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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00695
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
Creation Date: November 9, 2011
Frequency: semiweekly[1946-<1992>]
weekly[ former <1936>-1946]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
System ID: UF00028292:00695
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Preceded by: Polk County record

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Wednesday I


M November 9,2011




Polk County Democrat


Bartow's Hometown Newspaper Since 1931


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'The Second Line'was first in line


High schoolers return to the top in New


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW@POLKCOUN-
TYDEMOCRAT.COM

There was
excellence on the
field,
Page 1B
Jon Eck-
man can re-
lax for now. And that is what he is do-
ing. After three months of keeping 170
high school students in the Marching
Band and his staff and him running
around Cen-
tral Florida
showing
their stuff,
they earned
the top
honors in
Marching
Band Festival
Saturday,
the swan
song per-
PHOTO BY JEFF ROSLOW formance of
the Marching
Juan Santos sings "When Band season.
the Saints Go Marching In" Top honors
during the 2011 Marching means the
Band Festival Saturday at band earned
Denison Stadium in Winter superiors
Haven. for General
for General


Orleans show


Drum Majors Matthew Nave (front) and Aaron Presnell lead the Bartow High School band onto the field Saturday in Winter Haven at the
2011 Marching Band Festival. Though BHS wasn't in competition with the 13 other Polk County High School bands present, it earned superior
ratings, the top rating, in all four categories rated. For more on the festival, see Page 1B.


Effect, Auxiliary Marching/Maneu-
vering and two for music for their
performance called "The Second
Line." Fourteen high school bands
performed for about 15 minutes each
and were judged in those four cat-
egories. Four other bands at Denison
Stadium in Winter Haven earned all
superiors. They were Auburndale,
George W. Jenkins, Lake Region and
Winter Haven.


This week the band has one final
performance of their New Orleans act
at halftime of Bartow's final football
gdme, Senior Night at Bartow Memo-
rial Stadium on Friday. But unlike
weeks past, there is no practice this
week.
"They know their stuff," Eckman
said.
While the band has practiced hard
and performed on many Saturdays in


competitions and festivals, Eckman
has been working on this since he
came up with the concept in April.
Since then, he and his staff have
researched through the Internet and
other areas to come up with dances,
selections and costumes.
The show, with a mix of Cajun,
jazz and African culture, opens with
SUPERIOR 110A


Ford dealer: Overpass Bartow to salute veterans Friday


a business threat


Hometown Heroes, event at Mosaic salute those who served


By DIANE NICHOLS
DNICHOLS @POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Slinging mud isn't his style; so Bob Ambrose, vice president
of Bartow Ford, decided to face the Polk County commission-
ers during Tuesday's meeting and state his concerns about
the Fort Fraser Trail overpass.
Despite other media quoting Commissioner Bob English as
saying that those at Bartow Ford will be getting 1,000 feet of
exposure on the new road and that "they should be paying us
instead of bellyaching," Ambrose told The Polk County Demo-
crat that English is out of line as all he is doing is looking out
for the many employees who depend on the car dealership
for their livelihood.
"I've got 185 employees and their families looking to our
business for their means of support," said Ambrose. "It's been
a very, very, very tough economy. If anything happens to take
OVERPASS 13A


At the Hometown Heroes event
this year will be the empty table,
commemorating the veterans.


BY S.L. FRISBIE, IV
and JEFF ROSLOW
STAFF WRrIERS

One earned the Distinguished
Service Cross second only to the
Medal of Honor for heroism on a
battlefield in Korea.
One was a member of Merrill's
Marauders, an elite unit that oper-
ated hundreds of miles behind
enemy lines in World War II.
One was held prisoner of war,
liberated by American soldiers near
the end of World War II.
They are among nine veterans of
World War II and the Korean War
whose recollections were recorded
in a 33-minute video to be shown


on Friday at Bartow's Second
Hometown Heroes luncheon at
Peace River Country Club.
It is one of two Veterans Day
ceremonies to be held in Bartow
Friday. The other is the annual
event at Mosaic Park where the
cadets of Summerlin Academy and
the Bartow High School band will
salute veterans at 10 a.m.
The program will start with a re-
view of the cadets, the flight of the
flag of remembrance, a drill team
demonstration and a 21-gun salute
and medley by the band.
The free, public event is sched-
uled to last about an hour in order
for the event at the Peace River
SALUTE 10A


7 05252 00025 8


Editorial..........
Page 4A
Obituaries........
Page 6A
Calendar.........
Page 8A
School Life.......
Page IlA
Sports...........
Page 12A


Community.....
Page 13A
County Report
Page IB
Feeling Fit .......
Page 5B
Classifieds.......
Inside


Kenneth and Geneva
chance to celebrate
65th wedding
anniversary




Page13A


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RUN FOR HEALTH
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they're good
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Page5B


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Governors Board to vote on Poly split Wednesday


By LILLY ROCKWELL
FLORIDA NEWS SERVICE
It started with a letter.
Less than four months ago, a group of
community leaders from Polk County sent
a letter to the governing board for the State
University System imploring the group to
consider creating a 12th state university.
Naturally, the 12th university would come
from their own backyard the University of
South Florida Polytechnic in Lakeland, which
is in the process of building a new campus
and promises an emphasis on science and
technology.
The letter came a few weeks after State
University System Chancellor Frank Brogan
told the News Service of Florida the system
wanted to eventually add another univer-
sity to its 11-school roster, noting the rise in
demand for bachelor's degrees.
But few expected that USF Polytechnic
would so quickly wage a full-scale campaign
to convince the Board of Governors to ap-
prove the plan less than four months after
the detailed proposal emerged. The Board of
Governors is poised to discuss and vote on
whether to allow USF Polytechnic to become
an independent university on Wednesday.
The proposal to split USF Polytechnic
from its mother ship the main University of
South Florida campus in Tampa has proved


divisive, splitting faculty, the community, and
legislators, who will play a role in approving
the 12th university.
Supporting the USF Polytechnic split are a
number of prominent Polk County officials,
from the mayors ofWinter Haven and Lake
Wales, to Publix Board of DirectorsVice
Chairman Barney Barnett.
But perhaps the most influential USF
Polytechnic cheerleader is Sen. J.D. Alexan-
der, R-Lake Wales, who has been a long-
time advocate for USF Polytechnic, was key
to securing funding for a new campus, and
oversees the Senate's budget committee.
That gives him considerable control over
funding for universities in the next legisla-
tive session, and could play a role in the
Board of Governors' decision.
Alexander told the Board of Governors at
its September meeting that USF Polytechnic's
ties to the much larger Tampa main campus
are holding the university back. For instance,
Alexander said, a request to approve 15 new
degrees for the Polytechnic campus was
rejected and only three were approved.
"It goes on and on," Alexander said. "The
mass of USF is focused around programs.
This new alternative approach is just funda-
mentally at odds with USE"
Alexander said it made sense to focus on a
polytechnic school that emphasizes science
and technology and can better link students


with the type of jobs that are in demand in
the private sector.
"To me, this is a fairly small step," Alex-
ander told the board, and one in which the
"costs will be very minimal."
Those opposed to the split cite a number
of reasons, from questioning the finan-
cial viability of adding another university
during a time when existing universities
are struggling from deep budget cuts, to
opposing the political meddling that has
pushed what should be a methodical ex-
amination into a lightning-quick decision.
In an undated letter sent to the State
University System Board of Governors,
Preston Mercer, a biotechnology professor
at USF Polytechnic who used to head up
the university when it was called USF-
Lakeland, sharply criticized the plan to
make Polytechnic its own independent
university.
"I can say unequivocally that the idea of an
independent campus caught the commu-
nity by surprise," Mercer wrote in the letter,
adding that speculation focused on whether
the push to go independent was "politically"
driven.
Mercer said the process is too rushed, and
urged the board to consider slowing the pace.
But Alexander, who is approaching his last
year as a senator, is pushing for the decision
to happen this year. He has made the rounds


in his district selling community leaders on
the idea.
But not all lawmakers are sold on the
idea. Though the Board of Governors must
approve the decision, lawmakers and the
governor must also be on board to approve
statutory and budget changes.
Some lawmakers have asked for an audit
of USF Polytechnic's finances after a letter by
students at the school questioned spending
at the university, and have cast doubt the
state can afford a 12th university.
For instance, money would be needed to
build out the campus, and the funding for
new classroom construction has dried up
in recent years, leaving most universities
with only enough money to pay for basic
maintenance.
The last time a new university was added
to the system was New College in 2001,
which also used to be tied to USE Before
that, the system added Florida Gulf Coast
University in 1997.
USF-Lakeland was started in 1988. It
shares a campus with Polk State College,
though plans are under way to build a sepa-
rate campus for USF Polytechnic.
Three years ago, lawmakers approved a
plan to re-brand USF-Lakeland into USF
Polytechnic, with a promised emphasis on
science, technology, engineering and math
(STEM) degrees.


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Page 2A The Polk County Democrat


November 9, 2011








November 9, 2011 The Pollc County Democrat Page 3A


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November 9, 2011


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VIEWPOINT



Funding courts only way to ensure justice


Florida's court system is facing a pair of threats -
lack of funding and politicization that could affect
how it performs its core mission, according to Scott
Hawkins, president of the Florida Bar Association.
The two are linked in our mind, but space constraints
dictate we address the former today and the latter
tomorrow.
Hawkins, who is in the midst of a statewide educa-
tion tour aimed at bringing attention to the issues,
is calling for funding the courts through the state's
general fund, not with filing fees. Other solutions
proposed have included allocating 100 percent of the
cost of running the court system before skimming off
filing fees for other government purposes or a combi-
nation of both sources to ensure stable funding.
"We do not have adequate funding for the court,"
Hawkins said, adding that the shortfall is already
affecting the appointment of new judges and staff
needed to process cases. In addition to the bar as-
sociation, the Florida Chamber of Commerce and As-
sociated Industries of Florida have supported higher
court funding, citing the cost of judicial delays on
member businesses.


Our Viewpoint

We agree the court system is underfunded and that
using filing fees as the primary source of revenue for
court operations guarantees unwanted fluctuations
in funding, but the real issue isn't the source, but
the amount. After all, the bulk of state's tax revenues
are generated by a 6-percent sales tax, which itself
is prone to peaks and troughs, as we have recently
experienced. A statement issued this week by the
advocacy group Friends of Florida Courts said a sharp
reduction in foreclosure filings by banks will further
erode court funding from $432 million to $272.9
million unless more money is allocated from other
sources, as Gov. Rick Scott has done twice already in
2011.
In a recent op-ed column, Florida Supreme Court
Chief Justice Charles Canady noted that a third of the
$1 billion generated annually by fines, fees and other
court costs goes into the general fund. He cited a re-
port released in October by the Revenue Stabilization


Joint Workgroup that recommended "funding for the
'Core Court System' be stabilized by giving it enough
of the money it generates to support its budgets, be-
fore any distributions are made to other government
programs and services."
But even if this Legislature were to agree to another
round of court funding reform nothing would prevent
future legislatures from changing the arrangement.
Multiple "trust funds" including the State Courts
Revenue Trust Fund it created in 2009 in response
to the same concerns being expressed today have
been raided by the Legislature over the past decade to
cover budget shortfalls or pay for tax cuts.
What has to change is not necessarily the funding
formula or source, but a culture that undervalues the
role the courts play in Florida. That culture is a direct
result of the ruling party's antigovernment mantra
that passes for political philosophy but fails as a
governing policy. The Legislature must fully fund our
courts to ensure the rule of law is enforced for every
Floridian.
Falling short of that is falling short of serving the
people of Florida.


