Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 122

Petition calls OConnell mistaken

(EDITORS NOTE: This story
was produced by the combined
efforts of four writers: Christy
Tilson, Ron Sachs, Sam Pepper
and Carlos Licea.)
A spokesman for a group of
100 UF law students told
President Stephen C. OConnell,
Thursday afternoon, you made
a mistake, regarding his actions
one week ago when 66 black

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Pres. O'Connell addresses concerned students
... says full amnesty not possible

Chief Audie Shuler admits mistake

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Managing Editor
University Police Department
(UPD) Chief Audie Shuler said
his department made a mistake
Thursday when it took
videotape film of approximately
100 UF law school students
march to Tigert Hall and had the
film erased in front of this
reporter.
Audie Shuler
... admits mistake

The
Florida Alligator

Approximotely 300 law students sign

students were suspended and
arrested following their
occupation of his office.
The law students marched
from the Spessard Holland Law
Center to the presidents office
in Tigert Hall to present
OConnell with a petition that
had been circulated among law
students earlier this week.
The petition, which carried
approximately 300 signatures,

We violated our own policy
by taking the film, Shuler said.
We used it in an area we said
we would not.
The UPD policy states that
the videotape camera will be
used for the following purposes:
e Training and instructional
purposes within the University
Police Department.
Recording of crime scene
evidence.
Recording of crowd action
only when it reaches a disruptive
level.
Vjv <
The policy also states that,
This camera will not be used in
any way to record or intimidate
any individual or organization
participating in a non-disruptive
assembly, march or gathering.
Shuler made an apology to
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder shortly after eight
representatives of some 300 law
school students met with UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
to express their concern over the
administrations role in the

University of Florida, Gainesville

questioned OConnells actions
during the incident and his
membership in the all-white
Gainesville Golf and Country
Club. Close to 1,000 students
are enrolled at the law center.
Ed Dawkins, one of only six
blacks enrolled at the law
school, told OConnell he felt
the actions of the blacks April
15 did not necessitate the
action you called for.

present crisis between black
students and the administration.
We made a mistake and
admit we did, Shuler told
Uhlfelder in his Student
Government offices late
Thursday afternoon.
Shuler asked Uhlfelder if
someone could watch the film

BSU grad students
explain proposals

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is a
statement issued late Thursday
night by graduate students of
the Black Students Union
(BSU). The Alligator considers
the statement important enough
to Mondays ultimatum to print
it in its entirety.)
BLACK STUDENTS TELL IT
LIKE IT IS:
We are prompted to issue this

1 would hate to see them
leave here, Dawkins said in an
emotional statement, for 1 am
one of only six blacks at the law
school and I dont think I can
make it over there if they go.
Dawkins and eight others were
the only law students allowed to
see OConnell.
The other law students
representing the larger group
were John Parker, Don
Middlebrooks, Steve Uhlfelder,
Lou Talley, David Hoch, Rick
Richards, Ed Tolle and John
Shannon.
Approximately 50 black
students waited with other law
students on Tigert Halls front
steps after having earlier picked
up forms for withdrawal from
the LF.
OConnell responded to
remarks by the law students by
passing out copies of a report on
minority affairs released last
November.
A great deal has been done
on this campus to increase the
number of black students and
faculty, but we are operating
under a great number of
restraints, O'Connell said.
People who are reasonable,
OConnell said, will recognize
what has been done, and will

be erased instead of destroyed
because of the expensive price
for the videotape reels ($27
each).
UPD Lt. Dudley Goulden and
Cpl. Earl Crews took the films of
the march and meeting with
OConnell.
Some law students were

communique which states in its
entirety the position of the
black campus communitys
stand on the present crisis.
We need not go over the
events of April 15. Enough has
been said and restated. Black
students attempted to present a
petition to the president of the
university. The students were
seeking information on a
number of issues on which* they

Friday, April 23, 1971

mL
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Ed Daukins
... 'hate to see them leave'
see a great deal has been
accomplished.
Dawkins broke in and said,
If you had given the black
students (those in his office last
Thursday) this report and told
them what youre telling us, tliis
could have been avoided.
OConnell listened to the law
students and answered their
questions for 45 minutes, when
upon Dawkins request he went
(See 'Petition'page 4)

disturbed about the car the two
officers were driving in while
filming their march from the law
school to Tigert. The tag on the
unmarked car was a rental tag
from Orlando. Shuler said the
tag was placed on the car when
the tag was stolen from the car
in last Thursdays disturbance.

were in doubt. The president in
a very unsophistocated and
unreasonable fashion had the
students severely punished,
arrested, jailed and suspended.
The campus and indeed the
state and nation at large are now
witnessing the aftermath of the
initial presidential blunder.
(See 'BSU'page 9)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 23,1971

Election information released
4 V
Winners announced

Craig Hunter, Student
Government secretary of
interiors unofficially announced
the winning candidates in the SG
elections held Wednesday.
The unofficial results are; Don
Middlebrooks, president; Sam
Taylor, vice president; Ellen
Corenswet, treasurer; Bob Willis,
Honor Court; and Tom Hurst,
Chief Justice of the Traffic
Court. All top five officers
belong to Common Cause Party.
The results of the lower slate
are:
Agriculture: Arthur Chadwell
(R), Honor Court Justice;
Marvin Giddens (R), senator
Engineering: Guy Sanders (R),
Honor Court Justice; Dave
McClasky (R), John Chan Tung
(R), and Jim Thompson (R),
senators Law: Gene Peek (R)
Honor Court Justice; Mike Pugh
and Lou Tally, senators Phys.
Ed.: Carl Neel(R), Honor Court
Justice; Rhonda Fosha (R) and
Marie Gage (CC) tied for senator;
Journalism: Dimitri Femiany
(CC), Honor Court Justice; John
Batman (R) and Maijorie Wise
(R), senators.
Business Administration:
John Williams (R) and Brad
Share (CC) tied for Honor Court
Justice; Scott Baker (CC), Ken
Cate (CC), and John Revis (CC),
senators Architecture:
Margaret Fleming (CC), Honor
Court Justice; Ira Giller (R) and
Jo Lynn Pijot (CC), senators
Education: Susan Weakly (CC),
Honor Court Justice; Nancy

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Advertise
its good business
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of
/ University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during \
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
I several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next i
insertion. ~.(V

Atherlon (CC), Tom Ball (CC),
Bonnie Pickford (CC) and John
Schemer (CC), senators.
Pharmacy: Ed Olowin (CC),
senator Medicine: Hal Hall
(CC), Honor Court Justice;
Patrick Box (I), senator
Nursing: Ann-Lynn Denker (CC)
Honor Court Justice; Katie Mac
Reynolds (CC), senator Health
and Related Professions: Ann
Pierson (CC), Honor Court
Justice; Pat Crawford (CC),
senator Forestry: Andy
Cantrell (R), Honor Court;
Dennis Hargett (R), senator.
Arts and Sciences: Mike
Hittleman (CC), Honor Court;
Bill Balancadgui (CC), David
Chafin (CC), Richard Towne
(CC), Paula Galtright (CC) and
Ddward Hunsinger (CC),
senators lUC: Robert'Simon
(CC) and John Rodstrom (CC),
Honor Court: Karen Fischer
(CC), Brook Hunt (CC),
Marguerite Sharfer (CC),
Margeiet Tunstill (CC), and
Harold Ziakie Jr. (CC), senators.
2 UC: Steve Kraftchick (CC)
and Thomas McNamara (CC),
Honor Court; Chuck Edgell
(CC), Bebe Gaines (CC), Mimi
Gillis (CC), Robert Harris (CC),
Paul Koch (CC), Andy Van
Bueren (CC), and Mary Weiss
(CC), senators.
Official results will be
announced by the Honor Court
according to Hunter.

Election breakdown
The office of the SG secretary of interior released an unofficial Student Government
election breakdown according to colleges Thursday.

College:
Business Administration
Architecture
Education
Nursing
Forestry
Law
Engineering
Agriculture
Phys. Ed.
Journalism
Arts and Sciences
1 UC
2 UC
Totals
Referendum Questions:
Ammendment 1
Ammendment 2
Question 3
Ammendment 4

| The UF Board of Student Publications I
I Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified I
App,,, EDITOR
fbrida
quarterly
I Applications may be picked
I up in room 330, Reitz Union.
I Applications must be returned
I Prior to 5 p.m., April 23. Mail I
I or bring to I
Prof. Frank Taylor ]
I 415 Little Hall I

Mandell Stanley
Kaufman Whitman
216 30
107 21
168 21
85 17
12 8
212 20
408 65
104 12
27 1
102 13
296 62
616 73
598 64
2951 407

yes
4705
4712
3169
2705

Middlebrooks
Taylor
242
154
274
128
13
240
260
79
26
141
733
1216
896
4397

no
680
746
2218
2819



By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Staff Writer
About 300 concerned faculty
staff and administrators
discussed the current campus
situation and possible faculty
action in an emotionally charged
meeting Wednesday night.
A panel of the faculty
members, moderated by Dr.
Hanna, chairman of the
of philosophy,
initiated the disucssion.
The panel severely criticized
the way UF President Stephen
C. OConnell handled last
Thursdays events.
Any well controlled
president would have avoided it
(a confrontation), Dr. Alrow
Chow M.D., representative from
the office of minority affairs,
said.
He (OConnell) practiced the
politics of confrontation, Dr.
Paul Adams, psychiatry
professor, added.
After the floor was opened to
discussion, several members of
the audience blamed the faculty,
in part, for OConnells actions.
Members noted the faculty
had offered no directing force to
the administration and had
created a vacuum that was
eventually filled by politicians.
A new power structure
initiated at the bottom of the
university system, with students
and teachers, was suggested.
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Faculty discusses disturbances

Ml-
K % < :
Dr. Kenneth Megill
... supports Roy Mitchell
Gov. Rubin Askew was cited
as a possible mediator.
An unidentifiable man,
describing himself as a third
party, lashed out at the group,

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saying they didnt know what
they were dealing with.
Roy Mitchells (coordinator
of minority affairs) fife is on the
line. Consider the lives of these
individuals, he shouted as he
left the microphone.
Professor Barbara White,
chairman of the department of
physical therapy, told the group
she had come to the meeting to
hear both sides of the argument,
but so far had only heard one
side.
1 do not feel the blacks are
improving their causes by these
tactics, Miss White said.
Miss White said she was

Roy Mitchell
... 'his life on line'
sympathetic to the Blacks but
admitted she did not know the
issues involved. Her comments
were met with jeers and shouts
from the audience.

Friday. April 23,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Dr. Kenneth Megill,
philosophy professor, called for
immediate action by the group.
There are a lot of confused
students out there who have a
lot to teach us, Megill said.
Megill urged tbe faculty
members to put their personal
fate with the fate of others and
support Roy Mitchell.
Take action, talk, listen,
speak collectively, Megill said,
attend the dorm meetings,
stand up and support the
students.
Hanna joined with Megill and
urged the faculty to recognize
their power.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 23; 1971

.L... %
i jfrP'"9ponsors noon rap on voting;,

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Young Democrats
(YD) will sponsor a rap session
on the right to vote and dissent
today from 1 until 2:30 p.m. in
the Plaza of the Americas.
According to Gus Kouremetis,
YD president, the rap session
will end the three-day drive to
register voters 18 years old and
up in Alachua County.
Anyone who has lived in
Alachua County for six months
and claims residency in die
county may register for the 72
presidential election,'*
Kouremetis stated. And if the
consitutional amendment is

out to the front steps of Tigert
to speak to a group of about
250, composed of blacks and
other law students.
He explained his concern for
the 66 blacks arrested in the
incident and told of his request
to Judge John Connell to release
the students from jail on their
own recognizance.
O'Connell also said the
students -still had every right to
attend class, the charges against
them are being held in abeyance
until a hearing is held.
Amnesty, full
amnesty ... those who propose
this are saying in effect that this
which was done by those who
committed acts of violence as
well as those who committed
non-violent acts is proper
conduct, there's nothing wrong
with it and its perfectly all right
for it to be done in the future,
O'Connell said.
OConnell said student
conduct problems are treated
justly and individually.
Im dedicated to doing the
best I can to bring a proper
solution to this problem

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passed, they will be registered to
vote in any city, county or state
election also."
Don Middiebrooks, student
body president-elect, and Mike
Abrams, state YD president, will
speak at the Plaza urging
students to get out and register
to vote according to Kouremetis.
Between Wednesday and
Thursday," Kouremetis
commented, the Young
Democrats have registered 820
students in the plaza.
Kouremetis stated that he hopes
the YDs will reach their goal
today of 1,000 registered
student voters.
It took us three months to

Petition...

get the registration books in the
plaza, Kouremetis said, Were
very pleased with the student
turnout and we feel that our
objective has been fulfilled.
According to Kouremetis, the
purpose of YD is to make
students an educational force on
campus and in the community as
well as a political force through
association with the Democratic
Party. Through the YD
members, Kouremetis stated,
we hope to make people more
aware of issues and candidates.
Kouremetis said that the next
project of YD will be organizing
those who have registered. We

amnesty is not that solution," he
said.
Dawkins spoke of the law
students* concern regarding a
solution of the problem.
Lack of discretion... thats
what triggered everything (last
week) ... President O'Connell
exhibited a lack of discretion.
O'Connell did not take into
consideration, Dawkins charged,
the things that have gone
before lB months that a
proposal has been pushed
around and shoved aside.
OConnell, Dawkins said,
should have shown blacks last
Thursday what has been done in
minority affairs and set up an
appointment to discuss with
blacks their grievances and the
actions he planned to take.
I'm not condemning
President OConnell... Im
hoping he will be his own man
and not listen to all the crap
written in the papers by people
who are away from the campus
and the situation and dont
know whats going on, Dawkins
said.
White students, because of the
past week, understand what is
going on now, he said.
Now people are
aware .. now, maybe
something can come of this ... I
hope so, that maybe tomorrow,
you (OConnell) will act.

would like to see more activism
in te two party clubs on
campus, Kouremetis stated.
Membership in the Young
democrats or the Young

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elections.



