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The Polk County Democrat
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028292/00520
 Material Information
Title: The Polk County Democrat
Uniform Title: Polk County Democrat (Bartow, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Publications Corp.
Place of Publication: Bartow Fla
Publication Date: February 23, 2011
Frequency: semiweekly[1946-<1992>]
weekly[ former <1936>-1946]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bartow (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Bartow
Coordinates: 27.8925 x -81.839722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1931?
General Note: Publisher: Frisbie Pub. Co., <1946-1992>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Mar. 27, 1936).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579548
oclc - 33886838
notis - ADA7394
lccn - sn 95047484
sobekcm - UF00028292_00520
System ID: UF00028292:00520
 Related Items
Preceded by: Polk County record

Full Text




Local officials Youth Fair Mama wasn't so
still hopeful for Results interested in
high-speed rail Farm Day

ee Pa B See Page 2B See Page 4B
See Polk ountPage 1




Tie Polk County D.......


Bartow, Florida 33830


Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011


www.PolkCountyDemocrat.com


Saving factory strikes a ch


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER
According to Ken Atkins and
Irish Pfeiffer, who were among
several members of the Thomp-
son Cigar Factory Redevelop-
ment Project committee that
attended the Cigars and Guitars
event this past weekend, certain
goals and objectives were met
and surpassed. However, actual
cash donations or pledges made


at the event billed as the larg-
est cigar event in Florida may
not have been among the ac-
complishments. Still, it did not
dampen their enthusiasm.
An estimated 50 cigar manu-
facturers and those in related
industries attended, and Pfeiffer
said many were aware of the ef-
fort under way to save the cigar
factory.
"We had a captive audience,"
she said. "They knew who we


were."
"The event went rea
well," said Pfeiffer, wh
plimented the support
from Robert Franzblat
of Thompson Cigar. Tt
Thompson Cigar, the
was placed at a site in
location. She said their
prompted "tons of gre
est."


Copyright 2010 Sun Coast Media Group



Murder suspect



arrested in


Georgia


Friday Fest Fun









Polk County's
Historic Courthouse
makes a classic
backdrop for classic
cars as the sun
sets and the lights
shine on the silver
dome. The Cruise-in .....
Car Show was part : fo
of Friday Fest on ,, ,,., .
Friday, Feb. 18, and
is held monthly at
the street party
on East Main
Street and Central
Avenue.
Below, The Porch-
Dogs brought a
festive and easy
rhythm to Friday
Fest in Downtown
Bartow with their
Cajun and zydeco
music.
PHOTOS BY
PEGGY KEHOE


wanted for
second-de-
gree murder.
fHe contacted
Weston and
convinced
him to sur-
render to
police.
Deputies
from the Polk Larry D. Weston
County Sher-
iff's Office--N
went to G e ir-
gia to arr_ it
him and :dl.,1
him back r,
Bartow.
It was n,-i,
easy to find
him, Wyant
said, as of-
ficials from Vershontis Bradley
the mar-
shal's office
searched in South Carolina,
Georgia, Kentucky and Ten-
nessee for Weston.
Charles Wiggins, who lived
at the Azalea Gardens apart-
ment complex last September,
said after a fight had started
between Weston and Vershon-
tis Bradley's brother "things
got crazy."
SUSPECT 6A


Free taxes

Agencies offer help; CSC

in program for first time


By JEFF ROSLOW
EDITOR
If you believe that noth-
ing good is ever free, think
again. There are 11 places in
Polk County that will do your
income taxes for free.
Those looking for free filing
can do so through the AARP
or the United Way of Central

the United Way locations are
d only for those who made less
than $50,000 last year.
And, for the first time this
lly, really year, there's one place in
y, ready Bartow on the list. That is at
o0 com- the Church Service Center, in
t received
its new home at 495 East Sum-
u, the CEO
, the CEO merlin St. for less than a year.
hanks to
SExecutive Director Dixie
committee
committee Shivler said offering the free
a prime
a prie tax help to anyone in the
r presence
rat inter- category is all about what she
wants to the Church Service
Center to be.
CIGAR I 6A "We want to give Bartow


back what they've given to
us," she said. "They are the
ones who really kept us going
after the fire and we have to
give back and help people go
on with their lives."
The people who help those
get their taxes done spent
a week being trained and
are certified by the Internal
Revenue Service to do their
taxes. The United Way helps
those who make up to $50,000
per year and does taxes by
appointment only and only
on Monday. It does fewer
returns than those serviced by
the AARP, which is available
more days of the week.
But the United Way is trying
to branch out a bit to help
more middle class people be-
cause of a changing world.
"The United Way has a
new focus to help working
FREE 6A


City approves a bigger sign for Clear Springs


By BILL RETTEW JR.
S I-\T:F \'VR-ITI.R
All the T's were crossed and I's dotted.
City commissioners voted unani-
mously to i11M minor zoning changes
for signage at the Clear Springs develop-
ment at Monday's meeting.
Commissioners agreed to permit
larger signs than ill.- '.i by city ordi-
nances for Clear Springs and to locate
a directional ladder sign in the right of
way. Commissioners permitted a vari-


ance for two signs, while plans call for
the industrial park to host an entrance
sign and about nine directional signs
when the park is completed.
The proposed Polk State Corporate
College is the lynch-pin that builders
hope will someday attract high tech
businesses to the park located east of
the downtown on State Road 60 that
might someday double the city's popu-
lation.
Mavor Wavne Lewis said that there


are "a lot of good things" occurring at
the Clear Springs site. Work to place city
water lines along the north side of State
Road 60 is under way and a large reten-
tion ditch was recently dug.
"A sign isn't any good if you can't see
it," said Lewis. "We certainly want to
make folks aware of it.
"W'e want everybody to know where
the place is."
Commissioner Pat Huff agreed.


---.
PHOTO PROV ,D
PHOTO PROVIDED


SIGN I 6A An artist's rendering of the sign at the
entrance of Clear Springs Corporate Park.


7 05252 8


INSIDE:
Crim e .......................2A
Editoir ...................4A
Obituaries ..............5A
Community ............7A


County Report........1B
School Life.........4B-5B
Clubs ........................6B
Sporms.................7B-8B


Good Morning,
Connie
Thornton


I- -f


Deal of the Day
Model Year
Clearance
See Page 7A


75C


Demoat Vol. 80, No. 51


By JEFF ROSLOW
EDInF r
Five months after a 21-year-
old girl was shot and killed at
her apartment complex the
Bartow Police Department
believe it has arrested the man
responsible.
Larry D. Weston, 21, was ar-
rested Thursday in Savannah,
Ga., and booked into the Polk
County Jail Friday night after
his bail bondsman convinced
him to turn himself in, Sgt.
David Wyant of the police
department said.
The Bartow Police Depart-
ment used the U.S. Marshal's
Office to help it locate Weston
who they believe killed Ver-
shontis Bradley last Sept. 17.
The police department got a
warrant for his arrest the day
after the shooting based on
eyewitness accounts, Wyant
said.
On Thursday Kerry Jones of
Rico Reed Bail Bonds noticed
Weston had gone off bond on
possession of ammunition by
a convicted felon, possession
of drug paraphernalia and
possession of MDMA. Jones
had received information that
Weston was in Georgia and
had also found out that he was











February 23. 2011


Page 2.': I h Po!k CO :', eix rat


Corrections officer charged with domestic violence


.:. Po k, (.eL;f sh er-:
o rr e(-.tio rs o( ffreo ,','a



ing do,'.,nl his son. rth.

Oficf(e reports.
Junior Bird 2, 1 ,a
booked into the coun
jail. charged ,.irh domes-
it batter'. 1 i: ,ork t
thi: (orrectional In t in-u
in Cits, v.which i
oj)(er;rted b the Hlorida
I)(|partinecnt of (.orrec-
ions.1
Bird and his wxie,
i intred, got into a
argument at about 8:50
a.m. nday,bu .a rdi,
to the report.. The verbal
argument then turned
physical when Bird
pushed Winifred against
a i' in their home. The
couple's son tried to stop
his father from hitting
his mother any further,
and Bird then pushed his
son down, the sheriff's
office reports. Winifred
contacted law enforce-
ment, but Bird left prior
to deputies' arrival.
Bird later returned
to the residence while
deputies were still there
when they arrested


ji. the shoterfs on re


Bartow area arrests:
Feb. 9
Shane Alderman,
South Iloral .Aienue,
leasing the scene of ant
accident with property
damage, sentenced to 60
days: driving under the
influence wx ith property
damage, sentenced to
60 days; driving while
license suspended or
revoked, sentenced to 60
days.
Kim West, County
Road 555 South, delivery
of drug paraphernalia,
released on 51,000 bond;
possession with intent to
deliver drug parapher-
nalia, released on $1,000
bond.

Feb.10
Christopher Asbell,
Transport Road, no valid
driver's license, released
on $250 bond; false
verification to second
hand dealer, released
on $1,000 bond; deal-
ing in stolen property,
released on $5,000 bond;
petit theft, released on
$250 bond; possession


Feb. 11
Jo-ph Pr .at. VaLughn
Road. <.iol.: O 1 proha-
tion0 tr po-- i!n ot
cannabi-, ih withoutt
bond.
KenVuLnt (jreathouse.
Bob *. iRoad. armed
burglary of a structure.
held on S5.000 bond:
possession of burglary
tools with intent to use,
held on S!,000 bond;
resisting officer without
violence, held on S500
bond.
Monica Richardson,
South Sixth Avenue,
violation of probation for
organized fraud under
S2,000, held without
bond; violation of proba-
tion for grand theft, held


Junior Bird


without bond; violation
of probation for fraud
use of personal identi-
fication, held without
bond.
Vanessa Perez, Weston
Road, driver's license
expired more than four
months, released on S250
bond.


Feb. 12
Barbar-o Ruhl, Ham-
-ion -treet. burglars of
roccupi:ed cone\ dance.
rcleaedQ on S 1.000bond:
grand theft of motor \e-
ihicle. released on S1.000
bond.
james Parmer, South
)range, knowingly
driving while license
suspended or revoked,
sentenced to 30 days
weekend work release.
Trina Pickard, Marga-
ret Avenue, driving while
license suspended or
revoked with property
damage, held on $2,000
bond; possession of
methamphetamine, held
on $2,000 bond; posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia, held on $1,000 bond;
possession of alprazolam
without prescription,
held on S2,000 bond.
Renaldo Washing-
ton, East Laurel Street,


hatter\- held on S2,000
bond.

Feb. 13
ljeremia h Manning.
East Laurel Streer, bat-
ter\ on la\\ enforce-
ment officer, released on
51.000 bond.

Feb. 14
Don ll, l., Dudley
Drive, failure to redeliver
hired or leased property
over S300, released on
S1,000 bond.
Amelia Monres-Pan-
checho, West Davidson
Street, expired driver's
license more than four
months, released on $250
bond.

Feb. 15
Kaleef valentine ,
South Third A.venue, no
valid driver's license,
sentenced to 60 days.


PHOTO PROVIDED
Polk County Sheriff's Office Mounted Enforcement Unit and Mounted Search and Recovery Team participated in the Florida State
Fair Training and Critique Feb. 14-18. Polk County Sheriff's Office team took first place in the Fleeing Felon Course; second in
the Team Ride; third and fifth in Equitation; second, third, and fourth in Day Obstacles; and second, third, and fourth in Night
Obstacles. Displaying their ribbons are (from left) volunteer Julia Marshall, volunteer Ellynne Draper, volunteer Dani Horton, team
coordinator Deputy Jay Scarborough, volunteer Kamie Scarborough, Deputy Sarah Taylor and Deputy Randy Rolling. Volunteer
Connie Wheeler is not pictured.