Time to occupy Guava Street


Fellow peasants, arise. It is time to occupy
Guava Street!
Why Guava Street? Well, there are several
reasons.
(1) There actually is a Guava Street in
Bartow.
(2) Few people know where it is, so
perhaps it is time for Guava Street to obtain
the national recognition which it otherwise
would never get (and in all likelihood does
not want).
(3) It is small enough (only a couple of
blocks long) that just two or three of us who
have nothing better to do could establish a
significant presence.
(4) It is within sight of homes of a promi-
nent journalist, a distinguished jurist, and a
retired law enforcement officer. It is actually
a right prestigious venue, given that most
people don't know where it is.
(5) It is also within sight of an elementary
school crossing guard post, so the expense of
law enforcement to keep our protest under
surveillance would be quite modest.
(6) Perhaps most important, it's sort of a
cool sounding name. Guava Street. In Florida,
it is not uncommon to find an Orange
Avenue, a Lime Street, a Tangerine Court,
perhaps even a Grapefruit Boulevard. But
how many cities can boast a Guava Street?

Why should the inoffensive guava (okay, it
smells and tastes pretty strong when served
fresh, but it makes a wonderful jelly or jam,
and guava paste is to die for) be the target of
our protest?
Why ... it's obvious, isn't it?
One percent of Americans control 99 per-
cent of the guava production.
Actually, I don't know if there's a word of
truth in that assertion, but I figure that gives
us Guavonian protesters as much credibility
as the Wall Street Occupiers and their imita-
tors around the globe.

So, you realize that our cause is just; in-
deed, it borders on a moral imperative.


S.L. Frisbie





S.. Frisbie can be contacted at
FPCSLFIV@aol.com


In keeping with the laid back atmosphere
of this community, not to mention of the self-
appointed leader of this incipient movement,
we don't expect, or even want, to accomplish
anything.
Like our Occupier brethren, we have no
idea what we want. But unlike them, we have
no wish to inconvenience other people while
we try to figure it out.
We shall pitch no tents; for one thing,
Guava Street isn't wide enough to pitch a tent
in. We shall occupy from the comfort of our
folding canvas lawn chairs, preferably with
one beverage holder in each arm rest.
We shall occupy during daylight hours
only, because anybody foolish enough to be
out after dark in Central Florida will be physi-
cally lifted by a squadron of mosquitoes and
unceremoniously dropped into the nearest
phosphate pit.
And unlike the better known Occupiers
around the globe, we shall willingly obey the
orders of any police officer who has so little
to, do that he or she actually gives us an order.
I would expect an admonition like: "Be sure
to recycle that beer can, okay?" would cover
it.
That's about it, except for a mission.
How about "Everything for Everybody"?
Or "A guava in every pot; two guavas in
every garage."


(S. L. Frisbie is retired. This column makes
it sound like maybe he doesn't have enough
things to occupy his time. Let alone his mind.)


Letters to the editor

Grateful for treatment of veterans


As a volunteer, I had the honor of
accompanying the veterans from the
James A. Haley Veterans Hospital to Fort
Meade recently to view the Vietnam
Traveling Memorial Wall.
From the moment we picked up the
motorcycle escort until we left that eve-
ning, it was truly an extraordinary day
and I had to write to express my thanks
to all involved.
I understand a year of planning by all
the groups involved went into making
the day happen.
The welcome for each veteran as they
exited the bus, the individual escorts,
the wonderful lunch, making sure each
veteran who wished to go to the wall


had the time and space to do so, and
the inspiring program combined to
make it a perfect and meaningful day
for all the veterans.
For me, it was seeing how all of you
treated the veterans with such kindness,
anticipating their needs and giving
them the recognition and honor they so
deserve. I know it was a day they won't
soon forget, nor will I.
Fort Meade is indeed the quintessen-
tial American town, and I am so grateful
to all of you.
I hope you will convey my heartfelt
thanks.
Midge Glazer
Tampa


The Polk County Democrat
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
SAileen Hood General Manager leff Roslow Editori Peggy Kehoe Minaging Editor


Published every Wednesday and Saturday at
190 South Florida, Avenue
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Lakeland, Florida 33805
and additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 533-4183 *Fax (863) 533-0402
Postmaster: Send address changes to
190 South Florida Avenue
Bartow, FL 33830


HOM I DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
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We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Bartow area
can send letters and column submissions to eneis,:T'pi,:4icoun
tydemocrat.com or mail them to 190 South Florida Avenue,
Bartow, FL 33830


f~a-,1



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--


November 9, 2011


e gaP 4A The Polk Coun t


I












November 9, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 5A


Music for Many Occasions


Laurel Smith plays the drums at the opening show for the
Bartow Adult Concert Band Sunday at the Bartow Civic Center.
There were about 800 people at the monthly free show. The
next show is scheduled Sunday, Dec. 4.


Michael Hardy plays the bassoon Sunday during
the Bartow Adult Concert Band's opening show Sion Bearrentine plays the French horn Sunday
for the year. The free show is monthly at the at the 2011 opening show for the Bartow Adult
Bartow Civic Center. More than 800 people Concert Band. The 59-member band plays
showed up for the first show of the year. monthly at the Bartow Civic Center.


John DeYoung leads the Bartow Adult Concert Band Sunday at the Bartow Civic Center during the
band's opening show for the year.


November 9, 2011


The Polk County Democrat Page 5A












L Qe6A Tew ol Cuny.emcrtovmbr ,-01


Dave Thornton, center, the general manager of Kelly Buick GMC, gave a check worth $500
to the Bartow Youth Football League last week. The car dealership raises money for BYF
and this is the second year it was able to donate $500 to the league. Accepting the check
for BYF is Robert Armstrong (left) and league president Willie Myrick Jr. BYF has the Turkey
Bowl coming up on Nov. 23-26. The festival will include kids games and a football tourna-
ment at the 555 Sports Complex on State Road 555. Entry fee for a team to participate is
$100. For information, go to www.bartowyouthfootball.com/home.php



Bartow booming Saturday
There will be some action in down- Main Street Bartow sponsors the
town Bartow Saturday as the 20th event. For information about it, call
annual downtown Bartow Craft Fair (863) 519-0508.
takes place but there's more going Other things happening downtown
on than that. Saturday include an antique car show
One of the highlights of the day is where prizes will be awarded for the
the Bike and Hike So Kids Can Read top three cars and honorable men-
event sponsored by the Bartow Rotary tions as well.
Clubs. The third annual event takes The Polk County Treasures Antique
place from 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and in- Appraisal Fair runs from 10 a.m.-
cludes a children's bike rodeo, games 3 p.m. at the Polk County Historical
and events, an arts and crafts show, Museum. It will have two professional
raffles, a club challenge, food, rides antiques appraisers. It'll cost $5 per
and fun and a one- to 12-mile family person; $8 per couple. A $5 appraisal
ride. Four tours are offered for more fee per item will also be charged. The
advanced bikers and a family can money raised in this auction will
walk for a $30 registration fee. benefit the museum.
The event is to help the Rotary Also, just as it happens on every
Clubs raise enough money to get second Saturday, the Antique Fair
dictionaries for third, fourth and fifth takes place from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
graders in the area. The goal is to But if you don't want to spend the
raise $2,000 and they're within about day downtown, the Bartow Public
$250 of that before this final effort Library has some things going on, too.
gets under way. From 1:20-2:30 p.m. Smiles Un-
Registration starts at 6:30 a.m. leashed Therapy Dogs will visit for
Saturday. For information about the children to read to at the monthly
event, call (863) 533-8119. Paws to Read. And, after that the kids
The Craft Fair runs from 9 a.m.- (and adults if they want to) can see a
5 p.m. and tables will line Main Street. free movie upstairs. The movie starts
There will be children's games, pony at 2:30 p.m. and is scheduled to be
rides, a petting zoo and train rides, "Cars II."
and, of course, there will be food to The library is at 2150 S. Broadway.
buy downtown. For information, call (863) 534-0131.


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Li


Amos Thomas 'Tommy' Young


Donation to youth football


lEf IUPTlI R
BET SIER EVER.


fishing in Englewood.
He was preceded in death by his
parents; his brothers, Charles Young, Jr.,
and Jack Young; and his sisters, Edna
Rhymes and Louise Helms.
He is survived by his loving wife of 65
years, Lorraine Cliett Young of Fort Meade;
daughters, KathyYoung and Jamie Har-
rell and husband Scott, all of Fort Meade;
grandchildren, Elijah Harrell and Owen
Harrell; and several nieces and nephews.
Visitation: Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 10-
11 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8, at First United
Methodist Church, 135 E. Broadway,
Fort Meade. Funeral: Tuesday at 11 a.m.
at the church. Interment will follow in
Bowling Green Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, those wishing may
make contributions to the Methodist
Children's Home or the First United
Methodist Church of Fort Meade "Fel-
lowship Hall Building Fund."
Condolences may be sent to the fam-
ily at www.hancockfh.com. Arrange-
ments: Hancock Funeral Home, Fort
Meade.


