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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 126

Tapering black withdrawal totals 117

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
The exodus of black students
from the UF campus seemed to
be tapering off Wednesday,
when only 19 more blacks
joined the 98 who already had
withdrawn.
According to figures from the
registrars office, a total of 117
blacks have withdrawn since the
Monday deadline set by the
Black Student Union (BSU) for
UF administrators to go along
with their demands.
According to Dean for
Student Development Frank
Adams, four of the Mack
students who have withdrawn
have asked to come back to UF.
Adams also indicated Tuesday
the number of students which
have gone through with
preliminary withdrawal
procedures had risen to 170.
Other figures for the registrar
office indicate IS whites have
withdrawn from UF. Some of
those, officials hinted, may have
done so in sympathy with the
BSU.
So far, only A.A. Chow,
professor of medicine, has
submitted his resignation from
UF. Tuesday afternoon Roy
Mitchell, director of
disadvantaged students, had

Request for black fraternity
withdrawn by president

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Staff Writer
According to Kip Smith,
former Student Government
secretary of minority affairs, the
request for an all black
fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi, has
been dropped.
*' "fee#
Kip Smith
.. application dropped

The
Florida Alligator

JBfo. M's -c
Dean Frank Adams
... four wish re-entry
presented his resignation.
While black students
continued to quietly withdraw
from UF, a delegation of Mack
international students presented
a resolution to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell which
backed the demands of the BSU.
They were joined by a
delegation of students from the
Department of Agricultural
Economics, who gave OConnell
a petition signed by 35 students
in their area which backed the
BSU demands.
Karl Watson, a student from
Barbados, acting as spokesman
for the international students,

Smith, who was acting
president of the fraternity,
stated the members were
supposed to go before a
presidential committee for
approval of colonization this
week. Because of the recent
withdrawal of black students
from UF, the request has been
dropped, Smith said.
According to Bill Gross,
assistant director of the Reitz
Union, the request for the
fraternity had been approved by
the Interfratemity Council (IFC)
and was given to the Committee
of Student Organization for final
approval.
A letter of recommendation
for approval was sent to the
committee by Dean of Student
Affairs Frank Adams Jr., Cross
said.
Cross stated the Committee of
Student Organization reports to
UF Vice President Lester Hale.
The committee temporarily
approved Kappa Alpha Psi as a
legal fraternity at UF, Cross

University of Florida, Gainesville

Four ask to return

said the group represented about
50 blacks from Africa and the
West Indies.
The letter presented to
OConnell said they deplored the
way the UF President acted in
the handling the BSU.
Your actions were unjust,
inmoral and indicative of racism,
which therefore contradicts the
very principles of academic
freedom upheld by institutions
of higher learning. These are
principles we enjoy in colleges
and universities in our own
countries, the resolution reads.
UF black international
students, the resolution
continues, will inform their
respective embassies of the
situation at UF and that until
the university ceases to exhibit
racism, we will discourage our
governments from sending other
students to UF and to cease all
international programs now
existing in this university.
Pauline Lawrence, a Mack
graduate student in entomology
from Jamaica, said some of the
Macks listed in the minority
report released by the UF
administration do not hold
teaching positions as it is
indicated there; and many of
them are not Mack Americans.
I think the university is

stated. As soon as Kip Smith or
one of the other members of the
fraternity picks up the
temporary approval from the
committee Kappa Alpha Psi
becomes legal.
Cross said that as far as he
knew the request was still in
committee and no official
withdrawal of that request had
been announced.

AFT continues Trgert picketing,
1
to hold press conference today

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) continued
picketing Wednesday in front of

trying to use the foreign blacks
to increase the number of total
black persons on the campus
when it is convenient for them
(the administration) to do so,
Miss Lawrence said.
She contends that when it is
convenient for the
administration to separate the
foreign-bom blacks from
American-born blacks, they do
so, too.

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TERRY WALTERS
Far out chess
What better way to spend a Sunday afternoon in Gainesville than
playing chess with someone in Phoenix, Arizona. That's just what the
Gator Amateur Radio Club did last Sunday and they won. Members
pictured are, front to back, Sam McCluney, Al Holt, Phil Schwartz
and Arne Roostna. Some of the clubs other electronic talents are
described on page 6.

Tigert in support of black
student demands.
Ken Megill, philosophy
professor and vice president of
the AFT, said the AFT would
make a day-to-day decision as to

Thursday, April 29, 1971

If they are going to separate
us (foreign and American
blacks), separate us under all
situations; and if they are going
to put us together, put us
together under all situations.
OConnell accepted both
petitions and answered questions
from the delegations. He gave
the students a copy of the
November 1970 report on
Minority Affairs.

whether they would continue
picketing.
About IS to 20 AFT
(See 'AFT page 4)



!, The Florida Allifetor, Thursday. April 29.1971,

Page 2

Former Supreme Court judge to speak

ijfl
Justice Tom Clark
... appearing Monday

I i
I 1
I Veterans (or Peace |
| I
| to sponsor noon rally |
| 1
i 1
jjjj There will be a rally held in the Plaza of the :$
Americas today at noon for all concerned students. $,
| Speakers will include black students who have j§
x withdrawn from UF.
Si The rally is sponsored by the Veterans for Peace.

Architecture, fine arts students
to hold crafts sale and concert

By JIM SEALE
Alligator Writer
In conjunction with the
opening of the College of
Architectures Faculty Show
Sunday, **A Day of Sunshine
and Happiness will be
presented .by students of
architecture and fine arts
Sunday from 2-5 p.m. in the
plaza of the Architectural
complex.
The program features an arts

/THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is th official student newspaper of
/ University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during \
f June, July and August when Its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not cohsider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
\ several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next B
insertion. J

By JIM SEALE
Alligator Writer
Former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Tom Clark will return to
the University of Florida
Monday as Distinguished
Professor in the College of Law.
Sponsored by the college and
the Alumni Association, Justice
Clark was on campus for three
weeks in February to conduct
seminars and share his
experiences with law students.
During this three-day visit he
will conduct Law in the
Courts* seminars and speak
before a community luncheon
Tuesday.
Clark will address a noon

and crafts sale and the RGF rock
group starting at 3:30 p.m.
The student produced
activities are being coordinated
through the efforts of Ed Bondi
and John Glidden and are ope n
to everyone.
Anyone wishing to sell a work
of his own may enter it in the
arts and crafts side.
Were doing this to try to
expose the campus to some of

meeting sponsored by the
Exchange, Kiwanis, Lions and
Rotary clubs. The public is
invited to attend.
During the evening of May 4
from 8 to 10 p.m., Justice Clark
will sit in on Moot Court oral
arguments in the Law Centep
courtroom, Room 283.
Clarks broad legal experience
has taken him from assistant
U.S. attorney general in charge
of the criminal division

400 in county fed by
food stamp program

By STEVE PARSONS
Alligator Correspondent
and
CAROL BRADY
Alligator Staff Writar
About 400 students in the
Alachua County area are
currently participating in the
federal food stamp program.
Actually, that isnt such a
large number of students
considering the size of the
schools concerned, Blanche
Miller, Alachua County worker
in charge of food stamp
issuance, said.
Students from UF and Santa

the ideas of the Department of
Architecture and its faculty,
said Peter Blitstein, one of the
coordinators of the faculty
exhibit which the students of
the department are also
producing.
Among the faculty works to
be shown will be exhibits by Dr.
Leonard Ricci, the renowned
architect and architectural
faculty member.
The show is free and will run
for four weeks.

PATCHES tW, POSTERS I
75< y 4v\ / f. f from sl 25
G9ro* OSOUNDS
376-3471 1131 West University Ave. 376-3471
See Our Black Lite and Poster Room
B!ack Utes $14.95 Strobe Lite special $24.95
| Most Diamond Needles $4.79 (Ilf, tin,. auoronf) I

(1943-49) and finally to the high
court in 1949.
Clark retired as Supreme
Court associate justice in 1967
when his son, Ramsey, was
appointed attorney general. He
now devotes his time chiefly to
trial work in the federal district
courts.
Formally educated at the
University of Texas where he
received his LL.B. degree in

Fe Junior College are involved in
the program.
Food stamps are designed to
aid low income families.
Qualified recipients purchase a
set number of stamps which are
redeemable for a greater food
value at participating markets.
Eligibility for food stamps is
determined through the
verification of a qualification list
by a county worker.
Income of household
members and deductions
determine the amount of aid
given.
Deductions indude tuition,
books, medical expenses, rent
and child care. Parental aid is
also considered.
The county food stamp office
pro-rates the school period or
semester for students. Non
students are pro-rated on a
monthly basis.
A new regulation which will
probably be down m writing by
September, according to Mrs.
Miller, defines a household as u a
group of related persons living
together.
This means that groups of
students living communally are
unable to qualify unless each
student is eligible.
If each student is eligible for
the program, we can certify one
member for the group, Mrs.
Miller said.

1922, Clark holds honorary
degrees from numerous
universities including
Northwestern, Ohio Wesleyan,
Suffolk, St. Johns and Boston!
The Distinguished Visiting
Professor program is designed to
add to the students academic
experience and to provide him
with commentary from scholars
in his field. Clark is the
programs first appointee.

A set amount of stamps are
given to each family but the
price a family pays for the
stamps varies according to their
income and needs.
First their net income with
deductions is determined and
compared to income charts,
Mrs. Miller said.
The lowest amount a family
can pay for food stamps is SO
cents. These participants have an
annual income between SO-99.
The most a family can pay is
$lB. In both cases recipients
receive S2B in food value, Mrs.
Miller explained.
Stamps are redeemable for all
food items excluding alcoholic
beverages, imported foods and
tobacco products.
Signs are posted in the
windows of participating food
stores.
Almost every market in the
area accepts the stamps, Mrs.
Mfflersaid.
Students who feel they are
eligible for the program should
register at the food stamp office,
1105 W. University Ave.
A worker will then visit the
student as soon as possible to
verify his eligibility, Mrs. Miller
said.



Middlebrooks to open job applications

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Staff Writer
Don Middlebrooks, student
body president-elect, will be
taking applications for Student
Government positions next
week, Monday-Friday from 1
pm until 5 p.m. everyday.
Everyone who applies will be
contacted, Middlebrooks said.
There is an opportunity to

UF to landscape Towers 9
dirt parking lot this summer

By DARRELL HARTMAN
Alligator Writer
Towers residents will have
grass* and trees replacing the dirt
lot in front of their living area
next fall. But when the dirt goes,
so does the parking lot.
The dirt parking lot in front
of Tower B, on Museum Road,
designed to hold SO cars, but
which has been known to
contain twice that number, will
planted over this summer with
the grass and trees originally
planned for the area, according
to F. Lee Burrows, traffic and
parking coordinator.
The dirt parking lot was
approved by the Parking and
Transportation Committee as a
temporary lot because of the
immediate need of additional
parking spaces, said Burrows.
Starting September there
will be 188 parking spaces for

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Out of a twelve year university research full-range speakers, when properly equal- I
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work in SG for anyone who is
interested and willing.
Middlebrooks said many
positions ? need to be filled.
Students are needed not only to
serve as secretaries of the
cabinet, division directors,
under-secretaries but also to
serve on committees. We are
undergoing the entire
replacement of university

the 800 Tower residents in the
lot behind Towers if the present
landscaping plans are
implemented, said Burrows.
Burrows said juniors in
Towers currently can use the
Yulee and Jennings parking lots.
The Yulee lot is pretty full
right now, said Burrows, but
the Jennings lot is not being
fully utilized.
Burrows said the heart of the
Towers parking problem is that
most Towers residents are
juniors, seniors, or graduate
students and are all eligible to
have cars. In the Murphree lots,
we have many more spaces than
cars, said Burrows. This is
because most of the people
living there are freshmen and
sophomores.
Burrows said he thinks the

committees, Middlebrooks said.
Interested students are asked
to fill out applications giving
data on their overall academic
average, areas and positions in
SG of interest, previous
experience in SG, experience
outside of SG or other
organizations and a schedule of
the current classes the applicant
is enrolled in.

only alternative to the inevitable
crush of cars at Towers in the
fall is to make some as
well as juniors, park in the
Jennings lot.
William Jones, associate
director of the department of
physical planning, said the
original plan for the Towers was
to have some greenery in front
of them. He said the Towers
residents are just going to have
to find somewhere else to park.
Theres simply not enough land
for a parking space for
everybody.
Francis Digiovanni,
president of Towers, said many
students are upset over the
reduction of parking spaces. He
said he would try to stop the
landscaping of the temporary
dirt lot.