Riot 5 aftermath:
damage, injury
By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The aftermath of the April 15, campus disturbance, has left two
policeman injured according to Chief Audie Shuler, of the University
Police Department (UPD) and damage to cars and buildings.
Shuler said patrolman Lloyd Vipperman (UPD) suffered a knee
injury when he was kicked in the leg and will be wearing a cast for
three to four weeks.
Corporal Herbert Stevens (UPD) was cut on the arm and required
two studies.
Captain R.T. Angel, of the Gainesville Police Department said no
one from his department was hurt, though one or two of them were
scratched a little bit.
The Alachua County Sheriff department suffered a flat tire on one
of their patrol cars.
Two UPD cars were damaged. The damage consisted of dented
roofs, flat tires, shattered windshields, broken antennae and lights and
dented sides. Also, one of the two cars had garbage thrown inside the
car.
The two buses brought to Tigert to be used to take students caught
in any unlawful acts to the police station were also damaged. All four
tires were deflated, windows broken and sides dented.
An econoline van belonging to the UF suffered dented sides and
four flat tires, while blocking the rear escape of the buses holding the
arrested students during the disturbance.
Cost of damages during the entire incident has not been estimated
at this time, according to Shuler.
Drug Store may
' l ,' . ; 1 v
halt operations

By 808 STIFF
Alligrtor Staff Writer
Operation of the Comer Drug
Store could halt by the end of
June, unless new financial
assistance is forthcoming.
John Creech, operator of the
Comer Drug Store is in Colorado
this week, but his assistant, Mike
McAnaney said the grant on
which the facility has been
operating is running out.
When the giant runs out in
Jane, it will be difficult to
operate. Without new funds the
board of directors might have to
halt operations,** said
McAnaney.
The drug store has applied for
new grants, but matching funds
from the community must be
available before any new grants
will be approved, he said.

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As of now, we are not even
receiving verbal support from
the city. There is just no local
support, said McAnaney.
He noted that the monthly
rent for the Comer Drug Store is
$320.
We really cant afford this
high rent without outside
support, added McAnaney.
The drug store joined the
United Fund last summer, and
has since received $3,000 from
them, according to McAnaney.
Now that we are a part of
the United Fund, we can no
longer solicit funds. We can
accept donations, however, said
McAnaney.
Right now it is just a matter
of getting a new grant and we
cant do that without
community support, said
McAnaney.

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Friday, April 23,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida AlHgator, Friday, April 23,1971

Students hold nightly vigil at Tigert

By GARY PASKAL
Alligator Copy Editor
It was a party for some and a
cause for others when almost
200 students, mostly white,
started a vigil of rapping,
studying, card playing and
sleeping in front of Tigert Hall at
12:30 a.m. Thursday.
By sunrise, the crowd had
thinned out less than 100

WHAT S HAPPENING
Carol Brady-

Crazy, man: The Rose
Community Center will present
Bethlyhem Asylum tonight at
Santa Fe Junior College S.E.
Campus for two show, 7:30 and
11. Admission is 75 cents.
More music: SAI and OMA, in
cooperation with the
department of music, will
present an American Musicale
Sunday at 4:00 in the University
Auditorium.
A go go: Gator Go meets
tonight in room 150 F Reitz
Union at 8.
Plaza feast: The Krishna
House will hold its weekly love
feast Sunday at 4 p.m. in the
Plaza. Chanting, plays and
prasadam will be part of the
festivities.
No more: Zero Population
Growth will provide speakers for
any group or class during
Earth Week. Interested
parties should call 392-0893
between 9 a.m and 5 p.m. daily.
Experimental: The Union
will present six experimental
film greats including The Great
Bondino, and Eight, Sunday
night at 7 and 9 in the Union
Auditorium. Admission is 50
cents.
Something for everyone:
The Loved One, starring
Robert Morse and Jonathan
Winters, will be shown at the
Union Auditorium today and
Saturday at 5:30, 10:30.
Admission is 50 cents.
Calling all leaders: The
Campus Crusade for Christ will
hold its leadership training class
tonight at 7:00 on the third
floor of the union.
Watch the ants: Then
International Club is having a
picnic at Ocala State Forest
Saturday at 9 a.m Members will
meet at the International Center
on campus and are urged to
bring a car if possible.
College Life: An open
meeting discussing the relevance
of Jesus Christ in the world
today will be held at the SAE
house Sunday night at 9:13.

RAPPS
DELIVERS
373-3377
MON. SAT.
FROM 4:00
P.M. ON
SUN. FROM
NOON ON
FAST
i

students who began a picket line
at 8 a.m. The picketing broke up
soon after by sudden rain.
The sleep-in stemmed from
various rallies and teach-ins held
in several dorm areas and was to
lead into the picketing in the
morning. At midnight students
grouped together for the trek to
Tigert.
Those with sleeping bags and.
blankets rolled up in them to go

Starring Gainesville: Watch
Hogtown Presents Sunday
night at 11 p.m. on WUFT-TV
channel 5. Celebration,
Mudcrutch, and the Krishna
People will be featured.
Free love: (get a sampling of)
The Union will present Free
Love, a great band in concert,
Saturday from 9 p.m to 1 a.m.
on the terrace. No admission,
music lovers!
Films from India: The India
Club will rpesent Satyakam at
the Union Auditorium Sautrday
at 1:30. khedda will be
shown as an added attraction.

nm
HBNIIEF
I SUNDAY NIGHTS 10-12 WRUF RADIO 85

THE CELEBRATION 71
FILM FESTIVAL
encourages you to drop by its DAYLONG FILM
SYMPOSIUM TODAY in rooms 361, 362, 363 at the
J.W.R. Union anytime during the hours of 10 A.M. to
Noon, or 1 P.M. to 4P.M.
Ibis is your chance to meet and exchange ideas with noted
filmmaker JONAS MEKAS in a totally free and
independent atmosphere. Also available for comment and
discussion will be Professor Bruce Meyer from F.T.U. in
Orlando. Professor Meyer is an accomplished filmmaker
himself, and has brought examples of commercial film
which he will perceptively critique.
Remember the AWARDS CEREMONY tonite at the
M. 5.8., 8:00 ?M.

to sleep on the ground while
those without rolled up and kept
busy otherwise. The morale was
generally high.
The sleep-in the day before
drew less people than Thursdays
rally, A sympathetic custodian
behind Tigerts locked front
doors Wednesday taped up a sign
reading, Support black
demands, strike now.
Tigerts doors on Thursday
morning only held a sign saying,
These doors are locked, go to
rear of building, and an
occasional view of campus police

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strolling through the lit-up
building. The light was well
enough for a good card game or
studying up against the big glass
doors and underneath the
universitys seal.
From the steps eminated
un-noisy guitar and tamborine
music with soft singing. Located
on the peripheries of the area,
on the soft grass, was the Land
of Nod. By 4 a.m. at least half of
the students and a few
concerned dogs had sacked out
on green nature, between the red
brick of Tigert and the black
asphalt of NW 13 Street.

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Daybreak arrived, causing
surprise to some of the
eye-rubbing vigilantes, and some
campers found relief within the
unlocked bathrooms of nearby
Little Hall. Others just went
home and went to bed.
Several students began to
clean up the area before the
short-lived picket line began at
8. By late morning, when all had
dispersed, the only signs that
anyone had been sitting and
sleeping vigil in front of UF*s
administration building
Thursday morning were a couple
of neatly piled hills of trash.



New foreign students to lose waivers

By DARRELL HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
{ /-*
UF currently has 1.045 foreign students. Os them. 730
have their out-of-state tutiton waived and-most of the rest
hold graduate assistantships, which carry an automatic
tuition waiver.
i But only 30 to 50 of next falls expected 250 new
foreign students, will receive any kind of tuition help.
Graduate assistantships will also be harder to get and some
have already been cancelled. :*
The new policy, adopted by the presidents Executive
Committee, Feb. 10, and printed in the Page of Record in
The Alligator, March 30, says that no more waivers will be
granted independent of any contractural arrangements
with the University.
The statement went on to read: All students currently
enrolled will be eligible for continuance of waiver under a

Celebration '7l to sponsor
student made film festival

By JIM SEALE
Alligator Writer
Celebration *7l, the second annual cultural arts
festival sponsored by Omicron Delta Kappa,
leadership honorary organization, is underway on
campus this month.
As part of a spring quarter program to bring
various facets of culture to UF, Celebration seeks
to hit those areas not incorporated in SG
productions and Accent, according to ODK
President Joe Hilliard.
A new innovation to the Celebration program is
the Film Festival. The deadline for submitting
entries has not yet been set and anyone may enter a
film, said Mel Libby, ODKs CeVbration 71
Chairman.

Beware the Body Shirt Snatcherl
VAN HEUBEN'4I7iMyH

grandfather' provision, but this will not apply to
previously enrolled students who have been out of school
and return some time in the future.
UF Attorney Thomas Biggs was to decide if Cuban
students fall under this classification. Biacs could not be
V- v_
reached for comment.
Vice; President for Student Affairs Lester Hale said
Wednesday, the policy was needed when the excessive
influx and request for waivers couldnt be handled by the
funds granted for them at the beginning of the year.
Hale said the new policy would probably remain
indefinately.
Glenn A. Farris, foreign student advisor, said he
believed this policy, in connection with the Board of
Regents proposed graduate school cutbacks, could
seriously affect foreign student enrollment at UF.
On the other hand, said Farris, it is not in the best

Libby said, We have had a pretty good response
so far on the Films.
The submitted films will be judged by the
nationally prominent Village Voice Film critic Jonas
Mekas and will be shown in the Reitz Union.
The four divisions of competition for the films
are Bmm, 16mm, Being Blade in America and the
Student in America.
The prizes in the contest are SSO for each of the
four division winners, plus a Grand Prize Winner
who will receive S2OO and equipment from the
Perdue Motion Picture Company of Gainesville.
There are plans in the making to expand the Film
festival program next year to statewide competition.
The Celebration *7l program included the Phyllis
Curtin concert last Sunday and Your Own Thing,
the rock musical from off-broadway which closed
Wednesday night at Constans Theatre.

interests of the Florida taxpayers, if affluent students
from other countries do not share the education costs.
Significant numbers choose to stay here as

immigrants. This not helping the developing countries,
although it cant be denied it helps the individual student
for better economic and social opportunity.
Farris also pointed out that California's 18 state
colleges terminated 100 per cent of the out-of-state
tuition waivers for foreicn students in 1970.
Farris said the waiver reductions, which amounts to
S3OO per quarter, or about 40 per cent of the students
total cost, will shift the burden of costs to the foreign
student.
Most foreign students who come here are as well-off
Financially as the average American, said Farris. This
new policy has been dictated by national and state
economic factors.

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supply of Van Heusen 417 Body Shirts and you'll
always be wearing the best fitting shirt on campus!
-
DOWNTOWN ON THE SQUARE

Friday, April 23; 1971, The Florida AllfgaW;

Page 7



Page 8

;.Ths Florida Alligator; Friday,. April 23,1871 1

Editorial
Does inaction
undo censure?
You didn *t hear it,
you didn *t see it
You won't say nothing to no one
Oh how absurd it seems
Without any proof.
Tommy, by The Who
UF President Stephen OConnell must have gone hip. His
exclamations of the past week sound strikingly similar to
the rock opera excerpt.
All thats missing is the accompanying music.
The American Association of University Professorss
censure came at an inappropriate moment. Amidst
student-administrative confrontations, black demands and
an administrative hard-line policy, the AAUP condemned
the UF for a lack of academic freedom.
But President OConnell wont let a little thing like
censure bother him. The university plans no further action
to obtain relief from this unwarranted censure, he said
Monday. Instead he turned on the AAUP and attacked their
unfair methods. Claiming the AAUP had twisted, mangled
and distorted the truth he chose to ignore the censure.
We find one serious fault with the presidents solution to
the AAUP. Its still there; lurking right behind his back. And
for all the presidents exhortations that the AAUP violated
its own procedures the censure still stands against the
president and his administration.
Unfortunately students for years to come may also feel
the inferred lack of quality that accompanies a censured
administration.
The AAUP has assured the administration that the stigma
of censure is by no means printed in indelible ink. They
have offered to negotiate, and while the administration
claims no one has contacted them, they have made no effort
to rectify the conditions that brought censure.
These conditions deal with the presidents unequivocable
control over a faculty member's tenure. The president has
called it the best method possible.
We disagree with the right of a university president to
veto indiscriminately a faculty recommendation for tenure.
But regardless of the merits of present tenure procedures,
the censure still stands. A hard-line, uncompromising denial
of guilt by the university administration will only make the
asterick that signifies censure harder to remove.
We urge the president to use his power to compromise, to
influence tenure reform and to seek out the AAUP national
committee with a commitment towards allowing faculty \
members more than. recommending power in tenure
decisions.
The president has shown no inclination whatsoever to do
so. He has yet to realistically address the fact that the UF is
now a censured administration. He has, in the words of the
sadly autistic Tommy,
Said nothing to no one
never told a soul what
you know is the truth.
Alligator. Staff "N
Marian Jodrutiak Steve Strang
Assignments Editor Wire Editor
Copy Editors Gary PaskalDebt*Smith*Vickie Rich*Linda Miklowitz
Publnhed by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial. Business. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third Boor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. I
V Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or J
the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

The
.Florida
Alligator

Long time before the dawn

By EZEKIEL JONES
Alligator Columnist
Once upon a time in the
Kingdom of UF there lived a
King named Littlerat. King
Littlerat lived in a great castle
surrounded by Tigers, and,
protected within the city walls,
23,000 Ufans lived quiet lives
and never asked questions.
Now in the Kingdom of Us
there dwealt 300 Greons. These
Greons were certainly happy to
be living in the Kingdom of Us,
but they were well-aware that
outside the Walls of the
Kingdom their brothers and
sisters were left prey to the
Dragon.
The Greons living in the
Kingdom of Us petitioned King
Littlerat to allow more of their
brother and sister Greons to
enter the Kingdom to be safe
from the Dragon. There was
plenty of room in the Kingdom,
and, after all, one out of five of
the people outside the Walls
were Greons, whereas the ratio
within the Walls was one to 100.
The Greons outside of the Walls
were taxed by the Kingdom, and
helped to maintain the
Kingdom. It was very clear to
everyone that the Greons were
badly misrepresented and
abused.
Every time King Littlerat was
petitioned, he set up a
Committee to study the
problem, and he patted the
Greons paternally on their
backs, and he paternally ordered
them to shove off.
Now after this went on for
one and one half years, and the >
Greons knew that their brothers
and sisters were being constantly ?
ripped-off by the Dragon, a lot
of Greons formed a Union, and
- they marched into King
Littlerats Inner Chambers, and
presented the King with their
proposals. The Greons were well

Phyllis Gallub
-Editor-In-Chief
ji| \ &

Gary Grunder
News Editor

aware of their Right to Petition
under the Charter of the
Kingdom of Us. They also knew
that petitioning in itself is
meaningless when the other side
- in this case, King Littlerat
will not listen to what you have
to say. And they knew irytheir
hearts the greatest truth of all
about a Democratic Kingdom:
that all the freedoms are
meaningless without the
freedom to change.
King Littlerat listened to the
Greons for three minutes, and
then he waved his hand over the
petitioners and ordered that 70
of them be beheaded.
After King Littlerat ordered
the 70 Greons to be beheaded,
some Hewit Ufans heard what
was going on, and they marched
on the Castle surrounded by
Tigers, and they told King
Littlerat to cut the nonsense
out, and to get down to dealing
with the extremely reasonable
proposals.
When the Castle of Tigers was
surrounded by 2000 Hewits,
King Littlerat ordered out his
Elite Bodyguard, and Captain
Augie announced to the Hewits
that they had five minutes to
vacate the Castle Grounds.
But these Hewits were a
proud people with a proud
heritage. They knew that the
proposals of the Greons were
not only Just, but all too
minimal. So the Hewits refused
to leave the Grounds until Kaig
Littlerat would talk over the
proposals with them. It is true,
of course, that these Hewits
were passionate jn tbeir desire
for Justice; but it should be ?
remembered, too, that they were
young people, and it is the
nature of youth to believe
passionately in the possibility of
Justice.
Captain Augie demonstrated

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor
'gShjrifc v:-'* ;

I hsjp

his ability to count backwards
from five, and then proceeded to
turn on the Gas Hoses, and
watch 2000 Hewits suffer
agonizing deaths. Those Hewits
who did not succumb quickly to
the Gas, were quite unmerdMy
clubbed.
Now when the rest of the
Ufans saw just how far King
Littlerat was willing to go, they
became frightened, and they
withdrew from the struggle, and
returned to living quiet lives
without asking questions. They
refused to sign any more
petitions, even though it was
their Right. They refused to
speak out against the Tyranny of
King Littlerat, even though it
was their Right. And they
turned their heads away when
their Greon Ufan friends were
beheaded, and when their Hewit
Ufan friends were gassed to
death.
S*
But outside the Walls of the
Kingdom of Us, the Dragon of
Oppression still ravaged the
country. And while the Ufans
allowed this Dragon to destroy
the lives of others, they
themselves could never be free
from fearing it. Indeed, while
they allowed that destruction,
they themselves became the
Dragon.
So King Littlerat returned to
his Country Club, where he did
not have to look at one Green
face. And the Wheel of History
spun on, and people forgot the
Immutable Law of Democracy:
n that only when the Liberties of
protected, can the
(Liberties of any one be safe.
And thousands of Hewit Ufans,
without even the pretense of a
struggle, quietly surrendered to
their King, their Liberties, their
Rights, and, worst of all, their
Dignity.



