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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00690
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
Creation Date: October 22, 2011
Frequency: semiweekly[1946-<1992>]
weekly[ former <1936>-1946]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
System ID: UF00028292:00690
 Related Items
Preceded by: Polk County record

Full Text


Visit us on the Internet at www.PolkCountyDemocrat.com


1140


Saturday


DUSTrS cmPERWORL


'- New 2011 Starcraft AR-ON : '6BH
1 I't October 22, 2011 (_ stCWr R-
-: * ***SCH 3-DIGIT 326 S
sITI OF FLORIDA


Polk -ounty Democrav LJ


Volume 81 Num


Bartow's Hometown Newspaper Since 1931

ber 17 USPS NO 437-320 Bartow, Polk County Florid



Ghosts of Bartow


Haunts told in tour around old


a 33830


By CHRISTINE ROSLOW
CORRESPONDENT
Polk County Historical Mu-
seum volunteers donned period
costumes and welcomed guests
as they presented the Ghosts
of Bartow Tour. Fans of Bartow
history were guided on a walking
trip of the area surrounding the
old courthouse Thursday and
Friday and were told stories of
some of the more unfortunate
souls to have passed away on its
streets.
The stories of Bartow history
may have been told to set the
mood for Halloween, and vol-
unteers were careful to remain
true to the actual events as they
happened so many years ago.
And while the Ghosts of Bartow
Tour was entertaining, it was a
way to learn about the history of
the town.
One of the tour guides, J.
Lenora Bresler, dressed as Annie
Hughes, was the wife of David
Hughes. Mr. Hughes, one of the
first settlers in Bartow, started a
general store located across the
street from the courthouse and
became a very rich man. After
his death, gold coins were placed
over his eyes and he was laid out
in his parlor. During the night his
dear wife Annie heard footsteps.
In the morning it was discovered
that the two gold coins placed
over his eyes were missing, and
he was buried without them.
Every now and then people have
been known to hear old Mr.
Hughes walking around the site
of his home near the courthouse
asking the breathy question,
"Where's my coins? ... Where's
my coins?"
The tale of two young lovers
who, along with their friends,
stole off to Crooked Lake for
a graduation night party that
ended with both of their deaths
by drowning was told. Their bod-
ies were never found. It is said
on certain nights the mourning-
clad mother of poor Myrtle can
be seen by children repeatedly
asking them, "Have you seen my
baby? Please, have you seen my
baby?".
In 1886, the Mann brothers
were accused of killing Marshall


courthouse


Copyright 2011 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


Huff: City should

have law to hire local

Long says policy tricky,

but staff to look into it

By BILL RETTEW JR.
BRETIEW@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
Local contractors might get a step up on outside bid-
ders if a proposal made by Mayor Pat Huff at Monday's
meeting flies with fellow commissioners.
Huff suggested during this week's work session that
staff design a proposed ordinance allowing the city to
accept higher monetary bids from local contractors.
The city would pay more to use local contractors.
Commissioners would need to vote twice to change
the current low-bid policy.
It was not decided whether preference should be
given to contractors from just Bartow or from all of Polk
County.
Commissioner Wayne Lewis agreed that instituting a
sliding scale would help boost the local economy.
"Those are the folks who are living here, working
here, paying taxes here, using utilities and spending
money here," said Lewis.
City Manager George Long said that drafting a policy
would be difficult because there is "no perfect mouse
trap" or best way to give local contractors a leg up.
LOCAL 6A


Karats for carrots

Spath Jewelers drive gearing up
and up to $5,000 in prizes in store
By DIANE NICHOLS
DNICHOLS@POLKCOUNTYDEMOCRAT.COM
It started as a gesture to
help one organization in
need of feeding hungry
people in the community
for the holidays. Now, Spath
Jewelers in Bartow is gearing
up to hold its ninth an-
nual food drive with a rather
unique and sparkly incen-
tive. For merely walking in
the door on the first three
days of the drive beginning
Nov. 1, you will receive a free
gemstone bracelet.
"It's our way of saying PHOTO PROVIDED
'thank you' to those who
come out and help since First place winning Kulpa family won
we've had such a great a pair of 1.15-carat diamonds in and
response over the years," out earrings last year.
said Emily Spath Clark, vice
president of Operations at
her family's business. "It's amazing to see how giving people
are even when they are working hard to make ends meet.
With it being our 25th anniversary in business, we want to do
SPATH 16A


PHOTO BY CHRISTINE ROSLOW


Lenora Bresler, dressed as Annie Hughes, a Bartow resident from many years past,
told the story of her husband's death and other dark deaths from Bartow's past
duirng the Ghosts of Bartow Tour.


Silas Campbell in the street out-
side the 1883 courthouse. A mob
lynched them and on certain
nights their swinging bodies have
been seen in the trees behind the
courthouse.
The Spanish influenza took its
toll on the citizens of Bartow in


1913. Many people were forced
to bury their loved ones without
church services. People have
claimed to see "Shadow People"
waiting outside many churches
around historic Bartow in the last
week of October, perhaps waiting
for proper burials.


-- 0 A lv.xZ y -v.-6 pI I
S. -.ur iclsive of Tax, title. lirnse and deal doc fees Advmrised invmnory avail-
7 I abte at ti of pning. See dealer for detail. offer expits O/3Vll. DCW15789-09ll
See more bargains Inside


I


7 05252 00025 8
7 05252 00025 8


Editorial .........
Page 4A
Community .....
Page 5A
County Report
Page 8A
Obituaries ......
Page 1O0A


Calendar.......
Page 12A
Sports...............
Inside
USA
Weekend..........
Inside


HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Oldest church
in county to
pI. celebrate 157th
anniversary
Sunday



Page 14A


Yellow Jackets
on field after
being off week


See Sports


I


I






Page 2A The Polk County Democrat October 22. 2011


The good fork in the

Although well traveled, Vietnam casualty


By JAMES COULTER
CORRESPONDENT

FortMeade hosts the Vietnam Travel-
ing Memorial Wall starting Oct. 27 at the
American Legion grounds near Patterson
Park on U.S. Highway 17/98. James Robert
Adams' name is on the wall.
James Robert Adams had a wild streak in
him during his senior year of high school
near Fort Hood outside Killeen, Texas,
where he and his friends often got in
trouble picking fights with the soldiers off
base, his sister Patti Long said.
"Our mother warned him he would
wind up in jail for fighting and he did,"
she said. 'After she bailed him out the first
time, she told him it was a freebie, but if he
wound up there again, he was on his own."
Sure enough it was not long before
Adams was arrested for fighting again.
After he was released from jail, his mother,
Louise, calmly invited him to get in the
car and drove him to the local Air Force
recruiting office.
"She told the recruiting officer she was
done with him and that he now belonged


to them," Long said. "And that's how his
military career began."
Adams was born June 6, 1942, in Little
Rock, Ark. Because his father was a career
army officer, his family was often trans-
ferred, even living in Germany for two and
a half years.
After graduating Killeen High School
in 1960, he entered the Air Force where
he attained the rank of Airman 2nd Class.
During his second year in the Air Force, he
applied for and successfully passed the rig-
orous testing for an appointment to the Air
Force Academy, where he attended for two
years, but left after failing his vision test,
which would have disqualified him from
flight training after graduation, Long said.
He received a Congressional appoint-
ment from Sen. Spessard L. Holland and
entered West Point in 1963. His previous
military experience allowed him to excel
among his peers, Joseph P Jackson, Jr.,
M.D. wrote of him in 'A Tibute to the.
Fallen Members of the West Point Class of
1967," published in "67 Requiem" in June
2009.
"He lent an experienced hand in


Road

called Bartow home
explaining the nuances of spit shine
and polishing brass to his less'spoony'
classmates, but he never seemed to be
bothered by the more mundane features
of cadet life," he wrote.
Adams loved fishing and boxing, having
attained the title of Golden Gloves boxing
champ in high school, and often partici-
pating in the Brigade Open Boxing Tourna-
ments in West Point.
His family transferred to Bartow in 1961
where his father retired, having served in
the Army for 30 years. Adams would spend
a month there every summer during his
down time. Even though he never lived in
Bartow, he considered it his home, Long
said.
He graduated West Point in 1967. He
married his wife Barbara shortly before
volunteering forVietnam. Being the only
son in his family, he did not have to vol-
unteer, but did so anyway out of sense of
duty, Long said.
"Jim was anxious to assume his respon-
sibilities as an officer, and the determina-
tion and aggressiveness he displayed as a
boxer made him an outstanding infantry


-j |ort Mrade Oclober 27-31, 2UI 1

combat leader, leading from the front and
by example," Jackson wrote.
On Feb. 14,1968, Adams was deployed
with the 3rd Brigade of the 82nd Airborne
Division, to which he and his class had
previously been temporarily assigned
before their graduation, Jackson wrote.
One month later, he led his men into
the Battle of The Candy Stripe, where they
received heavy fire and casualties from the
enemy. He spotted one of his wounded
men lying in the open, rushed from cover
to recover him, and was hit by one round
of sniper fire to the head, Long said.
For his sacrifice, he received a Purple
Heart and Silver Star. He was buried in
West Point Cemetery.
"It's been over 40 years since he died,
and I miss him just as much today as I did
40 years ago," Long said.