According to the recently
approved amendment to Article
VII, each secretary and director
of the cabinet shall be appointed
by the president of the student
body with the approval of a
majority vote of the student

(By the author of Ratty Round It* Flay, 80y*... Pohir Cil!i* ... dr.)
The Preening of America
Recent polls taken on American campuses by Time and News Newsweek
week Newsweek have revealed unexpected, and most welcome, results. Both mag magazines
azines magazines found that todays undergraduates, far from boiling with revo revolutionary
lutionary revolutionary fervor, are just as torpid as everyone else.
Joyous tidings, of course, but I must say that I was never worried.
Sure, life-styles are a little different on campus these days; neverthe nevertheless,
less, nevertheless, Ive always felt that down deep this generation clings to the same
solid values that sustained all their predecessors.
In my own college days, for example, the most popular aid to socia sociability
bility sociability on campus was precisely what it is today: Miller High Life Beer.
And, mind you, my college days were a good long time ago. I got my
B.A. way back in 1908. (My alma mater, incidentally, was a school
Im sure you all knowthe Wyoming College of Belles Lettres and
Commercial Baking, from whence, as you are undoubtedly aware,
came a veritable host of graduates who later achieved stardom in the
breadstuffs gamemen like Darrell J. Inskip who invented rye bread
with caraway seeds; Irving T. Whitsun who invented the toothpick,
thus making it possible to eat rye bread with caraway seeds; Sol Bagel
who invented the permanent doughnut which bears his name; and
many, many others. Indeed, the list would be far longer if the college
had stayed in business but, alas, it was killed by mold in 1921.)
But I digress. Even in 1908,1 say, Miller High Life was a campus
favorite. In fact, it was popular even before 1908, for Miller has been
delivering flavor to discriminating Americans for over 115 years! And
today it is more widely appreciated than ever! And why wouldnt it
be? In 115 years no other brewer has ever duplicated Millers flavor.
Oh, they've tried to copy Miller, you can bet, but a fat lot of good it
did them. Since the very beginning Millers superb brewing formula
has been one of the best kept secrets on earth. It has never been known
to more than one manMillers chief brewmasterand he has always
been kept inside a hollow mountain in downtown Milwaukee.
But I digress. The polls, I say, have proved that todays college
student, though he dresses in a homespun robe and wears chicken
bones in his ears, cherishes the same dreams and drives that students
have always held dear.
To illustrate, I recently visited a student commune at a prominent
Southern university (Michigan State). Now, Ill admit it didnt look
much like one of your old-fashioned fraternity or sorority houses. First
of all, there was no house. Everyone slept in trees, except for one girl
who made a hammock out of a discarded bra. In the second place,
meals were not served; they were trapped. And in the third place, the
kids didnt talk about the usual things like life, sex, truth and beauty.
In fact, they didnt talk. They just sang "Om, holding the note till
they hyperventilated and toppled over in a faint.
But appearances are only appearances, as I discovered when I
started to interview these people.
What are you studying? I asked one yoiing man.
My navel, he said, and I was vastly reassured, for we all know
the crying need for new doctors.
What do you want to be when you finish school? I asked
another young man.
A druid, he said, and again I was reassured, for as anyone on
Wall Street can tell you, forest ecology is the coming thing.
Do you believe in womens liberation? I asked a girl.
No, was the answer.
Why not? I asked.
Im a boy, was the answer. 1 %
And so it went. And so I say to you again: worry not. Take away
the beards, the beads, and the buckskin, and youve got the same lov lovable
able lovable freckle-faced achievers you always had, only naked.
} * *N v . V
We at Miller High Life are brewers, not social scientists, but this
much ue know: whatever may be changing in this country, it certainly is
not taste buds. We will continue, therefore, to bring you the same delicious
Miller High Life. If youve got the lime, weve got the beer.

Thursday, April 29, T 971, The Florida Alligator,

senate present and voting at a
regular meeting.
All secretaries must be
enrolled as full-time students for
the duration of their term:
failure to do so will result in
automatic resignation.

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

R.A.s petition in favor of blacks

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Alpha Omega, a UF service
fraternity made up of resident
advisors (RA), is circulating a
petition among their members
calling on UF blacks and
administrators to reopen
channels of communications*
between each other.
In a letter to President
Stephen C. OConnell, Alpha
Omega charged the walkout of
black students and the pain
these students are suffering will
leave UF with a legacy of pain
and frustration.
The letter stated further that

UF engineering students repair equipment
for exceptional Sunland Center children

Theres a little more music
and brightness in the lives of
exceptional children at the
Sunland Training Center in
Gainesville now, thanks to the
efforts of UF engineering
students.
These students have initiated
a project to collect, repair and
no cost.
The idea was developed by

AFT...

members picketed yesterday
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Megill said Len Lewis,
director of the civil rights
division of the AFT, will hold a
press conference today at 9:30
a.m. with Norman Maikel,
president of the AFT at UF, and
Roy Mitchell, former
coordinator for disadvantaged
students and minority affairs.
The conference will be held at

£j PIZZA HUT
Smorgasbord
Thursday April 29th
5 P.M.-8 P.M.
All the pizza you can eat $1.25
I GOOD ONLY AT PIZZA HUT ON SOUTH 13th St]

Macks find themselves in an
untenable situation: not wanting
to leave because of what it will
mean to them personally, being
unable to live with themselves in
good conscience should they
stay.
The idea for the letter
which was attached with a
signature sheet was originated
by Debra Kiddy, 2UC, a Hume
RA. and was written by Ray
Holbrook, 7ED, a Murphree
Area Resident Advisor. It was
first presented at an Alpha
Omega meeting Tuesday night.
We hope something can be
done in the remainder of the

Ken Sanders and Val Shires and
was taken up by fellow members
of the Society of Engineering
Sciences.
The engineering students sent
out word for donations in any
state of repair, electronics
students fixed them and the first
JipHi warn made in January.
- 4
Shoe then Mm cantor has
received five TVs, three stereos,

the Presbyterian Student Center
and will be concerned with the
action to be taken by the AFT
concerning Mediation with
interested parties. Megill did
not elaborate on who the
interested parties are.
The conference will also be
concerned with a civil rights
investigation of UF to be
conducted by the AFT.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said Tuesday, The
AFT is not recognized in any
way as the official bargaining
agent of personnel and has no
right to conduct any

quarter to alleviate the situation
of the students involved,
Holbrook said on Wednesday,
We dont condemn one side or
the other, but we recognize the
personal problems these
individuals (the black students)
are encountering.
We felt,* continued
Holbrook, that, as RA.S, we
have an obligation to speak on
behalf of the personnel on this
campus.
Alpha Omega was founded by
Charlie Heekin, 4 AS, of
Murphree Area, last year and has
existed as an informal service
organization since that time.

three transistor radios, 40 record
albums, an organ, and a
shipment of costume jewelry.
Besides the cost for the truck
rental, the project has cost the
engineers less than $5 for parts.
Student Government has
promised $620 for future
equipment and transportation
involved, Shires said. The

investigation on campus.
OConnell also refused an
offer by the AFT to arrange for
mediation by the American
Arbitration Association which is
not an AFT agency, according to
Megill.
Megill said mediation is a
good way to solve this problem
and mediation is the usual way
of settling problems by labor
and on other campuses.
Megill said the withdrawal of
black students is a particular
blow to every faculty member
since it changes the working
conditions on campus.

This year the R.A.s have
submitted their constitution and
a list of officers to the student
senate in hopes of achieving
recognition.
According to Holbrook, the
purpose of the service fraternity
is to improve the living
conditions of dormitory
residents and to share ideas and
activities among the different
campus residence areas.
Concerning the letter, Heekin
said: We feel the individual
student was being ignored and
Alpha Omega exists for the
purpose of bettering the lives of
the students. Both OConnell

engineering mind and skills
should be applied to social
problems such as this one. Often
we stay clear of controversial
issues. We feel this project has a
definite worth.
Recipients urged
- -#? ''
TO WWW 501 W|V
The confidential drug survey
sponsored by the Comer Drug
Store and Student Government
has been sent out and it is
necessary that the responses be
returned as soon as possible.
There are no numbers or
identification asked for on the
survey, Joel Lipman, a
spokesman for Corner Drug
Store, said. It is important we
get as many responses as possible
in order to get a valid survey.
If the return envelope has
been lost, it may be returned to
the Corner Durg Store with the
word survey marked on the
outside.

and the Black Student Union are
ignoring the crises these students
are going through.
The solution, according to the
letter, is a concentrated effort
on the part of all concerned to
seek understanding of the
problems *the other guy* faces.
Holbrook said that 10 out of
17 Murphree RAs had signed as
of Wednesday afternoon.
GAME
1 AT THE RAT
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DECORATING FABRICS PASHION FABRICS NOTIONS '9HR the nation's sewing basket

Thursday, April 29, 1971. The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29,

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligrtor Staff Writer
Two members of the Gator
Amateur Radio Club (GARC)
spent last Sunday afternoon
playing chess over the air waves
with ham radio operators in
Phoenix, Arizona.
Phil Schwartz and Buz Holt,
both sophomores operating the
GARC ham radio station, under
the direction of Sam McCluney,
a licensed ham radio operator,
were making one of their first
contacts on the school rig and
ended up playing a cross-country
chess game.
According to Holt, the game
was played in .regular chess
notation which is used in
correspondence and
communication games.
It took us two hours to
complete the game and 57
moves to checkmate, Holt said.
We won the chess game,
Schwartz commented, but I
think we had an unfair
advantage since our competitors
informed us they had had very
little experience with chess.
Holt said the operators
enjoyed the chess game so much
they agreed to meet every
Sunday at 2 p.m. over the air
waves to compete.
Ham operators from all over

Mysterious oil leak
gets duckling in its path

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Leaking oil fronr an unknown
source has spilled into a creek
leading into Lake Alice and has
caught at least one duckling in
it*s sticky path.
Harold Rhoads (7EG) spotted
the oil and duckling in the
Ravine Park, between Reitz
Union and Graham Area, Friday
afternoon.
The oil soaked animal tat
wadding from the park toward
Museum Road when Rhoads
shooed it back toward the
ravine.
I noticed all this garbage on
him,** Rhoads said. I could see
this oil slime floating in the
water. 1 think it was black fuel
oil. That was my first
impression.**
Rhoads contacted Ray
Bunton of Enviommental
Action Group (EAG), who
called th*: campus Plants &

J
13*B-Qte +ftea Uwod jtetJOqy
4 s:l* W7I
SL i "* *r
; at _HArn - ~Vs m fr*
S CdfAge amdDomuts
ICe fteeim wsi-su. l ; oo-b:ao ft*
W mao ftijl 1:00 wm,

Hams play chess over the air

the country were tuning to our
band Sunday and helping the
Phoenix operators with their
chess moves, Schwartz said.
We are hoping to form a
network band with the help of
the Phoenix operators to carry
chess games from Miami to
Phoenix.
This would enable more
stations to correspond and make
chess moves, perhaps forming
teams, Schwartz said.
Schwartz also said he would
like the chess network to turn
into an international operation.
The GARC station is located
in room 525 of Weil Hall where
all contacts are made and
meetings are held. The GARC is
open to anyone but the
operation of the ham radio set
must be made under the
assistance of a licensed operator.
Anyone interested in joining the
club should contact either Ray
Mouynes, president, or Professor
AT). Sutherland, trustee.
Many students dont know
that members of the GARC will
send messages anywhere in the
Western Hemisphere free of
charge, Schwartz said.
If a student wishes to send a
greeting to someone in
California we contact a ham
radio operator in the vicinity
and then he places a local

Grounds Dept, to inform them
of the situation.
According to Bunton, the
Plants & Grounds Dept, was not
aware of the oil and said they
would check into it.
In the meantime, Rhoads
took his new pet to the
Mechanical Engineering building
where several students helped
him clean it with a mild
detergent.
Another student, Steve Long,
searched nearby ponds and
Hume Lake to see if there were
any other gucked up ducks. He
didn't find any.
Rhoads duckling, after two
days of recovering his natural
oils which the washings
removed, was put in Union
pond.
Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Billie
Byron, secretary to Calvin
Greene, Director & Campus
Engineer in the Physical Plant
division, said, Our man in
grounds is checking up on it. It
(an oil leak) has happened
before. By the time we can

lb'/ I IBBt J§'
MBPS/.'? I aaygv?.-.-
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Sam McCluney TERRY WALTERS
... plays chess via short wave radio

telephone call and relays the
message.
Schwartz said this procedure
can also be done through
telephone hookups. We can
hook up a students telephone
on campus to the radio set,
contact an operator in South
America, have him hook up the
desired partys phone for a

check it, it stops and we haven't
been able to determine the
source.**
I believe the source of it is
the big tank behind mechanical
engineering,** Rhoads contends.
Somehow oil just leaks out of
that tank. I*m not even sure the
tank is being used. If it isnt
being used it should be emptied
and not be a problem to the
campus."
The tank Rhoads speaks of is
located between the Nuclear
Sciences and Metallurgical &
Materials buildings. A survey of
the area shows the tank to be
located in a depression with
thick dark oil on the ground
outside the base.
EAG is asking anyone with
information about other oiled
ducks found on campus to call
392-1635.
GAME
AT THE RAT

person to person conversation
without the cost of a long
distance phone call. This has
worked for a number of South
American students.

