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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 128

4 students arrested in Washington

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
WASHINGTON, D.C. Four
UF students arrested in the
office of Florida Sen. Ed Gurney
Friday afternoon were released
from jail late Saturday after
federal charges of unlawful entry
and demonstrating after a
warning were dropped.
David Hoch, Joan Spiegel,
Amy Faircloth and Pete
Giordano were arrested at 7 p.m.
Friday after refusing to leave
Gurneys office until they could
meet with him. A Gurney aide
called Capitol Hill police and the
four were booked and taken to

Troops called
to stop shutdown

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
WASHINGTON, D.C. More
than 10,000 army and marine
troops are in Washington today
to aid police in meeting the
attempted shutdown of the
nations capitol by an estimated
50,000 antiwar demonstrators.
Demonstrators plan to block
entrance to Washington, which is
much like an island, connected
to Maryland and Virginia by
several bridges and highways.
21 target points have been
selected by the demonstrators as
areas they will bodily block to
keep the traffic and government
tied up.
Each state has been assigned a
particular site to focus their
efforts on.
Students from Florida are to
join students from upstate New
York in locking entrance from
Virginia at the Francis Scott Key
Bridge leading to Washington.
Approximately 400 students are
Floridians most coming from
Gainesville, Tarppa, Miami and
Tallahassee.
A rock festival was held over
the weekend to celebrate the
signing of the Peoples Peace
Treaty between the American
people and the people of North
and Sooth Vietnam.
West Potomac Park, renamed
Peace City by the demonstrators
steadily filled up in the past
week, with thousands of
students coming from as far
away as Hawaii to camp out and
take part in the Anit-War

The
Florida Alligator

Charged with unlawful entry and demonstrating

separate cetention centers.
The four students had come
to Washington to meet with
Florida representatives to discuss
the recent crisis on the UF
campus, including massive black
withdrawals and events
surrounding black dissatisfaction
with the campus.
Press accounts of the arrests
of the four students have
focused on the fact that Miss
Faircloth is the daughter of
former State Atty. Gen. Earl
Faircloth.
I regret nothing except that
all over Florida the press tries to
play up my name as a reflection
on my father. This was an action

Movements Spring Offensive.
In an apparent attempt to
stifle planning of the shutdown,
and encourage demonstrators to
leave town, police revoked the
groups camping permit early
Sunday, charging the
demonstrators were disorderly
and rowdy.
123 campers refused to leave
the campgrounds and riot police
arrested them for unlawful
entry.
The demonstrators are
(See Shutdown page 2)

Weida Tucker intends to stay at UF
'fighting for what I believe in

£) C wmdaTuckar V;; v
... staying at UF

University of Florida. Gainesville

I took on my own and I dont
regret it, Miss Faircloth said in
an interview Sunday.
Hoch, Giordano, Miss
Faircloth and Miss Spiegel had
been to the offices of Florida
congressional officials Claude
Pepper, Don Fuqua, Lawton
Chiles and to the offices of Sen.
Edward Kennedy of
Massachusetts and Rep. Ron
Dellums of California before
their incident in Gurneys office.

iiiiiliilll' hwwwssw VNr
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piplp
PHIL COPE
Grandma, what big ...

The Reitz Union Players captivated a young
audience with their rendition of Little Red
Ridding Hood." The bed-time story was produced
as part of the J. Wayne Reitz Union fourth birthday

To be committed
is to be
in danger.
It only means
that you must
stand up
and be counted
when you feel
the case is worth
fighting for.
Weida Tucker
April 22, 1971

Hoch, in a statement Sunday,
called the entire expericence
worth more than a year and a
half of college in educational
value.
The four students said their
purpose in coming to
Washington was to speak with
the elected representatives of
Florida f-' convey the
seriousness ?e problem at
UF, anu hoped to
obtain sup,/* .o get some

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
One black student who has
chosen to stay and fight at
UF, even though she feels its a
racist institution is Weida
Tucker, 3JM.
The decision to remain as one
of the few blacks on campus was
not an easy one.
From the beginning, Miss
Tucker explains, using her hands
to make the point, 1 couldnt
decide whether I should go or

celebration Saturday, May Ist. Pat O'Neal, program
director of the Union, played Little Red Ridding
Hood and Chad Reed, a member of Florida Players,
gave a great performance as the Big, Bad Wolf.

stay. I didnt know until the
veiy last moment.
Taking an active part in the
protests, over the arrest of 66
black students, Miss Tucker
attended rallies, slept at Tigert
Hall, and marched to UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
home, . |
Her final decision to stay was
not a result of oppostion to the
black demands or cause, but a
belief that its a personal
decis as to how one thinks
(See'Tucker'page 3)

Monday, May 3. 1971

pressure exerted for change.
A Gurney aide told the four
when they entered the office
Friday that the senator was not
in. They did not have an
appointment but informed the
aide that they would wait until
the senator could see them.
At 7 p.m. when the office was
to be closed, police came to
remove the four.
(See 'Students'page 3)



!, !> FJoricfe Alliflitor,

Page 2

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Students visit Senators Chiles and Gurney

Commenting on the
experience and the talks they
had with congrssional
representatives and aides, the
four expressed dissatisfaction
with results they received.
When we spoke to Chiles he
gpve us ideas and solutions that
never went outside the political
boundaries that only help to
make problems more complex. I
think only a fraction of the
problems can be solved within
political boundaries nothing
inside can do any more than
make little marks.
Giordano said the problem
with their trip to Washington
was a prcvading reluctance to
change especially in our state,
and all it's going to do is bring a
continuing conflict between the
people who want to see things
the same and people who want
to see things change.
Miss Spiegel expressed

Sin|te THESES DISSERTATIONS Sin|lts
4 i REPORTS BOOKS 44
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3 4 1718 W. UNIV 3784334 \ U
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official itudMt newspaper pf thrlj,:
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frustration at the results of the
fours efforts to make a real
effort at working in system.
Out of frustration with the
ineffectiveness of protest and
marches we came to use the
system we came to state the
problem and to see response
but when we went to the offices
of our state's officials we were
not given much encourage encouragement.
ment. encouragement.
Chiles, who met with the four
in his office for half an hour,
was the most condescending of
all, Miss Spiegel said. He
thought he was duping us and
satisfying us, but he didn't say
anything worthwhile and he
didn't fool us.
Miss Fairdoth said the
majority of problems that have
moral implications need moral
changes but are not dealt with
on that level.
Elected officials may agree
with you, and theyll tdl you so,
but they deal only with not
losing votes, and as a result they

Pie in your face?
A near miss in a pie throwing contest made this
young volunteer smile Saturday. The contest was
one of the focal points of the Reitz Union's fourth
anniversary celebration Saturday afternoon.
Volunteers from the College of Health, Physcial
Education and Recreation manned the booth to
have shaving-cream filled pies thrown at them for
the price of three peanuts a pie. The peanuts were
given out free by the Union.

PHOTOS BY PHIL COPE

rarely seek to make changes.
May Day antiwar
demonstrations, expected to last
through May 8 are interesting
to note as a comparison with our
problem, Giordano said. So
many millions of people in this

Shutdown...

relocating themselves
throughout the city, most of
them being welcomed into the
dorms of American, Georgetown
and George Washington
Universities.
Florida students have
regrouped at Georgetown
University.
A rumor among the students
late Sunday was that they would
have to leave the universities or
be trapped in the dorms by
police early today.
Rennie Davis, of the Chicago

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country are against the war, but
the nonviolent movement by
students in Washington is made
to look bad to the public.
The black situation in the
university is very similar, Hoch
said. Many people may agree

7, is coordinator of May Day
and is a member of the May Day
Tribesmen, the group planning
antiwar activities.
In a statement Sunday, Davis
ladled out at Richard Nixon for
accomplishing something that
no other president has been able
t 0... he has created material
law.
Back when the Macks were
trying to demonstrate a few
years ago, Nixon made the
statement that no one could
hold a disorderly demonstration
even with a permit. Now he is
doing the same to university
groups who want to discuss what
is so wrong with our country.

that massive changes are needed
but they hesitate to act.
We tried to go about this the
right way, we were serious, we
were sincere, we dont regret it,
but look where it got us. Hoch
said.

If the whole country focuses
its eyes on the most carefully
planned antiwar demonstration
in its history, the government
stands ready to meet the
demonstrators head on.
The Army has brought in riot
equipment, including the new
VIOO riot control vehicle, which
has the capability of riding over
can, to control demonstrators.
Watch Gator (jtsrjrfcSS
Advertisers



Tucker ...

that the problem can be solved.
I think that if Id left I would
have been right where OConnell
wanted me; out of sight and out
of mind, Miss Tucker contends.
I decided to stay because 1
knew some time or another, Id
have to learn how to start
fighting for what I believe in. I
decided that it was time for me
to start right now, right here.
Weidas fighting right now,
right here, is not a physical
fight, or even one of extreme
activism, but an individaul fight,
as a student for her education.
As a floor director for
WUFT-TVs Color Us Black
Program, and staff member of
WRUF, Miss Tucker thinks,
Experience and education
make the person, and if I possess
both these qualities I will have
more influence when I get out in
the world.
In the field I*m going into,
broadcast journalism, I can be in
a very influential position and
really work for the cause.
And although some Macks
may condemn her as an Uncle
Tom for her decision to stay,
Miss Tucker does believe in the
cause. She says, The demands
are real needs, and I think
theyre very legitimate. I support
those who left, because I think
theyre acting from a very strong
commitment. v
There is one point that Miss
Tucker did not support. That

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WeMa Tucker
... 'racism is prevalent
was the one-week ultimatium
the blacks gave OConnell.
I think maybe that if black
students had pushed just as hard
for their proposals all along, I
think a lot of things would have
been realized by now, she said.
At the same time, you can
look at the time element involved
and judge OConnells
willingness to concede to any of
the demands in the first place.
Miss Tucker has few friendly
feelings toward OConnell. I
think that he demonstrated a
lack of intelligence, she says,
by not talking things out with
the students at that particular
time.
Any reasonable person,
when confronted with a
situation like that, even if they
wanted to be half-way fair,
could have taken some time out
to talk to them. It seems like he

was rather unconcerned about
the whole thing.
The reason hes really
uptight about the situation now
is because he has a lot of people
breathing down his back, Miss
Tucker continued/
Her feelings toward UF are
about the same.
I think that racism is very
prevalent on this campus. Ive
gotten a lot of good breaks and
Ive been lucky, but I have seen
racism on this campus and how
it destroys other blacks.
The racism is shown through
whites attitudes and, in turn, by
their treatment of blacks. I
believe white people are ignorant
about blacks. White people
should be educated in respect to
blacks and Mack people should
be educated in respect to
themselves.
Explaining why she is not a
member of the Blade Student
Union (BSU) Miss Tucker
contends, Before I came here I
vowed that because of my past
actions and the effect it had on
my past grades that I would not
get into anything that would not
benefit my career.
In high school, Miss Tucker
was an activist as student council
president at the then
predominately-white Melbome
High School, and again as
student body president at
Brevard Junior College.
Maybe youd call it copping
out, but I played the activist role
in working for the cause and it
can be a very, very long and hard
battle, Miss Tucker concluded.