J^MPAGEON^J
Come Monday, April 26, the
University of Florida will revert
to its original status of being an
all white segregated southern
school.
Between Thursday, April 16,
and up to this present moment,
negotiations, bargainings,
proposals and counterproposals
have been and are still being
made. Let us here and now
examine and evaluate the
proposals originally presented to
the president by the black
students.
There shall be a commitment
on the part of the University to
Approve and fund the
Blade Cultural Center with
library facilities..
Actively recruit and admit
500 black students out of the
total freshmen quota of 2,800
and to continue the operation of
the Critical Year Freshman
Program, giving black persons a
greater voice in the program.
To establish a department
of minority affairs under the
direction of a full vice president.
To hire a black
administrator in academic affairs
to coordinate the recruitment of
the black faculty.
To hire a black person in
the personnel division at the
assistant manager level.
To intensify the
recruitment and hiring of blade
faculty so as to reflect the ratio
of black students on University
of Florida campus.
The fair and equal
treatment of our blade brothers
and sisters who are employed by
this University.
These proposed changes are
fundamental and would take
little effort by the University of
Florida administration to
immediately implement some of
them and the others could be
implemented at a convenient
date with slight modification
We would like to start the
examination from the last
proposal. We can all clearly
remember late last quarter when
the HEW investigation team
visited the UF campus. The state
officials criticized the UF for
moving too slow in the
implementation of equal
opportunity effort to afford
black people adequate job and
education facilities.
In fact, it was spedfically
stated that black persons are still
being treated in an inhumane
and derogatory manner on this
campus. We as black students
operate our daily rounds on
campus going to and from
classes. We are confronted by
the hostile glances of numerous
white students. If we ride the
bus to classes, our bus passes are
rigorously sciutinized by the
white driver to detect the fake in
it If we pass this test and find a
seat in the bus, that seat will
remain occupied by us for the
rest of the ride.
Many are the instances in
which white students were seen
standing in the bus while empty
seats near to black students were
available. If we go to the
swimming pod, the white

BSU states position

persons there get out of the
water and stand around
watching and waiting until either
the blade student leaves or
drowns, whichever is sooner.
When we enter the classroom
auditorium or lecture hall and
decide to occupy a seat therein,
that row of seats usually remains
empty or it is the last to be
filled. In short we are treated
like lepers.
Around the campus we see
daily our friends, families and
acquaintances all in subordinate
and menial positions, cleaning
shit, sweeping the classrooms,
laying bricks and cutting the
grass. There is not one black
person on this campus who is in
a position to hire and fire
employees.
This brings us to proposal
number five. One of the reasons
why negligeable progress has
been made in the direction of
equal employment opportunity
is due to the absence of a black
person at the assistant manager
level. The housing department is
segregated. The Hub is
integrated with four black
persons in a staff of over 100
persons. This is not an equitable
basis.

Since October, 1970, a
committee was in session to
explore and make
recommendation for this center.
The center was requested by
black students on campus who
very rightly felt that they were
(a) excluded from meaningful
social and cultural endeavors on
this campus and (b) needed a
library with literature, records,
tapes, slides, painting and other
cultural items relevant to the
black experience.
The committee agreed that
the Reitz Union facilities,
particularly the browsing library,
had little in the way of black
cultural enrichment. As a result,
they recommended to the vice
president for student affairs that
the center be established. The
committee has supplied the
physical, financial and
adninistrative framework within
which the center was to operate.
The last meeting was held on
Jan. 13,1971, and the president
never heard about the center
until students approached him
on April 15.
Many arguments have been
volunteered concerning the
setting of a quota to admit black
students on an accelerated basis.
The realities of the situation is
that UF has an infamous history
as a strongly segregated southern
college and the only way that
the proportions of black
students on this campus can
reach a meaning number to
reflect the state percentage of
black citizens is by unique
programs such as the Critical
Year Program where black and
other minority class students are
given head start training to cope
with the ultra sophisticated
freshman education level. It is
also necessary to have a black
faculty or administrative,
personnel on the board of < the)
program because he would be in
a better position to evaluate
grades and progress and to
suggest meaningful changes that

could be made in the program.
Proposal number three refers
to the department of minority
affairs. It is a telling fact that the
president of UF consulted with
the coordinator for minority
affairs twice since Brother
Mitchell was in office. Both
these instances were times of
crisis. The coordinator for
minority affairs was never
invited to the presidents staff
meetings. In fact no black
person was or is in the family
of educators that run the UF.
We believe that if there were a
vice president for minority
affairs, no communications gap
would have existed between the
president and black persons on
the campus and the present crisis
might have been avoided.
Another area where a half
hearted attempt has been made
to pacify black students is in the
area of the black studies
program. We have a director of
the program who has no
department. He teaches a few
classes in black history. His staff
consists of one part time
x secretary and he is allowed to
use the campus mail. His office
is in a delapidated temporary
building near Anderson Hall.
Proposal number six refers to
the increase in the number of
black faculty. There is of a total
of over 2,600 faculty members
on this campus of which only
three persons can be considered
black American faculty. There
are over 100 foreign-bom
faculty on this campus and over
1,100 foreign students. There
are between 200 and 300 black
students on this campus now.
Monday there wont be any. We
think that the UF
Administration has been
apathetic, insensible and in
many instances hostile to the
needs of black persons here on
the campus.
We feel that reason and good
judgement has been sacrificed
for the better of the law. We
think that the initial error of the
president should not be allowed
to mar the future of a great
institution such as the UF. We
think that laws governing the
existance and operations of the
community at large and the
university in particular have
been applied in an inequitable
fashion. The fraternity that
destroyed the state road, public
property, did not even face the
universitys conduct board much
less the civil courts. Yet black
students were persecuted when
they attempted to have a
rapport with the president of
their university.
- We, as graduate students on
this UF campus, having studied
the entire situation from the
incident with the president to
the present deteriorating stand
of today, have decided it is a
great personal sacrifice to make
do walk out Monday r :April 26.
With the black facility and tfce
black undergraduate students,
we shall all leave and migrate to
more pleasant surroundings.

Friday, April 23,1971, Tho Florida AMtatot/

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 23,.1971

Street dance to start Derby

By 808 STIFF
Alligator Staff Writer
Sigma Chi Derby will make its
22nd appearance on the UF
campus this weekend.
Derby is known as the
biggest Greek extravaganza at
many of the nations
universities, said Sigma Chi
Derby chairman Craig Curry.
Curry said the first Derby was
held at the University of Georgia
Couple to wed
in Plaza Sunday
Chimes in Century Tower will
herald more than the time this
Sunday, when wedding vows are
taken in the Plaza of the
Americas.
Ann Hundley and John
Hudson, former UF students,
will be married in an informal
ceremony, beginning at 1:00
p.m.
Solemnized by Reverand
Robert Besalski, a Lutheran
minister, the ceremony is being
held in the Plaza, because we
like the nature and
out-of-doors, Miss Hundley
said.
In case of rain, the wedding
will be moved to the Lutheran
Church.

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400 m/m t/5.6 11950 8988
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1021 W. University Ave.

/
in 1935, and approximately 100
chapters around the nation still
participate.
This years Derby events begin
tonight at 5:30 p.m. with a
street dance on sorority row.
All UF students are invited
to the dance, said Curry. The
whole idea behind Derby, is it is
a social activity for the entire
campus.
Actual Derby events will be
held Saturday afternoon at 2:30
on Beta Field.
So that Derby will be more
fun and less work for the
sororities, all of this years events
will be mystery events, said
Curry. This means that the
sororoities wont have to spend
time practicing, but can just
have a good time at Derby.
However, several associated
activities which carry points
toward the Derby championship
are known.
The annual Derby Queen
contest was held last Saturday at
Silver Springs, but
announcement of the winner is
being delayed until Derby day.
A new Derby activity this
year, the Rabbit Habit, has each
sorority caring for a rabbit until
Derby. On Saturday, these
rabbits will be entered in a
rabbit race, and will also be
judged on the best dressed
rabbit.

In keeping with the Derby
policy of having the brothers
and pledges bear the brunt of
the Derby jokes, each pledge has
been assigned to a sorority to be
dressed in a costume appropriate
to a bedtime story, said Curry.
These pledges will make their
debut at Saturdays activities.
This year boys from the
Sheriffs Boys Ranch will attend
Derby and spend the day with
the various sororities.
UNirfisirr \\\w4
mantis <£)
Fraternity Jewelry^
Now order It 6 days a week
Trophy & Plaque Dept.
Expert Engraving
Class rings
Watch repair
Jewelry repair
1802 West University Ave.
Across from Campus
2 blocks from Hub 373-1025

r 1
SI.W
\ ....
v c- 2
Now ... thru April 25
with every purchase of a family bucket, or barrel
of Kentucky Fried Chicken accompanied by this coupon
well give you a whole dollar
1 off the price!
TEAR OUT DOTTED PORTION ABOVE AND PRESENT
AT ANY KENTUCKY CHICKEN STORE. WELL GIVE
YOU A DOLLAR OFF THE PRICE OF YOUR ORDER
When you can buy chicken J*e this \... why cook?
COLONEL SANDERS' RECIPE
Kentucky fried kidteit
t 214 N.W. 13 ST 114 S.W. 34TH ST J

The boys really enjoy
spending a day with the girls,
and participating in Derby,
added Curry.
As a finale to days
activities, a party will be held at
the Sigma Chi house from 9:30
to 1:30 Saturday night.
Again, this party is open to
everyone on campus, said
Curry.

Singles THESES DISSERTATIONS Singles
4 4 REPORTS BOOKS M
LECTURE NOTES
x THE Aopy jr Typi
R Binders I ?">""
. c m M CKITCD -study Notes 0
O ,n 5 CWICK TO GRAD SPECS Y
Y Colors
A NEXT TO PASQUALES REST.
FREE PARKING IN REAR f"
3 i 1718W.UNIV 376-9334 3 1

iSCOVer
Lowest Jet fares!
e Buy 2 TAX-FREE
motorcycle delivered
in England
e Norton, BMW, BSA,
Honda, Kawasaki, and
650 Triumph choppers I
e Full Insurance
e Air Freight bike
back to U.S.
For More Info, Write:
EURO-BIKE inc.
Suite 703 810 18th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20006
U of F Agent; John Strong -378-6806



A GRAND o
M OPENING
376-3471 1131 West University Ave. 376-3471
WE HANDLE THESE COME IN AND SEE OUR
FAMOUS BRANDS ### ALSO COMPLETE STOCK OF
v- r 5 , y . f ~ ," ,* j
Car Tape Records
r .r od ALL ITEMS AT SPECIAL
KLH REDUCED PRICES
Panasonic Diamond Needles
Kraco Shore Dynetic Carage
Audiovox Speakers
Koss THESE ARE JUST A FEW: / 4 . .
... , Transistors wholesale)
Wald most Diamond needles <4 70 ... ,
Electro Voice (lit* time guarantee) Tubes (wholesale)
Norelco most 8-Track Tapes 3 95 Electronic Parts
Jensen (wholesale)
Garrard 35 minute 8-Track Blanks 19 Accessories
Wharfedale * Posters
Yil 70 minute 8-Track Blanks $1.39 Black utes
(limited supply)
Dual Strobes
Car Tape Players $29.95
pi us Stereo Headphones 54 95 Opens
Many Oth.r Mon.-Fri.
Name Brands Cassettes Blanks 10 A.M. 9 P.M.
0 . . 30 minute 5*54 Sat.
per 60 minute J.OO 10 A.M. 6 P.M.
customer 90 minute $94
WHILE AT C*r*M SOUNDS SEE OUR
S£|jG(A(r*JJ&lil@NlNG RO(pM AND STEP.. m\rr. i.
UPSTAIRS TO OUR BLACK LITE' POSTER ROOM
376-3471 1131 West University Ave. 376-3471

Friday, April 23.T971, Th* Florida Alllpfor.

Page 11



Page 12

L Th* Florida Alligator. Friday, April 23,1971

jkj- m >.' WkimL jmtk;
' I

UF receives $78,000 biology grant

By COLLINS FORMAN
Alligator Writer
This year a $78,000 grant has
been given to the UF for
research in tropical and
subtropical biology.
The money comes from one
of two grants that UF receives
every year from the National
Institutes of Health.