Page 2A The Polk County Democrat


October 22. 2011





October 22, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 3A


Publix


WELCOME TO YOUR NEW PUBLIC it a tw


Come discover your brand-new Publix in Bartow. You'll find everything you've
come to expect from Publix: farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, just-baked breads,
quality meats cut to order. You'll enjoy top-notch service from knowledgeable,
friendly associates who are happy to answer questions, offer cooking tips,
and take your groceries right to your car. Be sure to visit your new Publix


THURSDAYOCTTOBER 27 AT 8 A.M.


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5-:
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You can sample delicious foods and-
if you're one of the first 500 customers-
receive a FREE reusable grocery tote bag.

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Publix at Golden Gate Shopping Center
255 East Van Fleet Drive
Bartow, FL 33830

Store Hours: 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily

Pharmacy Hours:
Monday-Friday: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Store: 863.534.1560
Pharmacy: 863.534.1824
publix.com


__


The Polk County Democrat Page 3A


October 22, 2011






Pae4 h okCut eortOtbr2,21


VIEWPOINT


An extraordinary year in Tallahassee


This year's extraordinarily strange batch of
laws made Florida's legislative session one of
the most outlandish ever. If these were more
normal times, the governor and legislature
would be running around the state playing
'make-up' for all the missteps and resulting
bombs and duds they lobbed around.
,In fact, it's still 2011, the ink has barely
dried on many of the radical changes, and
Florida's political leaders are happy.
They have repeatedly attempted to portray
it as a productive success, yet the facts tell
a different story about many of their flag-
ship efforts: The courts have blocked a plan
pushed by Senator J.D. Alexander, R-Lake
Wales, to hand over control of a huge chunk
of Florida's prison system to private compa-
nies.
Had the plan gone forward, thousands of
state employees would have been laid off
and replaced by lower-paid private prison


Our Viewpoint
guards. It would have been by far the larg-
est such effort in history, with huge costs to
taxpayers if the plan failed. The legislature
has also been playing fast and loose with
taxpayer dollars in trying to block the voter-
approved Fair Districts plan.
The voters approved the two constitutional
amendments for state and federal elections
by overwhelming majorities, but that in-
terferes with legislators' cherry-picking of
districts slanted to re-elect them.
Now our tax dollars are being spent by the
legislature to appeal a Federal District Court
ruling that sustains the voter's rights.
Led by the political arm of the National
Rifle Association, the legislature, always
eager to please, passed laws prohibiting doc-
tors from speaking with their patients about


guns in the home.
Senility? Drug use? Mental illness? Loaded
guns? No, the legislature would prohibit the
doctor from inquiring. Happily, that gag
order was ruled unconstitutional.
Another act pushed by the NRA is designed
to outlaw any city or county rules on guns
or gun use which are more prohibitive than
state law. The result: some cities are clos-
ing their gun ranges just ahead of hunting
season, because they are prohibited from
controlling their use with sensible rules.
As if the antics of the Legislature weren't
bad enough, the governor's repeated 'loss' of
public email records is disturbing. Whether
due to incompetence or intentional hiding
of damning evidence, it is highly disturbing.
The law sets specific penalties, including
impeachment.
We won't hold our breath waiting for the
Legislature to act on that problem.


Because we owe it to them


Few places in America inspire such a
somber atmosphere as the Vietnam Wall
in Washington, D.C.
The highly non-traditional memo-
rial, controversial when it was proposed
but now one of the most visited venues
in the nation's capital, bears the name
of every member of the armed forces
killed or missing in the war in Vietnam.
It seems appropriate that the wall
was, in its own context, almost as
controversial as the war whose casu-
alties it honors. And it seems further
appropriate that most Americans have
come to appreciate the symbolism of
the structure, even as they have come to
appreciate the service of those mem-
bers of the armed forces who fought in
that war.
A half-sized replica, the Traveling Me-
morial Wall, will be on display in Fort
Meade next week, from Thursday, Oct.
27, through Sunday, Oct. 30.
Arranging the event has approached a
full-time job for Wayne Guest, aViet-
nam veteran who lost 35 Officer Candi-
date School classmates in that war.
From a staging area south of Lake
Wales, the replica will depart around
10:15 a.m. on Thursday with a sheriff's
office motorcycle escort, arriving in Fort
Meade via East Broadway around 11.
School kids and anyone who wishes
to join them will line Broadway, waving
small flags that will be furnished for the
event.
With an estimated 500 to 1,000 mo-
torcycles from various organizations
leading the way, the wall procession
will turn north on Charleston Avenue,
which will be lined by cadets from the
13 high school ROTC programs in Polk
County.
The replica will be assembled at the
American Legion grounds on the north


side of Fort Meade.
A one-hour opening ceremony will
begin at 6, and the replica will be on
display for the next three days from 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. Computers will be on the
site to help visitors locate the names of
loved ones among the more than 58,000
names inscribed on the wall.
Vietnam was arguably the most
controversial and least popular war in
which America has been involved.
The fault lies with our national lead-
ership, beginning at the White House
and going east to the Capitol, most
assuredly not with our men and women
in uniform.
In the first place, the mission was
poorly defined. That has been recog-
nized as a textbook failure in military
history.
Worse still, our nation's leadership
lacked the political will to see our
troops through to victory, however
victory might be defined. That mal-
aise trickled down to Main Street, and
resentment was directed at returning
service members, rather than at the
national leadership that failed them.
It was a dark hour in American his-


tory.


That the name of every sol


dier, sailor,
FRISBIE 6A


------ r .. - -



Letters to the editor


Where we are on landfill talks


I have been in settlement mode
more than 4 years while state-approved
reclamation funding has been held. The
uncontested reclamation permits from
2005 allow for the removal of trees, flat-
tening of the land, and wetland mitiga-
tion for solid waste management pursu-
ant to the 1994 Settlement Agreement.
During the Republic/Bartow settle-
ment, no person, association, or lawyer
made issue of Republic's right to pro-
cess garbage at Cedar Trail, pursuant to
FDEP rules. After Republic's settlement,
zoning language at Cedar Trail was
changed in route to Tallahassee for ap-
proval. Changes can be made to zoning
language after formal approval if chang-
es are minor. Bartow now contends
that processing solid waste (including
garbage) in an enclosed building, closer
to Mosaic's chemical plant than Bartow
is a major zoning difference.