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Monday, May 1971, Tha FlocK* AMgator,

Page 3



TH* AHigitof.Mbndy, May*, 1971

Page 4

USA attempts to stop tuition increase

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
Members of UF's United
Student Action (USA) will be
talking to legislators in
Tallahassee in an effort to stop
passage of a bill that would raise
tuition in the state university
system $25.
USA Vice President Bill
Watson said Sunday the
sentiment among legislators is
that tuition will increase. Last
week Watson talked to Senate
President Jerry Thomas
(D-Jupiter), and Thomas hinted
he was in favor of the increase.
Watson said legislators he
talked to cited the rise of
inflation and the need for new
taxes to be levied in the state.
The tuition increase, the
legislators contend, will only
have students shouldering some
of the debt incurred by the
university system.
According to Watson, the
state university system ran a
deficit of about $251,000,000
last year. Legislators say the
tuition in the Florida universities
is low compared to other states.
According to a fact sheet sent
to the legislators by USA, if
tuition is raised $25, Florida will
have the fourth highest tuition
in the United States.
Right now, Florida ranks
ninth in tuition in the nation.
At UF, about 12,000 students
- more than 50 per cent of the
student body depends on
some kind of financial aid to go
through school. Os those, 5,000
fall under the category of high
need, according to the office of
financial aid.
A comparative study of
tuition rate at UF, indicates that
since 1966, tuition has increased
99 per cent, from $226 to $450.
The proposed $25 tuition
increase will cause tuition to rise
230 per cent of what it was in
1966, according to USA figures.
I am afraid the tuition
increase is going to come. There
is no question in their
(legislators) mind, tuition win
increase; the question is, uhere
is the money from the increase
going to go, Watson said.
Watson and U.S.A. President
Shelly Stevens visited
Tallahassee last month and
talked to Dr. Bill Malloy, Gov.
Reiibin Askew's budget director,
and relayed to him the feeling of

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*7 am afraid the tuition
increase is going to come.
There is no question in their
(legislators) mind, tuition
will increase; the question
is, where is the money from
the increase going to go.
Bill Watson Vice-President
United Student Action
iiHiiuiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiifiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiinii
the students at UF about a
tuition increase.
It was Askew who suggested
to the legislature that tuition in
the universities should be raised
$25. His suggestion came after
the Council of Presidents
formed by the presidents of the
seven existing universities had

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I PHIL COPE

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asked the legislature for a sls
increase.
Right now the 525 tuition
increase bill has cleared the
House Appropriations
committee and is going to the
House Ways and Means
committee. If it is cleared here,
the bOl would then go the the
House Rules and Calendar
committee to be included on the
agenda.
However, no date has been
given for the tuition increase bill
to hit the floor of the House,
Watson said.
Watson said during the visits
of the USA to the capital,
members talked to 10 senators
and 20 representatives about the
tuition increase and why they

Military Queen
Lisa Council was crowned the
1971 Military Ball Queen Friday
night at the annual Scabbard and
Blade Military Ball. The ball was
sponsored by UF's H Company,
2nd regiment. Miss Council was
chosen from a field of beauties
sponsored by various military
and Greek organizations. Alpha
Tau Omega sponsored Miss
Council. Jacquelyn Young,
sponsored by Kappa Delta, was
first runner-up and Sally Burner,
sponsored by Lamda Chi Alpha,
was second runner-up.

should not vote for it.
Watson said he and Stevens
will be going to the capital again

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this week, and try to talk to
most of the members of the
legislature.



RESIGN! to seek
s rv ~ ?* t-; >* r-f S ; 1i..:
official recognition

By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Staff Writer
RESIGN!, a group of UF law,
graduate and undergraduate
students seeking to obtain the
resignation of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, will seek
recognition as a campus
organization.
There are many groups
circulating petitions asking for
OConnells resignation, such as
the Union of Florida Students,
the Black Student Union and the
American Federation of
Teachers,** said Jim Clark, a
spokesman for the group.
The petitions are currently
bang collected from the various
groups.
I think we have a pretty
good chance of being recognized
oh campus,* he said;
RESIGN! has sent letters to
Gov. Reubin Askew, the Board
of Regents and the Florida
Legislature to inform them of
their purpose.

WHAT'S HAPPENING
Carol Brady 1
PAX, PEACE: Le Cercle Francais will read a French antiwar play
entitled Pique-Nique en Campagne, by Fernando Arrabal, tonight at
8:30 in Auditorium 103-B Architecture and Fine Arts.
CHRISTIAN RENEWAL: Rocky Doddridge will speak tonight at 8 at
the Christian Student Renewal, room 356 Reitz Union. Everyone is
welcome.
MINI-OLYMPICS: The International Chib is organizing an intra-club
tournament in volley ball, table tennis, lawn tennis, chess and
bowling. For information and registration call Saeed Khan at
392-7502.
PRE-MEDS AND PRE-DENTS: May 7 is the deadline for registering
for the spring quarter with the Office of Preprofessional Education,
102 Anderson Hall.
DOGGONE IT: The curtain in the Plaza rises at sunset May 9 with
The Committee,** Abbott and Costello Meet Frankestein, The
Little Rascals,** and lots of cartoons. The Hare Krishna people
begin the fun with a love feast at 4 p.m. A dog frisbee contest will be
held prior to the films!
USE YOUR...: Tmagbiero,** a film by Jorge Preloran about the life
and work of an Argentine Andean folk artist, will be shown
Wednesday night at 8 in room 427 Graduate and International Studies
Building. Admission is free.
TWILIGHT ZONE: Accent *7l will present Rod Serling Tuesday at 8
p.m., Graham pond. He will speak on Man, Child and Society.**
Admission is free.
i w i.
MORNING MANIACS: Buy your tickets for the Gainesville Music
Festival at Roc Records. Admission is $2.50 for the May 22-23 event.
Advance sales only!
PICK UP QUICK: Alpha Lambda Delta wishes to remind students
who purchased ALD jewelry before March 1971 and have not yet
received it to call 392-1261 before May 7, the FINAL deadline.
SUMMER IN EUROPE
ROUNDTRIPS TAMPA- LONDON-TAMPA
June 19-September 4 Caledonian Airways
round-trip fare $219.00 Boeing 707 (fan jet,
Open to University of Florida Students,
faculty, staff and their families
For further information call:
Mrs. J. Manougian Ph: 988-8733 (Tampa)
or write: Mrs. J. Manougian, 10003 53rd St
. Temple Terrace, Fla. 33617

Robert B. Mautz, Chancellor
of the Board of Regents, said he
had not received a copy of the
letter and would be reluctant to
comment.
Mautz did term the issue a
university matter** rather than
the business of the Regents.
According to a pamphlet
issued by RESIGN!, the purpose
of the group is to inform the
university community and the
public at large, of events in
Stephen C. OConnells record as
President of the university that
shows him to be ineffective as an
educator and administrator, and
to obtain his resignation.**
Dean Rae O. Weimer, Special
Assistant to the President had no
comment and said he didnt
think the matter was worth
commenting on.
According to a RESIGN!
spokesman, the group will
continue their education and
lobbying program until
OConnell resigns.*

v* >
-- .** -Vft i -I i S %
v ; -T r 11 ,tl - - ._
Butter up a
faster tan with
Coppertone
Tanning Butter
Coppertone Tanning Butter has extra coconijt oil and
cocoa butter for an incredibly fast deep tan.T'hats*
why more people butter up with Coppertone Tanning
Butter than any other.
Coppertone Tanning Butter. One of 11 great
tanning products by Coppertone.
A product of Plough, Inc.
L JM
f' |||*
apya 1 (
mKu Bwuk
WKtm k'M KiP^
-
tv ?---:.,: v.',..'
&..? . > t-**' ..-.; . ; ,-. *..' |

*1971, Th> Florid AUiftbf,

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florid* AlHe*tor, Monday, May 3, 9971

Agricultural awards presented

By ELLI MOSS
Alligrtor Staff Writer
UF students and faculty
shared in the 60 awards and
scholarships totaling 520,000 at
the Annual Agricultural
Scholarship Leadership
Convention on April 29.

Dr. Heschel to lecture
on 'The Humanity of Man

Or. Abraham J. Hatch ol
... theologian, philosopher

Annual IFC Blood Drive
begins today at Med Center

By JIM SEALE
Alligrtor Staff Writer
IFCs annual Blood Drive
service project will begin today
and run through May 28 this
year, according to Blood Drive
Chairman Robert Heekin.
In one of the IFCs largest
yearly service projects, members
of the 29 fraternities will be
asked to donate a pint of their
blood which any donating
fraternity member or member of
their immediate family will have
free access to as needed.
Anyone who is 18 may
donate without his parents*

PATCHES fro?* POSTERS
75i FROM $1.25
v du He
GaTOK -OSOHNOS
51-3471 1131 West Universit|i A%e.^W(^b47l
See Our Black Lite and Poster Room
Black Lites $14.95 Strobe Lite special $24.95
lost Diamond Needles $4.79 (life time guarantee)

A former state senator gave
the keynote address at the event
which was sponsored by the
Student Agricultural Council,
College of Agriculture.
If agriculture Is to grow in
the years ahead, we must have
agriculturally-oriented leaders in
state, county, and municipal

By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligrtor Staff Writer
Dr. Abraham Joshua Heschel, a well-known theologian, philosopher
and scholar is coming to UF on May 6 to deliver a lecture entitled
The Humanity of Man.** Heschel will speak in the University
Auditorium at 8 p.m.
At the present time Heschel holds the chair of professor of Jewish
Ethics and Mysticism at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.
Heschelfc ideology can be found in the many books he has written.
One of his most outstanding works is a magnus opus, written in two
parts, Man is not Alone** and God in Search of Man.**
Heschel has written books on Jewish history, philosophy and
mysticism, but his best known works are those which deal with
fundamental problems of religion as they arise for modem man.
As a philosopher Heschel is actively concerned with contemporary
problems, and is concerned with the moral issues of the nation.
Several of Dr. HescheTs projects have dealt with the nation's social,
political and racial problems. He was invited to the White House twice
to speak on these issues.
Heschel's talk, sponsored by the University Religious Association, is
part of the Religion-in-Life series and is open to the public.

permission. The house with the
highest percentage of blood
donors will get preferential bloc
seating for Fall Frolics 71,
featuring Chicago.
This year we hope to make
up for what is presently lacking
and even to surpass the blood
bank demands,*' reported
Heekin.
Last year over 400 pints of
blood were donated in the IFC

Ml An pIA
W 4 Or

government,'* Ed H. Price, Jr.,
president of the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce ane
executive vice-president and a
director of Tropicana Products,
told the audience of more than
500.
The support and assistance of
the UF Institute of Food and

project. Os the four trophies
awarded by IFC, Delta Sigma Pi
won the awards for the best
overall percentage and the best
showing in Blue League. AEPi
had the best showing in Orange
League and Sigma Chi won the
most improved" trophy.
Donations may be made in
the Med Center Blood Bank on
the ground floor from 8 a.m. to 8
pjn. on weekdays and from 8
a.m. to S p.m. on Saturdays.

