Darby, giving Bartow a 4-1 lead.
Bartow was quiet in the fifth but in
the sixth they scored two more as Darby
got things started with a hit, then Yost
was hit by a pitch.
Taylor Wagner drove in Darby then
Rachael Imig drove in Yost, giving
Bartow a 5-1 lead.
The sixth inning was exciting for both
teams as Bartow added three more


runs as Tonee Fabrizi, Davis and Yost
all scored. In the bottom of the seventh
Auburndale added two runs on a two-
run home run.
Getting two hits each for Bartow were
Darby, Yost, Wagner and Cheyenne
Blaha. Adding one hit each were Imig,
Fabrizi and Davis.
Winning pitcher was Imig as she
struck out four en route to a complete
game.
Bartow's JV suffered its first defeat as
the Bloodhounds beat them.
Bartow travels to Braden River-Bra-
denton on Tuesday, Feb. 21, and then
hosts Lake Wales on Friday, Feb. 24.
The Lady Jackets beat the Bunnell
Sumter Raiders 9-7 on Feb. 13 to win its
third straight game on the season.
In the first inning Danielle Yost was
hit by a pitch and Taylor Wagner scored
her on a field's choice as Yost made a
great slide into home. Two pitches later
Wagner scored on a passed ball, giving
the Jackets a 2-0 lead.
The Raiders came back in the bottom
of the first to score one. ,
Bartow had a big second inning as
Cheyenne Blaha lead off with a shot up
the middle. The next batter, Rachael
Imig, was hit by a pitch. Tonee Fab-
rizi reached on a fielder's choice but
knocked in Blaha. Yost then belted a
triple to score Imig.
Shelby Duncan hit a single to score


Malys, Eskdale win on Lake Toho


Yost, giving the Bugs a 6-1 lead. Bartow added an insurance run in
Lauren West struck out the next three the seventh as speedy Wandy Darby
batters. reached on a walk, stole second then
The Jackets failed to score in the third scored on Duncan's sacrifice fly.
but a pesky Raiders team plated two Bartow had seven hits and five batters
runs on three hits making the score 6-3. reached base, either on a base on balls
In the fourth the Lady Jackets scored or being hit by a pitch.
two more runs as Duncan and Wagner Yost and Duncan had two hits each
had back-to-back hits, giving them an and Taylor Wagner, Blaha and Taylor
8-3 lead. Pittman each had a hit.
Just as it looked like Bartow was tak- West and Imig combined for seven
ing complete control the Raiders woke strikeouts.
up their bats in the fourth with four Bartow travels to Auburndale on Fri-
runs on five hits, making the score 8-7. day to face a tough Bloodhound team.
Imig came in to relieve West in the The Bartow JV continued their domi-
fifth and stopped the Raiders in their nation of their opponents with a 14-0
tracks. run rule victory over the Raiders.


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at 2.55 Ibs. Cody Glowner and CJ Wright finished second with 5.6 Ibs., and Dustin Bozeman and
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I 71


The Polk County Democrat Page 11A


February 22, 2012







Page 12A The Polk County Democrat February 22, 2012


STUDENT
FROM PAGE 1A
he very quiet and shy," said Lori Jolliff,
the school's cheerleading coach for the
squad the mascot is part of. "We turn to
the Yellow Jacket and he leads the crowd.
He's been a tremendous support for the
cheerleading program."
And, you never know where to find
him. Sometimes he's in the stands getting
the little ones to cheer and sometimes
you can find him on the opposite side of
the field with the other team.
"He interacts with everyone," Jolliff
said. "He goes to the visitors' side and in-
teracts. You never know where he might
be."
That attitude has put him on video
on the Internet during a football game
against Lakeland.
"I started dancing with the Lakeland
band and someone videotaped it and it's
on PolkPrep.com," he said. "We lost real
bad, but I kept everyone's spirit up."
It's not always entirely friendly, he said.
"In the Winter Haven game they tried to
push me off the bleachers because I was
on their side."
But, he added, "Lake Wales was phe-
nomenal. Their fans were pretty nice to
me ... even the football players were nice."
He said he's grown to love being the
mascot. He's a regular at the many pa-
rades in Bartow and he's a regular when