I have agreed to allow Bartow to have
300 +/- acres for 99 years, gift a police/
fire station site, not landfill garbage, and
participate in new revenue. I believe
it's reasonable Bartow provide land for
solid waste uses at the better location;
I should not lose 160 acres; have to re-
permit mitigation; nor should the better
site be land-locked from SR 60.
Although all lawyers, and Commis-
sioner James E Clements have approved
the concept of garbage processing in a
building, with safeguards in the back
of property, the majority of commis-
sioners ignore concessions, the 1994
Agreement, and their own lawyers. It
is not the outcome I believe is reason-
able, honorable, or what I want for
Bartowans. Land use approvals were
granted in 1989, 1991, 1992, and 1994.
Kent C. Ellsworth
Dade City/Bartow landowner


Published every Wednesday and Saturday at
190 South Florida, Avenue
by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. at its Office.
Periodical postage paid at Lakeland, Florida 33805
and additional Entry Office
*Phone (863) 533-4183 *Fax (863) 533-0402
Postmaster: Send address changes to
190 South Florida Avenue
Bartow, FL 33830


HOME DELIVERY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK COUNTY
Six Months.............$25.68 One Year..........................$41.73
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNTY MAIL
Six Months....................$24.00 One Year......................... $39.00
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
Six Months....................$40.00 One Year..........................$65.00
OUT OF STATE SUBSCRIPTION
Six Months....................$44.00 One Year..........................$72.00


We welcome your letters
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have
some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters
will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address
and telephone number must be included. The phone number and
address are not for publication, but must be provided. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community
discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are
solely those of the individual writers. Readers in the Bartow area
can send letters and column submissions to letters@polkcoun-
tydemocrat.com or mail them to 190 South Florida Avenue,
Bartow, FL 33830


The Polk County Democrat
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
SAileen Hood General Manager Jeff Roslow Editor Peggy Kehoe Managing Editor


, I


October 22, 2011


Page 4A The Polk County Democrat






October 22, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 5A


Reception, awards Sunday
for Cornucopia Art Show
The reception for the artists in the Cornucopia Art
Show will be Sunday, Oct, 23, from 3-5 p.m. in the Pam-
plin Art Gallery on the second floor of the Bartow Public
Library.
The show winners will be recognized and rewarded
their prize money. There will also be a revival of the
People's Choice Award to be voted by the artists only.
The public is invited to attend and view the artworks of
the 49 entries. Many pieces will be for sale.
The first place award for Best of Show will now be
called the Eilertsen Award in honor of Norman and Mar-
tha Ellen Eilertsen who have generously sponsored the
Cornucopia every year it has been held.
Receiving awards will be:
Pat Heyer, the Eilertsen Award for Best of Show
Carol Conti, 2nd place
Dave Buerger, 3rd place
Ivy Monsees, 4th place
Honorable Mention Awards: Jane Bryant, Jerry Fuller,
Amalia Fredericksen, Kappy Williams, Joyce Bugaiski and
Nancy Cockerham
The art will be on display at these times:
Monday from 1-4 p.m.
Wednesday from 4-6 p.m.
Thursday from 1-6 pm.
Friday from 3-5 p.m.
Saturday, check with the front desk.


Bartow based A-C-T Environ-
mental & Infrastructure Inc. was
recognized as the top midsized en-
vironmental firm to work for in the
nation by ZweigWhite, publisher
of CE News.
The award was announced at
ZweigWhite's Best Firms To Work
For Summit, an annual event in
San Diego.
According to Christina Zweig,
Public Relations manager at
ZweigWhite, the award and rank-
ing is based on comprehensive
evaluations of firm culture, work-
place practices, employee benefits,
employee retention rates, profes-
sional development, and more
- both from the management
and staff's perspectives. Firms are
objectively ranked in size catego-
ries based on a numerical system
and survey results. Winners are
selected in the disciplines of archi-
tecture, civil engineering, struc-
tural engineering, environmental
and multidiscipline.


A-C-T applied for consideration,
and ultimately received top rank-
ing, in the midsized environmental
category and ranked fifth among
firms in all size categories.
Already this year, A-C-T has
been designated one of Polk
Works' Best Places to Work and is
among Florida Trend's 100 Best
Companies to Work.
The ZweigWhite recognition
completes what company officials
refer to as the perfect trifecta of
distinguished employer
recognition.
"It's really a pretty simple
concept," said A-C-T President,
Rob Kincart. "We hire and retain
the best team possible so that our
customers consistently receive the
best service possible. Our employ-
ees make the difference in a highly
competitive business arena. We
value each and every one of them
and, based on their response to
the ZweigWhite survey, they also
value working at A-C-T."


A-C-T named top midsized
firm to work for


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2011 NISSAN ARMADA


Learn to save money
at couponing seminar
If you're having trouble mak-
ing ends meet or if you just
want to learn how to save a lot
of money, you may want to get
in this class Tuesday.
It's not just couponing, it's
True Coupon(ing). It's open to
anyone in or around Bartow and
it's being held from 7-9:10 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 25 at Wildwood
Baptist Church, 1120 S. Wood-
lawn Ave., Bartow. To get in on
the class register at http://
truecouponing.com/ or call
(863) 533-9424 for information.
"It's open to men and wom-
en," said Sara Robinson, who
is organizing the seminar. "We
just going to learn how to do it."
It doesn't cost anything to
register but you need to register
on line at True Couponing by
going to their workshop and
then put down to the church
name. People can register two
people at a time, however you
can go back in and register
more.


2012 NV CARGO VAN


October 22, 2011


The Polk County Democrat Page 5A







Page 6A The Polk County Democrat October 22, 2011


SPATH
FROM PAGE 1A
something special for the community that
has supported us over the years. Nothing
replaces the feeling of doing something
good for people and making a difference in
the fight against hunger."
Despite lean times, giving is exactly what
Bartow residents have done. Last year,
Spath's food drive brought in more than
3,200 pounds of donated non-perishable
food with this year's goal being 4,000
pounds or better. One year they topped
out at more than 5,000 pounds, which is a
number they would love to duplicate.
Mat Clark, Emily's husband and the
Operations Manager at Spath Jewelers,
can't say enough about the generosity of
Bartow's residents.
"The neat thing is that every year there
is more food donated to our drive than the
year before," said Clark. "You would think
as the economy gets worse, there would
be less participation and less food, but it's
amazing how fantastic this community is.
When things get worse, people just keep
giving more."
The idea to have a food drive began
nearly a decade ago when the Church Ser-
vice Center contacted Spath Jewelers to see
if it would like to help replenish their food
pantry for the holidays. When the initial at-
tempt to get customers to bring in canned
food donations didn't get the response
they were hoping for, it became clear they
would have to use another strategy.



LOCAL
FROM PAGE 1A
"It sounds very simple on the sur-
face, but it's really not," said Long.
"It's a good thing and warranted, but
preferences need to be well thought
out.
"Everybody would prefer to do busi-
ness locally."
The city manager also said that
some non-local contractors might shy
away form bidding when local firms
are given a financial incentive.
"Any time you extend a special ben-
efit, there's a trade-off it's a balanc-
ing act," said Long.
Commissioner Adrian Jackson said
large contractors complain when oth-
er firms are given preferential treat-
ment since it takes a large amount


"We decided to tie the donations to a
game where people not only have the satis-
faction of giving food to those in need, but
they get discounts and wonderful prizes in
return," explained Tina Spath, co-owner of
the business. "When someone donates a
food item they get what we call Diamond
Points, which looks like Monopoly money
The more they donate, the more Diamond
Points they collect. The people with the
most Diamond Points at the end of the
drive will end up getting great discounts
and prizes. Last year, we gave away more
than $5,500 of prizes including diamond
hoop earrings and a three-karat diamond
tennis bracelet."
Other ways to earn Diamond Points
would be to bring in your unwanted gold
and silver for cash, bring in jewelry that
needs repair, or simply just come in to the
store to collect your paper points. Six free
prizes will be given away when the food
drive ends on Dec. 3.
Some non-perishable foods needed for
the drive include canned fruit and juice,
breakfast items such as cereal, oatmeal
and pancake mix, peanut butter, canned
meats, canned beans and stews, canned
vegetables, infant formula and baby food,
pasta, macaroni and cheese, potato mixes,
canned soups and canned pasta items. It
is also encouraged to use coupons and be
aware of "buy one/get one free" deals at
supermarkets as a way to provide groceries
for your own needs and also have extra to
donate to the drive.
Spath Jewelers is located at 1360 Broad-
wayAve. Hours to donate non-perishable


of time to work through the bidding
process.
Jackson quoted contractors as likely
saying when talking about preparing
bids: "If I know you have a preferen-
tial buddy system, I'm not going to
waste my time.'"
Long noted not accepting the low-
est bid increases the city's cost.
"It's an investment in the communi-
ty money spent locally," said Long.
Commissioner Leo Longworth fa-
vored extending bidding preferences
to minority and women run firms.
Commissioner James E Clements
was opposed to the idea. He was con-
cerned with the bottom line.
"Now is not the time to be giving
anything away," said Clements.
Staff will come back to commission-
ers with a proposed ordinance, but no
date was set for when.


,H.