Agricultural Sciences, Price said,
has helped him enjoy success in
his agribusiness career.
I believe in the young people
of this nation, with all my heart.
They are going to run this
country in the years to come,*
said Price.
Florida needs young people
like you to influence the way
the state will go. We need your
practicing of the old values of
concern for those less fortunate,
your honesty and your
forthrightness in speaking out.*
Dr. E.T. York, Jr. UF Provost
of Agriculture announced
Special Help for Agricultural
Research and Education
(SHARE) faculty awards.
SHARE awards went to Prof.
Don Wakeman, Department of
nmtsiTY
JlWtltiS <§&
Fraternity Jewelry^
Now order It 6 day* weak
Trophy & Plaque Dept.
Expert Engraving
Class rings
Watch repair
Jeweiry repair
1802 West University Avs.
Across from Campus
2 blocks from Hub 373-1025

Delicacy of the U/eek
From Lisa's Garden of Oriental Delights

'Sweet &Sour Pork;
* Steamed Rice

; 2409 S.W. 13th St. 372-6801 _!
CAFETERIA LINE SPECIALS * I
LUNCH & DINNER ? II I I
MONDAY: I I IT
FRIED CHICKEN WITH 1 (11
FRENCH FRIES 3 | | | |
ITUESDAY] I 111
SMOTHERED SALISBURY I ( (i
WITH MASHED POTATOES I I II
- OR RICE jB 1
[WEDNJES DA Y] I |
ROAST TURKEY DRESSING Lm
WITH MASHED POTATOES | | 11
[THURSDAY: W J I b
'4
VEAL PARMIGIANA 1
WITH SPANISH RICE 1 |
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FRIED CODFISH 1 I I 1 I
WITH FRENCH FRIES 1 II I 1

Animal Science, for his
outstanding teaching; Dr. Martin
Mauma, Lake Alfred
Educational and Research
Center, for his research in citrus
grove ecology; Rudy Hamrick,
Madison County Agricultural
Agent for his leadership and
achievement in Extension; and
Dr. William G. Eden, chairman
of the Department of
Nematology and Entomology,
for his skill as an administrator.
A special posthumous award
was presented to Dr. Alvin T.
Wallace, a former Assistant Dean
for Research with the
Agricultural Experiment
Stations for his overall
excellence in teaching, research
and administration.** Dr. Wallace
passed away April 18 at age 49.

WE HAVE
ALL
STEREO &
PHONOGRAPH
NEEDLES
sU M/ V/ / /{ / o
I -I



Graeffe play deals with Utopia

By DARRELL HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writar
Strobelights, a plastic moon filled with dancing girls,
music, a Moog synthesizer, bikini-clad girls and players
romping through the audience chanting Mombassa!
Mombassa! were just some of the show in Friday and
Saturday nights productions of Code Name Phoenix in
University Auditorium.

* ... i
Two new ticket purchase sites
announced for Music Festival

Due to the unexpected
volume of tickets sold, two more
sites to purchase tickets for the
Gainesville Music Festival have
been announced.
Tickets can now be purchased
Rot to present
horror flicks
Horror fans will have a chance
to satisfy their cravings for the
macabre this week as the
Rathskeller presents Brides of
Dracula and Kiss of the
Vampire. Peter Cushing and
Christopher Lee star in blood
drenched double feature shown
tonight, tomorrow and
Wednesday. The movies present
the more bitting aspects of
courtship and marriage in the
kingdom of Transylvania.
Beer, soft drinks and popcorn
wifl be on sale for every
performance.
Legal hangover
More than 94 per cent of the
U. S. population lives in areas
where sale of distilled spirits is
legal.

GOOD MON., TUES ONLY
fcntiidai Tried CVacYsh.
214 N.W. 13th St. 0
114 S.W. 34th St.
376-6472 372-3649
fS\ DINNER QQ/t
'mmaiMu) BOX vvy
3 Re. Chicken Reg. 1.25
Mashed Potatoes
£££- BRING COUPON

at the Spanish Main and Tuesday
Morning as well as Roc Records,
for the May 22-23 festival.
The festival will be held on a
farm 2S miles south of
Gainesville. It is planned to
provide an unhassled weekend of
fresh air and good music at
peopled prices.
Rose Community Center,
which is sponsoring the event,
has booked such bands as RGF,
Power, Hampton Grease Band
and Stonehenge. Others include
Joe Taylor, Celebration, Image
and Mudcrutch.
Facilities and site preparations
at the 240 acre farm are
underway. Architecture students
and other UF students are
* 6tM-6UNS-gUNr;
* inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
4 reloading. Harry Beckwith
* gun dealer, Micanopy.
- 466-3340.
I Jerry Jeff IS
I Mr. Bo Jangles

Written by Dr. Didier Graeffe and directed by Michael
Beistle, both of the Humanities department, the play dealt
with mans quest for a perfect society, for utopia.
Performing before a capacity crowd of 1300, Friday
night and a somewhat smaller audience Saturday, the
honors humanities classes presented the crux of Graeffes
philosophy The flesh is stronger than the mountain.
Man's gullibility in following misguided leaders well

executing the design plan for the
festival. Volunteers are needed
for all aspects including building,
security, workshops and food.
All interested in working should
ca 373-3842.
Omdas £M la
Tlm Sam* Amount Os Tim* To Study
USE STUDY SOUNDS
Incraaaa Your Concentration And Improve
CAUSE THIS TO HAPPEN
- Tmcfc.TppffcowwjffiSr IP Soeord
Send Check or Money Order S9M Each
Include 75eH*ndlln* and iCm
Sound Concepts, Inc., Box 3552
Charlottesville, Va, 22902
LowwtjMfaral
Buy 2 TAX-FREE
motorcycle delivered
in Enoend
Norton, BMW, BSA,
Honda, Kawasaki, and
650 Triumnh chooDsra!
a Full Insurance
a Air Freight hike
beak to U.S.
For Mora Info, Write:
EURO-BIKE Inc.
Suita 703 81018th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20006
U of F Agents John Strong -378-6806

demonstrated and even put into reality when the audience
is enticed into purging themselves by screaming their
heads off at the end of the play.
Mary Taylor, in her yellow bikini, and later as a
cheerleader, was a big hit with the audience. Todd
Ramesberger,the disgruntled hitchhiker, Burce Schwack,
as narrator and abominable snowman were excellent. Also,
Phyllis Craig, Sally Kline, Carol Speurman, and, of course,
the Beistles, all showed some good acting.

SUMMER TERM
June 21-August 20
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY
Dade center
1414 Drexel Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
will offer
JUNIOR and SENIOR LEVEL COURSES
in
EDUCATION HUMANITIES
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SOCIAL SCIENCE
If you are interested in taking an elective course this
summer, call
305*534*8331
or write for a copy of the Dade
Center Summer Schedule.
I Some people wont make I
I a move without it. I
I I
'Xy V's W
m One of our good customers, faced with the choice of tak* 1
1 ing his wife or KLH Model Eleven to Port Saidtook his wife. 1
i Os course. 1
I We dont make silly claims about the Eleven. 1
But well bet you see more KLH Model Elevens going places
I with people who go places than any other stereo portable on
1 the market. |
1 The reason is simple. The Eleven is a portable thats really ]
I portable. Just 28 pounds of solid musical performance. j
Its got KLH quality throughout. There are specially de de-1
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Garrard; magnetic cartridge and diamond stylus; inputs for
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I Come to Hoyt's
1 Listen to the big sound of a little Eleven. I
| Its for sure youll run out of the store with one.
I And you wont need muscles or track shoes. Its that light I
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HICH FOR YOUR I
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I CTDffIFIIIEUTY -=
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r. MofMavJ May *) *9?t; TtW-FWWda 'Am&nor,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tht Florida Alligator, MoAday, May 3,1971

editorial
Is WUFT right?
When is a journalist not a journalist?
When he's a WUFT student apparently.
We have shied away from this distasteful conclusion, but
now it seems unavoidable. The College of Journalism has
just shoved it down our throats.
It all started in late October.
Richard Glenn, 4JM, was on assignment for a class to film
a junior high school football game at Citizens Field. During
halftime he saw a city policeman arrest two youths for
scaling a wall to get into the game.
As Glenn attempted to film the arrest, an officer shoved
the camera in my face.
He complained to the police department, and the
questions of a student journalists role and rights were
raised.
And thats when we got the first inkling.
College of Journalism Dean John Paul Jones said when a
student newsman is covering a regular story and an
additional news event spontaneously occurs the student
should leave if trouble arises.
We wonder if Walter Cronkite would do that.
Sure, we are aware that Cronkite makes somwhere in the
neighborhood of $200,000 a year for being in dangerous
spots. But how are we ever to learn how to cover this type
of situation if we turn tail and run?
Officials point to the fact that students have no
insurance to cover them, whereas working reporters would
at least get compensation if they were hurt.
The solution to that is to get some kind of insurance.
Until there is some real effort made, we wont know if its
feasible, and we havent noticed any real effort.
At the time all this occurred, Glenns instructor and news
director of WUFT-TV, Don Grooms, said Student
reporters are full fledged reporters. . their work is
presented for public consumption.
He also said the College of Journalisms policy is an old
one, and needs to be updated, to back the student up in
his work.
And we applauded him.
Unfortunately, he doesnt act that way in his classes.
During the recent UF demonstrations, WUFT-TV student
newsmen were on the scene filming.
University Police chief Audie Shuler requested the film,
both published and unpublished.
Grooms allowed police to view the film after four days
of soul-searching.
He says at one time The university was in a crisis
situation... the police thought the film might have helped
them out of the crisis.
But then he turns around and says he did not show them
the film until he was positive it could not be used for
identification purposes.
Even though this is a contradiction, it is not the
important point.
Grooms has missed an essential idea of journalism. A
reporters notes, a photographer's pictures and a
cameraman's film are theirs and no policeman has the
right to them.
We understand his point that ultimately the film
belonged to the university.
We understand that the film could be subpoenaed if it
couldn't be obtained in any other way.
But we cannot understand why the film was shown just
upon request.
CBS, is now involved in a lawsuit because they will not
turn over film which has been subpoenaed.
We are not saying they are right. We are sure there are
SQme instances when film should be made available to
police. It is not the job of the journalist to obstruct justice.
But it is also not our job to take pictures for the police
either.
In October, Don Grooms said the student should be
backed up by his college. We wonder what, or who, made
him change his mind.
Okay, we understand this is his class, and the station is
under the college. We also understand the college can set the
rules under which the students have to operate.
But dont try to make us believe that Channel S news is
the same as that which we get on the commercial stations.
There is a basic difference.
Reporters on Channel 5 stay away from where the action
is. And news events dont film themselves.
So, either have a policy which allows those students who
want to film dangerous situations to do so, or dont call
yourselves a news station.
A journalist has a certain basic responsibility to his
audience.
If he doesnt fulfill it, he isnt a journalist.

