Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator'Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Robert Shevin has
been requested and urged, by
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder, to review the 1971
UF Housing contract for a
possible violation of student
constitutional rights. N
Uhlfelder said he was
prompted into action after
seeing a copy of the 1971
contract and an article published
in The Alligator. The clause in

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One-and-one-half-year-old Reed Martin, 2PS (pre-school), is a little
excited or upset about the presence of an Alligator photographer.
Reed is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Richard Martin of Diamond Village.

Middlebrooks proposes
antipoverty corporation

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Common Cause Presidential
Candidate Don Middlebrooks
proposed a Gainesville
corporation Wednesday to
revitalize the low-income
ghetto section of the
community.
The corporation, dubbed New
Gainesville, Inc., will seek funds
from both the Small Business
Administration (SBA) and
nonprofit foundation donations.
According to Middebrooks.it
would give business and law

Uhlfelder urges contract review

question is section 3(E) of the
contract which allows
authorized university personnel
to enter a students room for
maintenance, housekeeping and
conduct purposes.
The section is disturbing,
Uhlfelder said, because of its
vagueness and the unlimited
possibilities for its use.
Uhlfelders letter urging
Shevins consideration was
prepared and sent out as an SG
action, with the hope that
Shevin would consider the

students the opportunity for
some actual educational
experience through providing
low-income ineffectively run
businesses with capital,
managerial assistance and a
student market.
By using the academic
expertise available plus financial
support from the federal, state
or local level, we can attack a
problem thats been totally
ignored by the university and
community.
This isnt particularly
planned to help the Gainesville
merchant, Middlebrooks said,

student body president a state
official.
The attorney general will not
prepare an opinion unless the
request is from an official of the
state.
I do not feel that just
because a student is required to
live in a dormitory he should be
subjected to different standards
of justice than other citizens,
Uhlfelder said.
Ive sent this request to
Shevin for several reasons, he
continued. 1 found out last
year I could not go to court with
it because I am not allowed to
use SG funds in a court action.
(Uhlfelder attempted in the
summer of 1970 to test a
question concerning voter
registration in court and was
denied the use of SG funds. He
later won the point on an
attorney general opinion
requested by the Alachua
County supervisor of elections.)
I think the attorney general

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 63, No. 116

Alleged illegal clause
Student files complaint
on housing agreement

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Assignments Editor
A UF freshman said he is
filing a complaint in Gainesville
circuit court this morning over
what may be an illegal waiver of
students rights in the 1971-72
Housing Agreement.
In addition, a motion is being

but to generate jobs and capital
within the low-income area that
will stay there.
The plan calls for the creation
of an economic development
corporation through either SG
or an independent group of
student and faculty members.
We wont need
administrative support to
organize the corporation,
Middlebrooks said. However we
will attempt to seek university
(See 'Middlebrooks'page 3)

should be concerned with the
protection of students rights,
Uhlfelder said.
His letter first spelled out
university policy which requires
a freshman to live in the dorm
and other students the choice to
live on-campus or in other
off-campus housing.
I went on to dedry the effect
upon individuals who are
required to sign the contract.
Uhlfelder asked the attorney
general, Does the university
have the right to inspect a room
for. conduct purposes without
following the normal rules of
criminal procedure to insure the
students constitutional rights?
A student should have the
right to be secure in his dwelling
as would an individual who lives
outside the university.
Im pretty pessimistic over
the result of this, Uhlfelder
said. Anytime a university does
something its pretty hard for

University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, April 15, 1971

filed by David Gordon, a
resident of Hume Hall for a
restraining order against the UF;
Harold Riker,director of housing;
UF president Stephen C.
OConnell and the Board of
Regents.
I strongly feel that a portion
of the UF housing agreement, as
it now stands, forces a student
to contract against his or her
constitutional rights to be free
from unlawful searches and
seizures, Gordon said.
The provision in the contract
to which Gordon is referring is
3*E under the category of
conditions and room
assignments. It reads,
Authorized University
personnel may enter student
rooms for inspection,
maintenance, housekeeping and
conduct purposes.
Gordon said he felt the clause
constituted an invasion of
privacy in allowing university
personnel to enter a students
room for conduct purposes
without any type of probable
cause or notification to the
student.
x According to Gordon this
constitutes a possible breach of
fourth and fourteenth
amendment rights.
Since the due date for UF

state court, or other officials, to
do anything about it.
Uhlfelder said he saw
problems in bringing the clauses
constitutionality to court. If a
case of that nature were to lose
there, it would in effect be
setting a precedent and the
attorney general would then not
be able to comment on it.
Uhlfelder said a side benefit
of requesting an opinion from
the attorney general would be
to establish the right of a
student body president to
request an opinion. It would
increase his power, he said.
I think weve presented the
attorney general with a
legitimate question. I feel it is
within his right to rule on the
validity of this clause. It is
possible that the net result may
only be an informal request to
the university to reconsider its
housing contract.

housing contracts is today the
urgency of gaining relief from
the unconstitutional provisions
is utmost, Gordon said.
The complaint calls for:
Injunctive relief from the
court for the clause in question
to be stricken from the housing
contract. For this to be
accomplished a full hearing
would be necessary.
A temporary restraining
order to be issued which would
postpone the due date of the
housing contracts.
The complaint is being filed as
a class action which would affect
all UF students who have to sign
contracts to live in UF housing
next year.
Gordon said he was
influenced to go to court after
reading his contract following a
campaign appearance in his
dorm by student body
presidential candidate Bob
Mandell and through articles in
the Alligator.
I am bringing this action
with the aid of Bob Mandell and
Real Party and several other
concerned UF students to
protect all students who have
been placed in the same
situation which I now find
myself, Gordon said.



Page 2

I The Florida Alligator; Thursday, April 15* 1971

Candidates reply
9
Do you plan to attend University Senate meetings and
what do you plan to do to strengthen student influence on
that body?
808 MANDELL
Yes, I plan to attend not only University Senate meetings, but
Student Senate meetings as well.
I feel that student goals in the area of academic changes often
correlate with those of assistant professors. Although neither group is
presently allowed to vote in the University Senate, by working
together, we can have a greater voice in attempted change. We will
continue making every effort to acquire voting privileges for both
student representatives and assistant professors.
DON MIDDLEBROOKS
I plan to attend University Senate meetings. I was a member this
year and attempts were made to restmture the senate. The five
student members now are allowed to make motions, but are still
denied the right to vote. Unless the senate is willing to reorganize
itself into a legitimate representative power, the time spent is largely a
waste of time. The reason for going to meetings is to at least present a
student view although that view is generally ignored. Continuing
efforts need to be made to reapportion the senate; however, I am
pessimistic as to whether this will occur because of the vested interest
groups in the senate, particularly from A.I.F.A.S. (College of
Agriculture), who now control 25 per cent of the senate. I will
consider the possibility of an ad hoc senate composed of faculty and
students to demonstrate the farce the present University Senate is and
how much more effective a representative body could be.
LOWELL STANLEY
The University Senate is a most powerful body that must be dealt
with by any student body president. I will certainly attend meetings.
The effect of student influence depends on an information
transmission function. We must try to improve transmission by
reducing transmission costs and improving worth of student
involvement. More student representation is necessary but not
sufficient. Using student specialists, knowledgeable in their academic
disciplines, able to work with professors individually and as a group,
reasonable answers initiated by students and collaborated by academic
fact can be presented to the senate in a non-political, rational
expression. The senate members will have worked with students on
the answers to the problems. They will then be in a favorable position
to initiate action.
What are your proposals for restructuring University
College?
__________ LOWELL STANLEY
University College seeks to provide the student with a sampling of
the various disciplines available to him, so that he may'wisely choose
a major field of study, only after sufficient exposure to all the areas of
academic endeavor. The premise is a sound one, and mere abolishment
or so-called verticalization is not the answer. University College suffers
from a synergistic quality of being considered in the aggregate more
than the sum of its parts. One cannot view UC as a huge monolith.
Each comprehensive course must be examined as a separate entity.
The studies available at present have not gone far enough. A
restructuring of subject matter and not of the college itself must be
undertaken.
DON MIDDLEBROOKS
Attempts first of all need to be made to gain more voice on the
curriculum committee presently four students out of 16. This year,
Gail Merein, Secretary of Academics, worked to gain needed change in
the University College and her efforts need to be continued and
adopted. Option should be given to students as to choice of an
academic program rather than rigidly structured comprehensive
courses. Standardized testing should be abolished leaving the choice of
testing up to individual classes and professors. There is a need for
general education for students, but it shouldnt be as rigid and
structured as it is at present. Counseling should remain a vital part of
the University College and should be strengthened and spread into
other colleges as well. The critical year program should be expanded
in the University College.
808 MANDELL
In the area of academic reform pertaining to University College I
have proposed the following changes:
First, students would have the opportunity of exercising the
pass-fail option in several areas, particularly the sciences. Students
would be eligible to take three of the five courses required in science,
while exercising this option. In addition any two courses may be
taken using this pass-fail option for a total of five pass-fail courses.
Secondly, I propose that students be allowed to take the latter
thirty hours of C courses during their upper-division years. This
offers a two-fold advantage: one, students will be able to work on
their majors earlier in their college careers and two, University College
requirements will become more flexible and encourage greater
aca<%ni£ freedqm. r
The overall aim of this two-fold proposal is to obtain greater
curriqilunt flexibility for undergraduate students at the University
College level, without endangering the academic standing of UF.

Mk
Campus polling places 1
| # \
1 The polling places for the April 21 election will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The poll locations and their respective a
X colleges are as follows:
A LOCATION COLLEGE No. MACHINES No. ELECTED No. WORKERS i
honor court senate
\ 1. Graduate Library collonade Arts and Science 4 15 4
A 2. Norman Hall Education 2 14 3a
1 (area across from main A
1 aud. doors)
A 3. Engineering Complex Engineering 2 1 3 2 C
a (area adj. the entrance A
k north electrical building
A and Weil Hall) V
A 4. Bryan Hall collonade Business Administration 2 13 2 2
5. Architecture 8t Fine Arts Architecture 2 1 2 2
A (walkway between \
A buildings C and A) J
\ 6. Law Complex Law 2 1 2 2 j
l (rear collonade wall) 1
/ 7. Stadium (gate 3) Journalism 1 12 2 d
\ 8. McCarty Hall Agriculture 1 112 2
i (between building A z
A and B) A
\ 9. Rolfs Hall Forestry 11 1 J
Â¥ (entrance lobby)
A 10. Florida Gym Phs. Education 1 112$
/ (basement) A
i 11- Health Center Nursing, Medicine, Pharmacy 1 leach leach 2 1
Y (2nd floor lobby) and Health Related Professions X
A 12. Hume Hall UC 2 2d
J (walk by cafeteria)
l 13. Graham Hall UC 2 2 I
A (lobby) A
\ 14. Tolbert Area UC 2 elect elect 2 2
(South Hall study 2 5
/ room) from from A
A 15. Murphree Area UC 2 both lUC 2 A
(Fletcher K study me and
V lounge) and 7 f
A 16 Jennings Hall UC 2 2UC from 2 I
5 (lobby) 2UC I
17. Yu lee Area UC 2 2 t
A (front porch of Yu lee X
i haH) 1
18. Broward-Rawlings UC 2 2
/ (lobby of Broward) A
| 19. Carlton Aud. UC 2 2 A
(porch) Y
i TOTAL 19 polling places 34 is 40 40 Y
* Ballot Box f

Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!
at bookstores.

BIKE RALLY, rL
Hume Commuter Lot
Cross Campus Rally
5-Man Team Relays
W Skill Gymkanas

w ft
Winners in 3 Classes
rt a
wvimusa
*1 PRIZES | 3-Speeds
Pono* t>y *> i. Wayne fritz Union


holidays and* exam 0 ed| t PU b, l h d and during student
of then- au*hn Ed,tor,a,s represent only the official opinions
? ,^ d drBSS correspondence to the Florida Alligator Reitz
Amto?k ,d J n t 9 .r.H n,VerS,ty of F,or,da Florlda fleoi. ThJ
£SsM?ss*, ssr' c b m>,,w " u "" s* F0,.0,i,
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objectlonablS t 0 rev,se or turn awa V copy It considers
more than one Incorrect insurHon/J'* w not responsible for
\ several times Not?ces for an advertis m nt scheduled to run
\lnsertion for correctl n must be given before the next J



Stanley circulates and tests poll

By MICHAEL CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
A six-question poll is
circulating the UF campus put
out by Lowell Stanley and Ruthi
Whitman, independent
candidates, with the purpose of
finding out exactly how long it
takes to contact a majority of
UF students to vote on a certain
issue.
The poll was a result of
accusations by both the other
presidential candidates stating a
student plebiscite and poll could
not be done easily and
effectively.
We wanted to go to the
students, make an effort to show
them what we are talking about
can work,** Stanley said.

Middlebrooks...

academic credit for those
participating students.**
Although the proposal
identifies three advantages of a
nonprofit corporation, direct
student economic benefit would
not be its main purpose.
We are trying to provide the
student with the best
educational opportunity we can
find,** Middlebrooks said. That,
plus the, benefit to the
community, is what were
attempting to do.
The university has got to
realize it cannot ignore the city
of Gainesville. Gainesville is just
like a lot of other really small

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Started first period
Wednesday, students were
contacted over the phone, in
classrooms, and in snack bar
areas.
I havent been in touch with
the other four people working
with me, Miss Whitman said,
but already 1 have contacted
more than 900 students in a
couple of hours.
Dorm students will be
contacted through student
advisors or resident advisors,
according to Miss Whitman.
The six questions were:
Do you think SG has been
useful to you personally?
Would you support a
deemphasis of Homecoming
activities if it provided SG with
more spending capital for
student needs?

