Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 108

Same books sold at different prices

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Campus Shop and
Bookstore is selling the same
bodes by different publishers,
placing the more expensive ones
up front in the reference section
and the least expensive in the
back of the store in the popular
reading aisle.
The bookstore, for example,
sells the book Vanity Fair by
Thackeray, published by
Houghton-Mifflin company for
$2.75 under English section 316.
In the popular reading aisle,
however, other copies of
Vanity Fair, published by
Signet Classics and Washington
Square press, sell for 95 cents
each.

Solares withdraws from race

(SEE editorial, page 8)
By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body Vice President
Henry Solares has announced his
withdrawal from the spring UF
student body presidential
election.
In a letter to The Alligator

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
With a promise to reform,
reform, reform always reform,
even if its wrong, El Magnifico
(Richard Glukstad) launched his
campaign for student body
president Sunday afternoon.
The uniformed candidate,
wearing a German helmet and
toting an M-16
toy rifle, said he
considered
himself to be
the only serious 'Bt *** I
candidate 1
running for the
position.
I do not want this election
to be a joke, El Magnifico
muttered, So I am running for
dictator ; not for president.
I think all the students in
this university are
underrepresented. It is my duty,
(See EI Magnifico page 2)

The
Florida Alligator

This has not been done on
purpose with the intent to take
advantage of the students,
according to Mr. Richard L.
Anderson, who manages the
book department.
The problem with the
different prices on the same
bode, excluding the fact that
some of these books are
published by different
companies, is professors will
usually designate a certain
publisher they wish the books to
be ordered from.
So while the basic text
between the books are the same,
in one bode there might be
footnotes or certain reference
pdnts a professor will want a
student to use, Anderson said.

dated April 2, Solares said he
registered as an April Fools
joke, and he had achieved my
objective of disclosing the true
colors of many politicians while
at the same time receiving
independent encouragement.
Solares added that the actions
and words of UF politicos
spoke for themselves but later
declined to comment of those
actions and words.

Candidates outline platforms

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Bookstore discrepancy explained

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Aaignment Ed tor
You must work within the
system to present constructive
alternatives to issues at hand,
Real Party Student Body
Presidential Candidate Robert
(Bobby) Mandell said.
The second year law student
and former |
chief defense
counsel for the AHBpi!|
Honor Court is
basing his
campaign with
alternatives in fKBm.
three basic areas: academics,
Student Government autonomy
and what he calls a real
approach to student problems.
In the area of academics,
Mandell said he supports the
idea of letting the registrar
determine the final grade in die
pass-fad option with the
(See Mandell page 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

Many have a real good
reason for using a certain text.
We really never know if there
will be a price difference until
we get the publishers invoice
which comes along with the
books. If professors didnt
specify certain books that are
put out by different publishers,
we could find and order the
cheapest book for the student.
When asked why the
bookstore didnt tell students
they were selling the same book
in different places for different
prices, Anderson replied, I
wouldnt dare because I might
be telling a student to buy a
wrong book and it would cause
the student a lot of
inconvenience.

Solares said he had been a
serious candidate for president
a few weeks ago but withdrew
since the powers to be on this
campus refused to grace me with
their nod.
I felt it would be suicidal to
run against two bloc supported
candidates, Solares added.
The student body vice

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Write'*
Don Middlebrooks, Common
Causes candidate for student
body president, will be
campaigning along a
philosophical redefinition of
Student Government, rather
than the day-to-day proposals
for change, he
says. ISPWHB
When things
still cannot be MINMNIip
done with a SG
president as
dedicated as HHH
Steve Uhlfelder has been, you
have to look at the SG
institution itself.
Middlebrooks says he regards
the institution as ineffectual,
lacking any power.
I wont make promises that
concern issues the student body
president has no control over,
(See Middlebrooks page 2)

The National Association of
College Stores (NACS) was
formed in 1923, with the intent
to establish a rapport between
publishers and bookstores.
Most of the publishers we
carry belong to the NACS,
Anderson said, where, during
the meeting, each side presents
its grievances and committees
are formed to help iron them
out.
One of the biggest problems
the bookstores face, according
to Sam P. Getzen, store director,
is that of multiple adoptions.
This usually takes place in
philosophy, humanities, or a
course in that general area,
Getzen said. A professor will
send in an order of around 20
books he will be assigning his

president attacked UF campus
politics as an institution which
ignored qualifications in favor of
power structure.
Solares concluded his letter
by urging UF students to trust
their own judgement when
voting. Teople may be able to
tell you how to vote but the
ultimate decision in the voting
machine is your own, he said.