HEA,** ** ** * ** ** ** ** ** *-* ~* ** FI*R.1


HEALTH FAIRi


I... l.u .rK.' & It0PA Yo


a^C rip ^ T. i Wl I ^ J


* Experience the Medispec
E3000 Lithotripter
* Learn about the
Incisionless Remedy
for Heartburn
* Talk to Primary Care
Physicians and Specialists
* Breast Cancer
Awareness
* Importance of
Handwashing
* Signs of Stroke Education
* Learn about Living Wills
* Fitness Screening


OW I 0


BARTOW REGIONAL
ME I CAL CENTER


Amos Thomas
"Tommy" Young, 92,
of Fort Meade, passed
away Friday, Nov. 4,
2011, of heart failure,
at the Rohr Home in
Bartow.
Mr. Young was born
to Charles J. and Roxie
Tye Young on April 23,
1919, in Bartow, and
moved to Fort Meade
from Bartow in 1948. Tommy Young
He worked for IMC
Phosphate for 30 years as a warehouse
supervisor. He was a member of First
United Methodist Church, Fort Meade,
and a U.S. Army Air Corps veteran.
He graduated from Summerlin
Institute in Bartow in 1939, attended
Columbia Military Academy and also
attended Vanderbilt University where
he played football under Bear Bryant.
Mr. Young also played semi-pro base-
ball in the Grapefruit League and he
loved spending much of his spare time


s)w 3^awul. (^yf.a t

650 E. Main Street 306 East Broadway
Bartow, Florida 33830 Fort Meade, Florida 33841
863-533-8123 863-285-2333
Fax: 863-533-3010 Fax:863-285-6779
7 ,wwwhiddenmcleanfiuneraiome.comn www.mcleanfimeralhome.net


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OBITUARIES











November 9, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 7A


Bartow residents to


see higher water bills


By DIANE NICHOLS
DNICHOLS@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
It was a matter of good news versus
bad news for utility rates at the Bartow
City Commission meeting on Monday.
While sewer rates will remain the same,
the amount on residents' water bills
will increase by 10 percent beginning in
December.
"To meet the coverage requirements
of the city, it is necessary to increase
water rates," said Harold Bridges of
Jones Edmunds & Associates, a con-


sultant hired to gather data on current
usage and projected rates through the
fiscal year 2016. "Still, out of 15 commu-
nities in the county, even with the new
rates, Bartow's water and sewer bills
rank as the fourth lowest out of those
15."
City commissioners unanimously
voted approval of the rate hike after
reviewing a study of the water and
sewer funds dating back to 2004. Charts
showed a steep drop in water usage by
both homes and businesses since 2005
where consumption plunged from ap-


proximately 1.2 billion gallons to a 876
million gallons. The study attributed
this drop to the crash in the housing
market, the state of the economy and
the effort by many to conserve water by
not using more than they have to.
The increase in next month's water
bill will amount to about $1.80 for the
average consumer who uses 5,000 gal-
lons per month. The 10 percent rate
hike will provide revenue for future
maintenance and inspections on the
city's water distribution system. The
cost to run the system has increased


partly due to the annual payment for
the $21 million bond issue pertaining to
the new water plant and sewer up-
grades completed nearly 10 years ago.
"We have dropped personnel and
done all we could, but the increased
costs are out of the city's control,"
said Bridges. "Even though the sewer
systems show a positive revenue, it just
isn't enough to make up for the defi-
ciency in the water system."
Rates will be on the rise 4.12 percent
annually through 2016 according to the
city's plan.


Lane closures expected this week


Construction activities this week
continue on the south side of Van
Fleet Drive from Broadway Avenue
to Wilson Drive but no lane closures
are necessary for this work, however
various driveways may be impacted
with access remaining open at all
times, the Florida Department of
Transportation reports.
Between 9:30 p.m. and 5:30 a.m.
activities along the outside lanes
and in the median on U.S. 98 from
Manor Drive to S.R. 60 and on S.R.
60 from U.S. 98 to Wilson Drive will
require intermittent lane closures
that may reduce traffic to one lane
in each direction on both 60 and 98.
This should continue for the next
three weeks.
The work here is to widen and
convert the S.R. 60 and U.S. 98 in-
tersection from asphalt to concrete
and provide additional travel lanes.


This week the work at U.S. 98
south of Manor Drive to north of
County Road 540A, will be done at
the intersections of 98 and Smith
Lane and 98 and 540A. There will be
intermittent, temporary northbound
and southbound lane closures on
U.S. 98 at these intersections.
Also this week, during the day,
activities continue on the east side
of U.S. 98 from Lyle Parkway to Boy
Scout Road to widen U.S. 98. Ac-
tivities also continue on the west
side of U.S. 98 from Manor Drive to
north of CR 540A. Work will be done
from C.R. 540A south to Smith Lane
and there should be no impact to
traffic.
In the construction work on U.S.
17 south of Homeland, motorists
can expect daytime lane'closures
from 9 am to 4 pm and nighttime
lane closures from 7 pm to 6 am.


for reading the
Polk County Democrat



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. a-


The Polk County Democrat Page 7A


November 9, 2011










e gaP 8A The Polk Coun t


CALENDAR]

an


BUSINESS
Saturday, Nov. 12-Sunday, Nov. 13
Polk County Builders Association Parade of Homes,
11 a.m.-6 p.m. To see schedule call (863) 559-3781. For
information go to www.pcba.com/Events/250/

CLUBS
Thursday, Nov. 10
Chamber of Commerce Fun Thursday, 5:15-7 p.m. Bartow
Regional Medical Center, 2200 Osprey Blvd.
Friday, Nov. 11
Third annual Boots and Pearls dinner auction, 6 p.m., $35
per person or $60 a couple. To purchase tickets or for more
information go to the website, auction.jslbartow.com or
email auction@jslbartow.com. Leland Young's Barn, Alturas.
Tuesday, Nov. 15
Bartow Golden Age Club, noon. In lieu of a covered dish
or desserts the meal will be $3.50. Wayne Lewis musical
group with Brady Draper, David Burton and John Kesler.
Donations for Church Service Center. Bartow Civic Center
auditorium, 2250 S. Floral Ave., (863) 533-1091.

COMMUNITY
Thursday, Nov. 10
Concert in the Park, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Fort Blount
Park at the corner of Broadway and Main Street. (863)
519-0508.
Friday, Nov. 11
Summerlin High School Veterans Day Event, 10 a.m., free.
Salute to veterans, Bartow High School band to play. Mosaic
Park, 2250 S. Floral Ave.
Friday, Nov. 11
Hometown Heroes to honor veterans of all military
conflicts with special acknowledgements of World War II
and Korean War veterans, noon, limited to 250 people, $25


per person. Peace River Country Club, 150 S. Idlewood Ave.,
Bartow. (863) 534-3585, (813) 500-6925 or (863) 533-7125.
Saturday, Nov. 12
20th annual Downtown Bartow Craft Fair, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Main Street in Bartow. (863) 519-0508.
Saturday, Nov. 12
Bike and Hike So Kids Can Read, 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Third
annual event by Rotary Club same time as Craft Fair. $30
registration fee. Registration, check-in at 6:30 a.m. (863)
533-8119.
Saturday, Nov. 12
Downtown Bartow car show, Features prizes for second
and third place and will name 20 honorable mentions. (863)
534-0121 to register.
Saturday, Nov. 12
Polk County Treasures Antique Appraisal Fair 10 a.m.-
3 p.m., and will feature two professional antiques appraisers.
Cost to enter museum is $5 per person; $8 per couple. A $5
appraisal fee per item will also be charged. Money to benefit
museum. Polk County Historical Museum, 100 E. Main St.,
Bartow. (863) 534-4386
Saturday, Nov. 12
Antique Fair, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Main Street. Booth spaces are


$15.519-0508 to rent a booth.


Saturday, Nov. 12
Paws to Read. 1:20-2:30 p.m., Bartow Public Library,
2150 S. Broadway, (863) 534-0131.
Saturday, Nov. 12
Movie"Cars I,"'2:30 p.m., free. Bartow Public Library,
2150 S. Broadway, (863) 534-0131.


EDUCATION
Thursday, Nov. 10
College Preparedness Workshop, 6:30-8 p.m. BHS
students can get information that influence college
admissions, how college entrance exams are scored,
SAT vs. ACT, strategies for improving test scores, and
more. Bartow High School auditorium, 1270 S. Broadway.


Flying high and keeping cool with...


c6ma 1. aw


Turn to the Experts'?


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m10II llilih~i' !\.7 '.wiinPIrk- IM59-i71 ag lhirilng 3 17:11 : ll ike Illneid 1.15-7771


Scouts
bowling for
fun
PHOTO BY
KATE HIMEL
Ninety-one Girl Scouts
from Bartow, Fort
Meade and Alturas
participated in an
afternoon of-bowling
fun on Saturday, Oct.
22, at Cypress Lanes
Family Fun Center,
Winter Haven. For
information on how to
join or volunteer with
local Girl Scout troops,
call (813) 325-1630.


I cxru Ull xl. --y- -------


November 9, 2011








The Polk County Democrat Page 9A


November 9 2011


NOW thru NOVEMBER 30'T


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gbap 1A Pk n m rN e r2


SALUTE: Hometown heroes event


FROM PAGE 1A
Country Club to get under way on time.
Cadets will be going there to help serve
lunch to the Hometown Heroes. That is
scheduled to start at 11:30 a.m.
The video, which is the highlight of
this year's Hometown Heroes celebra-
tion, recounts the experiences of Bartow
veteran William P. (Bill) McCraney, who
was awarded the Distinguished Service
Cross for leading his squad up Hill 329
near Seoul, Korea, against a much larger
force, digging in and defending with
Machine guns and hand grenades.
He destroyed a machine gun em-
placement, and minutes later, as the
first member of his squad to reach the
objective, single-handedly destroyed
a five-man enemy position. Though


wounded, he helped evacuate a wound-
ed comrade.
W.B. (Steve) Stevens was a member
of the legendary Merrill's Marauders,
which infiltrated hundreds of miles into
enemy territory, operating with mini-
mal restocking of food, ammunition,
and other supplies. He was awarded the
Silver Star for his heroism.
In the closing months of World War
II, Charles W. (Mac) McCall and his unit
were captured, and taken to a prisoner
of war camp in railroad cattle cars.
Seventy of his fellow soldiers died at the
camp before the prisoners were liber-
ated by a column of American Army
tanks that crashed through the gate of
the compound.
Others sharing their stories in the
video are Norval A. (Brownie) Brown,


Richard H. (Dick) Pipes, Carl Locke,
Bruce Tyndall, Dr. Paul E. Coury, and
Freddie (Mrs. O.H.) Wright.
The Veterans Day program will honor
veterans and their spouses, and veter-
ans will receive commemorative medals
struck for the occasion. The video most-
ly takes in those Bartow veterans who
served in World War II and Korea, but it
really is to commemorate all veterans.
"There are two from the Korean War
and others from World War II, but every
branch of the service is represented,"
said Freda Ridgway, who chaired the
committee for Hometown Heroes.
Everything is complimentary to vets
and one guest each; all others are $25
each. Reservations are required, and
seating is limited.
"We don't want to refuse anyone," she


said. "People on the committee will wait
until everything is over until we eat, no
one wants to take a seat reserved for
veterans."
Others taking part in the program are
Rear Admiral (Ret.) A.J. Jackson; Col.
(Ret.) S.L. Frisbie, IV; American Legion
Chaplain Garfield Sager; vocal soloists
Larry Madrid and Pam Renew; bugler
Dr. Richard Lake; and the Summerlin
Academy Color Guard.
Ridgwayhas hopes this event, which
is in its second year, will take off.
"Hopefully in the future this will
become more of a public event instead
of keeping it small," she said. "Maybe
we could have a parade, but right now
we're just taking baby steps."
For information call the Bartow
Chamber of Commerce, 533-7125.