Southern towns, he continued.
You go from one part that is
beautiful into parts that have
been totally ignored by the
city.
The corporations board of
directors would be composed of
students, faculty members and
people from the Gainesville
community. They would
allocate funds and personnel
support to selected business
concerns.
We eventually hope to create
several new businesses in the
low-income districts of
Gainesville, Middlebrooks said.
These people are so deep in
poverty they cant get out
without some type of outside
assistance. New Gainesville, Inc.
could give it

Does UF need more
student involvement?
Would you like to see a
summary report of all SG
activities in The Alligator?
Do you support the present
University College system?
Would you be willing to
participate in a SG poll like this
once a month?
These questions were not
very important, Miss Whitman
said, but the purpose was to see
how quickly and effectively we
could reach the students.
22jH]

The poll was also discussed
last night when 12 independent
students met in room 334
Weaver at 7:30 to discuss a
unification of efforts between
the major and minor canditates
running independently.
Lasting a little more than an
hour, all the candidates
discussed their problems, which
were essentially the same,
according to Miss Whitman.
After we introduced each
other and told our purpose for
running, we discussed strategy

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- 1

Thursday, April 15,1971, Tt Florida AlHfstor,

and everyone seemed to be in
the same boat when it came to
bloc support and financial
backing, Miss Whitman said.
It was more of an
identification type thing where
* all the candidates, when
campaigning would state theyre
running under Lowell. No deals
were made, nothing of a You
support me and Ill support you
thing. We are just trying to
unify.
All except two candidates
agreed to help out.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 15,1971

Subcommittee favors penalty change

By 808 STIFF
Alligrtor Staff Writer
A bill reducing the penalty for
first-offense posession of
marijuana received a 3-2
approval in a subcommittee of
the Florida House Monday.
The bill, similar to one before
the senate, is a committee
rewrite of a bill introduced by
Reps. Don Hazelton (R-West
Palm Beach), Lew Whitworth
(D-Miami) and Jim Tillman
(R-Sarasota).
Tillman, who was
Doty receives
i.
Medallion
Dean Franklin A. Doty of
University College received the
Presidents Medallion from
President Stephen C. OConnell
Wednesday afternoon at the
Administrative Council Meeting.
Dean Doty is retiring after 25
years at UF, the last five spent as
Dean of University College.
Responding to President
OConnells compliments and
best wishes, Doty humorously
replied, Retiring is an
exhilirating experience. If I had
known it would be like this, I
would have done it earlier and
oftener.

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instrumental in the defeat of a
similar bill during the last
session, said, IVe been
wrestling with my conscience for
some time about the problem.
He said that previously he did
not know enough about the
situation to make a proper
decision.
I toured state prisons and
talked with persons who were in
for possession only. This showed
me that many judges were not
being lenient enough toward
first offenders, and that most of
those in the prison were just
experimenters, said Tillman.
IVe always said that if Im
wrong about something, 111
admit it and change my stand.
The bill prepared by Tillman
and Whitworth is designed to
aid the experimenter, not the
habitual user.
Whitworth, a former FBI
agent, said, The penalty and
the offense are out of balance
now. There is just no evidence
that this is so bad and so
dangerous to society that you
ought to be put in prison. Its
like giving the electric chair for
spitting on the sidewalk.
Tillman said that originally
they had hoped to make the new
bill more lenient but that to be
accepted by the public, it could
not be done now.

The bill affords misdemeanor
treatment to a person convicted
for posession of no more than
five grams of marijuana. This
could result in a maximun
penalty of one year
imprisonment and SI,OOO fine.
Tillman said that the Student
Government sponsored
marijuana study had some
influence on his decision.
I had already decided to
favor reducing the penalty but
the report offered new facts and
information that I didnt know,
Tillman said.
Tillman said he used the
report on a two hour radio show
in Sarasota and quoted directly
from it.

Lilt* to bowl in
f COMPETITION?!
| SEE AD ON PAGE 25 $

CARNIGRAS
IS
HERE

After the show, I received 37
phone calls, and only two were
opposed to the legislation.
The house bill is similar to the
senate bill with the exception
that it removes marijuana from a
narcotics classification and
places it under the harmful drugs
provision of the state statutes.
Although public opinion has
been favorable to the new bill,
adverse opinions would not
affect his decision now, Tillman
said.
Another factor that
influenced the legislators were
the student lobbyists. They
have been a tremendous help in
gathering information, Tillman
noted.

Hear:
rfflffl
playing a dance and concert performance on the South ;
Terrace of Reitz Union immediately following the ;
BICYCLE FOLLIES. Follies run from 12 noon to 2 PM |
and TRUTH follows from 2:00 PM to 6:00 PM,
Saturday, April 17, 1971.
Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union
'**^*^ AA *^*^*^^*****"**-- i, -

/ toured state prisons
and talked with persons
who were in for
possession only. This
showed me that judges
were not being lenient
enough toward first
offenders, and that most
of those in the prison
were just experimenters.
- Rep. Jim Tillman



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Thursday, April 15,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 15,1971

UF grad student appears
i v
on'Jeopardy, wins $1,240

A UF graduate student appeared on the television show Jeopardy
for three days and won a total of $1,240.
Jose Pelleya, a 25-year-old graduate student in education, said
he needed money and thought he could do as well on the shows as
other contestants.
Pelleya wrote to NBC in February and went to New York the last
week in March. He was tested and accepted for two shows,
Concentration and Jeopardy.
Pelleya won on April 8 and 9 and appeared again April 12 when he
was defeated.
In recounting his appearance, Pelleya provided some interesting
sidelights to the behind the scenes workings of a television show.
Pelleya said six shows are taped in a two day period with about a
15 minute break between each show. Pelley said no one had told him
he was supposed to bring a change of clothes for each show so he
appeared on his three shows in the same suit.
Pelleya said he had to wear make-up powder so he wouldnt sweat
under the hot television lights. Also, he said the producer of the show
talked to the contestants before the taping to psyche them up for
the game.
The stage for the show is large but the actual set that appears on
television is small because the props and cameras take up all the room.
The audience for the shows are present at the tapings and they
purchase tickets for a certain amount of time. Many members of the
audience are actually on a tour and attend other quiz shows during
the day.
Pelleya said he received a letter from UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, congratulating him. The letter said OConnell had not
actually seen Pelleya on the show but that his wife had.
Pelleya graduated from UF in 1969 with a BS. degree in
advertising and a minor in English. He spent a year teaching English
and other subjects to inmates at the state prison in Raiford before
returning to UF
Psychiatrist Szasz to give talk
Psychiatrist Thomas S. Szasz will lecture on The Manufacture of
Madness, April 20 at 8 p.m. in the Spessard Holland Law Center
Auditorium.
Szasz, professor of psychiatry at the New Yoik State University at
Syracuse, specializes in psychiatry in law.
The free talk is sponsored by the departments of law, psychology
and psychiatry.
For more information, call Fernando Melendes, 392-2074.

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f Delicacy of the Week
v From Lisas Garden of Oriental Delights



Communications week
scheduled tor April lv-22

By CHRISTY TILSON
Alligator Writer
A multitude of professional
journalists will be on the UF
campus April 19-22 for the 13th
Annual Communications Week
sponsored by the College of
Journalism and Communi Communications.
cations. Communications.
The activities, designed to
bring students and professionals
together, will be broken down
into four days, each highlighting
the four areas of journalism
advertising, public relations,
journalism, and broadcasting.
When the university first
changed to the quarter system,
the college experimented with
having one day each quarter,
but decided this year to return
to the week to concentrate
efforts for a major event.
According to coordinator Dr.
J.S. Detweiler, we lost
something. This is the first time
in three years we have put it
together as a whole.
Highlighting Broadcasting

Goffman, Stahmer
named advisors
Newly elected Accent Chairman Rodney Margol has appointed two
new advisors to his executive board for Accent 72.
The two appointees are Dr. Irving Goffman, chairman of the
Economics department, and Dean Harold Stahmer who is associate
dean for the College of Arts and Sciences.
Dr. Goffman and Dean Stahmer will start working for Accent May
4th and will serve till this time next year. They will have the power to
vote on committee decisions, but most of their influence will be of an
advisory capacity, according to Margol.
Both Dr. Goffman and Dean Stahmer have been active in student
concerns this year. I really feel lucky to get both of them, Margol
said.
According to Margol the rest of the Accent executive committee
will be chosen within the next two weeks. Anyone interested in
serving in this capacity should apply at the Accent activities desk,
third floor, Reitz Union.

PPIZZA CARRY OUTS-DINING ROOM
Serving the Univ. of Fie. with the finest in Italian food
TO SHOW OUR APPRECIATION FOR
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11:00 AM To 12:00 ~, <
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Day, April 19, will be Martin E.
Pinsker, director of radio
programming for CBS; luncheon
speaker, John W. Macy, Jr.,
president of the Corporation for
Public Broadcasting; and
banquet speaker Irwin A. Lewis,
director of election operations
for NBC news.
Journalism Day, April 20, will
feature luncheon speaker, Don
Bacon, White House
correspondent for Newhouse
News Service and a UF alumnus.
For the April 21 Public
Relations Day, the banquet
speaker will be Robert B.
Slawter, director of public
relations for Miller Brewing Co.
Among the speakers for
Advertising Day, April 22, are
Richard E. Coffey, promotion
director of Time Magazine;
Keith E. Crain, publisher of
Advertising and Sales'Promotion
Magazine.
The Florida Public Relations
Association Board of Directors
has scheduled its spring meeting
at 3:30 p.m. on April 21 at the

Reitz Union to tie in with Public
Relations Day activities.
The Alpha Delta
Sigma-Gamma Alpha Chi
Southeastern Regional
Advertising Convention is
scheduled to coincide with the
last two days of the week.
All events are scheduled in the
Union Ballroom.
The College of Journalism and
Communications has cancelled
all classes for the week.

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iy the author of Rally Round the Flag, 80y *... Dohir Gillie... etc. i
Tenure; or Old Teachers Never Die
Today let us discuss tenure, an academic custom which stipulates
that if a college doesnt fire a teacher fast enough, they are stuck with
him forever.
The rules of tenure vary from campus to campus, but in general,
a teacher gets tenure when he reaches the rank of associate professor
or, failing that, when he completes eight years on the faculty. There Thereafter,
after, Thereafter, he cannot be fired except for two rigidly defined causes: a) if he
is habitually nude during lectures; or b) if the college can prove he has
been dead for more than one semester.
Small wonder, then, that colleges are so careful about granting
tenure. Who wants to be saddled with a dull teacher for the rest of his
lumpish life? Forlet us speak franklyeven among a group as glit glittering
tering glittering as teachers, you will find an occasional deadhead. Take, for ex example,
ample, example, Ralph J. Stagnant.
Mr. Stagnant was not only dull, he was stupefying. Believe me, I
would never say such a mean thing, true though it is, if he were a sensi sensitive
tive sensitive man, but he is not. In fact, if you want an example of how insensi insensitive
tive insensitive he is, he wrote his entire Ph. D. thesis on a chair that had a nail
sticking through the seat.
And if you want further evidence of his dullness, the thesis was
called The Dynamics of Luggage.
But even so, the academic job market was booming at the time
Mr. Stagnant got his doctorate, and he soon found employment.
Whats more, by blending with the ivy and always walking on tiptoe,
he managed never to attract the Deans attention and thus got rehired
every year.
But finally came Year No. 8, and Mr. Stagnant knew his luck had
run out. This time rehiring would mean tenure and naturally the Dean
would first take a good hard look. How, thought Mr. Stagnant with a
sinking heart, could he persuade the Dean he was worth keeping?
Well sir, as everyone knows, the way to impress Deans is to pub publish
lish publish books. So Mr. Stagnant, who thus far had been too sluggish even
to attempt a book, now began turning them out at a frantic rate
The Foot Locker Through History ... Valise and the Single Girl ... My
Satchel, Right or Wrong. Alas, the publisher rejected them all.
Finally, in desperation, Mr. Stagnant tried a novel, but this fared
no better. We are herewith returning your cornball novel, wrote the
publisher. Are you kidding with this stuff? Can you seriously believe
that in this modem day and age anybody would want to read a tear tearjerker
jerker tearjerker about a rich Harvard boy who marries a poor Radcliffe girl who
dies of leukemia?
And so, alas, Mr. Stagnant was fired. Today, a broken man, he
lives in a New Orleans slum, working part-time as a praline.
There is a powerful lesson here for all of us: if you want tenure,
dont be dull.
Take, for instance, Miller High Life Beer. Do you think that if
Miller had been dull, it would have enjoyed a tenure of 115 years so
far? Os course not. Miller abides because it is the very opposite of dull;
it is lively, sparkling, vivacious, animated, sprightly, buoyant, spry,
ardent, sportive and waggish. Just pour a Miller and the hills are alive
with the sound of music, and theres a bright golden haze on the mead meadow,
ow, meadow, and every cloud has a silver lining, and zing! go the strings of
your heart.
Perhaps you think Im being a bit effusive about Miller High Life.
If you do, I ask you to remember (me thing: to me Miller is more than
just a beer; it is also an employer.
.- -r." m ST"
Its true. We, the bretoers of Miller High Life, bring you UtMcofamn
cdns, bottles and kegsand all v>ays delicious.

