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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00635
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
Publication Date: 3/30/2011
Frequency: semiweekly[1946-<1992>]
weekly[ former <1936>-1946]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
sobekcm - UF00028292_00635
System ID: UF00028292:00635
 Related Items
Preceded by: Polk County record

Full Text



_________________________ r M Field Day at Bartow


Expert cites hole in
phosphate research

See Page 2A


Welcome Karleigh ...
See the Back Fence

See Page 8A


Field Day at Bartow
SElementary Academy

See Page 4B


L .... ........ .. 3C ,-DIGIT 326
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SPECIAL COLL-PAM WILLIAMS 200
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007

lH~e Polk CountyDe


75C


Democrat Vol. 80, No. 61


Wednesday, March 30, 2011
Copyright 2010 Sun Coast Media Group


Happy Birthday, cancer survivors


By JEFF ROSI
EDITOR
There was a birth
Thursday night... t
be birthday parties.
It was so big it wa
the Bartow Civic Ce
somewhere between
100 people celebral
ing another year at
"Tonight is a birth
party," Patricia Cala
a packed room at ti
Cancer Survivor Ce
Dinner as hundred,
cakes, each with a
top, were served. "']
the American Canc
all about... bringing


Annual dinner helps gear
LOW birthday." Vugman, told tl
When all the cupcakes were people at the ci
da party served, Calandros told the "Sixty-seven pe
hat should crowd to light the candles, diagnosed with
make a wish and blow them alive five years
is held at out. percent of cane
enter and Citing her inability to sing 20 or more year
m 50 and well, she wished them all can lead norma
ted surviv- happy birthday, but the cancer tive lives."
this event, survivors, who later stood to Numbers so
hday be recognized, were applauded high from such
andros told for making it another year. nesses show ho
he 12th And the number of people research has co
lebration who stood to be recognized generation or t
s of cup- was numerous, helped by Relay
handle on "There are 11.7 million nationwide. Ba
That is what cancer survivors since 1997," year of particip
er Society is speaker and Watson Health lay For Life is o
lg one more Clinic hematologist Dr. Galina leaders in raisii


up Relay For Life walkers
he nearly 350 cancer research.
vic center. "They raise a lot of money
recent of adults here in Bartow," said this year's
cancer were chairman, Bartow Police Chief
later and 14.7 Joe Hall. "There are 360 teams
:er survivors live in the state and Bartow ranks
rs. So people number 12. That's awesome."
al and produc- This year's event is sched-
uled to take place Friday, April
dramatically 8, and Saturday, April 9, at
harmful ill- Bartow High School's stadium.
)w far cancer And, it isn't just a walk, it's, like
)me in the last most things that happen in
wo and it is Bartow, a party and celebra-
y For Life events tion. It starts at 6 p.m.
rtow, in its 11th There will be overnight PHOTO BYJEFF ROSLO\
eating in the Re- camping, a luminaria cer- An attendee at the Cancer Survivor
neofthe state "An attendee at the Cancer Survivor
g money for DINNER Dinner lights a candle during the
g money for INER7A birthday celebration Thursday.


City seat up




for grabs


Hopefuls disagree on

budget, police department


By BILL RETTEW JR.
STAFF WRITER
Wayne Lewis will face off against
John Fus for a seat on the city
commission in the Tuesday, April
5 election.
Lewis is finishing up his term
as both commissioner and mayor,
while this is
Fus' first shot
at becoming a
commissioner.
Both men
were asked
.the same five
questions
separately,
and while
there were
stark differ-
ences, the two John Fus
opponents
also agreed in
principal on some issues.
Both candidates were asked
about the budget, electricity rates,
downtown, the Community Rede-
velopment Agency and the police
department.
e In light of decreased revenues
from ad valorem taxes, how did
each candidate propose to meet
a state requirement of a balanced
city budget?
Fus said that assessing value is a
"balancing game" and the money


MORE INSIDE:
Where to vote, Page 2B
Polk County Democrat recommendation,
Page 4A

"has got to come out of homeown-
ers" pockets one way or another."
Lewis pro-
posed funding
the cuts by tak-
ing a long, hard
look at purchase
orders and lim-
iting re-leasing
of vehicles and
equipment.
"Just because
it's in the budget
doesn't mean we
have toss that Wayne ewis
one out and get
a new one," said
Lewis.
By changing energy providers,
this year, the city might save up
to $5 million annually for power
costs. Should residents, business
owners, the city, or all three ben-
efit from the savings?
The cost is "high, particularly
on the industrial side," said Lewis.
"Some of if it needs to be passed

CITY 7A


CORRECTIONS
Bartow High School, Summerlin Academy
and International Baccalaureate will have
graduation at 7:30.p.m. Saturday, June 4,
at the Lakeland Center, 701 W. Lime Blvd.,
Lakeland.
The baccalaureate event, an inspirational
service, is at 7 p.m., Tuesday, May 31, at
Main Street Baptist Church, 1140 E. Main St.,
Bartow.
The Polk County Democrat published incor-
rect information.
In a different story inWednesday, March
23 newspaper, there was not an argument
between Jodie Culverhouse and Leopoldo
Vazquez, a man who was Baker Acted by
the Bartow Police Department. Culverhouse
said Vazquez complained about noisy pets,
said there were drug users living in the
Summerlin Oaks apartments and said he was
with the CIA and left.


Trip to Tallahassee tops with POPS

Area students to see legislation, visit colleges


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER
Students with the POPS (Profes-
sional Opportunities Program for
Students) gathered in the lobby of
Triple Eagle CDC Monday after-
noon. Soon they would be board-
ing a bus and heading to Tallahas-
see. They excitedly talked about
what they would do once they
arrived.
"We're going to sit in on a Senate
legislation in Tallahassee," said
Don'Tavius Sanders, an 11th grade
student at Bartow High School.


Sanders said he wants to become
a lawyer, which was why sitting in
on a legislative session of the state
senate interested him. His ultimate
goal, he said, is to one day be a U.S.
Supreme Court justice.
But what really held his interest
was the other purpose of the trip.
"Then we'll be visiting two col-
leges, Florida State and FAMU," he
said. "I'm excited to be going. I'm
anxious, because I've never been to
FAMU."
Chauna Mason, a 10th grade
POPSI|7A


PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER


Hugging pillows, two youths with POPS board the bus to
Tallahassee, where they will join other students with POPS from
across the state.


7 05252 00025 8


INSIDE:
Arrests ......................2A
Editorial...................A
Obituaries................5A
Calendar ................5A


Conimi ity ............ A
Country Report........ 1B
School Life.........4B-6B
Sports ...................... B


Good Morning,
Nora
Unrue


1;s


____ ___ ___ ___ ___ ____ ___ ___ ___ ___I --


Deal of the Day
Lipizzan stallions
coming
See Page 6B


Bartow, Florida 33830
www.PolkCountyDemocrat.com


Platform Art: Hog Wild


W


I __











Grow house near Highland City found


Detectives arrested
a Highland City resi-
dent who was allegedly
growing marijuana in
her house and using an
above ground swimming
pool in the living room
for water and fertiliza-
tion, the Polk County
Sheriff's Office reported.
Responding to a house
at 6284 Cornerstone
Drive near Yarborough
Lane, detectives seized
and dismantled an ex-
tensive marijuana grow
house, taking 68 mature
five-foot tall marijuana
plants in three separate
grow rooms.
The resident, Vivian
Oviedo-Martinez, 26,
was arrested on March
25, the sheriff's office
reports. She was charged
with cultivation of




By GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA The
phosphate industry needs
to open up its research
on mine reclamation
techniques to worldwide
scientific review in order
to overcome a daunting
problem: restoring the
underground layers of
sand and clay that had
naturally kept wetlands
and streams on the sur-
face wet.
That's according to
renowned wetlands res-
toration ecologist Kevin
Erwin of Fort Myers. He
was one of more than
a dozen scientists who
spoke Monday on the first
day of a two-day confer-
ence.
About 120 people at-
tended the State of the
Science on Phosphate
Mining and the Envi-
ronment, held at the
Charlotte Harbor Event


marijuana, possession
of marijuana more than
20 grams, possession of
marijuana with intent to
sell, possession of drug
paraphernalia, theft of
electricity, maintaining.
a dwelling for drug use,
and child neglect. A child
in the home at the time
of arrest was turned over
to the Division of Chil-
dren and Families, PCSO
reported.
The sheriff's office was
operating undercover
during a PROCAP initia-
tive on Friday. PROCAP
stands for Proactive
Community Attack on
Problems. The program
involves crime analysts
gathering data each
day and studying crime
trends, and then deliv-
ering that information


This above ground swimming pool was providing water and
fertilizer to marijuana plants inside this house detectives found Bartow Area Arrests
in Highland City. March 20
to deputies. During its during this initiative: 71 Michelle Webb, Marty
investigation, deputies arrests were made on the Lane, possession of
focused their efforts on west side of the county, methamphetamine
the areas of Combee and 37 arrests on the east without prescription,
Road; Highland City, side. Bureau of Special released on $1,000 bond;
Crystal Lake and Willow Investigations under- possession of cannabis
Oak. cover detectives helped under 20 grams, re-
A total of 108 arrests account for 42 of the leased on $500 bond; use
were made county-wide arrests. or possession of drug
paraphernalia, released


Expert cites

and Conference Cen- by pioneering som
ter. Hosted by the U.S. the phosphate indl
Environmental Protection first wetlands rest
Agency, the conference projects.
was intended to identify He later crisscro,
gaps in the data to help between working a
guide an areawide impact consultant for the
study on phosphate try to working as a]
mining by the U.S. Army pert witness for co
Corps of Engineers. that challenged mi
Erwin displayed a pho- projects.
tograph to illustrate how For the past few
the mentalities of special Erwin has been wo
interests keep them from ing to restore wetla
working together to solve around the world a
phosphate mining prob- board member for
lems. The photo showed lands Internationa
two men with boxes over the Ramsar Convel
their heads butting up an organization we
against each other, to restore wetlands
"This is a small com- countries.
munity of scientists who The phosphate ii
are considered either has been focused c
for or against mining," to get vegetation to
Erwin said. "As long as root so wildlife can
we keep this contained to on reclaimed mine
ourselves, we are going Problems remain,
nowhere." er, because the ma
Erwin has a unique per- wetlands on the sit
spective. He launched his "unreliable," he sai
career in the early 1980s The problem ste:


hole in research


e of
ustry's
ration

ssed
.s a
indus-
n ex-
unties
ning

years,
irk-
nds
is a
Wet-
l and
nation,
)rking
s in 160,

industry
on how
take
Sdwell
sites.
howev-
nmade
:es are
.d.
ms


from the way mining
removes underground
layers of clay along with
phosphate pebbles and
sand.
To reclaim the sites,
phosphate workers fill
their pits with the leftover
sand.
The clay, which has
been liquified during
the mining process, gets
pumped into in gigantic
disposal reservoirs.
The sand-filled areas
become more porous and
the clay disposal less po-
rous. That makes the flow
of waterr through a site "a
wild card," he said.
The challenge is to "re-
construct substrate that
can hold water," Erwin
said.
"We have to give the
soils a lot of attention," he
said. "To date, we've given
only lip service to soils."
He displayed a photo of
one wetland he worked to
create some 30 years ago.