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Students interested in sending
messages should call the GARC
at 392-0997. According to
Schwartz the messages should be
short and precise.



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Thursday, April 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

Editorial
We need you
The black students are withdrawing.
So what else is new, right? Its getting to be old hat.
Os course it was a shock at first, but now we just seem to
be taking it in our stride.
"Whats the latest figure? we hear screamed across a
classroom.
Its almost become a game. Everyone is keeping score.
Somehow the whole point has been lost.
And that is what bothers us. We are afraid these black
students will withdraw and they will be forgotten.
They, and the lesson they are trying to teach us.
We hope that doesnt happen. This whole incident, from
that seemingly long ago Thursday morning, has been a
disaster. But we cannot even describe the magnitude of the
tragedy if the gesture and sacrifice these people are making,
comes to naught.
It doesnt have to be that way.
We try to understand the feeling of futility which the
black students must be experiencing.
We try to understand the feeling that if they are not
wanted here, they will go elsewhere.
We try to understand the feeling that they have been
better things to do than help the white by changing his
univeristy.
We try to understand, but we do not agree.
We hope those students who have not yet withdrawn will
reconsider. We need you here.
And we want to make you welcome. A Student
Government petition is being circulated, according to
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelfer, to "show the
blacks we care.
We do. But most of us have been raised in the South. We
really cant completely understand the problems of the
black student.
It will take your understanding, and your help.
If you leave now, the great majority of us will remain. We
will not have black friends in college, and problably not
have them later either.
And then neither will our children. They too will grow up
like us, not understanding the problems of the black man.
And the problem will continue into the next generation.
Sure, it isnt just your problem. It isnt a black problem
either.
It is going to take understanding on both sides and we
only gain understanding through working together.
We cant do that if you leave.
M/ iHB I
tti 1 1
Ton re hurting our morale

The
Florida
Alligator

! j /NOrODYS
Either change with time
or withdraw from society

By Rawn Stafford
Are you satisfied? The black
students are now withdrawing
from this institution. You are
probably still tired from the big
celebration Monday over things
like AAUP censure, denial of an
attorney to the student body,
Bob. Canney, things of the past
like Marshall Jones, Lee
Lambom and to top it all off
with the withdrawal of the black
students from this university.
You should be noticed for
your great* achievements here
at the university.
There is certainly no doubt in
my mind as well as others that
you are incompetent as an
educator better yet as president
(in your case Fuhrer) of this
university. This is justified by
the report issued by RESIGN!
and by my experience here as a
student.
One thing that strikes me of
particular interest is what
perpetuates you to remain
president of this university. You

' Alligator Staff
Marian Jedrusiak Stave Strang
Assignments Editor Wire Editor
Copy Editors Gary PaskabDebbi Smith*Vickie Rich-Linda Miklowitz
Published by studants of tha University of Florida under the
auspices of tha Board of Student Publications.
Editorial Busbtaas, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suit*
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1688,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
V of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Phyllis Gailub
Editor-In-Chief

Gary Grunder
News Editor

certainly have not proven
yourself as a competent
educator in the four years you
have been here. (I think that is
more than adequate time to
prove otherwise.)
Do you only wish to use the
office of president as a stepping
stone or as some type of status
that you must constantly
worship at the sacrifice of the
rights of the students whether
they are black white, or
whatever, whether they agree
with your policies (if any) or
not?
This university, or any
educational institution, is no
place for racist establishment
political pawns, megalomaniacs
or for the purpose of being used
as a reward by politicians to
certain people who are
unqualified as educators (better

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor

BLACK VOICES

yet as president of a large
university).
Your philosophy of higher
education, academic freedom
and relationships to students (if
any) are passe. They cannot and
will not hold ground in 1971 or
any time in the future.
If you (President Stephen
Cornelius O'Connell) cannot
admit to yourself that this
university is going to fall apart
because of your "pride" and
that your philosophy is in dire
need of change, then I
recommend that you remove
yourself from society. Society
had no need for primitive people
which inhibit its growth. There
must be change in order for
society to exist. You cannot
stagnate society, you either
change with it or withdraw from
it.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business
and Promotion Offices, Call:
392-1681,82,83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman *.
Business Manager
T. E. "Kent" Dwyer
Advertising Manager
Jeanne Orfinik
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation
Department, call: 392-1609 -J



Country club
Editor:
To President OC.onnell
The events of last week raised
an important issue beyond those
of arrests and violent
demonstrations. I refer
specifically to an article in the
St. Petersburg Times of April 17,
written by Dudley Clendinen. It
stated that you are still a
member of the rigidly segregated
Gainesville Golf and Country
Club. Your response to charges
that such membership made you
a racist was, in the social sense
- I dont think thats
reasonable. But people get
uptight about that, too, and
they try to control your life.
I cannot accept this response.
A man in your position
represents the university at all
times. If your reasoning is
carried to its logical conclusion
it would be permissible for you
to join the Ku Klux Klan (in the
social sense of course.)
Everything you do cannot help
but reflect on the university.
The implications of you, or any
other member of the
administration, belonging to a
segregated club are obvious. One
must wonder how the private,
social man can be separated

By KIP SMITH
Throughout this entire
incident, many names have been
called, and the finger of guilt has
been pointed in every possible
direction, but,at this moment,
that is not important.
What is important, is that the
black students are withdrawing
from this university. Just stop
and think about what that
means. I'm not really sure that
everyone here understands the
implications.
But before we get into that, it
is essential that we dear up a
few misconceptions.
First of all,.the president of
this university has publidy
stated that he has made
concessions and that he has
attempted to compromise with
the black students. But what he
did, in reality, was to try to
co-opt a movement.
The concessions the
president offered us were
nominal, the barest minimum.
They were not acceptable,
because the demands, as
presented, were already bare
minimums.
On the issue of amnesty, the
president still has not made a
statement to the county
solititors office, but rather, had
Dean Juhn (of the Law School)
to do this for him.
But still, the students will
have to appear in court and
could still face charges. Is this a
concession?
Any time this university
wants something, it gets it.
We've got three brand new
buildings: Music, Graduate &
International Studies, and the
museum. We're getting
Astro-turf and a $5 million
addition to the Health Center.
All we asked for was that the
president make every effort to

READERS FORUM

Can you really understand it?

from the public man. If you
privately condone segregation
how can you avoid carrying this
over into a tacit university
policy?
I think it proper that you be
asked to take a stand against
segregation by resigning your
membership in segregated
organizations. The same holds
true for any other administrator
in a similar position. This article
of faith would help dispel the
doubts about your past on the
Florida Supreme Court and
show that the University of
Floridas administration
practices racial equality in fact
as well as theory. Let us not be
subjected further to your
attitude of do as I say not as I
do.
I anxiously await your reply.
Richard Liss 3ED
Cultural lag
. &
Editor:
We all know that what has
occurred on the UF campus this
past week has clearly
demonstrated that this
institution is racist. (Was there
really any doubt in your mind

see that the Critical Year
Freshman Program is expanded
and continued. He replied that
funds were not available to
expand the program, and that he
could not guarantee it's
continuance. Is THAT a
concession?
We ask that the office of Vice
President for Minority Affairs be
created. No, said the
president. The needs of blacks
students are no different than
those of white students. We
asked then, that the present
minority affairs office be
elevated and funded in order
that it may function as it was
intended. And that it's head be
given at least the autonomy of a
dean, or even a separate
directorship. Again, no.
And the most ridiculous thing
about that entire issue is that the
president cannot even create this
position. He can only
recommend this to the Board of
Regents. His own Minority
Affairs Council, chaired by
Executive Vice President Sisler
recommended this addition and
yet the president said that his
office could not create this
position, and if he could, he
wouldn't. He would however
consider appointing a black
person as Assistant Dean for
Student Development.
lied down with bureaucracy,
and far too low on the scale of
hierarchy, the position will be
meaningless and ineffective. Is
that too a concession?
The person we wanted in
Academic Affairs has supposedly
been hired. But even if this is
true, its like adding insult to
injury. Dr. Thomas Cole is now
president of the largest black
college in Texas and wi be
brought here as an Assistant
Dean.
The president has, in fact,

before this?) It couldnt be more
clear if OConnell stood before
us every morning carrying a
Confederate flag and led us in
the singing of Dixie.
Can it be that this institution
is an example of the term we all
learned in American Institutions
Cultural Lag? Os course it
is. JEverytime we step onto this
campus we are taking a step into
the past. This university would
have no black problems if it
were 1871, but come on, man!
This is 1971! Its unbelievable.
How Stephen C. OConnell can
still walk with his head held up
is beyond me! Who do he, and
all his regent buddies think
theyre fooling when they try to
tell us that there is no black
problem on this campus?
Well, hell really be fooled
when all the blacks resign.
Doesnt it make you sick that
our brothers and sisters are being
forced to take such an action?
Education is a right of the
People and when the blacks
rights are being taken away then
everyones rights are. When the
blacks walk out of this
university everyone with any
pride or conscience should be
right behind them.
Patti Street

given very little, if anything.
We're not asking for the
world. Just enough to make our
lives here more pleasant, get the
most out of our educational
experiences and to share the
benefits of our culture with the
rest of the university
community.
We were looking for a show of
good faith and honest
commitments from the man who
controls our university. But
what we got was the same old
liberal lies: these things take
time; were doing the best we
can. And then: I will make no
commitments, and I will put
nothing in writing.
This is disheartening,
disillusioning and downright
disgusting. The president of our
university does not care about
us.
What then does he care
about? The president of this
university is and always will be a
politician. Every action he takes
here will reflect upon his
political image and that, above
all is his major concern.
The president is playing
political games with our lives,
our education, and our
- university. And we dont like it
We tried to come to some kind
of an agreement with them, but

Success!

all efforts have been fruitless.
And so we leave.
Some say we're giving up the
fight, that we should stay here
and try to correct the situation.
But we don't have time for
that. We have more to do with
ourselves and for ourselves than
to stay here and battle it out
with a racist old politician who
wont listen to reason.
Special circumstances will
force some black students to
remain here until the end of this
quarter. And there will probably
be a few black students who
want to stay. But they have our
sympathies.
When we have all gone, and
our supporters have left, you
who remain here shall live in
shame. You'll have nothing left
but a campus full of apathetic
students, red-necks and
right-wing extremists.
From the mail we have
received, and the phone calls,
this is just what many people in
this state are looking forward to.
Included among those are
your govenor, your Board of
Regents, and legislature.
We can't fight the entire
state's political machine. We'd
rather give our talents and tax
dollars to more sincere and
receptive environments.
Neither this university, nor
the state of Florida itself means
as much to us as our own lives
and the right to make some
decisions concerning our
destiny.
You can have your university.
We are presently finding places
for our people from all over the
country who sympathize and
support us. It's a small sacrifice
to drop out of school for the
opportunity to be yourself.
We will to stand at
a distance and watch UF revert
A

Thursday, April 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

back to the pre-segregation era
and crumble in the hands of
greedy, political-minded, racist
supporters and administrators.
A sad future indeed lies ahead
for you white students who
remain here. You will be caught
in the narrow-mindedness that
ruined your parents.
And for the black students
who choose to stay, you'll find
that the people who were sincere
in helping you have gone and
those who remain will be waiting
for the chance to call you
"nigger." You will have a hard
time. But whenever you wake
up, please come join us.
We leave this place with many
memories, but no regrets. We
sincerely feel that this is not the
place for decent folk to be. Our
lives are at stake and we cannot
be compromised out of our
identities.
And may President Stephen
C. O'Connell be awarded the
"Gator Great" Award for
delivering UF back into the
hands of his people.
In the meantime farewell, we
have some business to take care
of.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double 300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer dtows Just ceuse. The
editor reserve* the right to edit ell
letters for speee.
Any writer inte tested In
submitting a regular column ie
prepared to show samples of his
work. WHtets may pubmit long*
teseys, columns or lettew ie he §
-J

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29,1971

Gator Ray: the soul of UF athletics

By DELENE LOUGHRAN
Alligator Correspondent
Astrology buffs know a
capricorn is conservative, strong
willed and tactful, the makings
of a natural executive.
It should come as no surprise,
then, that Ray Graves UF
director of intercollegiate
athletics is a capricorn.
Graves, for ten years coach of
the Gator football team, said his
job as director of intercollegiate
athletics is diverse.
This job is 50 per cent
administrative and the remainder
is public relations, Graves said.
The public relations end of his
job, Graves said, includes
promoting athletics to all
segments of the university scene,
students, faculty and alumni, as
well as a relationship with the
student athletes who represent
the program here.
Graves dresses to fit to his job
not in a blue blazer and
orange shirt, but stylishly and
yet conservatively. He would
have been welcome in any office
in his silver gray jacket, charcoal
gray pants, and French blue
shirt.
The brown-eyed, silver-haired
former coach sees collegiate
athletics as a three-pronged
venture, combining
entertainment, a rallying point
and away to promote the
university.
Graves leaned forward, and
spoke enthusiastically. For
Mr*