Thursday, April IS, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligctor, Thursday, ApfH 15. 1971

Editorial
! t**' \ t
Let Ricci perform
Dr. Leonardo Ricci, perhaps one of the most brilliant and
distinguished visiting professors ever to work at UF, has
resigned.
This is a great loss, not only to the students in the College
of Architecture and the Urban Design Studio, but to this
entire institution.
Dr. Ricci is an unusual man. He believes the function of a
university is not only to inform, but also to show it can
actually perform.
Unless we are proved to be a real service to the society,
with actual benefits we can bring the society, then I should
not be here, Dr. Ricci said in an interview Tuesday.
Frustrated at the inability of the university to give the
Urban Design Studio the power and official recognition to
undertake solutions to urban problems, Dr. Ricci has chosen
to leave our campus.
In a letter dated April 12, UF President Stephen C.
OConnell explained to Ricci that the two requests he was
seeking ... in the form of an ultimatum ... are not
within my power to grant.
Those requests were:
That the Urban Design Studio be recognized as the
official instrument acting in behalf of the university to
undertake urban design projects, and
That the first undertaking of the Urban Design Studio,
i.e., the UF Campus Plan be guaranteed to become the
official campus plan.
According to OConnell, because nthe UF is a state
institution without autonomy and the Board of Regents is
the decision-making body regarding the construction of
campus buildings, the requests can not be fulfilled.
That answer did not satisfy Dr. Ricci.
And it does not satisfy us.
Dr. Ricci has proven over the past two-and-a-half years
that he can inspire students and enthuse them with the
desire to attack urban problems. If the university then
informs him that the theories are fine to profess but an
attempt at applying them is impossible, where can a logic
justify the reasoning.
We urge President OConnell to do all in his power to find
away to fulfill these two legitimate requests of Dr. Ricci.
We dont feel President OConnell is at fault for not having
the power to approve the requests himself, but if he does
not make the effort, we will all be responsible for for
admitting that a university is not capable of coping with
modern problems.
We can understand Dr. Riccis sense of professionalism
and commitment to his work and his students.
If nothing else is done to salvage his ideas and his
presence on this campus, we will most certainly relegate the
role of the scholar and the university to a tragic irrelevance.
/I* 7 .to

The
Florida
Alligator

\\ */ fi f s i| \ i I!
He cant call the FBI -- that is the FBI

Wondering if its worth
voting at all this year

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The author
has requested that his name be
withheld. It is being run as a
guest column rather than a letter
due to its length.)
In the last few days, listening
to the candidates for the office
of president of the student
body, I have begun to realize the
lack of concern and apathy of
the student body when it comes
to Student Government, and its
necessary elections. None of the
three candidates has set forth a
platform that has goals worth
expounding.
Its plain to see that the
candidates have failed to
consider any real common
causes for the plebescites.
It seems that Mr. Man dell and
Mr. Middlebrooks are caught up
in the idea of SG acquiring
autonomous control of the
activities fee. Had either of these
(< serious candidates taken the
time to inquire they would have
found that this is a breach of the
law and cant be done. Yet they
piesist in perpetrating this
promise to the students, while if

' Alligator Staff
Marian Jedrusiak Steve Strang
Assignments Editor Wire Editor
Copy Editors Gary PaskaFDebbi SmithVickie RicfrLinda Miklowitz
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
__ Editorial Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite
third floor, Mettz union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
I Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
V of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Phyllis Gallub
Editor-ln : Chief

Gary Grunder
News Editor

they would take a look
around they could see that its
a waste of time and energy.
To hire the student attorney
suggested by each, students
would have to be assessed
separately from any funds now
required. While this might seem
feasible, the individual student
would be at liberty to pay, or
refuse to pay, suffering no
consequences if he chose
negatively. Each student that
didnt pay would be eligible for
the attorneys services if he was
hired for the student body.
These two candidates cant
seem to develop their own
platform if WRUFs program

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor

Dialogue is any indication of
their abilities. It seemed like one
would say something and the
other would play like an echo. I
dont think we want parrots for
or president.
Meanwhile, Mr. Lowell
Stanley is ranting and raving
about how hard it is to be
non-political in a political race
without bloc support and
money. As if this werent issue
enough, he insisted that his
views made no difference to the
student body, he wants to hold
monthly meetings of the student
body to get all their varied and
opposing views, and incorporate
them all in the orderiy(?)
reorganization of Student
Government.
Come on candidates, give us
something to go to the polls for;
I mean if theres no difference
between the two major
candidates and the independent
candidate thinks his views dont
matter, then why should we go
to the polls?
I havent missed casting my
ballot in a single election in the
last three years, but this election
may be my first!

Student Publications 1
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business
and Promotion Offices, Call:
392-1681, 82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
T. E. "Kent" Dwyer
Advertising Manager
Jeanne Orfinik
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation
frepartment, &H: 3M-160j>, ulu>

/t/f T*' A 7
/-V £ T



READERS FORUM

Endorsed
/
Editor:
This is the time of year when
politicians are born and die and
most important the reins of
leadership of Student
Government change. My past
experience has given me much
insight into the problems and
frustrations which encompass
the attempts and
accomplishments of Student
Government and because of this
I feel I have both an obligation
and responsibility to express my
preferences.
The most qualified candidate
running for any office is Ellen
Corenswet. She is the current
student body treasurer and is the
Common Cause candidate for
that position. Her experience in
the realm of finances include her
tenure as chairman of the Senate
Budget and Finance Committee.
Because of her constant
dedication to the resolution of
the Rathskeller financial
disorders, 1 can do no less than
to strongly endorse Ellen
Corenswet for treasurer.
There are three slates of
candidates for the President-Vice
President positions. We, the
electorate, must make our
decision from those presented to
us. We must weigh
qualifications, platforms,
attitudes and potential action
based on past performance.
After evaluating the three
slates, I am endorsing Don
Middlebrooks and Sam Taylor. I
feel they are sincere candidates
who are both qualified and
have demonstrated their concern
for students. They are dedicated
to the continuation of the
projects, programs and policies
of the Uhlfelder administration.
Many individuals are responsible
for the successes realized this
year but those with the highest
degree of potential for another
of reform are the presidential
and vice presidential candidates
of Common Cause.
Reform in the judicial branch
of Student Government is one of
the most pressing problems
facing us. The Honor Court has
virtually vanished as a useful
institution. The elimination of
the Student Conduct Committee
and the transfer of its powers
and responsibilities to the Honor
Court should be a top priority
item. Further, the strengthening
of the Traffic Court and the
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
t Be typed, signed,
double spaced end not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer draws just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for space.
Any writer interested in
submitting a regular column is
eked.to contact the editor and be
prepared to show samples of hie I
work. Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be I
?*" 1

insurance of its existence on
campus should be defended. The
two most qualified candidates
for implementation in this field
are Real party candidates, Tom
Clark and Howard Lubel.
I am of the belief that blanket
party-line voting should not be
adhered to and as such I have
made my recommendations can
only hope that you will carefully
consider each office separately
and subsequently analyze each
candidate on his ownjnerits.
Henry Solares
Ethics
Editor:
Im sitting here choking over
your editorial style, ethics,
etc...,. and decided not to hold
it in any longer.
The Florida Alligator under
Phyllis Gallub has hit the lowest
mark of journalism sinch John
Sugg learned how to write
autobiographies.
Lets start off with the article
printed last week (with a
picture) concerning waterbeds.
It was nothing but an
advertisement made to look like
a news article on page one no
less. When the editorial staff
plays up a product in this
fashion, the fishy smell is
overbearing.
How about regressing to
Phyllis Gallubs unsigned
editorial which attacked Blue
Key for forcing her boy Solares
out of the race. She attacks
something which exists not
moral or immoral, but amoral.
Blue Key is now organized to
elect people to office, yet she
attacks them instead of those
independents who are not
organized. What was her purpose
of the editorial? Answer: to
arouse the independents into
organizing." Besides being a bad
case of sour grapes, this would
be the same as blasting The
Alligator because there is a lack
of other student publications.
Thirdly, how was Steve
Uhlfelder allowed to use his
office of student body president
to criticize Real party in the
Alligator (April 14) when he
didn't announce his support for
Middlebrooks until the following
day. It was known throughout
campus, however, that he
favored Middlebrooks from the
beginning of the campaign, yet
your article on the 14th did not
mention this influence along
with his criticism. (Shades of
Mark Glick).
Lastly, your editorial page is
irresponsible. You cite problems,
but no solutions and many of
your statements lack
development, facts and
credibility.
You've gone a long way
DOWN since Raul Ramirez was
editor and I see no bottom.
Perhaps a more conscientious
and objective job of
editorializing is needed, or even
a more responsible editor.
Gallub shape up or turn in
your pica ruler.
.jsfahoH to (tiznviaU srli tp
j Jay fort

A common denominator

Mini-skirt contests., a cover

By REG CROWDER
Alligator Columnist
I was having breakfast the
other day with a young lady.
Over my superbly prepared
omelet, freshly brewed coffee
and toasted English muffins and
peach jelly I read the newspaper.
I see the Rathskeller is
having a mini-skirt contest
tonight," I said, sharing the
news. I guess 111 have to cover
it."
Sure, said the anonymous
young lady.
Whats that supposed to
mean? I inquired.
You just want to look at all
those girls in their little dresses."
Oh come now, I retorted

~J BOEING At
bnr, aibrttfi *JtiJ 'to laiiiAi
~..',* ~ '*t-' / v)

t.
haughtily. It is a matter of
duty.
Oh really.
Yes," I said. Everybody
knows my beats are Latin
American events and mini-skirt

Thursday, April IS; 1971, Tha Florida Afffptor,

contests. I was assigned. I have
no choice.**
Oh for God*s sake. I*ve never
heard anything so ridiculous.**
Jest if you like. Perhaps you
dont recognize the importance
of an enlightened public. It is a
great responsibility we in
journalism bear as watchdogs of
freedom.**
I continued dramatically.
I must put this event in a
historic and cultural perspective.
I must interpret its significance
to a busy public who must make
important public decisions based
upon what we write.**
I dont know when Ive
heard so much baloney.'*
. Besides,*' I said. I'd like to
look at the girls.*'

Page 9



Page 10

l t Th# Rorid AHfcptoc Thursday, Apr! Jfc 1971

Nixon easing Red Chinese relations
-:UfTT if) Sffi 'hUr.-.-ii ,n: t s'

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon announced
Wednesday a five-step program
easing travel and trade
restrictions with Communist
China.
Nixon said that after a review,
he had decided on the following
steps none of which would
require new legislation or
diplomatic negotiations with the
Red Chinese government.
The United States is
prepared to expedite visas for
visitors or groups from the
Chinese mainland.
U.S. owned foreign flag
carriers may call at Chinese
ports.

Chou pingswithU.S.pongers

PEKING (UPI) Premier
Chou En-lai met and talked with
American table tennis players
Wednesday and said their visit
has opened a new chapter in
relations between Communist
China and the United States.
He said more Americans
would be coming to this country
to further lift the Bamboo
Curtain.
The 72-year-old Red Chinese
leader was amiable, conciliatory
and talkative in a one hour and
15 minute meeting with the
visiting table tennis players and
he shunned the anti-American
statements on U.S. involvement
in Indochina that have
characterized most official
Peking announcements.
In what appeared to be a
major change in Chinese policy,
Chou said Peking is interested
in friendly relations with
countries that do not recognize
the Communist regime in this
most populous nation of the
world. His conversation ranged
from this subject to the hippie
movement in the United State#
and the problems of youth
around the world.
In the past there were lots of
American friends in China and
you have made a new start,
Chou told the U.S. athletes who

jmm
ihl
BHHHHHHk X. JB|
Y Good Thurt. Sot. |
i ONI DOUAR SANDWICH I
SKOAL :
Good Thurs. Sat. fe
Turkey sandwich, french fries. Large 16oz. schooner f?
Budweiser 1:
Pastrami sandwich, french fries, large 16oz. 1
schooner Budweiser 1
l EACH ORDER ONLY ONI DOUAR II
M I
I
*.. *....*< ...J. I

U.S. currency controls are
to be relaxed to permit the use
of dollars by the Chinese
Communists. Previously, a
Treasury license had to be
obtained in order to send dollars
into China.
Restrictions are to be
ended on American oil
companies providing fuel to
ships or aircraft proceeding to
and from China except on
Chinese-owned or
Chinese-chartered carriers bound
to or from North Vietnam,
North Korea, or Cuba.
U.S. ships or aircraft may
now carry Chinese cargoes
between non-Communist ports.
Nixon has asked that a list be

arrived here last Saturday to
play exhibition matches against
the Chinese table tennis team.
There have been many
Sino-American exchanges. These
have been cut off for a long
time, but with the acceptance by
you of Chinas invitation to visit
our country, a new chapter has
been opened in relations
between our two
countries. Chou asked the 15
Americans to convey on their
return home the regards of the
Chinese people to the American
people. He underscored this
theme of people-to-people
friendship several times, leaving
the political considerations aside
and not harping on previous
Peking charges that the United
States is committing criminal
aggression in Indochina.
Chous statement appeared to
be a victory for President Nixon
ia his campaign to thaw
Washington-Peking relations.
Nixon announced last year that
certain Americans would be
granted permission by the State
Department to visit China but,
until the table tennis invitation,
the Chinese had not responded
to Washington overtures. Nixon
had specifically mentioned an
exchange of newsmen and some

prepared of non-strategic items
which can be generally licensed
for direct export to China.
Following review and his

American reporters were allowed
into China with the table tennis
team. Chou said more would be
granted visas.
Many American reporters
want to come here, but they
cannot do so at the same time,
Chou said Wednesday.
However, they will come in
batches.
While television crews
clustered around him in Pekings
Great Hall of the People, Chou
said: This renewal of friendship
will meet with approval and
support of our peoples. Then,
he turned to his audience and
asked: Do you agree? Chous
reply was a burst of applause
from the American players with
the Canadian, Colombian,
Nigerian and British table tennis
teams joining in.

POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT SSSSSSSSSSSSSj
ENGINEERS
THESE ARE YOUR SUaL CANDIDATES
SENATE
DAVE McCLOSKY
SENATE
JIM THOMPSON
HONOR COURT
GUY SANDERS
TOGETHER THEY WILL WORK FOR
ENGINEERS FAIR SHARE OF STUDENT
GOVT FUNDS
IF YOU WANT YOUR VOTE TO COUNT
I ___ Paid tor by the
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

approval of specific items on this
list, direct imports of designated
items from China also will be
allowed.
The President said in a
statement he will consider
additional steps that might be
taken to improve relations with
Red China.
His announcement came less
than a week after a U.S. table
tennis team was invited to visit
Red China along with a group of
American newsmen.
Nixons actions went far
beyond the symbolic gesture
involved in the ping pong
breakthrough.
Press Secretary Ronald L.
Ziegler said Nixons actions were
taken without any contacts with
the Red regime. But he added,

THE ALTERNATIVE
Are you interested in a graduate course in architecture,
agribusiness, small business administration, labor relations,
public relations, domestic relations, race relations, arts and
crafts, budgeting, management, ethnic culture, folklore,
economics, ecology, urban affairs, urban renewal, rural affairs,
indian affairs, health, nutrition, malnutrition, medical care,
legal aid, welfare rights, consumer rights, job development, job
training, remedial education, special education, tutoring,
recreation, counseling, psychology, sociology, political science
and myriad other skills to eliminate poverty in America.
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE Lynne Edelman
372-0563
CONSIDER / a
Reitz Union V/ ft Ojr wl
Ground Floor \
April 13-15

we would hope there would be
a positive response in practical
terms.
Ziegler said the President
made his decision before the
U.S. team was invited to China.
He said that the question of
loosening up on the trade and
travel barriers had been under
discussion in the administration
as far back as December.
White House officials
acknowledged that the fact the
American ping pong team was
invited made this an appropriate
time to announce the actions.
It was also significant that
Nixon used the term the
Peoples Republic of China in
his statement.
This is the official usage of
the Red Chinese government
itself and has never been used in
U.S. diplomatic circles.