;LEMING
FROM PAGE 1A
lawn Avenue about 1972.
She also recalled a story she was told
when Fleming went to pick her up at col-
lege in Miami to drive her home for the
summer.
"He said, 'I've got something to tell you
and your mother is pretty upset about this,'
"Lorraine, a Lake Wales resident, recalled.
"I had to arrest your brother."
One day when David was with his
friends in Bartow they found some heavy
equipment in a construction setting and
they climbed up into it They found the
keys in the ignition, so one of them started
it up and they drove it until it got stuck in
the sand. When they couldn't loosen it,
they all ran away, Lorraine said.
"The guy who owned the tractor calls
the cops and found it stuck," she said. "It
wasn't damaged or anything but that was
still vandalism."
She said her father felt like he had to do
the right thing and his son was arrested.
"I could only imagine what my father
was like when he found out."
Fleming, who moved to Frostproof in 2000
but spent the last few weeks in a nursing
home in Bartow, diedThursday, Feb. 16, at 91.
He was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire,
England on Dec. 1, 1920, and served in the
BritishArmy in Burma in the 14th Army.
He was later a bobby in the Manchester
police in the 1940s. The tall, strong pipe-
smoking man moved to Bartowin 1953 with
his wife and Lorraine, who was 5 years old.


cheerleaders visit the elementary schools
and he'll go anywhere he can. He wasn't
so sure at first he was going to take to it.
"I love it," he said. "I just go out there
and do it. When you put on that helmet
you feel like a new person."
Jolliff said it wasn't too hard to pick
Sanders as the mascot. People try out for
the part and he stood out.
S"Absolutely (he was the best to try out),"
Jolliff said. "He's one of those characters
who loves the mascot. First, the kids like
them. The little ones tend to cry, but he
gets to their level (to cheer them up)."
"I just tried out and she said I've got
the stuff," he recalled.
Being active in school as the mascot
and being the class president isn't all
Sanders does. He is a member of POPS,
which stands for Professional Opportuni-
ties Program for Students, and also works
part-time at State Farm as a customer
service representative. He also volun-
teers at the soup kitchen every Thursday
where he says he has a lot of fun feeding
the people and singing gospel songs to
those who come in.
"It's good to make people's day. It
makes my day," he said.
Sanders found out from Jolliff that
there is a chance he could get a college
scholarship as a mascot and that inter-
ested him. He plans to go to Bethune
Cookman when he finishes high school.
Jolliff said in order to.qualify for a
scholarship, those who try out have to
create a skit utilizing the mascot.

He joined the Bartow Police Department
and served as chief from 1979 until he
retired in 1986.
Milt Fowler worked for him from 1961-
1965 and recalled him as a great motiva-
tor and probably the best officer he ever
worked for.
S"No day was ever the same," Fowler re-
called. "Every day was a new thing. I always
did my best for him ... he was just a great
motivator."
Fowler also recalls Fleming's kindness
and his sense of humor, always being able
to take the lighter side of things.
One day the pair was chasing a suspect
through Bartow.
The suspect was a couple of blocks
ahead when Fowler said he saw him make
a right turn.
"I cut across the lot to try to cut him off
by the small cemetery. It was just trees and
brush then," he recalled. "I got about 100
yards out and the car sunk about three feet
into the mud."
They had to call a wrecker to rescue the
cruiser.
"Fowler, what do you think you're driv-
ing, a tank?" he recalled Fleming said to
him when they got stuck. He added the
humor also referred to when Fowler got the
car stuck in the mud a few weeks earlier.
Fowler also recalled his strength of char-
acter and how strong he was up to the end.
Two days before he died, Fowler and his
wife Mary went to see Fleming and Lor-
raine warned them he may not recognize
them. But he did.
"He mentioned our names and he called
me the stick in the mud," he recalled. "That
was the last time I saw him."