It now supports trees that
he planted.
But the site's "understo-
ry," a part of the ecosys-
tem used by a variety of
wildlife, "looks like crap,"
a sign of the site's altered
hydrology, he said.
Researchers now have
key tools to use to analyze
how water moves through
a site. Erwin cited a re-
mote sensing technology
called LIDAR.
However, Erwin also
emphasized the need for'
phosphate companies to
submit their research for
peer review.
The added costs of such
research should be con-
sider "full-cost account-
iig," he said.
"What we're doing is
destroying a resource and
not putting it back fully,"
he said.
Other scientists speak-
ing Monday included:
Hydrogeologist
Patricia Metz of the U.S.


on $500 bond; keep or
maintain dwelling or
vehicle for drug use, re-
leased on $500 bond.
John Smith, Golfview
Avenue, violation of
probation for grand
theft, community control
release.
Johnathan Johnson,
Shay Drive, violation of
probation for leaving
scene of accident with
property damage, held
without bond; failure to
appear for abuse of 911,
held on $1,500 bond;
failure to appear for dis-
orderly conduct, held on
$500 bond.
Jerry Manning, East
Magnolia Street, failure
to appear for knowingly
driving while license sus-
pended or revoked, held
on $2,000 bond.




Geological Survey, who
reported on a five-year
study that showed exces-
sive withdrawals primar-
ily for phosphate mining
drew down the Floridan
aquifer by as much as 70
feet by 1975 in the upper
Peace River. That reversed
the flow of water from
springs, so that now, the
river's flow drains down
sinkholes and crevices.
John Garlanger of
Ardaman & Associates,
used a simple mathemati-
cal formula to postulate
that mining causes little
change in the way rain
soaks into theground
or runs off into streams.
The Peace River flow has
declined 30 percent since
the 1960s, but that's due
to a decline in rainfall, he
said.
E-mail:gmartin@sun-herald.com


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March 30, 2011


Page 2A The Polk County Democrat








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March 30, 2011


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Last Thursday, Mayor Wayne
Lewis spent most of his day at
the civic center.
He was there for the mayor's
annual prayer breakfast and
then again later that evening for
the American Cancer Society's
Relay for Life Cancer Survivors
Dinner.
Lewis didn't just sit at the
head table, but was charged
with setting up the room
Wednesday and running the
sound system as he voluntarily
does at dozens of civic func-
tions.
Lewis is well known and liked
around the city.
He genuinely gets excited and
it's contagious when he talks
about everything from the city's


I OUR VIEWPOINT

street lamps to Bartow's claim
as the home of the world's larg-
est pallet factory.
His opponent in the April 5
race for commissioner, John
,Fus, is not an unknown around
town, but still has an uphill
battle to climb.
Fus is a first-time candidate
who regularly attends city
meetings.
He continues to fight hard
against expansion of Repub-
lic's Cedar Trail Landfill, which
abuts his property. But his polit-
ical experience, enthusiasm and
political savvy can't compete
with Lewis' tenure as a commis-
sioner and now as mayor.


Although candidates shouldn't
be judged on how well they are
liked, and the single ballot issue
to pick Fus or Lewis shouldn't
be decided on personalities, it's
hard to pass on Lewis.
Still, the issues have a more
lasting effect on the city and
should play a major role when
voters choose a candidate.
While Fus said during a recent
interview that homeowners
regularly get stuck picking up
the tab, Lewis had real solutions
when he mentioned his fiscal
record.
As a commissioner, Lewis
regularly "watches every penny"
by reading purchase orders, and
then quietly goes behind the
scenes making suggestions on


how to save.
Both men are proud of the
city's police force, though Fus
considered turning control over
to the county.
While Fus said the matter
should be further examined,
Lewis was vehemently opposed
to disbanding the local police
department.
Voters have a choice and
should exercise their right to
vote as a show of confidence for
both candidates.
We like Lewis' stand on the
issues and think he is more
experienced in the workings of
our government.
That's why we recommend
Wayne Lewis for a seat on the
Bartow City Commission.


52 years

A couple of months
ago, my friend Mary an-
nounced that her Apopka
Memorial High School
Class of 1959 was going
to have a 70th birthday
party.
"How can a class cel-
ebrate its 70th birthday?"
I asked.
"That's the year we all
turn 70," she said.
Never question Mary.

Mary was the baby
of her class. It will be a
little while before she
catches up with me. I
turned 70 on Jan. 15, but
who's counting? I am
not a stranger to Mary's
graduating class. She and
I have been attending her
AMHS reunions and class
luncheons together for a
couple of years.
When I go to Apopka,
I introduce myself as S.
L. Grossenbacher, Mary's
husband. It works well.

At our first shared
reunion, I commented to
her that one of the great
things about the passage
of time is that the cliques
disappear.
"The guy seated next to
me tonight," I asked. "He
was a leader in your class,
right? He made me feel
like an old friend."
"Yes," she replied. "He's
Jerome, our student body
president."


In Polk County
1 year $39.99
6 months $ 24.00


makes a difference


THINKING
OUT LOUD



S.L Frisbie

"And I saw you talking
to a woman I figure was a
special friend."
"Her name is Janice,
pronounced Janeece. We
were good friends. Janice
was a cheerleader."
Robert was a fellow
scholar of Mary's. He
earned a doctorate in
physics, but never men-
tions it.
Mary was fairly bright,
too. Look who she mar-
ried.

What especially im-
-pressed me, 52 years after
the last strains of "Pomp
and Circumstance" faded
away, was that there are
no class presidents, no
cheerleaders, no quar-
terbacks, no valedicto-
rians, no Ph.D.s at these
reunions.
Some classmates
retired as millionaires;
some are living on Social
Security. I could not
tell who is who. Whom?
They are all classmates;
they are all friends. They
gather as social equals.,

One is a retired football


coach who agreed to keep
twin brothers, members
of his team, when their
mother left home to take
up with a guy she met on
the Internet.
The first time she met
her sons' foster parents
was the day she left town.
Gerald and his wife still
consider them to be their
sons.
One is serving in the
Army in Iraq. They are
counting down the days
until his return.


Another graduate be-
came a football coach in
western Texas.
The nearest competitor
was 90 miles away. The
farthest was more than
400 miles.
"We took the governors
off the school buses and
drove 80 miles per hour,"
Farmer (yes, that is his
given name) told me.
"It was still an over-
night trip."
Only once did he
mouth off to an official.
"I'll buy you a new flag
if you learn how to use
it!" he told the referee
after three consecutive
backfield in motion calls
that Farmer said were
unmerited.
"That's it! I will penal-
ize your team another

FRISBIEI7A


The Polk County Democrat

Established August 28,1931
With which The Polk County Record was consolidated November 1,1946.
190 South Florida Avenue, Bartow, FL 33830 Phone (863) 533-4183 Fax (863) 533-0402
E-mail address for letters to the editor: letters@polkcountydemocrat.com
Jim Gouvellis, Publisher. Aileen Hood, General Manager
Jeff Roslow, Editor Peggy Kehoe, Managing Editor
S. L. FRISBIE, IV, (Publisher 1981-2009; General Manager 1976-1981; Managing Editor 1954-1976)
LOYAL FRISBIE (Publisher Emeritus 1981-2004; Publisher 1964-1981, Editor 1946-1981)
S. L. FRISBIE (President 1946-1958); S. LLOYD FRISBIE (Publisher 1946-1964)


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Published Wednesdays and Saturdays by
SUN COAST MEDIA GROUP, INC.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to; The Polk County Democrat,
Post Office Box 120, Bartow, FL 33831-0120


Other Florida Counties
1 year $65.00
6 months $40.00


Out of Florida
1 year $72.00
6 Months $44.00


Next time you should ask the city

what's happening with the landfill issue


In 2008, when Republic
decided they wanted their
Class I permit, I got in-
volved in the fight to stop
them. I contacted the city
attorney to see if there
would be any benefit to
our HOA getting involved.
The city attorney had me
contact Ralph DeMeo
of Hopping, Green and
Sams, the law firm which
the city hired to represent
them. It was determined
that our HOA was a third
party beneficiary in the
original agreement. Our
HOA was encouraged to
participate in the federal
lawsuit and administra-
tive hearing. I was told it
was important to get the
face of the people in front
of the judge.
At a strategy meet-
ing held on March 26th
2008, DeMeo advised the
HOA that our participa-
tion in the federal lawsuit
was not necessary. They
believed the city had a
solid case. That was great
news. We only needed to
participate in the admin-
istrative hearing.
At the March meeting,
the attorneys for HGS
stated that the DEP was
ignoring the public health
and environment and
that HGS had retained the
services of Christopher
Teaf, a PhD specializing
in toxicology and hazard-
ous waste, to testify on
the health hazard the
landfill will pose.
Along the way the
city decided that fight-
ing Republic in federal
court would be a long
and expensive proposi-
tion. They said they were
worried that they may
lose in federal court. The
city decided it would be
better to negotiate a new
agreement that would
save us all from garbage.
The new settlement
agreement allowed


Republic to operate a lim-
ited Class I landfill. The
city declared it a victory.
But the agreement still al-
lowed Republic to accept
other sources of waste
that included garbage. It
would still smell. It al-
lowed Republic to landfill
untreated sewer sludge,
which is a very big health
concern.
A major shortcoming of
the new agreement was it
did not require Republic
to incorporate any of the
settlement conditions
into their DEP permit.
Republic applied for an
unrestricted Class I per-
mit. If Republic violated
the agreement, the city
would have to take them
to federal court. The
agreement was toothless
and to Republic's advan-
tage.
When the DEP issued
their Intent to Permit
in December 2009, the
HOA again filed for an
administrative hearing.
John and Terry Frost also
filed their petition for a
hearing. It took almost
a year to get through the
hearing and for the DEP
to issue its Final Order.
The hearing had an
interesting twist. The city
filed to intervene in the
hearing. But they did not
file to help the homeown-
ers battle Republic. The
city filed to help Repub-
lic, an $11B corporation.
Why? Because the settle-
ment agreement said the
city would assist Republic
in getting their permit.