ADS -GAX convenes at Union

By CHRISTY TILSON
Alligator Writer
The UF is serving as host to
the Southeastern Regional
Advertising Convention of Alpha
Delta Sigma-Gamma Alpha Chi
(ADS-GAX) today.
ADS-GAX is a national
professional advertising
fraternity.
The six universities
represented at the convention
besides the UF are Florida State,
Memphis State, University of
Georgia, Miami, Tennessee and
the University of South
Carolina.
The convention coincided
with Thursdays Advertising
Day, part of Communication
Week.

iMNnn
i I
JWBw
oShHHspi

One grant goes to the Med
Center, the other goes for
research in a field that the
Division of Sponsored Research
elects.
The $78,000 will be divided
among staff investigators, who
submit proposals to a review
board. The board decides if
projects are worthwhile and
divides the money according to

Guest speaker for the
convention is Ralph L.
Sellmeyer, executive director of
National ADS-GAX from Texas
Tech.
The convention schedule
includes:
8:00 Continental breakfast.
9:30 Business meeting:
selection of officers and next
convention location.
1 1:00 Ed Schmidt,
advertising manager, Budweiser,
St. Louis.

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥
j CELEBRATION 71
FILM FESTIVAL
* proudly presents its WINNING FILMS at the t
\ AWARDS CEREMONY i
j TONIGHT 8:00 PM j
\ MEDICAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM '
: ADMISSION FREE! :
l
J WINNING FILMS WILL BE PRESENTED AT THE RAT ;
* TOMORROW NIGHT IF YOU MISS THEM TONIGHT l
l CELEBRATION '7l ALSO PMSMTS EWING STREET TIMES I
ADMISSION: SI.OO in advance AT THE RAT|
: TWO SHOWS: 9 MaMWm r TONIGHT AND TOMORROW NIGHT:
I REMEMBER ... :
- CELEBRATION and the FILM FESTIVAL love YOU! I
y yyy yjy yL jy y. yyyy yy y w yyy yy w M, * %r

the way it feels research in
certain areas will best benefit
mankind.
Proposals for new research
projects are being accepted by
the Division of Sponsored
Research, second floor,
Graduate Studies building.
Deadline for receiving proposals
is May 7.
A meeting to consider all

12:30 Luncheon: Alan Perry,
vice president of marketing,
Outdoor Advertising
Association, New York;
presentation of awards.
2:30 Business meeting: new
officers presiding.
6:30 Barbeque.
Tickets may be purchased
from Sharon Youmans, at room
329 of the Stadium or any
ADS-GAX members.
All events are scheduled for
the Union Ballroom.

proposals will be held May 18 at
10 a.m. in room 264, of the
building.
Announcement of the
accepted proposals will be made
May 19, and funds will be
distributed June 1.
No proposals from the
medical complex will be
accepted by the Division of

fIDEROSA
JI4L $ STEAK HOUBBI
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

x
Queen Finalists
** 1
Eleven finalists were chosen from a field Os 30 :ji
contestants Thursday for Military Ball Queen in the
semi-finals for the contest. 'The queen and two
princesses will be chosen at the final contest to be $
held on April 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the Reitz movie $
auditorium," according to Col. Corydon A. Veley, >|:
Jr. The winners of the semi-finals and their sponsors $|
include, L-R, Jacquelyn Young, Kappa Delta; Toni
Scavo, Arnold Air Society; Alicia Nielsen, Zeta Tau j§
Alpha; Martha Hall, Arnold Air Society; Sally $
Bruner, Lambda Chi Alpha; Deborah Anderson, :!;
Delta Delta Delta; Gail Strum, Alpha Delta Pi; Lisa :*
Council, Alpha Tau Omega; Gail Hil, Arnold Air §
Society; Debbie Maccallum, Signm Nu and Mary :|:j
Weiss, Sigma Alpha Epsilon The queen and her
court will be presented at the Military Ball on May $
1 st and they will reign over the event. S
M
$
PHIL COPE X;

Sponsored Research, as a
separate award is made to this
area. Proposals should be limited
to one page describing objectives
and methodology, with not
more than one additional page
discussing budget. All proposals
should be related to the
strengthening of tropical
biology.



- -
yj . i MmliMit jkXMujHQNTwf

President Duvalier
dies in Haiti at 64
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
(UPI) Francois Papa Doc**
Duvalier, Haitis president for
life and tyrannical ruler for the
past 14 years, died Wednesday
night at the age of 64 and was
succeeded Thursday by his son,
Jean-Claude, 20.
The announcement of Papa
Docs death, seven days after his
64th birthday, was accompanied
by a government proclamation
of 30 days of national mourning
and, despite the apparently
orderly succession, raised
speculation about a struggle for
power even within his own
family.
Jean-Claude, a pudgy playboy
with a penchant for fast cars,
motorcycles and women, is the
youngest of Duvaliers four
children and the only son.
The announcement of Papa
Doc's death gave no cause but
said he had been ill for three
months.
110 vaterans arrested
at Washington rally
WASHINGTON (UPI) With
hands clasped behind their heads
in POW fashion, 110 antiwar
protesters in battle fatigues were
arrested and led from the marble
steps of the Supreme Court
budding Thursday after a
90-minute rally against the
Indochina War.
Two Vietnam veterans in
wheelchairs, both double
amputees, demanded to be
arrested with the others, but

SPECIAL SALE
I Reg. Price $ 278.45 00K (lfl I
SAVE TODAY
I si 4ob I
I pior\ieen* sa-soo I
I W EiiikoTstvhii Solid State Integrated Stereo Amplifier Hoo**t eotti-11.000 Hi I
I Compute with <"> I
If UtiUtMt U. .5 percent Diet.,*.. iLk Up. Sepmli. I
I and speaker wire Extra Smooth Sound I
m ... * I
the FIDELITY SHOP
| 420 NW 13th St Ph_37B-8045_j
S\

District of Columbia Police
Chief Jerry V. Wilson curtly
refused. We dont have legs, but
were the same people," Jim
Dehlim of Flushing, Mich.,
pleaded in vain.
Many of the veterans had
spent a wet, chilly night camped
out on the Mall near the foot of
Capitol Hill in defiance of
Supreme Court ban. But police
termed the gathering peaceful
and looked the other way as the
young men slept.
Soviet leaders upset
over ping pong affair
SOFIA (UPI) The Kremlin
is so upset by growing U.S.
contacts with China that it may
harden its diplomatic line
toward the United States,
Communist sources said
Thursday.
Glimmers of that hardened
line have emeiged at the
Bulgarian Communist Party
Congress, where the Russians
suddenly dropped all references
to possibilities of
Soviet-American progress.
Barely three weeks ago, Soviet
Party leader Leonid I. Brezhnev
proposed a series of multilateral
and world conferences on
disarmament nonagression
treaties and other international
measures. That was before the
U.S. table tennis team went to
Peking.
Congressman: 45,000
sorvicomon on horoin
TOKYO (UPI) Two
American congressmen said

Thursday that an estimated
30,000 to 45,000 U.S.
servicemen in Vietnam have
become heroin addicts who will
bring their habit back home with
them.
Reps. Robert H. Steele,
R-Conn., and Morgan F. Murphy
Jr., D-111., said Americans as well
as Vietnamese were pushing
heroin. Murphy said that in a
short walk around Saigon he was
offered quarter-gram vials of the
drug by nine different persons,
including one school-age child.
Ten to 15 per cent of our
300,000 troops in South
Vietnam are addicted to
heroin," Steele said.

1: 1029 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. S
Sale Sale Sale II 1
!!! 1 l FLARES 400 PAIR §
/ Reg 10.95 to 18.95 H H §
Sizes 28-38 5
IVYS 300 PAIR I I |
Reg 7.00 to 14.00 9
Sizes 28-33 only S

Bill soaks to and
poors lust for sax
COLUMBIA, S. C. (UPI) A
bill to sterilize female welfare
recipients who have two children
was introduced in the South
Carolina House Thursday by
Republican Rep. Lucius O.
Porth.
Porth told newsmen later it
was time to move against
persons on the welfare roles who
have children because of their
lust for sex." He said he was
against anyone having children
that would not be cared for
properly.

Friday, April 23,1371, Tha Florida AMpOar,

II Quaen 1
H Sally Bruner smiles after ]
I being crowned queen at the jI
annual engineering fair j
recently. She is a junior ]
§ majoring in art, who enjoys ]
5 walking on the beach. j

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
1969 honda 350 firm $525 fair price
considering $275 just spent on
complete overhaul, battery and tire,
have receipts call 372-4676 after 5
(A-6t-117-p)
Fantastic Buy! Stereson 200 watt
bass amp & Gibson ebo Bass + Turner
500 microphone cost 1500 + must
sell for 500 sacrifice call 378-1795
(A-st-120-p)
TRIUMPH 650 semi-chop, chrome,
custom extras. 1967. Reduced price
from SIOOO to $825. MUST sell now.
a good deal. David 378-8946
(A-2t-122-p)
Irish setter puppies. Whelped Feb.
17. Males only. Beautiful, gentle pets.
AKC, champion lines. SIOO cash.
376-7074 evenings, wknds
(A-3M21-P)
SAVE 30% on worlds highest quality
tapes, BASF & Audiotape (reel,
cassette, 8-tr). For more Information
call John 373-5916 nights.
(A-st-121-pj
camera camera petri ft f(1.8) 55mm
+ 2x teleconverter, very good cond condslso
slso condslso or best offer (392-8641)
(A-st-118-p)

SttflP* 17J i*J3 rom Ml
m Clfl
B eB
I B b w a ><
B W b b. b
mm Jm BB mm. B. w >B
mm m
25 B
B B
B MBk T *B
B BP ,>f B
B MB
:::::% : :BB B Bf B
# I
V^ mjM S MF
, KJ 1* >r
* A m9
i ijii
l** *******iilllllj*t**lAfl wAI Iw
InffiMMMMnpiflrw I
liiiiiPENTH Ki m ! i
B*li v* tiQATPnr V iH

B BIRTHDAY DELE6RATIBN....
YOUR J. WAYNE REITZ UNION invito. all
to help celebrate it. ANNIVERSARY PAY!
MAO, im 4 V*
I*.-,' c: 4k- msut-
lily* fL~A TOURNAMENTS!!
,T'K E mArK e T **>?>
25 hours of nothing but |Uhl!!8:00*** jjja J

FOR SALE
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
Furniture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
376-1146 (a-25t-103-p)
1970 Sun Craft boat, trailer. 35hp.
even. Electric start, teleflex steering
16ft. long, 6 ft. beam trihull all the
extras. 372-0987 after 5 (A-3t-120-p)
Lear-jet stereo, tape deck am-fm
radio aztec speakers $250 royal all
electric typewriter new $l5O 121
gatortown if not home leave note
(A-st-120-p)
Colt python .357 magnun 4' barrel
still in pox $l5O save $45. call
373-2642 between 4-7 (A-4t-120-p)
Royal manuel typewriter very good
condition, beautiful brown carrying
case $45.00 cash, call 392-0728 ask
for Barbara. (A-3t-120-p)
Stereo 8-Tr Cartridges Recorded
Premium Quality Lubricated Tape 1
or 2 albums on 40 or 80 min tapes
$2.50 or $4 including tape. 'Qont
accept cheap imitation. -Get
Guaranteed Quality. John 378-5916
nights (A-st-113-p)

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 23, 1971

FOR SALE
XvXXyXvX*XvXvX-XvX-X*X\\*XvX
FOR SALE 196 7 Mercury Cougar
XR7 Campus Credit Union 1200 SW
sth Ave. 392-0393 (A-st-119-p)
GOLF used mens full set with mac
gregor woods, bag & cart only $65
like new WOMENS clubs "burke
reg. starter set & bag S6O 372-2628
(A-st-120-p)
King Size Water Mattress $39. ppd.
finest quality, guaranteed.
Manufacturer seeks local distributor.
Contact Steve Boone, Industrial
Fabrics, Inc., 735 So. Fidalgo St.,
Seattle, Washington 98102 (206)
763-8911 ((A-122-4t-p)
honda 305 excellent condition alot
of chrome. 12000 miles extras too
S4OO firm I need money to stay in
school call 392-8210 ask for John
(A-3t-122-p)
Attractive trailer, SISOO furnished,
extra room, new oven, screened
patio. 1 mile off campus. Students
only. FREE water & garbage pickup.
LOW RENT, AC.
376-8082 (A-st-122-p)
ORG AN-farfisa m i n i-compact,
exellent condition, must sell. SSOO
new- $175 or best offer call
378-3989 after 5:00 (A-3t-122-p)
kodak super 8 instamatic movie
camera + projector sls; concord
F-400 portable stereo cassette player
1 yr. old only $75 call 392-7271
(A-st-122-p)
69 Honda 305 only 6,000 miles, ex.
condition plus 2 helmets, tool, and
cover. Call Steve at 373-1591 or
come to 1534 S.W. 13 St. $375
(A-st-122-p)
portable typewriter w/ hard case $35,
also wurlitzer electric piano $l9O
378-7132 (A-2t-122-p)
Citrus Club selling Indian River pink
seedless grapefruit and oranges. 401 b.
cardboard cartons $4.50/$3.50 Call
392-1996 or room 1177 McCarty
1:30 to 5:30 April 19-23.
(A-lt-122-p)
Refrigerator 39.95 and up. Brooks
Used Appliance 2315 s.e. Hawthorne
Rd. Phone 378-8935 or 372-7426
open on Sunday (A-10t-122-p)
I Looking I
I Used Cat?
I FIND IT UNDER |
9. S
| AUTOS
I IN GATOR I