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PHOTO PROVIDED
The Keystrone Properties development between Van Fleet Drive and Baker Avenue was
presented to city commissioners Monday. Construction is scheduled to start in the summer.


KEYSTONE
FROM PAGE 1A

Bagwell said he will have an RFP in
45-60 days and hopefully start con-
struction by mid-summer.
Keystone bought the foreclosed
property on the one-acre site for
$420,000.
During the work session Monday,
Commissioner James E Clements
reminded commissioners and the
audience of the Listening Session the

"You'd never knew he was as old as
he was," Fowler said. "He moved like a
50-year-old."
Lorraine also recalled how active he was
until the last few weeks when she said he
faded quickly. He stayed active with his
fishing until the last few years of his life.
Fleming will be laid to rest at 10:30 a:m.
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the Silver Hill Cem-
etery in Frostproof.
He was preceded in death by his wife of
49 years, Ivy Murdoch Fleming, who died
in 1991, and his son, David John Fleming.


Polk Transit Authority is having at the
Bartow Civic Center Wednesday.
The session, one of many being
held in different cities in the county, is
meant to find out from residents what
public transportation is necessary in
their towns and around the county.
From that the authority wants to come
up with a plan to increase opportunities.
"I encourage all citizens who use
public transportation to make their
opinions known," Clements said.
The Listening Tour is scheduled to
start at 5:30 p.m. at the Bartow Civic
Center, 2250 S. Floral Ave.

His brothers Colin Fleming and David
Fleming and his sisters Patricia Needham
and Josie Williamson also preceded him in
death.
He is survived by his daughters, Lorraine
Johnson and husband Eugene of LakeWales
and Carol True and husband Charles of
Frostproof three grandchildren, Christopher
True of Maclenny, Fla., Candace True and
Charles E. True IV both of Frostproof; two
sisters, Elsie Tagg and Linda Glasscock, both
of England; and five great-grandchildren.


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JELL
I'~


Page 12A The Polk County Democrat


February 22, 2012






February 22 02TePl ont eortPg 3


RqH S __ Welcome to your community calendar
P' ,R N- P `k ?and If you would like to see your event listed on this page,
we can make it happen. Contact us at 863-533-4183.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR
GOVERNMENT

* Today
Community Redevelopment Agency,
8 a.m. Florida Department of Citrus, 605 E. Main St.,
Bartow, 863-534-0121.

*EVENTS

* Today
Finding Joy and Purpose, 10 a.m.-noon, $5
donation. 151 Second St., SW, Winter Haven, 863-293-9414.
Miss Melissa tells stories for 3-5 year
olds, 10-10:45 a.m., Bartow Library, 2150 S Broadway


Ave.863-534-0131.

* Thursday
Book Babies,18 months-2, 10-10:30 a.m.,
Bartow Public Library, 2150 S Broadway Ave., Bartow,
863-534-0131.

* Friday
Greek Festival, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-
6 p.m. Sunday. $2.1030 Bradbury Road, Winter Haven.

* Saturday
Cow Camp, Cow Camp. 8:30 a.m. Closing of 150th
anniversary. Circle B Bar Reserve, 4399 Winter Lake Road.
Lakeland. 800-828-7655.


* Sunday
Gourmet Gents, More than 50 male chefs offer
tasty food samples; music, entertainment prizes. $35 adult,
$1512 and under.

* Monday
Tiger Bay, Tiger Bay, 11:30 a.m., $15-$25, Water,


Present and Future, Country Club, 150 Idlewood Ave..
863-604-6164.

* Tuesday, Feb. 28
Miss Melissa, Miss Melissa tells stories for
6-8 year olds. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Bartow Library, 2150 S
Broadway Ave. 863-534-0131.