Apparently that included
the city fighting their own
citizens.
I was told by one city
official that the city got
involved in the hearing
simply to keep an eye on
things. Three attorneys
from HGS, plus the city
attorney, were present
every day at the hearing.
The city conducted the
majority of the deposition
on our geotechnical ex-
pert. The city conducted
the cross-examination of
our geotechnical expert at
the hearing.
The city paid for Re-
public's "health expert".
They provided Republic
with the services of Chris-
topher Teaf. The expert
who two years earlier was
going to testify the landfill
was a health hazard
now testified the landfill
posed no health risk to
the residents! How does
an "expert" completely re-
verse their opinion on the
same facts?
Republic had budgeted
$500,000 for the hearing's
legal expenses. The city
budgeted $200,000 for le-
gal expenses in 2010, but
spent $472,000 assisting
Republic. They kept an
expensive eye on things.
The settlement agree-
ment was supposed to
help the city avoid a
long and expensive legal
battle. Since 2008 the city
has spent $1,700,000 on
landfill legal expenses.
For $1,700,000 the city
could have fought Repub-
lic and the:Ellsworths in
federal court twice over.
The city still hasn't
reached an agreement
with the Ellsworth broth-
ers. It's anybody's guess
what the landfill will ulti-
mately cost the taxpayers
of Bartow. Next time you
see one of the commis-
sioners, ask them what's
going on with the landfill.


MailSubscriptions, Payable in Advance


I at I


March 30, 2011


Page 4A The Polk County Democrat


EDITORIAL




The race for Bartow City Commission











Obituaries


Lola Eastman Harleman


Willie Jones, Jr.


Lola Eastman Har-
leman, 77, a former
resident of Lakeland,
died Saturday, March 26,
2011, in Baton Rouge,
La., of complications of
Alzheimer's disease.
Born April 16, 1933,
in Madison, Fla., Mrs.
Harleman was a resi-
dent of Baton Rouge for
two years, moving from
Lakeland.
A graduate of Florida
'Southern College, she
received her master's de-
gree at the University of
Georgia. Mrs. Harleman
was an educator in the
public school system for
more than 30 years. She
was a U.S. Navy veteran.


j
Lola Harleman
Mrs. Harleman was
preceded in death by her
father, James H. Eastman.
Survivors include her
husband, Ted R. Har-
leman of Baton Rouge;
her mother, Georgia P.


Eastman of Bartow; three
sisters, Blanche Bryant
and husband Sam of
Homeland, Georgia Ann
Eastman and husband
Dr. John Stuart of Baton
Rouge, and Cindi Beahm
of Lakeland.
Visitation: Thursday,
March 31, from 1-2 p.m.,
at Whidden-McLean Fu-
neral Home, Bartow.
Funeral: Thursday at 2
p.m. at the funeral home.
Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to the
Alzheimer's Association at
www.alz.org.
Condolences to the
family may be made at
www.whiddenmcleanfu-
neralhome.com.


Willie Jones, Jr., 81, of
Lakeland passed away
Sunday, March 27, 2011,
from cancer.
He was born Feb. 19,
1930, in Dothan, Ala., to
the late Willie Jones, Sr.,
and Lillie Jones.
, Mr. Jones worked in
the phosphate industry
before becoming self-em-
ployed as a brick mason.
He was a member of New
Bethel AME Church in
Lakeland.
Survivors include five
sons, Robert Earl Jones
and wife Vicky of Lake-
land, Gerald Jones, Willie
Jones, III, Jireh Brooks


of Lakeland, and Dar-
ryl Matthews of Bartow;
three daughters, Win-
nifred Jones and Maria


Jones of Orlando, and
Victoria Michel of Bartow;
two stepdaughters, Tif-
fany Porter and Ludetra
Lott of Lakeland; two
sisters, Doris Cochran
of Margate and Carolyn
Alford of Springhill; a
brother, Alvin Jones of
Roseboro, N.C.; and a
devoted friend, Margaret
Jones of Lakeland.
Visitation: Friday,
April 1, at Gause Funeral
Home, Bartow. Time to be
determined.
Funeral: Saturday, April
2, at 11 a.m., at a place to
be determined.


Robert 'Bob' Powell


The deadline for getting
information to The Polk
County Democrat is 4 p.m.
Monday for Wednesday's
newspaper and 4 p.m. Thurs-
day for Saturday's newspaper:
For information or ques-
tions, call 533-4183 and
ask for eff Roslow or Peggy
Kehoe.
ARTS
Thursday, March 31-Sat-
urdayApril 2
"Daddy's Dyin', Who's Got
the Will?" 7:30 p.m., Buckner
Theatre at Florida Southern
College, Lakeland, 680-
3089 or bucknerboxoffice@
flsouthern.edu. Reserved
tickets may be picked up at
the Buckner Box Office be-
fore the show or on the night
of the performance.
Saturday, April 2
Rich Mistretta, 7 p.m.,
The Doggie Bag of Lakeland,
1745 E. Edgewood Dr. Lake-
land. 683-6220.
BUSINESS
Wednesday, March 30
Central Florida Commer-
cial Landscape Maintenance
Seminar and Trade Show,
8 a.m.-2:30 p.m., offered
by Polk County Extension
Service, designed for anyone
who works in the commer-
cial landscape maintenance
field, people who do lawn
and landscape maintenance
for residential properties;
municipal, county or state
parks, business or com-
mercial properties; school
athletic fields; golf courses;
Master Gardeners and
homeowners. $25 general
registration fee, $12 for mu-
nicipal workers and Master
Gardeners. 1702 US 17/98 S.,
Bartow. 519-8677, ext. 109 or
519-8677 ext. 110.
CLUBS
Friday, April 1
Dine with Chief Hall to
raise money for Cancer
Research, 5-9 p.m., The
Stanford Inn, 555 Stanford
St. Special menu and the
Stanford Inn will donate 15
percent of check total to Bar-
tow's Relay For Life. Reserva-
tions 533-2393.
COMMUNITY
Thursday, March 31
Book Babies for children
from birth to 2 with their
parents, 10-10:30 a.m., Bar-
tow Public Library, 2150 S.
Broadway. 534-0131.

Thursday, March 31
Sun 'n Fun International
Fly-In & Expo, 10 a.m.-5 p.m..
Guests are transported by
shuttle to and from Fantasy
of Flight and Sun 'n Fun
headquarters at Lakeland'
Linder Field throughout the
event. Celebrates seaplanes
and other amphibious air-
craft, as dozens of seaplane
pilots use Fantasy of Flight's
Lake Agnes as their landing
strip. 1400 Broadway Blvd.
S.E., Polk City. 644-2431.
Friday, April 2
Create a Rain Barrel, 9:30-
11:30 a.m., Saturday, April
2, at the Stuart Center, 1702
U.S. Highway 17 S., Bartow.
533-1772.

Sunday, April 3
Second Celebration of the
Horse Summerlin Academy
Equestrian Booster Club
fundraiser, 2-5 p.m. Her-
rmann's Royal Lipizzan
Stallions and the Summerlin
Academy Equestrian Team,
along with a special perfor-
mance by Ashley White and
Dreamcote. $15, ages 12
and up; $10, ages 6-11 High
Gait Farm, 6415 Garfield
Road, Fort Meade For ticket


information, e-mail high-
gaitfarm@dishmail.net.
EDUCATION
Wednesday, March 30
Registration deadline
for Advanced AutoCAD
Training, $500 or regular
registration is $550. Register
at poly.usf.edu/ManEng.
667-7059 or ksebeny@poly
usf.edu. Classes are 6-8 p.m.
on Tuesday, April 5-May 10.
University of South Florida
Polytechnic's Extended
University.
GOVERNMENT
Thursday, March 31
Polk Street Gateway
groundbreaking, 9:30 a.m.
Polk Street and State Road 60
underpass.
Monday, April 4
Bartow City Commission,
5:30 p.m. work session, 6:30
board meeting, 450 N. Wil-
son Ave. Call 534-0100.
HEALTH
Wednesday, March 30
Evidence Based Practices
Symposium, 9 a.m.-noon,
official start of the EBP
initiative in Circuit 10 begun
by Rita Ruggles, Circuit


10 Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Program of-
fice supervisor. First Baptist
Church, Fellowship Hall, at
410 E. Church Street, Bartow.
519-3655
Tuesday, April 5
Good Shepherd Hospice
volunteer training, 3 p.m.,
90-minute orientation ses-
sion. 551-3943 or merrickr@
goodshepherdhospice.
org for information or to
register.
RELIGION
Sunday, April 3
The Nelsons in concert, 11
a.m. Bethany Free Will Bap-
tist Church, 2905 Iowa Road,
Eaton Park. 667-9020.
Saturday, April 2
The Psalms 101 Band,
5:30 p.m., free. Open mike
for those who want to sing.
325 Lyle Parkway, Bartow.
604-3457.
Wednesday, April 6-Fri-
day, April 8
Revival with Evangelist
Cathy Moore and Apostle
James Moore, Faith and
Deliverance, 290 US 17 S.,
Bartow.


Robert "Bob" Powell,
88, of Bartow passed away
Sunday,March 27, 2011,
at Lakeland Regional
Medical Center.
Born in Port Went-
worth, Ga., Mr. Powell
moved to Winter Haven
in 1959 and had lived in
Bartow since 1975.
He retired as a sales
representative from
Newton Manufacturing
Company in Newton,
Iowa, with 50 years of
service. Mr. Powell was
a member of Lake Ruth
Baptist Church and en-
joyed spreading the word


Have an idea

or photo?
Please call
The Democrat
533-4183 or
The Leader
285-8625


of God and gardening, a
family member said, and
loved spending time with
his family.
Survivors include his
wife of 57 years, Stevie
Powell of Bartow; five
daughters, Robin Fisher
of Lakeland, Becky Wood-
man of Rose Hill, Va.,
Debbie Lacy of Bartow,
Myra White of Savan-
nah, and Sarah Glenn of
Winter Haven; one son,
Steve Powell of Bartow; 13
grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
Visitation: Friday, April
1, at Lake Ruth Baptist


Church in Bartow from
6:30-7 p.m.
Celebration of Life:
Friday, April 1, 7 p.m.,
at Lake Ruth Baptist
Church.
In lieu of flowers the
family requests donations
be made to Lake Ruth
Baptist Church, 800 West
Clower St., Bartow, 33830.
Arrangements: Whid-
den-McLean Funeral
Home, Bartow.
Condolences may be
sent to the family at www.
whiddenmcleanfuneral-
home.com.