(. I- v ." Fritz Paul

School-Related Employee of the Year,
Haines City High/International Baccalaureate


L to R: Harry Williams, MIDFLORIDA Board Member; Don Williams, MIDFLORIDA
Board Member; Tim Harris, MIDFLORIDA Board Member and Polk County School Board Member:
Linda Brett: and Dr. Sherrie Nickell. Ed.O, Superintendent. Polk County School Board.


ii .FLORIDA


- -I-- --












School name still contentious issue


I "r


l)ro .i ?: ':: ;::;e aF '-rf-
f eof.

hooter hosrin .:. ; 2'







22.
ro i irh torie < h.::ii;: E ,
told th( ',- .e ; ;:' a
peared she '. ;ji n ri:
Iheir (.omrrerste ide tir. i,



opinions and d- i plua
t the- rto .e built. (.orn
tarchool H ouiard herk
named in houed nor if nb.
22.
"J he torumri hadJ I)-(i]
held because mani',


retired uperintend 're
upset and displeased a
et-to-be-buinceemen
tarhe school would be
named in honor of now-
retired superintendent
Dr. Gail E McKinzie.
The announcement
the school would be
named for her was a
surprise to McKinzie,
who only learned about
it in late October, at the
close of the last School
Board public session she
presided as superinten-
dent.
The forum had been
called by -lii.-, in re-
sponse to first a request
made in writing by a
group whose number
was composed of numer-
ous military veterans that
the school be renamed
for Marine Cpl. Ron
Payne Jr., then following
an address made at the
public session that same
day, Jan. 25, by two of the
people spearheading that
effort.
It would not prove easy
or comfortable for Sell-


By STEVE STEINER a. r -


I


, io na i '. '. rit i-' [he ii
her husband Hioed ll-
lo,,iirng heir nf -r.fmti ).
.is an inroduuyi.iion,
(ii airv.o' n]ii: Ka, t-i'ld,
i'lt it in ce as-,rv 10 aic-
knowledge there might
)e different reactions
1once .. .I concluded
her presentation.
"l.vrervone''s opinion is
\aiuable," she said. Board
members might not
agree, and it was OK to
disagree, but at the end
of the day. the Board has
to do what is right by the
students and the com-
munity. Her own person-
al feelings on that would
run counter to that last
statement, it would later
be revealed.
Sellers began by apolo-
gizing to the Board and
McKinzie and then she
related what had been
discussed at the forum.
It was not what she had
expected.
"When we got down to
the real issue, it was not
one name but several,"
Sellers said, but that
was not what laid at the
heart of the community's
unrest. It was the fact
the community's input
had'not been taken into
account "We as a Board
took that right away
from the community of
Mulberry."
At its conclusion,
Sellers told fellow Board
members she made no
promises other than that


Reach to present Black History program


By MARY CANNADAY
STAFF WRITER
A presentation to honor
African Americans of
Distinction will be held
Saturday at 3 p.m. at the
Circle of Friends Ministry.
The program will honor
and present biographies
of African American
inventors, writers, award-
winners and others,
according to Reach Inc.,
spokesperson Jackie Jack-
son. Included are histori-
cal figures such as Rosa
Parks and M,,rtin Luther


YetO


retail


King, as well as modern-
day figures.
This is the second time
Reach has presented.
a program at Circle of
Friends, Jackson said,
and the first was such a
success that they were
invited back this year.
"It's important informa-
tion, because people just
don't know a lot of Black
history," she said.
"Even I, being an Afri-
can-American woman,
took a long time to learn
all our history, because
it's not in the books. You


don't get it all in school."
The family of Juliet
Mudemdei from Kenya
will also present dance
and song from their na-
tive land, as well as give
a presentation about
Kenya. There will also be
poetry readings. Refresh-
ments will be served
following the presenta-
tion and the event is free
of charge to the public,
Jackson said.
Reservations are not
necessary.
Reach, Inc., spon-
sor of the program, is a


successful


ilbusinss


irts here.


LU3~LJ1~


non-profit organization
created to combat drug
and alcohol abuse and


to mentor young people,
Jackson said.
The Circle of Friends


Ministry is located at 105
E. Stuart Ave. in down-
town Lake Wales.

x
"*c


NEW RADITION
COMINGSOON! Aii


HOLY

TRINITY

EPISCOPAL

CHURCH

Annual Shrove Tuesday
Pancake Supper
Carleton Hall (fellowship hall
Tuesday-March 8,2011
5:00p.m.-8:00p.m.
Pancakes, sausages or ham
& beverage.

All for only
ADULT................$5.00
CHILDREN
12 & UNDER.....$2.00


As always, a beautiful hand-
made quilt will be on display
that you could take home!
TICKET DONATIONS-
$1.00 PER TICKET
OR 6 FOR $5.00
Tickets available from
church members, at the church
office or at the door.


Please join us for this annual community event and enjoy
an evening filled with delicious food and wonderfulfellowship!
a


Madison Marquette offers unique retail
opportunities at the Eagle Ridge Mall
in Lake Wales
Bridal Florists
Clothing Retail Specialty

\Ve offer flexible long and short-term leases and a
proactire sophisticated management team

For questions please call 863-676-2300
451 Eagle Ridge Drive, Lake Wales, Florida


H oYPRI r- IfITYPITvfSCTBP A L:C H
500 We t Stuart Street latFatW i enuei Bart,.

S_863-53 8l


1. ,.,.,Jj.-Thurd '. Q '0 t rn.-5 (li p m iclho ed noon- Ip.


Board mmcibnr Pick

cent. H} rc L{Ltuni.L-d hi<
mmnl, h.'ich included
asking Bridges v, rtheth
naming the school was
legal and being told yes.
iHe also identified with
S! r rrv residents,
being from Mulberry
and being from a small
community and knowing
how feelings are when
something is forced on
people.
"But when you have
the opportunity to go
back and correct some-
tlli,.; do it," he said.
"I'm prepared to make a
motion at tonight's board
meeting."
It would prompt Fields
to respond that "regard-
less what decision made,
do not make exceptions."
Prior to her reply,
Board member Tim Har-
ris suggested that from
that day forward schools
should be named for the
geographical areas where
they are located, not
named for people.
For Debra Wright, as a
private citizen who had
not yet ascended to the
board seat she had won
when she had defeated
incumbent Margaret Lof-
ton, she said she ques-
tioned the decision.
"I was appalled at the
fact the community was
not a part of the input
process," she said. "I feel


--~--~-- -~~~-~~- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~~~-~--~--~~~~~-~-- ~-~~


IheC '' Count) Democrat Page 3A


f-:bru.iar 23 2


I


:he communir\ did not
e Ie N ibuy in' to hi'."
n'e ,added she requested
a cupy of [he policy re-
vic.,,ed i.
'! do feel ast a board
memiViber, \.e did not
fillou policy," she said.
" 1he police\ clearly\ sa\s
there should be input
from the community.
That w\as not the case."
Board member Frank
O'Reilly struck a posi-
tion similar to Fields. In a
preamble, he apologized
to Sellers for the posi-
tion she had been placed
in, as Mulberry was her
district and it was she
who had to be subjected
to the brunt of the com-
munity's dissatisfaction.
He lauded McKinzie,
saying that when she
came on board as the
first appointed superin-
tendent, she came into
a brand new world, the
21st century. However,
the decision to name the
elementary school after
her was nothing to be
ashamed about.
"What the Board did
was an act of kindness.
Sometimes you have to
do what your conscience
says is the right thing to
do," he said. "I have no
intention of changing my
vote."
He reminded fellow
members that following
the decision to name the
school after McKinzie,
there had been a sense of
elation among them.
Bridges then ad-
dressed the issue about
policy, saying it did not
adequately address the
situation.


"The way the police\ is
written creates a ticklish
situation for \VOu." he
said.
It would not he a
simple nmater. IThe pro-
cedure to either rename
or change the process, he
said. woould fall upon the
shoulders of Dr. Sher-
rie Nickell. current Polk
County Schools superin-
tendent, which the Board
could do through making
a motion to have Nickell
conduct a review and
then provide direction.
It was determined to
amend the public meet-
ing agenda to reflect that
a vote will be taken.
Just before calling for
a recess, Kay closed the
discussion by reassert-
ing the Board had acted
properly.
"We did not err," she
said, and added that de-
spite what is sometimes
what is reported in the
media is not iL-L L .11,il,
what happened.

What next
If the motion is sec-
onded and approved,
Dr. Nickell will review
and at the next work
session, which will be
in March, make her
recommendationss.
From there, it will be
placed on the subse-
quent, not immediate,
public session.
Because there will be
only one work session/
public meeting in March,
it is possible a final deci-
sion will not be deter-
mined until April accord-
ing to Sellers, who spoke
during the recess.


Dr. Gail McKinzie
of bringing it up at the
next board work ses-
sion. However, that had
proven insufficient to
a number of Mulberry
residents.
"There was no other
compromise but for us to
reconsider or re-address
the issue." she said. With
that, Sellers told the
Board she had no idea
what direction next to
proceed.
To clarify the situa-
tion, School attorney Wes
Bridges explained "The
responsibility for naming
schools is with the school
board of Polk County."
Fields then reminded
everyone the timeline
and how the process had
unfolded.
"Everyone was in con-
sensus that we wanted
to name the school after
Dr. McKinzie," she said.
"My opinion is, no mat-
ter what we do, what
decision we do, someone
is going to be unhappy."
She added that to renege
on having decided to
name the school after


ff;~








Pae4 h okCut emcu eray2,21


EDITORIAL




Florida going wrong way on renewables


Well, so much for Florida making
up lost ground in the race to be a
dominant player in the emerging re-
newable energy market. While ven-
ture capital flows into energy tech-
nology firms in California, Michigan
and New Jersey (yes, Michigan and
New Jersey are beating the Sunshine
State in solar), Florida is near the
top of a less auspicious list: Number
2 in carbon dioxide emissions from
coal-fired power plants.
The news, highlighted in a study
released last week by the non-parti-
san Environmental Integrity Project,
gets worse.
The 130.3 million tons of carbon
dioxide emissions produced by
Florida power companies in 2010
was 10.3 million tons more than
2009. That 8.6 percent increase was
even higher than the national jump
of 5.5 percent.
Over the same period, our renew-
able energy competitors in Califor-
nia, which reaped more than $3 bil-


OUR VIEWPOINT


lion in venture capital for research
and development of renewable
energy technologies in 2010, further
reduced power plant carbon dioxide
emissions to 37 million tons, despite
having a population nearly twice
that of Florida.
Power plants in Texas, which
weans its children on oil and raises
them on coal, released 257 million
tons of carbon dioxide emissions,
more then double the next two
worst offenders, Florida and Ohio.
Yet even Texas leads Florida in ven-
ture capital investments in renew-
able energy technology, according
CleanTech, a research and consult-
ing firm.
Lip service to renewable energy
investment paid by the GOP-led
Florida Legislature isn't fooling
anyone. Only about 3 percent of
the electricity generated in Florida


is from renewable sources, accord-
ing to an analysis released by the
Florida League of Cities in advance
of the start of the legislative session
on March 8. Despite passing the
Energy and Economic Development
Act in 2008, the Legislature failed
to adopt a 20-percent renewable
standards portfolio submitted by
the Public Service Commission, as
required by the act. It also refused to
fund at least three programs leg-
islators themselves approved that
would provide incentives for home
and business owners to install solar
products and improve energy ef-
ficiency.
Despite empty rhetoric about
implementing market-driven poli-
cies and a jobs agenda, Florida stills
forces renewable energy firms to
run uphill. Two renewable proj-
ects in the pipeline in Florida, a
350-megawatt photovoltaic power
plant and a proposed 80,000-gallon-
a-day biomass refinery face cost-re-


cover and permitting obstacles that
a truly pro-renewables policy would
have resolved.
California has a 33-percent renew-
able requirement. It gets 58 percent
of all renewable technology venture
capital investment made in the en-
tire country.
Florida is home to FPL Group, the
nation's largest provider of energy
from renewable sources. It isn't
allowed to recoup the cost of build-
ing the solar plant despite the fact
state law already allows it and other
firms to recover capital costs from
customers for coal and nuclear. The
silly game of musical chairs on the
PSC board drew more news cover-
age than any work it did to imple-
ment the Legislature's milquetoast
renewables policy.
So the air gets dirtier, jobs go else-
where and Floridians face a hidden
tax of higher energy costs while los-
ing the race to energy independence
and economic prosperity.


SI LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Gov. Rick Scott is Lex Luthor?


"We're going to be
keeping Liam and Calvin
for a sleepover in a couple
of weeks, and Summerlin
Academy has a lacrosse
game that night," de-
clared my friend Mary.
"I think we should take
them to the game."
"Great idea," I re-
sponded, because that
is one of the secrets of a
marriage that is 47 years
and counting. "What's
lacrosse?"
"I think it's that game
we see them practicing
when we walk around the
lake in Summerlin Park."

So on Friday night, the
four of us joined upwards
of a hundred souls on the
home team side of the
Bartow High School foot-
ball stadium to cheer for
Dear Old Summerlin.
On the visitors' side of
the stadium were three
Durant High School fans,
one of whom as a dog
who patrolled the stands
relentlessly, lest some-
body from the home team
try to infiltrate and steal
signals or something.
Our grandsons, ages 8
and 4, raced up and down
the steps of the stadium.
I tried with little
success to understand
lacrosse.

As best I could fig-
ure, lacrosse combines
elements of a number of


THINKING "
OUT LOUD

'

S.L Frisbie

other sports:
Football, because
the game is played on a
football field, though with
the sideline boundaries
extended.
Soccer, because there
is a goal and a goalie at
each end of the field.
Jousting, because
there are a lot of oppo-
nents hitting each other
with sticks, though they
are much smaller (and
more maneuverable) than
lances.
And hockey, because
as I would soon learn,
some of the rules don't
make much sense, like
about a third of the play-
ers on both teams have
to stay on the wrong end
of the field. Probably a
government rule.

Lacrosse is a game de-
veloped by American In-
dians before they became
Native Americans.
It is played with a ball
about the size of a base-
ball, and sticks with small
butterfly nets on the
ends. The sticks are called
crosses, from which the
game gets its name.


The object is to hurl the
ball with your crosse past
the goalie and into the
goal at your opponents'
end of the field.
When this happens,
your fans scream and
stomp their feet which,
in Bartow's aluminum
stadium, makes a sound
that can be heard in Port
Charlotte. The Charlot-
tonians often mistake
this for thunder from an
approaching Category 5
hurricane.