FOR SALE
XyX-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X
new zenith portable stereo
phonograph hardly used floating
needle head $145 see Steve colonial
manor 1216 sw 2nd ave apt No.llo
best offer gets (A-4t-121-p)
SCHWINN BIKE almost new 3 speed
(boys) with baskets S7O or best offer
see Steve colonial manor 1216 sw
2nd ave apt. No.llo (A-3t-121-p)
Learn to play TENNIS CHEAP!
also rackets RESTRUNG + 4 sale sl2
to $24 call 808 JACKSON 378-7841
now! (A-2t-122-p)
GOOD DIRT BIKE 175 cc bultaco
campera 1968 good running
condition $350 or trade? call John or
Barbara 495-2415 (A-lt-122-p)
FOR RENT
Married couple or serious grad to
sublease lbdr apt-no child or pets,
pool-lnquire Coy Thomas 1406-32
sw lOter or call Alvarez 372-8468
(B-12t-116-p)
Largest, most luxurious 3-Bdrm apt
in GYllle. Sublet for summer qtr
Pool, A/C. Perfect for partying. Call
376-4863 or 372-3126 (mgr.)
(B-st-120-p)
3 or 4 persons needed to sublet apt at
the Place. S7B per person per month
incl. UNLIMITED utilities, call
376-6832 (summer) (B-st-119-p)
LIVE in Hawaiian Village all summer
for sllO. 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms,
balcony facing lake air conditioning
call 373-2212. (B-2t-121-p)
2 female roomates wanted to sublet,
sllO + utilities for summer qtr.
Townhouse apt. at Williamsburg, near
med-center call 373-2503.
(B-st-121-p)
2 bedroom apt 200/mo ac
tanglewood mannor. call 378-3595
378-9636 376-8183 2 bedroom apt
200/mo ac tanglewood manor call
3 78-3595 378-9636 376-8183
(B-st-121-p)
sublet apt. summer qtr. near campus
and med center, quiet area 2 bdrm
a/c. SIOO mo. Call 373-3900 after 5
pm. (B-st-118-p)
JUNE RENT/FREE one bedroom
apt. sin city a/c/swlmmlng pool call
372-2086 rent for summer next year
If desired (B-st-118-p)
SINGLES: Swing Into summer In a
luxurious A/C poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O,
Including utilities, and free color TV.
378-7224 La Mancha Apts.
(B-15t-116-p)
sublet 1 br apt 110 mth thru Aug
376-4708 no pets, married couples or
singles only (B-st-122-p)
sublet village park apartment 2
bedroom $l7O 378-9882 evening
372-0939 afternoon (B-3t-121-p)
Luxury apt a-c, unfurn free rent to
may old rate 145 378-9784
(B-2t-122-p)
Male grad student wanted to share
lbr apt for summer a/c. 2 blocks to
campus. sllO for entire summer + v 2
util, call 378-5184 (B-2t-121-p)
live in luxury this summer CHEAP!
Hawaiian Village all the extras!
372-2949 anytime (B-st-121-p)

ttve MOTION
PICTURE
WICTvSOMKhiNG
TO OFFEND
EvproaiE!
friie
Loved
y I
L in
An uproariously funny movie
about the Hollywood way of life
and death, starring
Robert Morse
Jonathan Winter
Rod Steiger
Friday April 23 and Sat., April
24 Union Aud 5:30, 8:00, 10:30
50 cents. Advance sale tickets
available Friday from
12:30-4:30 at 2nd floor box
office
Sgonsore^jMheJLJWayne^PlitzjJi^
* *******.*******

* Patronize Gator*
*
* Advertisers
*
WALT DISNEY p "ocTiow
Extanw
n dnK, TECHMCKOR
IP] NOW 2:10-4:40
| U AT: 7:10-9:40
MB NOW PLAYING! I
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ft /A MBs Mi-ijft^
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

just UKT BUM* BORN I
FLORIDA QUARTERLY I

li
mind-bendinn jazz rock I **
I Saturday, april24, 1971 1 Hl|||ll tttlW Hlt
two shows:7:so& 11:00 ||j|Jjl| U I H
admission* /Scents ijjj{||j jj ill
santa fe U\ *.t\ campuiij IDIHIt ft
| old lincoln lug. audiloriuiH|||J !wtflmj|HH||!
_ florida
quarterly
V*. t~W

TICNT &' BB
the fItITZ
IN,CN fIAY h JUm \
tis , t W* 1
a gccd tiroes &
fiize s stuff... f
8:dO am-9:00 am. May 1-2

WANTED
Girl to live in mod 3 bdr house In SE
3 acres, own room, need car COED
living Rent $53 + 1/3 util call
373-3381 now. this qtr. only.
(C-st-120-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
a/c poolside 'apt. Private bedroom.
Walk to campus. S7O including
utilities + free color tv. 378-7224
(C-l St-116-p)
2 female roommates wanted to share
French Quarter apt. Next fall, rent is
$52.50 + V* utilities. Call Margaret or
Kathy. 373-3614
Friday, April 23,1971, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O
including utilities and free color TV.
378-7224 (C-15t-116-p)
M or f roommate for two bedroom
spacious cabin off 13 st. own
bedroom S6O 378-4338 1245 sw 22
ave immediate occupancy desired
(C-2t-121-p)
male' roommate landmark May or
June until Aug. 47.50 mo. + utils, or
negotiate, call Rich at 372-9946 aft.
6 or 392-3601 9-12 am (C-2t-121-p)
Female roommate wanted.
Immediate occupancy. April rent
free. Summit House apts. Call
373-2378 (C-121-3t-p)
Garage clean dry wanted for summer
call 392-6160 daytime (C-2t-121-p)
Need 3 roommates for fall qtr. to
share apt. at Fredrick Gardens. Call
Jerry at 392-9556. (C-st-121-p)
Need female roomate for The Place
apt. Immediate occupancy, call
373-3181 or come by N 0.109 so.
(C-4t-120-p)
one female roommate wanted for
spring and summer quarter April rent
free right on pool side french quarter,
call Patsy 378-0002 $46.25 + utl.
(C-2t-122-p)
Female roomate for 1 bdr apt. during
summer qtr. Unlv. Gardens Call
373-3081 ask for Mary Ann after 5
pm (C-4t-121-p)
Serious female student or working
girl share 1 br. apt. ac $62 mo. + V 2
util call 373-1792 mon-frl after 5
(C-st-110-p)
Female roommate for Williamsburg
apt. No.ll Immediately or for May.
call 373-4067 or 372-3505 x 245.
rent is $52.50 + V< utilities.
(C-st-119-p)
' 'T -
help wanted
Cocktail waitress wanted: full or part
time, no experience necessary. Will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5,
376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dub's
Steer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
(E-20t-4-p)
unusual opportunity for coeds $35
salary plus commission ten hours
weekly make your own schedule
apply 103 SE Ist st. 11 to 3 Mon to
Frl 10 to 12 Sat. (E-2t-121-p)
AUI OS
1965 Caravelle conv., new engine &
clutch S6OO. 60 BUG EYE sprite new
brakes & Inspection $450. 1966
Dodge Dart Conv. SBSO. 372-5827
(G-st-119-p)
63 Tempest excellent condition
Except need new clutch Best offer
call Warren after 5 372-2888
(G-st-12frp)

Page 15

ISHfIWTIMF
17:25 J
I carrie snodgress
I NOMINATED FOR BEST ACTRESS
I diary of a
mad housewife r
I TECHNICOLOR
I cunt EASTWOOD NO ONE UNDER
I SHIRLEYMACUUne 17 ADMITTED
WITHOUT
PARENTS
Bwsn ~
rJVr/nil I 2:00 3:55 5:50 7:50 9:50
SSBS!r!?ji
I Telephene 371-2434 I 1 |
Swy sfe. toSB
H IB VI HL
- |Msm
jpny|iy ?&*>
Baia/jL UnH
tOM /SI
\ fi IS
7ot£*y
*4:00 6:40 9:2S
umnnsnoini rawraM
TSE 70s PI&ST SBEAT EPIC!
- Stefan Kanfcr, Time Magazine
NSTmumiuiium!
I ilm it mrj uni ui fill if fialiif nrpim!" I
MB IF ID TUffSlO BEST!
I Viaceat Caaky, N. V. slams / Stefaa Kaaler, Tiaat Mafastae / Judith Crist. N. V. Mafaiinr
WilUaai Wall, Cae M*miae / Jasaph Geiasb. Newsday /Mm Sfaaea, Near Leader B
Jay re Haber. NatieaaNy Syndicated Celaaaaist / Stewart Weis. WNTW-TV
Leonard Harris. WCBB-TV / J stray Lyons, WPIX-TV / Charles Champlia. Lea Angeles Times
Wall Street Jemal / Bab Sahaaui. Crane W Netweeh
I i uumr uumoour
- Bob Salmaggi, Group W Network
k.V& ft J
I w^snE
DUSTIN HOffTMAN
LITTLE BIG MAN



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

* j
Great Experimental Films
*
* The Great Blondino *
* Eight
* Americas in Real Trouble
4t
* Loops
Blacks A Whites, Days A Nights
Pastorale
* 4
Union Aud. Adv.nc. tickets available 4
Sunday, April 25 today at 2nd floor Box Offiea 4
7:00 A
** + **
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DeodKne -300 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
GJ to *
( II 1| f I DDDOOODQ £
1 8 i£ 11 £
- I >
II II Z
-
Q
. >
w > w ro -*
__ _f f f g- g- § */.
Si 23
_ __ ___ 8 a a 2
\ ~ 11
Q
| Q > 3 Z
_ o 38 § |
ut -4
n =*

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>
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1 9 jri
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mmmm ~~ ~ """""

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 23,197 t

Page 16

AUTOS
Must sail 64 Volkswagen bug in good
condition except needs motor work
373-3890 (G-3M20-P)
1968 Austin America, automatic, low
mileage $950 or best offer, or trade
for cycle plus. 372-7655 (G-3t-122*p)
1961 MGA, ey't'.ient mech shape,
silver w/maroon interior, must sell
while overseas, can be seen evenings
and weekends, 376-9551 SSOO
(G-3t-120-p)
1969 VW with special handling
equipment and many extras-in
absolutely immaculate cond.-was
$1750-wlll take $1595 now.
392-7275 (G-st-118-p)
1965 Mustang real clean, new paint,
new tires, 289-2 u, 4 spd., rally pack,
delux Interior, A/C, stero tape, one
owner, Make offer 372-0987 Aft. 5
(G-3t-120-p)
1969 442 Olds. Loaded A/C Power
steering, brakes, ant, trunk. AM-FM
and tape. 4speeid tach. positreactlon
come see, Make offer. 372-0987 aft.
5 (G-3t-120-p)
68 VW sedan, automatic, air cond.
27,000 miles, good condition, 305
NW 15th Terr., 378-3194
(G-3t-121-p)
67 4-door Chevrolet Im pa la, gold.
Factory air cond. Power brakes and
steering. Perfect condition. $1250
Call after 6 378-9888 or 373-2304
(G-3t-121-p)
Malibu '64 4dr automatic VB.
Beautiful car in excellent running
order. Recent minor overhaul and
many new parts. $695 must sell!
376-9985 (G-st-121-p)
jpjg* jp T
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer.
Electrologlst... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment
(J-44t-54-p)
Engaged? See my selection of socially
correct wedding Invitations and
accessories. Phone 376-9951 to
borrow album for leisurely study.
(J-4t-118-p)
REWARD for the return or Info
leading to the return of the gas tank
taken off of my chopper parked In
front of rote bid. call 392-8202
(J-3t-120*p)

DANGER!
WE [DO NOTi WANT TO OFFEND OR OUTRAGE ANYONE'
IF THE FRANK PRESENTATION OF INTIMATE PASSIONS
OFFENDS YOU, DO NOT SEE THIS MOTION PICTURE!

me NP 'iAMHa^' s !sf T lM£aSl
IS j fuM- SECOND IBLo5W£il
COJIT ROVW> h,n FEATURE

*************.*{
* STUDENT GOVERNMENT AND CELEBRATION '7l PRESENT
*
Just back from their Midwestern Tour r
M
* Coconut Groves Own
J Ewing Street Times
* at the Rat l
R il 1
fIR
* UHBK
*
*
Mr
*
r kJ*
|
* This Friday and Saturday, April 23-24
R .' R
41 4 4t
* Showtime 9 PM & 11:15 PM
* R
41*******4* * 4 4 * 4- R
R R
: at the RATHSKELLER t
R R
********************************
Patronize Gator Advertisers



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS


PERSONAL
xXvXxXxXxXxXvXxXvX-XvX-Xv
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (j-46t-106-p)
Student needs ride to 8:00 class from
23rd blvd between 6th and 13th or
Gnsvle mall area. Call Gary 373-1246
after 6PM. (J-3t-120-p)
WANTED I Single males. We have ah
types of UF coeds eager to meet you.
Details, write: Box 77346, Atlanta
30309. (J-20t-120-p)
Volunteer drivers needed to drive
ghetto children to day-care center.
Wed. or Frl. 9:00-9:20 or
11:15-11:30 Call 372-3947 after
sp.m. (J-:it-120-p)
GOING TUBING Large Truck Tubes
For Rent 82.00 Per day Call
378-5931 or 372-1446 For
Arrangements (J-6t-116-p)
Community Action Agency needs
two people for work in crafts and
woodworking, for Information call
Samson 2-1608 or come by 315
union (J-2t-121-p)
Help Save America! Join the
American Vigilantes! For
Information-Buy and read The
American Vigilante by Alaric,
Branden Press, 221 Columbus Ave.,
Boston, Mass. 02116 $4.95
(J-15t-121p)
if you want a WATERBED get a
water bed and not a bag of water, call
373-3144 (J-st-121-p)
wanted suggestions on disposal of 2
leftover 321 b peppy lasagne fiasco
call Gayle B. may be used for ballast
or circus feed (J-lt-122-p)
Beautiful wilmot garden on campus
sou end of north south dr bring
blanket book broad and enjoy in
flowered outdoor nature (J-lt-122-p)
Sketti dinner with all the fixings
proceeds for corner drug store sigma
kappa house Sunday April 25,
12:30-5:30 pm. $1.25 per plate.
(J-lt-122-p)
Impress her with an 8* round
water bed by Pacific, $75. Pad, sls.
No frame required. Factory
guarantee. 319 W. University Ave.
(J-lt-122-p)
Gertie, I love you. Fe happy birthday
again (J-lt-121-p)

LOST di FOUND
found: CLASS RING. Identify and
pick up at Reitz Union lost and
found Rm. 130 (L-3t-122-p)
found-a WEDDING BAND and
CLASS RING-on handball courts,
identify and pick up at Rm. 134,
Florida Gym (L-3t-122-p)
REWARD SIOO for info lead to
return of 1970 Triumph tiger
motorcycle taken from place apts no
questions call 378-1109 anytime
(L-3t-120-p)
Lost: female gr. Shepard- Macke
silver; 9 mo. choke chain, lost In sin
city area; name Is gretchen; reward
offered call 378-5823 anytime
(L-3M20-P)
Found single key on lady bug key
chain, at union during engineers fair,
call 373-2912 to claim Lost Gold Rimmed Eyeglasses square
frame, Friday afternoon on East side
of campus Reward call 392-9063
(L-st-120-p)

%

r A 'Jt B^W* mT
. mL, W I IJB
1 ,>'*.'* j &!/>>,.., ~., &gaMIII HIsH Hjjiig£S&. f liKsv-
INGMAR BERGMAN'S CE.SS.C Hie SeWNltll Scfll
INLiMAK d ~ f man's search for meaning in life. A knight, after returning
ho toTrtieC^ 8 plays a U game g os chess With Death while The Plague ravages medieval Europe. An
Tis a work of awesome scope and remarkable v.sual pleasures.
Monday, April 26 Union Aud. S 0( 5:30 8:00 10:30
advance ticket, available on Friday from 12*W=30 "* Uni n a d
Monday at the Student Service, Booth rofrom Hub from 10.00 am to 2pm
sponsored by the J.W.R.U.