SUPERIOR: Return to top
FROM PAGE 1A nothing to do with the players in the
band, only commenting, "You gotta do
"When the Saints Go Marching In," fea- Louis Armstrong." However, it wasn't
turning Juan Santos singing in a rowboat. hard for him to choose Michael Tedder
It continues with the band playing to play the accordion. Trained to play
"Iko, Iko," with Michael Tedder taking the piano, he said, Tedder has an excep-
to the rowboat to play the accordion, tional ear.
accompanied by Zach Edwards on the Some of this is similar to last year
alto sax. It concludes with Louis Arm- when the band did a bluegrass show
strong's "What a Wonderful World," that because there was one particular player
features a trumpet solo by Alex Gess- who played some great bluegrass, he
selman and dancer Taylor Rogers while said.
the band circles the field. The crowd enjoyed Bartow's perfor-
It was one of the more unusual acts mance Saturday night as evidenced by
in the show as many bands featured the fact they seemed to get the loudest
hit songs from artists of the 1960s, cheers. The reaction from the crowd
1970s and 1980s such as Billy Joel, The and the uniqueness of the show is
Beatles, Aerosmith, The Blues Brothers something that drives students, keeps
and even "Star Trek." them interested and makes them want
Earning superior ratings again was a to do it over and over again.
tough thing to do. Getting there is one "The concept is the key, and main-
thing, staying there may be tougher. training the development," he said. "The
Last year, Bartow's Marching Band (students) love the shows and they love
earned top honors but it received two the crowd's reactions."
excellent among its superior ratings. He said another plus to being unique
"They (the crowd) come to expect it," is that it keeps the kids interested dur-
he said, and Eckman feels the chal- ing the school day.
lenge and rises to it as he has every year But at the heart are the major ingre-
except last year since he took over the dients that will make the shows and
band program in 2003. band stand out.
John DeYoung, a former Bartow High "There's the music and show, how the
School band director who was fre- audience reacts and the daily experi-
quently at the top with his programs, ence give them something to be excited
said it shows, about when they come to class," he
"With a leader like Jon Eckman said. "Then there's the high musical
they've really got something," he said. standard they've got to stick to."
"He's very creative." The students, 120 of whom returned
Eckman said he came up with this from last year's band, were determined
New Orleans show based on the fact to get all superiors. "This group was re-
that the band is going to participate in ally determined to make that happen,"
a New Orleans parade in March. The he said.
Songs the staff picked sometimes relate With the thrill of earning that, and
to the players and sometimes they after singing "Iko, Iko" on the bus ride
don't. home, the students toilet papered Eck-
In using "When the Saints Go March- man's house in celebration.
ing In," he had Juan Santos in mind, By Monday, Eckman said, the toilet
calling him "our Satchmo," a nickname paper was all cleared from the house.
- for Louis Armstrong. However, the fact And now he can really relax.
that he picked an Armstrong song had





.1.
', .. '







6
Novemer I ccen... r


Fort Meade Animal Clinic
"' 711 E. Broadway, Fort Meade/ 285-8652 *'i


To celebrate the arrival of the Vietnam Traveling
Memorial Wall in our cty on October 27,
we are proud to offer all active
and retired military veterans 11
percent off their total bill from
Oct 27 through Veterans Day,
Nov. 11, Just a small way of
.o extending our sincerest thanks to
those who have so bravely
,y served our country.
:s lWe salute youl


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November 9, 2011


aP e 10A The Polk Coun t


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Extra










November 9, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 11A





SCHOOL
..pi~l


Bartow IB student is Sunshine State scholar


Dominic Chiampi, a
Bartow International Bac-
calaureate 11th grader,
was one of two Polk
County students to repre-
sent the school system at
the annual Sunshine State
Scholars program in Or-
lando. The other student CHIAMPI
was Aubrey Presnell of
George W. Jenkins Senior High.
Chiampi and Presnell were selected after
they scored the top two scores on math
and science examinations, which were
administered to 19 juniors from various
high schools and academies in the county.
Eight other large school districts in Florida
will send two student scholar representa-
tives to Orlando, and the remaining 58
counties will send just one student scholar.
The focus of the Sunshine State
Scholars program is to have each of the
state's 67 school districts identify their
top 11th grade students in the areas
of science, technology, engineering
and mathematics. These two students,
along with their parents and a teacher
who has been a significant influence on
them, will attend the statewide rec-
ognition and recruiting conference in
Orlando Feb. 16-17.
According to a Sunshine State Schol-
ars informational video, the program's
goal is to keep intellectual student
talent from leaving the state for post-


secondary education and professional
careers. The program has invited rep-
resentatives from Florida's colleges and
universities to meet with the students
in Orlando to discuss career and post
secondary opportunities available to
them in their home state.

Cadets to play next Friday
Summerlin Academy holds its second
Organizational Day where students will
play Jacketball, Rattlesnake Ball, BigBall
Volleyball, Sniper, Ultimate Frisbee, The
Gauntlet and Battalion vs. Battalion
Football.
It's happening on Friday, Nov. 18, at
the school.

BHS students
prepare for college
Bartow High School students can get
a rundown of what could be ahead of
them on Thursday, Nov. 10, at the Col-
lege Preparedness Workshop.
Presented by Huntington Learning
Center, it runs from 6:30-8 p.m. in the
Bartow High School auditorium. IHun-
tington Learning Center staff is to give in-
formation regarding factors that influence
college admissions, how college entrance
exams are scored, SAT vs. ACT, strategies
for improving test scores, and more.
For information, call (863) 534-0194.


USF Polytechnic presents preview


Free book giveaway coming
The Polk County Public Schools
textbook and library book free giveaway
is scheduled Nov. 10-11 at the Surplus
Textbook Warehouse, at 5900 Yates Road
in Lakeland. Public hours will be from
8 a.m.-4 p.m., both days.
The materials, which are outdated,
and surplus textbooks, will be free.
The outdated and surplus textbooks
are offered throughout the year to


Our Schools


c(hoi.tine''on bei nuntrlidm t o r
(hits finrepoll untydrno falcorm


parents who are homeschooling their
children, and to parents who are start-
ing to teach their children the first steps
in learning how to read.


Lake Wales Family YMCA
Youth lci, SSier^ Sjorptj

What Is Youth Super Sports?
* Youth Super Sports is a great learning experience for children ages
2-5. They will learn the basic fundamental skills and concepts of
| r & various sports in a safe and fun environment
2-5 Year Old Sports Clinics
November December
SBasketball Soccer
Classes Meet Every g
Monday @ 5:30pm l
Rates starting at $15
R: Sign up now

Y 1001 Burns Ave.
the Lake Wales
863-676-9441


People can learn everything they
need to know about enrolling as a
freshman or transferring to the Uni-
versity of South Florida Polytechnic
at Poly Preview 9 a.m.-noon Nov. 19
in the Lakeland Technology Building
at USF Poly.
Students, faculty and staff will
answer questions about student life,
undergraduate academic programs,
admission requirements and finan-


cial aid. Campus tours will be
available.
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Page 12A The Polk County Democrat November 9, 2011


A game

Most football coaches will tell you that
every game is important. The objective is
always the same you are to win, to beat
your opponent, and claim the victory that
is rightfully yours. For some of the Bartow :- 4
Yellow Jackets who suit up for the game N ,
at Bartow Memorial Stadium, this game
is one of the most important of their lives.
It will be the last time they wear the uni-
form and may be the last time they ever
put on pads.
. While it may sound kind of melodra- reality will hit;
matic, it's the harsh reality of sports. Few more high sch
can play a game they love forever. Some trade school, \
athletes get to retire on top. Some who being cast into
have been superstars at other levels fade the student bc
into oblivion, reaching beyond the point Graduation
where their talents can comfortably take wish to whisk
them. ries with a con
The Class of 2012 at Bartow High ahead. We just
School is fortunate that the schedule- what will be.
makers allowed them to take their bows For the Bart
in front of the home crowd. Auburndale, of these player
Fort Meade, Haines City, Ridge, Lake Re- field with fami
gion, Kathleen and Lakeland Christian are their youth foc
among those on the road for their final field as memb
games. Lake Gibson had its final home program. They
game on Oct. 21 and will finish with a touchdowns o
pair of away games. E. Walker field
With the pomp and circumstance that Youth Football
surrounds a senior night, there's going to will continue a
be a lot on the minds of the young play- ent that will go
ers (as well as the band and cheerlead- nies in years al
ers, but the cheerleaders will move on The seniors
to other sports as will some members of team, present
the band). The ceremonies cut into game viewpoint of \
preparation, but it's all designed to salute four times befi
these student-athletes. It's designed to tion. For the n
give them the kind of memories that high them until after
school can bring: they walk from
It's akin to graduation, the time when board telling tt


with special meaning


t ,lrr ,i nbe contacted at
', "",l ;', ,'; il)|H/ |I '


the reality that there is no
ool. From here, it's college or
work, military or family. It's
o a much bigger pond than
)dy.
comes much later. We don't
away the senior year memo-
istant reminder of what's
t need to give recognition to

ow Yellow Jackets, many
rs who will walk across the
ily and special people played
)tball games on that same
ers of the Bartow Unlimited
y may have scored their
r thrown their blocks at Tom
at 555 as part of the Bartow
I programs. These programs
is feeders, bringing the tal-
through the same ceremo-
head.
will be separated from their
ng them with a different
ihat they have experienced
ore (this season) at this loca-
lost part, it won't hit any of
er the game is over, when
n the field with the score-
he story. A win would be a


Jackets prepare for Lake Wales


happy ending, but an ending nonetheless.
It's time to remember the highlights of
their years in uniform. Some may have
played together for years, teammates who
may never line up together again. They
suffered through the defeats together and
celebrated the wins. They rejoiced in the
individual achievement that moved a
team. They learned and they belonged and
that's big.
Football is more than Xs and Os on a
chalkboard. It's more than a coach trying
to drill a player into a series of actions
and reactions to push a pigskin across
an expanse. It's more than winning and
losing. It has an impact on who or what
you become.
The Bartow players who look across the


sidelines will see the lucky ones. Win or
lose, Lake Wales will play another day. Win
or lose, Bartow will not. For the seniors,
this is the last game.
They have made the contributions in
practice and game situations and they
write that final chapter Friday night. Some
names will be more recognizable than oth-
ers, but they have one thing in common.
They dressed for battle in the same place
with the same colors and the same goal.
The Class of 2012 members are Erin
Armstrong, Diante Baker, Jacob Bird, Mon-
tel Collins, William Cooper, Caleb Dean,
Zaragoza Dominguez, Quitten Lawrence,
Jeremy Manning, Chris West and Danny
Williams.
Congratulations to one and all.


By LARRY JEWETT
CORRESPONDENT

The 2011 football season for Bartow
High School will come to an end after
this Friday's game. Just like last year, the
curtain will close with the Lake Wales
Highlanders as the opponent.
This time, the game will be played at
Bartow's home field and it will be Senior
SNight, honoring the football players,
cheerleaders and band members who are
part of the class of 2012.
After opening with a pre-season tie
at Kathleen, the Highlanders reeled off
seven wins in a row. Three in that stretch
came against opponents common to the
Yellow Jackets. Lake Wales beat George W.
SJenkins, Mulberry and Lake Gibson while
Bartow was 1-2 against those teams.
The last two games for Lake Wales have
been exciting for the wrong reasons if you
are a fan of the Highlanders. Last week,
the team squared off at Auburndale in
C their last district game. The starting quar-
terback was ill, a starting wideout missed


the bus for travel and the kicker was hurt
during the game. The Bloodhounds led
most of the way, but a frantic comeback
gave Lake Wales a win. Their season
would have been perfect to this point had
they not run into unbeaten Winter Haven
the week before that. Those two district
champions-to-be were without a blem-
ish on their record and they showed why,
playing to a 0-0 regulation tie. Winter
Haven won the game 13-10 in double-
overtime.
For Bartow, the injury bug bit hard at
last week's 31-7 loss to Winter Haven.
Linebacker Gabriel Al-Shaer suffered a
shoulder injury. Late in the game, two-
way player Freddie Stevenson went out
with an ankle injury. The Jackets also lost
the services of Jermaine Lanier for the
balance of last week's game.
Last year, Bartow could only muster
seven points, those coming after Lake
Wales had rolled to a 37-0 lead. Turnovers
have been a steady storyline throughout
the season as well as the penalty situa-
tion.
Kickoff for the game is 7 p.m.


