Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tuesday, April 6, 1971

Regents refuse $25 tuition hike

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Gov. Reubin Askews
proposed $25 increase in tuition
fees was refused endorsement by
the Board of Regents and
authorization was given to sign
the contracts for the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center expansion
project at the regents meeting
Monday.
The regents finance
committee has been studying the
possibility of a sls a quarter
increase in tuition fees since
early this year. However, Gov.
Askew recently announced a
$25 increase is necessary for his

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Student craftsmen display wares

The second floor of the Reitz Union has been the
location of a print sale since Friday. However,
Monday, arts and crafts, including leather goods, #

Legislature should lower
voting age Saunders says

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Chances of the Florida
Legislative ratifying the
constitutional amendment that
would lower the voting age in all
elections to 18 are good,
according to Senator Bob
Saunders, D-Gainvesville.
My guess is that we will
ratify it, Saunders said before
he left for the opening session in
Tallahassee Monday. To me it
just doesnt make sense for
persons to vote nationally and
not in state elections.
I don't anticipate any long
v '-V ;

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

higher education budget to be
submitted to the upcoming state
legislative session.
If Askews proposed increase
is approved by the legislature,
full-time in-state students would
pay $175 a quarter and
out-of-state students would pay
$475 a quarter.
The regents also authorized
the signing of contracts for the
Health Center expansion at UF
which will include the states
first College of Dentistry. The
state cabinet must now
authorize the contracts before
construction can begin.
In order to help finance the

added. *T dont know who will
offer the resolution, but I am
confident it will be offered and
passed.
The 1970 Voting Rights Act
lowered the national voting age
in 48 states that previously
didn't allow 18-year-olds to
vote. This action was followed
by a U.S. Supreme Court ruling
last December upholding the
right of 18-year-olds to vote in
federal elections.
JL.
Although President Richard
Nixon supported the Voting
Rights Act, he questioned
whether the vote should have
been gwe* fay constitutional

Health Center gets go-ahead

candles and hand knitted items were added to the
collection. Here, Suzanne Mahoney and Allen
Cheuvront display their wares.

University of Florida, Gainesville

$42.4 million project, over $5
million was borrowed from
other state university projects
with the majority of the money
coming from FSU and Florida
International University (FIU).
FSU President Stanley
Marshall and FIU President
Charles Perry recently expressed
some dissatisfaction about the
borrowing of money from their
universities. Chancellor Robert
Mautz said Monday he expected
all the money that was borrowed
would be returned by the middle
of July at the latest.
In order to return the money
borrowed, the regents plan to

amendment rather than by an
act of Congress.
In late March, Congress gave
the nod to the 18-year vote by
passing the 26th amendment
to the U.S. Constitution in a
400-19 vote in the House, and
by a unanimous vote in the
Senate.
Four states ratified it that
very afternoon. Three-fourths of
the nations legislatures, 38
states, must ratify the
amendment in order for final
adoption.
A potential 10 million to 23
million voters would be added to
the rolls if the amendment
bgcooiiaw.
.x 4 '** r; .p T .,.

authorize the issue of revenue
certificates backed by money
from student fees. The
legislature authorized the
issuance of the certificates at the
last legislative session.
Also, Education
Commissioner Floyd Christian
said there is $11.3 million more
from the gross utilities tax than
was expected. Mautz said this
would be used to repay the
universities.
In other action taken by the
regents, an articulation
agreement with the states junior
colleges was passed. The
agreement was passed over an
objection by UF.
The agreement standardizes
admission requirements for
students transferring from junior
colleges to state universities. The
agreement includes a grade
forgiveness clause to which UF
objected at the last regents
meeting in March. This clause
allows a junior college transfer
to be admitted on the basis of
his most recent grades.
UF wants all grades, including

Uhlfelder restates
black regent need

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
In a letter to Gov. Reubin
Askew, Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder requested the
appointment of a person from
the black community to the
Board of Regents.
Uhlfelders second letter on
this subject came in response to
the vacant position on the board
left by Milton N. Weir of Boca
Raton who resigned Wednesday.
The letter stated, 4 *... for too
long our University and the
hierarachy of the university
system have kept certain
minorities out of schools. Right
now, efforts are being made to
correct the inequitable situation
on our campus where less than
one per cent of the population
of this University is black.
However, without members
on the Board of Regents who
understand the problems of all
the people in this state, we will
continue to have difficulties in
correcting this deplorable
situation.
After resigning Weir said,
You see no progress. The
institution of education is sp
deeply rooted and ingrained that
it takes too long to change it.
Official of The rift*
& '' &* 7- J ,vu

Vol. 63, No. 109

E 1
I 1 I
: HH f H
:Vx
.$
HAP < ..' Reubin Askew
... proposed hike refused
failing grades in courses which
have been repeated, to be
averaged in together. The
agreement, however, calls for
counting only the last grade in a
course that has been repeated.
The regents also tentatively
approved the budget guidelines
the universities must follow in
drawing up their budgets for
1972-1973.

Steve Uhlfelder
... reiterates black regent request
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
have urged Askew to appoint a
black Florida A&M University'
professor to the regents.
Regents Chancellor Robert
Mautz, commented it would be
improper for him to suggest
anyone for the job.
Press Secretary to the
Governor, Don Pride, said
Askew plans to name a black
member to the board.
However Pride said he does
not know if the black member
to the regents will be selected to



; Tha Florida Alligator, Tim day, April 6,1971

Page 2

SG sends 'pot report to legislature

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is
the first in a four-part series
dealing with the recently
released Student Government
marijuana study committee
report. The report is being issued
to members of the state
legislature.)
By 808 STIFF
Alligator Writer
In an effort to show the effect
of current marijuana legislation
on Florida and the university
community, a Student
Government study commission
has just completed a report for
presentation to Florida
legislators.
The report delved into three
aspects of marijuana:
pharmacological effects,
sociological effects of present
legislation, and alternatives to
and revisions of the present
marijuana laws.
In a letter attached to the
report issued March 31, Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder
said, M I appointed this
committee to investigate the
current laws pertaining to
marquana in Florida and the
effects such laws have on our
citizens. I hope that you (the
legislators) will consider this
report during the legislative
sessions and concerted efforts
will be made to reform the laws
to a more rational and logical
approach.
The report said that although
there are no well-substantiated
indications for its therapeutic
use, marijuana should be
separated from the
seditive-hypnotic or
hallucinogenic types of abused
drugs because of social

New law may hurt
disruptive students
By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
A Florida law passed by the Florida Legislature in 1970, is
concerned with lessening campus disorders from the high school to
the university level.
Students who may have been termed disruptive in high school
now face the possibility of being rejected from a state university.
This is the format the state institutions follow:
When a student registers for a state univeisity, he must sign a
Student Information Form or else his admission and registration
will be held up.
On this form the student must have his former high school or junior
college release confidential information from the schools student files.
These files are sent to the univeisity for the use of authorized
university personnel.
On the question form this is one of the questions asked: Have the
applicants actions been found by any school authorities or by any
court to have interferred with the orderly conduct, processes,
functions or programs of any university, college or junior college?
A Board of Regents operating manual policy made public on Feb.
2, requires the university to refuse admission to any student whose
record shows previous disruptive or other misconduct which would
not be conducive to the university community.
/THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during \
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements anti to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
ire than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
eral times. Notices for correction must be given before the next /
artlon. Jr
' -mm

controversy generated by the bias
of those occupying two poles of
thought. Some believe marijuana
is a frighteningly dangerous
drug, while others say that it is a
purely beneficial drug.
Both factions pose highly
charged emotional claims based
on the standards of presently
acceptable social drugs.
Dr. William Kline, UF
psychologist and committee
member, said, The present rigid
laws are a result of interviews
with heroin users in the 1930s
who said they had used
marijuana. Dr. Kline noted that
criminals drink milk also.
He said that many people who
try marijuana do so because of
its classification as a
hallucinogen. There is a mystic
quality to it. Some try it just to
see whether or not they can get
away with it, he said.
According to what I've read
in recent medical journals,
marijuana is not what the
lawmakers say, he added.
In the first section of the
report, the pharmacological
analysis of marijuana, the
committee said that even though
the effects of marijuana have
been known for several thousand
years, it is only in the last 35
years that the constituents of
Canabis sativa (marijuana) have
been isolated, identified and
pharmacologically characterized.
There has been a reluctance to
summarize the pharmacology of
marijuana because much of the
research on its biological activity
has been scant, dated, of poor
quality and fragmented.
This report will attempt to
expose many of the latest
findings related to the chemistry
and biological-pharmacological

.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.'

| There is a mystic
\ quality to marijuana.
Some try it just to see
\ whether they can get
: away with it. According
to what Ive read in
recent medical journals,
marijuana is not what the
lawmakers say
Dr. William Kline
UF psychologist
o
.V.V.VWJWW.WW
activity of marijuana.
Within the hist ten years, 17
chemicals have been isolated and
their structures determined by
modern chromatographic
techniques from plant extracts.
The biological testing remains
incomplete, however. Os nine
chemicals extracted from
marijuana and tested for
psychometric effects, the
dreamy state was caused by
only two constituents. These
two are commonly termed Delta
1 THC and Delta 1 6 THC
respectively. The two chemicals
were first synthesized in 1967.
The availability of these
proven psychometrically active
chemicals will help overcome
one of the greater obstacles of
marijuana research, large
variations of active chemicals
which occur within the
marijuana plant.
According to the report, the
biological potency of marijuana

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will vary according to the levels
of THC and other chemicals in
the plant.
These chemical levels are
dependent on where the plant is
grown, the age of the plant when
harvested, the length of storage
after harvesting and storage
conditions.
Plants grown in tropical or
sub-tropical areas produce a
higher level of THC than plants
grown in temperate areas where
days are shorter.
The active agent in marijuana
becomes inactive at a rate of
approximately five per cent per
month. These experiments
indicate that THC is not a stable
drug, losing half its potency
within a year.
The report noted that persons
smoking marijuana for the first
time demonstrate impaired
performance on intellectual and

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psychomotor tests. Regular users
of marijuana do not show the
same degree of impairment of
performance.
In some cases performance
even appears to improve slightly
after smoking marijuana.
Physical dependence and
withdrawal symptoms of
marijuana smokers is unusual or
very mild.
The actual effect of the
marijuana constituent, THC, is
best described as a dreamy state
with an increased tendency to
fantasize and accept suggestion.
Law student Louis S. Robles,
committee chairman, said, It is
pretty obvious something has to
be done. Legislators have been
receptive and have indicated
their interest in our studies.
They seem to be seriously
considering a reduction of
penalities.