PHOTO BY DIANE NICHOLS


From left is Gene Spath, Tina Spath, Jim Bowers, Judy Mathis, Mat Clark and Emily Spath Clark are
in the store on North Broadway Avenue.


foods from Nov. 1 until Dec. 3 will be Mon-
day through Friday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and
Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Local businesses have jumped on the
bandwagon and are helping to make
this year's food drive the best Spath's has
ever done. The Stanford Inn at 555 E.
Stanford St. in Bartow is doing its part by
encouraging diners to keep their receipt
and present it to someone at Spath's to
collect Diamond Points. Perkin's has
also partnered in the effort last year by
providing coffee and doughnuts during
opening day when free bracelets were
being given away. This year, Spath's has
seen even more local businesses wanting
to get involved as the tradition of helping
the needy continues.
Gene Spath, co-owner of Spath's Jewel-
ers, recalls the true reward the family gets
from running the drive.
"This person who won a free prize some


years back ended up seeing his son need-
ing food the year after," said Spath. "His
son came in and sold some gold to us say-
ing he needed cash to buy groceries, so we
told him we had tables filled with donated
food. It felt really good to tell him to help
himself to anything that he needed. We see
blessings like this all the time as a result of
people donating to the food drive."
Tina Spath added her memories of a
woman who came into the store one day
after her home burned down.
"She was the mother of four children
and they had just lost everything in the
fire," Spath explained. "When she said they
didn't even have food, I knew we could
help with that. When I showed her all we
had and that she could have as much as
she wanted, she literally just broke down
and cried. That's why we do this and why
it's so important to come out and donate. It
really changes lives."


[i ,, I . ,,_


Trlkse n 314 BEwLLEVIEW DRIVE
SreFT. MEADE
$1 Donation. Additional Donations Welcome


FRISBIE: We owe them


FROM PAGE 4A

airman and marine killed or unac-
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captain who was killed on his third tour
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Page 6A The Polk County Democrat


October 22, 2011







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The Polk County Democrat Page 7A


October 22, 2011






Page 8A The Polk County Democrat October 22, 2011


COUNTY REPORT I



Ag-Venture coming for the 12th time


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
If you happen to drive by the Highlands County
Fairgrounds Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, don't
be surprised to hear lots of kids squealing and laugh-
ing and see waves of bright-colored cowboy hats.
Don't worry; it's just Ag-Venture. For the 12th time.
Twelve hundred third graders will remember these
days and so will organizers Darlene Phypers, Daniel
Daum, Judy Bronson and hundreds of volunteers.
For Phypers, Daum and Bronson their 12-year-old
brainchild doesn't quit when Thursday comes, it just
rests up and gets ready for next year.
Ag-Venture is an agricultural education program
geared to Highlands County's third graders to show
them 14 different agricultural commodities and how
they are produced and their benefits to both them
and their county, according to Phypers.
"We want the kids to know what agriculture is and
how it affects us all in many different ways," she says.
"They know generally about some of it, but they don't
know many of the byproducts each area produces and
what it actually means to our everyday lives."
Ag-Venture'provides individual learning stations in
14 areas: alligators, beef, bees, caladiums, citrus, farm
animals, dairy, forestry, grapes, ornamental horticul-
tural, poultry, strawberries, water and soil conserva-
tion, and vegetables. The students go to seven stations
where most of the learning involves hands-on activi-
ties like churning butter, planting caladium bulbs,
milking a faux-cow and smashing grapes.
"We want it to be fun and educational at the same
time," Phypers explains.
The stations are set up and manned by area agri-
business people and agencies, who plan and present
activities in their various fields.
It all started a dozen years ago when Phypers and


Daum proposed the field trip loosely based on a simi-
lar activity in Hillsborough County.
"We talked with the school board and other com-
munity leaders and with their endorsement, we sent
out letters asking for community support," Phypers
explains. "Donations started coming in and we were
off and running."
It all starts for the kids at about 9 a.m. when they
arrive at the fair grounds to be welcomed at a 'holding
station.' The children are given a T-shirt and colored
cowboy hat and can climb on a tractor or use an old-
fashioned water pump while waiting to head to their
first station.
The groups move from station to station throughout
the morning and wind up with a sack lunch and en-
tertainment which includes real-life cowboys who talk
about the Cracker Trail and what ranching was like in
Highlands County's early days.
The experience ends for the students at 1 p.m. so
they can return to their schools for dismissal.
For the volunteers and the 10-member Ag-Venture
board, it starts at dark 30 days earlier when a semi
loaded with hay arrives and the massive set-up starts.
The stations are spread out so each can have their
audience's full attention with no distractions.
"We want them (the kids) to focus on each station
so they get the full benefit of the experience," Phypers
says.
For the third-grade teachers, Ag-Venture begins in
September where they have access to shopping bags
full of materials they can use in their classrooms that
dove-tail with what will be learned at the fairgrounds.
"We have a fabulous time out there," Linda Alexan-
der of Woodlawn Elementary School says. "We have
writing assignments on what they see out there. We
need kids to understand what agriculture means to
us all. It's exciting for them and for us. They also get
to interact with animals and see agriculture actually


-J


PHOTO PROVIDED


One of the hands-on activities at Ag-Venture taught these
third-graders how to properly pot bulbs and seeds.

come to life."
"We hear from parents all the time that what they
learn here shows up in conversations all year long,"
Daum said. "That's what it's all about."
The Highlands Ag-Venture has proved so popular
that other counties have approached board members
for guidance in establishing programs in their areas,
Phypers said.
"We must be doing something right."


By KIM WILMATH
ST. PETERSBURG TIMES
Citing an anonymous letter Sen. Paula
Dockery received earlier this week and a
story published this week, Dockery and
Sen. Mike Fasano are calling on the Uni-
versity of South Florida to investigate USF
Polytechnic's expenditures.
The two state leaders, who have voiced
concerns about USF Poly's quest to split
off and become its own independent uni-
versity, told USF President Judy Genshaft
in a letter that "Many in Polk County and
elsewhere are having second thoughts
about an independent Polytechnic."
They also forwarded the letter to State
University System Chancellor Frank
Brogan.
Included was the letter sent to Dock-
ery by an anonymous USF Poly student,
which listed a number of accusations
against USF Poly leader Marshall Good-
man notably, that he misused campus
funds "for some of his personal follies."
"We certainly hope this is not true,"
Dockery and Fasano's letter says.
One of the charges in the anonymous
letter holds water: Goodman's son is
employed by USF Poly to run the school's
business incubator program in Polk
County.
Dockery and Fasano included a second
St. Petersburg Times story in their mes-
sage to Genshaft: an account of how USF
Poly pledged to spend half a million dol-
lars on a promotional documentary about
the new campus's construction.
"We sincerely urge that you fully
investigate ("audit") USF Polytechnic
expenditures to determine whether the
accusations of the students are valid," the
senators wrote, "and whether or not Dr.


Goodman is using good
judgment in utilizing tax
payer dollars to produce a
half million dollar video."
A USF Poly spokeswoman
said the promotional plans
were in the works months
before Polk County leaders,
including powerful state DOCKERY
Sen. J.D. Alexander, made a
push for the campus' split mid-summer,
and they have nothing to do with the
prospect of a potential rebranding.
Rather, said Samantha Lane, the project
is crucial to attract students, faculty and
visitors from around world to the "histori-
cal" new Calatrava campus being built
in a swath of rural land off Interstate 4 in
Polk County.
USF Poly will recoup expenditures by
selling DVD copies, which the school also
hopes to pitch to PBS, Lane said.
"This investment, vs. any other market-
ing expense typical of a university, will
have a direct return on investment," she
said.
She pointed out that the project is cur-
rently on hold, pending royalty negotia-
tions with Calatrava, and no money has
yet been paid.
The story said Goodman authorized the
project without bringing it before the USF
Poly board or USF board of trustees, said
Gene Engle, who serves on both boards.
Engle said that was fine under Goodman's
authority as regional chancellor, as he
understands it.
Goodman did tell Engle about the idea,
Engle said, and it sounded like a good
one. But he never mentioned a price.
"Now that that's come along, it needs to
be reviewed," Engle said. "That is a lot of
money."