Monday. April 5, 1971

students. It then becomes our
job to guess which of the 20
books will be used the most and
which ones wont be assigned at
all. We guess right about as many
times as we guess wrong.
A student-faculty committee
for the store was established a
few years ago, according to
Getzen, though it has been very
ineffective in easing the
problems between professors
and the store.
The purpose of the
committee is to find the
problem areas in the bookstore
and make recommendations to
the vice-president of business
affairs, who we report to,
Hodges said. The meeting this
Wednesday will be concerned
with the problem area aspect of
the bookstore.
The meeting came after a
letter sent to Vice-President for
Business Affairs, Dr. William E.
Elmore, Secretary of Consumer
Affairs, Lee Schwartz and
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder requested such a
meeting. They claim the
committee had met only once
since it was created during the
summer.
A copy of the letter was sent
to Hodges. According to Hodges,
the reason for the delay in
having a meeting were personal
problems which have been
attended to.

By MICHAEL CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Cleamenceau said, War is
much too serious a matter to be
entrusted to the military.* We
believe Student Government is
much too serious a matter to be
entrusted to the politicos.* This
is the main theme behind Lowell
Stanleys fIHHM
platform for
student body
president.
Stanley wants
to put SG in the t
hands of what Pi
he calls student specialists.**
Student specialists in various
fields,* Stanley said, would
create an environment in which
students can explore together
many kinds of problems and
their solutions in a wide range of
areas affecting the continuing
welfare of the UF, specifically SG.
(See 'Stanley' page 2)



. The Florida Aflfgator, Monday, April'S,

Page 2

Stanley
The specialists would be
divided into many departments,
including the natural sciences,
mathematics, economics,
education, communication,
psychology and sociology.
These people, Stanley said,
would work in liason with the
academic departments. SG
would be completely
restructured and its not as
complicated as people think.
The framework is here, students
and faculty are already set up,
the problem is that it is not
being used effectively or to its
full advantage for the student.
Stanley calls himself a serious
candidate. He is not running as
joke but as a concerned
individual. Last year Stanleys
campaign manager Robert
Matte, ran for the presidency as
The Flash, going around
campus garbed'in a costume.
Stanley was his campaign
manager.
Rob ran as a sarcastic joke,
Stanley said, but the time for
fun is over. We are serious.
We dont want to be
beholden to anyone, Stanley
said. Were not politicians and
dont believe in political
favortism. We believe in rational
scientific methods. The
problems confronting our
university can be solved from a
professional academic viewpoint
and a complete reordering of
priorities.
We plan to get a major
portion of votes from students
who believe the old solutions
dont work, fraternity men and
independents, thinking students
who can evaluate the problems
themselves. We believe this is the
majority of the students at UF,
Stanley said.
Volunteers are welcomed.
This election is one huge power
game with the houses
(fraternities) split right down the
middle. The big think is the
independent vote, Stanley said.
Ruth Ellen Whitman, 3ED, is
Stanleys running partner for the
vice presidency. Miss Whitman is
also the student specialist in
education, according to Stanley.
He said other specialists include
Bob Sarazen, 4AS, psychology;
Jim Kohn, 4AS, sociology; Len
Soukup, 3EG, engineering; Ken
Scheiderer, 4AS, black studies;
Scott Simmons, 3JM,
communicatioiis, Pete Knocke,
4AS, module theorist and
Stanley, 4AS, economics.
Stanley is a member of
Omicron Delta Kappa, mens
leadership honorary society,
University Squires, Phi Eta
Sigma, a freshman scholastic
honorary society, ex-president
of Hume Hall and has a 3.8
average. He will be appearing on
two of WRUFs Dialogue shows.

/THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during \
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
~ Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
Vmore than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run I
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next /
insertion. '

Middlebrooks
ONE^j
Middlebrooks said. I feel,
though, it would be more
beneficial if we develop the
potential and power the student
does have.
Middlebrooks cited court
action, part i cul arly
student-brought class suits
against the university, as one
major area where activity has
only begun.
Ive spoken to a Gainesville
attorney who is witling to work
with us to sue the university for
full control of the student
activities fee, Middlebrooks
said. Thats only one example.
He' condemned the university
facultys majority control over
student-faculty committees on
campus. And SG cant even
decide the student
representatives it wants.
Middlebrooks said there will
be a closer working relationship
between him and Sam Taylor,
7AS, Common Causes vice
presidential candidate, than with
past student body
administrations. He is too good
a man to be given any less of a
chance.
There are many problems
the student body president has
no power or control over,
Middlebrooks said. I plan to
deal with the problems I do have
control in, and work towards
developing power in other
areas.
Termed by campaign
chairman Bob Westbrook a
unique approach, Middlebrooks
will attempt to make the
students aware of their
potential, to place much of the
burden on the student, himself.
According to Middlebrooks,
the students have not made
effective use of the available
levers of power. Hopefully my
campaign will educate the
student towards his potential. At
present, the average student is
apathetic towards voting and has
yet to take the initiative,
Middlebrooks said the student
should be in full control of any
committees or university bodies
that directly affect the student.
He said he believed, however,
that the use and development of
present potential in the
university and community
would be the best method of
achieving power in other areas.
We hope to create a quiet
committed activism.
Regarding drug enforcement
in the dormitories, Middlebrooks
said the university
administration should advocate a
policy against any enforcement
at all.
Although in reality the
university cant take a position
against the law, they shouldnt
be enforcing it either.

Mandell
instructor turning in regular class
grades. Mandell called the 1
pass-fail system as it now stands
with the instructor deciding
whether a student has done
satisfactory work a tremendous
inequity.
He also urged the adoption of
the pass-fail option in five or six
University College (UC) courses.
Concerning the curriculum of
UC, Mandell advocates partial
verticalization in
comprehensive courses. That is,
allowing UC students to spread
some of the UC requirements
out during their four years in
attendance at UF.
Mandell said he would like to
see internship programs
instituted whereby students
would receive practical
experience in their chosen fields,
such as are utilized in the
colleges of education and
journalism. Business and
architecture are two areas in
which Mandell said he would
like to see internship programs
developed.
The way to press for adoption
of these ideas is through the
University Curriculum
Committee, according to
Mandell.
SG autonomy, particularly
from the administration, could
be partially accomplished
through a students cooperative,
such as is used at the University
of California at Berkeley,
Mandell said. By this method,
students could buy shares in the
cooperative for the price of $1
in order to achieve lower prices
for various items. Mandell said
the project would have to start
out on a small scale with lower
priced records.
Concerning a real approach
to student problems, Mandell
said he felt student power could
be utilized through
confrontation and negotiation.
Mandell said he does not
believe in confrontation for the
sake of confrontation citing
last years SG protests against
charging students admission to
PRINTMAKING LESSONS
Instructor: Mrs. Judy Lantos
Tuesdays from April I to May 11
pm to 10 pm room C-4, Union
$6.00 fee register at the first
lesson Sponsored by the JWR
Union

Here we go again...
INSTRUCTIONS IN THE CATHOLIC FAITH
Every Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30 to 8:15 PM (Never Later)
Instructor: Father George D. Kirkpatrick (with moustache)
In the Library of the Catholic Student Center (next to c i)
No exams, no papers, no grades, no Fees (the original
experimental college)
An 8 week course STARTS TOMMOROW
APRIL 6
Everybody Welcome!

attend UF home football games.
He said he believes in
responsible confrontation with
ends that are in the realm of
possibility using the courts as a
tool of confrontation.
He said, students should be
made aware that there are other
alternatives to violence.
He termed his approach to SG
as idealism mixed with
pragmatism.
El Magnifico
as El Magnifico, empowered
with inspiration from the grand
creator of Curtaguay, to see to it
that my people are no longer
mistreated by the opressive,
domineering hand of the present
administration, he said.
I have a shadow cabinet at
this moment that will take over
as soon as I take power, El
Magnifico said, adding that as
soon as he is elected there is