RAPPS
DELICATESSEN
1515 SW 13th St
Delivery>373-3377
(From 4:00 Mon- Sot, Sunday
from noon on)
Pitcher of Beer
with purchase of or Coke
medium or large pizza
on premises only AA
J 99<:

students, sports provides
entertainment and a chance to
show support for UF through
spirit, soul and activity; for
alumni, athletics are a common
rallying point. Intercollegiate
sports also promote the
university itself through the
competition and publicity.
Graves played football for
three years at the University of
Tennessee, and still retains a
trim athletic figure. He was team
captain his senior year.
Besides playing football and
basketball for Tennessee, he
earned an AB degree.
Graves speculated that if he
had a son, he would encourage
him to play football at UF.
I would encourage him now,
I definitely would, if I'd still
been coaching, although, 1 might
have had reservations, Graves
said.
Graves three daughters all
attend UF. All my boys are
girls, he chuckled.
Graves paused to light his
Antonio and Cleopatra cigar,
then laughed again when asked
about his feelings on the
womens liberation movement.
With my background -a wife
and three daughters IVe been
aware of this movement for a
long time, he said.
Im for it. I think the women
have a point. In many areas,
even in athletics, they have been
discriminated against somewhat
in competition.
They should be given a
chance to compete, maybe
within an intercollegiate
program, Graves said.
But women are trapped
there because we do not support
and fund any intercollegiate
athletic program unless it is
approved by the conference.
And, of course, the conference
had made women ineligible.
Itll be a long time before we
have a fullback of the opposite
sex, although we certainly have
had some outstanding women
athletes at UF, Graves
concluded.
What about women coaches
for traditionally male sports, like
football?
Not in football. Maybe in
tennis, golf or swimming. There
might be a morale problem if we
brought in women football
coaches, even if they were fully
qualified in every other way,
Graves said.
Graves thinks the drug

problem on campus is blown out
of proportion. I think there is
one, but I think its magnified; I
dont think its as great as we are
led to believe.
The way to solve the problem,
Graves believes, is to face up to
it. We try to educate and get
everything out into the open.
You just cant sweep these
things under the rug. There are
two things involved here. If you
break a law, you should pay a
penalty for it. The starting place
would be to change the law if it
is wrong. But there are no simple
solutions, no one step to take,
Graves said.
Graves seemed to encourage
active student participation on
all levels, from changing drug
abuse laws to participation in
student activities.
Graves said he thinks student

n lu MAY 1.1971 -8:00 AM UNTIL MAY 2.1971 -9:00 AM C
J JXIOUTDOOR
XIOUTDOOR JXIOUTDOOR NIGHT-OWL SHOW (88*
N 1:00 AM-5:30 AM "QUICK-DRAW" HIM A
r IVIVA MAX XKELLY'S HEROESfJi
TLIIS SPRING
_ GET A PAIR OP
(TV UANDCRAPTED
AT
THE INTERNAL
j ; ' ;
§£yL L Jfr . - \.L
XCUANQC
<304 W, UNIVERSITY AVE. B

athletes should be an active,
functioning part of the student
body.
I think student athletes
should be as much as possible a
part of the general student body,
and they should participate in
any activities they feel interested
in. They ought to be right in the
mainstream, Graves said,
waving his cigar for emphasis.
He leaned back in his chair
and paused to choose his words
careftilly.
Ive encouraged our athletes
to be leaders and to get into
activities because I feel this is
healthy and will help them too.
I have no objection, and
frankly encourage active
participation as long as the
athlete stands by the honesty of
his convictions, Graves said.

* W
W \ H:
& rV



OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY J
9too A.M. TO 9:00 P.M. I |k I # g
SUNDAY 12:00NOON TO7:OOPM. /HI DCIICIOUS lOf 01111161
oi for lasty sandwiches!
KWIK BRAND FROZEN
CUBED BEEF STEAKS
PACKAGE
twostores \l I?j JiM !*f ill J*3 I k T £WTTh f4lT.fl Til
WJOr TO SERVE YOU! | P (^^JUjILII
n.w. 13 H. si FRYER QUARTERS -39 t
y\ \\ U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF TENDER
CHUCK STEAKS 68<
I U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF FULL CUT I LYKE'S QUALITY PURE
I ROUND STEAK I PORK SAUSAGE St 39<
I FROSTY MORN
| b. yo< I TASTY FRANKS S? z 40<
frozen
COOKED SHRIMP SF 89<
I OUR PRIDE FRESH SANDWICH H
I I Theres a smile
I BREAD every time.. [ Isl th6
I sss* 29< I Ballanfine I |
IJ BEER IBaUantine Ts I
70a V teet JsL J
PkMMMMPk.IM.-A- KSS /V Mi ~
CD CCU EGGS I OUR PRIDE FRESH DESSERT ALL VARIETIES HAWAIIAN
'Run CVJUJ SPONGE CUPS 5. 29< FRUIT PUNCH £2* 29<
I MEDIUM SIZE
f C X LYKE'S QUALITY VIENNA LE SUEUR EARLY GARDEN
CARTON K
DOZEN OJy I SAUSAGE CAN 20< SWEET PEAS CAN 25<
canned
b-b-q sauce BOTTLE 39< TOMATOES Sun 13<
B PACKER'S LABEL FROZEN ORCHARD CHARM NATURAL FLA.
Breakstone Swiss Parfait FRIES pkg. 29< GFRUIT JUICE 32<
I WASHINGTON RED OR GOLDEN
I YOGURT IfEDelicious Apples lb 28c
a mm H CRISP FLA. PASCAL WASHINGTON STATE RED WINESAP
14 pint |S£ SAVE ISBvCELERY ifflf 17< APPLES ££ 59<
B aZE M SWEET JUICY FLA. TASTY CRISP RED
iORANGES £? 48 RADISHES i£ 17<

Thursday, April 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



, Tlm Florida ARiftor, Thurvday, April 28. 1971

Page 12

* 600 jfcS
/\ Y I Pvvm fi&i J'l IUI 7 TOP VALUE STAMPS
A Jl n KjjlH tAIKA *7 50 to $ 9" i
,1 RH RBI 4R tk M I / 11 /y | other Triple Header |
J I AAI Yll Sm \I |
JjpPgwPWjr prices GOOD THURS., APRIL 29 thru SUN., MAY 2 JHj
chek all flavors soft d*flH
I DRINKS 1
with $7.50 or morg purchat* excluding
BBHB PRODUCT OP ORLANDO I Iflf
I CRACKIN'GOOD REGULAR OR DIP AJUffME SC\ AaffiffiStA BLUE. WHITE OR IwHBSWh DEL MONTE
POTATO | BLEACH i§§ ppnw W nr SS
CHIPS I CLOROX DETERGENT BEANS
limit 2 W/57.50 or More Purchase Ekc. Cig. I
I 1 J| 30 c
1 HALF 1
H T gal. I pkg. BT cans
" *> V- . \.
THRIFTY MAID ORANGE DIXIE DARtING HAMBURGER WHITE ACRE RAIMALITO
Juice 3ss s l Buns 2 49 c Peas 3 s l Guava Jelly 69 c
p |of OLD DUTCH SWEET A SOUR IYKES VIENNA DIXIE DARLING FAMILY STYLE WHITE
Brooms ... 98 c Dressing... is. 43 c Sausage ..5 %, S I OO Bread ... .3 ~49 c
MODERN HOME LYKES DEEF SOUTH STRAWBERRY DIXIE DARLING HOT DOG
Cotton Mop 79 c Beef Stew 3 *£ s l Preserves 69 c Rolls 2 49 c
HENRY ROBERTS BAR-B-QUE SPARKY BRIQUEnES DIXIE DARLING PECAN DIXIE DARLING COCONUT
Sauce ..... 33 c Charcoal 20 88 c Twirls .. 2 59 c Twirls ... .2 £ 59 e
Quantity Right* Reserved
SUPIRBRAND FRISH FI Hl-C GUSTAFSON'S FRESH
LARGE IBB? FRUIT Mg) PEANUT P HOMOGENIZED
EGGS TT DRINKS W butterlf MILK
I JjH I 1 GALLON
DOZ. I 46-ox. I
|_ B | I CANS JAR rn I I
I B BB 11 I
PRODUCT of OR. COVI SPRINGS^
DfiP SOUTH PGVBIIUIiCMFMaWH ARROW
MAYONNAISE saSHT* rA, PAPER TOWELS
vllrrCC <&*< 3
> H H | I t iiioia |
J| or more purchase T "mazola ii jm ... ... u 1
Q J U aV T # SAVE 2B MAXWELL ALL GR.NDS LBBBHI | I MARGARINE I ROLLS XMC
Coffee-59 c CAN A %3 Dd'
PRODUCT Os ORLANDO 7 PRODUCT OF JACKSONVILLE W- MM Os pALATKJ^^
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



Come Tpom Tlopic/o
Coupons A& C ore worth 400 stomps on a purchase of $22.50 through $27.49 1 M I
oupons C are worth 500 stamps on a purchase of $27.50 through $32.49 Ail l 1 lllrl \
, 1 11 J, l^ 1 . n purc^ase of $32.50 or more. Ik' 11 1 \
! TOP VALUE STAMM jfcl[ Ij 7 WkIwTsTAMPS )
:mm 10 TO s l4" ;|f S IS OO to s l9" : A\ I) Jf> flff?
I coupon may also be used 1 II
combination with other Triple Header I 1 coup n mo >' 0,40 b 4ed ln / VI a f# A II !
* laiffllliNW Coupons larger purchases I combination other Triple Header | A JLII
larger
I BBPHBm coupon coupon good thru may 2 1 WBSSSSSsM coupon
I W*R&MS9£M AT YOUR LOCAL WINN nmt I OPsSSsM COUPON GOOD THRU MAY 2 I >V^
I I I P
PRias GOOD THURS -' APRIL 29 thru SUN MAY 2 jmm Q 9
-D BRAND U.S. CHOICE RIB jk
W %#% A Cheese -59
9 c
llvnir I Cheese 2 & 69
superbrand sliced natural
USDA CHOICE WD BRAND BONELESS 0 E-Z CARVE IB SwiSS ChS 4z
SHOULDER ROAST. $ 1 19 oven ready LB Cream Cheese 39<
E..MAPUMPRUIJI..AMA
USOACHOICEW DELMONICO fBP GROUND YBM PORK fmP Jl'ZVi'IL
STEAK jfeBEEF T HAM TT MOT
W D BRAND GROUND HANDI-PAK 808 WHITE REGULAR TASTE GSEA PERCH COPELAND RANGER SMOKED SLAB WHOLE OR HALF
Stew Meat. 89 c Sli. Bacon .. 59 e Fish Fillets . 59 c Bacon 39 c
HORMEI SWIFT PREMIUM CORNISH (P/4 18. AVG.) FRENCH FRIED HEAT A SERVE COPELAND ALL MEAT
Canned Ham 3^2 99 Game Hens 2. $ 1 69 Fish Sticks 99 c Franks.... 15 49 c
GRADE A QUICK FROZEN JENNIE O TURKEY HY-ORADE'S All MEAT BALL PARK FRESH BOSTON BUTT TARNOW-SLICED COOKED OR BAKED
Roast.... 3 $ 3 39 Franks .... 89 c Pork Steaks 59 e Ham t 59 c
MERICO BUTTER-ME NOT SUNNYLAND PORK BREAKFAST LINK FRESH FROZEN DRESSED (l ib. 3Pe) OSCAR MAYER BRAUNSCHWEIGER OR SANDWICH
Biscuits .. .2 2S 39 c Sausage ... $ 1 99 Whiting ... $ 3 49 Spread .... 49 c
Quantity Right* Ratarvad
WINN Dixie Stoett. INC -COPYtlCttt .1971
if RiD RIPE MORTON ASSORTED QDfl REGULAR or CRINKLE CUT |
STRAW-W POT V CREAM W FRENCH
BERRIES I PIES PIES FRIES
3jol 8 488 k jJHB> JBH coconut MM MMM -iifli
CHOCOLATE
$M $M |
P.HH Ij | I ecu I
SAVE lot WfIOHT WATCHERS FLOUNOER A PERCH aSTOR SUCCOTASH OR MIXED SUNKIST
SAVE Jo< SWANSON CHICKEN. TURKEY. MEAT LOAF I / V ~ | i A ** r\f\
Dinners 2 $ 1 Lunches ... 69 c Vegetables 4 s l Lemons.... .. 59 e
II Iwl O # Mm STOUFFERSPOTATOESAU GRATIN. {SCALLOPEDAPPUS.MAC. A u
SAVE ISc LIBBY CHEESE SPINACH WASHINGTON STATE WINESAP RADISHES B
Lemonade 9 * 99 c Souffle ** ** 39 c Apples... 4 * 59 c Gr. Onions .10 c
ToDoina 3^'M 00 Shrimp ~ 1 Potatoes .10 69 c Rutabagas .. > 8 e
I V/UUIIIU W FREEZER QUEEN VEAL PARmAGIAN.CHICK ALA KING, BEEF, vs
cw W TURKEY. CHIPPED BEEF. TROPICANA FRESH ORANGE FRESH GREEN
Shrimp ~ $ 1" Salis. Steak 5 s l Juice 4 .* $ 1 00 Cabba^29*;
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS i, 1401 N. MAIN ST.