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November 12, 2011


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November 9, 2011


Page 12A The Polk County Democrat


...-%I--
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COMMUNITY gr


Chances celebrate 65th anniversary


Kenneth and Geneva Chance, 2011


OVERPASS: Business

FROM PAGE 1A
away from our business, it's not that
I'm bellyaching. I'm a person that cares
about my employees and the people
of this county. It's an injustice what
they're doing and I had to come here
today to say that."
The topic of building an overpass on
the Fort Fraser Trail has been heating
up lately after being rejected two years
ago. The trail would be built over the
Bartow Northern Connector with a
price tag of $1.4 million.
English has been the most outspoken
commissioner on the subject, stating
his concerns are that if there is no over-
pass for walkers and bikers built across
the six-lane toll road, fewer people will
use the trail. Three design prospects are
currently in the works with one having
a direct impact on Bartow Ford, located
at 2800 U.S. 98 N. The dealership has
served more than 175,000 customers
over the last 63 years, Ambrose said.
"The plan they have for the overpass
shows the ramps going halfway down
our property line," said Ambrose. "It
obstructs the view of the sign and it's
bad for business. While 1 don't want to
deny people their right to recreation,
how many people are really going to
use that trail during the week? I only
saw two bike riders coming in from
Highland City to work this morning.
It's an awful lot of money for just a few
people who are likely to use it."


Maybe it was a "chance" meeting, but
surely it was meant to be as that intro-
duction at a Tennessee church led to
the 65-year marriage that Kenneth and
Geneva Chance will celebrate on Satur-
day, Nov. 12, at First Baptist Church of
Wahneta.
He was 19 and she was "sweet 16,"
Kenneth Chance said. They were mar-
ried Nov. 17, 1946, and lived in Law-
renceburg, Tenn.
When they retired in 1992, Mr.
Chance was a mail carrier in Leoma,
Tenn., and Mrs. Chance was a postal


threat
Bartow resident Trish Pfeiffer, who is
active in cycling events, said at the Bar-
tow City Commission meeting Monday
the Family Fun Ride biking event this
year is at Fort Fraser Trail and it needs
a sheriff's escort to help bike riders
across Wilson Avenue. With small chil-
dren using the trail as well as families,
Pfeiffer said she is all for a pedestrian
overpass and plans to get more in-
volved as the project moves forward.
Ambrose sees solutions other than
putting an overpass in a place that
obstructs business to Bartow Ford.
With the bicycle path going south of
State Road 60, Ambrose would like to
see county commissioners consider
putting a new stop light there where
people can push a button to safely
cross. The at-grade location with the
stop light would cost an estimated
$66,000 as compared to the $1.4 million
the county would spend on the pro-
posed overpass, he said.
"I'm always hearing in the news that
there isn't enough money in the budget
for teachers, firemen and policemen,"
said Ambrose. "To spend over a million
dollars on this overpass would be an
injustice to the people of this county.
That is money that doesn't have to be
spent."
The project will formally come before
the commission at their Nov. 22 meet-
ing where a decision will be reached
about hiring a consultant to design the
overpass.


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clerk in Lauretta. They moved to Eagle
Lake in 1998. She does alterations,
while her husband enjoys "sleeping and
eating," she laughed. le also takes care
of a five-acre grove and their yard.
Their son Ray and wife Machelle,
and grandchildren Kenzi and Justin are
hosting the 65th wedding anniversary
party from 2-4 p.m. at First Baptist
Church of Wahneta, 609 S. Rifle Range
Rd., Winter Haven. Friends and family
are invited to attend.

Stogie For A Bogey
Friday, Nov. 11, is the deadline to enter


the "Stogie For A Bogey" golf scramble
set for Nov. 18 at the Bartow Golf Course.
Golfers are preparing to have fun, win
prizes and help save one of Bartow's
historical treasures, the Thompson Cigar
Factory.
Tee time for the four-person scramble
is 1 p.m. on Nov. 18. Individual entry fee
is $75 for cart, greens fees and dinner.
Proceeds will help fund preservation of
Bartow's Thompson Cigar Factory. Call
(863) 640--1024 for information.

Thanks for reading the
Polk County Democrat


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JOE G. TEDDER, CFC
-- TAX COLLECTORfor IMPERIAL POLK COUNTY STATE OF FLORIDA
MAIN BRANCH OFFICE
P.O. Box 1189 0 430 E. Main Street Bartow, Florida 33831-1189
WEB ADDRESS: www.PolkTaxes.com


THE FOLLOWING DISCOUNTS ARE ALLOWED BY LAW:
4% if paid by November 30, 2011 2% if paid by January 31, 2012
3% if paid by December 31, 2011 1% if paid by February 29, 2012
DELINQUENT APRIL 1, 2012
SECTION 197.122, FLORIDA STATUTES, provides: "All owners of property shall be held to know that taxes are due and
payable annually and are charged with the duty of ascertaining the amount of current and delinquent taxes and paying
them before April 1 of the year following the year in which taxes are'assessed." You are hereby notified that the Tax Rolls
have been received by the Tax Collector from the Property Appraiser. The Tax Collector's Office collects ad valorem
taxes and non-ad valorem assessments for the following taxing authorities:


POLK COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
General Revenue Fund
Environmental Land Acquisition Fund
Land Management Trust Fund
Polk County Fire Services
Polk County Garbage And Landfill
Polk County Lighting District
Roadway Improvement Assessment (MSBU)
Library (MSTU)
Parks (MSTU)
POLK COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
General Fund
Local Capital Improvement
MUNICIPALITIES
City of Auburndale/City Commission
City of Bartow/ City Commission
City of Davenport/City Commission
City of Eagle Lake/City Commission
City of Fort Meade/City Commission
City of Frostptoot/City Commission
City of Haines City/City Commission
City of Lake Alfred/City Commission
City of Lake Wales/City Commission
City of Lakeland/City Commission
City of Mulberry/City Commission
City of Winter Haven/City Commission
Town of Dundee/Town Council
Town of Hillcrest Heights/Town Council
Town of Lake Hamilton/Town Council
Town of Polk City/Town Council
Village of Highland Park/Board of Commissioners


OTHER AD VALOREM LEVYING AUTHORITIES
Lakeland Downtown Development Authority
Lakeland Area Mass Transit District (Citrus Connection)
South Florida Water Management District
Okeechobee Basin
Everglades Construction
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Lake Region Water Management Distnct
OTHER NON-AD VALOREM LEVYING AUTHORITIES
Bartow Storm Water Utility Tax District
Brahma Road (MSBU)
Bridgewater Community Development District
Dundee Storm Water Utility
Florida Development Roadway Improvement (MSBU)
Flonda Government Utility Authority (Poinciana-Solivita)
Fort Meade Lot Demolition
Golden Lakes Community Development District
Haines City Drainage District
Haines City Lot Demolition
Highland Meadows Community Development District
Lake Ashton Community Development District
Lakeland Lot Demolition
Lazy S (MSBU)
Lori Lane (MSBU)
Orangewood Subdivision
Poinciana Utility System District
Poinciana West Community Development District
Polk City (Water and Sewer Availability Charge)
Polk County Code Enforcement Lien
South Shore Oaks (MSBU)
West Lakeland Water Control District


Tax notices are being mailed to the addresses appearing on the 2011 Tax Rolls, or to the escrow agent requesting the
taxes. Failure to receive a tax notice will not exempt property owner from paying taxes and/or assessments or delinquent
costs. If a tax notice is not received by Monday, November 14. 2011, please request a duplicate, furnishing the legal
description c, each property. For the convenience of our customers, payments may be made as follows:
BY MAIL: PLI ASE SLI SL l I 1 TUNRN [ NVE LOPL- PROVII ) ANID lE- SURE 10 MAII. 1 HI LOWlER PART OF YOUR NO ICE
I OHM(S) 10 IiS 0 fCI: I-OI VAT IDAl1NG WIl N PAYING 1 AXI S
ON-LINE: GO r0 www.PolkTaxes.com AND I 01 1 OW Illi ON I INI PAYMI Ni I'ill:CIIONS
IN-PERSON: PAYMINISAl1. ACCI PIH1 A I l IAX COT 1i ICORIS AIilOW MAIN BRANCH OIiICAI, 1AKF LAND BRANCHi
O I ICI I AKI WA IS H,[RANCH 01 I ICL, ANII HAINI S CII' iHiANCH 01 I ('L
NOt IF- PAYIN' IN1 IRHOtN, I1HING1 i0lHl t'AIl"!y 1 O tl lAX NO1 I S
NOTICE: This office has no authority over assessed valuations or millage rates. Our authority is limited to tax collections.
nil rAX COtLI CIOlR'SMAIN OrFli CI IS Ol N AM ILINTl 5i O 0 P A M MONDAIIY I I HiII A'i 1 lI PROP1 i I AX IIVlON Of
I H lAXG[COL IO'S OnFICiE MAY IT CONT mACT1 1 BY PIONL AS IOi 1 OWS


Local Calling Area
(863) 534-4700


Outside (863) Calling Area
(855) 765-5829


, Web Address: www.PolkTaxes.com E-mail Address: taxes(@polktaxes.com


The Polk County Democrat Page 13A


November 9, 2011


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Merchant participating starts
with a 2 columns x 3"ad in
your community newspaper's
g Giveaway feature page.
CONTEST RULES and PROCEDURES
1. Customers will fill out entrant form and place in box.
2. Customers may enter contest each time they enter store.
3. Each store will have one winner.
4. The store owner/manager will pull one lucky winner with your
advertising sales rep.
5. Salesperson from newspaper will have the store owner
sign for Publix Gift certificate (this verifies for our records
that certificate was delivered).
6. Store owner/manager will contact winner to come back to
the store to pickup their Publix Free Turkey Gift Certificate.
7. The Salesperson will keep a list of all participating merchants
and winners to be published in a newspaper story.
8. After the contest the Salesperson will pickup entrant box.
9. Winners will be announced in the newspaper on
Wednesday, November 23rd.