Spring Florida Quarterly goes on sale

By DEBBI SMITH
Alligator Copy Editor
The spring issue of the Florida
Quarterly, UFs creative literary
magazine, is on sale this week in
Walker Plaza and in the library
colonnade at the Plaza of the
Americas.
The magazine includes poetry,
short stories, photographs and
drawings. All the artwork in the
spring issue was done by UF
students, and about half is the
work of professional and
semi-professional artists.
Greg Kucma, whose work has
appeared in the New York
Times, presents a portfolio of his
outstanding poems in this issue
of the Quarterly.

Legislature convenes; university bills on slate

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Several restricting measures
concerning universities will come
before the 1971 Florida
Legislature which meets for the
first time today.
Legislation proposed for this
session that would affect the
university community directly
includes bills:
o Making students help pay
for rise in costs of higher
education with a sls to $25

UPD experiments by using
different style of uniform

The University Police
Department (UPD), in an effort
to display a less-militant
appearance to the student
body, began experimenting with
a different type of uniform on
Monday.
Fourteen police officers,
including UPD Chief Audie
Shuler, are now clothed in a
white sports shirt and blazer.
The blazer conceals the officers
weapon, badge and nameplate,
but, in an emergency situation,
the blazer will be removed to
reveal a recognizable police
uniform. The remainder of the
53-man UPD complement is still
wearing the same blue uniforms
UF students have known in the
past.
The idea for the new uniform
experiment was originated at UF
by Shuler and Lt. Dudley
Goulden, head of the UPD
education and training division
in response to a student gun
study committees
recommendation to make pistols
less conspicuous on the UPD
officers, according to a release
from the UF Division of
Information Services.
The biggest question about
the new uniforms, Shuler said,
is identification. If a student
needs a police officer on the
street they might be harder to
recognize than with the old
uniforms.
The blazers do have an

fc.::
I
Jessica Everingham
... Florida Quarterly Editor
Poems written by a Raiford
Prison inmate, some of which

increase in tuition per quarter.
o Keeping drugs and alleged
immorality under control by
limiting open housing in dorms
on campus.
o Barring radical speakers
from using state university or
college facilities.
o Assuming more control
over instructors by limiting
research and other nonacademic
time by requiring that each
teaching faculty member spend
12 to 15 hours a week in class.
Most of the tuition increase,

emblem containing a UF seal
flanked on each side by an
alligator.
The newly clad UPD officers,
will carry some questionaires
designed to test further reaction
by University of Florida

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Alligator 'TRADE ads Ait |
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WE GUARANTEE ITI

appeared earlier in The Alligator,
also appear in the Quarterly.
Editor Jessica Everingham
said, We really worked hard
and took a long time, probably
longer than we shoud have.
People always say, This is
the best issue ever! but I really
feel that this is one of the best
issues weve ever done.
Miss Everingham said she was
particularly pleased with the
issues graphic material. Two
landscape photo foldouts, a first
for the Quarterly, are included
in this issue.
Im really very happy and
relieved that this issue turned

with higher education bonds and
the possibility of revenue
certificates, would be used to
finance capital outlays such as
the College of Dentistry and the
College of Veterinary Medicine.
Governor Reubin Askew has
favored a corporate income tax
which would add an estimated
SIOO million to the states
revenue. A measure to take the
tax question before Florida
voters was defeated in the
special session of the Legislature
earlier this year. Askew hopes

students, staff and visitors.
These questionaires can be sent
through the campus mail service.
Shuler said the men were
reacting to the change favorably,
and added 1 think its all going
to work out all right.

:LD jj j L;i yiLunmy
nlLUlllr.
The Florida Quarterly
. .. spring issue cover
out as well as it did.
Florida Quarterly received a

voters will be given another
chance to decide the tax issue.
In lieu of the corporate tax,
Askew has supported a $25 per
quarter tuition increase.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder has said of the tuition
increase, .. the student is
already overburdened
financially, and an increase in
tuition would only cut out
another bracket of students
eligible to meet the existing cost
of a state university.
Dormitory life has been a
favorite subject of legislators,
and some lawmakers think
limiting visitation rights in open
and coed dorms will keep a
check on what some consider to
be centers of drug usage and
promiscuity.
The presence of Abbie
Hoffman, Jane Fonda and
William Kunstler on campus has
spurred legislators to push for
more control over choice of
speakers; although, there is a
small chance that such

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Tuesday, April 6,1971, The Florida Alligator,

first class rating from the
Associated Press last year.
After three years as editor,
Miss Everingham recently
resigned her position. Because of
her duties as graduate student in
English and freshman English
teacher, she no longer felt she
could devote enough time to the
position. She will continue to
work on the Quarterly as poetry
editor.
Camille Symons, 3AS, was
named acting editor April 1 by
the chairman of the Board of
Student Publications. Later this
month the Board will make
available applications for editor.
Florida Quarterly is also on
sale for $1.25 at the Hub and
Florida Bookstore.

legislation will pass this spring.
Legislators say that
administrators already have
authority to keep radical
speakers off campus, and that
regents or university presidents
should enforce their present
authority.
Sen. Robert Haverfield,
D-Miami, and Senate President
Jerry Thomas, D-Riviera Beach,
have coauthored a bill that
would require any full time
university instructor to spend at
least 12 hours each week
teaching. The same bill would
make it mandatory for junior
college instructors to spend 15
hours a week in class.
According to the Associated
Press Haverfield has said, The
true burden of teaching should
fall clearly on the fulltime
faculty members, not on part
time teaching assistants. Based
on student complaints brought
to my attention, the situation is
particularly critical at the
university level.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 6,1971

Commission to consider
city ordinance changes

By ROBERT ROTHMAN
Alligator Staff Writr
Proposed ordinance changes
for the Bivens Arms complex
are now under consideration by
the City Commission after
having been tabled for several
months by the Gainesville Plan
Board.
According to Dr. Glenna Carr,
UF assistant professor of
education, ordinance number
1678 was passed Aug. 3, 1970.
This ordinance allows buildings
to be built over 35 feet tall, with
the approval of the Gainesville
Plan Board.
Dr. Carr is one of 50 residents
of Gainesville who filed a
request with the Board of
Adjustments that the sight plan
approval which was given to
Fred Konstand, owner of the
Bivens Arm Complex, be
overturned.
An alternate proposal was
brought before the Plan Board
on Aug. 10, 1970 which is
contrary to ordinance 1678.
This proposal, referred to as
the Shopping Center Increased
Height (SCIH) proposal would
create a new zoning district for
the shopping center. The
proposal was tabled by the Plan
Board and not acted upon until
February, 1971*
Following the Plan Board, the
SCIH proposal went to the City
Commission where it has been

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bottled up in committee since
February.
Konstand has had his sight
plan approved for the shopping
center on March 3, 1971. This
allows him to build buildings
under the law set down in
ordinance 1678.
Even though the SCIH
proposal would be contrary to
1678, a separate action would be
required to revoke 1678.
Therefore, Konstand needed
only the approval of the Plan
Board for his shopping center.
As of the present time,
Konstand will be governed under
the ordinances which were in
effect when he was granted his
sight plan approval.
For this reason, a group of 50
residents has filed a request with
the Board of Adjustments to
overturn the approval given to
Konstand. This would force
Konstand to go first before the
Plan Board and then the City
Commission for sight plan
approval.
Konstand also requested that
a portion of section 2946 of the
Gainesville zoning ordinance,
which states that a public street
or alley may not run through a
shopping center, be deleted.
The reason for this, according
to Dr. Carr, is that if a public
road runs through the shopping
center, the buildings in that
center will only have to be set

back 25 feet plus one foot for
every foot the building goes over
35 feet from that road. If the
road is not built, the buildings in
the center will have to be set
100 feet plus one foot for every
foot the building goes over 35
feet away from the residential
area next to Bivens Garden.
This ordinance change was
scheduled for consideration by
the Plan Board on March 18,
1971. It was recessed until
March 29, at which time it was
tabled until April 15.
simfiK
Thursday, from April 8 V-.'
to May 13 7:00 to 9:00 \ /
pm Instructor: Mrs. |/?
Delores Buch Room ( f
150 C & D, Union
$5.00 fee register at the (
first class
J. Wayne Reitz Union

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OF INTEREST TO
For Complete
(VICIX Information Contact
Maj. Berry, Rm. 111,
Military Building or
call 392-1395 not later
than April 9.



Union films make enough
to support themselves

By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Copy Editor
Reitz Union films are finally
making money, so much so they
have become self-supporting.
Recently released figures from
the office of the program
director indicate Union films
grossed a record figure last
quarter $15,370.75. But the
statistics are deceptive.
Deducted from that tidy
figure are expenses, chiefly
rental fees, advertising and free
showings, to the tune of some
$8,895.75. That left a $6,475.00
net, initially.
The Union Board decided
to make the films committee
pay employes out of their own
funds rather than from general
Union funds. The cost of 10
ushers and a full-time assistant
manager nears $4,000 quarterly.
The Board, furthermore, made
the salary rule retroactive to fall
quarter.
Thus, the final profit from
films shown last quarter is
$2,515. The film series just
breaks even for fall quarter after
salaries are deducted.
Profit goes back into the
Unions general fund to
compensate for such
money-losers as the fine arts
series.
All along movies had been
making minimal amounts, and
all of a sudden, we started
making money fall quarter, said
Mrs. Missie Uhlfelder, assistant
program director at the Union.
Now we are even making
money on classical films, she
said.
Increased interest in films and
the growth of film courses have
pushed up attendance figures,
but Mrs. Uhlfelder said she
believes UF is still several years
behind other campuses in its
film tastes.
The assistant program director
also attributes increased profits
to better films and better
management that insures only
paying customers are admitted.
Weekend runs extended to

£A/ *C/r, ocf ,RV
Soy- P M wi* hS S *o* B
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*****/>.. B Jan
Bte: S
JALS
|75