Friday, April 23,1971, The Florida Alligator,

LOST I lost a Yashica-D camera in the tear
gas barrage the 15th If Vou found It,
please call 373-2658 or 392-2612
REWARD (L-st-119-p)
found Thursday at Tigert KEYSon a
ring, pick up at Union Lost and
Found. (L-3t-120-p)
"****************"**********"******
*
SERVICES
t>W?X:Jt>£WWWSX*x ; >x-x*:-x ; x : x*x*
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
3 78-7330. Now! Bank Americard and
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
Lost: dinner ring, white gold, three
small diami.ids. sentimental value,
also: instamatic camera, lost at reitz
union, reward, call Carol 378-0179.
(L-3M21-p)
found on campus-female kitten
wearing a white collar w red stones.
Will keep for few days in hopes
owner will call 392-0950 or
378-2009 Mr. Carvjall (L-3t-121-nc)

f Todays |
I more for your money meal I
I moRR isons I
I CAFETERIA I
I r FRIDAY S FEATURE "l I
I | PORK CUTLET | I
I | | PARMESAN J | I
I t | YELLOW RICE | £ I
yl I I
I I
1 LUNCH: 11 til 2-SUPPER:4:3O til 8-FREE PARKING I
I moisons I
I CAFETERIA beyond comparison! 1
k 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall
jgSJWfffl FORESTS GANT

Page 17

a 0 m m m m
SERVICES
Mikes painting rooms 12x14 or
smaller sl4. Free estimates on any
size job. Interior or exterior, call eves
378-0968 (M-st-121-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at Sig SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Tired of sandwich suppers? get a
good home-cooked meal with fresh
vegs at coney Island rest. 210 SE Ist.
sam-7pm beer served, great food!
(M-st-120-p)
Save 25% or more on all auto parts.
Spark plugs 68 cents. Cash & Carry
Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St.
378-7330. (M-113-tfc)
FIND IT Vhvl
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICES
WRITERS CO-OP TERM PAPERS
EXAMS PO BOX 13678 UNIV
STATION Gainesville, Fla.
(M-7t-119-p)

[ABC FLORIDA STATE THEATRES]

SPECIAL RATES FOR FLORIDA RESIDENTS
Jfb On The World Famous
WdjIGLASS ROTTOM BOATS of
TMBgilyQr
Stqrt< TODAY!
*7* Little Rriss and Big Halsy
HI are not your fathers heroes.
7130 COMPLETELY FASCINATING TO
9:30 WATCH AND MUST BE PRONOUNCED
A TOTAL ENTERTAINMENT!
Redford is nothing short of
stunning! Not since Brando has
an actor had more presence
on the screen! Lucille Benson's
performance (as Pollard's Mother)-
'Best Supporting Actress Stuff!"
Lu Smith. COSMOPOLITAN
£> FAST!
P*
MAMONKCUHIKMi
AOO4RT IIIKHMIJ.
MDfOKD POUARD
JUTTU MUSS MID MO HALSY
5:30 M
7:30
WhheHopeO@M|
James Earl Jones,
r Jane Alexander
| Downtown LANDLORD 0 ACADEMY AWARD
1:30 NOW FOR THE 9 WINNER BEST
c. 4 n FIRST TIME IN f ACTRESS OF YEAR
J'Jjj THE GAINESVILLE AREA I GLENDA JACKSON IN
S EN "THE "WOMEN
lIAMPIORP color IN LOVE"
|.75d age 16 & under 1.25 age 17 &up I
I All day Every day |

, Get a Little Extra with
FREELOVE
** j£'
April 24, 1971 from 9:00 PM
to 1:00 AM on the South
Terrace of Reitz Union.
Drop in for four hours of
FREE ADMISSION rock.
sponsored by
your J. Wayne Reitz union



Page 18

. Th. Florid. AHfMor. Frkfcy. April 23.1*71

& ft.
. r~- ***~~
m hhh|^^^_
p3gi§ JBBjtiiir' JEfl^B
I i
H i j pll js,
k \V jjg
Ewing Street Times to appear
The Miami-based rock group Ewing Street Times will appear at the
Rathskeller tonight and tomorrow night, with shows at 9 p.m. and
11:15 p.nt Their appearance marks the beginning of a six-week
barrage of musical talent on campus, sponsored by Student
Government Productions. Tickets are SI.OO in advance and $1.50 at
the door.
I
II k I
I 1
I 4
I ? :#j W4 JU fXMnioh iliiiM I
:j aaviagaa iiviii? : .. ;f.
I The world famous Shure V-15 Type II now has improved track- 1
I ability in the bass and mid-range registers with its same re redoubtable
doubtable redoubtable treble. Result: where, in the past, you may have
1 been required to increase tracking forces to track heavily modu- I
I lated bass drum, tympani, organ pedal, bassoon, tuba, or piano 1
passages ... you can now play these passages at minimum
tracking force, without bass flutter or IM distortion . and
significantly increase record and stylus tip life. $67.50
Latin: always upward 1
1 You out Modify your present V-15 Type 11...
.xvil You may attain this higher bass and mid-
KWyI range trackability by installing the IMPROVED
\\V VNISE stylus @ $27.00.
I MUia v-15 TYPE II (IMPROVED) I
SUPER TRACKABILITY PHONO CARTRIDGE
I THE FIDELITY SHOP
| 420 NW 13 ST. 378-8045 |
yoc>o:->w:^ ,^,^^i. > lost you Contact? 5
I |
i
| Qaton AOs make Contacts! I

Gainesville Krishna Temple
feeds 100 students daily

By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Krishna Temple in
Gainesville, has moved to a new
location, at 216 SW 2nd Street,
and is feeding approximately
100 students daily.
Everyone is welcome to enjoy
the festivities at the Krishna
house for breakfast, lunch or
dinner. Meals are served at 7
a.m., 12 noon, and 7 p.m. The
diet consists primarily of East
Indian vegetarian foods, milk
products and fruits. No meat,
fish or eggs are used.
At mealtime, the Krishnas
partake in eating the spiritual
food and reading from the
Vedas, which is their religious
scriptures. The Vedas offer the
process of eating, reading from
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
Aj> 3 games SI.OO
O3y Sat. 9am 6 pm
Per game Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA

~4 r_ ~ r- yz~
=- Theres no reason to I
] hunt the treasure J/
| me lads... .....
)It lies at Long John' Silver s! j
1 H nettled in a bed ofeHip fries. And, I
1 if surrounded by Golden Nuggeti. /iV I
r Miniature drumsticks dipped in our cake-like I
ww mnd Imri mill chip, and Silver*, C
I SWFI ER MAJESTYS BREW |
j 1 ; \*M Hot or cold ... uniquely ours. 1
I E>,ht pi.ee of our
{/(* V !e St'.t w ,fer,hC
j
r~^ s::i^S^ w 1235 NW 16th Ave. *'
| i i N#x Jerrys North
** ~ ,<\f * /v J

the scriptures and chanting the
Hare Krishna Mantra.
On Sundays, the Krishnas
extend an invitation to everyone
to participate in their love feasts.
This festival takes place at the
Plaza at 4 p.m. It is at this
ceremony that the Krishnas
develop their external God
consciousness.
It takes an entire lifetime to
accomplish the love of God,
with God. The way to achieve
this level is through eating,
reading and chanting, said
David Lieberman, president of
the Krishna Temple in
Gainesville.
The Vedas were written
thousands of years ago, and have
just recently been brought over
to the United States. In fact, it
was only 6 years ago when His

Cl Dnivc AUTO REPAIRS
CLKUU 3 AND SALES
1 AO/ Discount
To Students
All Makes And Mod* Corvair Specialist
Get a Fair Shake.... See ELROD
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 SO. MAIN PHONE: 378-8532

Divine Grace, A.C.
Bhaktivedanta Swami
Prabhupada brought them over
from India.
The followers of the Krishna
Temple in Gainesville live their
lives through their master.
The Vedas also help to answer
questions for followers of
Krishna. Such questions are:
What is our existence for bn
earth? Who are you? Why is
their violence?
On Monday and Wednesday
evenings in room 7, at 7 p.m. in
Peabody Hall, a course in
Transcendental Science is
offered, through the efforts of
the Krishna house. At the
present time they are trying to
get the course accredited.
Anyone is welcome to take part
in the course.



Calcutta cyclist visits Gainesville
te*-3*4

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Aloke Baneijee, a student at
the University of Calcutta
(India), was in Gainesville
Thursday on the latest stop of
his tour around the world, which
he is taking on a bicycle.
50,000 miles and 23 months
ago, Banerjee left Calcutta with
a friend, Indrajij Mukherjee.
Since then, Baneijee has visited
51 countries and still plans to
visit Luxembourg, France,

Gainesville clinic run
by medical students
By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Last spring, UF medical students and faculty founded the
Northeast Gainesville Community Clinic at the Bartley Temple
Methodist Church, at N.E. Bth Ave. Students and faculty volunteer
their time three nights a week to treat patients on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
Sunday school materials are pushed aside and wooden partitions
and portable examining tables are set up.
On an average night, when Im there, we see about 15 patients,
said Dr. John Schwab, one of the volunteer faculty members.
The number of patients has increased during the year as the clinic
has gained acceptance, he said.
The clinic was met with skepticism and rejection when first
proposed and in the beginning, few patients came.
Medicine isnt divorced from social problems, said Mandel, a
third year med student. It represents a frustration that institutions
dont relate to the problems. Here, we're getting to relate to people as
people, not patients. The education experience shouldn't be confined
to Hie walls of a medical school.
Volunteers rotate schedules, with about 4 or 5 medical and nursing
students working each night the clinic is open. The senior students
supervise and there is always at least one physician on hand.
The dink is open from 6:30 to 10:30 p. m.
Students do the main work, under very close supervision,
Schwab said. Practicing physicians in the community also volunteer
and are on call, as well as various consultants who may be called in on
special cases.
FIRST WE OFFER TO SHIP
YOUR VOLVO HOME FREE
FROM THE FACTORY.
THEN WE MAKE IT WORTH
YOUR WHILE TO DECLINE
OUR GENEROUS
If you delivery on a Volvo in Europe and drop it off
at the Volvo factory in Sweden, well ship it to New York,
Baltimore or Portsmouth, Virginia for free.
This wonderful deal has just one drawback-you have to
drive back to the Volvo factory to take advantage of it.
So we offer an alternative* Drop your Volvo off in
Amsterdam, Oslo, Bremerhaven, Antwerp, Helsinki,
Copenhagen, Hamburg, Bremen, Rotterdam or Stockholm
and well ship it back for just $l2O.
Which is about one-third of what youd have to pay if you
did it yourself.
Either way you ship your Volvo back, you save money on it.
And either way, you get a car that lasts a long time. We
can't guarantee how long, of course, but nine out of every
tenVblvos registered here in the last eleven years are still
on the road.
Which means that after three years, you can stop putting
your money into car payments. And start putting it into
other things.
Like more trips to Europe. (ypsffi)
For a free copy of our Tourist Sales brochure, come in.
flarfred Auto Import#
Your New Volvo Deoler

Spain, Great Britain, Eastern
Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan
and Southeast Asia.
Mukherjee was separated from
Baneijee in Mexico and has not
been heard from since. Baneijee
fears for his friends safety.
After leaving India, the
cyclists traveled through the
Middle East where, in Syria, two
people painted we are friends
of the Israelis on the bikes.
We were nearly killed,
Banerjee recalls.
The Indians proceeded across

Southeast Europe, North and
West Africa. Banerjee said the
food and roads in that part of
the world, especially Mali, were
the worst he had seen, though
the people were nice.
In South America, the
Calcutta students walked 84
miles through the Andes
mountains. After going through
Mexico and much of North
America, Banerjee arrived in Los
Angeles where he shipped his
bicycle to Sydney but found
that he lacked the fare to go
himself.
Banerjee is now hitchhiking to
Miami. In the U.S., he is meeting
with Indian students on various
college campuses.
The weather in Florida is
hot, Banerjee stated,
sometimes worse than India.
The world traveler expects to
encounter some hostility in

r*V M>i
tJ/.kJLjL <§3^
*X Album!
NOW
NOW 5?3 £2l
TODAY, SATURDAY
AND MONDAY-ONLY'.
*' ; >. '3, V, :
J- If 'ti %
"

Britain, but quickly added,
people, especially in small
towns and villages, are usually
friendly.
When he gets to Moscow, the
Indian will ride on the famous
Trans-Siberian railway to
Vladivostok and take a ship to
Japan.
English is the closest thing to
a universal language, Banjeree
adds, but French and Spanish,
(which he has learned on the
road) are helpful too.
The entire trip will probably
take three years. I've enjoyed it
all, everyone is very generous,
Banerjee said.
* GUNS-GUNS-GUNS
* Inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair.*
* Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith
It gun dealer, Micanopy.
*

Friday, April 23.1971, Tha Florida AMplor,

*** --
S WL
til
Aloke Banerjee
... worldwide cyclist
ASCIEPIAOACEAE
coming! 11

Page 19



Page 20

, Tha Florida AMI gator, Friday, April 23,1971

dfc* ti -gs "Sr L. c J
* . : v*?
Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

GRE IS APRIL 24
The Graduate Record
Examination is to be given at
8:15 a.m on Saturday, April 24,
in Carlton Auditorium.
PRESIDENTIAL, SENATE
COMMITTEES NOMINEES
Members of the faculty
interested in serving on
University committees or in
recommending others for
vacancies are urged to send their
recommendations in writing to
Dr. James L. Wattenbarger at
Norman Hall. The Senate

Friday, April 30
Baseball; U of F vs. Tennessee,
Home (2)
Dept, of Humanities & JWRU:
Code Name Phoenix",
Mixed Media, University
Aud., 8:15 pm
SGP: Rathskeller "Game"
Broward Hall Dance, Broward
Hall, 9 p.m.
Union Movie: "Good-bye
Columbus", Union Aud.
BOX OFFICE SALES
Florida Players: "Dark of the
Moon", GP $1.50, Other
students SI.OO, I.D. $.75 (On
sale Monday)
Friday, April 23
Union Movie, "The Loved One",
Union Aud.
Celebration 7V Film Festival
Jonas Mekas, MSB Aud.
SGP: Rathskeller "Ewing
Streets"
Towers & Jennings Area
Concert: "Southern
Comfort", Towers Area, 9
pm
Saturday, April 24
Union Movie: 'The Loved One",
Union Aud.
Union Dance: "Free Love Free
Ride", Terrace, 9 pm.
Sigma Chi "Derby Day, Broward
Field
Vjr Badminton Club, Fla. Gym,
10 am.

ARE YOU A STUDENT?