Coordinated by




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November 9, 2011


Page 14A The Polk County Democrat









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Merchant participating starts
with a 2 columns x 3" ad in
your community newspaper's
Turkey Giveaway feature page.
CONTEST RULES and PROCEDURES
1. Customers will fill out entrant form and place in box.
2. Customers may enter contest each time they enter store.
3. Each store will have one winner
4. The store owner/manager will pull one lucky winner with your
advertising sales rep.
5. Salesperson from newspaper will have the store owner
sign for Publix Gift certificate (this verifies for our records
that certificate was delivered).
6. Store owner/manager will contact winner to come back to
the store to pickup their Publix Free Turkey Gift Certificate.
7. The Salesperson will keep a list of all participating merchants
and winners to be published in a newspaper story.
8. After the contest the Salesperson will pickup entrant box.
9. Winners will be announced in the newspaper on
Wednesday, November 23rd.


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The Polk County Democrat Page 15A


1


November 9 2011


i













Page iGA The Polk County Democrat November 9, 2011


Putnam: Giant snail'


By BECKY BOWERS
ST. PETERSBURG TIMES
Florida is now home to a slime-oozing
plant-chowing snail the size of a teacup chi-
huahua, and Adam Putnam wants to make
sure that's temporary.
The giant African land snail can grow up
to 8 inches, live nearly a decade, devour
indiscriminately, lay 500 eggs at a time and
snack on stucco for the calcium to build its
shiny brown shell striped with cream.
It's a backyard horror and an agricultural
nightmare.
Putnam, the state's agriculture commis-
sioner, says it also carries disease.
The 1,000-snail invasion of a South
Florida neighborhood became news in
mid September. It's the biggest outbreak
reported since the 1960s, when the state
spent $1 million over the course of a decade
battling three smuggled-in snails of a Miami
boy that became 18,000.
Last weekend, CBS News Sunday Morning
featured the snails along with other invasive
species, from Illinois' Asian carp (fish) to
Georgia's kudzu (plant). Southwest Miami
homeowners described the "disgusting,"
"slithery," "juicy" pests. Putnam explained
the public threat.
"It carries human meningitis, so people
are concerned," Putnam said. "It eats 500
different plants, so agriculture's concerned.
And it eats houses, so homeowners are very
concerned."
Leaf- and stucco-chomping? Check. Just
ask the snails' Miami neighbors. But disease-
carrying? PolitiFact Florida decided to check
it out.
About that disease: Your brain and spinal
column are protected by membranes called
meninges.When they get inflamed, that's
meningitis. Often there's a bacterium or
virus that causes the swelling, but you might
also hit your head, get cancer or take certain
- drugs and end up with the illness. Or get a
fungus. Or a parasite.
Around the world, giant African land snails
are known for carrying a parasite, one that
spends part of its life in rats, that can cause
a rare form of meningitis. (Most people fully
recover without treatment.) It's known as the
rat lungworm, or Angiostrongylus canto-
nensis. Snails and prawns and crabs and
frogs pick up baby rat lungworms from rat
droppings. Other animals who chow down











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carries hul


on tasty raw crab or frog legs or snail guts
pick up the larvae and can end up with the
brain infection. Animals can also get it from
eating unwashed snail-slimed greens, or
from rubbing snail mucus into their eyes or
noses or mouths.
That group includes humans.
Who eats giant snails? Plenty of folks, if not
so many in the United States. Just consider
escargot, the tasty French preparation of
smaller, corn-fed snails doused in butter,
garlic and herbs. Their meatier big brothers
are an important protein source in coastal
Nigeria. You can order them in a New York
restaurant for $10. But it's not cooked snails
that are the problem for the same reason
most folks don't eat raw shrimp or raw meat
in general, for that matter. You heat them
first, to kill uninvited disease-causing guests.
It's the undercooked or raw ones that can be
a problem. And also other exposure to slime.
'ake two cases of meningitis in Louisiana:
In one, an 11-year-old boy had eaten a small
raw snail on a dare. In another, a 22-year-old
had eaten two raw legs from a green tree frog
- also on a dare.
(Note to America's youth: Don't do dares.)
Then there is Florida's infamous case of
giant snail slime exposure last year, where
an African holy man poured the stuff into
mouths of followers hoping for healing.
Instead, they got violently ill though not of
meningitis.
In England, giant African land snails are
novelty pets that live in terrariuns and
sometimes crawl on their owners.
Where's the meningitis worry?
Snails that don't have a chance to pick up
baby rat lungworms can't give them to you.
Pet snails that haven't lived in the wild don't
carry the parasite, which requires rats to
complete its life cycle. No parasite-incubat-
ing rats, no rat lungwonms. No snail-caused
meningitis.
The parasite is found in snails in the South
Pacific, Asia, Australia and the Caribbean. It
shows up in Hawaii and Puerto Rico, with
sightings in Louisiana and Mississippi.
Florida had its rat lungworm scare in 2003,
when a gibbon at Miami Metrozoo suddenly
fell ill. It could have been a sign the rat lung-
worm had made it into the state's rats, snails,
frogs and shrimp. Or it could have simply
been infected monkey food from overseas.
The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services dispatched a biologist,


man meningitis'
John Teem, to test snails around the zoo, said
spokesman Sterling Ivey. He never found rat
lungworm.
He has tested some of the state's apple
snails an invasive species and hasn't
found rat lungworm.
This year, when the southwest Miami
neighbors started to notice their garden
snails seemed larger and more prolific than
normal, Teem tested those, too. Even in the
giant African land snails, he didn't find rat
lungworm.
A week ago, TV-watchers saw Putnam
warn them on national television about the
snail's triple threat: house-eating, plant-
devouring and disease-carrying.
He didn't mention the disease hasn't
been found in the state and where it has
been found in America, it's exceedingly rare.
"We've got the trifecta," and said the snail
"carries human meningitis."


PHOTO PROVIDED


Giant African land snails are shown to the
media as the Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services announces it has posi-
tively identified a population of the invasive
species in Miami-Dade county on Sept. 15.
The Giant African land snail is one of the most
damaging snails in the world because they
consume at least 500 different types of plants.


I 260 West Van Fleet Drive, Bartow, FL 33830


HIRED


Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to Individuals with
disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone may be reached by persons using TTYWTTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service
Sat 711. Disponible en Espanol.


6*34
2654 i J


I IA R KEsaTaaP


November 9, 2011


Page 16A The Polk County Democrat















COUNTY REPORT


There was excellence on the field


Area marching bands strut their stuff in Marching Band Festival


By JEFF ROSLOW
JROSLOW @POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Fourteen bands took center stage for about 15
minutes each Saturday and many walked away with
superior or excellent status in the 2011 Marching
Band Festival in Winter Haven.
Bartow High School was one of four high schools in
the county to earn superior ratings in all four catego-
ries, the other schools being Auburndale, George W.
Jenkins and Winter Haven high schools. The catego-
ries were General Effect, Music, Auxiliary, and March-
ing/Maneuvering. The four superiors last year put the
Bartow Marching Band back in a category it missed
last year when it earned two excellent and two supe-
riors. The excitement from their finish was evident as
the celebration started in the parking lot at Denison
Middle School in Winter Haven and continued after
they got home and toilet papered Director Jon Eck-
man's house.
"This group was really determined to make (getting
all superiors) happen," Eckman said.
With 170 members in the band, the sight and sound
of New Orleans music drew loud cheers from the
crowd, but it wasn't the size of the band that had the
full house of fans cheering. Frostproof's band, with
36 people on the field dressed appropriately, played A
Blues Brother Review with an act that entertained the
crowd. Selections such as "I Can't Turn You Loose,"
"Soul Man" "Flip, Flop and Fly" and "Rawhide" had
the fans' feet stomping.
"I almost put chicken wire in front of the tent,"
Director David Blackmon said, referring to the movie.
"But we just had to do 'Rawhide.' "
With all excellent ratings, Blackmon, in his first year,
showed pride in his students' work.
"You put pride and perseverance and with those
things you just can't go wrong," he said. "They think
like champions and as far as I'm concerned they are
champions."
The same feeling came from Lake Wales Band


Andrew Greenhill, Mira Patel and Jacob Roslow (from left) play
"The Star Bangled Banner" Saturday at the start of the 2011
Marching Band Festival in Winter Haven. The BHS marching band
was the first and last band to perform at the annual festival.

Director Tim Cain, who took over the program about
two months ago and is splitting his time between the


high school and Bok Acad-
emy. The 64-piece band
earned excellent and it was
satisfying for Cain.
"This is a good solid rat-
ing," he said. "The kids did
a fantastic job on the field.
I didn't think we'd get supe-
riors. I didn't feel we were
there yet."
However, he feels they
will get there.
"Based on comments,"
he said. "And many have
known where this band has
been. We got many high
compliments and we have
shown a great improve-
ment and we're on the right


BARTOW
General effect: Superior
Music: Superior
Music: Superior
Auxiliary: superior
Marching/Maneuvering:
Superior
TOTAL: Superor

FORT MEADE
General effect: Good
Music: Good
Music: Good
Auxiliary: Excellent
Marching/Maneuvering: Good
TOTAL: Good


track." FROSTPROOF
Second on the field Sat-
urday was the Fort Meade General effect: Excellent
Band which did a tribute to MusicGood
Aerosmith earning a mix- Musii Excellent
ture of excellent and good Auxiliary: Excellent
ratings. Director Michael MarcingManeuvering:
Yopp, in his first year, said TOTAL: Excellent
the students did an excel-
lent job but show they have
to still get their feet a little LAKE WALES
more wet. General effect: Excellent
"I think they did fantas- Music: Good
tic," he said, adding, "Basi- Music: Good
cally they have a mixture. Auxiliary: Excellent
The sound has not matured. Marching/Maneuvering:
They haven't played for the Excellent
number of years (as oth- TOTAL: Good
ers have). It's sort of like in
sports, you have a lot of tal-
ent but have to get into shape, but after four months
of work they did a very good job."


Monika Carillo dances Scottish style at the Marching Band Festival Saturday
in Winter Haven. The Lake Wales High School Band did a set of The Beatles
songs that included bagpipes.











Page 2B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, November 9,2011


2011 Marching Band Festival


Left: Frostproof
band members
(from the
front) Heather
Oyhola, Victoria
Stevenson
and Patricia
Quinn play a
song from "The
Blues Brothers"
movie Saturday
during the 2011
Marching Band
Festival.


'-MUIUbs Ut JtP-- -UsLUWw
Mackenzie Castle and Maleena Johnson make their moves during Frostproof High School's
marching band's "A Blues Brothers Review:'


Below: Fort
Meade musi-
cians (from
left) Victoria
Lazorko,
Amanda
Sanchez,
Meagan Yopp,
Tina Shadrick
and Trevor
Davis play the
horns in "Sweet
Emotion"
during their
Aerosmith set
at the Marching
Band Festival
Saturday.


Bartow High School Band members (front row, from left) Nicholas Wile, Katisha Gant and Blais Freeland play
the National Anthem at Denison Stadium Saturday in Winter Haven.


Pr


'I


---"mm,


Above: Fort Meade Miner drummers march on the field Saturday during
the band's performance at the 2011 Marching Marching Band Festival in .
Winter Haven.