B|^H
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*
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COLUMBIA RECORDS GIVING AWAY 15 "DIFFERENT STROKE" ALBUMS
AT THE RATHSKELLER

Alligator-

include Thursdays have also
brought more viewers.
The Union auditorium holds
354 persons, but only 340
tickets are sold. The average
attendance for all films was
about half, 186.
Winter quarters top
money-maker was 2001: A
Space Odyssey which netted
$1,643.62 over a three-day
weekend. Groupies was
second most successful with a
$812.74 net profit. The
Graduate fall quarter was tops
with a net of $ 1269.56.
The films committees
greatest cost is film rental fees
which average SIOO nightly
against 50 per cent of the gross
above SIOO after four per cent

Two students receive
regional SDX awards
By LESLIE FOX
Alligator Writer
Two UF journalism students received awards at the regional Sigma
Delta Chi (SDX) professional journalism society convention Saturday.
Jay Gartman and Reg Crowder, both 4JM, received first place
awards in the Mark of Excellence writing contest.
The awards are given annually for the best examples of newspaper,
editorial, magazine feature, nonfiction magazine writing and radio
newswriting. This was the first year the awards had been presented on
the regional level.
Gartman won the award for the best nonfiction magazine article. A
story about the 1920 UF football teams trip to Havana, Cuba,
published in Tropic magazine, of the Miami Herald.
Crowder, who won in the best newswriting category, wrote a series
of articles for the Miami Herald exposing substandard housing
conditions while he was state roving reporter last summer.
I was glad to get the award, mainly because the stories I did were
rough and unpopular, and upset a lot of people, said Crowder.
They identified specific people and showed instances of corruption
in government. Its good to get some reassurance from a professional
group like SDX that I did the right thing, said Crowder.
The awards were presented by H.G. Buddy Davis, SDX vice
president for campus affairs.

ANALYSIS

sales tax is deducted.
Booking films in the Union
Auditorium can be a big
problem when the films
committee must reserve the hall
sometimes as early as a year in
advance and between the
bookings of other groups,
according to Mrs. Uhlfelder.
The solution is to have our
own movie theater in the Union,
one with a larger seating
capacity, she. said.
It would cost one-third of
our present expenses to show
films only one time instead of
three to accomodate large
crowds.
Mrs. Uhlfelder said she would
like to see savings passed on to
students.

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Tuesday, April 6,1971, The Florida AlKgaior,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 6,1971

UFS boasts largest campus group

By ELLI MOSS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Union of Florida
Students, (UFS) is now the
largest organization at UF. After
only one week the Union has
recruited 500 members and is
averaging 100 new members a
day, a UFS officer said Sunday.
During a general meeting
Sunday night, Union members
voted to accept a constitution

Retreat sought answers
to handicap problems

By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
About 30 students and
professionals met for a weekend
retreat to seek answers to the
question What can we do for
the handicapped?
The interdisciplinary retreat,
held April 1-4 at Camp
Challenge north of Orlando, was
the first of its kind, according to
Richard Powers, coordinator of
the project.
Camp Challenge is a statewide
recreation-rehabilitation project
run by the Easter Seal Society
for Crippled Children and Adults
of Florida.
The purpose of the retreat
was to establish and encourage
communication between related
departments, between
professions, and between people
concerned with the
handicapped.
Stephen Kreimer, representing
the National Rehabilitation
Association in Washington, D. C.,
said too often people shun
involvement in anything not
directly related to their own
field.
Kreimer urged students to
explore dont just get
involved with your agency.
Participants in the program
I lf*| 1
ime $
PRINTMAKING LESSONS
Instructor: Mrs. Judy Lantos
Tuasdays from April 6 to May 11
pm to 10 pm room C-4, Union
$6.00 faa register at the first
lesson Sponsored by the JWR
Union

drawn up by a temporary
executive board and heard the
Union organizers explain the
groups plans and purposes.
The constitution will be
submitted to the administration
for recognition sometime next
week.
All Union activities and
election will be carried on
through local shops organized
according to living areas. Each
local shop will elect a shop

included students in
occupational and physical
therapy, hospital administration,
clinical psychology,
rehabilitation counseling,
medical technology and such
student-operated organizations
as the Corner Drugstore,
Samson, and Young Adult
Services.
After speakers discussed
problems of the handicapped
child, adolescent and adult, the
students broke into groups to
discuss and share ideas.
Joyce Flaigg, executive
secretary of the Florida chapter
of the American Physical
Therapy Association, said
Many MDs do not
communicate well with the
parents of a handicapped child.
She said this would be the job
of the students in health related
professions.
Sometimes, the problem in
helping terminal cases is just
teaching children how to enjoy
life while they can.
The retreat was sponsored by
the Deans Council for Health
Related Professions, the Alachua
County Easter Seal Society, and
the National Rehabilitation
Association.
To keep the channels of
communication open, an
interdisciplinary council of

BUSINESS MAJORS
DELTA SIGMA PI
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Active Sophomores & Juniors.
- Reitz Union Rm. 150
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 6, 1971

steward to represent them to the
executive board.
The Union plans to function
from the bottom up, with the
individual members directing
their needs through the local
shops to the executive board.
This week local shop meetings
are being organized and held in
on-campus housing areas. Area
meetings already scheduled are:
Hume Tues. 8 p.m.
Tolbert Wed. 8

students in the health field is
forming in cooperation with
Easter Seals.
Further retreats are planned
for the future, Powers said.

CARNIGRAS
April Bthrul6

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BRING COUPON I

Murphree Wed. 8
Yon Wed. 8
Yulee Wed. 8:30
Towers Wed. 9:30
Graham Thurs. 7
Rawlings Thurs. 8:30
Detailed information about
these meetings will be posted in
each area.
Off-campus and married
student housing local shops will
be organized next week.
As soon as 1000 members are
in the Union a regular executive
board will be elected.
Meanwhile, the temporary
executive board consists of
Kathi Horne, president; Amy
Faircloth, vice president; Steve
Waterhouse, in charge of writing
the constitution; David Hoch,in
charge of elections; and Bruce
Fried and Faye Douglas,
representatives at-large.
Dr. Joseph Zeman of the



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and for Wednesday
April 7 only
| DOUG CLARKE and The Hot Nats j
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y aMhe

Philosophy Department will
serve as faculty advisor.
The basic principle of'The
Union is that students have the
right to control their lives,
Waterhouse said, and the Union
attempts to assert this right.
According to Waterhouse,
The only way to effectively
organize students is through a
union. The way the situation is
now, the administration has the
power, and the student
government has been
powerless.
The first issue the Union plans
to become involved with is
opposition to the tuition
increase.
Other problems the Union is
concerned with are the low
wages paid to student employees
at UF and the organizing of UF
students who work within the
community.



UF holds Olympic meet
for mentally retarded

By ELLI MOSS
Alligator Staff Writer
About 174 entrants and 100
volunteer students participated
in an Olympic meet for the
mentally retarded held Saturday
at the varsity track and at the
bowling lanes in the Reitz
Union.
Betty Gilkirson, a teacher in
the recreation department,
directed the program sponsored
by the Gainesville Jaycees.
The Olympics included trade
and field events and bowling,
and induded participants from
11 counties and 23 schools and
organizations such as the special
education classes at Sunland
Training Center.
There was no age limit on the
entries and participants included
people from age five to 40.
The event, called Regional 2
Olympics, was held
simultaneously with a similar
event in Tampa.
The people who entered the
Olympics on Saturday will be

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able to participate in the
statewide Olympics held May 1.
Next year the national
Olympics will be held in which
every state can partidpate.
National Olympics are held every
other year with state Olympics

Good Friday service planned

The University Lutheran
Church and Campus Center of
Gainesville is presenting a special
service of organ, instrumental
and vocal music concerning the
Crucifixion of Christ for the
general public on Good Friday
(April 9) at 7:30 p.m.
Johann Sebastian Bachs
Orgelbuchlein Choral, Lenten
portion, will be featured along
with the Passion Choral by D.
Buxtehude and J. D. Walther,

SpwiK
Will Be Explained
World Famous Evelyn Wood Youll see why Presidents
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occurring on the off years.
It was really beautiful, Mrs.
Gilkerson commented. The
purpose of the event was to give
them a feeling of success and by
seeing the smiles on the faces of
the participants, I think we did.

and the Choral in A Minor by
C. Franck.
The organists will be Herbert
F. Schaake and Bertram Y.
Kinzey.
Miss Julie Renee Larson will
sing three arias for soprano from
cantatas of Bach. Miss Larson
will be accompanied by Eart
Groth on oboe and H. F.
Schaake on the organ. Groth will
also play the Arioso for oboe
and organ by Fiocco.

B ts BB^^HLJI
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John Lipman has a most sensitive and stirring
style, with material he has created and discovered
from his many appearances around the U.S. and
Canada. It is rare when we have the opportunity to
bring you such fine talent.
We invite you to share an exciting evening of
his music, when we proudly present John at the
Bench & Bar
10 PM TONIGHT ONLY
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ajl ibbrfajl yiiUi tfj^en.

Tu**y, April 6,1971. Th. Fieri* AJlflftor, |

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 6,1971

Editorial
Dont condone
war or Calley
Lt. William Calley.. convicted, sentenced to life
imprisonment, the subject of one of the most extensive
public opinion outcries in this nations history.
While many may find the protest of the citizenry a warm
outpouring of sentiment for the 27-year-old soldier, others
protest on the basis that the entire Army is to blame for the
My Lai atrocity.
We are not sympathetic to Lt. Calleys cause.
While he is not singularly guilty for the Vietnam war or
the orders to enter a tiny village in 1968 and level its count
of human beings, he is most assuredly guilty of failing to
question the nature of those orders.
It can be argued that he was a good soldier only
following orders, but through that same reasoning we can
also justify the actions of good Germans in World War II
who were only following orders in the process of
slaughtering over six million Jews.
The public has a right to its opinion, but we can not
absolve the guilt we all share for American involvement in
Southeast Asia by condoning the mission Lt. Calley led.
We find it interesting that President Nixon has chosen to
intervene in the case, claiming he will make the final
judgment of Calleys fate. Administration aides admitted
Sunday that the move was designed to cool public pressure.
Vengeance is one of the most worthless of causes. We see
justice in the Calley conviction, not vengeance. It is not the
sort of justice that can bring joy or pride, but it is a
necessary justice.
War, perhaps the most blatant flaw which mankind must
face within himself, still cannot be granted the power to
take all of mans rationale and intelligence.
Lt. William Calley relinquished his most precious ability
to discern what may be the last thread of civilization we
have a respect for human life.