The
Florida
Alligator

* m, ** > - I y-* 1 *>; t P | 1- g!
jd Wr <
f ll
If t / Jg
Dont be silly. The Russians said their platform was purely scientific.
Take the Nixon in me

This is a new column but the
topics sound like a couple of
dinosaurs from some prehistoric
era.
Black and white, you say?
Racism, whats that? Youll just
have to see the Judge, son.
No lie! When no lies? Not
around here, not since I got
here.
Stevie C. OConnell, reputed
boy scout of the year, where is
he now that the blacks of the
university need him?
No amnesty... OK, then no
peace on campus until we, the
student body, are convinced that
our continued association with
this university is not tainted by
racism.
Yea! racism and I mean you
Stevie and you Johnie redneck.
Oh, and I mean you Unde Audie
Shuler.
As Jerry Rubin said on
campus recently, theres a little
bit of Richard Nixon in all of us.
Its our culture. Well, all you
culture vultures, you can have
my part.
Since were on universities
(and most of us have been on
one too long for our own good),
lets talk about structure and
power. You see, around the
world things are not all done on
the American plan. In Europe,
university power resides in the
faculty and then in the student
body and lastly in the
functionaries, i.e. the
administrators. Sound better?
And up North and out West?
Far out rumor has it that
students are now in power.
Things can get better and

Phyllis Gallub
Editor-In-Chief

Gary Grunder
News Editor

m
lr \ VtCvjuf .iWWWMLjBUSKyjM
wi11..., I will, if you will and
then we can have a simple
majority and with a simple
majority one achieves
democratic power. The power is
in the hands of the people if the
people decide to assert their will.
Returning to Jerry Rubins
rap Monday night, he raised
some questions in my mind.
Am 1 a radical?
I call black people, boy,
(when I forget what Im saying)
* I call girls, chicks, (when I
forget who Im talking to)
Am I a radical?
I like school, tf*-*-**^**-****
I believe in God.

Alligator Staff
Marian Jadrusiak Carl Crawford Stave Strang
Assignments Editor Assistant Assignments Editor Wire Editor
Copy Editors Gary Paskal-Debbi Smith-Vickie Rich -Linda Miklowit*
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices cif
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
V Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or J
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida. V

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor

and, I smoke cigarettes.
Yes, I can be a radical, here,
but Jerry Rubin has assured me
that I cannot be a revolutionary.
Thats OK I guess, the
Revolution doesnt seem to be
around the corner and Im in no
particular rush to leave die
womb of university life.
And I wonder how many kids
went to Washington this
weekend? And I wonder how
many committed men and
women will be coming back?
Am I concerned? Should you
be concerned? Im not worried.
You know radicals dont worry.
My numbers can only be
strengthened by bigger and
better confrontations.
I just have to stop and think
about the dear old Washington I
knew. I just finished a four-year
term of academic imprisonment
there. I joined many brothers
and sisters who fought many a
brave fight. And always there
were still more coming who
hadnt gotten into it yet.
This I know; there will be one
large reception committee
waiting up there for you. ALL
POWER TO THE PEOPLE!
SEIZE THE TIME!

irfJhii f iMj
XuSlS\>^



Racists
EDITOR:
The recent sit-in by the Black
Student Union was, in my
opinion, a real setback for the
cause of integration. A
generation or more ago, there
existed in the South a minority
of whites that struggled against
the racial peijudices of that day.
They acted as individuals and as
members of churches, the
Southern Regional Council, the
NAACP and other organizations.
Their goal was clearly stated,
namely, that there shall be no
discrimination against any
individual based on the color of
his skin.
I can recall an interview with
Thurgood Marshall published
many years ago in the New
Yorker magazine. The reporter

Convert awareness
into positive reform

(EDITORS NOTE: The
author is a senior law student
who recently received an
injunction in circuit court
forbidding the UF from
imposing a $25 late fee on him.)
By Blais* Picchi
At the end of this term I will
be a graduating after seven years
at this university. In those years
I have seen much happen on this
campus and to this campus. One
of the things which I had hoped
would happen and have
subsequently seen is the rising
from apathy on the part of
students and their assuming an
active role in taking issue with
an insensitive administrative
agency. This has been the result
of a new awareness on the part
of our generation which has,
however, manifested itself
principally in emotion. I believe
the time has come to convert
heated passion into positive
programs of reform.
Mass demonstrations which
make national news and which
involve the use of teargas and
the destruction of taxpayers
property serve only to alienate
the very people at whom
students should be directing
their activities: the people of
Florida and the legislature.
Consequently, we have come
off looking like politically naive,
intellectually bigoted children
while making the man we
oppose look like a harried and
courageous public servant who is
standing up to the rabble. We
have become jaded Pottyannas
who see things as they ought to
be but through lack of
knowhow, and impatience, are
becoming dislhuioned with a
system which, afl the while, is
beckoning us forward, begging
us to affect the changes which if
desperately needs. Perhaps we
lack frith in ourselves and
perhaps, riso, we question our
commitmAst to meaningfully
change the system.
Opinions, proposals and mass
demonstrations will not
significantly affect the decisions
of Stephen C. OConnell. He
does not answer to the students.
He answers to the Board of

asked Marshall, But what if
they segregate schools on the
basis of family income in order
to keep the Negros out of white
schools? His answer was,
They can segregate on any basis
they like provided it is not one
of race. Os course he did not
favor economic segregation, but
he was quite clear on his
objective of racial integration.
Much still needs to be done to
complete integration. Our
segregated housing is a clear
illustration of this. Those who
work for this goal, however,
must now fight not only the
prejudiced whites, but also the
Black Student Union. When they
ask for an allotment of 500
black incoming freshmen, they
are discriminating on skin color.
Since the number of incoming
students is limited, some whites
would have to be replaced by

Regents which answers to the
governor who, in turn, answers
to the electorate. This circuitous
route between a univeristy
administration and the people,
only a few of whom it
administers to, should explain
the frustration and
consternation which students
perennially feel and the futility
of attempting to make a
university adiminstrator answer
directly to them.
No other single governmental
body, including the legislature,
the courts or the governor has
such extensive and specific
power over so large a class of
Floridians, without being
directly answerable to them, as
does a state university
administration. In a democracy
no administrative agency should
have so great an authority over
the everyday lives, as well as the
futures and aspirations of so
many people without it being, in
some way, directly responsible
to the people whose lives it
governs. This may have been
tolerated in the past when
universities were small and
relatively uncomplex, dealing
with students on a personal
vel. Today all the students at
this university are taxpayers and
members of the federal
electorate and will shortly be
members of the Florida
electorate, if not already.
Universities are not small but are
vast, complex and insensitive
There is no reason
why the autocratic,
administrative dictatroships
which still govern them should
be allowed to continue
unmodified. Tomorrow I wi*l
put before you a proposal as to
how that can be done.

READERS FORUM

blacks. When they insist on
preferential hiring of black
faculty, they would deny some
young white man a job because
of the color of his skin. In my
opinion, they cannot continue
to threaten the white majority in
this manner without setting up a
reaction that would set back the
progress of racial integration.
When, in addition, the BSU
threatens to disrupt the normal
operation ot the univeristy to
enforce demands that many of
us consider morally wrong; this
further motivates a reaction.
They insist on bringing in 500
new blacks a year. Are these
blacks to reinforce their
takeover of Tigert Hall? 1 do not
believe that all blacks support
their position. It is discouraging,
however, to see the
encouragement that Mayor Neil
Butler has given them by
committing himself to resign
from the university if they do.
I believe our only hope lies in
a firm stand by those who
believe in integration against the
old racism of some whites and
the new racism of some blacks.
Arthur A. Broyles
Professor of Physics
Rectify
EDITOR:
We, graduate students of the
Department of Agricultural
Economics, believe that the
events of the last days resulting
in the withdrawal of a large
number of our fellow black
students from this institution is
not in the best interests of all
concerned.
We are convinced that this
action on the part of our fellow
students has been a consequence
of the legalistic, precipitant and
stubborn attitude adopted by
the administration. We feel that
the substance of the proposals of
the Black Student Union is fair
and reasonable and should
form a valid basis for
negotiation.
We call upon President
Stephen OConnell to adopt a
mor compromising attitude and
to rectify the conditions which
led to this unfortunate situation.
35 graduate students

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, ~~.; : 1 Like father, like son" ..>-?,=,-*

Africans
EDITOR:
All along, we African students
at the University of Florida have
kept silent on the present
unfortunate situation hoping a
solution would be found which
will be in the interest of all. With
the recent development, and
having carefully reviewed the
situation, a cross-section of us
have got together to make our
stand clear.
Most of us are here on the
sponsorship of our respective
governments, and are forbidden,
as would be expected, to
interfere in the domestic affairs
or the host country.
We sincerely sympathize with
the American black students,
especially those at the University
of Florida on the recent
situation, and very much hope
that an acceptable solution will
be found by all concerned to
bring about once more a cordial
relationship.
Lasun Adigun
Depo Adenle
Excellent
Editor:
Please permit an old Fourth
Estater (and I mean old
(Berkeley 1920!) to compliment
you on your excellent editorials
during the past few days. They
are not only well written, but
thoughtful and compassionate
and sane in concept.
I am sure that what you have
written will have a most
beneficial impact.
And I love your Alligator.
Ashley M. Pinkerton
Backwards
Editor:
I have patiently sat back
during the last two weeks and
listened to the BSlfs demands
and charges with regard to this
university. My feelings at this
time approach those of a once
famous cartoon sailor THATS

ia Mav 3 1971. Th Florida Alligator.

ALL 1 CAN STAND. I CAN'T
STAND NO MORE.
The BSU. Alligator and others
have spoken constantly of the
racist policies at this institution.
I sec as racist any policy that
restricts or identifies any
individual not on his merits but
rather on his race or color. In
my four years here at the
university 1 have seen no such
policy implemented that fits this
description. I wish the people
making these charges would take
time to identify the policies they
speak of.
The only racist policies I have
seen are those proposed by BSU
such as:
admission of students not
on merit but because they are
black
hiring of faculty not on
qualifications but because they
are black
release of individuals
accused of destroying property
and assaulting an officer not
because of their innocence but
because they are black
I am and will be against any
policy that established because
they are criteria, regardless of
how you fill the rest in.
Hopefully we are accepted or
rejected because of our
qualifications not because we are
red, white or blue. Isnt that
what civil rights is all about?
It is indeed unfortunate that
some of the black students have
withdrawn -for the university
and especially for them. I
cannot, however, see where this
University or its president have
acted improperly and I back
both 100%.
Kenneth Moffat 4BA
Saddest
EDITOR:
Surely the saddest thing to
ever happen at this university is
the current withdrawal of the
black students. 1 suggest that all
students and faculty observe a
30 day mourning period because
of this occurrence. I am going to
wear a black armband and I urge
everyone else to symbolize his
mourning in this way.
Jim Norman* 3EG