Bartow Area


Community Calendar


dkoeaw lfTneWl 9fow
7t Omc eade
www.mcleanfuneralhome.net

WAidde,&-OoG m asel 9fom

www.whiddenmcleanfuneralhome.com
SOur Family Serving Yours


II


CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
OF THE CITY OF FORT MEADE
CITY COMMISSION MEETING
TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011, 7:00PM
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. THAT THE CITY OF FORT
MEADE, FLORIDA CITY COMMISSION, WILL HOLD A PUB-
LIC HEARING ON TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011, AT 7:00PM IN
THE FORT MEADE CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS, 8 WEST
BROADWAY AVENUE, FOR MEADE FLORIDA TO CONSIDER
THE FOLLOWING ORDINANCES:
PROPOSED ORDINANCE 11-01: AN ORDINANCE OF
THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA PURSUANT TO
FLORIDA STATUTE 193.306, APPROVING A COMMU-
NITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR THE AREA AS SET
FORTH IN RESOLUTION 04-15 OF THE CITY COMMIS-
SION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
PROPOSED ORDINANCE 11-02: AN ORDINANCE OF
THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN BASED ON THE CITY'S EVALUATION AND
APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR); PROVIDING FOR SEVER-
ABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

ANY INTERESTED PERSONS WHO FEEL THEY ARE AFFECT-
ED BY THESE CHANGES ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND
THE PUBLIC HEARING AND BE HEARD. ANY PERSONS)
WISHING TO VIEW RELEVANT INFORMATION IN ADVANCE
OF THE PUBLIC HEARING MAY VIEW SAID DOCUMENTS AT
THE FORT MEADE CITY HALL AT 8 WEST BROADWAY AV-
ENUE, FORT MEADE, FLORIDA BETWEEN THE HOURS OF
8:00AM AND 5:00PM, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY.
ANYONE WISHING TO APPEAL ANY DECISIONS MADE
AT THIS HEARING WILL NEED A RECORD OF PROCEED-
INGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE THEY MAY NEED TO EN-
SURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE REAL APPEAL IS MADE. YOU
MUST MAKE YOUR OWN ARRANGEMENTS TO PRODUCE
THIS RECORD. (FLORIDA STATUTE 276.0105 )
ANY PERSON WITH DISABILITIES REQUIRING ACCOMMO-
DATIONS IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE SHOULD CONTACT
THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO THE MEETING AT 863-285-1100
Phyllis Kirk, Deputy Cuy Clerk
CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA
PROPOSED MAPAMENDMENTS TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN


Missing a loved one,

a co-worker or friend?
Place a 2 to 5 inch memorial
(In Memory Of) for $50 or a 5.1 to
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Add your loved one's picture for $20.
Receive a free laminated copy.
Additional copies available for $1 each.





IAPPY BIRTHDAY
















Sean C. Dunn
6/25/82- 1/31/02
Du never sald I'm leaving, you
ver said goodbye, you were
eno before we knew it and only
od knows why. A million times Call Vicky at
we've needed you, a million times
,'ve cr ie. If love alone could 533-4183 to
ive saved you, you neverwould place your
ve died. In life we loved you
arly, In death we love you still. memorial.
our hearts you hold a place or
at no one else can ever fill. It Deadline for
oke our hearts to lose you, but ..
u didn't go alone for part of us Wednesday
nt with you the day God took publication is
)u home.
noon on Friday;
) the most courageous person
i know who gave such uncon- for Saturday
tonal love everywhere you
Bnt and touched so many lives. publication is

itll we meet again, We love youno n
ever and always, Mom, Dad, Wednesday.
evor, Sara, Destiny and your
ends at Action and Sunrise.


I

I-


YO
ne
go
Go
we
W(
we
ha
ha
de
In
thi
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we
yo

To
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Un
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March 30, 2011


The Polk County Democrat Page 5A









PCSO Animal Control is Agency of Year


"If the sheer volume
of the submission were a
determining factor, this
county would have won
just on that," the Florida
Animal Control Associa-
tion said in its newsletter
announcing that Polk
County Sheriff Animal
Control had been named
the 2010 Agency of the
Year.
"It helps that the ma-
terials presented were of
excellent quality and of-
fered a lot to be proud of
and to share. This agency
covers approximately
2,000 square miles with
585,000+ residents," it
reported.
The unit works with
animal welfare groups,
the county health depart-
ment, Humane Society,
Ridge Veterinary Medical
Society, and about 90
not-for-profit 501(c)(3)
agencies in the area.
It reported to FACA the
inmate work program
saved their county ap-
proximately $250,000 in
2010 and has had 3,859


for new hires, it reported.
The eight-week program
enhances the required
certification with two
weeks of classroom and
strict supervision and
evaluation in the field.


"This agency is a prime
example of the depth
and breadth of commit-
ment to exceptional ani-
mal care and control," a
press release from FACA
reported.


The sheriff's office's
Animal Control facil-
ity is at 7115 De Castro
Road, Winter Haven. It
is open from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. Monday through
Saturday.


There's something for everyone

at Eagle Ridge Mall.


PHOTO PROVIDED
Members 6f the Polk County Sheriff's Animal Control Depart-
ment show the trophy it earned for being named the 2010
Agency of the Year.


adoptions, held many
local events and public
presentations and has
educated the public
about responsible pet
ownership and animal
control laws.
Polk programs include
disaster preparedness,
bite prevention and
license compliance. Polk
Animal Control has cre-


ated such documents as
a "pet owner's emergency
guide," a pet-friendly
shelters FAQ, an owner's
bite prevention guide,
and "About Rabies" bro-
.chure.
The committee was
"especially impressed"
with the sheriff's office's
internal ACO Training
and Evaluation Program


Man pleads guilty to


shining laser at helicopter


TAMPA (AP) -A Lake-
land man pleaded guilty
in Tampa federal court
to shining a laser into
the cockpit of a sheriff's
helicopter and temporar-
ily blinding the pilot.
Court records show
59-year-old Mark Clay
Hazlitt pleaded guilty
last week to one count
of interfering with the
operation of an aircraft.
With no plea deal in
place, Hazlitt could face
up to 20 years in prison


Mark Clay Hazlitt
at his June 2 sentencing.


Hazlitt was first ar-
rested in November by
Polk County deputies
after a sheriff's helicopter
pilot identified Hazlitt's
home as the source of
a laser light. He was
later indicted by a federal
grand jury.
After his arrest Hazlitt
told the police he was
"tired of hearing it." Of-
ficers were using the heli-
copter to look for some-
one who had threatened
suicide.


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Page 6A The Polk County Democrat


March 30, 2011


~:-
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The Polk County Democrat Page 7A


March 30 2011


DINNER: Helps gear up Relay for Life walkers


FROM PAGE 1A
emony, live music and
a barbecue ceremony
called the Sticky Fingers
Barbecue Cookoff. It was
started by John Hutto,
Bartow's Relay for Life
original chairman, years
ago. For $6 people can
buy a pre-sold ticket for
a complete dinner and


drink and there will be a
contest for the best bar-
becue. And, of course, all
the money goes to ACS.
By the way the tickets
can be bought at Bartow
Chamber of Commerce
and BB&T Bank, or by
calling 533-6442.
That party atmosphere
is something Hall said


he's noticed in the year
and a half he's lived here.
"This is the busiest
town I've ever been in,"
he said. "The Relay For
Life is like that. When I
got involved in that thing
there's so much going
on there is practically
nowhere.to walk."
And the party atmo-


sphere surrounding the
Relay for Life event at
Bartow Memorial Sta-
dium isn't all of it.
On April 1, Hall will
be the celebrity host at
an event at The Stanford
Inn. From 5-9 p.m. at
the Inn at 555 Stanford
Street, Hall will be serv-
ing dinner and 15 per-


cent of the check amount
will go to the ACS in the
Relay For Life fundraiser.
Currently 52 teams are
signed up to take part
in the annual walk and
there's still time to sign
up. The goal is have 55
teams.
"Each year we set goals
for ourselves and this


year we're going to try
$178,000 for relay, get 55
teams," Hall said. "That's
absolutely reachable with
the amount of participa-
tion in Bartow and the
breadth."
For more information
about Bartow's Relay for
Life visit www.bartowre-
lay.com.


CITY: Seat up for grabs
FROM PAGE 1A downtown, both men
agreed that public events
along to the citizens ... bring people into the
but by reducing for the city,
business community, you "Festivals are the way
create a more level play- to do it," said Fus. "It's a
ing field." nice small town with a
Fus: "The city needs lot of character.
more businesses. We We should key off our
need to find some way small, hometown char-
that's going to attract ac{er."
people to Bartow. Lewis favors bringing
Cutting the cost to stores to the downtown
businesses, "would that are geared toward
generate more jobs and walkers rather than driv-
make Bartow more at- ers
tractive" to new busi- "We need stores that
nesses, said Fus. everybody can walk to,"
When asked how said Lewis. "We make
to improve the historic said Lewis. "We make

POPS: Trip to Tallahassee


FROM PAGE 1A
student stood off to the
side, accompanied by
her mother, Maloney. For
her, just like for Sand-
ers, being in POPS was
already reaping results.
"I look forward to get-
ting a job," she said. "I
think it's going to help
me achieve my goal to
become a nurse."
Also like Sanders, visit-
ing the college campuses
was something she was
looking forward to doing
when in Tallahassee,
POPS is a program
with a goal to motivate
at-risk students to com-
plete their high school
education and prepare
them for future success.


A secondary goal is to re-
duce some of the at-risk
factors through tutoring,
mentoring, counseling,
character education,
money management and
workforce development.
It was not only stu-
dents enrolled in the
program who were
excited about the trip.
Chaperones, most who
were also parents of
POPS students, were also
enthused.
"I'm looking forward
to it," said Gwendolyne
Jones. But without a
doubt, she said, it was
the students' enthusi-
asm that truly mattered.
"They've been talking
about it all week. They're


everything for cars, we
should make it for people
to walk so residents
don't have to drive out of
town."
SThe director of the
CRA recently retired.
Does the agency need
any tinkering?
Lewis: "It's working
beautifully just the way
it is with an independent
board. I don't want to see
the CRA just become an-
other funding source for
infrastructure projects."
Fus said that the CRA
stifles decay, while revi-
talizing the center of the


really excited."
As the students and
chaperones began
loading their belong-
ing in the cargo hold
and then boarding the
bus, they were joined
by Joyce Bentley, Bar-
tow district manager for
POPS. The students, she
said, would be joining
other POPS students
from across the state on
Tuesday.
"I call it POPS Day at
the Capital," Bentley
said. Sitting in on a ses-
sion in the legislative
would be very important
to the students. "I want
them to be familiar with
how the political process
works."


city.
"In principal it's a good
idea to have it," said Fus.
"It appears to be a ben-
efit to the city."
Fus said the city should
investigate disbanding
the city's police depart-
ment and giving the job
to the Polk County Sher-
iff's Office. He said using
the sheriff might be more
cost effective.
Lewis disagreed. He
said that the response
time is quicker with a


city force and it's nice to
develop personal rela-
tionships with individual
officers.
"If it sounds too good
to be true, it probably is,"
said Lewis. "We would
not be getting the same,
personal service."
The other city com-
mission up for election
is the seat currently held
by Leo Longworth. He is
unopposed and will not
appear on the ballot.
The election for the


FRISBIE: 52 years makes a d


FROM PAGE 4
15 yards for every step it
takes you to get off off
the field!" the ref replied.
"I called over two line-
men to carry me off the
field. He still penalized
me another 15 yards."
Another became a col-
lege professor in Okla-
homa.