I fttrll ilHilH^| 1 i*fliWlTM '** Ww PbPSM|| lll^i|VA^t

The
Florida
Alligator

"yfiy ' - w
% jtf
m
< /
/ wonder if anyone will demonstrate, get up a petition or start a fund to bring us back
Lt. Calley not blameless,
he chose orders to follow

By JACK BREIHAN
I would like to take issue with
the seemingly-universal
disapproval of the verdict and
sentence in Lt. Calleys
court-martial. In a moral sense, I
find it scandalous that the
protest raised at the
imprisonment of one American
criminal should bid fair to
exceed the indignation at the
murder of those hundred-odd
innocent human beings for
whose death he is in part
responsible.
How much mercy should be
accorded to a man who showed
so little of it to these
unfortunate people? Lt. Calley
received orders to kill, yet he
also operated under Army
regulations which forbid war
crimes in this ambiguous
situation, Calley chose which
orders he would obey, and it
seems just that he should be
called to account for his choice.
In a legal sense, it is certainly
true that those who gave Lt.
Calley his illegal orders should
also stand responsible. These
responsible parties include the
general officers of Galley's
division, the UJS. military
command in Saigon, the
Secretary of Defense and the
r
President. These men were
superbly equipped to be aware
of the carnage they were
ordering to be visited upon
civilians in Vietnam, yet they
ordered the unrestricted
bombing, the extermination of

Phyllis Gallub
Editor-In-Chief

Gary Grunder
News Editor

L ^ilm
XS^^iM^gC^vlCTsMwjK2iariac^:^fe^'>frjflyiaFSfc?jfrV > .' > t

peasants in firee-fire zones, and
the use of defoliants and other
illegal chemical weapons. These
men all bear guilt for a great
number of things, and part of
the guilt for what occurred at
My Lai.
The whole population of the
United States, however, is not
legally responsible. Ordinary
citizens were much less
well-informed about the war
than their leaders, they elected
very few of the ones who made
criminal decisions, and in the
elections which did occur,
Vietnam policy was not the only
issue on which they were
decided. Indeed, in 1964,
President Johnson won
re-election promising to do
almost exactly the opposite of
his later policies with regard to
Vietnam, which were the ones
which led Lt. Calley and his men
to My Lai. All United States
citizens may bear a moral guilt
for thf ** *es committed in
*hey do not bear a
legal one. tamp, can Vy niH
of the and Japanese
peoples, who wholeheartedly
supported their countries'
actions in World War 11. If we
are to continue the role of law in
world affairs which we
sponsored in 1945, President

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor

Johnson, the generals and the
lieutenants and privates must be
tried for their crimes, just as we
tried government officials,
generals and concentration camp
guards in Germany.
Many of the people who
proclaim that Lt. Calley is a
scapegoat for persons higher
up or for the system have no
intention whatever of calling for
the trials of these other criminals
or for the drastic revision of
the system. They give rise to
the suspicion that the people of
this country feel that for a U.S.
soldier to kill oriental human
beings, is somehow permissible,
no matter what the
circumstances.
~
Look once again at the
pictures of the bodies of the
unarmed people Calley shot with
his own hand; if justice is to be
served in the midst of this
horrible slaughter, and in all the
other horrible slaughters in
Viatnam i* 1J U_
- u wuuiu ue ucner to
look for the men whose policies
and orders caused all this to
happen, rather than to grant
clemency to a man who by an
intelligible moral or
standard is guilty of a large part
in a heinous crime.

//> X



Where does guilt lie?

f Responsibility
Editor:
Unlike those less fortunate
persons who are governed by
dictator or obligarchy, those
privileged to be governed by
democracy or republic must bear
responsibility for the
consequences of governmental
actions, and, while he may
accept the praise for the
humanitarian efforts of his
government, he is also culpable
for the heinous acts of that
government. Only through
vigilence, protest and
demonstration is a democratic
man relieved of the burden of
the immoral actions perpetrated
by the government.
1 have opposed the Vietnam
War from the esdations of 1966
and 1967; 1 have protested the
expansion of the war; I have
demonstrated against the wars
continuation, against what I
consider the needless slaughter
of both Asians and Americans,
and I have decried the senseless
misallocation of Americas
human and natural resources. It
is for this reason, namely, that I
have fulfilled die obligations
imposed upon me by the very
nature of a democracy, and,
thus, have exonaterated myself
from all moral guilt
accompanying the Vietnam War,
that I refuse to accept the life of
Lt. William Calley as the
expiation for my sins; in this
matter, I stand guiltless.
Yet, Calley is not condemned
alone. Those who support the
war, who urge its continuation,
those who clamor for a military
victory, who deplore
withdrawaal, those who would
excuse the killing of innocent
civilians by pleading the
necessities of guerrilla war, these
persons are equally guilty; they
must share the guilt with the
realization that there is no
vicarious punishment, that, like

Lt. William Calley: a 'corporate personality

By FRANK CASEY
Lt. Calley has been convicted
and there is anguish.
There is anguish from the
right and from the left. Why?
Was he guilty of the acts
attributed to him? It appears so.
Was he responsible for them?
Most probably. Should he be
killed? The prevailing feeling
seems to be, NO.
In fact the countrys feeling
teems to be saying that It would
not only be unjust to kill Lt.
Calley but even to imprison him.
But why? Then mhm to be a
conflict between common
feeling and the judicial logic that
a responsible individual should
be punished for his criminal acts.
There are probably a number
of explanations for this

READERS FORUM

Lady Macbeth, they cannot
wash the blood from their
hands. If these people truly
opposed the Tolling, they would
help end the war, if they
honestly deplored our
involvement in the destruction

" Guilty

disparity. An important one
might be a situation ethics-type
explanation: that is, Lt. Calley
should not be punished for what
he did in the circumstances of
war and Vietnam. But, to me,
that line of thought has certain
serious flaws.
I would like to articulate
another explanation which was
implied in Wednesdays Alligator
sketch: Sure; he is... but
were not, we never are! This
sketch appeared on page nine.
Lt. Calley is a corporate
personality.
The concept of corporate
personality has great significance
in the history of Judaism,
certain Christian traditions and
is, at least, strongly implied in
the thought *of some
philosophers.
The concept gives insight into

of thousands of homes and
villages, they would urge us to
rebuild, not destroy.
Lt. Calley should be freed. We
have deluded ourselves if we feel
the condemnation of this man
affirms our own moral worth;

the mystery of how one man,
Adam, could sin, yet all men,
even those not bom, could share
in the responsibility of his sin. It
is ait iiiipOitaiu part of the
Hebrew mentality and explains
how the promises made to
Abraham were also made to
countless generations of unborn
Israelites. It is also used by
Christianity to help explain how
Christs actions have a real

we ask the world to fly in the
face of fact if we ask it to
believe that, as a Christian and
Humanistic nation, we do not
kill women and children. The
nation is no less guilty than
Calley, and, remembering that

redemptive effect on all
minkind.
Certain philosophers imply
the concept too.
To them, human beings are
not isolated monads, but are
actually related to each other
according to the nature of
reality. Persons are meant to
communicate. There is a human
solidarity. All men are related
and are brothers, whether they
realize it or not, and like it or
not.
To them, the good or evil that
one man does, metaphysically
has a real implication for the
totality of mankind. And not
only do all mankind share in
the effects of one another's
actions, but th|y also are,
somehow, responsible for the
actions of one another.
It is precisely at this point
that Lt. Calley can be seen as a
corporate personality. Not only
is he an individual, but he is the

Tuesday, April 6,1971, The Florida AlMprtor,

the first step in repentance is
confession, we must be willing
to admit that our sensitivity to
communism has made us callous
to human life, that in our
obsession with democracy, we
have forgotten people.
Dwight Lambert 4AS
Together
Editor:
I may be Lt. Calley when 1
accept all the sad little steps
toward my little dreams as
inevitable, and I may have been
Charles Manson when IVe
satisfied some of my dark
appetites all the way, but I
havent abdicated yet. Not yet. I
am he as you are she, and you
are me, and we are all together.
Peter Clausen 6AS
Different
Editor:
Since the conviction of Lt.
Calley on murder charges, public
opinion has rallied behind him.
Somewhere, a draft board
member resigned in protest. The
American Legion has declared
their full support for Calley.
(God bless mass-murders!)
Few people realize this man
rounded up men, women, and
children (including babies) and,
although he knew they were
unarmed and harmless, he
proceeded to cut them down
with automatic fire. Some might
say this is no more barbaric than
a firing squad. But then, in a
firing squad, they dont shoot
children, do they?
Os course, their skin was not
white and their eyes were
slanted. I guess that makes their
children different.
David Burdette 4AS