My good friend and
primary care physician,
Tom McMicken, who has
a grandson on Bartow's
team, explained the rules
of the game, including
the finesse required when
a player uses his stick
(or crosse) as a weapon


against an opp
The rules in
are similar to ic
except that you
allowed to kno
ponent's teeth
With all due
the wise doctor
stood his expla
lacrosse rules a
well as I do his
good and bad
His explanat
with the fact th
vou want as mi
good cholester
little of the bad
terol as possible


The Polk County Democrat

Established August 28,1931
With which The Polk County Record was consolidated November 1,1946
190 South Florida Avenue, Bartow, FL 33830 Phone (863) 533-4183 Fax (863)
E-mail address for letters to the editor: letters@polkcountydemocrat.col
Jim Gouvellis, Publisher Aileen Hood, General Manager
Jeff Roslow, Editor Peggy Kehoe, Managing Editor
S. L. FRISBIE, IV, (Publisher 1981-2009; General Manager 1976-1981; Managing Editor 1954
LOYAL FRISBIE (Publisher Emeritus 1981-2004; Publisher 1964-1981, Editor 1946-198
S. L. FRISBIE (President 1946-1958); S. LLOYD FRISBIE (Publisher 1946-1964)
Mail Subscriptions, Payable in Advance J- -
Periodical dass postage paid at Lakelan
and additional entry office


In Polk County
1 year $39.99
6 months S 24.00


Other Florida Counties
1 year $65.00
6 months 540.00


For those of you who
voted for Rick Scott, I
hope as many others
do, that you are happy
with yourselves. During
his campaign, he said
he would create 700,000
jobs and find ways to cut
wasteful spending.
In his new budget, he
proposes to cut 8400 state
employees, cut money
form the school budgets,
and continue making
teachers responsible for
their students to make
good grades.
As far as I am con-

I support
I have always had an
interest in trains and rail-
roading. My family was
a railroad family many
years ago. I volunteered
on a tourist railroad for 11
years and I enjoy travel-
ing by train.
With that said, I fail to
see the rationale for this
high-speed rail project
between Tampa and
Orlando.
There is already a
means to travel from
Tampa to Orlando by rail
or bus more cheaply.
It is anything but
high speed but could be
improved upon much
more economically. The
construction jobs cre-
ated by this project would
be temporary and cost
overruns are always a


cerned, his true persona
has emerged, and that is
Lex Luthor.
For those of you who
do not know who Lex
Luthor is, he is Super-
man's biggest foe, who's
character wanted to rule
the world, using his own
money.
After winning the
election, Scott put out
an email address to the
citizens of Florida, to give
ideas on saving money
and creating jobs.
I sent him an email,
and suggested a way to

t Scott on rail
concern.
I don't know of any gov-
ernment project that did
not have enormous cost
overruns. The ridership
numbers, too, I believe
are wishful thinking. The
companies talked about
to solicit bids from are
all foreign companies. To
pay for this rail system,
the ticket prices would
have to be more than I
would want to pay. And
then there are the main-
tenance costs. Maintain-
ing a system like this with
all its associated safety
issues would also be high.
It would be just another
government money pit.
So we are to support a
project that we don't need
with money that, for the
most part, is borrowed


GOP is really cons(


onent. The wrestling room at
that regard Graham High School in
ce hockey, St. Paris, Ohio, where Jim
i are not Jordan, now 47, began the
ck an op- athletic career that took
out. him to the University of
respect to Wisconsin and two NCAA
r, I under- wrestling championships,
nation of contains this sign: "Dis-
ibout as cipline is doing what you
treatise on don't want to do when
cholesterol. you don't want to do it."
ion ends Today, as a thirdterm con-
iat while gressman from Ohio and
uch of the chairman of the Repub-
ol and as lican Study Committee,
I choles- Jordan leads what looks
e, the total like an ongoing insurgen-
FRISBIEj 6A cv to discipline his party's
leadership in the House
of Representatives.
The RSC is the caucus
of the most conserva-
tive Republicans in the
House. Its members
p.
are determined to find
533-0402 whether their party's
m frugality is operational or
merely rhetorical. Jordan
is serenely confident that
4-1976) those in the caucus mean
1) what they say.
Recently, the RSC,
which includes more than
F 3 170 of the 241 Republi-
*: can House members and
more than 70 of the 87
r freshmen, told the party's


House leaders every
one of them very conser-
vative that their pro-
posed budget cuts were
too timid. The RSC, which
has produced a plan to
cut S2.5 trillion from
federal spending over the
next 10 years, rejected
the leadership's proposal
to cut fiscal 2011 spend-
ing less than S100 billion.
And the leadership bowed
to the led. The RSC,
which Jordan says "helps
Republicans remember
we're Republicans," is not
the tail that wags the dog.
It essentially is the dog.
So House conserva-
tives aced their first test
of their sincerity about
spending. But will the dog
take a big bite out of a
sacred cow, such as farm
subsidies?
Michael Tanner of the


save enough money to
hire 2700 teachers state
wide. I advised him to
eliminate the FCAT, as all
it does is force the teach-
ers to teach the students
to take a test, and learn
nothing about how to live
in this society.
Just to let you all know,
the FCAT in 2008 cost
the state $51,577,36, and
looking at the numbers
climbing since 1996, 1
would venture a guess of
about $60,000,000 now.
Bill Simpkins
Bartow

Decision
from China although it is
said it is tax money, for
a train that will be built
with foreign technology
that many will not be
able to afford to ride. Gee,
thanks for nothing.
I support Governor
Scott's decision on this.
Tell the federal govern-
ment to take a hike.
We don't need this
boondoggle and we don't
want their (our) money
for this.
What we do need are
real wealth-producing
jobs, not more govern-
ment busy work.
Let's get our house in
order first. Thank you,
Governor Scott; I think
you are on the right track.
Gary M. Wiesing
Lake Wales


ervative?
libertarian Cato Insti-
tute notes that 24 of the
RSC's members are on
the House Agriculture
Committee, that farm
income in 2010 was
$92.5 billion, 34 percent
higher than in 2009. And,
even subtracting govern-
ment payments, was 28.8
percent higher than the
average of the preceding
decade. And 73 percent
of all farm subsidies go to
the wealthiest 10 percent
of recipients. And Jordan's
district in west-central
Ohio receives $30 mil-
lion in direct payments,
putting it among the top
50 beneficiaries of such
subsidies.
Asked about this,
Jordan smiles like Al-
bert Pujols watching the
approach of a hanging
curve ball. He says he
recently met with some
corn growers who were
in Washington to try to
protect their programs,
including the ethanol
fiasco, and he told them,
in the nicest possible way,
that he is all for ethanol
to the extent that the

WILL 6A


Like soccer with sticks


Out of Florida PuUlsh~ej'inedac i--
1 year 572.00 suJ',-ASTVE-' ;
POSTMASTER: Sed acre.- ;hi: : t; -- "':
6 Months $44.00 pofM eR. oe 2 K'* :- "


February 23,2011


Page 4A The Polk County, Democrat


U


~-~c
~Lrt~-~c








Februar'. 23, J,1 I The Polk County Democrat Page SA


BPAS concert: Mark & Clark play pianos with


Identical twins on
identical baby grand
pianos take the stage
Saturday offering their
high-energy perfor-
mance with more than a
dash of fun.
Bartow Performing
Arts Series presents
Mark & Clark at 7:30
p.m. Feb. 26, in the Bar-
tow Flementarn audito-
rium, 590 S. Wilson Ave.
Mark & Clark have
performed all over the
world from sold-out
shows in Las Vegas and
Atlantic City to cruise


ships to a circuit in
Horida to Europe and
Asia.
After many years of
performing throughout
the world, Mark and
Clark performed in both
Las Vegas and Atlantic
City. After several years
in both cities, they were
invited to perform shows
at the entire Mirage
facilities, such as MGM
Grand, New York City,
Bellagio, Monte Carlo,
and in the Las Vegas area.
In 2004, Mark and
Clark opened their own


PHOTO PROVIDED
Mark & Clark, twin pianists, perform Saturday, Feb. 26, as part
of the Bartow Performing Arts Series, in the Bartow Elementary
Academy auditorium.


Las Vegas Showroom.
appearing with come-
dian Gallagher. After a
successful run, they were
returned to Florida. their
website says, where their
new success began.
When they moved
back to Florida 2007. it
v,'.a the beginning of a
new era for "The Mark &
Clark Show." performing
for country clubs. yacht
clubs, and communities.
The duo has produced
gold albums in five
countries and perform
selections from Elton


energy
John and Billy Joel to
Ferrante & Teicher.
General admission
tickets are S15 per show.
Senior 055 or better)
tickets are S12 per show
and students K-12 are
S10. A child not vet in
school is free with a pay-
ing adult.
For information on the
Bartow Performing Arts
Series, tickets or spon-
sorships, call the Bartow
Chamber of Commerce
or the Bartow Area
Chamber Foundation at
533-7125.


Obituaries


Get your rain sensor


Marvin Anthony
"Andy" Kyser, 63, of Hope
Mills, N.C., formerly of
Bartow, died Sunday,
Feb. 13, 2011, in Cape
Fear Valley Medical Cen-
ter in Fayetteville, N.C.
lie was born Dec. 14,
1947. An Army veteran,
Mr. Kyser served two
tours in Vietnam. iHe
was a registered land
surveyor and worked for
the Florida Department
of Transportation for 42
years.
Survivors include his
wife of 38 years, Shel-
ley; a daughter, Kelley
Youngs and husband Carl
of San Antonio, Texas;
a son, Miles Kyser and


wife Ashley of Columbus,
N.D.; two sisters, Virginia
Craven of Lake Wales and
Maudine Harvard of Clio,
Ala.; one granddaugh-
ter, Taylor Kyser; and
three grandsons, Russell
Collins, Zane and Gavin
Kyser.
Memorial service: Sat-
urday, Feb. 26, at 1 p.m.,
at Marion Nelson Funeral
Home in Lake Wales.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests memori-
als be made to theVFW,
200 West Central Avenue,
Lake Wales, 33853, or the
American Legion, 300
Avenue M N.W., Winter
Haven, 33881.


Polk County and the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District are
offering rebates to cus-
tomers with documented
rain sensor costs up to
$50.
About 50 percent of
Polk County's drinking
water is used for land-
scape irrigation. Many
automatic irrigation sys-
tems operate during and
shortly after rainfall, an
indication that they lack
automatic rain sensor
shut-offs.
Polk County Utilities'
rain sensor rebate could
help save people up to
100 gallons of water per


day- that averages
about 10 percent of the
annual water bill, the
county said. If all Polk
County Utilities custom-
ers participate, they
would cumulatively save
nearly 130,000 gallons
of water per day county-
wide, the county said in a


.press release.
Residential or business
water customers who use
drinking water for irriga-
tion systems installed
before Jan. 1, 1991, and
do not have a working
rain sensor can partici-
pate. To do that, contact
Polk County Utilities,


Attn: Rain Sensor Rebate
Program, 1011 Jim Keene
Blvd., Winter Haven,
33880, or phone 298-
4100. This program will
end on Aug. 31 or when
funds are exhausted,
whichever occurs first.


Emma Hernandez


Emma Hernandez, 71,
of Bartow, died Mon-
day, Feb. 21, 2011, at her
home, from complica-
tions of diabetes.
Born in Parras, Coa-
huila, Mexico, Mrs.
Hernandez was a lifelong
resident of the Bartow
area.
She was a homemaker
and a member of the
Guadalupe Catholic Mis-
sion of Wahneta.
Mrs. Hernandez was
preceded in death by a
son, Abel Hernandez.
Survivors include her
husband of 56 years,
Avelino Hernandez of
Bartow; eight children,
Maria Hernandez Rodri-
guez of Winter Haven,
Jose P Hernandez, Sr., of
Arkansas, Emma A. Her-
nandez of Bartow, Chris-
tina Alvarado of Eagle
Lake, Luis A. Hernandez
of Lakeland, Victoria H.
Sihweil of Bartow, Alejan-
dro Hernandez of Alturas,
and Mauricio Hernandez
of Bartow; three sis-,
ters, Irene, Graciela and
Raquel; three brothers,
Jesus, Juan and Mauro;
19 grandchildren; and 21
great-grandchildren.
Visitation: Wednesday,


Emma Hernandez


Feb. 23, from 6-8 p.m. at
Whidden-McLean Fu-
neral Home in Bartow.
Funeral mass: Thurs-
day, Feb. 24, at 11 a.m. at
the Guadalupe Catholic


Residential


Mission in Wahneta.
Condolences may be
sent to the family at www.
whiddenmcleanfuneral-
home.com.


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WAVL


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The Polk County Democrat Page 5A


February 23, 201 1


/IT


li~i~








Page 6A The Polk County Democrat February 23, 2011


SIGN: City approves


FROM PAGE 1A
"They're very tasteful
signs and look very nice,"
said Huff.
While city ordinances
before the Clear Springs
zoning exception were
permitted to rise 8 feet
from ground level and sit
6 feet wide. The new sign
will stand about 10 feet
tall and up to 9 feet wide.
Commissioners were
assured by City Planner
Bob Weigers that the city
will not be responsible
for upkeep of the pro-
posed directional sign


located in the right of
way.
Robert Furlong, Clear
Springs vice president of
design standards, said
the builder hopes to start
work on the signs within
a week after pulling a
permit and finish the job
within two months after
starting construction.
Notice of Polk State
Corporate College will
grace the bottom of each
ladder sign in a bid to
brand or advertise the
college.
Weigers said the move
to change the rules


midstream wouldn't
affect other businesses
that might request larger
signs than allowed oth-
enwise.
"It doesn't open you
up to any comparisons,"
said Weigers. "I don't see
this as a precedent."
Beautification com-
mittee member needed
City commissioners
seek a member to serve
on the Beautification
Board. Meetings are held
Wednesday nights. Pro-
spective applicants may
pick up an application at
City Hall.