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

rtV.VAV/.V.SV.VAV.V.V.V.V.V.V..V.V.
.
FOR SALE
-XxX*:vXvrvXv:vttw>x-Xw>x-r*x
1970 mobile home, 2 bedrms,
carpets, furnished, oil heat, 8 mos.
old, in park, 12 x 52, cypress model,
brand new condition, $3500.
373-1484 (A-3t-125-p)
two brass youth beds with mattresses
clean both for $12.50 372-6262
(A-2t-128-p)
Decca stereo DPI 12 with speakers
Raleigh 5-speed Will sell or trade
both 378-5551 Brian (A-st-126-p)
FROM MAIL Ik
j-f-i jPh 372 F 533 ; ;
~mo4/p i
4 JOUNNIT INTO THI i -'WL J
WHISm WOKID OF WOMTN
I i AIXMONY
1 ViCKILiJ ijovims
F R ANC m
*** i v>y,y t %,v,,v.v.v* > l!*lv

r 'l
Todays
more for your money meal
a.moisons
CRFETERIR
r
| MONDAYS FEATURE |
| CHUCK WAGON STEAK i
AND HASH
§\ BROWN RV£ I ?
35 i POTATOES *5
QI. ... .. JLfr.
I I 2
, e GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN <
~ 1 ALL YOU QOA
CAN EAT! I
t I
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
mORRISOIVS
CAFETERIA beyond comparison!
L 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall Jk

FOR SALE
::--:*:;X->x-::-x-:-x-:-x-x*XvX-x-:-X':-:-x
tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bobcats ocelots skunks parrots hawks
snakes lizards turtles for sale trade or
buy Kongo Pet 475-2546 (local)
(a-!6t-55-p)
Best looking Honda 160 scrambler in
town. Runs great! S3OO. Womans 3
speed English racer w/basket S2O
Phone 378-4413 (A-3t-126-p)
Going Abroad must find home for
loving, well-trained Golden Retriever
Call 378-4127 for all details including
AKC pedigree (A-st-126-p)
Refrigerator 39.95 and up. Brooks
Used Appliance 2315 s.e. Hawthorne
Rd. Phone 378-8935 or 372-7426
open on Sunday (A-10t-122-p)
Gerts a gay girl ready for a whirl
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooers also
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfc)
60x12 69 Shelby 2 br furnished,
stepdown living rm, shag carpet,
raised celling, a-c, excel cond. Phone
373-1167 weekdays after 5.
(A-st-128-p)
ATTENTION
GRADUATES
MAKE RESERVATIONS
EARLY FOR-
U-HAUL
TRUCKS AND TRAILERS
IRA'S GULF SERVICE
707 N.W. 13th St. 373-3541
*T$ 4:45
l*r-ATir,r. ,v,rt-jl sorry no
WINNER of PASSES THIS
WINNER Or ENGAGEMENT
TWO ACADEMY tNfaftfat MENT
AWARDS
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
JOHN MILLS BEST
Cl NEMATOG R APH Y
A story of love.
& Filmed by David Lean
IRyaiiLS
Daughter
AT ..
I IJl 1:40 4:10
6:4S 9:25
DUSTIN
HOFFMAN
LITTLE
BIG MAN^
Ranavision Technicolor fGPI

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 3,1971

Page 10


..v.v.-.v.*.*.-.v.v.vr.x.v*!.v.*.vx*w-:.
FOR SALE
.X-X-X'X-XX'XX-X-X'X'XX'X'X-X'Xv
Spalding golf clubs with new bag plus
2 dozen new balls only $45 call Tom
at 373-1492 anytime must sell need
cash bad. (A-3t-127-p)
Full-sized double bed (new mattress)
asking SSO. green flower print sofa
(makes into 48 bed) and matching
arm chair, asking $75. 373-3182.
(A-st-127-p)
Decca Stereo System ideal for dorm
or small apartment includes AM-FM
100.00-also Allied turntable-make
offer Call 378-4127 (A-st-126-p)
STEREO 8-track TAPES 90 cents
(cost per album) when you convert
your player into a recorder and
Record Your Own, get professional
quality from any source, 1 yr
warranty, install easily yourself, only
$19.95. SAVE 30% on RECORDING
TAPE, world's highest quality, BASF
(reel, 8-tr, cassette). New stereo
equipment 25% Off. 378-5916 night
(A-st-126-p)
STAINED GLASS, help the cause of
higher ed. tiffany styled stained, glass
and lead lamps do-it-yourself or
ready to hang. 376-2195
(A-5M26-P)
8 tr stereo tapes. Any 2 albums on 1
tape. Professional equip used all for
only $3.50 why pay more? Call
373-3611 Jonathan or leave message.
(A-st-124-p)
10 SPEED BICYCLES Tired of
walking? Tired of riding a bike that is
more work than fun to pump? Tired
of burning dollars and polluting the
countryside? We have available the
following fine European racing bikes
for immediate shipment: TRIUMPH
(English) mens 21 or 23 frame
74.50. FALCON (ENGUSH) Mens
21 frame 90.00. Ladles 21 frame
90.00. GITANE (French) Mens
21", 23, 24 fr 90.00. Ladles
19Vi, 21", 22" fr 90.00. Gitanes
as above l>ut with quick release
hubs 99.95. CLAUD BUTLER
(English) Mens 21 frame with
Campagnol gears lOO.OO.
LEGNANO (Italian) For shipment
approx. May 15th Mens 20Vi, 22,
23*fc frames with tires & tubes
110.00, with tubular tires 125.00,
both models equipped with
Campagnolo gears. Frame sizes on
Gitanes and Legnanos approximate
(derived from metric sizes). We also
have a limited number of RALEIGH
INTERNATIONALS ($250.00) and
RALEIGH MARK II
PROFESSIONALS ($320.00) in
various frame sizes. Orders of 5 or
more deduct 5%. Orders of 10 or
more less 10%. Add 4% sales tax.
Freight prepaid. Color selection
limited, list preferences, We stock a
complete line of parts and accessories
such as armlltes ($1.60) & bike
covers ($4.00). All bikes listed have
27 wheels. Be sure to specify frame
size. All Inquiries answered promptly.
DADE CYCLE SHOP, 3423 MAIN
HIGHWAY, COCONUT GROVE,
FLORIDA 33133 (305) 443-6075.
(A-st-127-p)
PANASONIC all types 8 track
cassette, tv radio and phonos ALL
NEW I will beat any price order
TODAY Call Don 376-0476
(A-3t-128-p)
Refrigerator, old but in great shape
$35; presto electric curlers $lO. HI-FI
$lO. girl's spyder bike $25 folk guitar
$35 392-7821 anytime (A-st-128-p)
1968 Honda CBI6O Electric start
good mechanical condition. Buco
helmet included. S3OO. 372-6415 Get
as second car. only 2519 miles.
(A-st-128-p)
Portable electric typewriter with
case, In excellent condition with 3
years left on guarantee, has been used
very little, $55, call 378-5249
(A-3M28-P)

Hborzoi
gSI A Mrs. Clyde C. Council
5632 Bronx Ave.
Sarasota, Fla. 33581
(Russian Wolfhound) Puppies Champion
Sire + C.D. Dam
Excellent Show Quality or an ;
Elegant Hu House Pet
Well Behaved, Great Temperament
No Doggy Odor
SIOO A Terms To S3OO
IN GAINSEVHIE CALL 378-7791

FOR SALE
v:vX*X-;vX-:*X-:-X-;
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. flies 29.50 USED arm
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
Furniture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
376-1146 (a-25t-103-p)
AIR CONDITIONER, 5000 BTU
used 1 mo. Carrier with 4 year
warranty $75 Call 372-4181
(A-3t-127-p)
REFRIGERATOR apt. size good
condition -$35 ideal for dorm room.
Will Deliver, call 372-6416 or
373-1609 (A-2t-128-p)
Crown Graphic 4 by 5 camera, optar
4.7 lens, fully synchronized shutter,
film pack adapter, graflite flash with
two reflectors, 12 film holder, good
condition. Other good camera buys.
Cameo Photos, 1326 S. W. Pine Ave.,
Phone (904) 622-6570, Ocala Fla.
(A-10t-128-p)
New Components: Miracord
turntables with base, cover, & S6O
cart. 45% off; Fisher receivers-25%
off; SSO-headsets-$33. Much more.
378-9192 (A-3t-128-p)
Diamond engagement ring and
wedding band set. Also set of golf
clubs. Call 372-5023 after 6 P.M.
(A-2t-127-p)
FOR RENT
SINGLES: Swing Into summer in a
luxurious A/C poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O,
including utilities, and free color TV.
378-7224 La Mancha Apts.
(B-15t-116-p)
for rent 1 bdrm furn apt sub-lease
thru Aug 135 p/mo univ gdns call
378-6768 (B-st-124-p)
1 bd apt to sublet 130 mo renewable
tease, stove and ref furn. 1824 nw 3
pi apt 3 3 blocks fr campus call
372-8148 (B-st-125-p)
Need to sublet Immediately one
bedroom air conditioned apt
Carpeted free water A block from
Tiger SIOO monthly Call 378-8855
(B-4t-125-p)
Sublet one bedroom apt. pool air
must let by May 19 one block from
campus 120.00 a month for a quiet
place to live, call 376-9765.
(B-3t-126-p)
Summer Special large 2 bdrm. apt.
$320 for whole summer qtr. air, close
to campus swimming pool call
376-2317 411 N.W. 15 St.
(B-st-126-p)
Room for rent 1 or 2 persons
S6B/mo. Fredrick Garden apt 20
1130 SW 16th Ave. a/c pool.
(B-3t-127-p)
LANDMARK phase II 3 female
roommates to sublet summer quarter
, $95 each + utilities no parking
/problems apt 128 372-0929
(B-3M27-P)
1 female roomate wanted to sublet
Williamsburg townhouse apt. sllO +
utilities for summer qtr. near
med-center, call Renee 373-2503
(B-st-127-p)
sublet one bedroom In large house,
with private bath & entrance $125
entire summer close to campus
behind Norman Hall Palmer
378-0164. (B-3t-128-p)
sublet two bedroom landmark apt.
poolside, air cond, new shag carpet,
pay only July and August 190.00 a
month call now 378-6752
(B-st-128-p)