embodiment of the American
people.
What Lt. Calley did, he did
acting for all Americans. And in
his actions all Americans really
share.
It is precisely here, also, that
common feeling and judicial
logic collide. Why should only
Lt. Calley be punished?
As human beings, we feel it is
unfair to punish Lt. Calley. But
we are perplexed and anguished
at effectively understanding
why. Our individualistic
framework and outlook on life
tell us if he is responsible and
guilty, he should be punished.
But we feel it is wrong to punish
him.
1 think we realize, way down
deep in ourselves, that it is
unfair to punish Lt. Calley
because it is we who are really
guilty. 1 hope we come to fully
appreciate the real source of our
anguish.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Roberts 778 x 7" reel deck w/8 track
tape deck. Graduation present. Never
used still in box. Sells for $429.95
yours for $335 call 378-8771
(A-3t-109-p)
AKC PUPS and KITTENS bassets
and german shepherds SSO each.
Siamese kittens S2O. bluepoint.
seaipoint. 468-1121 waldo us 301 s
(A-5M09-P)
Aria classical guitar and case both
only 8 months old and 4n mint
condition S6O. call Harvey at
373-3127 anytime. (A-st-109-p)
Ampex 761 reel-to-reel tape player &
recorder with speakers. New costs
$370, 2 yrs old for $225 or best
offer. 392-7815 call Jan Tapes too
(A-4M09-P)
VAN ford econoline 1965 $750 runs
good air conditioner awning windows
IRISH SETTER puppies champion
sired 917 ne 7th place (A-st-109-p)
4 acres of land Joins Univ. and 10
acre of land on 241 south of 26
Call for more information 372-4114
or 372-1207 and appointment after
5:30 (A-st-109-p)
weimaraner puppies, field-show
champ bloodlines, whelped feb 24,
call Charles Benedict after spm week
day anytime weekends. (A-st-109-p)
portble tapedeck 4 BEACH home
car-rns on battries electricty + car
lighter + 15 tapes for SBS;
masterwork amfm amp-receivr $45;
magnavox port stereo $65 call Betty
378-6548 1969 Honda 350 Includes, helmet,
luggage rack, and windshield. Great
all around bike in good condition.
$425. Call Reb 378-0105
(A-lt-109-p)
PANASONIC tape recorder model
rs76os, 3 speed, sound on sound $65.
ALSO engagement-wedding ring set,
33 caret S7O. 378-4940 7 pm
(A-st-107-p)
Surfboards for Sale or Rent Weber,
Oceanside or R&R. Will also make
you a custom surfboard Call
392-8328 or 392-8402 (a-st-106-p)
TENNIS! rackets balls restringing and
lessons all at lower prices call Bob
Jackson 378-7841 (A-st-106-p)
Yamaha 7O dt-1 Endura excel, cond
call 734-0869 after 5 PM
(A-st-107-p)
Girls 3 speed bicycle good condition
phone afer 3:30 373-3616
(A-3M07-P)
1970 Yamaha Enduro 250 cc 6,000
mi S6OO. call 376-4185 (A-st-107-p)
Stereo 8-tr Cartridges Recorded
Premium Quality Low-Noise Tape
80-mi n (2 or more albums)
$4,40-min $2.50 includes tape & 1
day service Dont be fooled by cheap
imitation Guaranteed Quality
378-5916 night (A-st-107-p)
1
Stereo: Scott 342 c 110 watt fm
receiver with case. Still under
warranty. Cost $325 heW-now $215.
SSO Superex head phones $36.
378-9192 (A-3t-107-p)
WATERBEDS. 319 West University
Ave. 11:30 5:30, Tues. Sat.
Waterbeds of Gainesville.
(A-5M07-P)
STEREO zenith circle of sound
perfect cond. extras include hdpns.
worth $260 selling for $175 40 watts
call Barry 378-3029 (A-3t-107-p)
1969 Honda 350. 2000 actual miles.
Street scrambler, excellent
mechanical condition. Hardly driven,
only SSOO. call Steve 373-3480.
(A-st-107-p)
140 watt Scott amplifier (deluxe
pre-amp and power amp) $l5O. call
Rick at 392-2651 or 372-6167
(A-3t-108-p)
for sale 5 pc. gordon silver service
$200.00 call 372-6539 before 10a.m.
ea. day (A-st-108-p)
MOBILE home on lot for one or two.
SISOO with screened patio, ac, extra
room, new oven, i mile from campus.
Low rent, free garbage pickup, water,
and sewage. 376-8082 (A-st-108-p)
4-Sale: Kawasaki Mach 3-500 cc_
motorcycle 1970 well cared for, in
good shape, asking $750 with extras
call Jim, 373-2771 (A-st-103-p)
A CX E f Q/
o o
April 17, 1971
Ready?

FOR SALE
BMW 600 cc roils royce of
motorcycles fairing rack 6 gal gas
tank tools good mech condition turn
signals $775 5-6 pm 378-0181
(A-4t-107-p)
ALL PHONO NEEDLES ARE
AVAILABLE AT MUNTZ STEREO
319 NW 13 ST (A-15t-107-p)
305 HONDA superhawk engine
completely rebuilt, new chain &
sprockets really excellent condition
$375 see at the Cycle Works or call
373-4080 (A-3t-107-p)
8 TRACK TAPES PRE-RECORDED
3.99' largest selection we also trade,
buy & sell, new & used tapes
TRADE-A-TAPE 14 nw 13 st.
(A-15t-107-p)
tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bobcats ocelots skunks parrots hawks
snakes lizards turtles for sale trade or
buy Kongo Pet 475-2546 (local)
(a-lrtt-55-p)
AQUARIUM, 20 gal, air pump, two
filters, light, heater, gravel, plants, 12
assorted fish. $50.00 call 378-5192
after 5:00 p.m. (A-st-106-p)
ELECTRIC GUITAR two
pick-ups, vibrato tailpiece, with cord
& case 560.00. call 378-5192 after
5:00 p.m. (A-st-106-p)
For Sale Vista 10 speed bicycle good
condition only 2 months old call
373-3279 ask for Lee $60.00
(A-st-106-p)
Benjamin stereo with miracord
turntable 100 watt amp and two
scott speakers, cost $550 new. need
money, will sell for S4OO call Jack
376-1481 (A-5M05-P)
HONDA cb-160 in excellent
condition $350 or best offer 804 W.
univ. ave. afternoons (A-st-105-p)
Panasonic 8-track stereo tape player
system, needs adjustment, perfect for
student who can fix it himself, must
sell, call Sue 2-7678 (A-st-108-p)
Stereo 8-tr tapes. Any 2 albums
$3.50 Professional equipment used.
All tapes guaranteed Call 373-3611
Ask for Jonathan or leave message
(A-10t-105-p)
BE gentle, be kind, to that expensive
carpet, clean it with Blue Lastre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-IFC)
Triumph 1955 custom 650. must sell
immediately! helmet and cover too.
445 or? 372-0380 Bob 1236 nw 3rd
ave. (A-3t-108-p)
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
Furniture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
376-1146 (a-25t-103-p)
SUPER SALE Blank 8-track 80 min
tapes 6 for $9.95 MUNTZ STEREO
319 N.W. 13 St. (a-20t-89-p)
Doberman Pinscher Puppies AKC
Registered males $125 call 378-8067
(A-10t-103-p)
Stained glass lamps, tiffany style and
box lamps, many colors and sizes, do
it yourself or ready to hang easy, fun
and stylish. call 376-2195
(A-st-105-p)
35mm edixa reflex camera with light
meter, 35mm, 85mm, 135 mm,
50mm, lenses SIOO call Dana
392-1691 poloroid model 150 $25
(A-st-108-p)
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way,
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Electric
shampoos also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Nikka 8-track recorder-player deck,
cost $135 new. need money so will
take $75. in perfect condition.
392-8399 (A-st-108-p)
£22
LA
ACROSS I
X COLOR M
fil£l rs

JiaVAQER
MagmaMa
Venice Sjh j Helpful Stranger

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 6,1971

Page 10

FOR RENT
AVAV.V.V.VAV.VMV.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V
Get a liberal education by rooming
with a hippe, a jock, and an
intellectual, university gardens trace
37.50 a mo. 378-6353 (B-st-106-p)
Need 1 female roomate for
Gatortown apt. 259 $45 per mo. no
deposit call 378-6708 spring quarter
(B-st-107-p)
Male roomate wanted spring qtr at
Hawiian Village pool tv S6O a mo. +
1/3 utilities call 372-8923 after spm
(B-4t-107-p)
SUBLEASE Tanglewood apt 2
bedrooms IV2 baths dishwasher
disposal 190 a month furnished
available immediately call 378-0910
(B-st-105-p)
Apartments for summer qtr. close to
campus, pool, air-conditioned,
sllO-$240 per qtr. university apts.
1524 nw 4th ave. apt. n, 376-8990
(B-10t-108-p)
Sublet 1 br ac apt. quiet, out of town
103/mo. call 373-3739 after 5 prairie
view apts. (B-3t-108-p)
1 bdrm furn apt 144.56 per month,
summit house 26d. after 5:00 call
378-3262. before 5:00 call 392-2017.
(B-3t-108-p)
Sublet 2 bdrm twnhse furn apt avail.
June 15 $45 a month call 373-4394
fr quarter apt 67 (B-st-108-p)
Female roommate wanted
$46/month French Qtr. 113 call
378-9057 (B-st-106-p)
NEED TO SUBLET TODAY female
to share townhouse Hawaiian Village
stop in 162 or call 378-8037 pool
A/C laundry (B-st-105-p)
Sublet June 1 large 2 bdrm unfurn
quiet faces lake free bus pool ac
married couples playgrnd negotiate
price univ gardens 702-116 378-5419
(B-st-109-p)
MUST sublet imm. 4bdrm, a/c heat,
dishwasher, pool; utilities incl; near
campus. Spring quarter thru Aug.
Please call 373-1189 $82.50
(B-4t-109-p)
WANTED
female roomate wanted for 1
bedroom furn apt. 26D summit
house. $72 per month + V 2 utilities
call after 5:00 378-3262.
(C-3t-108-p)
Apartments for fall qtr. close to
campus, pool a/c, SBO-130 per
month, university apts. 1524 nw 4th
ave. apt. n 376-8990 (C-st-108-p)
roomate wanted comfortable
apartment only 3 blocks from
campus. S3B/month plus soulful
roomates! call Ed or Cas 378-4526
(C-3t-108-p)

Bf
, /: ;
GLAUBER ROCHA SERIES
The Reitz Union's Film Classics Committee is presenting these
films, never before shown in Gainesville, by the exciting Brazilian
director, Glauber Rocha.
One of the few national cinemas to emerge in the last decade is the
recent cinema of Brazil. It accurately reflects the social fervor and
progressive nationalist commitment of a new generation coining to
maturity in a stagnant, dictatorial oligarchy shored up by American capital
and based on poverty, oppression, and cultural and political colonization.
Apart from being one of its most original and prolific filmmakers,
Glauber Rocha is also the leading ideological spokesman of this movement,
Brazils famed Cinema Novo. This organization of young and socially
committed film directors aims to develop an indigenous, socially relevant
Brazilian cinema, free of domination by foreign (especially American)
capital, drawing its themes and esthetic preoccupations from the countrys
heritage and need for transformation. To make film, Rocha maintains,
4s to make a contribution to the revolution, to stoke it, in order to make
people in Brazil conscious of their condition. This is the tragic origin of our
new cinema. Our origin is our hunger as well as our most profound
misery because it is experienced rather than artistically imagined. Our
esthetics is the esthetics of cruelty, i.e., of primal instinct. It is
revolutionary.
. Antonio Das Mortes Tuesday, April 6 & Wed, April 7 winner of the Best
Director Award at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival
Union Auditorium 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 50 cet cents advance tickets available
Friday at 2nd floor box office 12:30-4:30