Nominating Committee consists
of three presidential appointees:
Dr. Buford D. Thompson,
professor, I FAS vegetable crops,
and Dr. Wattenbarger: and four
members of the steering
committee, Dr. Billy G.
Dunavant, professor and director
of nuclear sciences; Dr. Ray
Fahien, professor of chemical
engineering; Dr. Thomas A.
Scott, professor of physics, and
Dr. John D. Butterworth,
professor and chairman of
marketing.
The nominating committee
wishes to consider
recommendations from the

university calendar

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

International Club picnic, Ocala
State Forest, Meeting at Int'l
Center 9 am.
India Club Movie: "Satyakam",
Union Aud., 1:30 pm.
Sunday, April 25
Union Movie: "Experimental
Films", Union Aud.
Monday, April 26
Union Movie: "The Seventh
Seal", Union Aud.
Baseball: U of F vs. Miami,
Home
French Club: Evening of french
songs. Apt. No.
230-Hawaiian Village, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, April 27
Baseball: U of F vs. Miami,
Home
UF Duplicate Bridge, Union 150
C&D, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept.: Florida String
Quartet, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, April 28
UF Badminton Club, Norman
Gym, 8:00 p.m.
Circle K meeting, Union 361,
7:30 p.m.
Sky Lab Meeting, McCarty Hall
Aud., 1:30 pm.
Thursday, April 29
Union Movie: "Good-bye
Columbus", Union Aud.

faculty prior to making its
report. President O'Connell has
asked the committee to forward
to him two nominations for each
vacancy on committees for
which the members are elected
by the senate.
It is President O'Connell's
desire to appoint as many
faculty as possible to
presidential committees. In
general, nominations should be
for persons not now serving on
committees. The nominating
committee in its recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations will not only consider the
interests and qualifications of
prospective members, but also

rank and college distribution and
special requirements as to
expertise.
A list of committees, with
persons currently serving on
them, is available in the office of
each dean and department
chairman. Each faculty member
now serving on a presidential or
senate committee also had a
copy of this list.
Letters forwarding
nominations should reach Dr.
Wattenbarger prior to May 1. A
brief statement of the interests
and qualifications of faculty
members, especially those with
recent appointments that you
recommend, will be appreciated.
PFPL MEETING
The Public Functions Policy and
Lectures Committee will meet
Friday April 30 at 2 p.m. in
Room 355, Reitz Union.
MIDTERM EXAMS
All students enrolled in the
classes below are expected to
take these tests and each must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security Number.

T^k^^Break
H
I
enjoy
The Florida Alligator

The University Calendar will be
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "Whet's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G*72 Union.

CSS 111 MIDTERM
The CSS 111 midterm will be
given Tuesday, April 27, at 7
p.m. All students report to
Carleton (Walker) Auditorium.
MS 204 MIDTERM
The MS 204 midterm will be
given Wednesday, April 28, at 7
p.m. All students report to
Carleton (Walker) Auditorium.
CPS 123 MfoTERM
The CPS 123 midterm will be'
given Thursday, April 29, at 7
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with: A report to Carleton
(Walker) Auditorium; B to Little
101 or 109; Cto 4,8, 10,
12,14,15, 211,213 or 219; D-E
to Little 221, 223, or 225; F to
Little 207, 213, 227, 233, 235,
237 or 239; G to Little 201,
203, 205, 215, 217 or 219; H-J
to McCarty 86 or 186; K-L to
Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7,10, or 11;
M to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
114, 201 or 205; N-0 to. Bryan
201; P-Q to Floyd or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;Sto
Carleton (Walker) Auditorium;
T-V to Little 113, 121 or 125;
W-Z to Bryan 120.



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Our Gator Girl is Cynthia Raye Perkins, lUC, from Fort Walton
Beach. She is a member of the Gator ski team and is planning a major
in architecture or interior design. Cynthia likes piano, drawing and
photo modeling, as you can see here.

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|| out service or drive-in for an "in-car picnic. AHHHg
I JERRY'S SOUTH JERRY'S NORTH (span 24 hours daily)
I 2310 S.W. 13th St. & 1505 N.W. 13th St.

One out of four students
unemployed on graduation

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
One out of every four UF
graduates in the last ten years
has been unemployed upon
graduation, according to Maurice
Mayberry director of the UF
Placement Office.
In a bulletin from the UF
Division of Information services,
Mayberry said the job situation
for college graduates is not as
grim as is commonly believed.
The number of available jobs
is approximately equal to the
number of college graduates,
said Mayberry, but educators
have come to believe it is normal
to have five jobs for every
graduate.
The complete breakdown of
the status of student
employment and placement
upon graduation for the last ten
years was reported in the
bulletin as follows: employed,
50 per cent; entering military
service, 10 per cent; continuing
education, 15 per cent; and 25
per cent unemployed.
From an employment
standpoint, UF graduates from
December 1970 faired worse
than the ten year average. The
bulletin showed only 39 per cent
of the December graduates had
been hired, seven per cent joined
the armed services, 24 per cent

1~~
asx.-'
Maurice Mayberry
... UF placement director
continued their education, one
per cent was composed of
females who were married and
did not seek employment or
volunteer workers such as Vista
or Peace Corps, and 29 per cent
unemployed.
Mayberry believes college
students should have some idea
of the direction of their careers
prior to graduation, and a
college graduate can no longer
expect a job to come knocking
at the door.
In the bulletin, Mayberry said
the problem will not be solved
until effective and intelligent

, Friday,, April 23,1971, Thr Florida Alligator

career planning*' becomes
common practice for a student.
The United States
Department of Labor, according
to Mayberry, predicts 8 per cent
of the jobs available in the next
decade will not require a college
education. This will lead to a
renewed respect. for vocational
schools* and more careful
planning and programming in
the entire educational spectrum.
Massive government
cutbacks in expenditures for the
military and the space program,
as well as the stopping of funds
for the SST, will have a
detrimental effect on the job
situation, said Mayberry.
The government could
redirect many of these people
who were layed off into meeting
the ecological needs of the
nation.
Mayberry said majors in the
physical sciences, chemistry and
physics, in particular, are
currently the hardest hit by the
job situation.
Opportunities in these fields
should open up again before
1980, Mayberry said.
Long term career
opportunities, the placement
director believes, are brightest in
medical science, financial
management, systems
engineering, and economics.

Page 21



Page 22

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LAST
CHANCE



Cabinet changes announced
Haitis Duvalier dies, son to take over

By REG CROWDER
and
CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writers
Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier,
president for life of Haiti, died
Wednesday night. The
announcement over the
government radio station
Thursday morning said he had
been ill for three months. He
was 64.
Duvaliers son Jean-Claude
took power.
Hie announcement of the
younger Duvaliers succession
included several appointments to
the new cabinet.
Adrian Ramond, brother of
the head of the Haitian army,
was named minister of foreign
affairs. Political observers said
this meant Jean-Claude would
probably have the backing of the
military.
Other appointments were
Luckner Cambronne, minister of
the interior who is in charge of
police and defense, and Edouard
Francesque, secretary of finance.
There were no visible signs of
revolt by mid-day Thursday.
Schools were ordered closed
and all movie houses were
ordered shuttered for the week
in honor of the grey haired
dictator who exercised iron
fisted rule of the black republic
since 1957.
Before his death Papa Doc
designated his overweight
playboy son as successor,
engineering a referendum to
confirm his choice.
Robert I. Rotberg, a professor
of political science and author of
the book, Haiti, the Politics of
Squalor was asked recently of
Jean-Claudes prospects.
He said it might be only a
matter of hours after Papa Docs
passing before Haitis veteran
politicians begin chewing the
boy to pieces.
Jean-Claude, he said, knows
nothing of politics and has been
interested primarily in cars and
girls.
Another possibility is that old
veterans could use Jean-Claude
as a front.
The timing of Papa Docs
death holds some irony. It was
announced on April 22. He had
always considered 22 his lucky
number. He installed as
president for lift on June 22,
1964. Haitis last elections were
on Jan. 22,1967.
Although Jean-Claude seems
to have the army under control

mRCEDE^^
3 *ill
dilllNG & CLARK
4300 fsfcl3th St. 372-4226
, OR
AVE & 2ND ST S.E.

Alligator V
Looks L at p
Latin \ y
America\j
it is not known what the status
is for the dreaded Ton Ton
secret police. The
elder Duvalier had used them as
a counterbalance to the power
of the army.
They operated an
uncontrolled reign of terror,
living by extortion and killing at
the slightest offense, until about
1967, when Duvalier began to
clamp down on them.
CUBA
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel
Castro rejected Monday any
possibility of a reconciliation
between his government and the
United States.
In a two hour speech, the
Cuban premier said Cuba did not
wish to rejoin the Organization
of American States, from which
Cuba was expelled from the
OAS for giving support to
revolutionary movements in
Venezuela, Guatemala and
Panama.
Castro reiterated his
govemmeiits position of
supporting revolutionary
movements anywhere in the
Western Hemisphere.
This statement of Castros
foreign policy seems to indicate
a rejection of one of the
conditions which the American
government had stated for a
reapproachment.
The conditions were that the
Cuban government must stop
meddling in the internal affairs
of other Latin American nations
and cut his regimes military
dependance on the Soviet
Union.
Castros statement of foreign
policy came at a speech
comemorating the 10th
anniversary of the defeat of a
CIA-sponsored invasion of
Cuban by exiles.
. The Yankee imperialists have

no right and no basis for
dreaming of any kind of
normalization of relations with
Cuba or reconciliation with
Cuba, Castro said.
And, even though there seems
to be a sentiment among OAS
nations that Cuba should return
to the organization; Castro
denounced the horde of
bandits in the OAS, and
repeated that Cuba is
supporting and will continue to
support revolutionary v
movements in Latin America.
Meanwhile, in Washington,
Rep. Claude Pepper (D.Fla.)
introduced a resolution
Wednesday saying the United

WE HAVE
ALL
STEREO &
PHONOGRAPH
NEEDLES
pfr.vrx stereo]
PHONt j 8 733 ;

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felfcAHO UiHIO. 372-6189 t

States should withhold
diplomatic recognition of Cuba
as long as Castro remains in
power.
Pepper said the thaw in
our relations with Communist
China should not kindle the
hopes in the Castro regime that
the United States will ever
accept the prescence of an
agressive Communist regime on
its Doorsteps.
EXHIBIT
The Center for Latin
American Studies will sponsor
an art exhibit in the lobby of the
Graduate and International

wwavOTOTWOTpifgSSIfSSSSSaMHMNMM
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
PAI TWO FARM FRESH EGOS
B (Cooked the way you like them)
*ll HOT BUTTERED GRITS
Uliy GOLDEN TOAST
Jerry's North FRESHLY BREWED COFFEE
(mu im.) Jerry's South
T 505 NW 13 St. 2310 SW 13 St.

Fridpy, April 23,1971, Th* Florid* AMpMor,

jT 1
B Wfcty-W Jf > JB I
PtofAporoPTHg VCAVENS (T 1
/ IB

' I B I
IB
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THE GUYS SLACKS GRLSLOVEo I
:>* n

Studies building April 26
through 30.
The paintings, ceramics and
drawings have a Carribean
motiff. They are the work of
Miss Elisabetta La Monaca, an
Italian-born painter and
sculptress.
Miss La Monaca has had
several one-man shows, most
recently at the John J. Myers
gallery in New York, the Gdcria
National de Bellas Artes in the
Dominican Galena
II Camino In Rome.
Miss La Monaca is the wife of
Gustavo Antonini, a research
professor working with the
Center.

Page 23



The
! Florida
91OW * *v£
Alligator

Spring drills taking toll ;
Injured list swells to 20

By LEE DEHMLOW
Alligator Sports Witter
Spring practice is taking its
toll of players as the third week
of drills draws to a dose.
Thursday's injured list had no
less than twenty names on it.
Topping off the list is
<>' y,/Jill
Gene Conrad
... broken hand

Bucks win first

MILWAUKEE (UPI) During
halftime of the Baltimore
Bullets-Milwaukee Bucks game
Wednesday night, Lew Alcindor
was presented the trophy as
most valuable player in the
National Basketball Assodation
by NBA Commissioner Walter
Kennedy.
Then, in the third quarter, Big
Lew went out and showed the
10,746 fans in the Milwaukee
Arena as well as a national
television audience just why
he won the award.
Alcindor had scored only
eight points in the ffast half,
playing just nine minutes
because of fouls.
In the third period he scored
18 points as he led the Bucks to
a 17-point lead an eventual
98-88 win over the Bullets in the
first game of their best-ofeeven

Gators need Auburn wins
to catch SEC Vanderbilt
By SIM SMITH
AHiprtor Sports Writ*
They are all must games now, coach Dave Fuller said
Thursday in reference to the Gators visit to Auburn this
weekend for a two game set. The Gators are 5-4 and are
struggling to catch league leading Vanderbilt, 6-2.
"Vandy has the advantage of six home games remaining/*
Fuller explained. The Gators havrbnly three more home games
against SEC rivals.
Florida will probably throw ace pitcher Tom Seybold in
game and Dong Corbett will be the Hrdy choke to start
Saturday.
Seybold now stands 5-1 on the year and appears to be in top
form. Corbetts record is 3-3 but the freshman righthander has
won Hs bat two Mutt andJo&tf wty
, Auburn altohu record 0f,5-4 and the Tigeis are aiiilHWCitt
i to scNwASTMr ace>; Rick Eisenacher and Earl Nance. TOT*
Tigers and the Gators split a pair of games earlier this season in
Gainesville.
Florida will face arch rival Miami Monday and Tuesday.
Last years games were ones to remember as each team won
two. The contests saw players on both teams swinging at things
other than baseballs.

l^RvP^tt'''Va*.** *W! * .v..
ryyA v>v. - -* *-

quarterback Chan Gailey, who
was last fall's freshman signal
caller. Until last Saturday, he
was playing behind John Reaves,
but during the scrimmage he
suffered a shoulder separation
that will keep him out of the
rest of spring practice.
Carlos Alvarez, Mike Dwyer,
H
*^|. ipi-*
Dennis Tucker
... undergoing tests

series for the NBA
championship.
Alcindor easily outplayed
Baltimore center Wes Unseld,
who has given him trouble in the
past.
It's been a while since Wes
played against me," Alcindor
said. Maybe he just forgot how
to do it."
Unacid didn't think there was
any sense taking about his duel
with Alcindor.
Lew didn't do anything
different," he said. I just
played him the way 1 was told to
play him. Fm not up for a
head-to-head duel with Aldndor.
This is the Bullets against the
Bucks."
Bucks' coach Larry Costello
had said before the game the key
would be the bench strength of
both dubs.

Terry Meyer and Dennis Tucker
are all victims of knee injuries or
irritations. Alvarez, who had
surgery last fall will not
participate in any contact woik
at all unto fall practice begins.
Dwyer and Meyer have knee
irritations and Tucker is
undergoing tests at the Shands
Teaching Hospital to determine
the extent of his injury.
Greg Langley and Walter
Hutchinson have sprained
insteps, but Langley is expected
to return to practice Saturday.
Gene Conrad and Sandy
Ellison suffer from a broken hand
and a fractured thumb*
respectively, with both to return
to drills next Tuesday.
Halfback Lenny Lucas,
another outstanding player on
last fall's freshman team, is out
with a pulled groin muscle and
will be back on Tuesday, as wfll
Ken Booth who has a shoulder
sprain.
Jerry Coker is recovering from
the effects of a cold and will
participate in the Saturday
workouts. Scott Nugent is out
with a back injury.
Defensive standout Harvin
Clark is having neck problems
for an undetermined length of
time. Linebacker Rich Broedy is
suffering from an undiagnosed
ailment and entered the hospital
Thursday for tests.
Returning to Thrusday's
workouts were John Clifford, A1
Dorminy, Greg Harlow and Jim
Yancey.