Ley recital
both musical
and political

Military
Ball set
4
for May
Scabbard and Blade, a
National Military Honor Society,
will host its Military Ball this
year on May 1 in Reitz Union
Ballroom.
This year, as in the past, the
men of Scabbard and Blade will
choose their Military Queen.
Each of the 34 contestants will
be judged by their appearance in
swimsuit, evening gown and
sportswear. Ten will be chosen
as finalists on April 22. From
these, two princesses and the
queen will be chosen.
The Ball is open to all
R.O.T.C. cadets. Tickets are five
dollars and can be purchased at
the door.

j Are You Really
j Capturing The J
X Essence of Your J
I LECTURES
: 5
: STUD-EASE ;
: DOES!
: *** ;
Buy Subscription
* Now S Save

*
* as low as 2K per
* lecture, tax ind.
i
* 1730 W. Univ. Ave.
* adjoining College Inn
* Phono 373-4584
Watch Gator
Advertisers
f -uj.iiu .me 1?- nitSSUm

3 By RIG CROWDER
Alligator Staff Writer
4
Guatemalan composer and pianist, Salvador Ley,
laced his Tuesday night recital with observations as
much political as musical.
The event, sponsored by the UF Center for Latin
American Studies, marked Pan America Day.
There was never a day when it was so important
that we think of just What Pan Americanism is,*
Ley said. It is true in this family of 21 American
nations, both north and south, as in other families
that all the members do not always get along.
Pan Americanism in the past has meant a
conformist policy of mutual aid and agreement.
This is changing.
Ley noted that the Organization of American
states was to meet beginning Wednesday and take
up several important measures.
The OAS structure is facing its most difficult
crisis, he said, and I hope the organization will be
able to face it and adapt to the new realities
stemming from new political situations and events.
He called for international understanding through
the arts and music.
It is my firm belief that the arts and music can
contribute to the knowledge of each other and the
awareness of mutual values, Ley said.
It b my hope that events like tonight will be
repeated many times, not just with one person but

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in great festivals where young people caa
together and the professionals of the arts may
engage in an intense free dialogue.*
Ley presented a program of music by composers
from Mexico, Chile, Peru, Argentina, Brazil and
Guatemala.
Ley poked fun at North Americans in his remarks
before performing Rustica by the Chilean
composer Juan Orrego Salas.
When you mention Chile these days it is like
you are mentioning the devil, he laughed. The
new Marxist regime has the whole North American
continent baffled.
We know the change will influence their music.
Socialist regimes use the arts in service of the state. I
havent seen anything on this yet but it will be
interesting to see what happens.
The pieces Ley performed were strictly art music
compositions. He left out the popular avant-garde
and folk music because of the introductory nature
of the presentation.
The composers represented, he said, are
among those who have been on the front row for 40
years.
Ley received his early training in Guatemala.
Later he studied piano in Berlin. After a German
concert tour he returned to Guatemala where he
became head of the National Conservatory of Music.
A U;S. resident since 1953, he lives now in St.
Petersburg.

Tharttty, AfnH 15, I7l>Th* Florida AfllflAtbr,

The OAS structure is
facing its most difficult
crisis and I hope the
organization will be able
to face it and adopt to
the new realities
stemming from new
political situations and
events.
- Salvador Ley

Page 11



!, The RorWs Alllgslsr, Thnwdw* Apti fS W1

Page 12

JHHH|
t|777i^^^H
liipairang^S^W^lix!
PRICES EFFECTIVE
-.;;' V WED. NOON, APRIL 17 THRU
': WED. NOON, APRIL 21, L_ U 4 4/ JJ ~ *TV//
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED t *"' l
ESQ OUSI^^TW
1 I DovibiPood C##f *lf" ke L| UJ fW(kOjft
IVISYDAY LOW PMCII Mercel Whit* |||||l CfllKA *(h OV Clwh S**wler
Paper Napkins... 9* ~, Margarine .* 19*
Kidney Beans ... " 18' C|L English Muffins... X 29*
Canned Spam... 7 59 c Butter-Tastin' ST 19*
Patch Oven Fleur J£ 38*
White Grits C 46* EvTj Sliced American .. X 69*
IVISYDAY tow Sett-Sly Averted Col.r. ledivideelly-Wreyy.*
Bath Tissue X 35* Sliced American .. X 35*
IVISYDAY LOW With Lewee, Armeer*. Wlecee.ie
Low-Cal Nestea !r 49* Pimento Spread .. 49*
Apple Sauce 19* Big-Eye Swiss *l 4s*
Liquid Starch .... 5 M 4B* Cottage Cheese ... V-i 67*
CvMAyday j£o4* Priced.! I
IVISYDAY-LOW PSICIISIve State I Pie Shells IT?! 37*
PE Ml eeert
Mayonnaise n
IVISYDAY LOW SSICII Set 1 Slrd. lye S M d4ie. Started
Evap*Milk # -IS* Mr Cool'nCreamy ... 369*



New Crept U.S. No. 1 Potatoes '^BAlfe.
Red Bliss 5 Jag 49 c
M I Jonathans 3 ..39- l?P||||llXl
Tender m\ mTrkit* fm
_______ Asparagus ;c 69* Bk, Jm
Sunkist Lemons £. 49 c : y ?w < %
O ran 9e Ji< ***
Sliced Cooked
German or
Cuban j^TV
Sandwiches # tor 59
Flavor r* #\ II f\
Baked Beans o o o o o pound 39* horn Vwi tleuMWi |M I U
_ lt ,.... Ajl
Delicious # s
Potato Salad ..... 39* K,tt Y L,tter -'. b 95* JHkMH|
SealW Pedt. Coffee Filters V£ 36*
|| Sparky Hardwood l' 1
S.ofoo, Tr..t, D.li.i.v* CHarC001
Lake Erie Smelts... ST 39* a. n/j n.
Seafood Treat, Tasty Froien PIMTI [JWI C/CHt/ili (/ffit M I
Red Grouper Fillets " 89 c ,00 1/ 1 I
track's Chocolate-Covered
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE I fjfifllty fjjfa.
B Assarted
Swift's Premium Proton Beneloss B M A i ...
Imperial Roast.. c 99 an po 89
Premium Proton Hair Spray eee ee o can 59*
English-Cut Roast $ 1 HBM Aspirin nr
BCCf Short RlbS # #!.' 59* Cream ...
SH PUBLIX H
63 ***** 13 **' str ** l University Avenue at 34tk Street 1014 N. Main Street

Thunday, April 15,1571, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
1970 YAMAHA RT 1-MX very good
condition I must sell this machine
call 376-6252 after spm (A-3t-116-p)
Yamaha 50 + helmet must sell best
offer. call Pam 373-3664
(A-2t-116-p)
TRIUMPH 650 semichop, custom
paint, seat, chrome, runs good, cut
price from SIOOO to $875. must sell
nowl call Dave 378-8946, 7-noon.
(A-2t-116-p)
For Sale: Boy's 2 speed Schwinn
Bicycle. $25. Light ash brown long
human hair fall-worn once $25 Call
Anne 373-3718 (A-st-116-p)
AUCTION Apr. 17 7:30 pm new,
used, antiques & mlsc. Items, dont
miss this sale. col. Wylie Cobb
auctioneer cobb's auction house 41
south archer fla. (A-2t-116-p)
Need money fasti Am willing to sell
llke-new refrigerator for only $65. It
Is 3 ft. high and cost SIIO.OO new;
call Wm. at 376-0406 (A-st-l 16-p)
1969 Honda C 8350. Includes,
helmet, luggage rack, windshield.
Excellent condition. Great all around
bike. $450. Dennis 378-0105
(A-lt-116-p)
1968 Triumph Bonneville 650 cc low
mileage, carefully maintained. SBOO
call Dan at 372-7877 (A-st-116-p)
Brand new University sound
speakers, Vegas model. $l7O list, will
sell pair for $275. 5 year warranty.
372-7694 between 6 & 8 pm
(A-3t-116-p)
Remmlngton 700 BDL cal. 22-250
varmlt barrel never fired $160; cal
.303 British lee-enfield 4X scope S6O;
Zenith Stereo $75; 378-9942
(A-4t-116-p)
back packs, ideal for books and other
small articles, use on bike or bicycle.
call Steve 373-3187 (A-lt-116-p)
SONY compact stereo system.
Turntable, amp, AM-FM, 2-way
speaker system. Excellent condition.
Marcia LaMancha No.l. 378-9064.
(A-3t-115-p)
69 TRIUMPH 500 TIOOC
motorcycle excel, cond. extras Inc.
$750 also 65 GTO $1250 call
392-9523 (A-st-115-p)
Heathkit Amature Band DX-60A
Transmitter and HR-10 Receiver with
SWR/power meter $l5O for Info call
392-9031 (A-st-115-p)
120 watt SANSUI AU-555 solid-state
stereo control amplifier $140.00
phone 373-3023 Earl MUST SELLII
(A-4t-115-p)
1969 S-90 honda In good condition
$175 call 372-5254 ask for Jeff or
see at 805 E. University Ave.
(A-st-115-p)
1970 TRIUMPH 650 Bonneville,
excellent condition fast, clean,
chrome fender, sissy bar, medium
high rise bars sllsO 378-3196
(A-3t-115-p)
SUPER SALE Blank 8-track 80 min
tapes 6 for $9.95 MUNTZ STEREO
319 N.W. 13 St. (a-20t-89-p)
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY AM
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
Furniture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
376-1146 (a-25t-103-p)
Ham radio unit. Elco
transcelver/power supply like new.
Vlbroplex key Shure mike and
antenna Included. Asking S2OO.
378-5430 evenings. (A-st-115-p)

Student Government and Celebration 7l Present
The Voice as Superstar
W ';
On Sunday, April 18, 4:00 PM, world renowned opera
star Phyllis Curtin will perform in the University B
i Auditorium. Miss Curtin is as gifted as any musician in
, the world. Her instrument? The voice that scales the \ p J
musical heights of opera as a soloist might distinguish a i Jf
symphony orchestra. With feeling. With emotion. With V < M||jj^b
genius. The voice. As superstar.
SUNDAY APRIL 18th 4PM UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM i
i TICKETS AVAILABLE REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE (392-1653)
# Miss Curtin l


FOR SALE
AKC Female silver mlnature Poodle,
must sale leaving for Germany, loves
cats, soon able to breed, 75$ or best
offer. Call 378-6247 (A-st-113-p)
Honda 150. 1965, good condition,
17,300 ml. $230, Includes 2 helmets.
Call 378-9534 after 5 (A-4t-114-p)
Stereo 8-Tr Cartridges Recorded
Premium Quality Lubricated Tape 1
or 2 albums on 40 or 80 min tapes
$2.50 or $4 Including tape. Dont
accept cheap Imitation. Get
Guaranteed Quality. John 378-5916
nights (A-5M13-P)
Breadtruck 6cyl chevy panelled and
carpeted w/ gas oven & stove hinged
double bed shelves table etc see at
410 nw 13th or call ed 378-9451
SSOO (A-st-114-p)
8 TRACK TAPES PRE-RECORDED
3.99 largest selection we also trade,
buy & sell, new & used tapes
TRADE-A-TAPE 14 nw 13 st.
(A-15t-107-p)
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre
way from carpets and upholstery.
Rent electric shampooer $1 electric
upholstery shampoos also available
Lowry Furniture Co. (atfg)
5 cubic coldspot refrig 3 mos old
SIOO call 392-9851 (A-2t-115-p)
4 acres of land Joins Univ. and 10
acre, of land on 241 south of 26
Call for more Information 372-4114
or 378-1207 and appointment after
5:30 (A-st-109-p)
ALL PHONO NEEDLES ARE
AVAILABLE AT MUNTZ STEREO
319 NW 13 ST (A-15M07-P)
1961 volvo-good running
condition-great for town &
tr I ps-S3OO-376-885 5. westing house
delux air conditioner-5000 btu-llttle
use-SBO 376-8855 In stock: 31b. nylon 2 man tents;
Red, white, blue basketballs; Masks,
fins, snorkels; Backpacking supplies.
B & B SPORTS CENTER 5320 N.W.
13th ST. 378-1461 (A-st-113-p)
for sale 9000 btu air conditioner still
under warranty SIOO call 373-3737
Kris (A-4t-113-p)
FOR RENT
Aprils rent freel Sublet furnished or
unfurnished apt., $l4O or $l3O,
Balcony bedroom, Shag carpet, 3
blocks from campus. Ph 378-2888.
(B-st-114-p)
Roomy 2 bdrm a/c furnished triplex
In nw area available may 1. pets &
children allowed, only sllO month I
call 372-0664 mon-frl (B-st-115-p)
SINGLES: Swing Into summer In a
luxurious A/C poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O,
Including utilities, and free color TV.
378-7224 La Mancha Apts.
(B-15t-116-p)
Sublet apt summer qtr. Tanglewood
one bedr furnished, a/c ww carpet.
Faces pool, very quiet. Reasonable
price. 378-5430 evenings.
(B-st-115-p)
Male roommate wanted Colonial
Manor apt. 149. one block from
Ttgert pool air conditioning S6O a
month call George anytime 378-3474
(B-112-st-p)
Apartments for summer qtr. close to
campus, pool, air-conditioned.
sllO-8240 per qtr. university apts.
1524 nw 4th ave. apt. n, 376-8990
(B-10t-108-p)