NOTICE TO CALENDAR EVENT SUBMITTERS
We revised the calendar events we publish in the paper and display online. All events must be entered by
the person submitting them through our website. It's easy. Go to www.polkcountydemocrat.com and click on
the "Community Calendar" link on the left. Click "Submit Event'" and fill out the appropriate information. The
"Print edition text" area of the form is for information intended for the print edition of the paper. Information
outside of the"Print edition text"area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the"Event Title,"as that will
be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included in
the"Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep) at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number must be
included in these 120 characters. This change will give our readers a broader range of community events.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10 per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid events will run in the location designated for the event type. If you
do not have the ability to enter your events via our website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of $5 per
event, per community edition; but this fee does not guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please call
(863) 533-4183 Monday through Friday from 9-5 p.m. to make a payment or to have us.enter your event for you.
We reserve the right to exclude any submitted event that does not meet our specifications or that requires
excessive editing. There is no expressed or implied guarantee that any free event will be included in any event
calendar or run in any specific location. This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to review the"Guide-
lines" link on the Submission page to help ensure you get the most information in without exceeding the line
limit. Remember to save the confirmation email you receive after submitting each event. If you made an error
or the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw submission" noted at the bottom of that email, follow
the provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


PHOTO PROVIDED
A gospel concert coming Saturday, Feb. 25, features Crimson Flow, pictured here, Shekinah Knights
and Amanda Masse. The show starts at 6 p.m. at It's All About Jesus Church, 4219 Bomber Road,
Bartow, under a big tent. It's a free show. For information, call 863-837-8086 or 863-258-3685.
A-



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The Polk County Democrat Page 13A


February 22, 2012


0]


2687439






Page 14A The Polk County Democrat February 22, 2012


COMMUNITY


Scoot on down to Barn Boogie


Organizers are promising a
Southern-style, honky-tonk, boot
scootin' celebration at the annual Barn
Boogie Dinner and Barn Dance on
Thursday, March 1, sponsored by the
Chamber of Commerce Leadership
Bartow program.
Ace Jackson and the Jump Kings will
perform at the event at Leland Young's
Barn in Alturas. The group combines
more than 100 years of performing to


their playlist of positive, danceable
music.
The event runs from 5:30-9:30 p.m. A
steak dinner from Texas Cattle Com-
pany will be served at 6:30 p.m. The
$40 per person ticket price includes
complimentary beer and wine.
Tickets must be purchased prior to
the event. For information and tickets
call Liftda Holcomb at the Chamber,
(863) 533-3793.


An intense story from WW II


James W. MacMeekin, III, author of
"Richard O'Kane and the Sinking of the
Forty-Nine," presented an intense true
story and exciting piece of history at the
monthly meeting of the Lakeland chap-
ter of the Sons of American Revolution.
Richard O'Kane graduated from the
United States Naval Academy in 1933
and is remembered as the greatest
submariner of World War II, the speaker
said. He destroyed 49 enemy vessels as
commander of the USS Tang and attack
officer of the USS Wahoo.
Sinking enemy ships was the objec-
tive and the United States Navy had a
procedure manual to accomplish this.
The established use of a submarine
was that of a stealth underwater attack
boat of opportunity; however, O'Kane
created his own methods, procedures
and opportunities. He did not lie in wait
for ships he actively hunted them. He
used his boat as a surface vessel, taking
advantage of its surface speed and fired
torpedoes whether his boat was moving
forward, backward or at a standstill.
O'Kane did what it took to achieve
his objective; he outsmarted, outma-
neuvered and confused his enemy and
was victorious in every engagement,
MacMeekin said.
Ironically, the very last torpedo on
his last patrol before heading to his
home base was defective. The defec-
tive torpedo shot from the USS Tang
made a U-turn and struck the Tang. The
massive explosion catapulted O'Kane
into the sea. A Japanese destroyer found
O'Kane and the other survivors. He and
the other eight survivors spent the rest
of the war in Japanese war camps.
O'Kane retired in 1957 as a rear admi-
ral. Among his many battle awards and
service awards are the Congressional
Medal of Honor, the Navy Cross with
two gold stars, the Silver Star Medal
with two gold stars, the Purple Heart