Right: Lake Wales band members (from left, front) Abby Thompson, Zack
Futter, Clayton Kieffer and (back) Jonathan Kaufman and Ricardo Alvarez
play during the 2011 Marching Band Festival in Winter Haven.


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Wednesday, November 9, 2011


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Wednesday, November 9,2011 SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


fI1


22nd Annual


Saturday, December 3rd 7 to 11 AM
SHoly Trinity Church
500 W. Stuart St., Bartow
Pancakes, Sausage, Juice, Coffee
Free Crafts for Children


Sponsored


by Zonta


Club of Bartow and


The Swarm


youth baseball team


0 as b &Wi?


Available at The Democrat, 190 S. Florida Ave.,


Bartow


And from


The Swarm team Coach Mike Martin 537-1190
And the Zonta Club Pat Wright 533-2566
Mary Frisbie 533-4610


SCMG Central Florida Page 3B


Wednesday, November 9, 2011


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Roar n' Soar this weekend


Fantasy of Flight is putting the "wow!"
factor into Polk County this weekend
with its fifth annual Roar n' Soar, a signa-
ture two-day racing extravaganza show-
casing the finest classic racing machines
ever built for land, sea or air.
Roar n' Soar revs into Fantasy of Flight
on Saturday, Nov. 12, and Sunday, Nov.
13, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in Polk City.
Tickets are on sale now for the family-
oriented event.
Throughout the two-day festival, the
best of the best in the world of aviation


will perform heart-stopping precision
aerial maneuvers featuring the "World's
Greatest Aircraft Collection" includ-
ing the Grumman Duck, P51-C and T-6
Texan. The daring pilots who fly these
sometimes temperamental beauties
will be on hand between flights to greet
guests and inspire the dreams of future
pilots of all ages.
Adding to that, a team of powered
paragliders will compete in a "kiting"
contest to see who can fly their glider the
longest. Spectators can chant for their


Shooting event info

coming Wednesday


favorite or root for the underdog while
these paragliders participate in an aerial
dog fight of sorts to keep their competi-
tion from "stealing" their air or tugging
on their line.
Two-day tickets are $38 per person


with one child ages 6-12 free. Additional
two-day children's tickets may be pur-
chased for $19. Children 5 and younger
are free. For more information or to
purchase tickets, call (863) 984-3500 or
visit www.fantasyofflight.com.


k PR F S IO AL S OCA I


At the Polk County Tourism &
Sports Marketing's Business Expo on
Wednesday, Nov. 9, the bureau plans
an announcement on the county's
recent bid for the International
Practical Shooting Federation's 2014
World Shoot XVII world champion-
ship event.
It is scheduled for 1 p.m.
The expo is an opportunity for
people to meet with representatives


from Polk County accommodations,
attractions and services as well as
sports and special event organizers.
New features this year include an
educational session featuring Josh
Hallett, director of client services
from Voce Communications, present-
ing "How to Market Your Business
through Social Media" and a closing
reception including refreshments and
raffle drawings for prizes.


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Wednesday, November 9, 2011


Page 4B SCMG Central Florida


9


F r iarm











Wednesday, November 9,2011 SCMG Central Florida Page 58


FEELING


Bow wow and gobble this year


Wanna go for a walk? Or a run? Take out the dog?


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
Wanna go for a walk? Or a run? Take
out the dog?
Don't go alone ... go with dozens of
Polk Countians at one of Bartow Parks
and Recreation Department's upcoming
race/walks.
This year's latest entry to the city's
popular race/walk events is one that
even Fido or Fifi can join in: The 2011
Inaugural Walk and Wag 2K. The two-
kilometer (roughly a mile) walk is the
first city-sponsored opportunity where
Bartow area dog-lovers can take their
canine companions with them on a
stroll through south city streets. The
Walk and Wag is slated for a joint start
with the third annual Turkey Chase, a
2K and 5K race, along the same streets
for 2K and then branching off on the


extended course, according to BPR's
Recreation Services Supervisor Josh
Brandl.
"This type event has proven to be
very popular in other areas," Brandl
says. "We thought it would be fun to
offer it here. Since we already had the
Turkey Chase in the works, it seemed
like a good add to the activities we've
been successful with in the past."
Both races start at 8 a.m. on Satur-
day, Nov. 19, at Summerlin Park. All
events are open to all ages and are not
limited to city residents. Registrants
will receive commemorative T-shirts
and canine entrants will get colorful
bandanas. Registration for the Walk &
Wag is $28 up to and including event
day. Pet owners with more than one
dog will add an additional $5 fee for
the extra entrants to cover the cost of
the second bandana. Registration for
the Turkey Chase is $21. Registration
also will be available on race day.
T-shirts will be provided for later
entrants if still available.
The Walk & Wag is not a timed event,
but the 5K Turkey Chase is a manually
timed event. The 2K is self-timed.
Registration is available at the BPR


MFdU


office at 2250 S. Floral Ave. (the Bar-
tow Civic Center offices) or online at
Active.com.
"The Walk & Wag is purely a recre-
ational event," Brandl says. "The other
races are truly competitive and are rec-
ognized by the sports communities."
Only wagging and bragging rights
go with the Walk & Wag, but awards
will be presented for the Turkey Chase
for the overall male and female win-
ners, overall masters (40+) in the 5K
and overall wheelchair participants.
There also will be age group awards
in 14 categories. Brandl says the city
expects about 75 entrants in the Walk
& Wag and upwards of 130 for the
Turkey Chase.
As part of the project, according to
Brandl, canned and non-perishable
food items will be collected to benefit
the Church Service Center to provide
emergency assistance to the needy.
For the runner, these races are easy.
You show up; you run. For the Parks
and Recreation Department, it's not
so easy, Brandl says. It takes a host of
sponsors and volunteers.
"We've been very lucky," he says.
"The community really kicks in to


The Bartow Parks & Recreation Department's
third annual Turkey Chase 5K and 2K are on
Saturday, Nov. 19.
make these a success." Refreshments
of cookies, fruit and sport drinks will
be available after the events and a
water station on the course.
Brandl says the 2K and 5K events
require about 35 volunteers, many
of whom are students at Summerlin
Academy and in Bartow High School
service clubs.
While the two November races are
geared more for the casual or less
ambitious runner and walkers, the
third annual Bartow Blarney Triath-
Ion on St. Patrick's Day is a different
story. It's a USA Triathlon-sanctioned
event that features a /4- mile swim, a
15-mile bike ride and culminates with
a 5K run.
Entry fees for the triathlon range
from $59 to $80 per person and $120
to $160 for teams. Early registration is
prior to Feb. 18.
It also offers numerous awards in
various divisions. The entry fee for the
triathlon also includes a pasta pre-
race dinner the night before, as well as
post-race refreshments.


Jason Magnetico was prepared for St. Patrick's
Day Bartow Blarney Triathalon last year wearing
a green wig. The swim is one part of the race
that also features bicyde riding and running.
Here he, George McGill, Trey Williams and Aaron
Griner (from left) watch the swimmers during
the first leg as Ellen Vargo turns around to take
another leg on her eight-lap trek.


Scott Nyhoff cheered for himself as he crossed the finish line in the second Bartow Blarney
Triathlon last year. Early registration for this year's event ends Feb. 18.


The trophy for last year's female winner at last
year's Blarney Triathalon.


LRMC Foundation awards grants


The Lakeland Regional Medical Cen-
ter Foundation's 2011 grant recipients
who will receive funds from the Women
in Philanthropy giving society were
revealed during the group's annual lun-
cheon on Friday, Nov. 4 at the Lakeland
Center.
A combined $76,718.50 was granted
to purchase:
A state-of-the-art, interactive man-
nequin (or manikin as they are known
in the healthcare industry) which has
the capability of recreating realistic
clinical scenarios. This expenditure
will aid in continuing education efforts
and further prepare staff to respond to
pediatric emergencies.
Interactive gaming stations for the
pediatric "vertical lobby" in the ER, an
area designated to ease stress during an
emergency situation.
Ten pressure-relieving cushions


and two heated massage chairs and
ultimately greater comfort for patients
receiving dialysis.
Two vision vein viewers, innovative
technology that will help caregivers
find difficult-to-locate veins, such as
those of infants within the Neonatal
Intensive Care Unit.
The final grant was awarded to cover
capital needs costs related to LRMC's
Women's Health Services expansion.
This is the second year of a five year
commitment.
During the luncheon, nearly 70
"Leadership Givers" were asked to
stand and be recognized for their
incredible $1,000 contribution over
the course of two years. One such
individual was Jennifer Kincart Jons-
son, human resources director of ACT
Environmental & Infrastructure Inc.
"I got involved with the Founda-


tion's Women in Philanthropy because
I wanted to give back to the Lakeland
Community," said Jonsson. She later
added that she could think of no more
deserving cause than one that affects
the lives of the women and children
treated at Lakeland Regional.
This year, the Women in Philanthropy
luncheon featured Tracey Conway,
Emmy-winning actress and comedian
who presented "Drop Dead Gorgeous,"
her own personal journey as a heart
disease survivor. Conway shared details
from the day she was taping a televi-
sion comedy show when she literally
dropped dead from sudden cardiac ar-
rest. Twenty minutes later, paramedics
shocked her heart into beating again.
Overcoming 20-to-1 odds, she survived
and turned her miraculous recovery
into a poignant, yet laugh-out-loud,
presentation that has wowed celebrities


like Oprah Winfrey.
During the past three years, Women
in Philanthropy has raised a total of
$259,461.50 to support women's and
children's services at either Lakeland
Regional Medical Center or Lakeland
Regional Cancer Center. The funds
raised by Women in Philanthropy are
designated to improve the quality
and scope of healthcare that women
and children receive. The purpose of
Women in Philanthropy is to inspire
and empower women to fulfill their
philanthropic potential by improving
the quality of health care for women of
all ages in our community. Members
of Women in Philanthropy not only
enhance their own awareness of health,
but also that of family and friends,
while setting the example of the art of
philanthropy for the next generation of
women.


SCMG Central Florida Page 58


Wednesday, November 9, 2011












Page 6B SCMG Central Florida Wednesday, November 9,2011


Watson Clinic lectures coming


Watson Clinic's latest installments
in their series of free monthly lec-
tures is under way.
Watson Clinic orthopaedic sur-
geon/sports medicine specialist Dr.
Douglas A. Shenkman conducts a
special presentation titled, "A Knee
Pain Talk That Will Help You Walk" on
Thursday, Nov. 10, at 6 p.m.
Shenkman will discuss the latest
non-operative options used to rem-
edy knee pain, as well as a host of the
most advanced surgical treatments,
including minimally invasive surgery,
computer-assisted procedures and
gender specific knee replacements.
Call (863) 680-7189 to RSVP.