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 15,1971

Page 14

:X:XvXvX;:;X:X;X;X;X;X:X:X;XxX;Xx::v
FOR RENT
2 br. cent, air-heat, elec, kitchen,
fenced yard, furn., near campus,
duplex $l5O lease 373-3449
(B-st-112-p)
Sublet lbr apt no children no pets
quiet near campus married couples
only call 373-1183 (B-st-116-pJ
Married couple or serious grad to
sublease lbdr apt-no child or pets.
pool-1 nquire Coy Thomas 1406-32
sw lOter or call Alvarez 372-8468
(B-12t-116-p)
New England style duplex-needs
female roomate, one block from
campus available now. 1007 S.W. 6th
Ave. call 372-6112 for Michele
(B-4t-114-p)
WANTED
Need one male roommate badly for
nice apartment. SSO a month call
376-4185 (C-st-116-p)
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apt. Private
bedroom. Walk to campus. S7O
Including utilities and free color TV.
378-7224 (C-15t-116-p)
2 roommates wanted large 4
bedroom house near mall cable tv
private or semi-private bedroom S4O
per month utilities incl. 378-6810
(C-st-116-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
a/c poolside apt. Private bedroom.
Walk to campus. S7O including
utilities + free color tv. 378-7224
(C-15t-116-p)
Listeners wanted I Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call LeVan between 8
and 5 for appointment. 392-2049
(C-112-tfc)
Two girls want apartment to sublease
fall quarter. Call Carln or Mary Anne
372-6507 (C-st-113-p)
Female roomate family style living
NW section, $lO/mo. + 1/8 utilities.
Steve 376-0613 after 7 pm.
(C-2t-115-p)
Senior coed desires 1 br efficiency
apt for summer qtr. ac close to
campus ph. 373-3355 (C-112-st-p)
Two female roommates wanted at
Landmark apt. N 0.32 for summer
quarter (C-st-113-p)
MELF* WANTED
V/.V.V.V.V.V.V.-.V.'.-.V.-.-.V.V.V.V.V. .V.
Addressers commlsion mailers
needed, work at home earn 50, 100,
$l5O week for Info send 25 cents &
self addressed envelope to Box 2213
GYllle (E-2t-115-p)
Part time chemistry lab technician
experience preferred Call 372-1500
(E-5M14-P)
AMBITIOUS COUPLE who need
more Income. Unusual opportunity
for good earnings for both, work
together, part-time or full-time,
phone 373-1476 (E-st-109-p)
ALTOS
66 Falcon Futura good mechanical
condition, radio, heater good tires
$685 call 378-7676 (G-st-113-p)
63 MGB, wire wheels, perilll tires,
tonneau. $550 call 373-1216
(G-4t-115-p)

WftfW

I STENO- RECEPTIONIST I
Permanent position statewide professional associatioa Modem
1 offices and equipment. Salary competitive commensurate with
% qualifications. Five day week, fringe benefits. Qualifications must
I include proficiency in typing, record keeping, filing, routine general
I office duties. Opening immediately available. Reply Box 13455, B
Gainesville. I
\ Todays \
I more for your money meal I
moisons
I CRFETERIfI I
I [THURSDAYS FEATURE'S I
I I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND J I
| MACARONI _ I
£ j ALL YOU CAN 70/ | 3
I I j eati 'Y | I
I i I FRIDAYS FEATURE I 1 I
I | I PORK CUTLET PARMESAN % I
1 | AND
YELLOW A A X
I 99 I LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall
I 111 l
riAUAippveHr|



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
1965 Mercury Monterey, Good
Condition. Graduating Senior In
desperate need of cash. $450 or best
offer. Call JJ76-0486 or 378*8070.
(G-3M15-EQ
67 vw" one owner low milage Must
sacrifice this weekl MUSTII perfect
mech cond will sell cheepll pay off
bank only 373-4035 after
S(G-st-116-p)
67 MGB -GT green w/black; radio;
abarth; wire wheels; 37,000 miles;
looks good and runs well, will
consider offers around $1350
Camelot Apts, apt. 110 (G-4t-116-p)
1965 FALCON-stlck, radio, clean
and In good condition $425 call John
or Roxie 373-1436 night or
392-1521 da* (G-2M16-P)
VOLVO 544 excellent condition
SBOO or best offer can see at 3511
NW 13th st dally or call 378-6410
after 7:00 must sell this week
(G-st-115-p)
I
Truman Capotes
IN INCOLD
COLD INCOLD
BLOOD
Friday, April 16 & Saturday,
April 17 5:30, 8:15, 11:00
Union Aud. 50 cents buy
advance tickets Friday at 2nd
floor box office from
12:30-9:30 Sponsored by the
J. Wayne Reitz Union
Proceeds from Fridays
showings will go to the Gator
Loan Fund
a i

OnWfcjJj^OUMttGH^yjtWTl
T*.' 1 j : J~" r, >.'-''V''i"' t vt' : -v. s r . / V s ) .4/vijfi 1 1
i ll I r> JIA
. wKm "^tlfeMs# I*' 1 *' ,
>i sffagaMlififi. W" v i
?* r A ?Sjs?^<'3^v?^ ? ? *' : *i
\yM Bg~
! The above ragged assortment of humanity are referred
r to as the capable employees of ye olde Rathskel er. If you dofrt belreve .t, |
; bring your carcass over tonight and see for yourself.
SOtMHE BEAKS AT THE RAtHSKiUEM 50
VtV, # X%\vXvXvXvXvXv*'' ,,, ,, ** ***''*v
AUTOS
A%W:W:W;X-!-X->X.X,v.-.v.v.v.v.v.v.
WtS'SMSSi SR'S
r ( G.|tn!!.rt' ck 27045 r
Camper step-van, seif contained,
excellent condition, must be sold fast
*> a V f ? r school, contact Don or
, 4 5 mur Phree c 392-7305
(G-4t-114-p)
fL*,5? nnev,lle 4dr ht. extra clean.
68000 actual miles, good tires, one
owner. 895 or best cash offer.
372- after 6pm (G-st-114-p)
BMW TISA 4 door luxury, plenty of
go. Webers, five speed, all other
factory equipment. Original papers
excellent SISOO-best offer 378-6874
(G-st-111-p)
1969 mgb excellent condition, low
mileage, fully synchro, wire wheels
radio, radials, tonneau, marriage
forces sale, call 373-1607 after 5:00
(G-st-113-p)
1970 FIAT 850 Spider Great cond
7000 miles new top, tires and new
paint job asking 1750 call Steve
Moore at 378-9627 (G-112-st-p)
is*iy
Two things are better on a
WATERBED. One is sleep. From
Innerspace Environment at
reasonable prices, call Elliott,
373- (J-15t-105-p)

Decadence, and Depravity I
All at the Infamous Rathskeller I
Friday 9PM -?? The music of RGF
Saturday 9PM -?? Lynard Skynard
(half price Sat with Bill Cosby ticket stub)
) The Rat Th Rai |

Thursday, April 15,1971, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
Coed looking for female companions
to travel with this summer in europe.
leave from miami. call Bobbl
373-2287 (J-st-113-p)
GOING TUBING Large Truck Tubes
For Rent $2.00 Fter day Call
378-5931 or 372-1446 For
Arrangements (J-6t-116*p)
SMB: I love you and cant wait until
June 26. AEB (J-lt-116-p)
The women are here for the taking
Not for the usual, but rather for
themselves as individuals. k
(J-lt-116-p)
Help! 1962 Corvalr stolen. White 4
door sedan, red seat cover, three
white walls, one black. License no.-
16-D-7970. reward, call 373-3090.
(J-st-114-p)
Florida girls wake upl we know what
girls are, but where are the women?
frolics is near & the men are herel we
are up for It, are you? a stud
(J-3t-114-p)
Studs, including silver and gold stars,
all sizes, the widest selection of
patches + appliques anywhere,
GRAPEWINEPAPERS (even Spiro
Agnew papers), bluejeans, all sizes,
always In stock, SATIN HOT
PANTS, and all your Gainesville
Green supplies. Everythlngs at the
SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS, 10 SW
7th St. Open 10 to 10 daily and 12
to 8 Sundays. (J-3t-110-p)

Page 15

/ ~ a Weekend Relaxer
/LEST WE FORGEtTTT: May 1, 1971
/ TWENTY-FIVE HOURS 0F...
\ "*** SS"
\ M oar> ceS Light Show I
fV\ GoodMuSic and...
U l *'w'A' eS I
V\ 1 N* w J. WAYNE REITZ UNION I
v\ N. 4th ANNIVERSARY I
% BIRTHDAY /
\\ party/
SPECIAL RATES FOR FLORIDA RESIDENT*
jffflflV On The World Famous
GLASS BOTTOM ROATS at //-
Springs
MSteaTl-Theld ovFft /-
1 m a. Wjm IS. / for a Final /
This movie is the / ThrtlliitWtekl /
SHOWS I |JJill, mi illS fl
ins i omiter nonnou Ji p i
H ACADEMY I
I JL*- AWARD I
I NOMINATIONS!
s ?3o s I BEST ACTOR
3-3 o I James Earl Jones, IwH '^l
1 I BEST ACTRESS WM
| Jane Alexander
BHOADWAY'S MOST HONORED PLAY
IS NOW AMOTION PICTURE I
I 1 ~
1 ,r | y 1 TOMORROW! 7 DAY iMAQEmHTM
w William Shakespeare's
Julius
APSS I MUUWMMMI|UM| JMMMWWMMMMI
M CHARITON JASON JNM MCIUM
KSfW MUM IBM JMM I
H fln .-Nag
75 d AGE 15 8. UNDER
1.00 STUDENT 17 A UP
1.28 ADULTS ALL PAY |



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND
SATURDAY APRIL 17
8:30 PM FLORIDA FIELD
TICKETS
Students G.P. Gate
$3.00 $3.25 $3.50
AVAILABLE AT RECORDSVILLE
RECORD BAR-JWRU BOX OFFICE
I REBEL DISCOUNT

tRf SF.NTFD HV
IFC SPRING F HOLICS

c gJ|JJs^^^^SOONi!§
1 YOUR OWN THING
g The Rock Musical that
x took Shakespeares 12th Night S
x and turned Broadway on its ear! §
2******* * * 4 S
| NATIONAL TOURING COMPANY \
o c
X A STUDENT GOVERNMENT AND CELEBRATION 71
R PRODUCTION S
0 TUESDAY 8t WEDNESDAY APRIL 20, 21 I
8 *8 PM UNIV. AUDITORIUM \
XTICKETS AVAILABLE REITZ UNION BOX OFFICER
men and the woman
OkAUwiyar e araMW who tried to interfere.
shm ANDY
WARHOLS
LONESOME -* 1
COWBOYS \ J
IN EASTMAN COLOR |
"ANDY WARHOLSLONESOME COWBOYS'
MAY BE A BIT 188 MUCH EBB MANY
PEBPLE. BUI THAT'S THEIB PBOBLEM.
t Lonesome Cowboysis a
! magnificent and very
funny satire of the
American Western
$. that is liberally
seasoned with our
favorite 4,8,10 and
y, p 12-letter words and a
1 cornucopia of nudity
t \ \V\QOvfC^UW and sexuai carryings-on
I ttal-i ~* n combination!
|rtwSS|'SrWL'&R IL-perhaps precgejjl^l^
Ml II AOMITTIO I llllflAl _
I, J Se 1 WWW engn
: 4'i'iVJr.* <

Page 16

, Thd Ftorida AUioator, Thursday, April 15, ,1971

PERSONA L
No finer cats than we arel Three
beautiful Siamese kittens 9 wks. old.
These cats are perfect and, the going
price Is S2O. 378-9282 (J-st-115-p)
put a little pup into your life we have
eleven of them all are very friendly
and full of puppy love free call
373-3723 anytime (J-st-115-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Owyer.
Electrologist ... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment.
(J-44t-54-p)
Independant Thinkers Unite! vote
STANLEY & Whitman! Questions
call Think Tank Hot Line!!!!
392-7825 & 372-9319. pd. pol. adv.
(J-2t-115-p)
One Candidate Cares. Make Student
Government Responsive. Elect Larry
Tropp. Senate Arts and Sciences Ind.
pd. pol. adv. (J-st-113-p)

Alachua County
Fair
April 19-25
Waldo Road.

PERSONAL
5 affectionate KITTENS free
litter-trained six wks. old call
378-0219 after 12 noon. (J-2t-115-p)
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (j-46.t-106-p)
LOST eSt POUN'O
. *_
Lost black wallet near murphee area
tennis courts please return ids no
questions 376-9895 John Kemp
(L-3t-116-p)
Lost white female poodle In the
vicinity of list NW 2 ave She is
wearing a flea collar and has brown
stains under eyes Reward 372-2912
(L-4t-115-p)
, lost-gray-black tiger stripe cat, white
chest and legs, red flea collar, seen
around nw 1 ave 18 st and murphrey
call John 373-2516 reward
(L-3t-115-p)
SERVICES
term papers, thesis, reports etc typed
to your specifications, accuracy and
neatness guaranteed. 50 cents per
page. call tola 373-1003
(M-10t-110-p)
Save 25% or more oh all auto parts.
Spark plugs 68 cents. Cash & Carry
Auto Parts, 1111 S. Main St.
378-7330. (M-113-tfc)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric .Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmericard adn
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
INCOME TAX RETURNS 35 n main
st. haber and budd accountants
378-9666 378-6127 (M-10t-107-p)
Young legal secretary with 8 years
typing experience. Will type all you
require promptly and accurately at
50 cents a page. Call 378-6983 after
6:30 P.M. any evening. (M-st-115-p)
HORSES BOARDED finest care
spacious stalls lighted ring wooded
trails recretatlon activities for patrons
beautiful grounds 373-1059
(M-st-113-p)
HORSES for any purpose. Horseback
riding, hay rides, western
parties-dance floor. Cowboys Riding
Stables. S.E. 22nd Ave. and 15th
Street phone 372-9134
(M-10t-103-p)
KftVnK FEATURES AT .
jUtZSJH 2:00 3:55 5:50
*rjJSJ I ?.**Ol 7:50 9:45
DON'T MISS IT! [g§
The Roling Stones
GIMME
SHELTER
2:10 4:00 5:45
1 ifi-MH 4J 1 9:30 7:40
JORUtf NUPafiRK
FLORIDA QUARTERLY

productions §
H.BMEMOT a
BtWniE 1
P I AT: 2:10-4:40-7:10-and 9:40 I
*.
>
FVetty Maids allinarow
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of |
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Daadfiiw -100 pjn. 2 days prior lo starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* <*> M n
I lI | | | O £
||? §| I?? I
| g
_ z
_ >
oi w ro
N *-s -i 3& |
mmmmm mamam mamma mamma /-s Q) mm
Pg. __ iO
§i SS c
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< SI go
o
TO
r i o > <3 z
g o i
-5 2 f
3 o
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_' 2
I ; N f 1
* T i T *~ --rr 111 jy *. .~~