CIGAR: Saving factory strikes a chord


FROM PAGE 1A
"We were a magnet of
interest," she said.
She said the committee
would next be meeting
with Bartow City Man-
ager George A. Long.
Her sentiment and
experience paralleled
those of Ken Atkins, who
heads up the restoration
committee.
"It went better than I
expected," Atkins said.
"Everyone we met was
very enthusiastic."
He and Bill Melvin gar-
nered a similar reception
several weeks earlier at a
boutique cigar manufac-
turer conference. Cigar
company executives at
Cigars and Guitars pro-
vided names and num-
bers for Atkins, Pfeiffer
and others to contact to
arrange financial dona-


FREE: Tax hel
FROM PAGE 1A
families and we're trying
to reach out to let people
know about it," said Scott
Lonsberry, the commu-
nity projects manager for
United Way.
United Way's locations
to get your taxes filed are:
Church Service Cen-
ter, 495 E. Summerlin St.,
Bartow
Help of Fort Meade,
121 W Broadway, Fort
Meade
The Salvation Army,
830 N. Kentucky Ave.,
Lakeland
Mulberry Community
Service Center, 301 N.E.
Fifth St., Mulberry
The Salvation Army,
320 Avenue T N.W, Win-
ter Haven
AARP's tax help sites
and times are:
Latt Maxcy Library, 15
N. Magnolia, Frostproof,
8:30 a.m.-noon and
5-7 p.m. Monday, and
9-11:30 a.m. Thursday
First Presbyterian
Church, 104 Scenic High-
way, Haines City, 10 a.m.-
2 p.m. Thursday
Legacy Church, 901
W. Beacon Road, Lake-
land, S a.m.-2 p.m. Mon-
day and Wednesday
Reformation Luther-
an Church, 6760 Old Polk
City Road, Lakeland, 8:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Monday
and Thursday
Church of the Good
Shepherd, Johnson and
Fourth streets, Lake
Wales, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday, 8 a.m.-noon
Tuesday and Thursday
Hope Presbyterian


tions, said Atkins.
The redevelopment
committee hopes to raise
at least $100,000 to fund
protection and preserva-
tion of the cigar fac-
tory building. While that
amount would be nice,
Long believes all that is
necessary to be raised is
between $50,000-$75,000
for that phase.
However, the window
of opportunity is slowly
but surely closing. At the
Monday, Feb. 21, Bartow
city commission work
session, Long said the
first week in May marks
the ultimate deadline
of whether the effort
progresses or grinds to
a halt.
Atkins expressed the
belief the committee's ef-
fort will yield the hoped-
for result.
"It's coming down to

lp available
Church, 2110 Cypress
Gardens Blvd., Winter
Haven, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Wednesday-
People need to know
their bank routing and
account numbers so the
money can be directly
deposited.
Filers should have a
picture ID for individual
and spouse; allW2 and
1099 forms; Social Secu-
rity cards for everyone
in the family, includ-
ing children; evidence
of any real estate tax; if
children were in care,


the wire, but we're confi-
dent we'll get the mon-
ey," he said. He added
that with the reception
received at Cigars and
Guitars, the ball is "really
starting to roll."
"We're going to make
it," said Atkins. "We've
come too far to fail."
Want to learn more or
make a contribution?
Donations may be
made out to: Bartow
Area Chamber Founda-
tion Cigar Factory; 510
N. Broadway, Bartow, FL
33830. Donations should
specifically state "cigar
factory."
To learn more, visit:
www.CigarFactoryBar-
tow.com; e-mail: info@
cigarfactorybartow.com;
or follow on Twitter and
Facebook and type in
Cigar Factory Bartow.



you need their names,
address, identification
of child care provider
and amount you paid;
bank documents show-
ing routing and account
numbers; interest and
dividend statements; and
last year's tax return.
To make an appoint-
ment for the United Way
sites, call 648-1500, dial
zero and ask for 211 or
go to www.uwcf.org
For AARP people can
visit www.aarp.org/mon-
ey/taxes/.


FRISBIE: Like soccer with sticks


FROM PAGE 4A
number of both the good
and the bad should not
equal more than the sum
of your age, added to the
first three digits of your
Social Security number,
divided by three.
When it comes to un-
derstanding lacrosse, if


you learn to stomp your soccer and basketball,
feet when your team "non-contact sports" ii
scores, anything more is which violence must a
just showing off. ways appear to have b
nrri'ol tnl clu ,nttina in


(S. L Frisbie is retired.
The rules of checkers
strain his ability to mas-
ter complicated sports. He
did observe that unlike


'1
l-
een
liur


{ilLtIUVIII(li, o S L V llllg .yo
opponent with a crosse
is allowed, but only in a
genteel fashion.)


WILL: GOP is really conservative


FROM PAGE 4A
market pronounces it
viable. But, he says, the
government subsidizes
the production of it, pro-
tects it with tariffs and
mandates the use of it -
and still it cannot thrive
in this rigged market.
How did the corn
growers take this? Jordan
laughs: "They know I'm
just one of those crazy
conservatives."
His explanation of why
he got into politics is a
verbal shrug: "You get
married and have kids"
- he has four "and
you get sick of having
the government take
your money and tell you
what to do. I'm just a
conservative guy." And
an athlete looking for a
surrogate sport.
One of the surprising
number of representa-
tives who sleep in their
offices (why rent an


apartment, Jordan won-
ders, when Congress will
keep him in Washington
just six nights in Febru-
ary?), he is in politics
partly because he is too
old to wrestle and too
young to dampen his fe-
rocious competitive fires.
To spend an hour with
him is to understand that
the 112th Congress is go-
ing to be tumultuous.
Jordan is an apple that
fell far from the tree,
but the tree has moved
toward the apple. His
father was a Democrat, a
member of the Interna-
tional Union of Electrical
Workers who retired at
age 48 after 30 years with
General Motors and now,
at 66, is a successful Ohio
businessman. He makes
bows for bow Hunters,
votes Republican and lis-
tens to Rush Limbaugh.
Many Republicans
will urge Jordan to run


SUSPECT: Arrested in Georgi


FROM PAGE 1A
He said the day after
the shooting that Brad-
ley's brother, Arvell
Bradley, III, was involved
in a fight with someone
other than Weston before
Weston and Bradley's
began again. Ultimately
the argument turned into
a fist-fight.
Wiggins said the two


were punching each
other when Vershontis
Bradley tried to break
up the fight. That's when
Weston pulled out a gun
and shot.
Vershontis was taken
to Lakeland Regional
Medical Center where
she died on Sept. 20.
Vershontis, 21, was
putting herself through
college and was the


next year against Sher-
rod Brown, Ohio's liberal
freshman senator. Jordan
is disinclined because
it would limit his abil-
ity to attend his son's
high school wrestling
matches. Jordan's high
school wrestling record
was 150-1. The RSC's
record in this Congress
is, so far, slightly better.
On March 4, however,
the continuing resolu-
tion currently funding
the government expires;
next, the government's
borrowing will bump up
against the debt ceiling.
Jordan is determined
that the RSC, using both
deadlines as leverage for
spending cuts, will then
still be undefeated.

George Will is a colum-
nist for theWashington
Post. Readers may reach
him at georgewill@wash-
post.com.


a
mother of a then 2-year-
old daughter.
Weston is being held
in the county jail for
possession of MDMA,
possession of drug para-
phernalia, possession of
a firearm by a convicted
felon, violation of parole
with property damage
from driving under the
influence, and second-
degree murder.


-l

-- ----j


V You're invited!! To our

special community open,

house on Saturday,

Feb. 26., noon to 3 p.m.


Join Dr. Lori 5hanK and staff to
see all our exciting changes, like
our new digital x-ray, surgery
room and lab equipment. We'd
like to say thanks for such
a gracious welcome to Fort
Meade, and look forward
to many great years with
you and your pets!

2542 165


February 23, 2011


Page 6A The Polk County Democrat







f-ebruary 23, 2011



90th birthday

for Bernice Johnston


It's not ever, day that
someone turns 90 that
day for Bernice Johnston
is Feb. 28.
Her three daughters.
Beverly Stidham of
Columbia. (.C. Sandra
Bush of Winter I laven
and Paula White of Bar-
tow and their families
have planned a drop-in
reception for all of their
mother's friends to come
and share their well
wishes with her.
The reception will be
held from 3-5 p.m. Satur-
day, Feb. 26 in the parlor
at the Ministry Center of
First Baptist Church in
Bartow.
All friends of Mrs.
Johnston's are invited and
welcome to attend.
Bernice and her hus-
band, J.C. "Jake" John-
ston, along with their
three daughters, moved
to Bartow in 1959. Jake
and Bernice were mar-
ried 40 years before his
death in 1985. He was an
active Rotarian and she
supported and assisted
him with his community
involvement and political
service throughout his
life, including his tenure
as city commissioner and
mayor.
Mrs. Johnston has been
a life-long member of En-
gineers' Wives Club, she
was a Mariner Girl Scout
Troop leader and a mem-
ber of the Bartow Gar-
den Club. She was also
a leader for the Junior-
Garden Club and served
on the city's Beautifica-
tion Board. She has been
an active member of the
First Baptist Church and
her Sunday School class


Bernice Johnston


in Bartow for 40 years
and still volunteers in the
nursery.
She was the executive
secretary to four adminis-
trators at Bartow Memo-
rial Hospital and served
as a Hospital Auxiliary
member from 1971 until
recently.
Mrs. Johnston received
the Rotary Medal of Hon-
or in 1998. This award is
presented each year to a
person who has achieved
exceptional service out-
side of their profession.
She made fighting can-
cer one of her biggest cru-
sades. She became active
with the American Cancer
Society in 1986, and has
served as a volunteer,
incoming development
chairman, president and
treasurer of the Bartow/
Fort Meade Unit.
Mrs. Johnston was the
recipient of the Hope
Award presented by the
American Cancer Society
for outstanding volun-
teerism in 2000 and 2002.
She has been named an
Honorary Life Member
of the American Cancer
Society.


Community


Susan Taylor

concert benefits Relay7


Former Bartov.an >usan
Tavlor returns to her
hometown Sunday for a
concert presented by Bar-
tow Relay for I 7;; team
DeNeve for a Cure.
"Concert for a Cure"
will feature Tavlor and
other local talent at 1 p.m.
Feb. 27 at the : -...1-I.lII
in Mosaic Park, north of
Bartow Civic Center.
Based out of Atlanta for
the past 25 years, Taylor
is a vocalist, band leader
and musical entertain-
ment producer. She has
appeared as featured
vocalist with the Atlanta
Symphony Orchestra, Ritz
Carlton Orchestra, Ru-
pert's Orchestra, and her
own group, Susan Taylor
and The Paragons.
Taylor has entertained
audiences for local,
national and interna-
tional clients including
the Democratic National
Convention, Super Bowl
pre-game party, and
World Series VIP recep-
tion at such renowned
venues as New York's Wal-
dorfAstoria, Bermuda's
Southampton Princess,
The Fabulous Fox The-
atre, Drake Hotel and The
World Congress Center.
The Atlanta Songwriters
Association named Taylor
"Georgia's Best New Per-
forming Artist" in 1988.
While the concert is
free, a hat will be passed
for donations. Checks
should be made payable
to the American Cancer
Society. All proceeds will
go to Bartow Relay For
Life /American Can-
cer Society. Relay is the
signature fundraiser for


The Polk County Democrat Page TA
*1'


Gospel Singing

Convention


Polk County Gospel
Singing Convention will
meet t 3 p.m. Saturday.
Feb. 26 at the old Wel-
come Primitive Baptist
Church.


The church is at the
corner of Countv Roads
630 and 555.
For more information,
contact Ginger Fortner at
533-8896.


Scales and Tails Pet

Festival Saturday


The Scale and Tails Pet
Festival is this weekend
and aside from lots of
things for the kids to do
Losey's Animal Hospital
will be there to give you
tips on how to take better
care of your pet.
At 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m. Dr. Losey will take
questions on what's on
your mind about your
pet.
The rest of the day will
be all fund and games.
There will be live en-
tertainment by Living
Among Alligators, a Kid's
Zone with a bounce


house, carnival games
and a "kiddie" train. And,
at 10:40 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Living Among Alligators
shows take place.
The pet contests begin
at 11:30 a.m. and will rec-
ognize the best dressed,
largest, and smallest
animals.
There will also be
drawings for prizes. The
event starts at 10 a.m.
and will be at Simmers-
Young Park, 5630 W. C.R.
542, Winter Haven. It's off
of K-ville Avenue behind
the Auburndale Speed-
way. Call 534-6911.


Susan Taylor
ACS. This year's event in
Bartow is April 8-9.
Those attending the
concert are asked to bring
chairs or blankets to sit
on.
Boxed lunches will be
available for purchase;
drinks and desserts will
be sold by the Floral
Lakes Relay Team.
More information
about Susan is available
on her website www.
susantaylor.com.


j- 5 ^moo, F* y- rNtO

C)- j NA l- L i -FJ1 1tC C_(1 E-= i li J NA E-=
CNA OMM UTI NG GOVERNME
MADE EASY. MADE EASY.
J^^*^^^--- ^*^^^^^


You Can Be a


Patron of the Arts!

Support the 40th Annual Bloomin' Arts Festival
by purchasing a gift certificate (purchase award)
and/or providing a donation in the amount you
choose. A purchase award is actually a gift cer-
tificate, which allows you to pick out a piece of ',
artwork from the artist of your choice during the
show. It's surprisingly affordable and makes the
perfect gift for a friend or loved one.