By KIM WILMATH
ST. PETERSBURG TIMES
The University of South Florida Poly-
technic has been good to the Goodman
family.
Marshall Goodman, its regional
chancellor since 2006, earns more than
$261,000 year, the highest salary of all
three USF system regional chancellors.
And during his tenure, both of his sons
have worked for the Lakeland branch
campus.
Robert Goodman, 27, beat out more
than a dozen applicants for a $50,112 job
at USF Poly last year.
Steven Goodman, 24, the chancel-
lor's other son, earned $3,000 over three
months as a consultant for USF Poly's
social media services.
Does that qualify as nepotism?
USF Poly, which is at the center of a
debate about whether it should split off
and become an independent public uni-
versity, says no.
"USF Polytechnic recognizes the
concerns of nepotism and has made
additional efforts to ensure we follow
proper procedures," said spokeswoman
Samantha Lane.
Michael Hoad, spokesman at USF's
main Tampa campus, put it this way:
"There was a potential for conflict of
interest, and we had to manage that
potential."
Marshall Goodman was not available
for an interview, Lane said.
Before opening its new business incu-
bator program in Polk County, called Blue
Sky, USF Poly decided to bring in some-
one to promote the venture on social
media. They landed on Steven Goodman.
He worked for USF for three months
starting in December 2009. But, according
to Lane, his father never knew about it.
"When he was informed, Dr. Goodman


personally reimbursed the full amount to
USF Polytechnic for all payment to Steven
Goodman," Lane said.
Documents from USF Poly corroborate
that account.
Steven Goodman sent three invoices
to USF Poly for $1,000 each to create and
maintain the Blue Sky blog and Twitter
account, monitor staff LinkedIn accounts,
shoot video for USF Poly's You'ube chan-
nel and deliver weekly progress reports.
USF used his services, Lane said,
because at the time he was president of
NeoNet Media, a Lakeland consulting
firm dedicated to bringing "21st century
marketing techniques" to its clients, ac-
cording to its website.
A person who answered the company's
phoneWednesday said Goodman no
longer worked there.
The offer for Goodman's other son,
Robert, came in August 2010.
On behalf of USF Polytechnic, the letter
said, administrators were pleased to offer
Robert Goodman the position of univer-
sity liaison for Blue Sky. He would help
coordinate internships, special events and
educational programs at USF Poly's four
business incubators across Polk County.
"We are very excited about the prospect
of your joining our team and our staff
at USF!" the letter said. Marshall Good-
man, his father, is one of two people who
signed it.
The same day, USF president Judy
Genshaft signed a memo from USF Poly-
technic titled, "No violation of nepotism
exists," detailing the reasons why Robert
Goodman was the most qualified candi-
date for the position.
Out of 17 applicants, Goodman, who
eamed a master's in history from Cal Poly
San Luis Obispo, was the only one with an
education from a polytechnic university,
the memo says. And he gave the best on-
campus interview.


Dockery, Fasano cal


1 for audit of Poly


Poly says no nepotism in

hiring of chancellor's sons


Page 8A The Polk County Democrat


October 22, 2011





fltn 2.01ThPokCuyDeort ag9


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS RIGHT HERE.


"Winter Haven Hospital is


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AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


We are pleased to welcome Sijo Parekattil, M.D., as
Director of Urology and Robotics at Winter Haven Hospital. Board
certified in Urology, Dr. Parekattil is one of the world's most
renowned robotic micro-surgeons having performed more
robotic microsurgery procedures than any other surgeon in
the world. He joins us full time from the University of Florida
College of Medicine and Shands Healthcare and will continue
his work as Assistant Professor of Medicine and Co-director
of Robotic Surgery in the University's Urology Department.

The addition of Dr. Parekattil provides Polk County men and
women with access to university-level urologic research and
care-exciting new treatment options for prostate cancer,
infertility, chronic groin pain and women's-health. Please join
us in welcoming Dr. Parekattil to the Winter Haven community.

Compassion. Innovation.Trust. We're your family's choice.


Fororenfomatinabut interHavenHosit
Centerfor Uology call 63-29-4652


~a
~3


The Polk County Democrat Page 9A


October 22 2011






.Pne T P u mc 2 hr


OBITUARIES


George Watson Wilson


George Watson i.-,' -.- *
Wilson, age 92, of .':.
Bartow died Sun-
day, Oct 9, 2011, at '
Lakeland Regional
Medical Center in '
Lakeland.
He was em- .
played by Polk
County and was
a deacon of St.
John Missionary
Baptist Church of George Watson Wilson
Bartow.
He served in the Army.
He was the son of the late Watson


Wilson and the late Rose Wilson.
He is survived by his wife, Frances
Wilson of Bartow; three sons, Otis Wil-
son (Camille), of Lakeland, Alvin Wilson
(Janice), Hampton, Va., Ralph Wilson
(Wanda), Jacksonville, Fla.; two sisters,
Marie Dunbar, Augusta, Ga., Ida Lou
Hicks, Augusta, Ga.
Visitation: 5-7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 21.
Funeral: 11 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 22 at
St. John Missionary Baptist Church.
Interment: Wildwood Cemetery,
Bartow.
Arrangements are by Gause Funeral
Home, 625 S. Holland Parkway, Bartow
where the family will receive friends.


Matthew Ed-
ward Anderson,
age 23, passed
away Wednesday,
Oct. 19, 2011, in
Bartow.
Born March 15,
1988, in Winter
Haven, Matt was
a lifelong area -
resident.
Matt was a
graduate of Bar- Matthew Anderson
tow High School,
Class of 2006.
He worked in the construction industry.
Matt's hobbies included surfing and
riding motorcycles.


Matt is survived by his parents, Todd
and Wendy Anderson of Eagle Lake;
maternal grandmother Frances Parrish
of Eagle Lake; paternal grandmother
Jane Nelson and husband Roy of
Lakeland; paternal grandfather Martin
Anderson of Bartow; aunts and uncles,
Tommy and Sherri Russ of Bartow,
and James and Carmen Anderson of
Bartow; cousins, Benson Farmer, Bailey
Russ, Jesse Anderson all of Bartow,
along with all of his friends.
Service: 6 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 at
Whidden-McLean Funeral Home, 650
E. Main St., Bartow.
Condolences may be made to the
family at www.whiddenmcleanfuneral
home.com.


Cecil Newton (Preacher) Patterson


For more
Words of Comfort, go to
www.inheavenshome.com


Cecil Newton (Preacher) Patterson,
age 69, of Bowling Green, Fla., died
Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011, at home.
He was the son of the late Archibol
Patterson and the late Gwendolyn
Patterson.
He is also survived by his wife, Mattie
Patterson of Bowling Green, Fla.; one
son, two daughters, nine stepchildren.


Visitation: 5-7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 21,
2011.
Funeral: 3 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 22 at
Macedonia Primative Baptist Church
Bowling Green, Fla.
Arrangements are being handled by
Gause Funeral Home, 625 S. Holland
Parkway, Bartow where the family will
receive friends.


I make sure the water is clean, for all of us.

I am Mosaic.


As we mine the phosphate needed to help grow the world's food, it's no coincidence
That we preserve the water quality of nearby creeks and rivers. As an environmental
specialist, I'm part of a team that monitors these bodies of water to ensure that the
Water quality is sustained or even enhanced. Mosaic takes great care to meet Florida's
clean water standards. Because stewardship is an integral part of what we do.


SAnd I. see to it that the job is done right


Mosaic



www.mosaicfla.com


Matthew Edward Anderson


Words of Comfort
Death is the end of a lifetime,
not the end of a relationship.
Mitch Albom


October 22, 2011


e gaP 10A The Polk County Democrat







October 22, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 1 lA


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28193 569.995
MSD $69,995
$254E 578,495
525,3I $79,995
S25.0 $79,995
$19,%9 $79,995
$SM $586,895
Sw0 5$89,995
9W7. 5114,995


USED 2010 Dutchmen
DUTCHMEN LITE 29Q-G
STK #DCW8057A WAS 524.995
Now S'lA 6 71"


USED 2007 Forest River
CEDAR CREEK 34RETD
STK #DCW8093A WAS S59.995
Now $SAA 4 00


I' o E
1"; ws.--, YEASIof
,B .ROADSIDE

ASSISTANCE


USED 2004 Damon
CHALLENGER 348
STK #DCW8322 WAS 559.995
Now s47,982'


USED 2009 Heartland
LANDMARK Pinehurst 39
STK #DCW8315A WAS 559.995
Now $47,995'


USED 2007 Four Winds
HUuRICANE us
STK #DCW8151A WAS $66.670
Now $52,877'


USED 2010 Four Winds
HURRICANE 30Q
STK #DCW8209A WAS $69,995
Now $59,995


One year of Good Sam Platinum
Roadside Assitance included
with every retail RV sold.
Prior sales excluded Roadside
Assistance administered by
Affinity Road & Travel Club, Inc.