Thursday, April 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

##
?#
_ _
FOR SALE
1970 mobile home, 2 bedrms,
carpets, furnished, oil heat, 8 mos.
old, in park, 12 x 52, cypress model,
brand new condition, $3200
373-1484 (A-3t-125-p)
Stereo concord hes3s am-fm-cassette
rec+playback, w. spkrs. $l5O. also
12-string guitar beautiful 2mo old
orig. box S6O. Ron 378-9333
(A-3t-125-p)
for sale scuba diving tank and
aqua-master regulator, both in good
condition, asking sllO for the
combination, call dave 392-8915
(A-3t-125-p)
Zenith circle of sound stereo
excellent condition 373-1935
(A-3t-124-p)
Gretch Tennesean electric guitar
Excellent condition, hardshell case
included S2OO 376-2006 after 5:00
(A-3t-124-p)
8 tr stereo tapes. Any 2 albums on 1
tape. Professional equip used all for
only $3.50 why pay more? Call
373-3611 Jonathan or leave message.
(A-5M24-P)
CARPETS a fright? Make them a
beautiful sight with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Electric
upholstery shampoos also available.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
kodak super 8 instamatlc movie
camera + projector sls; concord
F-400 portable stereo cassette player
1 yr. old only $75 call 392-7271
(A-st-122-p)
Attractive trailer, SISOO furnished,
extra room, new oven, screened
patio. 1 mile off campus. Students
only. FREE water & garbage pickup.
LOW RENT, AC.
376-8082. (A-st-122-p)
Convert your CARTRIDGE
PLAYER to a RECORDER,
professional quality Stereo recording
from any source, Install yourself or
installation is available, 1 yr.
warranty, only $19.95. 378-5916
nights (A-st-123-p)
Panasonic 7070, AM, fm&fm stereo,
8 track, speakers and tum table, for
S2OO, for more information call after
6 p.m. 376-8878 (A-st-123-p)
Need transportation and fun I 1970
honda cl 125-2 helmets less than 3000
miles $350 or best offer call
376-1377 -after-noon (A-st-123-p)
Akal 150 D tape deck, great shape,
hardly used S2OO phone 378-0381
after 5:00 (A-4t-123-p)
Water beds klngslze 20ml 5 year
warantee only S4O call Sharon
372-0881 after 9pm (A-st-123-p)
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm'
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
Furniture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
376-1146 (a-25M03-p)
69 Honda 305 only 6,000 miles, ex.
condition plus 2 helmets, tool, and
cover. Call Steve at 373-1591 or
come to 1534 S.W. 13 St. $375
(A-st-122-p)
Refrigerator 39.95 and up. Brooks
Used Appliance 2315 s.e. Hawthorne
Rd. Phone 378-8935 or 372-7426
open on Sunday (A-10t-122-p)
For Sale 10 SPEED BIKE good
condition $55 373-2498 Jeff
(A-2t-126-p)
Stereo you can afford I FM Stereo
Reclever and Speakers. Only S4O.
Call Larry 378-8370 (A-lt-126-p)
Decca Stereo System Ideal for dorm
or small apartment Includes AM-FM
100.00-also Allied turntable-make
Offer Call 378-4127 (A-st-126-p)
GUARANTEED
VALUE
QUALITY
SERVICE
YOU GET
THESE
ONLY AT
Mustang
MOMU HOMES MOV
4820 N.W. 13th St
378-1346

_
-a
* .*. .. #.# ,..
FOR SA LE
STEREO 8-track TAPES 90 cents
(cost per album) when you convert
your player into a recorder and
Record Your Own, get professional
quality from any source, 1 yr
warranty, install easily yourself, only
$19.95. SAVE 30% on RECORDING
TAPE, world's highest quality, BASF
(reel, 8-tr, cassette). New stereo
equipment 25% Off. 378-5916 night
(A-st-126-p)
STAINED GLASS, help the cause of
higher ed. tiffany styled stained glass
and lead lamps do-it-yourself or
ready to hang. 376-2195
(A-st-126-p)
Leslie Cabinet model 31W S2OO Call
Vance 392-7135 after SPM
(A-2t-126-p)
Decca stereo DPI 12 with speakers
Raleigh 5-speed Will sell or trade
both 378-5551 Brian (A-st-126-p)
Best looking Honda 160 scrambler in
town. Runs great! S3OO. Womans 3
speed English racer w/basket S2O
Phone 378-4413 (A-3t-126-p)
Going Abroad must find home for
loving, well-trained Golden Retriever
Call 378-4127 for all details Including
AKC pedigree (A-st-126-p)
Dutch Boy Wig-aubum, worn once,
was $25, now sls, Includes cleaner
and wig form. 376-9674 especially
P.M. (A-lt-126-p)
BICYCLE, man's dunelt 3 speed $25
call after 4pm Bob 378-7479
(A-2t-126-p)
FOR RENT
'X*VV#V*VV#yVVVtVeVeVVeV*%V#;
VVVVV%%VVV*%ViVrVVVV
Sublet one bedroom apt. pool air
must let by May 19 one block from
campus 120.00 a month for a quiet
place to live, call 376-9765.
(B-3t-126-p)
Summer Special large 2 bdrm. apt.
$320 for whole summer qtr. air, close
to campus swimming pool call
376-2317 411 N.W. 15 St.
(B-st-126-p)
Sublease large 1 bedroom apt
summer qtr. central air & pool Mt
Vernon Apts June already paid
378-0795 (B-st-126-p)
Eff-type apt. with bedroom, a/c
summer quarter 2 blocks from
campus 1829 NW 2nd Ave. Apt. 4
(B-4t-124-p) ;
Sublet 4 bdrm. apt. for summer The
Place pool, sauna, a/c, dishwasher,
etc. $67.50/mo. Includes utilities
(good deall) Call 378-8284
(B-st-123-p)
sublet NW sec. apt now-concrete
bldg., ac, all electric, walk to campus,
quiet, call Pat after 5:30, 376-8059
or days on campus, 2-1671.
(B-3t-125-p)
2 Female roommates for summer
quarter 2 bedrooms a/c lots of room
over Rebel Discount 37.50 mo.
utilities. 376-0612 after 5 pm
(B-3t-125-p)
Need to sublet immediately one
bedroom air conditioned apt
Carpeted free water A block from
Tiger SIOO monthly Call 378-8855
(B-4t-125-p)
SINGLES: Swing Into summer In a
luxurious A/C poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O,
Including utilities, and free color TV.
378-7224 La Mancha Apts.
(B-15t-116-p)

HH BIRTHDAY QELE6RATION....
YOUR J. WAYNE REITZ UNION invito all
to he,p CELEBRATE it* ANNIVERSARY OAV!
Ml may 1-l?71 iif
tAj* fiSp jV 9
\ ***lH TOURNAMENTS!! K 4?P
JWR fL A MW fi.at?*
25 hours of nothing but *%&Â¥

Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

*********** ************"*
FOR RENT
x-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-
To sublet for summer, lbdrm. apt.
a/c, carpet, pool, laundry, $125m0.
June rent paid call 378-7113
(B-4t-123-p)
sublet landmark poolside, air cond.,
new shag carpet, pay only July and
August 47.50 per month plus utilities"
call 378-6752 (B-4t-124-p)
***************
* Are You Really
* Capturing The
* Essence of Your
t LECTURES?
*
: STUD-EASE ;
: DOES!
; :
-k as low as 2K per
* lecture, tax incl.
: :
* 1730 W. Univ. Ave.
*ad joining College Inn J
* Phone 373-4584
****

I GAMES...GAMES...GAMES FOR ALL AGES!
GAMES ROOM & OUTDOORS c
BILLIARDS TRICYCLE RACE
BOWLING PJJCH' N PUTT
CHECKERS d&SvtJUjC* WAR
FOOSBALL COJV MAY-DAY POLE
HEARTS FRISBEE CONTEST S
POCKET BILLIARDS CARNIVAL TYPE BOOTHS
AT THE REITZ UNION BIRTHDAY PARTY
8:00AM. MAY 1 TO 9:OOAM, MAY 2,1971
IKLEAH-A-MATIC LAUNDRY t
1717 N.W. Ist AVE T
WHY CARRY YOUR WINTER CLOTHES
HOME WHEN YOU CAN STORE THEM 4
FOR ONLY $5 UNDER CERTIFIED VAULT 4
SHIRTS DRYCLEANING 4
CATERING TO COLLEGE STUDENTS 4
PHONE 376-5321

FOR RENT
1 bd apt to sublet 130 mo renewable
lease, stove and ref furn. 1824 nw 3
pi apt 3 3 blocks fr campus call
372-8148 (B-st-125-p)
male grad student wanted to share 1
br apt for summer. 2 blocks to
campus a/c. sllO for entire summer
+ Vi util, call 378-5184 (B-3t-125-p)

Nu-Way Discount
I \ ""'piiHiiirfj /
AcX tfJJITtA / Magazines
Sewing Cards
J_ . .. \ / School Supplies
|Pet Supplies \ Cinw* /
| UNIVERSITY PLAZA V 1620 W. UNIV. AVE. j
I THE PRICE TODAY IS THE PRICE TOMORROW! 1

FOR RENT
Marrted couple or serious grad to
sublease lbdr apt-no child or pets,
pool-lnquire Coy Thomas 1406-32
sw lOter or call Alvarez 372-8468
(B-12t-116-p)
1 or 2 rooms in a/c 2 bedroom apt
1016V2 SW 4 Ave 378-5551 discuss
terms (B-st-126-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
sublet bottom floor of house over
summer completely furnished 2
bedrooms 2 baths screened porch too
SBO per month call 376-9848
(B-st-123-p)
for rent 1 bdrm furn apt sub-lease
thru Aug 135 p/mo unlv gdns call
378-6768 (B-st-124-p)
sublet 1 br apt 110 mth thru Aug
376-4708 no pets, married couples or
singles only (B-st-122-p)
GAME
AT THE RAT
THE JOKE
directed by Jaromil Jires
The last I heard, Jaromil Jires is
still in Czechoslovakia. I thought
of him there on a cold morning
this winter as I came to a subway
in midtown New York after
seeing his film, The Joke. Slashed
into a poster outside the entrance
was the proclamation: WEVE
GOT ALL POLICE ON THE
RUN! WE SEE THEM BURN IN
HELL-FIRE.
But who will burn in hell-fire in
Czechoslovakia? In America? The
force of The Jokewhich will not
get out of my head these weeks
afteris that it confronts this
question and, by doing so, makes
itself a mirror for viewers in many
other places besides
Czechoslovakia. ... Nat Hentoff
THE JOKE.. .Monday, and
Tuesday at the Union

REITZ UNION 4th BIRTHDAY!!!!
8:00AM, May 1, 1971 9:00 AM, May 2,1971
Celebrate with Tournaments and Play in BILLIARDS,
BOWLING, POOL, FOOSBALL, CHECKERS,
TABLE TENNIS, CARDS (Hearts)
Games and Tournaments begin and run from 9:00 AM
7:30 PM and again 1.00 AM, May 2.
PRIZES, PRIZES, PRIZES, PRIZES, PRIZES!!!!!!
COME IN AND SEE OUR p *%
COMPLETE STOCK OF 10 a.m. 9 p.m.
Sat.
ITX\ 10 A.M. 6 P.M.
GRTO *I*OSOUNDS
376-3471 1131 West University Ave. 376-3471
TAPES SPECIAL RECORDS
20-WATT STEREO AMPLIFIER $29.95
40-WATT STEREO AMPLIFIER $39.95
VM CHANGER, BASE, AND DUST COVER
WITH STEREO XTL DIAMOND STYLUS $36.95