This year's event will take place in Downtown Bartow. It's
one of Bartow's largest events and features the amazing
work of artists from all over the country and thousands
are sure to attend.


But that's not all... This years activities include:
A Car Show Flower Show
Children's Art Show Exhibits
Quilt Show Food, Fun and Music


40th Annual Bartow


Bloomin' Art Festival

Saturday, March 5 and Sunday March 6
in Downtown Bartow
r -- -- --r -r- n- n- -- - *
I YES! I want to to support Bloomin' Arts Festival I
I

i D I am pleased to make a purchase award/
I gift certificate in the amount of $_
I

SI am enclosing my check in the amount of
$ $ as a donation to the Bloomin'
SArts Festival.
SPlease make all checks payable to Bartow Bloomin' Arts Festival, and mail
Sto: Bartow Bloomin'Arts festival, P 0. Box 632 Bartow, Florida 33831 I
16-rnrn rn-a--------*-J


MOODY LAW
0 0 P O ES I NA SSO ITO


Missing a loved one,

a co-worker or friend?
Place a 2 to 5 inch memorial
(In Memory Of) for $50 or a 5.1 to
10 inch memorial for $100.
Add your loved one's picture for $20.
Receive a free laminated copy.
Additional copies available for $1 each.




HAPPY BIRTHDAY














Sean C. Dunn
6/25/82 1/31/02
rou never sal I'm leaving, you
ver said goodbye, you were
one before we knew it and only
iod knows why. A million tmes Call Vicky at
ve've needed you, a million times 533-4183to
we've cried. If love alone could-41 t
ave saved you, you neverwould place your
ave died. In life we loved you
aarfy, In detwe love you still. memorial.
n our heart you hold a place
et no one else can ever fill. t Deadline for
roke our hearts to lose you, but
ou didn't go alone for part of us Wednesday
nt wt you he day God too publication is
fou home.
noon on Friday;
o the most courageous person
Skow who gave suchuncon- for Saturday
litlonal love everywhere you
rent and touched so many lives, publication is
noon on
Intll we meet again, We love you n n
forever and always, Mom, Dad, Wednesday.
*1 IllreI @wj leoII Gnnfm r^UAW


I


Y
n
9
G
W(

h
h
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In
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lera' I 2iIb okconsDmca ael


By JEFF ROSLOW


'Ihe high-speed rail
Iavy be (lI- ..i'I, at a
slower pace but it's not
dead yet, area officials
are saying.
"Number one, let's not
bury high speed rail vet.
It's dead, but not buried,"
I'. h County Commission
Chairman Edwin Smith
said.
Lakeland's Mayor Gow
Fields is not giving up
vet either. "Overall I don't
believe high-speed rail is
dead. We'll get another
chance, I just don't know
when that is."
That was their reac-
tions last week after
(Gov. Rick Scott rejected
the 11.S. Department of
Transportation's S2.4
billion for a Tampa-to-
Orlando bullet train. The
total cost to build the rail
is estimated to be $2.8
billion.
Scott based his rejec-
tion on three factors: The
potential for construc-
tion cost overruns, which
could cost the state $3
billion, whether train
ridership and revenue
estimates are optimistic
and the fact that Florida
would have had to return
the money to Washing-
ton if it decided later to
stop the project.
And the shock at the
governor's decision was
not just local. In the U.S.
Congress steps have been
taken to see if Florida
can get that money and
still build the rail despite
Scott's decision.
Both Smith and Fields
said the decision made
their jaws drop, but U.S.
Sen. Bill Nelson met
with U.S. Transportation
Secretary Ray LaHood
Wednesday and the DOT
is looking into how to
salvage the project. That
move gave them both
some hope.
"LaHlood said Wednes-


PHOTO PROVIDED


An artist's rendering of the high-speed rail in the middle of Interstate 4.


day and we both agree
(on the project). We
have Department of
Transportation lawyers
researching how we can
work around the gover-
nor's decision. We don't
know what that's going
to be," Nelson said in a
conference call interview
Wednesday.
Nelson said this op-
portunity should not be
passed up.
"Florida has the best
proposal in the entire
United States," he said.
"We cannot let this op-
portunity pass us by."
Then on Thursday, 26
Florida senators wrote a
letter to LaHood suggest-
ing the Passenger Rail
Commission and Rail En-
terprise created last year
could accept the money.
That number dropped to
25 Monday when Sen.
Greg Evers withdrew his
name.
LaHood said last week
he is giving Florida a
week to decide what to
do about the money. At
least three bther states
- New York, California
and Rhode Island are
seeking some or all of
that money.


Local officials be-
lieve the rejection hurts
Florida's chances of be-
ing able to deal with the
future.
A high-speed rail, one
area transportation of-
ficial said, takes care of
something he believes
people are missing.
"Everybody is look-
ing at high-speed rail as
another form of a com-
muter rail," said Danny
Ours, executive director
of Citrus Connection
for Polk County Transit
Authority. "It is a system
from one metro area to
another in a quick man-
ner. I don't understand
how people are missing
the boat."
It requires politicians,
workers and anyone else
to think differently. His
point is if there is a high-
speed rail that connects
Dade County with the
Orlando area, people
doing business or even
employed in Orange
County could live in
Dade County and get to
work in a routine manner
using a high speed rail.
"People on both ends
of the line could do busi-
ness on both ends at a


cost that's a lot cheaper
than flying." Ours said.
If you were to fly from
Dade to Orange you
would have to get to the
airport two hours before
the flight, make sure you
get your ticket ahead of
time and take the trip, he
said.
By the time you get
home at the end of the
day you'd be pretty tired
from a full day of busi-
ness and traveling, he
added. A high-speed rail
takes a lot of that stress
away.
But, he said, getting
that point across is dif-
ficult. In a recent survey
Ours saw the split on
whether the high-speed
rail should be done is
"about 50-50." Whether
or not people understand
his point is questionable.
'At this point Central
Florida should support
Nelson," Ours said. "This
is controversial because
some are saying we
shouldn't because there's
a great investment but
there's two sides to every
story."

Scott's support
While people such


Area hope for rail




money not fading


as Florida Sen. Paula
Dockery. Sen. Nelson and
a host of other Florida
representatives want to
get around Scott's rejec-
tion, there are those who
are backing him on the
tight money situation
and his fight to encour-
age cutting the budget
and creating jobs.
Florida Sen. JD Alexan-
der did not sign Dock-
ery's letter to LaITood
saying, All of us have
had serious concerns
about whether it really
makes sense for our state
and our nation to under-
take the project."
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos said, "There
is no more important
issue today for the long-
term well-being of our
nation than to rein in
deficit spending. Wash-
ington's reckless spend-
ing addiction has set
our nation on a critically
dangerous path. For the
good of the nation, it's
time to change course."
And USF Polytech-
nic President Marshall
Goodman felt the gov-
ernor had a good point
in rejecting the federal
money.
"We think it is unfor-
tunate that residents of
Polk County, and the I-4
corridor,, will not have
access to high-speed rail
service between Tampa
and Orlando. We real-
ize, however, that in the
current economy the
governor must make
some tough budget deci-
sions, and we respect his
decision to suspend the
high-speed rail project,"
he said.
USFP stands to gain in
a high-speed rail. Polk
is looking to have one
stop for the rail. Potential
stops could be at State
Road 570 West, Kathleen
Road and station sites
associated with USF


Polytech.
The city of Lakeland fa-
vored a stop at Polytech
because it could help the
school's student popu-
lation and help attract
businesses here.
A recent Central
Florida Development
Council study showed
Polytechnic's value
to Polk County at its
completion will have a
total annual economic
impact of S3.2 billion.
The study also showed
an additional 36,610 jobs
will be created in the
local economy by the
project, adding another
$1.3 billion in earnings.
The economic im-
pact of Polytech could
be enhanced if the stop
is adjacent to the new
campus, Tom Patton, the
director of CFDC, said.
But, still the fight
continues. Friday, the
Polk County Commis-
sion came out in favor
of seeking an alternative
to get the federal money.
It strongly supports the
Tampa, Lakeland and Or-
lando mayors and other
leaders on all levels to
pursue alternative plans.
The board endorsed
a joint statement by the
Central Florida Partner-
ship and Tampa Bay
Partnership "encouraging
everyone to be a part of
the effort to find the right
solution."
"Florida is key in the
federal high speed rail
initiative, because out of
all the projects in line to
receive federal funding,
our state is the only one
ready to move forward
immediately," Smith said.
"We have the capability
of administering funding
in Polk County, and we
want to see this project
happen assuming all
issues and concerns are
satisfactorily addressed."


By KEITH LAING
Tli NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE -While
backers rallied Monday
in Tampa and officials in
Washington continued
working on plans that
did not involve state ap-
proval, Gov. Rick Scott
reiterated his objection to
accepting federal money
for high speed rail in Cen-
tral Florida, even if the
state is not involved.
And the effort by
lawmakers to go around
Scott's objection was
weakened when one of
the 26 state senators who
signed a letter opposing
Scott's move changed his
mind Monday.
Twenty-six was a veto-
proof number in the Sen-
ate, but with the defec-
tion of Sen. Greg Evers.
that's no longer the case.
But even so. Scott told
reporters Monday in
Tallahassee that he was
doubtful a plan could
emerge that would satisfy
his concerns over the
long-sought Tampa-
to-Orlando project, for
which the federal govern-
ment had offered to pay
S2.4 billion of the roughly
S2.8 billion projected
cost.
"As you know, I've said
all along I don't believe
that there is anyway the
taxpayers of the state
should be on the hook


for the operational cost
of that or for the risks if
it gets shut down," Scott
said. "I don't see any way
to do that."
Over the weekend, rail
advocates had hoped that
Scott was leaving the door
open to the possibility of
allowing them to accept
the money. A spokesman
for U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson
said the Democrat came
away from a joint appear-
ance with Scott at the
Daytona 500 convinced
the governor would at
least look at the plans be-
ing crafted.
However, Scott ap-
peared Monday to put the
horse back in the barn.
"Despite efforts by
many to re-open the door
to high speed rail, my po-
sition has not changed,"
he posted on his Face-
book page, on which he
has almost 60,000 friends.
Meanwhile, Evers, R-
Baker, said he regretted
signing the letter to U.S.
Transportation Secretary-
Ray LaHood last week
that suggested that two
statewide rail panels set
up by the Legislature
could accept the S2.4 bil-
lion Scott rejected.
"As a representative of
the people of Florida Sen-
ate District 2, I do hereby
remove my signature on
the letter you received on
Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011,
regarding funding for


High Speed Rail," Evers
wrote to LaHood. "Let me
be very clear. I do not
want to spend one dime
on High Speed Rail and I
absolutely support Gov.
Scott sending the money
back. I regret signing the
letter as I believe it mis-
construed my position on
High Speed Rail.
"I was trying to send
a message to Gov. Scott
to bring to the forefront
my firm belief that we
should not fund any rail
projects with state or
federal money," Evers
concluded.
Evers also suggested
that Scott put the brakes
on a separate proposed
commuter train in Or-
lando, SunRail, which
the governor has said he
is currently reviewing.
Without Evers on board,
lawmakers in the Florida
Senate lose the p-" :ibil; r.
of overriding a veto of any
rail legislation or budget
line items they pass.
However, another
plan emerged Monday
that would not involve
lawmakers in Tallahassee
at all. The plan, which
U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor,
D-Tampa, detailed to
reporters, would call for
the creation of a news
independent agency with
representatives from the
local jurisdictions that
would house the pro-
posed 84-mile train.


may

By KEITH LIANG
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott found out last
week there is this pesky
little thing called the
Florida Legislature as law-
makers pushed back on a
couple of his decisions for
the first time.
Whatever leftover
warm-and-fuzziness
there was with lawmakers
from Scott's inauguration
came to a screeching halt
at least as sudden as the
one he put on a proposed
Tampa-to-Orlando high
speed rail by rejecting 2.4
billion federal dollars to
build it.
If that wasn't enough
transport angst, the
Senate chief budget
writer brought some
turbulence to Scott's
much-ballyhooed sale of
the state aircraft fleet bv
saving that the "get-to-
work" governor may have
violated state law and
even the Constitution by
selling off the planes.
If they ever had been
honeymooners, several
lawmakers skipped the
muttering of "one of
these days, one of these
days," this week. A veto-
proof number of them got
right to work themselves,
trying to detour around
Scott to take the train


be just starting
money anyway. collected signatures for
Led by rail supporter her letter to LaHood.
Sen. Paula Dockery, Senate Democratic
R-Lakeland, a bipartisan Leader Nan Rich indi-
group of 26 Florida sena- cated this week that her
tors sent a letter to U.S. 11-member caucus would
Transportation Secretary be willing to participate
Ray LaHood suggest- in any legislative effort to
ing the Passenger Rail create an end-run around
Commission and Rail Scott on rail, and indeed
Enterprise could accept all of them signed on to
the cash. Dockerv's letter.
Also picking up steam The public backlash is
by the end of the week not to suggest that there
was the possibility that was not also quiet mut-
cities and counties or tering about Scott's deci-
transportation planning sion this week. Most of it
organizations in Central wasn't fit to print.
Florida could bypass the "At least today I'm not
state and directly accept using four-letter words,"
the cash. said Rich Templin, vice
Dockery so vocally sup- president of labor union
ported Scott's campaign AFL-CIO, said the day af-
that she was rumored to ter Scott's decision. "This
be under consideration to is a tragedy, a disaster
be his lieutenant gover- of unmitigated propor-
nor or transportation sec- tions."


retary. But by week's end,
she was the conductor of
the anti-Scott train.
"I'm hearing from
Central Florida that the
mayors are getting to-
gether talking about what
they can do, I'm hearing
that the (metropolitan
planning organizations;
are talking about what
they can. I'm hearing that
Chambers of Commerce
in Miami and other plac-
es are talking about what
they can do so there's a
lot of efforts going on,"
she told reporters as she


There were some
cheers for Scott's decision
coming from the fourth
floor of the Capitol,
though it took three days
before even a peep was
heard from Senate Presi-
dent Mike Haridopolos.
When the aspiring U.S.
Senate candidate finally
decided to speak, he was
definitely not saying "all
aboard."
Haridopolos said if it
is shut down, the state
would have to return the
S2.4 billion in federal
funds to D.C.