a,


PHOTO PROVIDED
James W. MacMeekin III (right) receives a
certificate of appreciation from William Thorn-
hill, president of hte Lakeland chapter of the
Sons of the American Revolution.
and the Prisoner or War Medal.
The guided missile destroyer USS
O'Kane (DDG 77), commissioned
Oct. 23, 1999, was named in his honor.
Author MacMeekin was a staff ser-
geant in the United States Air Force and
is a Korean War veteran. He earned his
B.A. and M.A. at Michigan State Uni-
versity and taught basic business and
finance in their doctoral program.
He retired from Wall Street as chair-
man and CEO of his own venture capi-
tal firm. He taught high school math
and English after his retirement from
Wall Street and has since become an au-
thor and 19th/20th century historian.
Other books MacMeekin wrote in-
clude: "Lincoln Laughing," the humor-
ous side of Abraham Lincoln (a silver
star book award winner); "Destination
Germany," WWII combat missions of
Lt. Col Felts flying a B24 over Germany;
"The Politically Incorrect Notebook";
and "2010 and Beyond." The latter two
books deal with the economic and
financial condition of America today.
For information or to become a mem-
ber of the SAR contact William Thorn-
hill at (863) 294-5730 or Joe Hill, P.O.
Box 367, San Antonio, FL 33576.


I-


Mt. Gilboa celebrates


119th anniversary


Sister Vivian Young said.
Sunday's events are Sunday
School at 9 a.m., morning worship
at 10:45, with a sermon by Pastor
Derrien A. Bonney, senior pastor,
followed by a fellowship luncheon.
After lunch, the afternoon service
will feature a sermon by Rev. Robert
D. Austin, pastor of First Baptist
Hilltop M.B. Church of Frostproof.
Mount Gilboa is at 1205 Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Bartow.
Phone is (863) 537-6390.
For more information, contact the
Youngs at 863-533-1207.


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Feb. 25, with the Gospel Jubilee at
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The event features gospel groups
from around Polk County, from
the traditional to the contempo-
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Page 14A The Polk County Democrat


February 22, 2012






February 22, 2012 The Polk CountyDemocrat Page iSA


Fun, learning at


Highways to Tomorrow


PHOTOS BY
VANSHERRI
BRADLEY
Kids at
Highways to
Tomorrow
celebrated
Valentine's
Day with a
Sweethearts
Dance that
was a big hit.
Parents and
teachers got
down and
boogied with
the children
and also had
a blast.


Dog obedience classes with temper-
ament and socialization training are
being offered by the Humane Society
of Polk County.
Classes will begin at 9 a.m. on Satur-
day, March 3, and run for eight weeks.
Cost is $50 per dog if pre-registered
and pre-paid at the shelter before the
day of the class, or $60 the day of the
class.
Training equipment (leashes, col-
lars, chew bones, etc.) will be available
though the instructor, Bob Sokoloskis,
at discount prices.
Sokoloskis has been the training
director at the Humane Society of


Polk County since 1983. He also held
classes for the Humane Society of
Highlands County for seven years,
and has additionally taught classes
at South Florida Community College
in dog obedience, temperament, and
socialization training. Sokoloskis has
been professionally training dogs for
more than 36 years.
To get to the shelter turn north off
Dundee Road (State Road 542) onto
Sage Road (across from Carl Floyd
Road).
For more information, contact the
Shelter at (863) 324-5227 or the in-
structor at 676-2798.


Young scientists
at Highways
to Tomorrow
invited their
parents to watch
their skills in
making butter.
The kids also
showed off how
to determine
what will sink
and what will
float.


Li


* Day Service and Respite Available
* Restaurant Style Dining Experience
* Personalized Service Plans
* Housekeeping & Laundry Services
* Excellent Apartment Choices .
* Scheduled Transportation
* 24-HourWell-Trained, boringg Associates -


Call us today, stop by for a visit,
join us for lunch, or all of the above!
You are always welcome!