She returned to
Florida to become a pub-
lic school PE teacher for
$10,000 more in salary.
She is now president
of her homeowners' as-
sociation.
Mary's class had 83
graduates, a little more
than half as many as my
1958 graduating class.
I have met many of


seat is scheduled Tues-
day, April 5 and the only
poll to vote, The Bartow
Civic Center, 2250 S.
Floral Ave., is open from
7 a.m.-7 p.m.
Today is the final day
to request an absentee
ballot from the Supervi-
sor of Elections Office.
People have until 5 p.m.
to ask for one. Absentee
ballots have to be re-
ceived by the Supervisor
of Elections Office by 7
p.m. on Election Day..


difference
them; they have become
friends. They are neat
people.
(S. L. Frisbie is retired.
He is a member of the
Summerlin-by-gosh-
Institute Class of 1958. He
also considers himself to
be a member ofApopka
Memorial High School
Class of 1959, S. L. Gros-
senbacher)


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Page 8A The Polk County Democrat C
A golden celebration in Community

A golden celebration in Floral Lakes


'~J~F7--;I~C._ '` r ~$~3~
1'~PJ~EL ~T~1`
:..srL'. f~i; s


~tr
... ~


March 30, 2011


Across the

Back Fence


j;*J,--


PHOTO BY BOB STEFFEN
These four couples, married in 1961, were honored at the Floral Lakes 50th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, March 19 (from
left): Barrie and Becky Anderson, Jim and Kathleen Morris, Vicki and Dave Haglund, and Emily and Al Frechette.


Rebecca Beam, Richard Hall are engaged


An autumn wedding is
planned by Rebecca Jean
Beam and Richard Drew
Hall, both of Bartow, who
have announced their
engagement.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Charlie and
Melba Beam. She is a
2010 graduate of Bartow
High School.
Her fiance is the son of
Ricky Hall and Marylynn
Pittman, both of Bartow.

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He graduated from Trav-
iss Career Center in 2010.
Their wedding is
planned for Oct. 15, 2011,
at 6 p.m., at Turning
Point Worship Center in
Bartow.


Karleigh Ann Puckett


Karleigh Ann Puckett
is bringing smiles to her
family. The first child of
Jenna Cottrell and Patrick
Puckett of Fort Meade,
she was born March 2,
2011, at Lakeland Region-
al Medical Center.
At birth she weighed 8
lbs., 6 oz., and was 20-3/4
inches long.
Karleigh's maternal


grandparents are Sarita
and Geary Cottrell, and
her paternal grandpar-
ents are Brenda and
Jose Cruz, Jr., all of Fort
Meade.
Share your news with-
friends. Call or e-mail
Peggy Kehoe, 533-4183
or pkehoe@polkcoun-
tydemocrat.com.


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March 30, 2011 The Polk County Democrat Page lB


Ai IN T I REPORT





Can school system



make the grade? "


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER

"What's the vision?"
Tom Freijo challenged
the Polk County School
Board at Monday's
retreat. "Given what you
know about education,
what would you like to
see?"
Board member Lori
Cunningham led the
charge. She wanted to
make Polk County an "A"
school district by no later
than the end of the 2013-
2014.school year.
While everyone was on
board with that desire,
reservations were ex-
pressed. School Super-
intendent Dr. Sherrie


Nickell, who firmly stated
reaching that goal was
possible, said there were
a number of variables
that would need to be
taken into account; one
of those is how success
is measured as according
to the state Legislature.
"But those measures
keep changing, and that
makes me nervous," said
Nickell, who emphasized
that what she was about
to say was only her feel-
ing. It would be of enor-
mous benefit if measures
were unchanged for at
least three years, she
opined. Constant chang-
es, plus recent actions
taken by both houses of
the Florida Legislature


PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER
Polk County School Board member Lori Cunningham pauses in
her note taking at a work session held Monday, March 8.


that Gov. Scott signed,
have had a demoralizing
effect upon teachers.
While everyone agreed
they wanted the school
district to attain and
retain "A" status, is it
possible to achieve in the
time frame Cunningham
proposed.
Freijo, with the Uni-
versity of South Florida
Polytechnic, moderated
the retreat that was a
follow-up to the Febru-
ary retreat the DOE held.
"Do we have the re-
sources and everything,
in place to do that?" que-
ried Board Chairwoman
Kay Fields. Nickell said
yes for this year, but she
was not so sure the fol-
lowing year as it is still
not known what financial
revenues might be.
It began to appear as if
School Board members
were wavering. Debra
Wright feltthere were too
many variables.
"Putting a number
might not be the right
path," she said in re-
sponse to Cunningham,
who had made a propos-
al that a fixed percentage
be set to increase the
number of "A" and "B"
schools.
However, Nickell inter-
jected, telling the board
members that despite
low teacher morale, in


good measure due to Tal-
lahassee, "I would love to
set the goals higher." She
also urged board mem-
bers to be mindful that
whatever they did would,
through the media, be-
come public knowledge.
The bar needed to be set
high.
Comparisons were
made between education
and business, and at one
point, Board Member
Tim Harris, who wanted
to see progress made on
an ever-climbing line,
felt that support from the
business sector in Talla-
hassee was not there.
"The Chamber of Com-
merce and the Depart-
ment of Education seem
to be on opposite sides
of the goal," he said.
Further talk of mea-
sures not remaining stat-
ic ultimately prompted a
reply by Cunningham.
"I don't want to use
"ever changing' as a
crutch," she said. "There
have to be specific goals
with measurable results."
Yet concerns remained
over that issue. Basing
her comments on her
own experiences as an
educator, Wright felt Polk
County Schools were do-
ing all that could be done
to maintain its current
"B" ranking. She may
have found some limited


Tom Freijo, Learning Outcomes and Assessment director with
USF-Polytechnic, goes over a point raised by Polk County School
Board members. Freijo served as moderator for the Monday,
March 28, work session.


support from Nickell.
"We've got to keep
moving, but we've got
to be reasonable," she
said as a printout she
had her staff develop
was distributed. The
handout recommended
customizing targets per
hypothetical school and
the model demonstrated
what percentage each of
the schools (classified as
either A, B or C) would
need to achieve in order
to either raise itself to the
next level or maintain
its A status. "These are
stretch goals."
Again the topic re-
turned to the issue of
teachers.
"If I was a teacher,
what are you going to
give me to attain this?"
asked School,Board
Member Frank O'Reilly.
Teachers have not had
raises in years, he said,
and reiterated the same
belief Harris had, that
business has not gotten
behind teachers, espe-
cially in light of what the


Legislature did. "Teach-
ers have been beaten
up."
Harris agreed.
"The law the governor
signed, it's going to be a
challenge to recruit and
retain teachers," he said.
It would be, he added,
a major factor in how
and whether the goal to
become an "A" district
would be accomplished.
Regardless of the
challenges, said Board
Member Hazel Sellers,
the board had to move
forward. It could not
settle for less.
"We need to set spe-
cific goals," she said. "If
we announce we are sat-
isfied being a "B" district,
it is not going to set well
with the public."
Harris proposed the
school system strive
toward becoming an
'A" school according to
the current rating scale
established by the state.
His proposal found
favor with the rest of the
board.


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER

In 2000, Polk County
citizens in a referendum
vote approved changes
to the county charter. It
limited Polk County com-
missioners to two terms,
as well as cut their pay in
half.
Thus it came as a sur-
prise when County Com-
missioner Bob English
announced at the March
22 public session that
term limits in the Polk
County Charter may be
unconstitutional, as also
might be the salary paid
commissioners. Accord-
ing to English, the crux
of the matter was term
limits and salary are to be
decided at the state level.
The matter, English
said, had been brought
to his attention by two
constituents, prompting
him to do some research,
which verified what he
had been told. As a result,
English requested fellow
commissioners approve
a motion authorizing
County Attorney Michael
Craig to research Articles
2.3 and 2.5 of the Polk
County Charter and, if
necessary, bring legal
action.
At that session, Com-
missioner Sam Johnson
said that the term limita-
tions issue was not iso-
lated to just Polk County.
"This has been chal-
lenged across the state
and it has been ruled


Commissioner Bob English
unconstitutional,"
Johnson said. He added,
however, that voters had
overwhelmingly approved
the referendum, which
prompted English to re-
ply, "A majority does not
make it the truth."
The Board of County
Commissioners approved
English's motion and
Craig was instructed to
proceed.
"We're in the process of
preparing to file a declar-
atory judgment,' Craig
recently announced. By
doing so, the BOCC is
essentially asking the
court to make a ruling on
certain acts and law, said
Craig. "We're asking the
court to give them (the
BOCC) guidance."
Although this issue has
come up in two or three
other counties, there is no
precedent.
"One of the things we're
doing is getting infor-
mation from the other
cases," said Craig. "Each


case is unique and we'll
deal with it as we get the
ruling."
English said he felt the
court would find in favor
of the BOCC. At the same
time, he acknowledged
that if a ruling is decided
in favor of the BOCC, it
might not sit well with
the general populace, but
overall that is not a factor.
"Whether it's well
received is immaterial, it's
a constitutional issue," he
said."If people want term
limits for local officials, it
has to be done through
an amendment in the
state legislature."
As for the issue of sal-
ary, according to state
statute, Polk County
commissioners should
be paid $82,000. Cur-
rently, their salary is half
that. While that may not
sit well with Polk County
citizens, especially in
this economic turndown,
again it was an issue that
was not in the hands of
the BOCC.
English added his
bringing up the issue was
not a self-serving action
by the BOCC, nor by him.
He said he had not even
given any thought to
whether he would run for
a third term should the
court decide term limits
were unconstitutional.
It might not have had to
come to this, English said,
as he castigated the then-
sitting BOCC. "It should
have been challenged
back in 2000."


County Manager Jim Freeman said
Friday Jim Bell was appointed as In-
terim Executive Director of the Cen-
tral Florida Development Council.
He started his new job on Monday.
"I have full confidence in Jim's
ability to provide stable and effec-
tive leadership during this transi-
tion period for the Central Florida
Development Council," Freeman
said. "Jim has demonstrated the
ability throughout his career to work
effectively with elected officials,
management, staff, citizens and
other stakeholders."
Bell has worked for Polk County
since 1991 and has served as Public
Safety Director, Community Services
Director and Transportation Director.
Before joining Polk County, he was


STAFF, WIRE REPORT
Florida's unemploy-
ment rate dropped by 0.4
of a percentage point to
11.5 percent in February,
the second consecutive
month it's declined, state
labor officials said Friday.
And, in Polk County it
dropped by more than 1
percent, the latest statis-
tics show.
The state figure is the
lowest it's been since last
July, when Florida also
was at.11.5 percent, but
nearly 1.1 million Florid-
ians remain out of work.
In Polk County 32,286 are
out of work. That figure
is down from 35,178 from
last month.
"This decrease in Flor-
ida's unemployment rate,
combined with continued
job growth, is welcome
news and provides ad-
ditional evidence that our
economy is getting back
on track," said Cynthia R.
Lorenzo, director of the
state Agency for Work-
force Innovation.
The agency reported


the City Manager of Auburndale.
He retired after 28 years in the
United States Air Force as a fighter
pilot, the last three months of which
he served as a base commander. Bell
earned a Bachelor of Arts in econom-
ics from Emory University in Atlanta.
"Economic development and job
creation are vital to Polk County's
future," Freeman said. "Therefore, I
have selected the most experienced
director on my staff to take on this
important assignment."
Jerry Miller, president of the CFDC
said he is in support of naming Jim
Bell as Interim Executive Director.
"Jim's proven leadership and man-
agement style is just what we need
during this transition period," Miller.
said.