A map showing where the high-speed rail would run.





A map showing where the high-speed rail would run.


Scott firm against rail


Legislature, governor fight


Ihe Polk County Democrat PageIlB


February 2 20i (1 j








Page 2B '1 he Polk .iouint,.Dern'-r. a


2010 Polk County Youth Fair Parade of Champions


l:ditor':. .,oe. fIor more
on rr, *ee 5aturda;,.
,dition.

f-ernando Alejandro,
lake ,egion Sr. f-CCl :
I ).femonstratiorn-enior
Division, Iirst Place.
Stephen II' r I I.ucky
Clovers 4-. : I ducatior nal
Ex.ihibit, Best of Sholv,.
hadii;i a Almnallah,
lidge C(,rommunity'
Sr. I1JA: Cake Auction
(,ontest, Cake Auction
participant-flunnming-
bird Cake.
Emily Arrington, Thun-
derhooves 1-f I: Sr. Horse
Show Quiz, First Place.
Michaela Aycock, Top
Notch 4-1: Market Steer
Show, Grand Champion
Steer; Market Steer Show
Class 8, First Place; Pure-
bred Beef Brangus Fe-
male, Grand Champion
and Reserve Champion;
Purebred Beef Brahman
Breed, Grand Champion;
Beef Breeding Sr. Show-
manship, First Place.
T.I. Babb, I.ake Gibson
Middle FFA: Market Steer
Show (lass 7, First Place;
Market Steer Jr. Show-
manship Contest, First
Place.
Brittany Ball, Top
Notch 4-11: Market Hog
Show, Randd Champion;
Market I log Show Class
Winner-Class 15, First
Place.
Bailey Barber, All Stars
4- H: Elementary Table
Setting and Menu Plan-
ning, Best Formal; Dog
Show Jr. Rally Basic, First
Place; Dog Show Jr. Agil-
ity Basic, First Place; Dog
Show Jr. Obedience, First
Place.
Mackenzie Barber, All
Stars 4-H: Elementary
Table Setting and Menu
Planning, Best Informal
Outdoor; Dog Show Jr.
Agility Sub-Novice, First
Place.
Leigh Ann Barthle,
Haines City Sr. FFA:
Home Furnishings,
Tri-Color; Cake Auction
Contest, Cake Auction
Participant-Carrot Cake.
Hannah Bell, Dundee
Ridge FFA: Rabbit Show
Third Runner Up Over-
all; Rabbit Show, Best of
Breed-Mini Lop.
Keith Bennett, IHome
Grown 4-HI: Commercial
1Heifer Show-Brahman
Influence, Reserve
Champion Yearling


KJ 0ion Poultry Shovw
Sho.. marnhip Jr. Divi-
ion. First Place.
Zach Bennett, Home
Gro,.n r4-H: Commercial
I ifeer Sho'w,-Brahman
Influence. Grand (;ham-
pion 2-Year-Old Divi-
sion. PReserve Champion
2-Y'ear-Old Division.
C.aitlvn Benton, Barn-
yard 4-1I: Three Hlome
Furnishing items. Three
Tri-C.olors; Foods, 1ri-
Color; Sr. Table Setting
and Menu Planning,
Best Informal Outdoor;
Sew-Off Sr. Division, First
Place: Scrap-Off Sr. Divi-
sion, First Place.
Clare Bibby, Hog Wild
4-H: Home Furnishings,
Tri-Color.
Brie Bird, Thunder-
hooves 4-H: Sr. English
Showmanship-Horse
Show, First Place; Sr.
Grooming and Condi-
tioning-Horse Show,
First Place; Sr. English
Pleasure-Horse Show,
First Place; Sr. English
Equitation-Horse Show,
First Place.
Erin Boccalori, Kath-
leen Sr. FFA: Market Hog
Show Class Winner-Class
9, First Place.
Steven Boles, Mulberry
Sr. FFA: Poultry Show,
Champion Male Bantam;
Poultry and Egg Judging,
First Place Team.
Amanda Bolin, Bartow
Sr. FFA: Horticulture
Citrus Dept., Tri-Color
Citrus Plant.
Robert Bratton, Lake
Gibson Sr. FFA: Horticul-
ture Blueberry Dept., Tri-
Color Blueberry Plant;
Horticulture Judging
Contest Sr. Team, First
Place.
Dalton Brewer, Boone
Middle FFA: Cake Auc-
tion Contest, Cake
Auction Participant-Jean
Bell's Layer Cake.
Christa Brickman, Hog
Wild 4-H: Poultry Show,
Champion Male Stan-
dard, Champion Turkey;
Rabbit Show, Best of
Breed Chinchilla.
Blair Buchanon, Hog
Wild 4-H: Commercial
Heifer Show Jr. Show-
manship, First Place;
Livestock Judging Con-
test Jr., First Place.
Lauren Butler, Cheval,
Etc. 4-H Club: Jr. Western
Showmanship-Horse
Show, First Place.
Lacie Calhoun, Coun-


tryP 4-H: Market:
Hog Shov. Cia. \a'in:.er-
Class 17,. First .
Megan ( .
Kathleen sr. FI\: Poultny
ShowI'. Best Dozen Bro. wn
I .. and Reserve Dozen
Brown E-ggs; Purebred
Beef Beefrnabter Female,
(Grand ( ij.., p.... Pure-
bred Beef Beefmaster
Bull, ( rand ( i ; .. i,
lulia Canad\, Cheval.
Etc. 4-11 Club: Jr. Horse
Show Quiz, First Place.
Morgan Carlton, Kath-
leen Sr. FFA: Market Hog
Show Class Winner-Class
5, First Place; Market Hog
Senior Showmanship
Contest, First Place.
Shelby Carlton, Hoof-
n-Horn 4-H: Horticulture
Ornamentals Dept., Tri-
Color Ornamental Plant.
Jenna Carr, Hog Wild
4-H: Rabbit Show, Best of
Breed HIanana.
Quinn Carter, Haines
City Sr. FFA: Purebred
Beef Brangus Bull, Grand
Champion; Purebred
Beef Brahman Breed
Male, Grand Champion.
Patrice Carter, Bartow
Sr. FFA: Horticulture
Blueberry Dept., Reserve
Champion Blueberry.
Maria Catello, Lake
Gibson Sr. FFA: Sr. West-
ern Showmanship-Horse
Show, First Place; Sr.
Western Pleasure-Horse
Show, First Place; Sr.
Trail-Horse Show, First
Place.
Erica Chaney, All Paws
In: Dog Show Jr. Show-
manship Basic, First
Place.
Josalynne Christian,
Home Grown 4-H: Two
Home Furnishing items,
Two Tri-Colors; Jr. Table
Setting and Menu Plan-
ning, Judges' Choice;
Dog Show Intermediate
Agility Basic, First Place.
Cody Clark, Kathleen
Middle FFA: Commercial
Heifer Show European
Influence, Grand Cham-
pion, Yearling Division.
Kaitlynn Coatney,
McLaughlin Middle FFA:
Commercial Heifer Show
Brahman Influence,
Grand Champion 3-Year-
Old Division; Rabbit
Show, Best of Breed New
Zealand.
Ryan Coile, Polk City
4-H: Horticulture Orna-
mentals Dept., Overall
Premier Horticulture
Exhibitor Award, Reserve


For $30 you can place a Happy Ad to announce a
new birth, an engagement, a birthday, an anniversary,
all "A's", graduation from school or college -
even a job promotion.
If it makes you happy and you want to share it with
the world call Vicky at 863-533-4183
to place your ad now.
(Ad limited to 4 inches plus picture).
We'll even send you a laminated copy for $1 each. Call now!!
__ _,__-_-_-_i ,- __T8............. --- .- .............:.g


PHOTO BY MIKE CREECH

Shelby Oesterreicher, a student at Bartow High School, turns her steer during competition at the
Polk County Youth Fair.


Champion Ornamental,
Tri-Color Ornamental-
Begonia, Tri-Color
Ornamental-Nandina.
Aaron Cole, Bartow
Middle FFA: Poultry and
Egg Judging, First Place
Team.
Lanson Collins, Hoof
n Horn 4-H: Purebred
Beef Zebu Female, Grand
Champion; Purebred
Beef Zebu Bull, Grand
Champion.
Ivy Comparato, Hog
Heaven 4-H: Two Foods
Items, Two Foods Tri-
Colors; Table Setting and
Menu Planning, Best
Informal Outdoor.
Taylor Connell, Thun-
derhooves 4-H: Jr. Walk
Trot-Horse Show, First
Place.
Christy Connelly, Teno-
roc Sr. FFA: Market Hog
Show Class Winner-Class


Three, First Place.
Alexis Conner, Bartow
Middle FFA: Market Hog
Show Class Winner-Class
8, First Place.
Haley Conner, Mulber-
ry Sr. FFA: Rabbit Judging
Contest Sr. Individual,
Overall High Sr. Indi-
vidual.
Amber Cooper, Ft.
Meade FFA: Jr. Speed
Showmanship-Horse
Show, First Place; Jr.
Flags-Horse Show, First
Place.
Michael Copeland,
Dundee Clovers 4-H:
Dog Show Sr. Showman-
ship Basic, First Place;
Dog Show Sr. Rally Basic,
First Place; Dog Show Sr.
Agility Basic, First Place;
Dog Show Sr. Obedience
Basic, First Place.
Brittany Crawn: Live-
stock Judging Individual,


Overall High Individual.
Kasey Currier, Bartow
Sr. FFA: Commercial
Heifer Show-European
Influence, Grand Cham-
pion 3-Year-Old Division;
Market Steer Show Class
9, First Place.
Erica Curtis, Polk
County Sea Stars: 4-H
Two Foods Items, Two
Tri-Colors; Dog Show
Intermediate Rally Nov-
ice A, First Place; Rabbit
Judging Contest- 4-H Sr.
Individual, First Place.
Baley Davis, Hog Wild
4-H: Purebred Beef Re-
serve Champion Angus
Bull.
Sabrina Davis, Country
Ridge 4-H: Horticulture
Vegetables Department,
Tri-Color Vegetables-
Cabbage.


This notice paid for with public donations

FREE to the public

Weight Loss & Stop Smoking Hypnotherapy


Dave Miller is providing
hypnotherapy for weight
loss, stop smoking & stress
relief. For many people,
this therapy reduces 2 to 3
clothing sizes and/or stops
smoking. Anyone who
wants treatment will receive
professional hypnotherapy
free from charge. An
appointment is not
necessary. Sign in and


immediately receive treatment.
Dave Miller is a retired
counselor and has been
conducting hypnosis seminars
for over 30 years. He has
helped thousands stop
smoking & lose weight or
both without any side effects
or dieting. A modest $5 donation
when signing in is appreciated.
Only one 2-hour session is
needed for desirable results.


Mon Mar. 7-Winter Haven
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5665 Cypress Gardens Blvd.

Tue. Mar 8-Lake Wales
Hampton Inn
22900 Hwy 27


Sign in 30 minutes early. All meetings begin at 7:30pm
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} brui rT",_-3 _3. i












Community Calendar


All pIhone 12iumber
area codes are ,P63 uIn2!te
indicated other ie. 'I he
deadline to be included
in the upcoming calendar
and for news stories is 4
p.m. Monday for .1ednes-
day's newspaper and 4
p.m. Thursday for Satur-
days newspaper
For information or
questions, call Jeff Roslow
or Peggy Kehoe at 533-
4183.

ARTS
Thursday, Feb. 24
Ballroom dancing with
instructor Jean Reyn-
olds, 2:30-3:30 p.m.,
The Center for Personal
Growth, 151 Second St.
S.W., Winter Haven. S5
donation suggested for
each class to help main-
tain program. 299-9070 to
register.

Friday, Feb. 25
Delores "Mom" Winans,
the matriarch of Detroit's
renowned gospel-music
family, 6-8 p.m., Fred T.
Lenfestey Student Center
at the school, 999 Avenue
H N.E., Winter Hlaven.
Free. 292-3602.

Friday, Feb. 25
Be My Love: A Tribute
to Mario Lanza, 7:30 p.m.,
Lake Wales Arts Center,
1099 SR 60 E., Lake Wales.
Tickets $25 for non-mem-
bers, students with ID $5,
can be purchased at the
Arts Center or by phone
at 676-8426, Monday-Fri-
day, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., or visit
www.lakewalesartscoun-
cil.org. 676-8426.

Saturday, Feb. 26-
Sunday, Feb. 27
The Over 55 Show
Band, composed of musi-
cians ranging in age from
42 to 80, big band con-
cert, Polk State College's
Winter Haven campus in
Fine Arts Building. $8 per
ticket. 2 p.m.