WANTED
' *

*
Male Roomate wanted for 2 bedroom
trailer. SIBO per quarter + V 2 util, call
3 7 8-0733 between 5-7 pm
(C-3t-109-p)
roommate wanted, own room in 3
bedroom house, close to campus. S7O
p/month utilities inc. 373-1575
(C-4t-109-p)
Book for BS 671 Human Relations in
Management, by Huneryager, 1967
Call 392-7528 (C-lt-109-p)
Need 1 roommate immediately three
bedroom house on 55 st call
378-6407 (C-3t-107-p)
Female roomate needed for
immediate occupancy at La Bonne
Vie apt $54 plus V utilities call
378-4403 (C-3t-107-p)
2 male roommates wanted large 4
bedroom house nw section cable tv
private or semi-private bedroom S4O
per month utilities incl. 378-6810
(C-st-107-p)
Female roommate needed for nice
apt. close to campus. $52.50 per
month, pool, a/c. Call 378-7080.
(C-st-107-p)
Female roommate Landmark Apts
poolside Available immediately Call
373-2240 (C-st-105-p)
Girl roommate wanted May Ist 37.50
+ >/2 utilities Close to campus Call
Brigid at 378-9391 (C-st-107-p)
Male roomate wanted. Live Entire
spring qtr for ONLY $53.75 +
utilities. La Bonne Vie apt
townhouse 356. Call 373-3385
(C-st-105-p)
Roommates for 12x70 3 bdrm
mobile home stereo, air, pool, color
tv $55 plus util, lot 132 pinehurst
park (C-st-106-p)
Female Roomate 1 bedroom,
airconditioned apartment. call
372- after 4:00 (C-st-106-p)
Male roomate (1 or 2) wanted for 2
bedroom apt. 512-9 (Pt West)
subleasing also available Call
373- 97 (C-4t-106-p)
Roommate wanted for the Place V 2
months rent free. 82.50 per month
call 373-4346 grad student preferred
(C-3t-107-p)
Two male roommates needed.
Immediate occupancy. SSO a month
376-4185 6 neat apartment
(C-st-107-p)
Male roomate needed for quiet one
bedroom frederick gardens apt.
Spring, or spring-summer 62.50/mo.
or sublet for Apr-Aug. 378-2058
(C-st-105-p>
Roommate, call 373-3408 or come
by 142 landmark, male (C-st-107-p)

\tw
MONDO
I SEXO
LAST TIMES TODAY!
AT: 1:30 & 7:30 ONLY
LAST TIMES TODAY!
AT: 1:25-3:30-5:35-7:40*9:45
Richard
Burton,
Raid an m
Ramntei
tpPl A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR*
I liitfn CMr
i@a(lrN
HH . W. I . \Z \
Shows Paramount
1:30*3:30*5:30 Pictures
7:25*9:25 presents |
I the laugh
I year. I
(Otdter Motthou!
i Ekdne Hoy.;
"fl (tetter
I 1S M.W.IM
Si ACADEMY S?!|
2S?
m NOMINATIONS i:3O %
* BEST ACTRESS 3:30
Jane Alexander 5:30
| BEST ACTOR 7:30 I
i James Earl Jone* 9530 I
*£%*+ LAST
I * 1 2
UEQEEIs days
PI W. Wwntty 4w. \
SUMMER-3:05 \
6:25-9:45 \
PLUCKED-1:30 %
4:55-9:20
U PUA OBTRBUTORB WC PRESENTS
"MUCKEIT;
\ GINA LOLLOBRIGIOA &
i pou (X)
# n %
J OhCe to every young man
| comes a summer M iW 'OIK SWEDISH SUMMER* I
\ J] tOLOR I
% FLORIDA ONLY $
\ ALL SEATS $1.25 g
* ALL DAY S
' everyday



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Wanted one male roomate in 3
bedroom apt. Rent S4O/mo. 3 blocks
from campus rent paid till Apr. 15
1/3 ults. 411 b nw 15 st. 378-3972
alrcond. bdr. now (C-st-108-p)
HELP wanted
TALENT for motion picture work
such as television commercials If you
wish to be listed come to 1230 W
University Wed 4/7/71 A.M. Prepare
25 second monolog for filming.
Pardue Motion Picture (E-2t-109-p)
AMBITIOUS COUPLE who need
more income. Unusual opportunity
for good earnings for both, work
together, part-time or full-time,
phone 373-1476 (E-st-109-p)
Film Editor (commercial and news),
Processing, etc. PERDUE MOTION
PICTURE 1230 w university
(E-st-109-p)
WRUF needs first phone radio
operators to cover the summer
months. If you will be In town during
summer quarter, please call Ed
Sllmak at 392-0771 (E-10t-103-c)
Advertising sales, production &
layout, general office, need talented
and/or experienced help with new
publications. 376-5716 after 5:30
pm. (E-st-107-p)
2 males needed part-time during day
to exercise, stand In braces, take to
class and read to a disabled veteran.
$1.50 an hr. 378-3489 (E-6t-107-p)
Sell advertising for the Gainesville
Guide Full or part time phone
372-9555 leave name and number
(E-st-107-p)
DONT MISS
"CELEBRATION"
and
"AUGUST"
as they play a
DANCE
AND
CONCERT
on
April 10,1971
on the
Reitz Union South Terrace
Celebration 3:00-5:00 PM
August 5:00-7:00 PM
FREE ADMISSION!!!!!
sponsored by your
J. Wayne Reitz Union

r i
Todays
more for your money meal
moisoivs
CAFETERIA
* ______
T TUESDAY'S FEATURE |
IGOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I
I ALL YOU CAN EAT I
l! 99<:s
iI I
I | WEDNESDAY FEATURE | \
I FISH ALMONDINE WITH I
| HUSH PUPPIES |
! FRENCH FRIED 94 £
! POTATOES
I--
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8 FREE PARKING
moisorrs
CfIFETERIfi beyond comparison!

H 'S/YA.
Male student drive elderly man In
1960 Ford manual shift. Tues. or
Wed. around 2 pm. Call 378-3282
after spm (E-3t-108-p)
AUTOS
1966 Simca Excellent condition.
$450 or best offer. Call 495-2198
(weekdays after 6pm) (G-st-109-p)
OLSMOBILE 63 good condition,
asking $224, call 378-5532 after 5
p.m. (G-st-109-p)
62 rambler amerlcan convert, good
working condition must sell $309.
378-8998 anytime (G-lt-109-p)
62 Rambler wagon, fact a/c, radio,
heat. Excellent economical
transportation. Must see to
appreciate. Must sell this week. S2OO
378-5738 (G-st-105-p)
MGA 1600 1960 excellent cond. new
top wire wheels paint radials good
interior correllas mechanically sound
S9OO serious offers only 372-2340
(G-3t-107-p)
CONVERTABLE *65 corvair corsa
excellent shape 4spd. 180 hp cheap!
$697.23: call 372-5254 & ask for
Scott. (G-st-105-p)
Convertible Impala 1966 radio heater
Panasonic stereo and speakers
Installed. $1200.00 dr best offer.
378-3596 (G-st-106-p)
CAMPER, step-van, self contained,
excellent condition, must sell fast to
pay for school 392-7305
(G-st-106-p)
Zazooks! due to unforseen deficit
spending my fiat 124 coupe must be
sacrificed, am-fm radio, stereo,
5-speed trans., mechanically
Impecable but It does need a waxing.
40 tho. miles. I want $2600 but Ill
settle for $2249. buy it. call
378-6376 bet. 5-6 pm. (G-3t-105-p)
Volkswagen sedan 1969 white
excellent condition 23000 miles
SI4OO call Hans at 392-1461
(G-6t-107-p)
1967 396 ss chevell. Great condition.
SIOOO. Brand new Craig 8-track
stereo tape player. Cost me $l2O.
Best offer. 372-7104 evenings
(G-st-105-p)
1968 VW Sedan, radio. Excellent
condition. Working hours call
378-1531 ask for Kris Buros. After
SPM call 376-8490 (G-st-107-p)
*65 corvair monza 4 doors radio 8
heat new paint and 2 tires runs good
call 392-7178 make offer
(G-3t-107-p)
Volkswagen sedan 1969 white
excellent condition 23000 miles
SI4OO call Hans at 392-1461
(G-6t- 107-p)
PF; jpj T
**s
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer.
Electrologist... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment.
(j-44t-54-p)

Tuesday, April 6,1971, The Florida Alligator,

X;X;X:X:X:Xv:;X:^
Xvx^^itrsrirlri^vtirixXrXtltXxXrXrXvXv:::
law students need girl to cook dinner
Sunday through thursday. point west
apts. call 372-7850 between 5 and 7
pm only (J-3t-109-p)
COED Interested in cooking for
mature law or grad students during
week. Want Info? 392-8511
(J-2t-109-p)
Happy birthday old man! Only a
quarter of a century, right? And
you've spent in all In school!! Many
more to you.. .Nancy (J-lt-109-p)
Married couples lnterested In
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate In a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths of your
marriage. Call now for a group
beginning this quarter. It's free.
Marriage and College Life Project.
Information at 392-1590.
(J-5t- 107-p)
Explore your natural creativity,
drawing is expressing your own
personal visual vocabulary, private
unique individual Instruction.
373-1947 (J-st-106-p)
Custom jewelry hand sculpted, cast
or fabricated gold, silver, or other,
modern made from old. wedding
rings w/speclal meaning, reasonable
373-1947 (J-5M06-P)
PLEASE HELP US!! five adorable
kittens are looking for homesl free,
boxtrained kittens make great easter
gifts call 373-3832 (J-3t-107-p)
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (J-46t-106-p)
BAHAMAS flying $35 rd. trip, need
3 pass., dates to be arranged.
DENVER $125 need 2 April 23? ST.
PETE $8 April 9 372-2419
(J-3t-108-p)
Students are always welcome at
highlands presbyterlan church, 1001
ne 16 ave. college crowd meets 9:45
am Sundays, church at 11 am
(J-st-106-p)
The Photoworkshopexcellent b&w
and color work at best prices,
passports, portraits, etc. Get fine
handcrafted SANDLES at the
ETERNAL EXCHANGE 804 W.
University Ave. (J-st-105-p)
Two things are better on a
WATERBED. One is sleep. From
Innerspace Environment at
reasonable prices, call Elliott,
373-3144 (J-l St-105-p)
Any individual or group wanting to
set up a game booth ($50.00) or set
or set up tables to sell at
CARNIGRAS call Jeff 376-9473
(J-st-108-p)
GOING TO EUROPE? We Have
Charter Flights At People's Prices.
Call 372-6846 (J-lt-108-p)