WANTED
want coed (grad or 20's) to room
with this summer, either your apt. or
will look for one. own bedroom
preferred, call Robin at 378-4404
(C-lt-126-p)
One or two female roommates
needed for Gatortown Apt. 224.
move in lmme. call 372-6790 or go
by apt. (C-3t-126-p)
Roommate wanted to move in this
month Village Park. apt. 58 ph
378-3367 (C-3t-126-p)
1 female to share twnhse apt with 3
others in quiet, serene location for
next fall. We have a 9-month lease!
Call Marti at 373-3713. (C-lt-126-p)
2 need ride to Cal. Leisurely trip,
flexible share expenses. Iv. after May
9 Call Jay 372-7904 (C-st-124-p)
Female roomate wanted for fall to
share 2 bdrm. apt. own room, a/c,
carpet, pool, laundry, SBS mo. call
378-7113 after 3:30 pm (C-4t-123-p)
female roommate to share country
house, preferably someone interested
In horses, car necessary S4O + Vz util.
472-2541 after 9 pm (C-3t-124-p)
1 or 2 roommates wanted-summer
qtr occupy mid-June, frederick
gardens a/c pool $42.50 + 1/3 util,
call Bob 378-4730 after 6 p.m. must
rent (C-st-123-p)
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O
Including utilities and free color TV.
Male roommate to share luxurious
a/c poolside apt. Private bedroom.
Walk to campus. S7O Including
utilities + free color tv. 378-7224
(C-15t-116-p)
2 roommates wanted large 4
bedroom house near mall cable tv
private or semi-private bedroom S4O
per month utilities incl. 378-6810
(C-st-125-p)
One male roommate wanted to share
Tanglewood apt. SSO a month + V*
utl call 378-9636 ask for Gary.
(C-3t-125-p)
HELP WANTED
Wanted attractive & intelligent coeds
for positions in new enterprise-full or
part time-excellent wages. Now
interviewing & taking applications for
summer or fall quarters-Contact Mr.
Goldring or Mr. Rosenberg.
373-3163. (E-lt-126-p)

Thursday, April 29,1971, The Florida Alligator,

HELP WANTED
Cocktail* waitress wanted: full or part
time, no experience necessary. Will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5,
376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dubs
Steer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
(E-20t-4-p)
ATTENTION: Communications,
Journalism and Business Graduates!
WGVL needs aggressive,
hard-working people to sell radio
advertising. Some appreciation of
Country music would be helpful. Call
Irv Uram for appt. at 378-3806
(E-st-126-p)
Part time secretary-typist. Must have
good typing skills and spelling ability.
$2.00. Call 378-2823 (E-2t-126-p)
Part or full time: Door-to-door
salesmen needed. Can earn $2-5 hr on
commission basis.. Need car and
phone. Call Mr. Smith at 378-0121
between 7-9 pm (E-7t-123-p)
SIOO.OO weekly possible addressing
mail for firms Full and part time at
home Send stamped self-addressed
envelope to Blaber Co. Box 12459 El
Paso, Texas 79912 (E-st-125-p)
AUTOS
S3OO 1964 mercury, radio, heater,
very clean, dependable transportation
must sell quickly call Bob 376-0892
or see at 1112 NW 3rd Ave
(G-4t-126-p)
1967 english ford (anglia), 18,000
miles, radio, ww, tutone paint, one
owner, SSOO. call 392-1474 days, or
373-1310 after six (G-3t-126-p)
68 4d cortina 1600 GT. S7OO will
trade for big bike. Carter 372-0747
376-9450 after 4pm 378-1621
(G-st-126-p)
1968 MGB Perfect Condition 30,000
Miles BRG, AM-FM Prof Moving,
Selling 2nd Car. $1575 Call 392-0106
or 378-0343 after 6 pm (G-st-124-p)
1963 Ford econoline van 1962 Ford
Econoline van 1952 Ford Walk In van
call 376-5341 Monday through
Friday 8 to 5 (G-st-124-p)
69 Firebird 350 Automatic, Air full
power, stereo tape, new tires only
26,000 miles, Great condition asking
2395, call 372-1277 372-2528
(G-st-123-p)
The army got me. must sacrifice flat
124 coupe, *69, 5-speed trans. am-fm
radio, stereo, 41,000. Just had engine
overhauled. $1799 or best offer
378-6376 (G-3t-125-p)

Page 15

AUTOS
66 VW Clean, dependable. Many new
parts. Must sell soon. Call 376-3295
after five (G-st-125-p)

_ ___________..._ ____ !_
jmmmmmmmammgjggmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmam
with
W Ali McGraw and
Richard Benjamin
Thursday, April 29 7:00 & 9:30
Friday, April 30 & Saturday May 1
5:30,8:00,10:30
Union Aud 50 i
Buy advance tickets Friday from 12:30-4:30 at
2nd floor box office
Sponsored by the J. Wiyn Rite Union
Jason Katharine
Robards Ross
They touched each other
oncl le *- 9 wor cl
H i" 0 "I l&qm
SMI' m. I&WC-*?.'/'
w ig^HP
Gnerama Reteasing presents a Robert H YaminHenri Bollinger Production
screenplay by Robfirt RlldsISOH executive producer Pdt ROOflSy
produced Henri Bollinger and Robert H.Yamin dectedDTom Gries .Color
lap prrrtrel wHHedue4eed FR RELEASING I
Original soundmen Feeturmq KENNY WOOERS 4 THE FIRST EDITION on Reprise Records | I
m NOW AT... 1:25-3:25
| PLAYING! 5:25 7:25 9:25
l^l.ia-.ZllJlfl
2 NOW AT... 2:40 4:55
PLAYINGI 7:10-9:25
m- f x >
GEORGE PEPPARD
"ONE MORE
TRAIN TO ROB"
HR A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR*
Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrn

AUTOS
::::::-:r:-:r:::r:::-:r:r:::r>:-:-:::::::-:-:-:*:-:-:-:::-:-:-:-:*:-:*:*:*:
1969 Mustang V 8 Automatic Radio
& heater blue Excellent condt
372-7009 (G-5M24-P)



CLASSIFIEDS

Page 16

AUTOS
(*(
6B chevy van >food running
condition asking $1395 call eve after
7 pm 591*1612 of weekdays call
378-3890 and leave message for more
info. (G-2M25-P)
61 Anglia. 5 excellent tires, r & h,
good brakes, just rebuilt engine but
broke rod; insides unmarred. $95 or
best offer. Call Ray at 378*0105
(G-3t-125*p)
THINKING OF BUYING A NEW
vw BUS? buy mine for SISOO and
assume payments 372-7571
(G-3t-125-p)
68 Fiat 850 Coupe, orange, low
mileage, perfect finish, excellent
engine, interior, and tires. $llOO. (I
want a VW bus). 378-1219
(G-3t-125-p)
PERSONAL
Please help me find homes for six
adorable kittens, 6 weeks old. call
376-4768 Thanks (J-3t-126-p)
Good home wanted for two furry
young GUINEAPIGS. Cage and food
included. $5.00. Call 376-3758
anytime (J-st-126-p)
Photography-portraits, advertising,
passports, custom processing, good
prices, open l-spm Photoworkshop,
Eternal Exchange 804 w. Univ.
372- (J-st-126-p)
fe-so. Catch us if you canl Love, The
Gold Dust Twins. (J-lt-126-p)
Its been a week Love since you said
the words iVe waited so long to hear.
Together as we were meant to be we
share true happiness Skip
(J-lt-126-p)
Feet lonely and in need of help you
are not getting from your fellow
man? Try Jesus Christ at one of his
churches. If you dont have one,
Highlands Presbyterian welcomes
you. 1001 N.E. 16th Avenue
(J-st-126-p)
Auction Sat. May 1, 7:30 pm
Antiques, new, used, + mlsc. Items.
Auction House 41 South Archer, Fla.
(J-2t-126-p)
mr. scum first there was you and me
now there is us and If we work
together on a couple basis then we
never need to worry eight mrs. scum
(J-2t-125-p)
Volunteers wanted to set up craft
workshop and organic kitchen at the
Gainesville Music Festival, call
373- (J-st-125-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer.
Electrologist... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment
(J-44t-54-p)
Help Save America I Join the
American Vigilantes! For
Information-Buy and read The
American Vigilante by Alarlc,
Branden Press, 221 Columbus Ave.,
Boston, Mass. 02116 $4.95
(J-15t-121-p)
HAVING TROUBLE
UNDERSTANDING MATH? let me
explain it to you in language yo u can
understand. $4.00 hr. 378-4066.
(J-3t-125-p)

i>
I A JOURNtY INTO THI
I WHISPER |
I fflfel I

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

PE R SON A T
volunteers wanted for construction
and security work at the Gainesville
Music Festival. call 373-3842
(J-St-125-p)
GOING TUBING Large Truck Tubes
For Rent $2.00 Per day Call
378-5931 or 372-1446 For
Arrangements (J-6t-116-p)
BIRTH CONTROL HOTLINE
Volunteers needed. Contact Sharon
Friedman 392-1665 (J-4t-123-p)
WANTEDI Single males. We have ah
types of UF coeds eager to meet you.
Details, write: Box 77346, Atlanta
30309. (J-20M20-P)
Wanted attractive & intelligent coeds
for positions in new enterprise-full or
part time-excellent wages. Now
interviewing & taking applications for
summer or fall quarters-Contact Mr.
Goldring or Mr. Rosenberg,
373-3163. (J-lt-126-p)
Graduating Sr. wishes mate
hitchhiking companion for summer
fun- See new places, camp out, etc.
June 15-? call Mary 392-6015
(J-2t-125-p)
Try us In May for a week or weekend
at 60% our seasonal rate. Sal-Lu
Cottages, 5441 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key, Sarasota, Fla.
813-3 83-2133 Private beach
(J-10t-125-p)
HOMEWORKERS NEEDED.
SIOO.OO weekly possible addressing,
and mailing your own catalogs; for
catalogs and complete Instructions
send $3.00 to: gift catalogs-6006 N.
Mesa, Rm. 607, El Paso, Texas 79912
(J-3t-125-p)

ORGANIST WANTED for rock
group, must own equipment, call Ken
at 373-2872 (J-3t-125-p)
Im looking for someone to travel In
europe over the summer. Please call
Margaret 376-9848 as soon as
possible (J-st-123-p)
/ 1
Flea Market- May 1 at the Union,
from 9 am to 1 pm. Save it and sell
It, someone else may want It or swap
for it.l UF people only (J-st-123-p)
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (J-46t-106-p)
For the ultimate in WATERBEDS get
a quality bed from Innerspace
environments. call 373-3144.
(J-st-126-p)
GOING TO EUROPE? We Have
Charter Flights At Peoples Prices.
Call 372-6846 (J-st-U7-p)
SUMMER JOBS
Dont take a job selling anything
until you have compared our offer.
We have 16 years local references.
Our people do no canvassing, earn
more money, work less hours, win
scholarships, vacations etc. We offer
twice as mueh $ as most
companies.... .perhaps the company
your considering. Write us for details
and job comparisons. Tall us about
yourself and include your local
phone number. All replies will be
CONFIDENTIAL.
SMC SUMMER JOBS
871 TOWNSEND BLVD.

*** ' - ----- - -V 9* '* *>.. b> '.V 'V * - -i. -.r r **:**.. <* w- -
LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD
V directed by Alain Resnais
Without a doubt, LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD
is the most demanding film in many years. Resnais
has broken with all former tradition of cinema
chronology in telling his story: the events, as they
r are portrayed, are not only shown as they
HP happened, but, also as the characters would have
liked them to happen. The past is fused with the
present and the future, and real scenes with those
imagine y ones in the minds of the characters.
plus Flash Gordon No. 7
Sunday, May 2
Hh| Union Auditorium
|K 5:30, 8:00,10:30 50 i
HL' sponsored by the
ffjf J. Wayne Reitz Union Classic Film Committee
TICNT MSS M ay
the REITJ
UNION m|§ j
eitiTHOAY
PARTY H 7
fW, 1
n gccd tiroes*
*ize 8
8:OOam9:Q0m f May I2
I HELD OVER breakingweek I
I |CHOWPS||MwW kn -y newt jxfckui b Hsli Cwrt-lIcROWDsI I
I *o,oo I Now oil Amtricu cai too H UNCENSORED! UNCUT) 11 ,,, ... I
people saw it I
in Pittsburgh fBItfiIWIHBWBBBBBBHHHBHHII people saw it
LAST WEEKI YORK
I N *MSSL* lrf HlVtO ANTTHIW KS IT BWOMWmM tUfaZfun I
** N , nT) I'mm RevliM M*k Plot. Ever Fllmrij
If You Cant Take It, Dont Come Alone 18 ADMITTED \fy j Its A Must Dont Miss I
1 -ar*. I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

LOST gold rimmed eyeglasses FOUND at
rock quarry west of Gainesville call
Laird at 372*5254 after spm for
return (L-3t-125-p)
FOUND: Lady's watch at bus stop
near Floyd Hall. Contact Bob Elser at
392*0556. (L-3t-126-nc)
LOST: pair of glasses, April 19 near
engineering complex; if found call
376*9613 after spm (L*3t*l2s*p)
found: pair of MEN'S GLASSES in
Ist floor men's room, NASA
Building. call 392*2007.
(L-3M26-nc)
Found: VW car key In parking lot
across from the JM school, call
372-6633 (L-3t-125-nc)
found: female german shepherd black
w/light brown legs. 9-12 mo. old flea
collar, call 392-7537 (L-3t-125-nc)
lost female Irish setter wearing
braided leather collar. phone
376-6028 lost-green fuzzy blanket with print I
boarder In front of tigert Wednesday 1
please ret urn-Its my security trio
392-8555 iSTEVE C RESIGN
(L-5M26-P)
SERVICES
electronics technician, tv-hifi-stereos
repaired evenings free estimates work
guaranteed, dan numan 285-16 corry
vill 372-7395 (M-st-123-p)
Typing done, guaranteed accuracy &
neatness. Electric typewriter will do
term papers, theses, etc. phone
378-7493. $.50 per page. Good
REFS. (M-st-124-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
term papers, thesis, reports etc typed
to your specifications, accuracy and
neatness guaranteed. 50 cents per
page. call Tola 373-1003
(M-10t-110-p)
Full or part time drafting performed.
Your table or my table. 378-2042
(M-st-126-p)