Florida added 22,700 jobs-
in February and now has
32,700 more jobs than it
did in February 2010, an
increase of 0.5 percent.
That's the strongest an-
nual growth rate recorded
since May 2007, when it
was 0.7 percent. February
also is the fifth consecu-
tive month of annual job
growth.
In Polk County the 11.7
percent unemployment
figure means that out of
a registered workforce of
274,917, there are 242,631
people employed. Last
month of the 275,890
labor force, 240,712 were
employed. That unem-
ployment figure was
12.8 percent, 1.1 percent
higher. In February 2010
of the 273,008 labor force,
239,297 people were em-
ployed. That represented
a 12.3 percent unemploy-
ment rate.
SThe leisure and hospi-
tality industry has led the
way by adding 26,100 jobs
over 12 months through
February, a 2.9 percent


growth rate. Other indus-
tries adding jobs include
education and health
services, professional and
business services, and
trade, transportation and
utilities.
Those gains have been
partly offset by continued
shrinkage in other sec-
tors led by construction,
which was down 15,800
jobs, or 4.5 percent. Also
losing jobs were financial
activities, manufacturing,
information and govern-
ment.
Polk County's un-
employment figure for
February 2011 means it
has the 44th highest rate
in the state. There are
.67 counties in the state.
Polk is tied with Lee and
Madison counties at 11.7
percent.
Monroe County had
the state's lowest rate at
6.9 percent, followed by
Liberty County at 7.1 per-
cent and Alachua at 7.7
percent. Flagler County
had the highest rate at
14.9 percent,


English: Term



limit ruling may



upset voters


Commissioner said limits, salary

are constitutional issues


Bell named CFDC


interim director


Florida jobless rate

drops to 11.5 percent


The Polk County Democrat Page 1B


March 30, 2011











Today is last day to ask for absentee ballots


People who want to
vote absentee in the
Tuesday, April 5, city
elections have until 5
p.m. today to ask for a
ballot.
Requests to the Super-
visor of Elections Office
can be made by calling
'534-5888 or through the.
website at www.polkelec-
tions.com.
A completed ballot
must be returned to
Election Headquarters
in Bartow by 7 p.m. on
Election Day in person or
by mail.
In the latest voting
statistics, Bartow has the
most voters of the cities
that have candidates up
for election, the Supervi-
sor of Elections reports.
For those registered
through March 7, Bartow
has 9,063 registered to


vote. Of those, 4,619 are
Democrats, 3,037 are
Republicans, 205 are
registered with other
parties and 1,202 are
registered in a category
listed as unknown. There
are 6,081 white voters,
2,198 black voters, 400
Hispanic, 105 listed as
other and 279 unknown.
There are 5,051 women
voters, 3,852 male voters,
and 160 unknown.
The city that has the
fewest registered voters is
Lake Hamilton, with 747
voters registered through
March 7.
A total of 33,785 people
are registered to vote in
the eight city elections.
Lake Wales has 7,538
voters registered. Of
those, 3,711 people are
registered as Democrats,
2,610 are Republicans,


271 are registered in
other parties and 946 are
listed as unknown. There
are 4,882 white voters,
1,884 black voters, 454
Hispanic, 85 other voters
and 253 listed as un-
known. There are 4,274
women registered, 3,126
men registered and 138
registered unknown.
Frostproof has 1,281
voters with 582 regis-
tered as Republicans, 502
registered as Democrats,
52 registered with other
parties and 353 listed as
unknown. Among the
voters, 1,041 are white,
401 black voters, 211
Hispanic voters, 49 listed
as other and 94 listed as
unknown. There are 983
female voters, 779 male
voters and 34 listed as
unknown.
Fort Meade statistics


were not released as
that town does not have.
municipal elections on
April 5.
Municipal elections in
Bartow, Dundee, Frost-
proof, Haines City, Lake
Alfred, Lake Hamilton,
Lake Wales and Mulberry
are scheduled April 5.
Polls will be open from 7
a.m.-7 p.m.
Results of the elections
will be available at the
Supervisor of Elections
website at www.polkelec-
tions.com and local races
will be published in this
newspaper.
Polling locations for
each city are:
Bartow City Residents
vote at: Bartow Civic
Center (Game Room),
2250 S. Floral Ave.
Lake Wales City Resi-
dents vote at: Municipal


SUPERVISOR OF

ELECTIONS
PotC COutrX Y. FtOMOA
U ...


Administration Building,
201 W. Central Ave.
Frostproof City Resi-
dents vote at: First Bap-
tist Church, 96W. B St.
Haines City Resi-
dents:
Residents in Precincts
402, 407, 408 vote at:
Bethune Neighborhood
Center, 915 Ave. E.
Residents in Precincts
405, 409, 410, & 414 vote
at: Haines City Commu-
nity Center, 555 Ledwith
Ave.


Dundee Town Resi-
dents vote at: Dundee
Community Center, 603
Lake Marie Drive
Lake Alfred City
Residents vote at: Lake
Alfred City Hall, 120 E.
Pomelo S.
Lake Hamilton Town
Residents vote at: Lake
Hamilton Woman's Club,
85 N. Omaha St.
Mulberry City Resi-
dents vote at: Mulberry
Civic Center, 901 N.W.
Fifth St.


Organizations get education grants


West Bartow Front Porch is among recipients


ByJEFF ROSLOW
EDITOR
In an effort to further
people's knowledge of
how to conserve water,
the Southwest Florida
Water Management
District gave community
education grants to five
Polk County organiza-
tions.
West Bartow Front
Porch Revitalization
Council, Inc., was one.
West Bartow Front
Porch Revitalization
Council, Inc., received
a $4,120 grant to edu-
cate East Polk County
residents about Florida-
Friendly LandscapingTM
principles, water supply
and water conservation.
Polk County Extension


staff will teach the prin-
ciples at four workshops
and Front Porch's annual
community celebration.
The project received
funding from the Dis-
trict's Peace River Basin
Board, the Southwest
Florida Water Man-
agement District, also
known as Swiftmud, said.
The maximum grant
amount is $5,000.
The first workshop was
Friday, March 18, at the
Main Street Bartow of-
fice on Main Street, said
Levonia Wynn of West
Bartow Front Porch.
She said it was not too
well-attended as it hap-
pened on the same night
as Friday Fest which is
the third Friday of every


month. This month's
Friday Fest was held after
the annual unparade
to celebrate St. Patrick's
Day.
"They blocked off
downtown and we did it
at Friday Fest and they
had the parade going
on," Wynn said. "There.
was so much stuff going
on and we were in the
Main Street office."
She thinks the other
workshops will be better
attended.
Future workshops are:
Create a Rain Barrel,
9:30-11:30 a.m., Saturday,
April 2, at the Stuart Cen-
ter, 1702 U.S. Highway 17
S., Bartow.
Florida Friendly
Landscaping -Native


Plants, 10-11:30 a.m.,
Saturday, April 30, at
Carver Recreation Cen-
ter, 1520 S. Idlewood
Avenue, Bartow.
Butterfly Gardening,
5:30-7 p.m., Friday, May
20, at Main Street Bartow
office, 165 E. Main Street,
Bartow.
Juneteenth Mas-
ter Gardener Displays,
time to be announced,
Saturday, June 18, at Polk
Street Gateway (U.S. 60
Underpass), Bartow.
This year the District
approved 29 grants
districtwide for a total
of $120,471. This is the
14th year Community
Education Grants have
been available. Other
organizations that got


education grant money
included:
The City of Mulberry
Revitalization Task Force
that got $4,500 grant to
educate members of the
community about how
their behaviors affect the
watershed.
The Winter Haven
Heights. Neighborhood
Association got $692 to
educate local residents
about water conserva-
tion and rain barrel
installation. Association
volunteers will conduct
a workshop in which
participants will paint a
community rain barrel,
which will be installed at
the neighborhood park.
The City of Winter-
Haven got $3,460 grant to


educate the public about
Florida-friendly land-
scapes and promote their
installation in neighbor-
Shoods.
Polk County Extension
received a $4,680 grant to
educate homeowners on
Florida-Friendly Land-
scaping principles and
Polk County FFL pro-
grams. Workshops and
utility bill inserts will be
used to educate residents
about FFL principles.
Swiftmud's 2012 Com-
munity Education Grant
program will begin a new
application process in
June. To find out more
about the grant process
and for an application,
visit www.WaterMatters.
org/communitygrants/.


Page 2B The Polk County Democrat


March 30, 2011







March 30.2011 The Polk County Democrat Page 3B


Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf.
From the beginning, we have taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our commitment
to the Gulf remains unchanged, as does our responsibility to keep you informed.


No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100%
of the waters are open and the beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety,
Gulf seafood has been more rigorously tested by independent researchers and
experts than any other seafood in the world. To date, BP has spent more than
$13 billion in clean-up costs.


An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife
rescue and restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed
$500 million to the Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund scientific studies on the
potential impact of the spill.

H ljp t, I '^o L '' 1 f:E' '' '
$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an
independent fund to pay for environmental restoration and all legitimate claims,
including lost incomes. More than $200 million in grants have been made to the
Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.


This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn
from it and share with competitors, partners, governments and regulators to help
ensure that it never happens again.

We know we haven't always been perfect but we are working to live up to our
commitments, both now and in the future.

For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.


facebook.com/B PAmerica
twitter.com/B R_America
youtube.com/bp


aFf '"

4r'*'
P> y-
^ ,,cF


2011 BP, E&P


The Polk County Democrat Page 3B


March 30, 2011


;.I ~
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i"' '-: "*









Five win superior for science projects


Nearly 80 public school
students had their sci-
ence projects selected as
superior by judges in the
2010-11 Polk Elemen-
tary Science Fairs. Seven
superior students go to
Bartow schools.