>EN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY

SAJM. TO 9:00 PAi.
D ay 1200 noon to too p M / TWO STORES TO SERVE YOU
816 STAR NUMBER 1
3736 NEWBERRY ROAD
BIG STAR NUMBER 2
I 2605 N.W. 13 th STREET
J.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF FULL CUT I FLA. GRADE "A" FRESH DRESSED WHOLE I
?OUND STEAKS . 98< I rnyCDC I
I.S.D.A. CHOICE WELL TRIMMED TIV I E|X W I
:HUCK ROASTS L. 58< I I
PORK SAUSAGE St 39< I LB ZV( I
IUDAHY BAR "S" WHOLE
CANNED HAMS SS $2.79
ROSTY MORN TASTY
ML MEAT FRANKS lit 1 49<
INGLETON'S FROZEN
SHRIMP COCKTAILS -4-OZ. JARS 89< I BACON I
II BRAND FROZEN
CHOPPED SIRLOINS %u 29< I Z 5Qt I
BIG STAR EXTRA VALUE BUYS! I V I
ESUEUR TINY GREEN TRIANGLE RISING
EAS S. 25< FLOUR tS 29<
UE PLATE MAXWELL HOUSE
MAYONNAISE m" 45t COFFEE. 69C §^ll
.L PURPOSE SHORTENING ACTIVE ENZYME DETERGENT I OUR RR,DE BAKERY EXTRA VALUE BUYS
RISCO c" 75< GAIN Z" 69< I NMUUMER MMS Z z 19*1
RM CHARM EVAPORATED BETTY-CROCKER ASSORTED FLAVORS MAT IfcAfi MMK 11 OZ IOaI
t|IK TALL 13* MIXES Ml 9 CAN '*V pkg. Joy I HIUA|E HIIKiT RMtlk IMZ mu|
EVERYDAY LOW, LOW PRICES WWU HRAI IRUP loaf
USY CUT GREEN CANNED SOFT DRINKS ASSORTED FLAVORS COFFEE CAKE PKG. 49t|
EANS ai2t ZESTY S? 7<
(RAFT'S DEEP RICH BAR B QUE PACKERS LABEL MASHED ***"
SAUCE YAMS
1802. QQA 303 IO A
SIZE w# V CANS ~ V LARGE AND PLUMP GOLDEN RIPE
Minimi iceberg lettuce sr IBt I BANANAS I
FRESH CRISP FLORIDA PASCAL JUICY LARGE SUNKIST I I
IjHW CELERY JSK 19< LEMONS 55< | B IQ>
aiiiaaiiif ONIONS 33c POTATOES^B9c^^

Tkuraday, April 15,1571, Th# Rpcid# Alliprtor,

Page 17



Page 18

I, Tlm Florida Anterior, Thurd*y, Apr! 15.1971

5E 600 TO Jfe
iur T*P VKj 7 TO 9
If AIIIE VI MBSBae jssir^rArsi.
V* U r jC. i Couponi with lorg*r purchoMi |
** _^o^ 00^ m S ,mm mSSSSSK COUFOM COUPON GOOD THRU APRIL l
Aan a a I AT YOUR
!! STAMPS
PERES 600 D IMIMB.. APRIL 15 SWL. APRIL IS
DIXIE DARIING PRESTIGE Ia M J
bread 2 59 c flpSnorteniiig |y
DIXIE DARUNG HOT DOG OR HAMBURGER iCnBl
-RK. limit On* of Choie* With $7.30 or Mor* Purcho*E*c. Cig. L
Honey Bam 1 !. 39' Sgj)) lsco 3-59 j A
, IM^M^*^w l^MIIIII lll^^^Bt^^* IIM ** lll *^nim!rNi!!uo l,llllllllll^^^^^^^* ll l lll ,lll,llllll lll ** IIMIIII,l ** l, astor
astor HI fruit M THRIFTY MAID JS3 FRUIT
COFFEE DRINKS Tomatoes Hf Cocktail
Limit lof choic* with S7JO *r mori purchase *ichi4ie cigs. Limit 3 With $7.50 or Moro Purchot* Exc. Clg. M| limit 6 Can W/$7.50 or Mor* Purchot* Ec. Cig.
AU GRINDS MAXWELL HOUSE I HBI I I
'-&J V J \. J V J
SPARKY BRIQUETTES THRIPTY MAID PINEAPPLE DEL MONTE DEEP SOUTH STRAWBERRY
Charcoal.. 88 c Juice 3ss s l Catsup 48 c Preserves .." 69 c
ARROW BATH UPTON THRIFTY MAID MIXED VEG. OR LYRES VIENNA
Tissue ... .2 -1 YL Tea £ 49 c Gr. Limas .6 sr s l Sausage ..5 s l
AU VEGETABLE UPTON MUELLERS ELBOW t KRAFT RAR-B-QUE
Wesson Oil 98 c Tea Bags .. ? 69 c Macaroni .2 25 c Sauces 39 c
VENEZUELAN FLAT CRACKIN'GOOD THRIFTY MAID STEWED MY-T-FINE 4-PK.
Sardines ..7 s l Fig Bars ... ~ 39 c Tomatoes .4 s l Puddings .2 * *l
Quantity Rights Reserved
WWMRMV STOtfS. INC. COTVBOHT If7l
&/
SUNSHINE I! f/<#J DETERGENT If HOMOGENIZED
BUTTER I TIDE M JOY | MILK
limit 2 With $7.30 or Mor* Purchot* Ec. Cig.
I I l
KRAPT FRENCH GREEN GIANT I 1 BOTTLE H| I 1 GALLON
NIBLETS THRIFTY MAID All FLAVORS RITTY CROCKER LAYER CAKE DEL MONTE TOMATO
Com 4 s l Soups r 10 c Mixes .... 3 s l Juice 3ss s l
GREEN GIANT CS OR THRIFTY MAID TOMATO OREEN WANT KITCHEN MAXWfU HOUSE INSTANT
WK Com 4 s l Sauce .;. .5 s l Sli Beans 4ss s l Coffee .... z 99 c
. THRIFTY MAID EVAPORATED dixie refill
Bowls tvtl 3 s l oo Milk .12 c -P -,- 40 "^
lfVff W W limit 6 With $7.30 or Mor* Purthat* Exc. Cig. Onlt Po Pr ,WJ 49
.12 HIAM IÂ¥WAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS HSiH ,I*M4blW. MAIN ST.



SPECIAI
** Coupons A& C are worth 400 stamps on a purchase <££22 JQ though $27.49 M
Coupons B & C are worth 500 stamps eti a
A. B & C are worth 600 stamps, on a
! mm *io o to *l4 'ms3 *i5 w > ,o *l9 A SiTPIHH
comL' S nat UPOn X ay .k' T* > "| U, u C j I HsSIkOIuGm coupon may alto bo usod in I MM J II
combinot,on with olh.r TnpW H a d. r 1 combinative olh.r Tripl. Hnadnr | W I Wf "s
Coupon, w,th lar 9 .r purcha,.,. ||Coupon, with largor purcha,.,. J J Wg A
? COUPON COUPON GOOD THRU APRIL 18th I rmiortu A IS cL
I
at your local winn-dixh || jjyj? 7
PRICES GOOD THURS., APRIL 15 SUN., APRIL 18
\ bob WHITE REGULAR SLICED l[/OU/tJJ
AfAII HU
Bvlli cKsr 99-
Mi cheese 2 & 69*
tjuemjboaUA save 29* O sliced Cheese. 55 e
SriAj vVM4S| 1-LB. Bfl k | SUPERBRAND SUCED SINGLY WRAPPED AMERICAN SUCES
. W pkos. MS Cheese Food.. S? 69 s
f-cwcnite, HneakfiOtt. .. Jp G?sa
I ROUND I GROUND PORK rump
I STEAK n| BEEF ROAST ROAST
l NSSH WHOLE OS SIB HALS
W|D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS FRESH PORK (MB. *1.19) PRESH FROZEN GRADE "A" TURKEY FRESH FROZEN TURBOT WHITE
Sh Id. Roast s l l9 Tenderloins $ 9 98 Wings ... 39* Fish Fillets 49*
W-D BRAND GROUND BEEF HANDI PAK. FRESH SLICED SUNNVIAND PORK BREAKFAST UNK TASTE O'SEA
Stew Meat. 89* Pork Liver.. 88* Sausage . $ 1 99 Fish Cakes ~ 39*
USDA CHOKE W-D BRAND BEEF PLATE BONE-IN FRESH PORK PIUMROSE (NEED NO REFRIGERATION) 10c OFF ANY
Stew Meat. 49* Neck Boness-. 88* Canned Ham £ $ 1 39 Tarnow Pizza
W-D BRAND CUBED BEEF SMOKED PORK FRESH FROZEN TROUT FISH COPELAND SUCED AU MEAT
Steakettes. 88* Knuckles .. 39* Fillets 79* Bologna... 69*
Quantify Right, Rcwmd
wiwiann stoms, Inc comuoMT-itri
/ >B^T!Trr^^V/ > ;^^^^mortonassoi!^
au purpose 3-course (LpsSmi :sr :sk- :sa' :ssr 1
Potatoes* 19 Pot Pies Fruit Pies I
...1.. ....... ..... .......... i
Lettuce 2 39 c Sandwich ..2 s l Topping ... 5 "S s s l Bar-B-Que.. 99* I
LARGE STALKS FLA. SAVE lie ACTOR REGULAR OR CRINKLE CUT SAVE 25< MCH3 SAVE 14c FOX DfIUXR CHEESE B 1
\CoffeeichsJ^l^
WASHINGTON STATI WINCSA. GEOHOIA ISO SWIIT WTOH INSTANT ** IS.NINDTI MNDOHANGI
Apples... 4 69* Potatoes ... 15* Potatoes ... 49* Juice 4 s l
US. N1 YEUOW HARVEST FRESH FILBERT (QTRS.) DIXIANNA FOLV BAG GREEN FEAS OR BABY
Onions .. .3 29* Rutabagas ..- 8* Margarine 3 89* Limas
HENNYPEN KEEBLER PECAN DOW SPRAY (7toi. 93c) ASTOR FOROHOOK UMAS OR CHOPPED
Dog Food .3 £* 33* Sandies ... 55* Disinfectant '£ $ 1 39 Broccoli.. 4. s l
Cat Food 10 -* 99* Wafers 51* Plumr Salad Fruit. 49*
UNIVERSITY AVE.. open on Sunday
T 2 !4SAM WWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 20HI>m HOIH ,IM* MAIN ST

Tburaday, April 16,1971, Thm Merida AHlpiar,

Page 19



Page 20

>, Tha Florida Allifrtor, Thursday, April 15,1871

4 civilians offer
exchange for POWs
LOS ANGELES (UPI) Four
civilians recruited by an
insurance salesman left
Wednesday for Laos to offer
themselves as replacements for
American prisoners of war in
North Vietnam.
Dominic Bud Cimino, 45,
organizer of the project, said
they hoped to negotiate a
body-for-body exchange one
human being for another human
being.
y.
A Marine veteran of World
War II and father of three
children, Cimino said at the
airport he was optimistic that
the unusual operation would
succeed. Weve got a good
partner God, he said.
The men offering themselves
as hostages are the Rev. Jean
Trouche, 59, a French-speaking
Methodist minister here; Stan
Bagwell, 50, a retired Navy petty
officer; Patrick MacDonald, 21,
a conscientious objector, and Ed
Newmyer, 70, a retired fireman.
Cimino, who plans to return
to Los Angeles if the other four
are accepted as replacements,
says he has 50 more volunteers
waiting to take the places of war
prisoners.
Few under-21 voters
turn out for election
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (UPI)
Only a small percentage of
eligible 18, 19 and 20-year-olds
voted Tuesday in a special
congressional primary election
which marked the first time in

r~l FLEETWOOD
[Em SKYLINE
PEACHTREE
' :
HILLCREST
iT^nrU^H*
I 9m
SPECIAL! SPACIOUS 12x64
MOBILE HOME-2 BEDROOM
REG. PRICE $6,971.25 NOW $5,477 o*> 0 *>
1 4505 13th Street
_ Phone 378-1377
I*3 Continental mobile homes
OF AMERICA. INC
about finding a roommate? I
Alligator WANTED ads are gosd |

Maryland persons under 21 had
the right to vote. A light
turnout in general seemed
evident during early balloting to
decide Republican and
Democratic nominees for the
congressional seat vacated by
Interior Secretary Rogers C.B.
Morton.
However, lack of interest in
the contests seemed greatest
among the young many of
whom apparently passed up
their first chance to vote for lack
of a clearcut choice among
candidates regarded moderate to
conservative in political views.
Askew approves
anfilitter campaign
TALLAHASSEE, F&. (UPI)
- A $75,000-a-year 20-year plan
to rid Florida of litter, trash and
junk was approved by Gov.
Reubin Askew Tuesday, making
this the first state in the
southeast to adopt a longrange
program.
Unless halted, Askew said,
Floridians will generate enough
trash by 1990 to cover a 25-foot
wide road from Jacksonville to
Miami 50 feet high.
Other staggering figures
projected by the governor show
that Floridians now generate
about five pounds of solid waste
per day and would grow to 12
pounds per person by 1990 or
an unbelievable 22 million tons
per year.
"Solid waste litter, trash,
junk is as much a threat to
Floridas environment as are
other forms of pollution,
Askew said. Not only ecology
but much of our economics is
dependent upon a litter-free land
and seascape.

WORLD WRAP-UP

McCarthy to teach
poetry at Maryland
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Former Sen. Eugene McCarthy
will join the University of
Maryland faculty this fall as a
visiting professor of poetry. But
the Minnesotan whose
unsuccessful bid for the
Democratic presidential
nomination in 1968 attracted
thousands of young Americans
turned down an offer to teach
politics,too.
McCarty will spend one day a
week on campus in his part time
postion, and earn the title of
professor.
McCarthy plans to talk about
politics and history, but only in
conjunction with poetry as an
art form.
South Vietnamese lift
Siege at Fire Base 6
SAIGON (UPI) South
Vietnamese relief forces lifted a
15-day siege at Fire Base 6
Wednesday, permitting U.S.
helicopters to fly tons of food,

The UF Board of Student Publications
Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
Apply For the Following Positions .
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Fall (Term I) 1971
Fall & Winter (Terms I & II) 1971-72
Winter (Term II) 1972
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Fall (Term I) 1972
Fall & Winter (Terms I & II) 1971-72
Winter (Term II) 1972
The Board of Student Publications shall choose
the term of office after full deliberation
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
You do not have to be a journalism major.
General Instructions
-L
, All applications are to be picked up and
returned between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union.
Applicants must return the original plus two
copies of the completed application prior to ;' ; ~
4 p.m., Thursday, April 22.


water and ammunition into
defenders of the strategic
outpost.
Two American advisers were
killed in the fight through the
Communist lines.
Pressures on Fire Base 6
eased, but U.S. and South
Vietnamese field commanders
said elements of a large North
Vietnamese force were
apparently regrouping to
continue what has been
described as a local offensive on
the Central Highlands.
Military sources at the front
said about 2,700 North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong were
slain in 15 days of combat in the
Fire Base 6 area. South
Vietnamese losses were placed at
172 men killed and 292
wounded.
Field reports said the two
slain Americans were military
advisers who accompanied the
60,000-man South Vietnamese
relief force in a drive to the
hilltop post.
One South Vietnamese unit
fought a 16-hour battle with
Communist forces near the base
before punching through to
relieve it.