COMMUNITY
Wednesday, Feb. 23
3-5-year-old Story
Time, 10-10:45 a.m. Bar-
tow Public Library, 2150
S. Broadway, 534-0131.

Thursday, Feb. 24
Book Babies, 11-11:30
a.m. Bartow Public Li-
brary, 2150 S. Broadway,
534-0131.

Friday, Feb. 25
Movies on the Lawn,
"How to Train Your
Dragon," 7 p.m. Free. On
the northwest corner of
Wilson Avenue and Main
Street.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Bartow Perform-
ing Art Series, "Mark &
Clark," 7:30 p.m., Bartow
Elementary Academy
Auditorium. Identical
baby grand pianos and
identical twins perform-
ing selections from Elton
John and Billy Joel to Fer-
rante & Teicher. Tickets
$15, available at Greater


Bartow. Chamber of Com-
merce. 533-7125.

Saturday, Feb.26
Scales and Tails Pet
Festival. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Simmers-Young Park.
5630 \W CR 542, Winter
Haven, off K-ville Avenue
behind the Auburndale
Speedway. Free activities
include live entertain-
ment by Living Among
Alligators, a question
and answer session by
Dr. Losey, pet contests, a
Kids Zone with a bounce
house, carnival games
and a "kiddie" train. 534-
6911.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Dr. Seuss Birthday Cel-
ebration, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Hands-on activities based
on Dr. Seuss books. S5 per
person, children under 2
and museum members
are free. Explorations V
Children's Museum, 109
N. Kentucky Ave., Lake-
land, 687-3869.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Photography Hike with
local photography duo,
8-11 a.m., Polk's Nature
Discovery Center at Circle
B Bar Reserve, 4399 Win-
ter Lake Road, Lakeland.
668-4673.

Monday, Feb. 28
Juneteenth Community
Celebration committee
meeting, 5:30 p.m., Polk
Street Community Center,
1255 W. Polk St., Bartow.
All interested invited to
attend. 533-1773.

EDUCATION
Thursday, Feb. 24
Resource fair for
parents of children with
disabilities. 8:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m., free. Jim Miles
Professional Develop-
ment Center, 5204 US 98
S., Lakeland. 647-4258.

Thursday, Feb. 24
11th annual History
Fair, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.,
skits, displays, awards
program for entries from
middle and high school
students. Polk Historical
Museum, 100 E. Main St.,
Bartow, and First Baptist
Church of Bartow, 410 E.
Church St. 519-3708.

Friday, Feb. 25-
Saturday, Feb. 26
Middle, high school
orchestra concerts, 2-9:15
p.m. Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. and 1:30-6
p.m. Saturday, Tenoroc
High, 4905 Saddle Creek
Road, Lakeland. Free.
Thirty-one orchestras
play at 30-minute inter-
vals. 647-4729 for each
school's performance
schedule with selections.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Achievement Acad-
emy's Rise & Shine Walk
for children with special
needs. Registration begins
at 7:30 a.m., walk 8 a.m.
First Presbyterian Church
on Lake Hollingsworth,


Lakeland.

RELIGION
Wednesday, Feb.23-
Friday, Feb. 25
Revival featuring
Prophetess Rosetta
Northern-Rahming. 7
p.m. nightly. Faith and
Deliverance In Christ
Outreach. 290 US 17.
Bartow.

Saturday, Feb. 26
The Souls A Fire, 5:30
p.m., free, open mike for
those who want to sing.
Gospel Music Coffee
House, 325 Lyle Parkway,
Bartow, 604-3457.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Monthly gospel sing
featuring The Dosses,
7 p.m., Christian Home
Free Will Baptist Church
1125 Spessard Holland
Parkway, Bartow. 533-
4734.

Saturday, Feb. 26
Polk County Gospel
Singing Convention, 3
p.m., Welcome Primitive
Baptist Church, corner of
SR 630 and CR 555. 533-
8896.

Monday, Feb. 28-
Friday, March 4
Revival, 7 p.m. nightly,
Judah Deliverance Temple
Inc., 1275 Martin Luther
King Jr. Blvd., Bartow.
440-1920. Hosted by Elder
Jeradas L. Warner.

Tuesday, March 1-
Thursday, March 3
Fourth annual revival, 7
p.m., St. John Missionary
Baptist Church, 430 7th
Ave., Bartow. 712-2219.

SPORTS
Saturday, Feb. 26
19th annual Polk Senior
Games, 9 a.m. Opening
ceremony at Lake Region
High School athletic field,
Eagle Lake. Following the
opening festivities track
and field competitions
will kick off the first of 92
events in 34 sports over a
15-day period.

Monday, Feb. 28
Sign-up deadline for
second Bartow Blar-
ney Triathlon which is
Saturday, March 12, at
Bartow Civic Center. Call
534-0120, ext. 3, or e-mail
kberman@cityofbartow.
com.


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PHOTO BY COLLEEN HOLLAND


Lauren Kuhlman (left) and Mikalynn Souvannarath, fifth graders at Bartow Elementary
Academy, paint pillowcases for residents of Savannah Court of Bartow.


PHOTO BY COLLEEN HOLLAND
Pearl Warfel enjoyed receiving a handpainted pillowcase from Bartow Elementary Academy
students, as well as a visit from Santa Claus to Savannah Court of Bartow.

'Sweet Dreams' at Savannah Court


Dreams may be a little
sweeter for residents
of Savannah Court of
Bartow, when they lay
their heads on pillow-
cases handpainted by
fifth grade art students
at Bartow Elementary
Academy.
Art teacher Col-
leen Holland and her
fifth grade art students
wanted to do something
special for the residents
of Savannah Court. In the
past Holland's students


had painted pillowcases
as part of a Polk County


Schools Service Learning
project.


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CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD MEETING
MONDAY,MARCH 7,2011
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF FORT MEADE, FLORIDA,
PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON TUESDAY,
MARCH 1,2011, AT 5:30 PM IN THE FORT MEADE CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 8
WEST BROADWAY AVE., FORT MEADE, FLORIDA TO CONSIDER THE
FOLLOWING:
I) TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS TO THE CITY OF FORT MEADE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR).
2) THE CITY OF FORT MEADE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN
PROVIDING FOR THE REDEVELOPMENT AND REHABILITATION OF THE
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA.
ANY INTERESTED PERSONS WHO FEEL THEY ARE AFFECTED BY THESE CHANGEj
ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND THE PUBLIC HEARING AND BE HEARD. ANY
PERSONS) WISHING TO VIEW RELEVANT INFORMATION IN ADVANCE OF THE
PUBLIC HEARING MAY VIEW SAID DOCUMENTS AT THE FORT MEADE CITY HALL
AT 8 WEST BROADWAY AVE, FLORIDA BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 8 AM AND 5 PM,
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY.
ANYONE WISHING TO APPEAL ANY DECISIONS MADE AT THIS HEARING WILL
NEED A RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE THEY MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, WHICH
RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS
MADE.
ANY PERSON WITH DISABILITIES REQUIRING ACCOMMODATIONS IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE SHOULD CONTACT THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO THE MEETING AT
863-285-1100.



City of Fort Meade, Florida
Proposed Map Amendments to the Comprehensive Plan


"" -fSA-gov

M'AAOE EASY MlADE EASY,





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Get The Job Done.


Deliver the

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and make

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Immediate opening for
Newspaper Delivery Person
Wednesday and Saturday
Early Mornings

Bartow, Fort Meade,
Lake Wales and Frostproof Areas
Must have reliable transportation.
We will train the right candidate.

We are a Drug Free Workplace.
For further information call:
Fa or Pam

863-533-4183

j863-676-3467


The Polk County Democrat Page 3B


February 2., 21 1








Pae l l (t .lbmmj2.21


SCHOOL


Students


will be


bloomin'n

In Our
SchoolIS





Crolow porkountydemoat com
Students may be able
to win some money at the
Bloomin' Arts Festival in
the student art show.
The festival, scheduled
March 5-6, will award
middle and senior high
schools awards of S1,140
and students may be able Isabi
to sell their work. her
Public and private
schools, grades kinder-
garten through fifth,
have been invited to
display the best artwork
of the students from
their schools both days
of the show. TIhe work
will be judged and each
school will receive a first,
second, third and Award
of Merit.
Each school's display
will be judged and the
Best Display Award of
$100 with a ribbon will
be awarded to the art
teacher.

Agri-Fest is all week long
and next week, too
The 23rd annual Polk
County Agri-Fest will host
more than 6,000 Polk
County students as they
and their teachers take
part in workshops on cit-
rus, beef cattle, horticul-
ture, forestry, blueberries,
phosphate, soil and water
conservation and Florida
farms.
The festival will have
students today through
Friday and again on Mon-
day, Feb. 28.
The tours take place at
the Polk County Agricul- Flora
tural Center at 1702 U.S. Barti
17-98 S., Bartow. Call 581-
5877 for information.

Orchestra
concerts coming
Middle and high school
students are scheduled to
play orchestra concerts at
the end of the month.
The concerts are 2-9:15
p.m. on Fridl., Feb. 25,
and 8:30 a.m-12:30 p.m.
and 1:30-6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 26, at Tenoroc High,
4905 Saddle Creek Road,
Lakeland. They are free.
Thirty-one orchestras
from middle and high
schools will perform in
30-minute intervals dur-
ing both days. They are
judged by a state panel
and the orchestras receive
their annual state assess- Justir
ment and rating based Frida
on their performances. welco
Selections chosen by Flora
schools include ar-
rangements by Vivaldi,
Schubert and Bach. Call
647-4729 for each school's
performance schedule
with selections.

Spelling Bee
final March 8
The Polk County Spell-
ing Bee Finals are at 6
p.m.. Tuesday. March 8,
at Lakeland I ighlands
Middle, 740 Lake Miriam
Drive, l.akeland. It is free.
Thirty-one students
from 18 middle schools
have qualified for the
finals. Call 647-4712 for
information.


Contact Christine !
Rosloun t croslow J
polkcounrt demnocrat.coam
to get your school neu's in
the paper.


Down on the arm


Wes ussell, a 10th grade agriculture student, and his tether, Mike Vussell, were on hand Friday
to talk about horses and their behavior. Floral Avenue student Luis Vasquez enjoys the opportu-
elle Lake enjoys the softness of the calf's ears Friday during nity to get up close to pet the animal with his therapist Cindy Steele.
visit to Bartow High School's agriculture department.


On Friday, Jan. 18,
kindergarten students
from Floral Avenue
Elementary School walked
to Bartow High School to
visit it's agriculture depart-
ment for Farm Day.
High school students
showed the elementary
school students the pigs,
the chickens, the cows, the
rabbits, the flowers and
everything they have at
the school.


Photos by
Christine Roslow


Il Avenue kindergartner Steven Murillo chooses a cutting and plants it to take home with him during Farm Day at
ow High School.


m- W.' wsA -wig..; r .. .*
n Riley Phillips gently pets a rabbit
y at BHS. Agriculture students
)med kindergarten students from
I Avenue Elementary for Farm Day.


Linda Futch gets a turn to make her own butter during a lesson
on dairy production given by Bartow High students.


-.. -, '"- H ,. -illSlf i l
Tanner Ross, a senior at Bartow High, gives Ginelis
Alonso a push during the tractor races on Farm Day.


Thanks for the rides


Bus attendants
Carolyn Hagans (on
S>left in photo at left)
and Theresa Vlier
enjoy a special brunch
in appreciation of
their invaluable work
at Stephens Elemen-
S tary.
At right, \Stephens
Elementary PTO
SPresident Maria Gallo
put together a festive
S display of goodies to
show the schools' bus
S, -" S drivers and crossing
: guards just how much
.' they are appreciated.
PHOTOS BY
.) :' CHRISTINE ROSLO'W


Februan, 23. 2011


Pawe 4? : he Cou:.' ,:::.-..':







Ih 1 Pol Countr Dem-ocrat Page 5B


[.- ri r" '/ < ')(


Spirit Cards ^i


are here .


Banro'.e, I igh (hool
students are sdllinrg
Spirit Cards for PlO)
apie(( (. fI hey ar valid all
year and help support
BIllS students in tihe
class of 2012.
ILach has these busi-
nesses listed on them:
Anna's Diner, Gator's
Dockside-HIighlands
City, King Buffet.
Sonny s-Bartow, Beef'0'
Bradv's-Bartow, Cookie
Jar, Big 1.. I1 Burgers,
Slacienda Mexico, Bar-
tow0 ( 1 'r I Perkins
Restaurant, Palace
Pizza, Cool Shoppe,
I avana delights, Pretty
Nails and Spa, Peter-
son's Cleaners, Bevond
the Millennium, Sara's
Flower Fashions and
Fred's Market.
For information or to
order, contact Jennie
Scully at I 11 111, ., ull -
I" 'I -fl.net or call the
1 IS Main O(ffice at 534-
7400.
Information
Fair scheduled
Polk Public Schools
Exceptional Student
Education Depart-
ment and the Florida
Diagnostic Learning Re-
sources System have a
free fair for parents and
guardians with disabled
children.
Attendees will get


i normation about
organizational that help
disabled children. lMore
than 0 and agencies are sched-
uled to attend the fair
the school district laid.
I he fair is scheduled
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
I hursdav I-eb. 2-, at the
Jim Miles Professional
Development Center,
5204 [1.S. I highway 98
S., Lakeland. It will be
in the Citrus, Cypress
and Palm rooms of the
center.
(all 647-4258 for
more information.
History fair
scheduled
Middle and high
school students have
submitted nearly 180
entries in historical
research for the history
fair and the.llth an-
nual event is coming on
Thursday, Feb. 24.
The fair includes
video documentaries
and live history reen-
actments and perfor-
mances. The public can
watch live drama skits
from 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Public viewing of re-
search displays is from
11:30 a.m-12:30 p.m.
An awards program is
scheduled from 1:30-
2:30 p.m.
The event is free at
Polk Historical Mu-
seum, 100 E. Main St.,
Bartow, and First Bap-
tist Church of Bartow,
410 E. Church St.
Some students win-
ning awards at the local
History Fair will qualify
to compete at the state
History Fair in Tallahas-
see in May. Call 519-
3708 for information.