On Saturday, Nov. 12, at 10 a.m.,
Watson Clinic facial plastic surgeon
Dr. Raam S. Lakhani presents "Imag-
ine the Possibilities of Facial Plastic
Surgery," an overview of all surgical
facial rejuvenation options, as well
as the growing popularity of non-
surgical treatments such as fillers
and laser resurfacing. In addition, he
will provide information on in-office
mini facelift and eyelid rejuvenation.
Call 863-904-6218 to RSVP for
Lakhani's lecture.
The lectures will take place on the
third floor of Watson Clinic's Bella
Vista Building at 1755 N. Florida Ave.,
Lakeland.


HEALTH BRIEFS
Alzheimer's Project
coming the next
3 Wednesday
The award-winning HBO
series "Alzheimer Project"
will be presented by the
Alzheimer's Association and
the city of Winter Haven at
the Chain of Lakes Com-
plex for three Wednesdays,
Nov. 9,16 and 30, at 9 a.m.
The shows are free.
Chris Wilcox, program
specialist at the Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter of the
Alzheimer's Association,
will facilitate a guided
discussion before and after
the film.
First of the HBO Series is
"Memory Loss Tapes." It's
an in-depth look at the day
to day life of people with
Alzheimer's disease.
The second is "Momen-
tum of Science Part 1,"
which viewers inside the
laboratories and clinics of
25 leading scientists and
physicians, who seek to dis-
cover what can be done to
better detect and diagnose
Alzheimer's.
Third will be the "Mo-
mentum in Science Part 2."
People should RSVP for
seating purposes by calling
863-292-9210. At 210 Cy-
press Gardens Blvd., Winter
Haven.

Open house set
for new physician
Lake Wales Medical Cen-


ter will hold an open house
from 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 15, to welcome Dr. Ajay
Mangal to the community.
Mangal is a board-certi-
fied otolaryngologist and
has established his practice
- Ear, Nose & Throat of Polk
County in Lake Wales.
He specializes in pediatric
otolaryngology, allergy
treatment, sinus disease
and surgery, head, neck and
thyroid surgery, adult and
childhood sleep disorders,
and otologic diseases.
The open house is at 1255
State Road 60 East, Suite
200, in Lake Wales. Call
679-6869.

Hospital
celebrates staff
Florida Hospital Heart-
land Medical Center and
Florida HospitalWauchula
are observing National Med-
ical Staff Services Awareness
Week by recognizing medi-
cal staff professionals in the
hospital.
"These professionals play
an important role in main-
taining the highest qual-
ity care at Florida Hospital
by making certain that all
patients receive care from
practitioners who are prop-
erly educated, licensed and
trained in their specialty,"
said Florida Hospital Presi-
dent and CEO Tim Cook.
Medical service profession-
als' duties include provider
credentialing and privileging,


medical staff organization,
accreditation and regulatory
compliance, and provider
relations in the diverse health
care industry. They credential
and monitor ongoing com-
petence of the physicians
and other practitioners who
provide patient care services
in hospitals, managed care
organizations and other
healthcare settings.

Healthy Woman
holiday brunch
planned
The HealthyWoman pro-
gram at Lake Wales Medical
Center has its annual Holi-
day Brunch at 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday, Nov. 19, at Lake
Wales Country Club.
Participants will have the
opportunity to create home-
made, ready-to-bake gift
jars. All ingredients and sup-
plies will be provided, and
Erika Schindler will provide
step-by-step guidance as
participants create their jars
at work stations. A special
holiday meal is included,
and during lunch, guests
will be treated to holiday
music, including some
sing-alongs, with Brandon
Collins.
Tickets are $15, and are
available at Lake Wales
Medical Center's Healthy
Woman office in Room 201
of the Hunt Building. Tickets
must be purchased by
Nov. 15. Call 863-678-2288
for questions.


)eciq(ize in YYour ciq( y3es

Accredited by Accreditation Association for
Ambulatory Health Care, Inc.

Dr. Damon Welch
Board Eligible
Ophthalmologist
Dr. David Lowey
Board Certified
Ophthalmologist
ID CERTIFIED OPTOMETRISTS
S* P baceW Hafihr.:" Dr. David.r :
D Vre. Miuldd: .'..".- Dr, l~it Co.ns.
*D t IJ. Ataway -.*, .


You deserve personalized quality health care!

S Benigno Feliciano, M.D
Diplomate of the American
Board of Internal Medicine
Cardiac Diseases
Treating all High Blood Pressure
adult illnesses Pulmonary Diseases
and diseases: Osteo/ Rheumatoid Arthritis
S j* Hypo/Hyperthyroidism
441n7 n-lr.n r.i Diabetes


Ila[15 rI IE'.J uII
Lake Wales, Florida
2000 Osprey Blvd., Suite 110
Bartow, Florida


* Skin Diseases/ Cancer
* High Cholesterol
* Strokes


Se habla Espahol
Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
863-533-1617
Accepting new patients 16 and older
Walk ins welcome Same day appointments
Internal Medicine Institute, P.A.


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Florida Hospital
Therapy Center
Wauchula opens
new pool
PHOTO PROVIDED
The Therapy Center Wauchula
opened a new aquatic therapy
pool. This indoor heated
pool offers patients motor
training coordination with a
zero gravity effect to facilitate
better healing. The Therapy
Center also offers a wide range
of physical, occupational and
speech therapy services in
an modern setting featuring
licensed therapists "providing
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Therapy Center Facility Super-
visor Rosa Perez-Smith works
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We <
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Specialists
ofMid-Florida, PA

Dr. Neil Okun
Board Certified
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Dr. Daniel Welch
Board Certified
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BOAR
I FJr.Iohn D. i "s. -..;:
rin_ Thomas W Brlton,
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Page 6B SCMG Central Florida


Wednesday, November 9, 2011










Wednesday. November 9,2011 SCMG Central Florida Page lB


Urge incontinence is another problem of bladder control
DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have urge polycythemia vera, diabetes, high ucts are neither sugars nor alcohol.
incontinence. I asked the doctor if TO YOUR blood pressure, lupus and an excess They're sweeteners. Foods with
I could take one of the advertised of blood platelets. Nifedipine and sugar alcohols in them can be called
medicines to relieve it. Another GOOD verapamil are examples of medicines sugar-free. Sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol
doctor had told me that I only half- HEALTH that are sometimes responsible for it. and lactitol are some common sugar
empty my bladder. I asked the secondAL Undoubtedly you've been checked for alcohols.
doctor what would happen if I took these things by the specialists you've If people are on a strictly limited
one of these drugs and was suddenly Dr. Paul seen. carbohydrate diet, they divide the
unable to pass urine. He said I would Donohue Aspirin might lessen the number of grams of sugar alcohol by two and
have to go to the hospital and have a attacks. Lidoderm skin patches have add that number to their total daily
catheter inserted to drain the blad-- been prescribed with some success. consumption of carbohydrates.
der. That turned me off the idea of DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I read all
using a drug. food labels. I notice on the list of in- Dr. Donohue regrets that he is un-
The second doctor finally gave me week of retraining. Go to the bath- gredients of some foods the term "sug- able to answer individual letters, but
Vesicare pills to try. The advertisement room at that interval, regardless of ar alcohol." Does that mean it is both he will incorporate them in his col-
states, "Do not take Vesicare if you whether you need to. Then increase sugar and alcohol? If it does, a clearer umn whenever possible. Readers may
are unable to empty your bladder." the interval by 15 minutes every week warning ought to be given. M.M. write him or request an order form of
Should I take this medicine? B.R. or two. Continue with this program ANSWER: "Sugar alcohol" is a most available health newsletters at PO.
ANSWER: Urge incontinence, also until you're able to hold off going to unfortunate name. These prod- Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
called overactive bladder, comes the bathroom for two and a half to
from too-powerful and too-frequent three hours.
contractions of the bladder muscles. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have been AFFORDABLE
Because of this urge, people often diagnosed with erythromelalgia (uh- DENTURES
lose bladder control unless they RITH-row-mel-AL-gee-uh). My feet 4- t
make it to the bathroom quickly. The turn bright red or dark purplish red. FuY 5
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times during the day and night. This tion. The only relief I can get is to Affordable Dentures-Lakeland, RA. nmy Ful Set
T.V. Pham D.M.D., General Dentist
is a disruptive condition. submerge them in cold water with ice Merchant's Walk Shopping Center
I don't know how the doctor de- added. 3615 S. FloridaAve.. Suite 1230. Lakeland FL Routine
termined that you empty only half I have seen many doctors, includ- No Appointment Necessary (863) 701-7404 OU action
your bladder. Even if that is the truth, ing a neurologist, a vascular surgeon Affordable Dentures-Avon Park, RA. o)
that's not a contraindication to using and a rheumatologist. Do you have Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry Complex
medicines for this condition. Medi- any suggestions? S.H. Highlands Plaza $ Tooth
cines calm the bladder muscles so ANSWER: Your description of this 1036 US 27 South. Avon Pork FL ( Extracon
that they aren't contracting so fre- condition is as good as the descrip- Call For Appointment (863) 784-0463
quently and so powerfully. Examples tion in medical textbooks. Most of- SAVL SAVE SAVE
include Ditropan, Vesicare, Enablex, ten, the soles of the feet are the major Same Day Service100 5 2
Sanctura and Detrol LA. The warning source of pain. Warmth and letting 1
you read in the advertisement applies the legs hang down, as in sitting for I On-Site L F E i abCUSTOM
to people who cannot pass any urine, too long, trigger attacks. The cold- np
Bladder retraining is a method to water treatment is always recom- 1-800-DENTURE .
overcome urge incontinence without mended. If you have an attack and www.AffordableDentures.com c ,. .... .
with any other coupons, discounts, package price. Insurance benefit or prior order.
medicine. For a couple of days, keep can't get to cold water, elevating the Offer expires 4/30/12 andmay change withoutnotice.
a record of the length of time be- legs can bring relief. ------------. .--------
tween bathroom trips. Use the short- Erythromelalgia is seen with ........... ...
est interval between trips for the first other illnesses like the blood disease T . .. ..... .1. .... - . i . . .. . mentoour se es.


We're Champs at Fighting Strokes













Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center Sebring is
Now a Designated Primary Stroke Center

We are the only certified Primary Stroke Center in the Heartland. When a stroke occurs, time is of the
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It is important to understand warning signs.

The symptoms of a stroke include: sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arm or leg, sudden trouble speaking
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If you experience any of these symptoms, call 9-1-1, and ask to be taken to Florida Hospital.
For more information, please visit www.fhheartland.org


FLORIDA HOSPITAL
HEARTLAND MEDICAL CENTER -.


SCMG Central Florida Page 7B


Wednesday, November 9, 2011










Page8BCMG ental Foria WdnesayNoveber9,211


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS BASED ON TRUST.


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Winter Haven

Hospital

BOSTICK HEART CENTER

www.winterhavenhospital.org


AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


Winter Haven Hospital's Bostick Heart Center is
recognized by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons as
being in the top 10 percent of Heart Programs in the
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Learn more at www.winterhavenhospital.org or
call 863-292-4688.

Compassion. Innovation.Trust. We're your family's choice.



1k A *~i IS *T~~B;ITF t


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Wednesday, November 9, 2011


Page 8B SCMG Central Florida


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