FOR RENT
1 room in a/c 2-bedroom apt. May
only 1016Vz S.W. 4 ave 378-5551
Discuss terms. (B-st-126-p)
Sublease large 1 bedroom apt
summer qtr. central air & pool Mt
Vernon Apts June already paid
378-0795 (B-st-126-p)
sublet for summer 3 bedroom a/c
house in northeast section $l3O
month with a tv call 378-0711
(B-st-128-p)
efficiency to sublease
IMMEDIATELY air cond. $95 mo.
1222 NW 8 ave apt 17 stop in before
noon or after 6 pm (B-st-128-p)
sublet starting In summer, across
from sorority row, 2 bedroom apt.
central ac w/w carpet 2 blocks from
campus $l5O a month call 372-2966
(B-st-128-p)
Sublease 3 bedroom deluxe La Bonne
Vie Apt. summer quarter. $235 total
per month. (S7O for own room or
SSO for sharing.) 376-0121.
(B-3M28-P)
2-bedroom apts. for summer qtr.
pool, a/c, close to campus. $230-240
per qtr. call 376-8990. 1524 NW 4th
Ave. apt. N. hours 10-5 Mon. Frl.
(B-st-l 28-fi)
WANTED
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O
Including utilities and free color TV.
378-7224 (C-15t-116-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
a/c poolside apt. Private bedroom.
Walk to campus. S7O including.
utilities + free color tv. 378-7224
(C-15t-116-p)
2 need ride to Cal. Leisurely trip,
flexible share expenses. Iv. after May
9 Call Jay 372-7904 (C-st-124-p)
One or two female roommates
needed for Gatortown Apt. 224.
move In imme. call 372-6790 or go
by apt. (C-3t-126-p)
Roommate wanted to move in this
month Village Park. apt. 58 ph
378-3367 (C-3t-126-p)
2 roommates wanted large 4
bedroom house near mall cable tv
private or semi-private bedroom S4O
per month utilities incl. 378-6810
(C-st-125-p)
1 would like to rent a 2 or 3 bedroqm
house or part of a house for Sept.%r
fall quarter. It must be near campus
and furnished. 392-6076 (C-3t-127-p)
Two female roommates, large
4-bedroom house, for summer or
next year, nice residential area, NE
section, call 378-7203 after spm
(C-4t-127-p)
Female roomate needed immediately,
own room, $65, 373-1992
(C-3t-127-p)
BUYING-1 want your old rare or
unusual COINS. Collections wanted,
call for appraisals and offers, also sell.
TOM 392-7316 (C-10t-127-p)
Female roommate wanted for
summer to share 1 bdrm apt a/c pool
laundry Butler Gardens $62 mo call
373-3287 or 373-3664 (C-st-127-p)
Female roommate for Williamsburg
apt No.ll immediately or for May.
CaH 373-4067 or 372-3505 x 245.
rent Is 4 $52.50 + U* utilities.
(C-4t-127-p)
Fairly quite girl stu to help find,
share apt near campus begin fall or
move in Win, Spr. Pref grad stu no ty.
call Patty 392-7681 (C-3t-128-p)
2 Male roommates to sublet apt for
summer quarter. $142 per person for
whole summer In Landmark apts. call
378-5154 and ask for Champe
(C-st-128-p)
**l
ar jjm |ll
!§R



m
IGrATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
V**
li or 2 male roomatas for summer qtr
June rent pd. Landmark apt 27
n76*0529 (C-st-128-p)
tamale roommate For large 3 br
Louse in NW. Private room/phone.
Ino lease. 372-5677 Becky or Jeanne,
bis per month (C-3t-128-p)
| it model VW micro bus or camper
Cor rent or sale. Terms negotiable
I R eD iy John Hammond 256 E church
Ct Jacksonville 353-4333 (C-st-128-p)
IpEMALE roOMATE 2 bdr. house
lon large lot screened porch own bdr.
with Drivate ent. 637.50 + util
1372-6416 or 373-1609 (C-2t-128-p)
j|l p NTEO
Cocktail waitress wanted: full or part
hime, no experience necessary, will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5.
1376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dub's
Bteer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
ME*2ot-4-p)
Pert or- full time: Door-to-door
Isalesmen needed. Can earn 62-5 hr on
commission basis. Need car and
phone. Call Mr. Smith at 378-0121
between 7-9 pm (E-7t-123-p)
[sloo.oo weekly possible addressing
mail for firms Full and part time at
home Send stamped self-addressed
[envelope to Blabar Co. Box 12459 El
Paso, Texas 79912 (E-st-125-p)
[ATTENTION: Communications,
{journalism and Business Graduates!
mvgvl needs aggressive,
hard-working people to sell radio
advertising. Some appreciation of
Country music would be helpful. Call
irv Uram for appt. at 378-3806
KE-St-126-p)
part time secretary-typist. Must have
good typing skills and spelling ability.
12.00. Call 378-2823 (E-2t-126-p)
AUTOS
Ivxyxxxx-Xrx-Xsxxxxxxxxx
1963 Ford econoline van 1962 Ford
Econoline van 1952 Ford Walk In van
call 376-5341 Monday through
Friday 8 to 5 (G-St-124-p)
66 vw Clean, dependable. Many new
Parts. Must sell soon. Call 376-3295
pfter f Ive(Q-st-125-p)
1968 MGB Perfect Condition 30,000
Miles BRG, AM-FM Prof Moving,
Selling 2nd Car. 61575 Call 392-0106
or 378-0343 after 6 pm (G-St-124-p)
1969 Mustang V 8 Automatic Radio
8 heater blue Excellent condt
[372-7009 (Q-St-124-p)
1967 english ford (anglla), 18,000
miles, radio, ww, tutone paint, one
owner, 6500. call 392-1474 days, or
873-1310 after six 68 4d cortlna 1600 GT. 8700 will
trade for big bike. Carter 372-0747
376-9450 after 4pm 378-1621
O-St-126-p)

CARS TRUCKS BUSES
SKOAL MTBtTIOH TO jglMNg

I Thrills & Chills
illr H 'BRIDES OF DRACULA'
\zsssssf-~ At the RATHSKELLER

Monday, May 3,1971, The Floride Alligator, I

XvX'XvlvWvXv''< , .v. .v.'. .v.v.v.v.
AUTOS
!-!-;X;X:XS:X?X:X:X;X:X*X*X*X-X-X-X-X-X !-!-;X;X:XS:X?X:X:X;X:X*X*X*X-X-X-X-X-X---1966
--1966 !-!-;X;X:XS:X?X:X:X;X:X*X*X*X-X-X-X-X-X---1966 Tempest, V-8. Air. Fine than.
Must sell. SBSO or offer. May take
cheap Import trade. 372-1039. Also
dune-buggy and VW parts chean
(G-6t-127-p) cn ** p
Stp T an contained,
excellent condition, must be seen to
be appreciated contact Dan or Pat.
c 3927305
66 Dodge Monaco 1-owner, 62,000
"J&- v T* A,r N w *ldal Tires.
6900. Call 392-8580 (G-3t-127-p)
Pretty 69 flat 850 spider sports car in
excellent condition, new tires, one
owner only 6435 and assume
payments of 659 Chris 378-3733
(G-st-127-p)
6300 1964 mercury, radio, heater,
very clean, dependable transportation
must sell quickly call Bob 376*0892
or see at 1112 NW 3rd Ave
(G-4M26-P,
Enlarged family forces sale of
extraordinarily well preserved
Porsche 356 C (1965). Professionally
serviced every 3,000 miles of its
55,000 miles, the car has a perfect
mechanical condition. Within past
5,000 4 new Bridgestone 6 ply radial,
new battery, new headlights, 8 new
brake pads Installed. Blaupunkt
amfmsw, detachable hardtop, call
378-6837 63,200 firm. (G-st-128-p)
63 pontlac bonnevllle-alr, radio,
power brakes, power steering, 6600
call 378-4237 (G-lt-128-p)
1966 opel kadett good condition 4
speed 37,000 miles phone 378-7265
after 5:00 63.50 (6-2t-128-p)
1967 sunbeam alpine Perfect cond
New top, paint, tires, and brakes
exterior & Interior perfect eng Excel
call Tom 392-8158 after six ask 800
(G-4t-128-p)
Bulck Skylark convertible 1967 Fully
equipped excellent condition
positraction new tires tinted glass
Must sell Student 372-1879 61495
(G-lt-128-p)
.;X;X;X*X^
PERSONAL
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medlcal-Legal-Psychologlc open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (j-46t-106-p)
Help Save America I Join the
American Vigilantes! For
Information-Buy and read The
American Vigilante by Alaric,
Brandan Press, 221 Columbus Ave
Boston, Mass. 02116 64.95
(J-15t-121-p) ___
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer.
Electrologist... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment
(J*44t-54-p)
Please help me find homes for six
adorable kittens, 6 weeks old. call
376-4768 Thanks (J-3t-126-p)

Page 11

Good home wanted for two furry
young GUINEAPIGS. Cage and food
included. 85.00. Call 376-3758
anytime (J-st-126-p)
Photography-portraits, advertising,
passports, custom processing, good
prices, open l-spm Photoworkshop,
Eternal Exchange 804 w. Univ.
372- (J-st-126-p)
WANTED! Single males. We have alt
types of UF coeds eager to meet you.
Details, write: Box 77346. Atlanta
30309. (J-20t-120-p)
I'm looking for someone to travel In
europe over the summer. Please call
Margaret 376-9848 as soon as
possible (J-st-123-p)
volunteers wanted for construction
and security work at the Gainesville
Music Festival. call 373-3842
(J-st-125-p)
Try us In May for a week or weekend
at 60% our seasonal rate. Sal-Lu
Cottages, 5441 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key, Sarasota, Fla.
813-383-2133 Private beach
(J-10t-125-p)
Volunteers wanted to set up craft
workshop and organic kitchen at the
Gainesville Music Festival, call
373- (J-st-125-p)
For the ultimate In WATERBEDS get
a quality bed from innerspaee
environments. call 373-3144'.
(J-5M26-P)
Chris Turner the best Insurance
salesman In the whole world Catt
Stevens, sunsets, and you forever! All
my love Hon. (J-2t-127-p)
Feel lonely and in need of help you
are not getting from your fellow
man? Try Jesus Christ at one of his
churches. If you don't, have one,
Highlands Presbyterian welcomes
you. 1001 N.E. 16th Avenue
(J-st-126-p)
FREEDOM! 11 from HIGHPRICES.
Gainesville DISCOUNT MUSIC. 107
N. MAIN ST. (J-5M29-P)
THE GIRL FROM IPANEMA.
Prepare for her and fulfill your U.F.
language requirements by taking 15
hours of INTENSIVE BRAZILIAN
PORTUGUESE this summer. SEE
Dr. Hower, 319 GSIS or PHONE
392-0375. (J-lt-128-p)
FREE this week-1 handball or 3
tennis balls on purchase of leather
tennis shoes by Spalding at 813.95 B
81 B SPORTS CENTER 5320 N. W.
13th ST. 378-1461 (J-st-129-p)
COOK, professional experienced In
exchange for room and board, begin
next school year. Paula 373-3061
between 4 and 7 (J-st-128-p)
LOST <& FOUND
XXXXXXXXXX-X-XXXX-X-X-Xv
found: pair Os MEN'S GLASSES In
Ist floor men's room, NASA
Building. call 392-2007.
(L-3t-126-nc)
FOUND TAPE RECORDER call
Gayle 392-8650 (L-3t-127-nc)
GOLD WOMAN'S WATCH found
Wed. Identify and pick up at union
lost and found, rm. 130, Reitz Union
(L-3t-127-nc)
Lost Waltham calendar watch on
Beta Field Sun. April 25. Please call
Jim at 372-9283. Reward for safe
return. Thank you. (L-2t-128-p)
lost-green fuzzy blanket with print
boarder In front of tlgert Wednesday
please retum-tt"* my security trio
392-8555 STEVE C RESIGN
(L-st-126-p)
1 2 weekold gray a Mack fluff puppy
answers to buttercup lost last Thur at
plaza reward call 376-3311
(L-2t-127-p)

SERVICES
Typing at its best by format NY
sacy. speed & accuracy, theses,
dissertation, papers 50 cents & up.
Barbara Coaxum 373-4361
(M-6MIB-P) \
Save 25% or on ail auto parts.
Spark plugs 68 cents. Cash & Carry
Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St.
378-7330. (M-113-tfc)
Typing dong, guaranteed accuracy 6i
neatness. Electric typewriter wIH do
term papers, theses, etc. phone
378-7493. 8.50 per page. Good
REFS. (M-st-124-p)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfC)
1 1,1 " 11
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Mr. Bo Jangles
Wi'fliiiiiiiinai
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AT: 1:25-3:26 5:25 7:28
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Robords
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PEFRAHD
"ONE MORE
TRAIN TO ROB
m A USIVERSAL WCTURt TECHWCOLO#*