< sj9 M _ wBHj

Page 11

SONA t
Auto stereo cassette player & tape
recorder; fast forward, rewind, tone
& balance control. Reg. $79.95, now
$59.95 new in box, includes speakers
New 8-track also. Reg. $49.95, only
$34.95. phone 378-2957.
(J-st-108-p)
LOST eSt FOUND
Reward of ten dollars for a calendar
watch "TUGARIS lost at Little Hall
205 last Wednesday night, call Jerry
Lin at 392-0294 (L-3t-109-p)
Glasses tortisesheil black case found
in eng. parking lot check with union
barbershop (L-3t-107-nc)
HELP! gold wire rimmed glases lost
(possibly) in rote courtyard
URGENT! call Janlne 392-7806
(L-2t-108-p)
SERVICES
XrXvXvW*:*:^
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmerlcard adn
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
INCOME TAX RETURNS 35 n main
st. haber and budd accountants
378-9666 378-6127 (M-10t-107-p)
Experienced Spanish tutor native
speaker remedial arammar reading
exam conversation $4 an hour
373-2252 (M-3t-107-p)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
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OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
FIND IT £Vv )
GAT R
CLASSIFIEDS

iiWl fnawi An exquisite and beautiful film!"
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SERVICES
Overseas Jobs for Students. Australia,
Europe, So. America, Africa, etc. All.
professions and occupations, S7OO to
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!, The Florida Alflitor, Tuesday, April 6,1971

Page 12

DFDFDSFSFSD

By FRAZIER SOLSBERRY
Entertainment Writer
Once every couple of years
popular music goes into a lull or
kind of recession. During these
periods there is still alot of good
music being made in contrast
to the full-blown depressions
like the one that preceded the
emergence of the Beatles. But,
no group or sound or style ~
bursts forth with an energy that
immediately captivates the rock
audience.
Were caught in a recession
right now. Shopping the record
stores becomes a search for
something new and exciting that
doesnt seem to exist. The
biggest musical events in recent
months, discounting
promotional type, are the release
of Elton Johns albums and the
George Harrison solo album.
None of these satisfy the longing
for something new and strong.
The natural thing to do in
times like this is look back. If
you want records and have the
money to spend, find an artist
who's been around for awhile
but hasnt received wide notice.
Van Morrison qualifies on both
counts and stands well above the

§ m i i# g Jf§
.. 111
M&
M
'Knack' opens Wednesday
Hailed as a bawdy British comedy, The Knack, a Florida Players
Production, will open Wednesday in the H. P. Constans Theater.
Directed by PhD candidate Thomas C. Nash, the cast includes UF
students Rusty Sailing and Gregory Hausch, above, and Susan Krieger
and Gene Touchet.
Tickets are available at the theater box office and are priced at 75
cents for UF students, $1 for all other students and $1.50 for the
general public.
For reservations call 392-1653.

when it won't womb . twc
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union 1200 S.W. Fifth Avenue Phone 392-0393
Auto Loans for UF Faculty and Staff

S'
jdK- Bk
Van Morrison
general mediocrity of the new
single artists.
Morrison has certainly been
around a long time. In 1965 his
recording of Gloria, which he
wrote, recorded with Them, was
a number one single in this
country. It had been preceeded
in England by Thems hit
recording of Baby Please Dont
Go, an old Lightning Hopkins
song. These, together with
several other successful singles
and two good albums, showed a
musical range not found in most
groups of the time.
The group experimented with
combinations of the elements of

rock and roll, jazz, folk, blues,
and soul. All this at a time when
the Beatles were just breaking
away from rock and roll and the
Rolling Stones were a raunchy
blues band. But the eminence of
the latter two overshadowed
Them, the group foundered and
re-emerged as the Belfast
Gypsies, without Van Morrison.
Late in 1967, Blowin My
Mind, Morrisons first solo
album, appeared. The new Van
was a folksy guitar player and
singer with a slightly mellower
voice but the selection of music
ran in a similar vein to that of
Ihem. Except for its hideous
cover and a single, Brown Eyed
Girl, the album would have
passed unnoticed.
When Astral Weeks was
released about a year and a half
later, popular music may have
been ready for Van Morrison,
but it still didnt pay him much
tribute. The wailing, grating
voice that has caused some
reviewers to call him the new
Bob Dylan drifted above and
below the jazz influenced
instrumental backing, but very
few people seemed to notice. He
had found himself but it was
necessary to prove himself in the
stretch before he would be a
star.
Moondance, Morrisons
second album, should have
been enough to satisfy anybody.
His singing remained basically
the same, but the music was
more arranged and blended
better with his voice. With this
album, Van Morrison and his
music became a harmonious
whole and transcended the
impression of an unusual singer
with backing instrumental. Here
he added his saxophone which
had been absent since the Them
albums.
The latest album, Van
Morrison, His Band and the
Street Choir, has unified form
and feeling into a happy and
moving sound. The blues have
gone; in their place is a sense
that things are working
themselves out. The feeling is
one of goodtime music, like that
associated with the Loving
Spoonful, expressed in much
fuller and tighter arrangements.
Domino, a single from the
album, has had amazing success
on the popular charts. It is
characteristic of the album
you want to sing along and
dance to the songs because they
make you feel so good.
If you aren't satisfied with
what youre finding on the
record racks, try Van Morrison.
He just might suit you.

staff personnel
column j
RETIREMENT PLAN
Q. It is my understanding that only some portions of the new state
retirement plan which became effective on December 1,1970 are now
in effect. Why is the precentage rate of computation for age over 65
not in effect and when does it become effective?
A. All portions of the new Florida Retirementgjpystem hfve been in
effect since December 1, 1970. The benefit rate on retirement varies
depending on the number of years an employee had contributed to
each plan he may have been under prior to December 1, 1970, then
changes to the benefit rate for the new plan at his retirement age for
the period of time under the new plan. For instance, suppose an
employee began state employment January 1, 1950 and planned to
retire effective January 31, 1971 when he would be 65. Here is how
the retirement rate would be computed.
January 1,1950 to
January 1,1956 = 6 yrs. X?% = 12.0%
(He was under Plan A)
January 1,1956 to
December 1,1970
approximately 15 yrs. X 1.5% = 22.5%
(He was under Plan B)
December 1,1970 to
January 31,1971 = 1/6 yr. X 1.68% = .3%
(He has been under new plan 2 mo. only)
34.8% X average a salary (best 5 of last 10) = annual benefit
For those who are eligible also to receive the cost of living increases
after age 65, these will be effective on July 1 of each year.
FREE COURSE
Q. What do I have to do to take advantage of the six hours of free
coursework per quarter offered by the University?
A. In order to take advantage of the tuition waiver for six hours of
coursework per quarter, an employee must have completed six
months of satisfactory service in a budgeted position not OPS.
If an employee meets this first requirement, he must apply and be
accepted for admission to the University just like any other student.
Once he has been accepted for admission and arranged for a
registration appointment, he may pick up a tuition waiver application
from the Processing and Records Section of the Personnel Division,
have it completed with all required signatures and turn it in with his
fee cards by the due date for paying fees.
IF YOU ARE A STAFF EMPLOYEE AT THE UNIVERSITY AND HAVE A
QUESTION ABOUT THE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES AFFECTING
STAFF EMPLOYEES, PLEASE SEND IT TO "STAFF PERSONNEL
COLUMN," ROOM 240 HUB. IT IS REQUESTED THAT QUESTIONS BE
LIMITED TO THOSE OF A GENERAL NATURE AND NOT INDIVIDUAL
PROBLEMS. SINCE SPACE LIMITATIONS WILL NOT PERMIT US TO
PUBLISH EVERY QUESTION AND ANSWER, QUESTIONS WILL BE
CHOSEN FOR PUBLICATION BASED ON EXTENT OF INTEREST AND
TIMELINESS.
Advertise
its good business



~*m**~**~- TT'immi
The
Florida
Alligator

Beaver, Okla. championships
Measurements are made
when cow chips down

(EDITORS NOTE: It is the
intention of the Alligator sports
staff to provide fair and equal
coverage in all areas of the
sporting world. In our zeal to
meet this goal, we bring you the
annual cow chip chucking
championship from Beaver,
Okla.)
BEAVER, Okla. (UPI) The
experts say if a fellow selects
just the right weight and shape,
preferably fortified with a little
buffalo grass for consistency, he
can chuck a cow chip well over
100 feet.
That should be good enough
to place in one of the worlds
most highly-specialized athletic
events. The 2,087 good citizens
of Beaver expect 5,000 to 6,000
spectators and more than 100
entries for the second annual
Worlds Championship Cow
Chip Throwing Contest on
April 24
The panhandle city of Beaver,
settled in the 1800s in
then-infamous no mans land,
now bills itself as Captial of the
Cow Chip Country. The
contest is the highlight event of
the three-day Cimarron
Territory Celebration.