Jews plague Soviets
like in days of old
NEW YORK (UPI) A small
group of youths, protesting the
plight of Jews in the Soviet
Union, released some 50 live
frogs in a Soviet office in
Manhattan Tuesday.
Minutes later, they turned
loose 50 live mice in another
Soviet office.
The group, Student Activists
for Soviet Jewry, described the
action as the first and second of
10 plagues symbolic of the
biblical plagues given the
Egyptian pharoah that it
planned in the next few days to
harass the Russians.
The group struck first Tuesday
afternoon at the Soviets
Aeroflot airlines ticket office
where, according to a group
spokesman, two teen-agers
staged a fight to divert attention
while three others dumped the
frogs on a secretarys desk.
A spokesman for the airlines
said later that when police
arrived, the youths gathered the
frogs and took them away.



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Thursday, April 15,1971, Tha Florida AMiptor,

Page 21



Page 22

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 15,1971

"Dark of the Moon begins rehearsals

By KIM HART
Alligator Correspondent
Bob Rudd and Susan Baum captured the lead roles in the upcoming
Florida Players production, Dark of the Moon, early this quarter,
climaxing a week of tryouts involving more than 75 students.
A folk fantasy written by Howard Richardson and William Bemey,
Dark of the Moon takes place in a small Smokey Mountain
community and involves a love story between a witch boy named
John and a young mountaineer girl called Barbara Allen.
The show includes both singing and dancing and will be under the
direction of Dr. Clyde G. Sumpter of the UF Theater Department.
According to Dr. Sumpter, Dark of the Moon is a very
action-oriented play requiring extreme energy from all cast members.
For this reason Dr. Sumpter chose to begin each night of tryouts with
a series of calisthenics.
Fm a firm believer in physical exercise, Dr. Sumpter saidr, and I
plan to use them throughout my rehearsals to help keep the energy
level of my actors up.
The script calls for a cast of 25, but Dr. Sumpter has added towns
people, and a chorus of witches to bring the cast up to a massive 45.
Sumpter sees the coordination Os all these people into one
homogenous community as his biggest production problem.
Working with Dr. Sumpter on the production will be students
Marilyn Wall, as assistant to the director; and Elizabeth Jane Green, as
choral director.
Dark of the Moon will include much dance set to the original
music of UF student Fernando Fonseca, and Maikwood T. Holmes of
Kansas State College of Pittsburg. The nine dances will be
choreographed by Richard Lake, assistant professor of theater.
According to Mr. Lake, one of the most difficult tasks for the dancers
of this show will be their leaps from one platform height to another.
By the use of these platform movements, Lake hopes to create a sense
of flying.
The set, designed by Asst. Prof. J. Michael Gillette, involves an
enormous mountain, several wagon platforms, and drops. Also
designed by Mr. Gillette is the lighting, which will bring out the eerie
effects of mountain life. The authentic costumes will be designed and
executed by Miss Lyn Carroll, Assistant Professor. The construction
of the set by students is under the direction of Asst. Prof. Duane K.
Ford.
Dark of the Moon will be staged at the H.P. Constans Theater
May 10-15. Tickets for the show will go on sale at the J. Wayne Reitz
Union Box office starting April 26.

Players to hold auditions

The Florida Players will hold
open auditions for all UF
students for their evening of one
act plays. The tryouts will be
held Monday and Tuesday, April
19 and 20, in the HP. Constans
Theater from 5:30 p.m. until 7
p.m. Because of the large cast of

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Dade Os The Moon there will
be a demand for actors. So, all
are encouraged to turn out. The
wide variety of plays will "*
include: The Still Alarm,
Please No Flowers, Bringing
It All Back Home, Hello Out
There, and The Artist.

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Mass east
More than 75 UF students
tried out for the year's last
major Florida Players'
production, "Dark of the
Moon." The scene above was
typical of almost a week of
intense work by students vying
for roles in the production, to be
directed by Dr. Glyde G.
Sumpter. Three tryouts for the
nine "witch dancers" in the play
listen intently (right) to assistant
professor Richard Lake, the
play's choreographer, tell them
of "witch" ideas for its Smokey
Mountain setting. Out of the 75
tryouts, Dr. Green gave 45 parts
in the play, which will run from
May 10-15 at the Constans
Theater.

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Muskie: FBI spied on Earth Day

WASHINGTON QM) Sen.
Edmund S. Muskie, (Mfalne),
accused the FBI Wednesday of
spying on Earth Day rallies held
a year ago to glorify the
environment. He said Congress
should set up a board to monitor
all government agencies who
gather intelligence on civilians.
In a Senate speech, Muskie
said the FBI had no business
eavesdropping on citizens
protesting pollution where no
crime or threat of crime was
involved nor ... any violence
threatened.
He inserted into the
congressional record and
released to reporters, copies of a
document on FBI stationery
describing the Earth Day rally

Fair to include
' e
earthquake, robot
By JENNIFER RICH
Alligator Writer
An earthquake and a talking mechanical man are just a few of the
projects planned for the 26th Annual Engineers Fair being held April
16-18.
Visitors to the College of Engineering will be able to see and talk
with Albert, the Mechanical Man, or Otto 11, as he is affectionately
called. The neW Albert is internally controlled using no outside wires
or cables.
According to Prof. Marinus Latour, who has worked with Albert
since his inception, the principle behind Alberts operation is digital
signals on the same nature as computer signals. This enables Albert
to talk to fair-goers byway of a tape recorder and instructions from
the control panel operator.
Albert was designed by students from the Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers, a student organization. Work began in late 1969
on plans and design criterion. Albert was ready in time for last years
fair. But problems developed when Albert started heating up after
long hours in the sun. Improvements have been made and Albert will
be on display on the second floor patio of Larsen Hall.
An earthquake simulator is another of the unusual exhibits to be
displayed at the fair. Other exhibits include an electric car, a system
of three-dimensional pictures using lazer beams, a heartbeat machine,
a rotating putting green, and a double elliptical pendulum which
draws designs.
Candidates for the coveted Engineers Queen title Sally Bruner,
Carolyn Jones and Marcia Graf, will serve as hostesses during the Fair.
They are being sponsored by Tau Beta Pi, Society for Engineering
Sciences and the American Nuclear Society. The final choice for
Queen will be made on Sunday.
Attendance at the fair is expected to exceed 40,000 visitors during
the three.days.
PIT I
I mhmm you get break M
on tMk and
. w k everything else
MM 'MaaMMMwWMMwwa ' .... ~ .WM
When a man sets out to air ftis knowledge, he is
1 always able to supply the wind.

If antipollution rallies are a subject of intelligence
concern, is anything immune? Is there any citizen
involved in politics who is not a potential subject for
an FBI dossier ?
-Edmund Muskie

Held April 22, 1970 near the
Wadiington Monument. The
report listed the speakers at the
demonstration, including Muskie
himself.
He said the FBI compiled
between 40 to 60 reports on
other Earth Day rallies held
around the nation.
If anitpollution rallies are a
subject of intelligence concern,

is anything immune? Muskie
asked the senate. Is there any
citizen involved in politics who
is not a potential subject for an
FBI dossier?
Muskie refused to disclose
how he obtained the report but
said it was not among the more
than 1,000 documents stolen
recently from the FBI office at
Media, Pa.

From Orlando, Florida, recently appearing
with Edgar Winter
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To counteract what he called
the excessive zeal of the FBI
and other civilian intelligence
agencies, Muskie proposed
creating an independent review
board composed- of
congressmen, judges, lawyers
and intelligence officers. It
would keep tabs on the amount
of spying done and issue an
annual report to the public.
Legislation spelling out limits
on the scope of domestic
intelligence might also be
needed, he said.
Sens. Birch Bayh, D-Ind., and
Henry M. Jackson, D-Wash., who
along with Muskie are
considered Democratic
presidential hopefuls, endorsed
Muskies proposal.

Thursday, April 15,1971, Ths Florida AMprtor,

Edmund Muskie
... blasts FBI

Page 23



THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Golf team 3rd in Houston All-America

By CHRIS LANE
Aligator Sports Editor
Gator Andy North fired a
two-under-par 70 in the first
round of the Houston
All-America Golf Tournament
Wednesday to pace Florida to a
third place effort behind the
University of Texas and
Oklahoma State.
Texas posted a first day tally
of 284, six strokes better than
second-placed Oklahoma with a
290. Florida registered a 291,
two strokes ahead of the host
Cougars.
Freshman Gary Koch
slammed even par on the
Houston Altascocita Golf Course
while team captain Mike Killian
hit a two-over-par 74. Junior Jim
McQuillian added a 75 on the
6,700-yard, par 36-36-72 course.
Texas George Machock was
low ith a four-under 68.

By CHRIS LANE
Aligator Sports Editor
Gator Andy North fired a
two-under-par 70 in the first
round of the Houston
All-America Golf Tournament
Wednesday to pace Florida to a
third place effort behind the
University of Texas and
Oklahoma State.
Texas posted a first day tally
of 284, six strokes better than
second-placed Oklahoma with a
290. Florida registered a 291,
two strokes ahead of the host
Cougars.
Freshman Gary Koch
slammed even par on the
Houston Altascocita Golf Course
while team captain Mike Killian
hit a two-over-par 74. Junior Jim
McQuillian added a 75 on the
6,700-yard, par 36-36-72 course.
Texas George Machock was
low ith a four-under 68.

Tennis team faces important match

Floridas tennis team faces an
important triangular match
beginning this afternoon in
Baton Rouge, La., when they
face Southeastern Conference
rivals Tennessee and LSU.
The Gators, although one
game under .500 this season, will
be bolstered by the return of
Bruce Bartlett.
Bartlett was nursing
tendonitis in his right arm for
the past three weeks and made
his return to the courts against
Georgia Tech, April 9.

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The UF team was playing
minus their coach, Buster
Bishop, who had to return to
Gainesville due to the illness of
his mother.
The Gators, embarrassed by
their hosts to the tune of 28
mBgBaL W m I
I r M
v Bf m''
B^B

Andy North
... low with 70

The Gators will have to pick
up a couple of singles and
doubles victories in the match in
order to get a high seed in the
SEC tournament May 6-8 in
Oxford, Miss., the home of the
Ole Miss Rebels.
Coach Bill Potter will be
playing Ray Heidema in the No.
1 singles and will start Mike
McCaffery, Kenn Terry, Ricky
Knight and Buddy Miles in the
singles.
The Gators next home match

strokes in the Cape Coral
Invitational April 1-4, are out
for revenge and Killian, himself a
former Cougar, thinks they can
get it.
Houston isnt playing as well
as I thought theyd play, he
mUr b
ill |
Gary Koch
... first round 72

is April 19 against top ranked
Georgia, who shut out Florida
earlier this season, 7-0.

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MARTY PER LMUTTER f CHRIS LANE
Eirecutive'Sports*Editor Sports editor

Page 24

explained. If we play this well
the rest of the tournament well
beat them easy.
Houston, defending champion
for the tournament, also boasts
the 1970 medalist berth when
Cougar John Mahaffey scored a
68 in the final round.

Intramural all-stars
better than last year
By BRITT CRITTENTON
Alligator Correspondent
The intramural flag football all stars move into their third practice
session this Sunday at Florida Field at 4 p.m.
According to game coordinator Gene Newman, the team is getting
stronger each passing day. The first two sessions have had turnouts of
over 50 prospects. The session Sunday will be the last one before the
team is cut down to 25 men.
Fourteen of last year's 20 man squad that won the championship,
are back to participate this year.
The next session will be held the April 25th when starting berths
will begin to take form.
According to reliable sources, the Gator Greats are taking this
years game more seriously then in prior years. They were obviously
humiliated by last years defeat.
The big questions fans have been asking are: Will Steve Spurrier
ever make it as an intramural quarterback? Will Larry Rentz beat
Spurrier out for the No. one slot? Is Steve Tannen afraid of the great
speed and moves of the Intramural All Stars?
Tickets will be on sale at dormitories and local fraternity houses
starting April 29. Local business outlets will also have tickets on sale
for the scheduled May 6 game.

, The Florida Alligator, Thurtday, April 15,1971

Twenty-seven teams from 15
states are competing for six
championships in 72 holes of
play. Besides the medalist slot,
teams will also be competing for
the team medal, team match,
overall team, low two-ball and
low four-ball awards.