THE JOKE directed byjaromil Jires
The last I heard, Jaromil Jires is still in
Czechoslovakia. 1 thought of him there on a cold
morning this winter as I came to a sudway in midtown
New York after seeing his film, The Joke. Slashed into a
poster outside the entrance was the proclamation:
WE'VE GOT ALL POLICE ON THE RUN! WE SEE
THEM BURN IN HELL-FIRE.
But who will bum in hell-fire in Czechoslovakia? In
America? The force of The Joke-which will not get out
-of my head these weeks afteris that it confronts this
question and, by doing so, makes itself a mirror for
viewers in many other places besides Czechoslovakia.
...Nat Ht
\ i
Monday, May 3
"MSdil*, May 4
5:30,8:00,10:30 Union And. SO 4
Vornond by th* JWRU

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Full or part time drafting performed.
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electrical systems tested and repaired.
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i,Thm Florida AIK gator, Monday, May 3,1971

Page 12

CAMPUS CRIER I
/I V A SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT f
J§ll
ROD I
I SERLING..., TO I
I SPEAK I
B V Rod Sorting, writer and producer of the "Twlight Zone" television series, will speak on, "Man, Child, and |
B Society," May 4 at Graham Pond. The program begins at 7:30 P.M. Admission to the lecture is free. I
I And Monday of the following week... I
B I Accent in conjunction with the BSU as part of Black Week will bring MUHAMMED ALI to the I
B I University of Fla. The program will be held on Mon. May 10 at 8:00 P.M. at Graham Pond. I
I Student Govt Positions Now Available I
B 1 Applications are now being taken for Student Gov't positions under the new administration. Any student B
I I interested in a cabinet position, position on a committee or other Student Gov't job should turn in an I
B application before Friday, May 7. Applications can be picked up in Room 305 of the Reitz Union.
I French Club I
B m Mon. May 3rd at 8:30 P.M. in the Aud. of the Architecture and Fine Arts Bldg, there will be a reading of B
I the French Anti-war play "Pique-Nique En Campagne."
I Sociology Majors I
-m
There will be a meeting this Thurs. nite at 7:00 P.M. in Room 349 of the Reitz Union.
I i EAG Needs Your Help I
fl 1 EAG needs people who are interested in helping to compile fact sheets on various environmental issues. All
B I interested call 373-1162 or come by the EAG office on the third floor of the Student Union.
I Shuttle Up for Badminton I
I I U. of Fla. badminton fans meet every Wed. at 8:00 P.M. and Saturdays at 10 A.M. at the Fla. Gym.
I Equipment provided free of charge. For more information call 373-2573.
I | SEXHave a Question? I
I The Student Gov't Hotline is now in service. Confidential answers referrals concerning birth control,
pregnancies, V.D., and related subjects are available. Call Mon. through Fri. between 10AM-10PM. I
I Volunteers are asked to call 392-1665.
B : I Class Attendance a Problem? I
I Teachers who threaten to lower a class grade for lack of attendance are violating the intent of University I
.# i regulations. We need YOU to help correct the problem. Call the Senate office at 392-1665 to air your B
I complaints. B
I f Spirit Committee Forming
I Xu..
I Any freshman girl interested in working on the Spirit Committee please contact Jay Schneider at 392-8421.
]B I Student Senate Meeting I
M There will be a Student Senate Meeting Monday, May 3, at 7:30 p.m., in Room 349, J.W. Reitz Union. This B
|| I meeting is to certify the election results and all newly elected Senators and out going senators should be
I pfOUtt
B I Accent *72 Staff Meeting I
B I There will be a meeting of the general staff of Accent 72 May sth at 7:30 in room C-4 of the Reitz Union. ft
I All members of the Accent staff are asked to attend. I
b I Student Govt Book Exchange B
B 1 Students who left books.. .may either pick up their books or their money if their books were on the list of I
B 1 sold books. Pickups may be made on Thursdays between 1 and 5 P.M. 1
If ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE I
fe 1 THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON SOO Os EAcS I
| 1 WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
I 1 V
ft ROBERT HARRIS 1
L
. O'-'* STUDENT GOVERNMENT"' J



Police raid protesters encampment

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Moving without warning at
dawn, the government broke up
an encampment of thousands of
antiwar protesters Sunday, but
their leaders still vowed to shut
down the capital today by
blocking rush-hour traffic.
Led by chief Jerry V. Wilson,
300 riot-trained police swept
through the camp on the banks
of the Potomac River a little
after noon and arrested several
ADA calls
for Nixon's
impeachment
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Americans for Democratic
Action urged Congress Sunday
to impeach President Nixon for
high crimes in Indochina and
to create a commission to
investigate the conduct of the
war.
The resolution, adopted as the
ADA ended its 24th annual
convention, described the war as
a violation of constitutional
provisions dealing with the
duties of the executive and
legislative branches of the
federal government.
It also charged that crimes
against humanity were
committed under standards
followed by the Nuremberg war
criminal trials after World War
n.
The impeachment call was
contained in an amendment
added to a milder resolution
asserting merely that the war
violated the Constitution, the
United Nations Charter and the
1928 Treaty of Paris.
The amendment, adopted by
a show of hands, asked that
action be taken in Congress to
institute impeachment
proceedings against Richard M.
Nixon on the grounds of high
crimes committed by him.
We further call upon
Congress to establish a
commission to hilly investigate
the conduct of the war in
Indochina, establish standards
for the application of existing
laws and treaties with regards to
the conduct of war and institute
appropriate proceedings to
enforce those standards against
any other persons found to have
violated them, the resolution
said.
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dozen demonstrators who had
refused to leave.
The remainder of the
estimated 20,000 to 30,000 who
had been camped there in West
Potomac Park at dawn when
Wilson announced the camp s
permit had been revoked had
left before his noon deadline to
clear out.
As the riot police, carrying
billy clubs, gas masks and tear
gas cannisters, swept across the
park, Wilson said they have
been here unlawfully for five
and a half hours and we figure
that gave them time enough to
move out if they wanted to.
Backing up the police were
1,800 District of Columbia
National Guardsmen who had
been called up for duty earlier
and several thousand regular
Army, Marine and Air Force
troops who were placed on

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standby alert for possible use
this morning.
Despite the exodus, Rennie
Davis, a leader of the Peoples
Coalition for Peace and Justice
which is sponsoring the final
demonstrations in three weeks
of war protests this spring,
declared we still intend,
Monday, May 3, to close down
the U.S. government by
blocking traffic on highways and
bridges leading to the city.
He said the government
moved on the encampment
because too many people are
here. Too many came to shut
down the government. Now we
have to think in a clear-headed
way to see that Nixons
objectives to clear us out are not
met.
The decision to revoke the
camping permit was made
jointly by the Justice and

Interior Departments and the
police late Saturday after Nixon
told a news conference there
that he would not allow those
demonstrating for peace abroad
to violate the laws at home.

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Fly from Miami June 15, 1971 via Pan
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September 7, 1971 air hire $290.00 plus
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.. Monday, May 3,1971 % Thq florid? Alligator,

Those arrested at the
encampment wpre charged with
unlawful entry and held under
SSOO bond, meaning they would
have to post at least SSO to be
released.

Page 13



>, Tha Florida AMoator, .Monday, May 3,1971
i r f--r -i V'i* *t i '

Page 14

FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR

Reaves leads 32-20 win for first unit
O range No. I on football team

H MBBPIBlBifc:
If fl MpMiMHMk 'W
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|Mi 11 I l^ip
Mi l I 1111 Itt I
#fl Bill S % 5 §
' efe ifr w-
£
% j § % jh vfj
I 1 aH BB
I Jp% v SBSf^jjSib SBSf^jjSib
SBSf^jjSib ,ap_
ft """""
J||p £,
PHIL BANNISTER
Chan Gailey (10) unload as touchdown pan to Hollis Boardman
... sophomore has bolted down No. 2 quarterback job

Track team low, 92-53
FSU inflicts wound to UFs record

By LEE DEHMLOW
Alligator Sports Writer
The absence of sprinter Jerry
Fannin cost the Florida track
team dearly as the Gators went
down to defeat in Tallahassee
this past weekend.
A fired up Seminole squad
ennhed UF 92-53 for Floridas
first loss of the seiaon and only
it's fifth in seven years.
Famfin was the difference,*
explained assistant coach Walter
WcfadL, His being sick coat us
np to twenty pointa as he runs
fiuee events, the 440 relay, 440
hurdfas and the mile relay.
When you consider that if
you lose an event worth five
points, you are redly losing ten
points five that they get and
five that you don't a few
losses really add up. And FSU
swept the high hurdles, the 440
intermediate hurdles and the
three mile, not to mention
taking two out of the three
places in a munber of other
events, Welsch continued.
The Iflfti* Florid*
performances were Eamonn
O'Keeffe's victory in the mile
and Mike Cottofi's 16-foot
winning pole vault
HKgk jumper flw* Doff,
. .r -. ** _-
triple jumper uravu nowani

and shot-putter won their events
also, but regular Gator winners
like Benny Vaughn in fire
half-mile, and Jim Stiles in the
javelin were edged by Seminoles.
They were really out to get
us," Welsch said. Benny
Vaughn just ran his heart out,
but got beat. What can you say?
They just whipped us. We knew
we would probably get beat in
foe 100 and the high hurdles,

Baseball team may finish in last place
* :

IMttl llmimmsi
... most consistent

IP IE l 1

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Exacuthra Sports EdHor
The curtain began to fall on
the real turf* at Florida Field
Saturday as the Gator football
team played the next to last
varsity game there before
AstroTurf is installed.
It was the annual Letterman*s
Day football game with the No.
1 offensive team recording a
32-20 victory -over the second
unit.
In the first half, with the first
unit working against the second
team defense (who wore white
while the offense was split in
orange and blue), John Reaves
led the orange to a 25-7 lead.
On the third play of the game,
Reaves passed 53 yards to
sophomore Joel Parker to set up
the first score of the game. Mike
Rich scored on the next play
from the three yard line.
Tommy Durrance climaxed a
53 yard drive late in the first
quarter when he scored on a
nine yard run. The touchdown
was set up after Reaves made
four first downs on successive
plays with the big one going 20
yards on a Durrance run.
The final score in the first
quarter came when junior Duane
Doel went 19 yards with 55
seconds remaining to up the
score to 18-0, orange. The point
after touchdown was missed all
three times.

but we did plan on getting first
and third in the pole vault.
Instead we only got first," he
continued.
Gator sprinter Roger Carson
won the 220 with a time of
21.8, but again two FSU men
took the other point-producing
places.
Other Florida placers included
Mike Larrison, second in the