USED 2003 Safari
SAHARA 3753
STK #DCW8444A WAS S94.995
Now 572,995'


USED 2011 Four Winds
CHATEAU 31B
STK #DCW8518A WAS $89.995
Now 74,995'


MANAGER'S PRE-OWNED SPECIALS!


SIRMAK/ ST # Y W SS


2005 Forest River SALEM 25FB
2004 Fleetwood CARAVANC255SBW
2003 Fleetwood CARAVAN 25
2006 GulfStreamAMERILITE24RS
2004 DutchmenSPORT26LDSL
2006 Fleetwood WILDERNESS250FQ
2004 Keystone OUTBACK 25RS
2004 DutchmenAEROUTE24RL
2005 Keystone OUTBACK 21RS
2011 Dutchmen KODIAK177QB-SL
2006 Sunnybrook BROOKSIDE289FWRLS
2010 Dutchmen AEROUTE 214
2005 Coachmen SPIRIT OF AMERICA 297RK
2006 Forest River SALEM26BH
2005 StarcraftARUBA TAHITI 295RLR
2006 Forest RiverTUNDRA24CKM5
2009 Trail Manor ELKMONT 24
2010 Dutchmen DUTCHMEN 26B-DL
2005 Forest River WILDCAT 29BHBP


DCW8290A 1I
DCW8334A T
DCW8613A TT
DCW8005A TT
DCW7817A TT
DCW8453B TT
DCW820A lTT
DCW8234A FW
DCW7814B n
DCW8085A HT
DCW8.238 FW
DCW7947A T
DCW8512A T
DCW7414B FW
DCW7771B FW
DCW8333A FW
DCW8356A T
DCW8432A TT
DCW8155C FW


14.995
S14.995
S.1995
515.995
514.995
$14.995
516.995
514995
aSI55995
521.995
519.995
S23.995
S57,995
519995
521.95
S19.995
524995
S22,275
521.995


55,000
552000
sooo
52.000
54.000
52.000
52,000





57oX

g.000
SLOOD






jaoo
Sim
Sim
S(Me


59,995
$9,995
59,995
$11,995
512,995
512,995
513.995
$13,995
514,995
$14,995
$14,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
516,995
516,995
517,995
$17,995
517,995


SID ST K Y W SS


2005 Holiday Rambler SAVOY 30BHS
2002 Holiday Rambler PRESIDENTIAL 36STT
2004 Carriage CAMEO 34CKT
2005 Fleetwood WILDERNESS 305RLDS
2006 Jayco EAGLE 323RKS
2000 Damon DAYBREAK 3270
2005 FleetwoodTERRA32S
2005 Coachmen FREELANDER 3100
2007 Gulf Stream CONQUEST 6211
2004 Forest River SUNSEEKER LE 3100SS
2006 Four Winds HURRICANE 30Q
2004 Coachmen CONCORD 225RK
2005 Starcraft AMBIENT 25DBS
2004 Forest River SUNSEEKER2890DS
2010 Four Winds CHATEAU 28A
2008 Keystone BIG SKY 315RLT
2011 Heartland GREYSTONE33QS
1999 Winnebago CHIEFTAIN 36L
2000 Safari CONTINENTAL PANTHER 425


DCW7976A FW
DCW8437A FW
DCW8429A FW
DCW8439A FW
DCW8295A FW
DCWC2102B A
DCWC2185 A
DCWC2115A C
DCW7932A C
DCWC2080A C
DCW8476A A
DCW8545B B
DCW8018A C
DCVVC2137BB C
DCW8614 C
DCW8128A FW
DCW8395A FW
DCW7848B AD
DCW8442B AD


519,995
S29,995
528,782
524,995
33,995
$29.995
549.995
S49.995
S45995
$39.995
539.995
$39,995
549.995
S44.995
S59.995
S54,995
559.995
S109,995


510000

SMlD



S4000
55m
55200


SSj
s2500



so=
m



Sms

9000


518,995
$19,995
$21,995
$22,995
$23,995
527,995
$29,995
$32,781
534,995
$34,995
$35,995
$37,995
539,995
$39,995
$42,995
$44,995
$44,995
544,995
579,995


'Prices not inclusive of tax. title, license and dealer doc fees "Based on Statistical Surveys 2010 Advertised inventory available at time of printing Not applicable to prior sales.
See dealer for details Offers expire 11,19/11 DCW15995-1011


ib; iii N
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SI_ M ]KEl/MnDE S :CK TP\. S 10SV VO


October 22, 2011


The Polk County Democrat Page 11A


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CALENDAIWN


ARTS
Saturday, Oct. 22
Roots and Boots Outdoor Music Festival, runs Saturday
and Sunday featuring Randy Houser, Bush Hawg, Robert
. Stowell, Daniel Lee Band and mud racing. Triple Canopy
Ranch is at 16950 County Road, 630 E., Lake Wales. Event
tickets and information are available at any of these spon-
sor's locations and online at www.triplecanopyranch.com.
Sunday, Oct. 23
Annual Cornucopia Art Show Reception, 3-5 p.m. Bartow
Art Guild will have show throughout October and November.
Bartow Public Library, 2150 S. Broadway, Bartow, 534-0131.

CLUBS
Tuesday, Oct. 25
Master Gardener Program, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., $125.00 to
cover cost of books and materials. Polk County Exten-
sion Office, 1702 Highway 17 South, Bartow. For Further
Information: Call David Shibles at (863) 519-8677, ext.
109 or www.polkhort.com.

COMMUNITY -
Saturday, Oct. 22
Haunted Jail Tour, 3-10 p.m., Kid friendly. $5 per entry.
Proceeds to the United Way. Tours are 30 minutes long.
PCSO Main Operations Center, Lawrence W. Crow, Jr., 455
N. Broadway, Bartow
Saturday, Oct. 22
PCSO and Bubba The Love Sponge Foundation charity
motorcycle ride for the family of Bea Reid, who was killed
on Sept. 18. All proceeds will benefit her sons. Start and
end at the WingHouse of Lakeland, 4515 S. Florida Ave.,
and includes a free food buffet for the participants. 8:30
a.m., registration; 10 a.m., kickstands up 11 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 22
Pix and Popcorn at the Library, 2:30 p.m. Bartow Public
Library, 2150 S Broadway Ave., Bartow, (863) 534-0131.
Saturday, Oct. 22
History Highlights Polk Proud 150, 2 p.m. Celebrate 150
years of Polk County history with special guided tours on
the history of the region. Included with general admis-
sion; Bok Tower Gardens, 1151 Tower Blvd., Lake Wales,
863-676-1408; www.boktowergardens.org
Saturday, Oct. 22
Iron Crusader 3.5 mile race, 10 a.m. Dirty Foot Adven-
ture Park, Singletary Road, Fort Meade..
Monday, Oct. 24
Computer Classes, Grant Seeking, 1 p.m. Bartow Public
Library, 2150 S Broadway Ave., Bartow, (863) 534-0131.
Tuesday, Oct. 25
True Coupon, 7-9 p.m., free. Wildwood Baptist Church,
1120 S. Woodlawn Ave., Bartow. Register at http://
truecouponing.com/ or call (863) 533-9424
Tuesday, Oct. 25
Adult Book Discussion, noon, These is My Words by
Nancy Turner, Good Measure Coffee and Cafe, 135 E. Main
St., Bartow. (863) 534-0131.


Tuesday, Oct. 25
6-8 Year-Old Story Time, 3:30 p.m., books read by
Bartow's Children's Librarian. Bartow Public Library, 2150
S. Broadway, Bartow, 534-0131.
Thursday, Oct. 27
The 69th annual Crickette Club, 4 p.m., downtown
Bartow. Annual carnival starts at about 5 p.m. immedi-
ately following the parade. Mosaic Park adjacent to the
Bartow Civic Center.

EDUCATION
Saturday, Oct. 22
K of C Youth Spelling Bee, 10 a.m., free. Open to
students in grades 5-10. Winter Haven Public Library at
325 Avenue A, NW. (863) 293-8203 or (863) 294-9184 for
information.