Two fairs were held to
accommodate a large
number of entries and it
featured about 380 stu-.
dents in 72 elementary
schools participated.
The Bartow students
who were rated superior


were: Beatriz Galindo,
Drake Harden from
Bartow Elementary Acad-
emy, Desaraye Bouchard,
McKenzie Braaten, Ma-
son Collins and Jett Nich-
olson from Spessard L.
Holland Elementary and


Maria Smith from Floral
Avenue Elementary.
For their projects,
fourth and fifth grade
students selected a
topic and determined
a question about the it
that could be answered


through measurable
experimentation.
Projects were assessed
by judges from science-
related businesses and
industries and science
instructors from the
elementary through uni-


versity level.
All students got a rib-
bon and certificate for
participating. Superior
Award winners received
an additional ribbon, a
medallion and a science
fair T-shirt.


Spessard Holland Elementary School award winners at the science fair were (from left): front
row fourth graders Desaraye Bouchard, Even West and Mckenzie Braaten; back row fifth
graders Jett Nicholson, Kelsey Rickey and Mason Collins.


Beatriz Galindo, a Bartow Maria Smith, who attends
Elementary fifth grader, was Floral Avenue Elementary
one of the award winners at School, was an award winner
the recent science fair. in the recent science fair
where students' projects were
on display at the Bartow Civic
Photos by Center.

Christine

Roslow


BEA Field Day


field in a very close hockey relay race. BEA's field day was
scheduled two weeks ago but got rained out. The students took
advantage of a beautiful day Friday to compete in everything
from bag toss to an obstacle course.


Addison Kidder calculates the angle as she sets up her shot on
the basketball court during Bartow Elementary Academy's field
day Friday.


Olivia Croy takes a break from the field day activities to just play
in the sand.


Josiah McPlatt almost loses his balloon Friday as he waits for
the relay race to start Friday.


Megan Perez flies in for a landing to make it over the rope as
broad jump judge Karen Keller looks on.


Elijah Lang tries his best to sail his Frisbee through a hoop
Friday at Bartow Elementary Academy's field day.


Dawson Padullah sports the latest in field day fashion attire.


Photos by

Christine

Roslow





Noah Jones hopes his broad
jump clears the rope line as
classmate. Ben Williams cheers
him on Friday at Bartow
Elementary Academy's field
day. Jumping judge Karen
Keller stands nearby.


m I


March 30, 2011


Page 4B The Polk County Democrat









Green Thumb Garden Club


Bartow Elementary Academy student Grady Daniels exits
the Butterfly House and heads through the hydro-stacks
where lettuce and a variety of herbs are grown.


Photos by

Christine Roslow


Kindergarten student Benjamin Alfaro takes a plant from his
father, Vincent, as they prepare a bed for planting. Parents join
students on Saturdays once per month to help out with some of
the bigger jobs like removing growth damaged by the winter
freeze.




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LAKE WALES, FL33859
863-638-0671


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Deliver the

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and make
extra cash!

Immediate opening for
Newspaper Delivery Person
Wednesday and Saturday
Early Mornings

Barlow, Fort Meade,
Lake Wales and Frostproof Areas
Must have reliable transportation.
We will train the right candidate.
We are a Drug Free Workplace.
For further information call:
Fa or Pam

863-533-4183
863-676-3467


STEM Resourc
Angelina Simpson and Masen Daniels, Junior Green Thumb Garden Club members, Lillian Creasy
join forces to plant and water a freshly prepared raised bed. The club meets after are ready to I
school on Wednesdays to tend their garden. 'are from the i

-I~rs~;~


Jack Likens, a kindergartner
at BEA, seems to think that
using two hand rakes will help
him keep up with his father,
Harrold Likens.


Rain Barrel Workshop
The West Bartow Front Porch invites you to "Creating a Rain Barrel"workshop! Save
water, money and the environment with this must have tool for your yard or garden. The
-workshop fee is $30 for a 55-gallon rain barrel and spigot.
Preregistration is required.
Participants will:
* Construct their own rain barrels (one per household)
* Learn about saving water the Florida-friendly way
* Practice protecting water resources
When: Saturday, April 2, 2011, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Where: UF/IFAS Polk County Extension, Stuart Center,
1702 US Hwy. 17 South, Bartow
RSVP: Preregistration is required. Call(863) 519-8677, ext. 121 or
visit http://rainbarrelworkshopl.eventbrite.com/.
Most of Florida's rainwater flows off our roofs onto lawns and dn e a) s, picking up fertilizers. pes-
ticides and other pollutants and carrying them to local waier bodies, contributing to nonpoint-source
pollution. Rain barrels are a convenient way to collect some of that water. B) using a rain barrel, you'll
reduce the stormwater runoff from your yard and have a free source of water to use for irrigatng your
landscape! Visit WaterMatters.org/yards to -arn more about Florida-Friendly Landscaping '" principles.


W IlItIAh l I lt *s11 1 I 4 1 1 17sI,


hen Glenn Temple walked
into Lakeland Regional's emergency
department he was pretty sure he
was having a heart attack, but he
didn't think it was serious. Fortu-
nately for him, Lakeland Regional's
ER is a PCI-accredited Chest Pain
Center with no waiting and door-
to-balloon angioplasty times faster
than the national average. Because.


moments after his arrival, before
his wife could park the car, Glenn
was in full cardiac arrest.
Thankfully, when Glenn col-
lapsed he was in our dedicated
screening room. Within seconds,
emergency RN Alicia Henry and
LPN Jessica Richardson were ad-
ministering chest compressions
and oxygen. Glenn's heart had
stopped for seven minutes before
a third shock with defibrillator


paddles brought him back to life.
Within 20 minutes he was in the
catheterization lab where they
found three blocked arteries.
Glenn's story is one of being in
exactly the right place at exactly
the right time. Had he been any-
where else, his outcome would
have been dramatically different.
According to board-certified.
emergency medicine physician
Dr. Matthew Schillinger, "It was the
special training and fast action
of our nursing staff that made
Glenn's revival possible. And it's
because of our well-orchestrated
chestt pain processes that he is
alive and well today."
This is just one of the many
happy endings made possible
by Lakeland Regional. To find

our PCI-accredited Chest Pain
Center, visit www.LRMC.com.


) 0 0* 0*


Glenn Temple's

heart stopped three times.

Our ER team never did.
08~~8~~~~0~e~8Q~~~i+~g*~+b


Real Life Stories.
Really Amazing Care.


' Lakeland
~wg=egional
MediAcal Center


The Polk County Democrat Page .B


March 30, 2011









Kindergarten Round-Up day changed


Parents should take
note that the district
day for the Kindergarten
Round-Up at Stephens
Elementary has been re-
scheduled to May 12 from
the original April date.
Parents can attend
either the 8-9 a.m. or 6-7
p.m. session that day.

Book Fair this week
Thursday is Ticket
to Read day during the
week-long Book Fair at
the Jean O'Dell Learning
Center, formerly the Polk
Life and Learning Cen-
ter, at 1310 S. Floral Ave.,
Bartow.
Ticket to Read runs


In
Our
Schools


(hr i qine
RhisIune
Rosluiv


from 6-8 p.m. Thursday
and is the feature day of
the Book Fair. Not only
will there be books, but
free corn dogs, popcorn,
cotton candy and sno-.
cones. There will also be
games such as ring toss, a
duck pond and bingo.
The Book Fair started
Monday and runs


FMS Drill Team performs


PHOTO PROVIDED
Thq First Methodist School Drill Team performed for the entire
student body on Friday, March 11. The team, directed by Lori
Albritton, participates in local parades and has performed at
Friday Fest. They consist of students Riley A., Devon J., Jesse
S., Caleb B., April L., Lexy C., Rhylee W., Elizabeth Z., Callie B.,
Sylvia Y., Sarah H. The students in this photos are Lexy C., Eliza-
beth Z. and April L. It is the school's policy to not release the last
names of the students.


.A"


through Friday and will
be open for anyone who
wants to see what's for
sale from 8 a.m.-2:45 p.m.

Top business students
Forty-five students
in Bartow schools won
awards at the 2010-11
Future Business Leaders
of America event.
* These students quali-
fied to compete at the
FBLA state leadership
conference in Orlando
April 25-28.
Events included ac-
counting, business law,
computer problem
solving, cyber security,
healthcare administra-
tion, technology concepts
and Web design. There
were nearly 60 individual
and team events.
FBLA is a business
education program in
middle and high schools
for students to develop
vocational and career
competencies.
Students from Bartow
included:
Bartow High: Eric
Konkol-Bennett, Destiny
Lawson, Jaznee Lyons,
Ashley Mills, Alex Mo-
hamed, Melissa Thamma-
vongsa, Christopher West
Bartow International
Baccalaureate: Joseph
Bacon, Adrielle Conner,
Corey Craig, Gabrielle
DiLullo, Hiral Jivanji, Ste-
phen Jose, Brian Joseph,
Jessica Killingsworth,
Anupa Kotipoyina, Emily
Lubin, Bianca Mulaney,
Nneka Ofuani, Komal
Patel, Shefali Patel, Vishal
Patel, Hunter Ponder,
Nicole Radivilov, Elaine
Rivera, Alix Rousseliere,
Kylie Werk Vien Yeung,


Alex Zalanka
Bartow Middle: Shiann
James, Alexsis Jefferson,
Jondra Martin, Zakiya
Mikell, Malisha Paul,
Abigail Prosise, Bryan
Salinas, Kayla White, Tiera
Whitfield, Olga Woodard
Gause Academy:
Quintearus Bell, Jonathan
Borges, Krystal Johnson,
David Schwartz, Sarah
Spruce
Summerlin Academy:
Camisha Alexis, Sarah
Flynn

Middle School chorus
concerts
Middle school cho-
rus concerts are com-
ing Thursday, April 7, at
Haines City High.
They are from 9-11:45
a.m., 12:30-5 p.m. and
6-7:30 p.m. and they're
free.
The school is at 2800
Hornet Drive, Haines City.
Thirty-two middle
school choral groups will
play in 15-minute inter-
vals during the three ses-
sions. They will be judged
by a state panel and the
choral groups receive an
annual state assessment
and rating based on their
performances.
For information, call
Beth Cummings at 647-
4729 or e-mail beth.cum-
mings@polk-fl.net.

Childcare sites looking
for participants
Polk Public Schools
Foodservice Department
is looking for summer
recreation programs,
camps or childcare sites
to participate in its free
summer meals program.
The foodservice de-


apartment provides free,
nutritious breakfasts and
lunches to children in
these and other programs
when school meals are
not available during the
summer. The meals pro-
gram is from June 15-Aug.
4 and is for children ages
1-18.
There is no cost for
sites to participate but
the program, camp or
center receiving the
meals must operate in an
area deemed needy based
on census tract or demo-
graphic data.
Other criteria includes:
Being able to serve a
minimum of 35 meals per
day and operate at least
10 days in the summer,
operate an open feeding
site where neighborhood
children not participating


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Time: 2:00PM to 5:00PM


TICKET PRICES:
$15 Age 12 & Up
$10 Age 6-11
Age 5 & Under FREE


Ticket prices include BBQ, Sundaes, Drinks
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1------11--,


March 30, 2011


Page 6B The Polk County Democrat


I


'.? i:.
I `'''''. il'l 1 i~ '~;]


in the summer program
can come to the site to be
fed, have adequate cool-
ers, refrigeration and food
storage equipment and
also be able to provide
adequate supervision
during mealtimes.
Organizations that
qualify and want more in-
formation may call Betty
Blankenship at 534-0588
or e-mail betty.blanken-
ship@polk-fl.net.
The application
deadline for potential
participating sites in the
summer meals program
is April.