Evolution Records Brings To THE RAT
GAME
Friday and Saturday April 30 May 1
TWO SHOWS 9 p.m. & 11p.m.
ADMISSION SI.OO
Tonight is Folk Night
AT THE RATHSKELLER
Potitivety tha only live entertainment on Campus thi* Weakand

Thursday, April 29,1971, The Florida Alligator,

I-::-:-:-:-::::::-:-:-:-:-:-:.:.;.:-:.:.:.:.:.;.;.;.:.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;
LOST Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! Bank Amertcard and
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
Veterns! financial, academic 6 other
problems, the office of Veterns
Affairs was set up to help you! rm
325 tigert (M-10t-123-p)

itotna ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
pffSfSrfSS? n best supporting actor
LlSSSUiliilLisJ JOHN MILLS ~
SORRY *ST CINEMATOGRAPHY \
engagement |H|nK| Rimed by David Lean
W) Ryans
FEATURE M
i.
CIA] f DUSIIN
HOFFMAN ljr
.£ "IIIIUE BIG MAN"
6-40 9:25
- florida
quarterly
E about getting a part-tlae job?
llijator HAP WANTED adt Iwlp |

Page 17

SERVICES
Typing at its best by former NY
sec*y. speed 6 accuracy, theses,
dissertation, papers 50 cents 6 up.
Barbara Coaxum 373-4363
(M-6MIB-P)
Save 25% or more on all auto parts.
Spark plugs 68 cents. Cash 6 Carry
Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St.
378-7330. (M-113-tfc)

| Todays
I more for your money meal
a.moisons
| CAFETERIA
I | THURSDAYS FEATURE
I I BAKED MEAT SAUCE
I | | ALL YOU CAN EATI Y
I I | FRIDAYS FEATURE j I
I | | PORK CUTLET PARMESAN i
I i OOai
1 YELLOW RICE 77 >
I LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
I CAFETERIA ...beyond comparison!
rnrnTV ii*****irtlELD.H********
TOIPSMj a OVERjJ
5s i W uttu muss £k*
S 5 WT add mrl
also 5 big HAISV ~ J
J ROMRT B,W n WT IIIKHMIJ. J
* MDf OAD ** POLLARD
| r^i r^irjrrinxv
rjrrinxv r^irjrrinxv A
I !? ".7my TOMMROW
j A LAVISH HISTORICAL |
1 SPECTACLE! A rich expan-
; sive and moving epic!
LAST J Jfo Catholic Film Newsletter
"GREAT J m .JsK JL
WHITE WmfflZL ACADEMY AWARDS $1
HOPE" i WLm WINNER V 4
Jo9k BEST COSTUME | J
* jSMSL, des,gn JL i
flw
* COLI'MBIA PKTI RKS*
IRVING ALLKN PROINTTION
* RICHARD ALEC
\WUm HARRIS GUINNESS
IVommeH
* V j
J TECHNICOLOR*/PAN A VISION* [§)
( - ft : | |********
i i
*v 'TJL S
f(MI JFsl| $ man 7 l
Jlffl f f Kuan mm
Ky J Ak BB RE
T N ewerac j
love SCOTT t
£ 5 2Qt PATTON*
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! 4 WMKR Kjf |
* W> ACADEMY rJmi 5
! V WMO gKA J
4- JL Best Screenplay }
JA COCKEYED PE'
* MASTERPIECE! Br%m*
2 Color by 0C LUXEe PANAVISION* Wk- J
***¥AHHt*¥¥*********¥4MM*¥******.
f PLORIOA THKATRC ONLY
f 7MAOI IIAUNDKR
H i.n au it a up a
A AU OAY-CVCRYOAY a



I, Tha Florida Altiptor, Thuraday, April 2S, 1871

Page 18

B.^aas B.^aass.
s. B.^aass. 'Jr 29*
.. 63*
?.. Iwou/ l,l 3 Hw#l&Bra%Ai4 jj^nSSl^k
IVIIYDAT IOW niCII rhiiii r Mind Rg. or Ixtra Hold &* S*t
Sterling Salt *Sr 10* Hair Spray .T 49* l
S?29* RighV Guard f 79* xKHI
ii.,miMtiNi,Hmmciat z'
£* PMCUI !!SSTi!r ' 39
.v-^now ....8uff0 rin Tablets ..... *£' 89*
Dutch Oven ts- 38* uXrine *# 92* V^Ty
1 *



Butter
Apricot Coffee Cake (f m||pSjgg|||m
,59c pamppH A ) /
Boston Cream Cake I -( f 1
Regular
Ballard's Biscuits.. 10 c C <_J
Ballard's Biscuits. "Si 19 c
"< Philadelphia Brand HLijU. R..J,,*, I - SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
Cream Cheese ee e e pkg. 36* ., J .. 1 .. 1^ 8<1 '""** LBHe INSPECTED WESTERN BEEF SALE!
Kraft's IndivMually-Wrapptd Pascal Calory *"*k 13* Swift'* Imperial Pretea Boneless
Sliced American .. ',\T 69 c iudiu*lTT; 5 M Imperial Roast IT 99*
Wisconsin Cheese Bar fM4m Mmr4 ****** ****** Swift's Premium Proton Boneless
Mild Cheddar T 79 c Green Cabbage '** English-Cut Roast ... " J l"
Praai Florida foadoe Small OR
Wisconsin Cheese Bar Yollaw SflUatll . Me Swift's Premium Preten
Longhorn Choose * ft. r 89 c y.. f Mi...rtd Boef Short Ribs ft. S9*
u~ £Si23 ,M,,fc 5rM A A
Cottage Cheese... , 67* Eggplant ~* is* ( 'M \ iPSO/
Fr l HwWs, SeleS Firhil f
Seafood Treat, Tasty Fresh ,r m nr*4m. imr JlsmM /
Flounder Fillet 'T *1 9 eedodtsho* * r
Seafood Treat, 41-SO ceent Medium OrttOQ# JlffiCO eeeeeeeeee £!! j
Florida Shrimp .... .' *1 V *\
Briquets M W *
Sparky Charcoal 20 £ 88* "tl B If'
Charcoal Lighter.. Sl!63* 11 111 k_J
Ice Chest *l B { ll Font Out. Meafeuett Dkft
Mergan-Jones Kitchen Terry 9 ( Tasty Smoked Braunschweiger or
Dish Cloths 5C- 35* si AJHBm I Liverwurst ....... V." 59 c
J J i A Delicious Sliced
_ Path r / German Bologna.. V." 49*
#iil \ Testy Beef or Perk
tffend'rX
A r** 9 V Tasty
x--f Delicious Submarine
TBTJ X" k puxl
THRU WED. NOON, Av #^o
MAV5,1971
quantity rights WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL
W. University Avenue of 34th Street 1014 N. Mein Street 2*90 N.W. 13th Street
. g***.

ThuvMtoy, April 29,1971, The FlorMi AJNptor, I

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

Dozens arrested in antiwar protest

WASHINpTON (UPI) Police arrested dozens of
antiwar demonstrators Wednesday after they spent a chilly
night in the rain outside Selective Service headquarters
vowing to block employes from entering.
The arrests were made by about 50 Washington city
policemen in a relaxed atmosphere.
There were no incidents, but for the first time during
the current series of demonstrations, some protesters went
limp and had to be carried to police vans. Normally the
protesters walk passively away with police when told they
are arrested. : <
The protesters took a different tact this morning at the <

Nixon to hold TV
conference at 9 p.m.
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon will hold a
formal, televised news
conference at 9 p.m. EDT
tonight in the White House
before flying to California for a
long weekend.
Press Secretary Ronald L.
Ziegler said the President plans
no formal announcements at the
news conference and will take
reporters' questions on any
subject.
Asked if Nixon's early return
was intended to head off
criticism that he was trying to
avoid antiwar demonstrations,
Ziegler said, I would not relate
it specifically to the
demonstrations.
Senate committee
keeps draft alive
WASHINGTON (UPI) A
Senate committee has voted to
keep the draft alive for two
more years but also to give
Congress control for the first
time over the size of the armed
services and the number of
draftees.
The draft measure passed by
the Armed Services Committee
Tuesday headed for lengthy
debate on the Senate floor,
where war critics were expected
to try to trim the draft authority
back to only one more year and
to make larger cuts in the
manpower level.
The committee acted a few
hours after Defense Secretary
Melvin R. Laird revealed that
draft calls for the rest of 1971
would not exceed 10,000 in any
month the lowest continuing
military callup rate in six years.
Laird also said the United
States will spend about $8
billion in Vietnam during the

I 01*0 RH&HIOJIEO ICE GBBJWH SAIcE I
i' MftSJIMftIL thA ,qi f OOU#2 i
GS&NO emmm zmaum*\
THURSDAY THRU SUNDAY:
{mini hot fudge sundae -19$ hot dogs -15$I
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WORLD WRAP-UP

business year starting July 1,
about one-third of the peak
Vietnam expenditure in 1968.
Chiles asks legion
to reconsider cripple
WASHINGTON (UPI) UJS.
Sen. Lawton Chiles, D-Fla.,
telephoned Florida American
Legion headquarters in Orlando
Tuesday on behalf of Scott
Trees, a 16-year-old Fort
Lauderdale youth.
The boy was
nominated by
Legion Post 180 j
in Fort
Lauderdale for
Boys State, a Rf
week 1 o n g
in
model govern- ?
ment, but I
turned down by chiles
the state director
of the legion-sponsored event
because of a physical handicap.
He was bom without fingers or
toes but is active in athletics.
A Chiles aide said the senator
was told by Legion officials that
the feeling is the boy cant
handle the physical demands of
the meeting.
GM pays to keep
letters from Nader
DETROIT (UPI)- The Detroit
Free Press reported today that
[General Motors Corp., in a
panic when 19 cardboard
boxes of missing microfilmed
complaint letters about the
Corvair and other Chevrolet
products turned up in a salvage
warehouse, paid $20,000 sight
unseen to keep the documents
from falling into the hands of
Ralph Nader.
The newspaper said in todays
editions that the microfilmed

Internal Revenue Service building, which occupies a block
along Constitution Avenue at 11th St. Instead of blocking
entrances, they opened the doors for arriving employes
and handed them peace literature.
A handful of protesters was at each entrance to the IRS
building where more than 5,000 persons work.
The heads of 27 religious organizations with
membership of more than 86 million Americans issued a
call Tuesday for an end to the war.
The leaders of Catholic, Protestant, Jewish and
orthodox churches asked that bells be tolled across the
country from noon to 1 p.m. Saturday in mourning for

letters from the years 1964 and
1965 had vanished from the
Chevrolet division's customer
relations department sometime
after 1965 and turned up earlier
this month in a warehouse in
suburban Wyandotte.
The years involved were the
height of Nader's campaign
against safety defects in the
Corvair, which since has gone
out of production.
Scrap dealers Floyd E. Avery
and Kenneth A. Simpson
discovered the 19 boxes, marked
GM, among surplus goods
they purchased from a Detroit
electronics concern in March for
$7,500.
W.E. Ludwick, assistant
manager of Chevrolet customer
relations, was instructed by top
Chevrolet officials to pay the
asking price of 20 cents per
microfilm card, or $20,000,
sight unseen, the Free Press said.
20 homosexuals visit
Gurney at his office
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Edward J. Gurney, R-Fla.,
Tuesday mounted a protest
against a group of homosexuals
who visited his office.
Its not every day you have
men kissing each other in the
Senate hallway, Gurney
observed, after a group of about
20 members of the Gay
Liberation Front visited his
office. Some of the men were
dressed like women; long
dresses and opaque panty hose
with the most popular mode,
Gurney said.
The senator quoted them as
saying: We want equal rights
with married people. That is, we
want the right to marry, to file
joint tax returns or to live
together as married people can
do." Gurney said the
demonstrators, kissed and held

those who have already died in Southeast Asia and our
sorrow that the killing continues.
Our nation is sorely troubled, the church leaders said.
We believe this to be a sickness of the spirit.
A major cause is the continuing war in Southest Asia.
Although substantial numbers of combat forces have been
withdrawn, the war has widened geographically and
additional thousands of combatants and noncombatants
are still being killed.
War protesters have threatened to block traffic and shut
down government buildings next week.
This week they have been lobbying at different
government buildings each day.

hands while their spokesman was
talking.
The senator said several of the
Gay Liberation members were
from FSU and UF.
HAPPY
4
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MAY 1,1971
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Thursday, April 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Page 21



Page 22

! ( Ttn Florid* Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR

Greats declare war on All-Stars

m£^^K£'''<&&W%£l&* : 7 ''^VSf
v
I B
J__
Carlos Alvarez
... now football coach
Blackathletes
decide to stay
Willie Jackson, speaking for
all 10 black athletes on the
Florida campus decided Tuesday
afternoon that they would stay
in school for the rest of the
quarter and quite possibly on a
permanent basis.
The athletes, four in football,
two freshman basketball players
and four in track decided that
they were going to give this
thing a chance here. Theres got
to be somebody left here to
keep the pressure on so changes
can be made.
The ten athletes are Jackson,
Leonard George, Vince Kendrick
and Leonard Lucas in football;
Steve Williams and Malcolm
Meeks in basketball and Ron
Coleman, Benny Vaughn, Henry
Cummings and Nate Jenkins in
track.
Jackson, Kendrick and Lucas
appear likely to start in Saturday
Lettermens Day football game.
Only Williams and Meeks had
made a definite decision before
Jackson made the statement for
all the black athletes. Both
basketball players were not
going to withdraw no matter
what had happened.