Graves announces Monsanto contract
Florida Field fro be Asfrro-frurfed

By MARTY PERIMUTTER
ExmuUvo Sports Edftor
Astro-turf will be placed on
Florida Field, athletic director
Ray Graves announced Thursday
afternoon.
After our financial and
planning committees gave their
recommendations, we have
decided on Astro-turf for
Florida because they have had
the most experience in installing
artificial surfaces, Graves said.
Along with the committees,
three engineers bom file
university gars their reports on
me umerem styles or artmcsai
playing surfaces. The three
raprwnttd chemical, textile and
i I Threb compaities had
I expressed interest in delaying
its product on Flofida Field.
Minnesota Mining (3M),
makers of Tartan Turf, Allied
Chemical, and Poly Turf all had
given bids, Norm Carlson,
sports information director said.
But Tartan was the most

MARTY PER LMUTTER CHRIS LANE
Pv< r *lj-Y -gru #, Sportsjdi^...
'H : is.

Page 24

Freshman Richard Reece intercepts
~. one of few remaining unhurt in spring drills
*
I Intramurals I
linimiNiiNiiitiiiiiiiiHiminiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiniiiiiiii BRITT CRITTENTON mi
The intramural All Stars have retained the services of All America
receiver Carlos Alvarez for the Gator Great vsi Intramural All Star
Flag Football Championship.
Alvarez will not be hauling in passes but rather has agreed to coach
the offensive unit of the Stars. Bob Allen, Director of Intramurals and
mastermind of last years All-Star win will be heading up the defensive
unit.
The Stars lineups are beginning to take shape and the coaches are
predicting that the Gator Greats may not even be able to keep in dose
this year.
Fans are reminded that proceeds of the game will be donated to the
Gator Loan Fund where the Federal Government will match each
dollar on a 9-1 basis. Admission is only SO cents.
It has been reported that the Gator Great team has been having
special workouts in the back of the Steve Spurrier Health Center in
preparation for the big game. The Greats are not taking this one
lightly after last years shellacking.
Professional teams represented by the Greats include the New York
Jets, the L.A. Rams, the San Francisco Forty-Niners, the Chicago
Bears, Cincinnati Bengals, Detroit Lions and the PhfladdphiaEagles.
Other teams that might be represented are the Atlanta Falcons with
Harmon Wages and the Haiti more Colts with Paul Maliska.

Ray Qtmn
... picks Astro-turf
said, we steered away from
; ASed because they haven't
toadied any fcirffces at yet.
Astro-turf, made by Monsanto
Corporation in Pensacola, has
over 45 fields installed and is the
most proven, Graves said.
Coaches like Frank Broyles
and Darrell Royal have

Ray Graves

, The Florida Aligptor, Friday. April 23,1971

Astro-turf on their playing fields
and they have had national
champions to the past couple of
years, Graves said.
Footha nach Doug Dickey
had Tutan Turf to Tesmeaee
when he was head coach these.
But, Graves aid, these were
more abradant on that field and
coach. Dkkay recommended
something elan
Work -sa the subsurface will
begin biSO with the entire
scheduled for
completic* before the annual
high sdv -yd tUhSta football game
July 35,
Grave* wfe? ihe total price will
come ;>?proximately
subsurface
material eod labor being
! furnished by county and fcity
efforts.
Gatoy% high schools will
be abk i*? *e field for
football ;sarn in the fall as they
will b scheduled around
unfreraty-ielated events. .



Chamberlain,Ali tosxjuarmnff

By WILLIAM VERIGAN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK (UPI)
Muhammad Ali, who suffered
his only defeat in 32
professional fights last month to

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Joe Frazier, and 7-fooM
professional basketball star Wilt
Chamberlain are making plans
for a fight in Houstons
Astrodome on July 26 with each
man receiving $1 million.
Chamberlain, 34, has never

had a professional fight but he
said that he plans to fly to
Houston today to complete
arrangements for the bout. The
Los Angeles Laker center said no
contracts have been signed but
that he was interested in the
bout, which has been more than
four years in the making.
Representatives for Ali also
were in Houston to complete
negotiations.
However, the bout could still
run into a snag if the Supreme
Court rules unfavorably on Alis
appeal of his draft evasion
conviction. The Supreme Court
heard arguments from the
former champion's lawyers this
week and will make its final
decision in June.
Ali, also known as Cassius
Clay, and Chamberlain had
discussed a possible title fight
more than four years ago before
Ali was stripped of the title for.
refusing to go into the Army.
However, the bout never came
off at the time and plans were
shelved until Alis comeback last
y ear
Archers host
state Tourney
Over 70 archers from around
the state will be competing this
weekend in the Florida
Collegiate State Tournament.
The tournament begins
Saturday at 9 ajn and will
continue until awards at 5 pjn.
Trophies will be presented to
the first place teams and to first
place individual high scorers in
each class. Medals will be
awarded for second and third
place finishers.

After Ali defeated Jerry
Quarry and Oscar Bonavena in
his first two comeback fights,
plans were revived for the
showdown. Afi was defeated by
heavyweight champion Frazier
in a Match 8 title fight, but the
setback didn't dampen the
former champion's enthusiasm
for a meeting with Chamberlain.
Ali, at 6-2, would be giving
away nearly a foot in height,
more than 60 pounds in weight
and much in reach against
Chamberlain. However,
Chamberlain is five years older
than Ali and his basketball knees
are questionable.
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GRADUATES
MAKE RESERVAUONS
EARLY FOR-
U-HAUL
I TRUCKS AND TRAILERS
IRA'S GULF SERVICE
I 707 N.W. 13th St. 373-3541

If you've got a class in Norman

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STATION

Page 25



Page 26

. Tho Florida Altigator,Friday. April 2$

Montreal waits for playoff foe

By GARY KALE
UPI Sports Writer
The odds are mounting that
this time the Montreal Canadiens
will do the sweeping and wait

Springfield paces
AHL Colder duel
CLEVELAND (UPI) ) The Springfield Kings have taken a 2-1 edge
in semifinal playoffs for the American Hockey League Calder Cup and
Billy Orban has tied a playoff record.
Orban scored four goals Wednesday night for the Kings as they
edged the Cleveland Barons 6-5 in the third game of the semifinals.
The fourth game of the best-of-five series will be played at Springfield
Friday.
Orban was the first on the scoreboard for either team, sliding the
puck past the Cleveland goalie with 1:30 elapsed in the first period.
The Barons, however, came back with two goals, by Mike Chemoff
and Billy Heindl, before Orbans second goal tied the game at 2-2.
After exchanging three goals apiece, Orban broke loose at 7:04 in
the final period with his fourth goal to seal the Kings win.
,-J ., I VV- :
Colonels, Squires in
ABA best-of-three

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UPI)
The Kentucky Colonels-Virginia
Squires series for the American
Basketball Association's Eastern
Division playoff title has been
reduced to a best-of-three
competition.
The Colonels evened the series
at 2-2 Wednesday night with a
128-110 victory as rookie Dan
Issel led the way with 31 points.
Issel was amply supported by
Darrel Carrier with 25 points
and Lou Dampier with 22.
Charlie Scott once again
paced the Squires with 30 points
but Virginia's next highest scorer
was Neil Johnson with 14.
The series now moves to
UCLAs Wicks
called best
college senior
NEW YORK (UPI) Sidney
Wicks, the inspirational forward
of national champion UCLA,
became the first recipient
Wednesday of the Basketball
News' Joe Lapchick Trophy as
the country's outstanding senior
collegiate player.
Wicks received a total of 125
points in balloting of 31
sportswriters across the nation.
Austin Carr of Notre Dame was
runner-up in the voting with 112
points.
"1
CAMPUS REP
fxi 1M I /I I V I
* ; v^l
MILLER-BROWN
im.iotjaih ?Ti J

for the survivor of a prolonged
New York-Chicago Stanley Cup
semifinal playoff series.
Montreal, yet to taste defeat
by a National Hockey League
expansion club in playoff

Hampton, Va., for the fifth
game Friday night with the sixth
game scheduled for Saturday
night in Louisville.
The Western Conference final
playoff could end tonight when
Indiana meets Utah at Anderson,
Ind. Utah holds a 3-1 lead in the
best-of-seven series.
Foster ready
for title fight
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI) Light
heavyweight champion Bob
Foster sparred four rounds
Wednesday and pronounced
himself ready for Saturday
night's nationally-televised
15-round title fight with
fourth-ranked challenger Ray
Anderson.

PTAKE IT FROM
TAURUS
THAT THE
I BURGERS ARE BIGGER
r ATBURGER KING
| jjjSS 10 NW 16TH AVE

competition, routed Minnesota
7-2 Tuesday night.
New York was in an enviable
position after splitting a pair
with the Black Hawks in
Chicago. The Rangers now have
the home ice advantage and can
clinch the series by winning their
remaining home games.
Although the experts are
predicting a four-game sweep for
Montreal, Canadiens coach A1
Mac Neil doesn't see such a fast
finish.
I thought wed never get
going in the first game, Mac Neil
said, referring to Montreal
ending the first period of the
opener on the short end of a 1-0
score. Theyre aggressive, but
fortunately thev dont have the
reputation of that tough Boston
team.
Montreal took the defending
Stanley Cup Bruins in seven
games.
Most of the aggressiveness was
in she Montreal camp, however,
as Jacques Lemaire tied a

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playoff record with three goals
in the second period. Lemaires
easy handling of veteran goalie
Gump Worsley prompted
Minnesota coach Jack Gordon to
start Cesare Maniago in the nets
for tonight's game.
Ranger coach Emile Francis
pooh-poohs the home ice edge in
a playoff series. Chicago coach
Billy Reay agreed the teams
were evenly matched.

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DAVE MILLER M
1 I
Are pro-sports
entirely honest?
Those of us who have not yet read Ball Four, Out Os Their League,
or The Jocks are probably still under the impression that all those
connected with professional sports are honest, diligent Walter
Alston-George GippJack Armstrong-Dink Stover types. However,
hypocrisy, among other things, abounds in the big leagues, and here
are just a few outstanding examples:
... Denny McLain, former Detroit Tigers bad boy, who is now a
Washington Senators bad boy, holds the American League record for
most suspensions in one season.
Last year, he was suspended by Bowie Kuhn (Spiro Agnew with
glasses, a sort of extension of General Eckert as a pawn for the
owners), for, among things, conspiring in various ways with gamblers.
Kuhn called McLain gullible and avaricious.
Denny asked what those words meant. He was told Stupid and
greedy.
Denny replied, Yeah, I guess I am stupid and greedy.
Last summer, shortly before being suspended for carrying a gun in
the Tiger clubhouse (not to be confused with his suspension for
dumping water on sportswriters), Denny McLain spoke before the
Michigan legislature. Denny urged a crackdown by law enforcers on
campuses, suggesting that dissenting college students be dealt with
severely. Good ole law and order Denny McLain, always setting a fine
example for youngsters. Lock up the radicals for 10 years, but make
sure Denny McLain can pitch by July.
.. .Ted Williams, former surly player with the Boston Red Sox, is
now surly manager of the Washington Senators. When Williams was a
player, he used to take batting practice in left field, sometimes when
the other team was at bat.
Teddy Ballgame refused to wear a tie although ordered to do so by
his manager.
Teddy Ballgame used to scream when the manager wouldn't let him
bat against lefties.
He used to spit at fans, feud with writers, and all sorts of other fan
activities. He weighed 170 pounds then.
Williams is now manager of the Senators and weighs 240 or more
pounds. The Splendid Splinter is now quite fat. He demands that
Frank Howard lose weight. He platoons Mike Epstein, refusing to let
the latter hit against lefties. He complains about the team's fielding
now that Eddie Brinkman and Aurelio Rodriquez have been traded.
Oh, yes, Teddy Ballgame is now a great law n' order advocate, having
campaigned strongly for Dick Nixon in *6B. Bad boy Denny, meet
Teddy Ballgame.
.. .The National Basketball Association, particularly Jack Kent
Cooke, screamed when Seattle signed Spencer Haywood, former ABA
star. Those who did the most screaming were those who had tried the
hardest to sign Haywood before Seattle got the chance. Cooke offered
Haywood the most money then turned around and screamed the
loudest when Haywood chose Seattle. The Chicago Bulls filed suit
(later withdrawn) against Haywood, charging that he owed Chet
Walker $600,000 because Walker was injured against Seattle and that
Haywood dressed out.
The NBA has been screaming about Haywood having been signed
before completing his college eligibility.
Well, the NBA used to have a special territorial rights part of its
draft.
Cincinnati Royals drafted Oscar Robertson when he was attending
Attucks High in Indianapolis, and the Philadelphia Warriors drafted
Wilt Chamberlain when he was attending Overbook High in
Philadelphia.
The NBA refused to let Roger Brown, Connie Hawkins, and Doug
Moe play in the NBA because they had been approached by gamblers
in college, but the three were never charged with any crime.
So much for the ethics of the NBA.
VOLVOi
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Friday, April 23,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 27



Page 28

I. Tht Florida Alligator, Friday, April 23, 1971

'THERE IS ONLY ONE \ jfr
2445 S.W. 13 ST.
BONANZA Jake Out 378-0946 hs\ -2S&
"Congratulates the X^cor/1 f d&rW*'
I Player of the Week I Player Os The Weekl Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks, I
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OMIY Mike Killian ifj f
f\|Ntl j|/ r nr|J This week's Player of the week award goes
to Gator golf team captain Mike Killian.
PDAMF j? DAO Killian slammed a five-under-par 67 on Graduation, a time to say goodbye
I I\MPI C Os w Air Houston's Atiscocita Country Club course last t 0 one t YP * l*f and start a new
weekend to bolster the UF winning score en on - Your relatives and friends will
route to the All-America title. warrt * remember your college life
Ayi u too. We have the novelties for gifts
(JRIIf Florida edged out second-placed Texas by and w av Diplomas of Gratitude
two strokes, scoring 1169 against the for those who helped you through
Longhorn's 1171. Killian finished third school. For you, we have books to
_ individually in the tournament. a new library, official class
m c IJ If w help you through this last step
to a new life? Come by today I
MON.-FRI.
WATER. BEDS ZHT m A
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235 W. Univ. Ave.
372-7591
Next to Florida Theatre located in the Hub
'/