GOVERNMENT
Tuesday, Oct. 25
Polk County Commission, 9 p.m. Polk County Admin-
istrative Center, 330 W. Church St.., Bartow. 534-6000.
See agenda at http://www.polk-county.net/agendas.
aspx?menuid=70
Tuesday Oct. 25
Polk County School Board meeting, Work Session, work
session 1:30 p.m., Polk County School District, 1915 S.
Floral Ave., Bartow. 534-0521 to register for agenda or
see it at www.polk-fl.net/. School Board meeting, 5 p.m.,
Bartow High School, 1270 S. Broadway Ave.

HEALTH
Tuesday Oct. 25
Hospice Volunteer Training, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Part
of four classes people must attend for 16-hour certification
and interested participants should plan to attend all four
training. Lake Gibson Church of the Nazarene, 6868 N.'
Socrum Loop Road, Lakeland (863) 291-5567

RELIGION
Sunday, Oct. 23
157th homecoming celebration, 10 a.m. Music provided
by the Royal City Family Ministries. Featured guest speaker
will be Rev. Anthony Goff. Peace Creek Baptist, 3070 State
Road 60 E., Bartow. (863) 533-9263 or www.peacecreek
baptist.org for more information.

SPORTS
Saturday, Oct. 23
Paintball Tournament, event and trade show free, free
parking or admission, but tickets are required to watch
the Pro Games from the main grandstands $15 per day
at www.pspevents.com. This is the last day of three-day
event,1400 Broadway Blvd. S.E. Polk City, FL. 33868 (863)
984-3500.

Monday, Oct. 24
18th Annual Denis L. Fontaine Children'(Classic Gof-
Tournament to beneft Explorations V Children's Museum,
Lunch, registration at 11a.m. with a shotgun start at
1 p.m. Entry fee $125 per player or $450 for a foursome.
Lone Palm Golf Club, 800 Lone Palm Drive, Lakeland.
682-1178.


Tuesday
8 Ball Pool Tournament
Signupoat730pim.
55 Entry Fee WINLOTSOFCASH!
40( Wilgs Dine-inOnly
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Wednesday
Ladies Nite
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Karaoke &DJ 1til 2amSP
50, A&I ~"


Thursday
All YouCare To Eat
Baby Back B-B-Q Ribs
With Beans and Fries
$ 99 Dine-In only
1WA Mpurdiese ofany
bemrage4pm. 8.30p.m


Saturday
Ladies Night
Ladies drink free
9pm- 12:30am
No cover. DJs til2 am.


Friday .
All You Care To Drink
Unlimited Wells and Drafts
ONLY $10 9p. 130a.m.
with DJs 'Il2a.m.
veEntertainment by
Paige astle5S-8pm.Dinnerspedals


Wednesday,Oct 19
8pm- 1 pm
Live Entertainment
with Cory Greenway
& Rodger Brutus
And returning Nov. 2


SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL


'ALA
2011


And they
went Boo!


PHOTO BY
CHRISTINE ROSLOW
Caleb Fortune and
Madelyn Eden helped
storyteller Katie Adams
tell the tale of a solitary
woman, a one-eyed fish
and some unfortunate
bandits who learn never
to peak through holes in
the wall. It was during
Ghost Stories at the Polk
County Historical Musem
on Friday, Oct. 7.


I .. .. ..........




U~p mWe'reO PEnn-







Mon.-Sat. undrl til 7:OPM


October 22, 2011


Page 12A The Polk County Democrat




The Polk County Democrat Page 13A


nniversarv


CELEBRATE


Ulears!
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Peace Creek Baptist Church to celebrate 157th anniversary


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
On Sunday, Oct. 23, the congregation of
the Peace Creek Baptist Church just out-
side Bartow will gather, not just for regular
Sunday services, but to mark the church's
157th birthday and its special place in his-
tory as the oldest church in Polk County.
The homecoming festivities will kick off
at 10 a.m. with a special musical program
featuring the Royal City Family Ministries,
followed by regular worship services led
by longtime church member and defacto
associate pastor Anthony Goff who also
doubles as the church historian, according
to Pastor Shane Rodriguez.
In keeping with tradition, the services will
be followed by a covered dish dinner on the
grounds, to which the public is invited.
It all started back in 1854 when the
Peace River was still Peas Creek, and an
itinerant preacher from the Tampa area
met up with eight potential congregants,
mostly named Seward and a single slave.
The meeting was propitious for the little
band, giving root to Polk County's very first
Baptist Church. The tiny congregation met
irregularly in those days because the Rev.
J. M. Hayman had other flocks to tend,
but eventually, Hayman made his home in
nearby Fort Blount (later Bartow)


Nothing was easy in those days, church
members only gathered when the preach-
er made his circuit and times were hard
on the Florida frontier. Fighting with the
Seminoles forced minister to move his
family to the safety of the more populous
Tampa for a while, and then a multi-year
scourge of yellow fever hampered the
dedicated congregation's growth.
Faith and time helped and by 1868
the church was holding regular monthly
meetings with 81 members, which quickly
plummeted to only 17. The Rev. Hayman
kept the faith and continued to minister to
a fluctuating flock. Membership went from
81 to 17 and a later low of only 11 members,
but the upward trend has continued and
today's membership numbers 250.
Not only did the flock experience its
ups and downs, so did the church itself.
It started 'down by the riverside' until the
frame building was blown from its founda-
tions in a 1920s hurricane, later reseated
on its original foundation where it lasted
until the 1950s when a new structure was
constructed.
It has been in a building mode since
then. The present church was built on its
present site in the 1980s when a land swap
with IMC moved the worshipers from the
East Peace River Road south of State Road
60 to 3070 State Road 60 East. The present


ne original reace .reeK Iaptist nurcn.
building was erected in 1987, followed by
the pastor's home in 1990.
Rodriguez took the helm of the church
in 2009 when he and his family, wife Jesse,
daughters Jessica, Shannon, Raquel and
son Rickey moved from Tampa to make
Bartow their home.
Rodriguez said he was drawn to the
oldest Polk church by the "loving people"
who call Peace Creek Baptist church
their worship home. "This is an amazing
group of loving people who are dedicated
to reaching people for Christ and by
helping their community," he explains.
The church's outreach programs include
ongoing support for the Church Service
Center with food and clothing drives,
providing holiday meals for the needy
and helping where the community is in
need, he adds.
The church, Rodriguez says, unlike some


4 1
PHOTOS BY CATHY PALMER
Peace Creek Baptist Church, one of the state's
oldest churches, is located at 3070 State Road
60 East outside Bartow.
in Polk County, has a diverse membership
ranging from the very young to the elderly.
'Age doesn't matter to us," he explains, "ev-
eryone is welcome and everyone is loved."
Services on Sundays begin with Sunday
School at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship
services at 11. There is an evening Bible
training class at 5 p.m. on Sundays, fol-
lowed by a 6 p.m. service. The church also
holds a Wednesday evening prayer service
at 6:30 p.m.
It appears that the Indian-fighting,
circuit-riding Civil War veteran preacher
planted roots deep and strong in Polk
County's worship community. And that is
something to celebrate.


50 years on the organ


Conley has been playing at church since she was a young teen


By CATHY PALMER
CORRESPONDENT
As a young lady growing up at Lake
Buffam outside Bartow, Gayle Conley
busied herself with school, church and
music. She didn't know then that her in-
terest and ability at the piano would land
her a job that's lasted 50 years.
She learned the piano because she
loved it and apparently her love for the
instrument and ability at the ivories
reached the ears of the minister of the
nearby Peace Creek Baptist Church and
its deacons.
The Peace Creek church delegation, ap-
parently acquainted with Conley's father,
arranged a meeting with the girl, who
was barely in her teens, and her family.
"They asked me ifI would come and play
for their church," she explains. 'And, my
daddy said 'yes, I would' and I've been
doing it ever since." She adds that her
family showed their support by moving
their church membership to the small
Peace Creek church.
'Ever since' means just that. Gayle
Conley has played at Peace Creek Baptist
Church almost every Sunday since she was
'13 or 14,'she recalls. She started playing
the piano for the congregation since that
was all the church had. And, as her musi-
cal prowess grew to include the organ, the


PHOTO BY
CATHY PALMER
Gayle Conley.


church also added
an organ.
"I love both
instruments,"
she says, "but
the piano is my
favorite." Conley
says she plays by
ear even though
she reads music.
"When it sounds
right I know its
right," she ex-
plains. "I read the
notes and add the
feeling." She adds
that playing isn't a


job to her, "it's just fun."
Speaking of jobs, in addition to her
piano/organ duties, she also finds time
to teach Sunday School to a class of two-
and three-year-olds. "As much as I love to
play, I've always loved teaching the little
ones too," she says.
She may have kept her job at Peace
Creek church, but she left her job with the
Stuart family business several years ago
to follow another dream. She wanted to
take her love of children one step further
and applied for a job as a classroom para-
professional with the Polk school system.
She now spends her days with kindergart-
ners at Pinewood Elementary School.