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By BRITT CRITTENTON
Alligator Correspondent
The Gator Greats have
officially declared war on the
Intramural All-Stars. Calling last
years loss a fluke, the Greats
have resigned themselves to only
one goal: beat the All Stars in
this years flag football
championship.
Sources close to the Greats
training sessions have
determined that it is the
newcomers to this years squad
that are providing the
inspiration. We were a dejected
bunch at the beginning of
practice, said one oldtimer,
but the new crop came in and
lit our fire.
Die Intramural All Stars,
undaunted by all the publicity
given to the Greats, have pointed
out that the Greats are all a
bunch of has bee ns. They say

womusts

As the story has gone all year
long, it was Graham and Weaver
battling it out last week for the
Blue League Deck Tennis title.
Graham met Weaver II Monday
and came away with a hard
earned 15-11,15-10 victory.
Then on Wednesday they had
to return to play the Weaver I
team and barely pulled this one
out against the inspired women
of Weaver.
Graham and Weaver split the
first two games and then
Graham won 15-12. Lori
Lazarus, Pree Perry, Ellen
Robertson and Rhonda Roberts
combined their talents to bring
Graham the title. For Weaver,
the standouts were Pat Conway,
Adrienne Walters and Linda
Posey.
In the Orange League, Mallory
and Broward played two close
games, Mallory winning both
15-13, in what was probably the
deciding match for that league.
The final games will be played
today and if Rawlings is able to

S 3 3P IB 1115I 1 15

that a repeat of last years win is
assured.
The classic will be held May 6
with all profits going to the
student loan fund.
News of the game has gone far
and wide as Dick Stratton of
Jacksonvilles television channel
four will be on hand this week
for an exclusive interview.
Athletic Director Ray Graves
has graciously donated the use
of the field, lights, and
maintenance for this years
game.
Coach Carlos Alvarez has
really inspired his All Star team
and is really enthused over the
quality of his players.
The All Stars will be
quarterbacked by either Henry
Adorno, Ray Kearney or Tim
Culbertson. The Classic marks
the return of Culbertson to the
UF campus following two years

beat Mallory, the league will be
thrown into a tie and Broward
and Mallory will have to meet
for a second time later this
week.
Dorms will be playing softball
next and then finish off the year
with swimming. The deadline for
signing softball teams is April
28th.
Team shirts have now arrived
and are available to dorm teams.
They may be checked out by
managers or individual players at
the Broward or Graham
equipment rooms. Choice of
color is on a first come, first
served basis.
In the sorority softball
tournament, AOPi is leading the
Blue League and ADPiis leading
the Orange League. AOPi bearly
stopped the Tri-Delts last
Monday in a close 16-14 game.
Sororities will be playing
tennis next. Sign your team up
by 4:30 p.m., April 28th. A
team is composed of two singles
and one doubles team.

of absence. Culbertson was
Sigma Nus outstanding athlete
and one of the top all-round
intramural stars before he left
the campus.
Steve Sykes, Mike Reeder and
Jerry Stang will once again head
upa strong defensive unit.
Tickets go on sale this
weekend for the game at the
Hub, the Union, the Mall, and at
Fields as well as fraternity
GAME
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Ted Williams:

His love for baseball keeps him silent

By MILTON RICHMAN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Youre a lot
quieter than you used to be.
You must be mellowing.
Ted Williams disagreed

Orioles Grant Jackson
not fooled by green grass

NEW YORK (UP!) The grass isnt greener, it
only looks that way.
Ask Grant Jackson.
If you have a little trouble placing him, Giant
Jackson pitches for the Baltimore Orioles. Not very
often though. Thats where the color of the grass
comes in.
Grant Jackson wasnt very happy with the
Philadelphia Phillies last year and his 5-15 record
rather reflected it. What made him unhappy was
that he wasn't pitching enough. He had worked 253
innings in 1969 and last year figured in only 150.
He was so unhappy that during the winter the
Phils put together a three-player package includi/ig
Jackson and turned the whole thing over to
Baltimore for Roger Freed.
Nobody was happier about the deal than Grant
Jackson.
Its like getting married all over again, he
beamed upon reporting to the world champion
Orioles this spring. There's no way to explain the
difference. Its like turning a light off and then
turning it on again.
Grant Jackson made the club. To make room for
him on the staff Baltimore traded Marcelino Lopez
to Milwaukee and optioned Dave Leonhard to
Rochester.
So what happens? Through the Orioles' first 15
games of the season Grant Jackson gets to pitch a
total of 1 2-3 innings, and all that in relief.
The reason is pretty obvious. Dave McNally, Jim
Palmer, Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson are
Baltimore's four regular starters and Jackson is
considered a spot starter and long reliever.
McNally, Palmer, Cuellar and Dobson are the
only ones who have started for the Orioles so far
this season, that leaves Jackson and Jim Hardin
waiting around for the time Manager Earl Weaver
begins to feel the need for a fifth starter.
Unlike Richie Allen, Grant Jackson's eagerness to

am pit
where you get a break
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I A bore is a man who, when you H
[ ask him how he is, tells you. [
' ?* !&%#* ** * <' - ,*-*

immediately. Loudly, too.
Mellowing, my bleep, he
growled. I just try to guard
whtti say to the press a little
more, thats all.
Why? I asked him.
Maybe its because I love

be traded by the Phillies had nothing to do with the
city.
Philadelphia doesnt bother me, says the
28-year-old lefthander. There was friction between
me and my manager.He kept taking me out of
games too soon.
The manager in question is Frank Lucchesi, one
of the most popular pilots in the majors and one of
whom the great majority of players say if you can't
play for him, then you can't play for anyone.
They can say what they want, Jackson said
when that point was mentioned. They weren't in
the clubhouse every day. They didn't hear what was
said on the mound. I had the feeling he was always
ready to take me out. A thing like that is always in
die back of your mind. It makes you press.
The whole thing came to a head during a ball
game with Montreal in which Lucchesi pinch hit for
Jackson. Before he went up to hit Jackson says
Lucchesi told him hed yank him if the Montreal
pitcher, Dan McGinn, got so much as one strike on
him.
McGinns first three pitches were all balls and the
fourth should have been, too, according to Jackson,
but the ump called it a strike and sure enough,
Lucchesi sent Jim Hutto up to hit for him.
Jackson was so enraged he nearly blew his cork.
Instead he threw his helmet and slammed his bat.
Hutto then grounded out and that didn't make
Jackson feel any better.
Bygones are bygones though. Jackson now says
of Lucchesi, He's an all right guy, I guess, and
maybe if I had a good year it might've worked out,
but bad and bad never works out.
There are two post-scripts to Grant Jackson's
story. The first is that Jim Hutto went in the same
deal as Jackson and the second is now that Jackson
is with the Orioles his new manager has been taking
him out quicker than his old one.

baseball so much. I hate to see it
torn apart by bleep writers.
Some of the crap Ive read in the
papers makes me sick, said the
Washington Senators manager.
It wasnt much of a tirade.
Not by the old Williams

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standards, anyway. He didnt
even bother following it up. He
wouldve in the old days. This
time he simply let it lay there.
You dont get stirred up the
way you used to, I said to him.
Williams laughed.
If you saw me take those
DiGel pills after a game and
heard how hoarse I am you
wouldnt say that, he said. I
never used to take those pills
until I got this job, why I never
took 'em in my life. I wouldnt
say I take 'em all the time, but 1
gotta take 'em sometime.
Ted Williams was sitting
around in his underwear before
Wednesday's contest between
the Washington Senators and
New York Yankees. He was one
of four men in a room set aside
for the visiting manager at
Yankee Stadium. The other
three were Bob Short, the
Senators president, Joe Burke,
one of their vice presidents, and
Burt Hawkins, the club's

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Thursday, April 29, T 971, Tha Florida Alligator,

traveling secretary and press
relations director.
Did you see that article in
Forbes Magazine? I asked
Williams.
Yup, he said.
What did you think of one
of the reasons it gave for
baseball supposedly dying-that
the owners keep on resisting
change?
The most successful guys are
the toughest to tell anything
to, Williams said.
Short laughed.
Were you tough to tell
anything to when you were
playing? I asked Williams.
Sometimes, he said. Not
so much anymore.
You Ve learned, huh?
Sure Ive learned. Thats why
Im compassionate with guys
like McLain, Flood and Foy. Do
you know who the toughest one
on this club to tell anything to
is? McLain. That's because he's
the most successful.

Page 23



Page 24

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 29, 1971

C" m -*
DAVE MILLER
UM 'CC sports
a winning Curci
In Coral Gables, theres a magnificent swimming pool that is part
of a Student Union that reminds one of the stately pleasure dome
decreed by Kubla Khan in the Coleridge poem.
Since young people massed around the pool and Student Union,
someone decided to give the name University of Miami to the
surroundings, otherwise known as Coral Gables Country Club.
While the richest students from New York and New Jersey spent
$2,000 a year to swim in the pool, coal miners from Pennsylvania
were given athletic scholarships, under and over the table, to play
football for the Country Club... er, University.
The UM football and basketball teams used to be good, back in the
early 6os, because UM had the superstars, the George Miras and the
Rick Barrys. But pitiful coaching ruined the once-fine teams, and the
bowl teams of 6l, 62, 66 and 67 became terrible football teams in
6B-7O. Charlie Tate, known for his ability to destroy good
quarterbacks, resigned and was picked up by the New Orleans
Saints,... today, Kelly Cochrane, tomorrow Archie Manning.
The basketball program is just about non-existant. The golf and
swimming teams, having attracted some great freshmen the last two
years, are improving greatly.
But the brightest aspect of University of Miami sports this year has
to be the football team, with ex- Tampa miracle worker Fran Curci
starting his first season.
With the aid of Leon McQuay, some excellent transfers, and
entrance requirements about as demanding as those of Jacksonville U.,
Curci took a small-time team and made it the best football squad in
the state of Florida in 1970.
Curci, aided by equally unrigorous academic standards at UM, has
done a fine job of recruiting. From Miami Edison High, state Class AA
champs, he landed QB Kary Baker, running backs Sehrie Washington
and Allen Reynaud, tight end Alvis Darby, and All-American center
Wilmore Ritchie, who will probably be a great college linebacker. He
signed defensive backs Booker T. Cope (Miami Jackson) and Neil
Colzie (Coral Gables). He signed Jose Rios (North Miami), the best
passer in Dade County since Norlands Jackie Holmes. He signed
Hialeah QB Lonnie Hennequin and Southwest halfback Johnny
Williams, Dade Countys leading rusher last year.
Add some fine non-Miami recruits, and youve got a great crop of
1972 sophomores. But Curci still has this years football team, and
hell probably coach it to a winning season for the first time since
1967.
The poor attitude of last years 3-8 squad seems to have been
quickly corrected.
This spring was the first in which players voluntarily worked out
with weights and did calistenics before the actual spring scrimmaging.
The schedule is easy with Baylor, Army, Navy, and Wake Forest
easing the pain of an October confrontation with Notre Dame, the
lowest-salaried team in all of pro football.
Even if Cochrane doesnt come through at QB, Curci has scrambler
John Homibrook and sophomore Ed Carney (A lefthander with
promise) to lead the offense. There are many fine receivers, led by
Don Brennan. Tom (Silky) Sullivan and explosive Chuck Foreman
could be the best pair of running backs on a southern team along with
fullback Tom Smith, a transfer from lowa.
Coming up from the freshman squad are halfback Silvio Cardoso
(9.7 in the 100,4.5 in the 40) and monsterman Bill Frohbose. If Curci
can give Bad News Bames and A1 Palewicz some help on defense,
his first Miami squad could be bowl material.
Miami plays FSU in September, a traditional opening game loss for
the Hurricanes. If they beat FSU this time, theyll have a winning
season.
And students might leave the pool to take in a football game or
two.
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