Cameron A. Johnson


Locks of Love


.- .... .--


I-'.


..


'p .


PHOTO PROVIDED
Lexie Bennett, a sixth grade student at Bartow Middle School
grew her hair out to donate to Locks of Love. Locks of Love takes
the hair to make wigs for children who go through chemo-
therapy to fight cancer.


Ethan P. Emery Laura E. Hagerty


6 named finalists


Six -:. 11 public school
students are 2011 Na-
tional Merit or National
Achievement scholarship
finalists, the National
Merit Scholarship Corp.
announced.
Stephon M. Mikell, of
Barrow, a senior at Bartow
International Baccalaure-
ate, was named a Nation-
al Achievement Scholar-
ship finalist. He is among
1,300 finalists nationally.
Students nominated
as National Merit awards
were:
From Bartow Inter-
national Baccalaureate:
Caroline E. Bresnan of
Lakeland, Ethan P. Emery
of Lake Wales, Cameron


A. Johnson of Lake Wales
and Mae A. Valenti of
Lakeland.
From the Harrison
School For The Arts:
Laura E. Hagerty of Lake-
land.
More than 1.5 million
students entered the 2011
National Merit Program
by taking the prelimi-
nary SAI/National Merit
Scholarship Qualifying
Test. There are about
15,000 finalists. The 2011
National Merit finalists,
including the five from
Polk, represent less than
1 percent of high school
seniors and are the high-
est scoring entrants on
the qualifying test.


PHOTO PROVIDE
Mad MagicPHOTO
Spessard L. Holland Elementary first grader Travis Buck takes
part in Neutron Nick's magic during a Mad Science party at the
school held because 220 students met their Accelerated Reader
goals for the second nine weeks, meaning they scored 85
percent or higher.


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February 23 2011


e gaP BB 1 Polk County Democral


j ] j anuarv awards

giv-en to Siesel, Messners
I .A * t it^^^ .


Bartow Chapter DAR Regent Helen Gienau presented Good Citizen awards to (from left) Lilibeth
Ocampo, Macey Valenti and Andrea Young at the February DAR meeting at The Stanford Inn.


Bartow, Fort Meade


DAR Good Citizens named


;i Sheehan and Stele
: I *.... ,ere recognized by
:-e Knight of Columbus
Cunci! ITl and pre-
-nted a:ith the distin-
uished service awards

nReognized b Grand
night Ed Sheehan with
the Knight of Month
award vwas Siesel. with
IFamil\ of the Month
honors going to Trish and
Jerry Messner and their
children Mariah, Jacob
and Jilian.
Siesel. who has been a
member of the Knights
of Columbus for the past
28 years, was cited for his
recruitment activities,
having sponsored several


new members of KofC
Council 7091 during the
past two years. Hie also is
a member of the council'
Frank J. Durbin Fourth
Degree Assembly.
The \Messners were
honored as "Family of the
Month" for being active
in KofC Council 7091,
as well as St. Matthew-
Church.
A former Grand Knight,
Jerry Messner serves as a
member of the I..n ii's
First Degree team and
coordinates monthly
pancake breakfasts staged
by KofC Council 7091 for
parishioners at St. Mat-
thew Church. He also is
involved in a wide range


of KofCI southh and charity\
actiXities and coordinated
the printing of the coun-
cils monthly\ newsletter.
Irish Messner coordi-
nates middle and high
school youth groups at
St. Matthew while Mariah
and lacob are altar serv-
ers. lilian is also involved
in the St. Matthew parish
community.
Knights of Columbus
Council 7091 raises mon-
ev for area charities with
its Sunday and Thursday
evening Bingos at the K
of C Hall, 401 Third St.,
S\ in Winter Haven .
The doors open at 5:30
p.m. with a "Quarters Up"
round of bingo.


Three Bartow and Fort
Meade students were
honored as DAR Good
Citizens by the Bartow
Chapter Daughters of the
American Revolution at
the February meeting.
MaceyValenti, of Bar-
tow International Bacca-
laureate, Iilibeth Ocam-
po of Fort Meade Middle
Senior High School and
Andrea Young of Bartow
High School were chosen
by their schools for lead-
ership, dependability,
service and patriotism.
Those wishing to enter
the National Society DAR
scholarship competition
also completed essays
on a historical topic


assigned by the DAR at
the time of writing. No
reference materials were
allowed.
The award winners
told DAR members of
their school activities
and achievements and
also their volunteer work
in the community. Plans
for their future education
were shared.
Helen Gienau, Bartow
Chapter DAR regent, pre-
sented each student with
a National Society DAR
pin, certificate and wallet
card. Each also received a
lapel flag pin and booklet
on the flag code and spe-
cial meanings of the flag.
Special guests, includ-


Summerlin looking f


Summerlin Institute Class of 1968
Reunion is planning a reunion on
Veterans Day.
The next planning meeting is at
6:30 p.m., March 9, at the Bartow Golf
Course. If you cannot attend or have
not been contacted by a committee


ing family members and
school counselors, at-
t,-. rj,,-d ,. event held at
The Stanford Inn.
Bartow Chapter DAR
members are join-
ing with other DARs in
the Heartland Regents
Council to be hostesses
for the Florida DAR State
Conference March 25-27
in Orlando. The State Re-
gent's project is Paws for
Patriots. This is a com-
mitment for the cost of a
specially-trained dog for
a wounded veteran.
For information about
the Daughters of the
American Revolution
(DAR) call 533-6293.




or '68ers


member, send your mailing/e-mail ad-
dress to stsammie@yahoo.com or long
onto the Facebook link at Summerlin
Institute 68 for future updates.
The 43rd reunion event is planned for
Nov. 11.


Volunteers can clean up Polk County


Polk County residents
and visitors can help
clean up the county by
joining the Great Ameri-
can Cleanup, a nation-
wide cleanup initiative
led by Keep America
Beautiful.
This cleanup event
has taken place across
the country for the
past 25 years. Last year
thousands of volunteers
throughout Polk County
joined in the cleanup
effort, according to Keep
Polk County Beautiful.
Locally, cleanup events
are held throughout the
months of March, April
and May.
Volunteers are provided
with garbage bags, gloves
and safety vests. Those
who pre-register by Feb.
25 also will receive free
T-shirt and tickets to Bok
Tower Gardens. T-shirts
are limited to the first
2,500 who pre-register.
This is also an opportu-


nity for students to earn
community service hours.
Volunteers are encour-
aged to choose a location
in their local community
to help clean and beau-
tify. Lakes, roadways,
rivers and parks are great
locations for volunteers
to participate in the Great
American Cleanup, KPCB
says. Volunteers may
also join in one of the
community-coordinated
cleanup or recycling
events.
This cleanup is a com-
munity wide effort. Resi-
dents who have personal
garbage and large items
that need to be disposed
of should contact their
local waste hauler to
schedule arrangements
for pick up.
In addition to these
events, KPCB will hold
free tire recycling events:
March 12 Eagle Ridge
Mall, Lake Wales, 9 a.m.-2
p.m.


March 19 -\Vabash
Community Center, 1230
Southern Ave., 9 a.m.-2
p.m.
April 9 Fort Meade
Community Center, 10
S.W. Third St., 9 a.m.-2
p.m.
Residents may discard
of up to 10 tires at the
event. Tires must be stan-
dard vehicle size only and
off the rims. This limit
will be strictly enforced,
KPCB said.
It is a violation of
Florida Administrative
Code Rules to transport
more than 24 Waste Tires
over public highways
without a permit. It is
a first degree criminal
misdemeanor. For further
information visit the DEP
website at www.dep.state.
fl.us.
For more information,
contact Keep Polk County
Beautiful at 676-7019 or
kpcbeautiful@yahoo.com.














By NEAL DUNCAN
I his time las t ear. Jer-
neiah Samarrippa- s was
leading his Baro' High
School basketball tearn;
through the playotls and
to an eventual (.lass i\
State (.harfipionship.
Sarnarrippas w:as
later named the (lass '5A
Player of the Year.
J-I-rog. as he ,,as affec-
tionately known in high
school, took his talents
to Southern Method-
ist University in Dallas,
lexas, and on March 2
he'll be back in the area
as SMU faces the Univer-
sitv of Central Florida in
Orlando.
With the same desire
and incredible work
ethic, J-Frog not only
dresses for the Division
I Conference USA team,
but he is also the team's
starting point guard as a
true freshman.
"The coaching staff


was t. 'i ,, me if I come
in and do what I'm i up-
posed to do, there would
be a good chance I could
start as a freshman, so I
was excited about that."
said Samarrippas.
"Once I got here (Dal-
las) in the summer, I
went to work doing ev-
erything extra and trying
to outwork everyone else
because I want to be the
best and it paid off."
"Even though I'm start-
ing, I've learned from
my parents and Coach
McGriff (BHS head bas-
ketball coach) that I must
stay humble and I think
have," stated Samarrip-
pas.
SMU is 16-10 overall
and 7-5 in conference
play, just a game and a
half out of first place, a
vast improvement from
last year's record of 14-
17.
According to J-Frog,
"The season is going


greM:. ,.a 0
been irn roni-nce ULb.
J-Frog admit he ha-
been ne.ous before
eungr, arme bJ)ut kno:.ing
ib tmily an d friends get
to see hin play big time
c ;- basket does
add extra pressure but
say, its a good nervous-
ness.
Samarrippas and his
SMU teammates will be
in Orlando on Wednes-
day, March 2, to take on
UCE The game is sched-
uled to tip off at 7 p.m.
For ticket information go
to \ww\w.ucfathletics.cstv.
com/.


ALL NEW 2011
CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY


PHOTO PROVIDED
SJeremiah Samarrippas makes a layup in a game for SMU this
: year.


Jackets fall to

SLake Gibson 15-1


By MARK KING
CORRESPONDENT
The Lake Gibson High
-School Lady Braves lived
up to their nicknames as
they bravely battled the
Lady Yellow Jackets at
Bartow High School Fri-
day night. But the brav-
"ery didn't prevent them
from getting a hatchet
:job, getting scalped 15-1
Sin five innings of play.
Lauren \West was the
.winning pitcher, with
Rachael Imig and Jessica
"Fantasy" Eiland provid-
ing the cleanup work in
later innings.
Offensively, the bats for
the Bugs were a-buzzing.
Emily Sanders got two
triples, Kimmv "The
Good" Booker smacked a
couple of doubles and a
single and Shelby "Mus-
tang" Duncan ripped
three singles. Brittany
McNeil, Taylor "Stitch"
Wagner, DanielleYost
and Wanda Darbv also
had hits.
Defense for both teams
were also sharp. For Bar-


tow, Booker teamed up
with Lizzie Glass to nail a
runner at first. It hap-
pened in the top of the
second. After a long first
inning, the Lady Braves
got a runner at first with
one out. When the run-
ner took a little too long a
lead off the bag, Booker,
Bartow's catcher, threw a
rope down to Glass cov-
ering first. Glass applied
the tag while the runner
tried to dive back to the
bag.
In the bottom of the
third, the Jackets had a
runner at first with no
outs when Glass hit a
grounder to Braves short-
stop, Emily Wilds. Wilds
scooped up the ball ran
to second then gunned
down Glass at first for the
game's only double play.
Next up for the Lady
Jackets: the Lakeland
Dreadnaughts sail into
One Bug Place for a
double header Wednes-
day. Junior varsity's first
pitch is at 5:30 p.m. while
the varsity starts its game
at 7:30.


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Sports

J-Frog, SMU

hopping into Florida


PHOTO BY STEVE STEINER
Jacob Bird accepts congratulations from Bartow High School football coaches at the annual award
ceremony held Feb. 18 at the school cafeteria. He was one of several members of the football
team who was cited multiple times for his contributions, including the "Gung Ho" award. Upon
receipt of his award, he led his teammates in a chant.


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Sports


Bartow Dixie Baseball begins


Photos by
Christine
Roslow


Two Dixie Youth League veterans were on hand to throw out the first pitch and open
the 2011 T-ball and machine pitch season for Bartow Dixie Baseball. Bartow High
School player Josh Delph, current players Rainier McKinzy and Robby Putnam, and BHS
player Buddy Putnam pose in the dugout.


Orioles team members gather up before taking their place on the field
for the opening ceremony Friday night.


Braves T-ball player Nyah Griner, 5, enjoys some nachos after Orioles machine pitch players Wade Bohde (left) and Tyler Yates Angels T-ball player Tanner Hawsey, 4, shows his excitement
completing her first game of the season for Bartow Dixie wait for the opening ceremony Friday night at the Bartow Civic Friday as the opening ceremony ends and his first game of the
Baseball. Center baseball fields. Bartow Dixie Baseball season is about to start.


WINTE I' D!EALERIJIIIt Ir




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