Fort Meade Animal Clinic
0" 711 E. Broadway, Forteade/ 285-8652 "'


To celebrate the arrival of the Vietnam Traveling
Memorial Wall in our dty on October 27,
we are proud to offer all active
and retired military veterans 11
percent off their total bill from
Oct, 27 through Veterans Day,
Nov, 11, Just a small way of
extending our sincerest thanks to
those who have so bravely
served our country,
We salute youl


Conley recently celebrated another
50th anniversary, her marriage to hus-
band Lee, who is also active in the church
where they were married 50 years ago.
They have two sons, Larry and Kenny,
who both live in Orlando.


Conley also is often asked to expand
her Sunday worship playing to include
weddings and funerals, which she says
she does gladly. "It doesn't matter to me
what the occasion is, if it needs music, I'm
happy playing."


a 6:00pm 8:00pm
For Elementary School Age or Younger
Costume Optional
%f FREE
6* Ghoulish Games A Creepy Crafts
1001 Burns Ave. 0 Dr. Frankensteins Laboratory
Lak63eWales4 Spooky Boogy Dance Party
863-676-9441
www.lakewalesymca.org Kid's Costume Contest




' Brian's OuHioor World

NEW & USED FIREARMS & ACCESSORIES



RU .; ER


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WIr UITV., ~


- I-r-


Page 14A The Polk County Democrat


October 22, 2011




The Polk County Democrat Page 15A


OctorUU1 .Dr ,


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P~2e 16A The Polk County Democrat October 22, 2011


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Keystone AVALANCHE 320RK
Four Winds CHATEAU 19G
Thor Motor Coach ACE EV029.1
Four Winds FREEDOM ELITE 28U
Four Winds CHATEAU CITATION 245A
Four Winds HURRICANE 3U
Four Winds CHATEAU 235
Four Winds CHATEAU 31K
Four Winds HURRICANE 34U
Four Winds CHATEAU CITATION 29BG
Damon CHALLENGER 355D


bSl.


USED 210U Dutchmen
DUTCHMEN UTE 29Q-GS
STK #DCW8057A WAS S24.995
Now 516,871


USED 2007 Four Winds
HURRICANE 345
STK ,DCW8151A WAS S66.670
Now '52,877*


USED zuu/ forest Kiver
CEDAR CREEK 34RETSD
STK #DCW8093A WAS S59.995
Now 544,995'


USED 2010 Four Winds
HURRICANE 30Q
STK #DCW8209A WAS 569.995
Now $59,995'


1 YEAR of

ROADSIDE

ASSISTANCE
One year of Good Sam Platinum
Roadside Assitance included
with every retail RV sold.
Prior sales excluded Roadside
Assistance administered by
Affinity Road & Travel Club. Inc.


USED 2009 Heartland
LANDMARK Pinehurst 39
STK #DCW8315A WAS 559.995
Now s47,995'


USED 2UU3 Saarn
SAHARA 3753
STK ADCW8444A WAS $94.995
Now $72,995'


MANAGER'S PRE-OWNED SPECIALS!


SIRMK/OE STOC #SYE A AV O


Forest River SALEM 25FB
Fleetwood CARAVAN C5SBW
Fleetwood CARAVAN 25
Gulf Stream AMERILITE24RS
Dutchmen SPORT 26LDSL
Fleetwood WILDERNESS 250FQ
Keystone OUTBACK 25RS
Dutchmen AEROUTE24RL
Keystone OUTBACK 21RS
Dutchmen KODIAK I77QB-SL
Sunnybrook BROOKSIDE 289FWRLS
Dutchmen AEROUTE 214
Coachmen SPIRIT OF AMERICA 297RK
Forest River SALEM 26BH
Starcraft ARUBA TAHm 295RLR
Forest River TUNDRA 24CKM5
Trail Manor ELKMONT 24
Dutchmen DUTCHMEN 268-DL
Forest River WILDCAT 29BHBP


DCW8290A
DCW8334A
DCW8613A
DCW8005A
DCW7817A
DCW8453B
DCW820iA
DCW8234A
DCW7814B
DCW8085A
DCW852 B
DCW7947A
DCW8512A
DCW7414B
DCW7771B
DCW8333A
DCW8356A
DCW8432A
DCWS155C


514,995
514995
511995
515995
S14.995
514.995
51,995
514995
a515995
521.995
519.995
523.995
S17995
519995
21.995
519.995
524,995
522,275
S21995


S5,000
$5,000
S000
$4,000
52.000
$2,000
53.000
$1,000
$1,000
$7,000
S5.000
$7,000
51,000
$3,000
S5,000
$3,000
$7,000
$4,80
$4,000


$9,995
$9,995
59,995
511,995
$12,995
$12,995
513,995
513,995
514,995
514,995
514,995
516,995
$16,995
$16,995
516,995
$16,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995


Holiday Rambler SAVOY 30BHS
Holiday Rambler PRESIDENTIAL 36SIT
Carriage CAMEO 34CKT
Fleetwood WILDERNESS 305RIDS
Jayco EAGLE 323RKS
Damon DAYBREAK 3270
Fleetwood TERRA 325
Coachmen FREELANDER3100
Gulf Stream CONQUEST 6211
Forest River SUNSEEKER LE 310055
Four Winds HURRICANE 30Q
Coachmen CONCORD 225RK
Starcraft AMBIENT 25DB5
Forest River SUNSEEKER 2890DS
Four Winds CHATEAU 28A
Keystone BIG SKY 315RLT
Heartland GREYSTONE 33QS
Winnebago CHIEFTAIN 36.
Safari CONTINENTAL PANTHER 425


*Prices not inclusive of tax. title, license and dealer doc fees "Based on Statistical Surveys 2010 Advertised inventory available at time of printing Not applicable to prior sales
See dealer for details Offers expire 11/19/11 DCW15995-1011


0*MEMD ST # YAE


DCW8304
DCW8296
DCW7973
DCW812
DCW8668
DCW8158
DCW8281
DCW8037
DCW8039
DCW8115
DCW7855
DCW8043
DCW8207


S46.11
$46,762
548.616
S68.427
598,188
$84,696
5103.912
S105,343
S106.605
590.964
5124.621
5103.035
S142902


51.453
$8867
$8621
58,432
528,193
$14,701
$25.41
S25348
526,610
510,969
537,726
S13,040
527.907


$34,688
$37,895
$39,995
$59,995
$69,995
$69,995
578,495
$79,995
$79,995
579,995
$86,895
589,995
$114,995


USED 2011 Four Winds
CHATEAU 31B
STK #DCW8518A WAS $89,995
Now 574,995"


KYR MKSEa/M ODSTK YE WS SE S OW


DCW7976A I
DCW8437A I
DCW8429A I
DCW8439A I
DCW8295A I
DCWC2102B
DCWC2185
DCWC2115A
DCW7932A
DCWC2080A
DCW8476A
DCW8545B
DCW8038A
DCWC2I37BB
DCW8oI4
DCW8128A
DCW8395A
DCW7848B
DCW8442B


519.995
529.995
528782
524.995
533995
$29.995
549.995
549.995
545995
539.995
539.995
539,995
49,995
544.995
S44.995
559.995
554,995
559,995
109.995


$1000
$10,000
S6J87
52,000
$10,000
SO000
S20.000

SIL000
SSWOO
$4,000
$2.000
S10.000
$5,000
$100ooo
$15,000
$10,000

530,000


$18,995
519,995
521,995
$22,995
523,995
$27,995
$29,995
532,781
534,995
$34,995
$35,995
537,995
539,995
$39,995
542,995
$44,995
544,995
$44,995
$79,995


October 22, 2011


Paee 16A The Polk County Democrat


/a=- *** *"".47M