By SIM SMITH
AlNpftor SporW Writ*
For the first time since 1961,
the Gator baseball team is
doomed to finish lower than
second place in the SECs
eastern conference. The
Tennessee Volunteers crushed
any Florida title hopes by
sweeping three games from the
Gators this past weekend.
Florida is not onlyoqj of the
championship hut the
very teal possibility exists that
the Gators may finish in last
place.
They must play the role of
spalm M* batle^ne
Vanderbilt at leaat once tba

Tommy Durrance
.. scores twice
Dunance scored again in the
second quarter on a two yard
plunge and Elwood Aust finally
made an extra point as the
orange secured a commanding
25-0 lead.
But sophomore Chan Gailey,
who has taken over the backup
quarterback slot from John
Schnebly, directed an attack
that produced the blue's first
score. It was the passing of
Gailey to Hank Foldberg and
Hollis Boardman that set up the
19 yard touchdown pass to
Foldberg with 1:01 remaining in
the half.
Gailey showed a lot of poise
out there/' head coach Doug
Dickey said, He is not making

shot; Ran Purdam, tie for
second in the long jump and
thud in the triple jump; Ron
Coleman, second in the long
jump and third in the triple
jump; and John Courtney,
secood in the discus.
Just a fraction of a second
here and there could have made
the difference," Welsch said,
but we just didn't get them.

coming weekend in Nasfavflfe,
lean., to avoid the cedar.
The two teams zipped 27 hits
in a slugging dual that saw the
Vols whip Florida 12-9 in die
first game erf the series. The lead
changed hands four times but
Tennessee wrapped it up with
four tuns in the sixth inning of
the seven inning game. Hard luck
Larry Sheffield took the loss.
I 2 *** tothe fifthMsfeicft
the second game. The Vols
bounced back with two
unearned runs fc the sixth and
held off the Gators to win, 3-2.
The final game of the series
ptoyed Saturday morning.

the bad plays and did put that
drive together before the half
was out." Gailey finished with
11 of 21 passes for 189 yards
while Reaves was 14 of 24 and
215 yards.
With 7:15 remaining in the
third quarter, Gailey again
brought the scoreboard to fife
when he teamed with Boardman
for a 37 yard touchdown pass as
the blue closed to 25-13.
After an exchange of a fumble
on the orange side and an
interception for the blue, Reaves
went back to work and put the
final points on the board for the
orange. On the first play of the
fourth quarter, Reaves hit Willie
Jackson for a 12 yard
touchdown pass.
Dickey didn't name an
outstanding player in the game
but did dte some players for
their performance.
Hitchcock (sophomore David)
made some big plays, Dickey
said, he was banging around
alot in there.
Duane Doel also played a
good game. He has been the
most consistent runner we have
had this spring, Dickey said.
The junior from Plantation
gained 58 yards on nine carries
and caught two passes for 19
yards.
Only the annual Orange and
Blue game next Saturday
remains for the Gators this
spring.
jM 1 K'x
' .JH I I l
I
Jwry Fomin
...comes up lame

£ tattotanil errifad!
Mb* Hedgecodt angled and
both moved op a hole oo a odd
pitch. Fhdacand on a ground
out by Hainan and Beteoock
._ ks Mn Sutton's :
Vol left fielder Rotor
McKinney pounded out four hits
on the day and one RBI dq|i
in
twaifinnsidn tktt aeuenth to tie
the score.
McKhmey doubled in another
run in the eighth and the Vols
scored another run on an error.
Tennessee added a solo run in
theidnth.



INTRAMURALS:
zn \ \ :
_.^j
The psueao-jocks answer to varsity sports

By LEE DEHMLOW
Alligator Sports Writer
It is hot. And humid.
Scattered about the dusty
field are a bunch of young merr
casually dressed in cutoffs and
sneakers. Many sport headbands
that keep long-flowing locks in
place. Hardly a coachs dream of
athletic competition. But
perhaps ijt is better sport than
what a high-priced coach can
produce.
They are playing softball.
Intramural softball, in 90 degree
Longshot
Canonero
wins Derby
By Alligator Services
Canonero, a horse given
absolutely no chance to win the
Kentucky Derby Saturday, ran
outside the crowded pack and
then swept out in front of them
to win $145,000 and the 97th
annual classic by three lengths.
Bracketed in a field of five
other longshots, Canonero went
off as an 8-1 betting shot. A bet
on the group was a bet on him.
The other horses finished 16th,
17th, 18th, 19th and 20th.
If he were to have been listed
separately in the parimutuel
wagering, the Caracas-bred
three-year-old would have
posted odds dose to 50*1.
A $2 wager on Canonero or
the other five horses returned
$19.40 to win, $8 to place and
$4.20 to show.
Favorite Jim French picked
up speed toward the finish to
place second and returned $6.20
and $4.40. Another longshot,
Bold Reason, finished third and
paid $12.60 to show.
A record $2,648,139 was bet
by the biggest crowd ever to see
the thoroughbred spectacular.
An additional $750,000 was
wagered by Derby patrons in
'lew York Citys five off-track
letting parlors.

1
%
m* 7 f k I|C /
|sisi*p3l
-

heat. Because they want to.
During fall it was football, last
winter there was basketball in
Florida Gym. They are the last
of the all-round athletes.
There is a constant chatter of
mostly obscene catcalls and
insults flying back and forth
between the teams. But it is all
in fun. No pressures by fans and
alumni to win, win, win, because
there are no fans and alumni,
nor is there a efficient sports
publicity department that grinds
out press releases touting the
teams and their stars.
Most athletic competition at
the UF takes 'place much like
this on weekday afternoons at
the ROTC parade grounds, or
the handball and tennis courts
next to Murphree. Varsity
athletics are for the real jocks.
Intramurals are for the
psuedo-jocks; dorm jocks, frat
jocks, independent jocks,
ex-high school jocks. Everyone
who wants to can play and
sooner or later almost everyone
does. Even Steve Uhlfelder.
Don Burroughs, who
quarterbacked the Crandell
section of Trusler Hall to the
dorm football finals, said, A
lot of the guys on the floor
played in high school and there
was like a gap when we came up

Netters Close Season

Brace Bartlett
... last home match

here. During football season it
was fun to watch the varsity, but
playing yourself is better.
Intramurals provided an
organized outlet for competing.
Corey Kinter, another dorm
team member, agrees. lts a lot
easier to go play because of
intramurals. Trying to find
enough guys to play a game of
basketball or football is hard,
and then playing with some sort
of mles makes it even harder,
he said.
The fraternities compete in
their own Orange and Blue
leagues for the Presidents Cup,
but they are more tightly bound
to begin with the honor of the
house is at stake. Independent
and dorm competition is not as
much that as it is just individuals
competing.
It wasnt so much for the
floor as it was to just satisfy a
desire to play, continued
Burroughs. That may be the
essence of intramurals.
America is a sports-minded
nation, full of frustrated
athletes. Everyone likes to play
and win and the intramural
program at UF provides a place
to do just that to demonstrate
ones athletic prowess.
After all, a home run is a
home run is a home run.

The Florida tennis team will
see its last action of the year in
the friendly confines of
Gainesville when they challenge
FSU this afternoon at 2:30 on
the varsity courts.
Only the SEC meet in Oxford,
Miss., remains for the Gators
after today's match.
For Bruce Bartlett, it will be
the final match of his career for
the Gators as the senior will have
used his eligibility.
Coach Bill Potter will
probably start Ray Heidema,
Bartlett, Rusty Addie, Kenn
Terry, Bing Nobles and Buddy
Miles in the singles.

oaro* wsoitMas
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Points, plugs, condenser, compression
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'.A- A .A A
REITZ UNION/9:00-3:00/3-6 MAY

Monday, May 3. 1971, Th. Florida Alligator.

Page 15



Page 16

, Tho Florida Alligator, Monday, May 3,1971

X - . .
Gator Great duel Thursday

Coaches Allen, Alvarez
say All-Stars will be set

By ED ANNONE
Alligator Correspondent
When the Intramural All-Stars
meet the Gator Greats Thursday
night, theyll be ready. At least
their coaches, Dr. Robert Allen
and Carlos Alvarez think so.
According to Allen, who
handles the defense, We have
been practicing since April 4 and
have our formations and plays
down pat. Our players have
confidence in themselves and
know they can win because the
All-Stars won 26-22 last year.
Last years team was
comprised almost entirely of
fraternity men but. this years
squad is made up of men from
the independent, fraternity and
dorm leagues. Tryouts, held
April 4, were open to everyone.
This years Gator Great squad
once again includes Steve
Spurrier, Richard Trapp, Larry
Rentz, Larry Smith and about
20 other former UF standouts.
Alvarez, an All- American
receiver as a sophomore two
seasons ago, feels that his players
are confident in their own
ability but are slighly
apprehensive about how they
will perform against pros.
Anybody would be a little
apprehensive : about going up
against professional athletes. I
know I would. But after the
game starts, theyll forget who
the other guys are and
concentrate on doing their
best.
This second annual game for
charity will be played May 6 at
Florida Field. Game time is 7:30
p.m. Co-sponsors for the game
are the UF Intramural
Department and the Student
Association for Health, Physical
Education and Recreation
(S.A.H.P.E.R.)
Admission is 50 cents and all
proceeds will go to Gator L6an
Fund, matched 9 to 1 by the
federal government.
According to game

declare ~
MOTH PROOF
NOW!
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Bring your winter garments in for our "lik-Nu" extra
careful cleaning and we wiH mothproof them at no ex extro
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Be sure all summer that next winter your clothes will
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Uk-Nu Jsgsr*
Ounini Smrvicm
DtCrtry or Cash and Carry
503 SW3rdSt. Ph. 372-4154

co-ordinator Gene Newman, A
turnout of S,OOO would add over
$22,000 to the fund.
The game itself will be
characterized by its no-contact
rule. In intramural (flag)
football, blocking and tackling
are illegal. A ballcarrier is down
when his flag is pulled by an
opponent. In this kind of game
there are virtually no running
plays. Therefore, a team must
rely on the accuracy of its
passer.
In last years contest, All-Star
quarterback Hank Salzler
connected on over 70 percent of
his passes, a remarkable statistic.
This years All-Star
quarterbacks, Hank Adorno and
Ray Kearney will be trying to
equal that showing. Their
primarty receivers will probably
be Ken Galloway, Mike Smith,
Steve Lomar, Tim Culbertson,
Bob Schach, and Arthur Alvarez
(thats right Carlos brother).
Coach Allen considers Arthur
a versatile and gifted ball player
and just a tremendous athlete.
The All-Stars defense will be
anchored by Mike Reeder,
Chuck Siler and Steve Sykes.
Coaches generally dont like
to make predictions, but
Alvarez, who is handling the
offense, said he thought it would
be a close game.
I cant predict the final
score; but since the game is for
charity, all the players on both
teams will do their best to make
a good show of it. Its for a
worthwhile cause and I know
the fans will enjoy themselves.
Tickets will be available on
campus beginning May 1 at the

Hub, Reitz Union, and the 13
dorm areas. They can aslso be
purchased throughout Gainesville
at over 15 locations including
J.M. Fields and the Gainesville
Mall. Tickets can also be
obtained at the stadium
Thursday.
I Jerry Jeff IS
Mr. Bo Jangles
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

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