You can contact Chris-
tine Roslow at croslow@
polkcountydemocrat.com.


I


d.
r
t
1 SI







The Polk County Democrat Page 7B


M1\rrh 30 9011


SPORTS S


Lady

By MARK KING
CORRESPONDENT

Bartow High School
Lady Jackets' softball
team had a "Lake-
lustered" week with
three victories over Lak
Gibson, Lake Wales an(
Lakeland.
The first pond to
be pounded was Lake
Gibson. The Lady Bravi
were scalped by the Yel
low Jackets 17-1 at LGI
on Tuesday, March 22.
Seventeen to one.
That is the definition o
scalped. Look it up.
Jessica "Fantasy" Eila
(3-0) was the winning
pitcher for Bartow. The
sensational senior blev
away six batters at the
plate and gave up only
one hit.
The Lady Jacket offer
was led by Rachael "Bu
bles" Imig, who belted
homer, crushed a doubt
and racked four RBI go
3-for-4. Emily "True Gr
Sanders, matched Imig
homer, double and an
RBI while going 3-for-5
the platter.
Also helping out the
Bug batting were: Lizzi
"Shattering" Glass (3-4
2B, RBI), Marissa "Emr
Ortiz (3-4), Shelby
"Mustang" Duncan (3-
3B, 2B, two RBI),.Wand
"Lightning" Darby (2-2
RBI), Taylor "Stitch" Wa
ner (2-4, 2B, two RBI),
land (2- 4), and "Dand
DanielleYost (1-2, RBI)


Bugs win

Next Lake on the list
was Lake Wales. The
Highlanders reached a
low point with a 12-0 loss
on Wednesday, March 23,
to their bitter foes.
In recent years, the
e Lady Highlanders have
d had the better of Bartow.
Not so this year.
The Lady Jackets scored
in every inning except
s the fifth (the final inning
S in the game), When the
-I bleeding stopped for the
Highlanders, the Bugs
blasted the Bagpipers
f with 11 hits.
Lauren "Wild Wild"
ind West (10-0) recorded the
win for Coach Rutenbar
and all the fans, giving up
two hits over four innings
while fanning six batters.
On the offense, "Bub-
bles" Imig batted .500
with a double and three
sb- RBIs. Following close be-
Shind was "Fantasy" Eiland
e, (2-3, three RBIs).
inge Two Bartow Bug batters
it" belted two-baggers: "True
S Grit" Sanders (2-3) and
"Mustang" Duncan (2-4),
at while Kimmy "the Good"
Booker (1-2) had four
RBIs.
e After the Highlanders
hightailed it out of Lady
Sno Jacket Stadium, the Bugs
boarded the big yel-
, low bus to rumble up to
,a Lakeland High School to
face the dreaded Dread-
Snaughts.
Ei- Actually, it was more
, like meeting the "deflat-
. ed" Dreadnaughts.
In yet another shutout,


Bartow Women's Golf Assn.


Week of March 22
3's and 5's half-handicap
1st place, Linda Keith,
28-1/2
2nd place, Mary


3, record at 18-0


the Lady Yellow Jackets
demolished the Dreads
16-0, behind the pitching
of "Bubbles" Imig (4-0)
and Tiffany "Last Dance"
Waltz. The two team-
mates turned in a no-
hitter walking one batter
and striking out seven.
If you're a fan of hitting
(and who isn't?), you had
to be at this game. The
Lady Bugs belted 20 hits
en route to the victory.
Once again, the Bartow
Bug batting ensemble
blew away the competi-
tion with "True Grit"
Sanders and "Shattering"
Glass each getting hom-
ers.
Doubles were
drummed out by Sand-.
ers, Imig, and "the Good"
Booker.
When the lake lambast-
ing was done at the end
of the week, the Lady
Yellow Jackets of BHS
improved their season re-
cord to 18-0 and plastered
a big smile on the face of
their head coach, Glenn
Rutenbar.
"Obviously, we're real
excited about the team
this year. Hopefully, we
will continue to play
well," he says.

JV wins two
The junior varsity "Baby
Bugs" had a great week,
defeating the Lake Gibson
Lady Braves 16-1 and the
Lake Wales Highlanders
10-2.
In the Lake Gibson


game, Kalissa Sexton
pitched a no-hitter, fan-
ning five batters. Em-
ily DelleDonne, Aliah
Walters, Lexi Mathis and
Carmen Billante were the
leading hitters.
When the team met the
Highlanders, they sent
them packing behind the
pitching of DelleDonne.
Brooke Farrer, Savan-
nah Browder, Billante,
Taylor Pittman, Sierra
Coffman, Walters, Del-
aney Wright (the Wright
girl for the LEFT field),
and Lexi Mathis all racked
hits for Bartow.

As of this printing, the
Ladies will have played
Auburndale High on
Tuesday, March 29. The
story will be printed in
an upcoming edition
of The Democrat. On
Tuesday, April 5, the last
home game of the regular
season will be played
against the Lake Region
Thunder, with a JV game
at 5:30 p.m. and varsity at
7:30 p.m.
Since the Lake Region
game will be the last
home game of the season,
it will be Senior Night,
when we honor the team
seniors: Marissa Ortiz,
Lizzie Glass, Jessica Ei-
land, Emily Sanders, Brit-
tany McNeil, and Kimmy
Booker. These ladies have
worked very hard over the
last four years and have
had amazing careers.


Bourque, 29
Niners
1st place, Joanne All-
red, 14


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March 30, 2011


Professor offers discipline solutions for at-risk youth


"Our schools are in
crisis," said Richard Mar-
shall of the University of
South Florida Polytech-
nic.
He explained why and
offered some solutions at
the 22nd annual National
Youth-At-Risk Confer-
ence March 6-9 in Savan-
nah, Ga.
"We have not come
to terms with the fact
that approximately 20
percent of students lack
the necessary skills,
abilities, motivation or
background to fit into
and to benefit from
school," said Marshall,
an associate professor
at Polytechnic's Division
of Education. "Current
instructional and disci-
plinary practices seek to
reward or to punish these
children into compli-
ance. But these efforts


are failing both students
and teachers. And they
are failing because they
simply don't work for the
children on whom they
are used."
According to Marshall,
students with emotional
and behavioral difficul-
ties fall into three major
categories: predators


(bullies or other intimi-
dators), students with
mental illness and stu-
dents who are unsocial-
ized or under-socialized.
School-based interven-
tions that rely almost
exclusively on reward
and punish approaches
are notoriously ineffec-
tive for students in these
three groups.
"It is estimated that ap-
proximately 10 percent -
5,000,000 of children in
grades K through 12 have
a mental illness that is
serious enough to cause
impairments at home
or in school," he said.
"Unfortunately, teachers
and school administra-
tors receive little or no
training that helps them
understand and manage
students with mental
disorders."
His presentation aimed


to close that knowledge
gap. He began with an
explanation of the under-
lying brain abnormalities
these students have and
why traditional reward-
and-punish discipline
systems may not be
working. He then offered
alternative interventions
and how to implement
them in classrooms.
The alternatives he
recommends are based
largely on the work of
William Glasser, called
Choice Theory, and Ross
Greene, called Collab-
orative Problem Solv-
ing. These and similar
approaches share some
common assumptions
that explain their effec-
tiveness.
"First, they assume
that when students
misbehave they are do-
ing so because they are


unable to self-regulate or
they have never learned
other ways to behave,"
said Marshall. "These
students have what we
call 'involuntary devi-
ance.' They would like to
do better, but they can't
or they don't know how.
Rather than punishing
them for their misdeeds,
we should teach them
what they do not know or
cannot do. Teachers at all
levels are encouraged to
replace punishment with
teaching.
"Second, these meth-
ods include the child
in the conflict resolu-
tion. Unlike traditional
reward-and-punish
systems, interventions
are developed with the
child; they are not done
to the child.
"Third, whereas
reward-and-punish


methods rely on external
controls, our approach
encourages students to
develop self-control so
that they can manage
with or without adult
supervision."
At USF Polytech-
nic, Marshall teaches
courses in educational
psychology, counseling
psychology and reading
assessment. He is also an
adjunct associate profes-
sor of child psychiatry
in the Department of
Psychiatry and Behav-
ioral Medicine at the USF
College of Medicine. He
is a licensed school psy-
chologist with specialty
training in pediatric neu-
ropsychology, a clinical
therapist, and a develop-
mental specialist.


IPGS seminar features Ancestry.com's Smolenyak


Genealogist, researcher
and author Megan
Smolenyak will be guest
speaker at the Imperial
Polk Genealogical Society
2011 seminar on Satur-
day, April 9, at Florida
Southern College in
Lakeland.
Since 1999 she has
been chief family histori-
an and spokesperson for
Ancestry.com, the largest
genealogical company
in the world; creator of
RootsTelevision.com,
a pioneering online
channel of free videos
and winner of four Telly
Awards; and founder
of UnclaimedPersons.


Megan Smolenyak
org, a volunteer group
that assists coroners and
medical examiners.
A popular writer,
speaker and TV guest,
Smolenyak describes


herself as "a genealogi-
cal adventurer who loves
solving mysteries, mak-
ing unexpected discov-
eries and pushing the
boundaries of conven-
tional genealogy."
Her most recent book
is "Who Do You Think
You Are?: The Essen-
tial Guide to Tracing
Your Family History," a
companion guide to the
popular NBC series, now
in its second season.
Her Polk County
seminar will focus on
four topics: Reverse Ge-
nealogy Techniques for
Finding Your Lost Loved
Ones, Neglected History,


Trace Your Roots with
DNA, and Cases That
Made My Brain Hurt.
Advance registration
for the IPGS seminar
is open and costs $40
for IPGS members and
$45 for non members.
Walk-ins the day of the


seminar are $50 each.
A continental breakfast
and lunch are included.
Registration is from 8-9
a.m., with the seminar
running from 9 a.m.-
4 p.m. in the alumni
room of the Charles
Thrift Building at Florida


formerly
Community First Credit Union




MAGNIFY
SMlpli- baking. Magni-fGy (i-c.


Southern.
Information is avail-
able on the IPGS website,
www.ipgs.org, or send
a check with name, ad-
dress, phone number
and e-mail address to
IPGS, PO. Box 10, Kath-
leen, FL 33849-0010.


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