Cincinnatis Bobby To/an,
f?Gi ,3f ih*A ,y&:. .? 4 ........ v, ..... p i M, :
if only he could run bases

By MILTON RICHAMAN
UP I Sprats Writer
NEW YORK Bobby Tolan
stung the ball hard.
It took off on a blurred line
for the right field comer where
it hit the fenee on one of those
quick bounces, then caromed
crazily the other way toward
center field.
The ball wouldVe been good
for two bases sure... if this
wasnt batting practice... if
Bobby Tolan could only ran.
But Cincinnatis fine center
fielder hasnt been able to run
for the past three months, since
last Jan. 6 to be exact, when he
ruptured the Achilles tendon in
his right leg playing basketball
with several of his Reds
teammates.
Bobby Tolan underwent an
operation the next day and
everybody he meets now always

Delta Tau Delta in big golf lead

Delta Tau Delta continues to
build up its already
insurmountable Blue League
lead, having taken the lead after
the first two rounds of the Blue
League golf championship.
Bill Griffin hit a 38 and a 39
while Henry Iler fired a 37 after
an opening rouiid 41.
One stroke behind the Delts
at 156 is Kappa Alpha. Grady
Cooksey posted a 36 and a 39
while Bill Leady hit a 39 and a
42.
Delta Upsilon, paced by a 39
and a 38 from Bill Wilkins is in
third place with a 161. Right
behind the DUs are the Chi Phis
at 162. Jim Cole posted an
outstanding 36 on the back nine
for the Chi Phis.
A 37 by John Lynn enabled
the Theta Chis to make the cut
at 167.
In Orange League tennis
action, the Sigma Chis continued
100 wins
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) Jim
Bunning of the Phillies is the
second pitcher in major league
history to win 100 games in each
league. Bunning joined Cy
Young, a 511 major league game
winner, last August 11 with his
6-5 win over the Houston
Astros. Bunning has also hurled
a no-hit game in each league.

ffyrv Bowl on the Uof F
tIJLy Intercollegiate Team
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For more intormation call 392-1637
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HU. S T .HUUI
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starts off asking the same two
questions.
Hows the leg? and Vhen
you gonna be back? Bobby
Tolan says, repeating the
questions and smiling to show he
appreciates peoples concern
even though they Ve been asking
the same thing for three months
now.
lts tough to answer those
questions, Tolan says. You
dont know, you hope. Look at
Rico Carty. He was coming
along fine. You have to hurt
yourself to appreciate what
someone else is going through. I
know what Johnny Unitas is
going through now. You gotta
sympathize with the guy. Its
gonna take a lotta hard work on
his part. It did on my part and
Im younger.
Bobby Tolan is 25 and
Johnny Unitas will be 38 next
month. Tolan can swing the bat

to secure their hold on first
place by crashing AEPi in the
quarterfinals, 4-1.
At the same time, SAE
suffered a severe blow when
they were downed by the FUls,
3-2.
In the other bracket, SPE
downed last years champions,
the Pikes, 3-2 on the strength of
victories in both doubles
matches.
In the only other match of
the day, tournament favorite
Tau Epsilon Phi blasted ATO
5-0, as the ATOs managed to
win only one set in the entire
match.
In Independent softball, the
Hillcrest Bombs backed up
pitcher Wayne Feiler with only
two runs on eight hits. Feiler,
however, backed the Bombs
against the wall as he allowed 47
runs on 55 hits, as the Thigpen

CARNIGRAS
IS
HERE

right now the same way he did
last season when all he did was
hit .316, drive in 80 runs and
finish with 16 homers for the
Reds. But what he cant do is
steal 57 bases for them the way
he did last year.
All he can do now is jog, work
hard and hope for the best.
Theres still a little pain,
Tolan says, but its the kind of
pain you can bear. The doctor
said the critical stage would be
the 10th to the 12th week, when
Id get very active and I could
rupture the tendon again. This is
my 14th week though. Im past
my critical stage now.
Bobby Tolan may be but not
necessarily the Reds. Without
him they simply are not the
same ball club they were last
season offensively or
defensively.
The Reds front office had
warned Tolan against playing

Intramurals

experience mutilated the Bombs
47-2.
Scoring honors went to Paul
Faulkner who blasted three
homers and two doubles. Joe
Thigpen gave Faulkner a run

j====PAlD POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
YOUR RIGHTS ARE
808 MANDELL I I
JMHW REAL PARTY WILL
mm, Judicial challenge to RA room
PS?" search policy.
I Expand Student Defenders
Program to provide counsel prior I
to and during interrogation. I
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custody based on university I
I affiliation (personal I
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# opposition to any form
TOM CLARK I rasra*-. I
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code.
VOTE : 1 : :
your rights if charged with Violation of
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# you havl the right to know what the charge is against you.
You have the right to be apprised fully of the procedures open to you as I
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basketball but he felt he had to
do something to stay in good
condition.
We had just moved from Los
Angeles to Cincinnati where we
bought a new home, Tolan
says, and if I had stayed in Los
Angeles I wouldVe been playing
baseball every day. In Cincinnati
I couldn't because of the
weather so I played basketball.
Would I ever do it again? I think
so but I don't know for sure. I
dont think it was foolish or
stupid. Most everybody on our
ball club played, too, and if it
was foolish or stupid why would
they do it?
Tolan takes batting practice
with the Reds every day and
hopes hell be ready to pinch hit
for them in a month.
The doctors told me the
only thing they can do is put the
tendon back together, he said.
How it works out after that

BRITT CRITTENTON

but, Thigpen, however,
accounted for three of the
Experiences outs during the
game while no other member of
the team accounted for more
than one.

Thursday, April 15,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

I ET i
:*
i
depends on how much work the
individual does. The work is
more boring than hard. What I
have to do now is develop a calf
muscle. I was in a cast two
months and there's no muscle
there.
Tolan's spirits are good. Hes
doing his work every day and
listening to some advice his
mother has given him.
Be patient and do what the
doctor said, she told him.
Youll still be a good
ballplayer.
Some people dont realize
how good a ballplayer the
lefthanded hitting Tolan is. He
hit 368 against left-handed
pitching two years ago and 335
against Southpaws last year.
When Sparky Anderson, the
Reds manager, half-kiddingly
asked him How come you hit
left-handers so good? the other
day, Bobby Tolan didnt blink
an eye.
Tm just a naturally good
hitter, he said.
He wasnt kidding either.

Page 25



Page 26

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 15,1971

Intramurals fair in money sharing

Rugby coach Phil Wyatt says
he is ready to show the campus
that his team is ready to play.
The Water Ski Chib say they
are ready to show the campus
that they are ready to compete.
Jose Sasek and Bob Favreau
would like to show the campus
what they can do.
Unfortunately for all
mentioned, along with other
clubs on the campus that receive
funds from the Intramural
department, there just isnt
enough money to go around.
Wyatt thinks the Rugby team
can compete with the best in the
country if he had the chance.
Since he has to pay, along with
the other members of the team,
for away trips, their travel is
limited to areas reachable by car
within a couple of hours.
We are doing something for
the University of Florida,*'
Wyatt said this week. We are
winning and carrying the orange
and blue all over the southeast."
But his team is just one of 30
that are sponsored by
Intramurals, and as a result, get
Volunteers
needed for
track test
Robert Bessette and track
coach Jimmy Carnes are looking
for volunteers to help test the
new pacing system installed at
Florida Track.
Bessette, the founder of the
electronic device, needs students
or anyone involved indirectly or
directly with the campus to
come to the track between the
hours of 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. any
Monday, Wednesday* or Friday
if they are interested in helping
the test.
Hie object of die test is to
see if the pacing system does
indeed help a runner to speed up
his times while practicing
alone," Bessette said.
Anyone interested in helping
should call Bessette at 378-2982
or 378-9772.
The tests will conclude in six
weeks, enough time to give the
system a working over, Bessette
said.

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just as much money as say the
archery club.
We have to allocate the
funds the Student Senate votes
us to the different teams in
Intramurals," said Dr. Paul
Vames, who is in charge of
dividing the cash amoung the
different clubs.
Sure the rugby team travels
around the country, but we are
not authorized to give money
for dub travel," Dr. Vames said.
The Ski club has won the
tournament in Cyprus Gardens
for the past four years. But just
because they are winning the
Florida Intercollegiate Meet each
time out doesnt stipulate that
they receive any more money
the following year.
I am sure they could be
national champions if we could
afford to send them around the
country, Dr. Vames said.
As for Sasek, he has enough
qualifing points to make the
Olympic trials in New York. But

' t r<:
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UF rugby dub fin stripes) are ready to show the campus
... but funds limit teams play to areas in the southeastern part of country

m
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

30 clubs involved in big split

he will have to pay his own way
to go there.
And Favreau, who ranks in
the top five for his weight class,
is a likely candidate for the 72
Olympics as well. But again he
too will have to pay his way to
the trials.
Which brings us right back to
the rugby squad, presently
16-2-1 on the year and winner of
the Gator Invitational which
involved Ivy League champion
Yale and Brown, another Ivy
League power.
Yales Intramural
department gets $27.50 from
each student registered. And
with 4,000 students on campus
this year, the money builds up.
South Carolina (the team
that inflicted one of the losses to
the mgby team), is the same
way, so they can afford to give
more money totheir mgby.
And what does the entire
Intramural pepartment here at
Florida get? $70,000 for a total

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of 20,000 students on campus,
Dr. Vames said.
However, the chief budgeter
for Intramurals wasn't
complaining about the funds.
We are fairly well treated by
the Student Senate, he said.
Dr. Vames estimates that
Intramurals has given Wyatt over
S9OO this season in uniforms,
supplying game balls, officials,
equipment along with lining the
field for each game.
As each club gets more
active, we have to allocate the
money appropriately to that
club. A few years ago, the
archery club placed five in the
state tournament, making it
almost impossible to lose the
state tournament, Dr. Vames
stated.
As the rugby club gets more
involved in their scheduling, and
travel extends, the bills pile up,
bringing the team almost to
varsity level.
I doubt that Florida could
support a varsity mgby team,

Bob Favrwu
... Olympic prospect
one that abides by the NCAA
rules, Dr. Vames said. Some
of the players have been here for
over five years.
In the NCAA rules, an
athlete has five years to
complete four years of
eligibility. But guys like Whyatt
and Tony (Barker) have been
playing longer than that.
*1 think the club would lose
over SO percent of its players if
the club went varsity, Dr.
Vames said.
So the 30 odd clubs
Intramurals is in charge of have
to be content with sharing the
cash with the rest of the clubs
and all still have to pay out of
their pockets for travel.
We have access to a team bus
that was approved by the Senate
recently, which should cut down
on some expenses for the
teams, Dr. Varnes indicated.
We will decide what weekends
each team will use the bus and
then if a weekend is still open in
the quarter, we will see who
needs it.
It seems a step in the right
direction for the rugby club and
other teams that travel
extensively.
But the problem hasnt been
solved as yet for Favreau and
Sasek.



' # I'
Drop in sometime, but watch that last step

By DEBBI SMITH
Alligator Copy Editor
Driving a car scares me.
Thats probably why, at
18-years old, I dont even have a
drivers license.
But, quite ironically, campus
posters advertising the Gator
Skydiving Cub seemed to whet
my curiousity. Interested, I
sought to investigate.
Consequently, I even
surprised myself when I called
Harold Stewart, president of the
club. With sincere interest, I
asked about the clubs training
program.
Before I knew it I was in a
plane preparing for my first
jump at Gainesvilles Stengel Air
Field. When the plane door
finally opened, I wondered just
what kind of idiot I was to leave
the safety of the plane when It
really wasnt necessary.
The cockpit wasnt on fire,
the engines were still running
and the wings were still intact. I
chose to jump. I couldnt let the
thrill, the excitement of a first
jump escape.
The task of pulling myself out
of the plane, standing on a small
step and getting the right
position in 120 m. p. h. winds
seemed almost impossible.
The wind was so forceful that
I wanted to get out of it, even if
down was the only route.
The sensation of die next
seven seconds, after I pushed
away from the plane and before
the chute opened, is unlike
anything I ever experienced. Its
not like falling.
The chute blossomed into a
fine canopy and I knew that I
was home safe. The canopy ride
probably explains why there are
so many sport parachutists.
Winds that were so
threatening just a moment ago
diminished into a tolerable
whisper. It was so very still
and quiet.
Perceptions are very different
while you're suspended in mid
air. Time seems longer. It goes
slower.
Watching parachutists from
the ground gives you the
impression the jump is quick
over almost before it begins. But
my effortless drifting seemed to
last forever.
I floated downward and the
ground slowly came up to meet

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iTWfter ponders first parachute jump

me. I tugged at my left strap to
prevent landing in some trees
and I settled down in a clear
field. I struggled to turn into.the
wind to ease my fall.
I landed right on my can!
In the time it took me to
utter a surprised exclamation, a
gust of wind billowed my chute
open and I was once again riding
- on my back along Stengel
Field, which is not the best way
to travel.
Instinctively, I released my
capewell (hinge) which cut the
chute from my shoulder and it
collapsed.
After field packing my chute,
I trudged back to the clubhouse,
throughly annoyed with myself
for having performed such a
brilliant exhibition of
incompetence by a parachutist.
But, I was sure that sport
parachuting was something I
enjoyed very much. It was
something I would like to
become better at and to know
more about. And, I prided
myself in knowing that I had the
courage to find out for myself
what it was like.
It wasnt that easy.
Several hours of training
preceded my first jump. It
consisted of two 4-hour chalk
board sessions which included
the basics of sport parachuting,
construction and packing of the
parachute, proper exit procedure
from the aircraft, and emergency
and proper landing procedures.
The United States Parachute
Association (USPA) requires
that beginning jumpers
successfully complete five static
line jumps before they are
allowed to jump free fall.
On a static line jump, a
10-foot cord is attached to the
parachute instead of a ripcord.
The other end of the line is
attached to the plane and the
jump master has control of it.
When you jump from the plane
the parachute is deployed
automatically.
On a free fall jump the
parachutist pulls his own cord.
On the last three static line
jumps, the student puUs a dummy
ripcord to prepare for the first
free faU jump.
The complete course costs
$65 and includes training,

Sport parachuting is big at UF

equipment rental, USPA
membership, liability insurance,
a log book and the five static
jumps.
There is also a one jump
course available for S3O. The
following four static line jumps
cost $lO each.
Before I enrolled in the
course, I combed the library for
statistics on the dangers of
skydiving. Surprisingly,
skydiving is considered less
dangerous than other action
sports such as skindiving or auto
racing.
Even more important, the
Gator Skydiving Club has an
excellent safety record. There
have been no fatalities or serious
injuries in the club's five-year
history.
There have been a few
sprained ankles but I reasoned
that I could inflict greater
injuries on myself just by falling
from a curb.
My training went well. I had
bruises on my left leg to prove
that Id mastered the landing
fall. I practiced the roll from a
four-foot platform.
The instructor suspended me
from a roof, hamassed in the rig
with a reserve chute on. I had to
deploy the chute as I would in
an emergency and release the
capewells which would cut away
the main parachute. When I

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1029 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. : |
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finished the instructor
announced that I was ready to
jump.
With determination, I climbed
aboard the plane, a single engine

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Quiet flight ends in rough manner
... I landed right on my can ouch!"

Thursday, April 15, 1971, Th# Florida Alligator,

Cessna 180, and we leveled off
at 3,000 feet. My instructor gave
me the signal, I pushed off I
did it.
I jumped!

Page 27



Page 28

I, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday. April 16,1971

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