I Here Is Just One Os Jerry's I
Dotmir of / '<, 3T-'-x^ s >ec i NNf umus
lornrc / f I
is a *7
student
OlUUblll I
I PlWCliTmitol r ir <££' ope 'iy' B ': m I
4 if 4 ; r z* / I
anair. c^.^ o / I
an affair worth remembering I
- a meal at Jerrys. Theres something I
for everyone ... a quick snack, a complete dinner, carry
. ~ out service or drive-in for an in-car picnic. |r
'-M. JERRY'S SOUTH # JERRY'S NORTH (open 24 hours daily)
23105. W. 13th St & 1505 N.W. 13th St. I

GATOR SPORTS

Promoters hope for a classic
matchup this year between
Republican former Gov. Dewey
Bartlett and Democratic Gov.
David Hall. Bartlett is defending
champion in the politicians class,
a special category.
Rules are not yet firm, but
some refinements are being
made. Spectators last year faced
risks not unlike those of a golf
gallery with Vice President Spiro
Agnew on the tee.
Other politicians invited to
try their hand include both of
Oklahomas U.S. senators,
Republican Henry Bellmon and
Democrat Fred R. Harris, State
Attn. Gen. Larry Derryberry,
Republican Congreeman John N.
Happy Camp, State Sen. Leon
Field and Rep. Marvin McKee.
Dean Starr, 29, a Forgan,
Okla., defending champion in
the open division, said he will
feel less inhibited this time, with
the fans seated in the grandstand
at the fairgrounds.
Last year it was out in the
open, he said. The people
were supposed to stay behind
these white lines, but they just
kept crowding in and crowding
in. Quite a few of them got hit.

Starr prefers the overhand
delivery.
Some of them threw it
sidearm and some tried to throw
it like a discus, he said. But I
just reared back and chunked it
like a baseball.
You have to throw
barehand, thats the only way.
You dig around in a barrel and
pick out what you want, try to
find one solid enough that it
wont fly apart. I like them sort
of round, like a grapefruit.
Stan posted the current
record of 134 feet on one of his
three tries.
I got a trophy, he said,
but it didnt stay together too
long. It was a wooden plaque
with a cow chip nailed to it.
RED PIN qA
NIGHT Jy
8-iopm mU
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
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Cameras \ / Magazines
Electrical Acc\ / Pet Supplies
Bulbs, etc. \ /Greeting Cards
Sewing Notions \
Film Processing \ downs/ Household Items
UNIVERSITY PLAZA V 1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
THE PRICE TODAY IS THE PRICE TOMORROW!
"a- ' I I mom pit
: 35l ; B wh r you Ret 1 br ** k
on steak and
everything else
A man can save himself a lot of double B
by marrying his second wife first.
J u ||l|||H

Tuesday, April 6,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 6,1971

Thomas to start
against Moc nine

Floridas Gators, presently
3-1 in the Southeastern
Conference eastern division, will
,'k y

9Wr -^P^ 1
Dave Fuller
... has ace ready

Nixon isnt present
for baseball opener

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Washington Senators and the
Oakland As opened the 1971
baseball season Monday without
the fanfare of a presidential
presence but with a solemn
pre-game pause in tribute to
American prisoners of war in
Vietnam.
President Nixon, in California,
Deadlines set
for softball
intramurals
Deadlines for softball signup
has been set at Thursday for all
law school, independent and
engineering teams.
Other intramural deadlines
include Wednesday for all dorm
handball teams to register while
a required softball officials
meeting is Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in room 229, Florida Gym.
The rain Monday forced
cancellation of all activity in
intramural action.
YOGA
LESSONS
Instructor: Rjpndy Cameon
fee: $8 Union Lounges
lessons will be offered on
Mondays from 7pm to 9 pm,
Tims days from 2pm to 4pm, and
Wadnaadays from 10am to 12 noon
tha aight wack coursas twain on
April 12.13 and 14
flatfstar at tha first session, and
waar something you can
move comfortably in
Sponsored by the J. Wayne Reits
v Union

meet Florida Southern this
afternoon beginning at 3 p.m. on 0
Perry Field.
Dave Thomas, a senior from
Orlando, will start for the
Gators.
The Gators will travel to
Athens, Ga., Friday to meet SEC
rival Georgia in a two game
series. So far this season, the
Gators have defeated the
Bulldogs twice while defeating
Auburn once in SEC play.
Following Georgia, the Gators
will come back to meet
Jacksonville University April 12
on campus.
Coach Dave Fuller will keep
his ace Tom Seybold ready for
Georgia with Art Lee scheduled
to pitch Saturday in the second
game of the series.

sent a message read to the crowd
of more than 40,000 reminding
them there are 1,600 American
servicemen held captive by the
Communists.
These servicemen have not
seen a baseball game for a long
time, let alone their homes and
families, die President noted.
Nixon had designated Army
Master Sgt. Daniel L. Pitzer, a
prisoner of war of the North
Vietnamese for four years, to
officially throw out the
ceremonial first ball in his place.
In the message read by
Defense Secretary Melvin R.
Laird, Nixon said Pitzer
symbolized the deep and
continuing national concern for
the plight of these missing men.
Pitzer, 40, then lobbed out
two pitches one to Oakland
outfielder Reggie Jackson and
the other to Washington catcher
Paul Cassanova.

K' iOPHOMORES JUNIORS
NEED SOMETHING TO RELATE TO?
If you are majoring in BUSINESS
and you want CONTACTS:
ACT the Nations oldest and largest
business fraternity offers you:
alters, field trips, parties,athletics and job placemen
NO ONE can offer you more.
SMOKER, tomorrow 7:30 PM Room 122 UNION
AM| #1 Professional Business Fraternity.

Tom Seybold
... win No. 5?
H
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

A PIZZA CARRY OUTS-DINING ROOM
Q j J Serving the Univ. of Fla. with the finest in Italian food
TO SHOW OUR APPRECIATION FOR
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Womens amateur champion
Tammy Bowman wins golf title

Py MARK ROSNER
Alligator Staff Writer
Tammy Bowman, one of the
top three golfers on the UF
womens golf team, captured the
State Womens Amateur Golf

- fill},- :
Bob Favreau strains with burden
... paced lightweight class for UF
Weightlifters 3rd in Fla. AAU
The UF Weightlifting Club placed third in the Florida AAU
Weightlifting Championships this past weekend in Orlando, despite
having only half of the team in attendance.
The Gator lifters scored nine points behind the Stancyzks 300 Club
which easily outdistanced second place Florida Technological
University, 26-10.
The UF lifters put their weight on the little men as they placed
in all of the first three classes.
Rez Orr took a second place finish in the bantamweight class with a
total of 425 pounds for the three lifts: press, snatch and dean jerk.
Mike Smolek captured third place in the featherweight dass, with a
total lift of 455 pounds for his three efforts. This was the first state
AAU meet for both On and Smolek, both freshmen.
The Gator lifters also captured the lightweight class for the second
straight year. Bob Favreau snatched 200 pounds on the way to a 675
total to pace the event.
'TTX Special
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store hours Bam-7:3opiT* Sat. 9air-t2noon
1C CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE
am
B .. loco ted in the Hub

Championship this past weekend
in Sebring, edging Peggy Bass of
Orlando by one stroke.
Miss Bowman also defeated
Paulett Lee and Micky
Reuterfeldt in the semi-finals to
capture the tourney, played on

the Harder Hall course in match
play.
I think my driving and
putting won the tournament for
me, Mbs Bowman said. 1 don't
usually putt that well hut my
putts finally started dropping.
Coach Mary Ryan, coach of
the UF women's golf team, was
pleased with Miss Bowman's
performance.
I couldn't be happier,
Coach Ryan said. Shes the first
girl I've coached that has won
this title. In fact, she coaches
hersdf more than I coach her.
Mss Bowman was the only
Gator golfer to participate in the
event.
The womens golf team swings
back into action this weekend
against FSU in Tallahassee. Miss
Bowman will be joined by
teammates Cindy Meyers,
Suzanne Jackson and Pam Hughs
to face the Seminole gals already
defeated once this year by
Florida.
We should be even stronger
this time because Suzy (Jackson)
will be playing this time, Coach
Ryan explained.

Cvotwtu or tmc*. me.
- Bklnrai
B*
g|F w sp
*
Iworklkvtous gimmicks of thel94os.
Everyone laughed when they came didnt drink gas like water. Or oil like

out with the television.
A box that could show pictures
from 3,000 miles away? Absurd.
But everyone really cracked up
when we came out with the Volks Volkswagen.
wagen. Volkswagen.
A car with its engine in the back?
Its trunk in the front? And its radiator
in neither the front nor the back?
It even looked like a joke.
But time marched on.
The television clicked.
The Volkswagen accelerated.
People liked the idea of a car that

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Timdey, ApriTS, 1871, The Horkb AMtor,

water. Or, for that matter, didn't
even drink water.
Some strange people even liked
the idea that it was strange looking.
In fact, Detroit car makers now
like the idea Volkswagen so
much that they decided to make
their own.
And even with all those new small
cars around, the fate of the bug is
still secure.
This is the first year for all of the
others.
Weve had 23 years of re-runs.

Page 15



Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 6,1971

Spring drills open today

By KEN MCKINNON
Alligator Managing Editor
When Doug Dickey blows the
starting whistle today for the
1971 spring football drills, he
will reveal a whole new look for
his defense.
Dickey said last week that he
is revamping his defense to look
like the old-style 5-4 (five
linemen and four linebackers).
Last year, he used die
pro-style four-man front with
three linebackers and three
defensive hades, hut his pass
protection was so poor that it
gave up far more yardage hy the
airways than John Reaves could
make up for.
The new defense wont have
four linebackers, but two, thus
having four defensive backs
ready to cover the pass at all
times. The two linebackers can
drop off to cover for the pass
also. That would make six men
available to stop Auburns Pat
Sullivan from throwing three
touchdown passes to teammate
Terry Beasley, like he did last
year.
Dickey said that outside
linebacker Rick Buchanan,
suspended from the team for a
curfew violation mid-way
through last season, would move
into the stand-up defensive end
posistion and he too could
drop-off to cover the pass if
necessary.
Standout defensive end Bob
Harrell, who played opposite
all-American end Jack
Youngblood last year will move
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Richard Buchanon
... back from suspension
over to tackle under the new
alignment.
But Dickey said he Has a
problem one of the only
apparent ones this spring in
finding depth for his five man
defensive front.
He has Harrell, tackle Eddy
Moore, tackle Danny Williams
and end Tim Good returning,
but says it will take youngsters
like John Lacer of Brandon,
Mike Kraft of Key West, both

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Robert Harrell
... moves to tackle
sophomores, and Walter
Hutchinson of Tampa
Hillsborough, a junior who was
injured most of last year, to
come through to fill the gaps for
him.
The new five-man front with
two linebackers will not be all
that different, Dickey said.
Under the new alignment,
Dickey must find someone to
play the old nose-man, middle
guard of man-over-center
posistion.

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