VANNAH URT
ASSISTED LIVING RESIDENCE


is*I1an e
Llavanah courts icnedfr 6 eidns n


290 Idlewood Avenue
Bartow, FL 33830
P (863) 519-3398.
www.savannahcourtbartow.com
Assisted Living Facility License No. 9888


Bartow Women's

Golf Association
Winners week of Feb. 14
Back Nine /2 handicap:
First: Martha Post- 32 /2
Second: Mayme Clark 33 /2
Niners:
First: Ethel Smith- 37 1/22
Second: Louise Wilkie 44 1/2
Winners for week of Feb. 7:
Two penny putts
First: Pat Lowery, 31
Second: Juanita Nielsen, 34


Niners did not play -r' W W



., 'Sre

OPENI
L S11% T) Ofl t fomr^S^^Bqlibaw


'List 0 Ulm, 1110a I


la`e 3
@MB Fi *S B8


Teach a dog to sit

and more on March


~x "rs
-C~~ k~rI


Ashton


RV Comm. Benefit Assoc.


.. Benefit for
Area Elementary Schools
February 25, 2012 7 to 0OPM
Lake Ashton Clubhouse Ballroom

Great Pries Includes: 1 Free Drink (Beer, Wine or Soda)
Grea 1 Door Prize Ticket, 1 Raffle Ticket, $5,000
$25 Per Ticket in Gaming Money, Must Be 21 to Play


;For Information or Tickets Call t"

Bob Howardson 863-398-0824 or

Max Lupini 863-318-1942.



1 .L. ..
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.,, .. .


_ ___
_ _~__~


February 22, 2012


The -Polk County Democrat Page 15A


n- BL~



4







ULifiJUTr THE MADNESS/
SuAuomoIde Neiwork CONTINUES!-,
3 DAYS ONLY! FEBRUARY 23, 24 a 25
THURSDAY through SUNDAY 9AM 7PM RAIN OR SHINE!


CARS TRUCKS

SUVs and VANS from
OVER 14 MAKES TO CHOOSE FROM AT


SUN'N LAKE
GOLF CLUB


ONE LOCATION!


LINCOLN
QCj)p < -=-s r Receive TWO FREE rounds of golf at Sun 'N Lake Golf Club
with every test drive during the event (limit one per household)


REBATES AND DISCOUNTS UP TO
$10,000 ON SELECT VEHICLES IN STOCK!
Your trade HAS NEVER BEEN WORTH MORE than DURING THIS EVENT!I*
Just bring in your vehicle to the location listed below and pick out the new or certified pre-owned vehicle you want to buy or lease, (similar
arrangements will be made for lease customers). Bring your title, check book or payment book and be prepared to take immediate delivery!
NO MONEY GUARANTEED INTEREST RATES PAYMENTS
DOW N M NLOW LOW
N MAYNY N EW YOUR VEHICLE HAS --A
IE I BEEN WORTH MO.


BP GAS CARD ...
with your purchase of any new or used vehicle!


D DOUBLEY1IEl B '* ,
H~aIV iTR D $1,0001


CREDIT ASSISTANCE


AS LOW AS


FINANCING
AVAILABLE-


', -A .I ,, f -,., y '
Guaranteed
GOOD CREDIT
BAD CREDIT
NO CREDIT
BANKRUPTCY


L JOIN US FOR FREE LUNCH
THURS. SAT. 1 1AM-2PM
fee. 0% financing available for up to 72 months on select new vehicles in stock, subject to credit approval. All offers are separate
)roved credit $500 BP gas card promotion can not be combined with special pricing (employee pricing, price match guarantee,
at close of business. Prior sales are excluded. Photos are for illustration purposes only; some vehicles may be different in color.


- Automotive Network


YFORO INCOLN
CAI L83-8-62
mm,


L n m-uwru.
VEHICLESllI*
I PllssslZ ILP~'0100I


MORE THAN DURING
S THIS SALE!!! j


WITH RN PAYMENTS FOR
Q@ mm


*Prices include all factory rebates and incentives, assigned to dealer. Prices exclude tax, tag, title and $699 dealer f
and cannot be combined with any other offer or advertisement No payment for 90 days on select models with apl
etc.). Customer may choose additional discount in lieu of $500 BP gas card. All offers expire on last day of event
Dealer is-not responsible for typographical errors. We Buy Cars! All offers expire 2/25/12.


r


.000


Page 16A The Polk County Democrat


February 22, 2012


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