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not going to be anyone else but
Union Fraudulenta.
El Magnifico indicated his
shadow cabinet will be replacing
Student Government officials to
see his decrees and pledges are
fulfilled for the students.
1 am running to make SG as
fair as possible, with the student
in mind, not just in the interest
of a small minority of students
who seek power as the means to
their ends.
El Magnifico claims he has
already appointed a minister of
secret police and a propaganda
minister to bring the students all
the information possible during
his campaign.
He hinted there was a secret
army, made up of volunteers
from mythical Curtaguay, and
volunteers from various Latin
American and third world
countries who are going to
support him once he is elected.
If my opponents pose a
threat to my power, my minister
of secret police will do his best
to do his duty, El Magnifico
concluded.



Hams Meet: The UF Amateur
Radio Club will meet tonight at
8:30 in room 523 Weil Hall to
elect officers for the quarter.
Rocha Continues: The
Glauber Rocha film series
continues with Black God,
White Devil, tonight at 5:30, 8
and 10:30 in the Union
Auditorium. Antonio Das
Mortes, will be shown Tuesday
and Wednesday at those same
times. Admission is 50 cents.
Rat Extravaganza: Four super
happenings tonight at the
Rathskeller. Boys in the Band
will be shown at 7:15, 9:15 and
11:15 pjn. Admission is 25
cents. The Brotherhood, a great
folk rock group, will also be
featured, along with Different
Traffic court
justices want
lower fines
By DENNIS ARNOLD
Alligator Writer
While parking fines cost
students money, UF traffic
court is proposing to lessen the
burden.
Chief Justice of traffic court
John Rowe and associates Joe
Gilfarb and Bill Graham will
attempt to lower minor traffic
fines by sls at the next Parking
and Transportation Committee
(PTC) meeting.
There will be no changes
made on major violations such as
reckless driving or driving while
intoxicated, Rowe said.
Rowe explained that the
traffic court will try and change
parking violations of $25 for
third offenders to $lO.
According to Rowe, offenses
such as parking in no parking
zones and parking without the
proper decal are minor and
should not exceed a $lO limit.
The decision to lower parking
fines will need a majority vote at
die next PTC meeting.
AH things are hinging on
their decision, if the committee
approves, well try it and see
how the fine schedule works
out, Rowe said.
Rowe believes the punishment
should fit the crime.
The $25 fine is out of
proportion with the offense and
puts a hardship on the
students, he said.

WHAT'S HAPPENING

Strokes, starring Santana and
Chicago. The evenings
entertainment will be completed
with a fashion show by Mr.
Bojangles. Its Guys Night, 50
cents admission for guys and 75
cents for girls.
Arts and Crafts Safe: The
Union presents another Print
and Poster Sale today and
Tuesday in the Union Ballroom
and Galleries. One-of-a-kind
posters, as well as original
student crafts will be featured.
Come by from 11 a.m. to 9 p jn.
and browse.
Florida Players: There will be
an important business meeting
today for all members of the
Florida Players, at 5:30 p.m. at
the Constans Theatre.
Lenten-Easter Series: There
will be another lecture tonight at
8 at the Catholic Student

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Center. This is another in the
Lenten-Easter series which will
continue for four more weeks.
Aspiring Artists: Vaint for
fun classes begin Tuesday night
with instructor Mrs. Judy
Lantos. Classes will be held from
8 to 10 p.m. in room C-40 Reitz
Union. Fee is $6.
Gkl Tak: The Business
Administration Dames will hold
their April meeting Tuesday at 8
p.m. in the University Womens
Club on Newberry Road. All
business administration students
wives are invited to attended.
The Middle East Question:
The Council on International
Relations and the United
Nations Affairs (CIRUNA) will
sponsor an open meeting to
consider the Arab-Israeli
conflict, Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in room 346 JWRU.

£L
Guatamalan Politics: The
Latin American Colloquium will
present Dr. Alexander Moore
Wednesday at 8 p.m. in room
427 Graduate and International

THANK YOU,
PEOPLE OF GAINESVILLE,
FOR MAKING OUR STORE

Monday, April 5, 1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Carol Brady
Studies Building. The topic of
Dr. Moores speech will be
Education in Guatamala:
National Politics and Peasant
Careers.

Page 3



Page 4

Tl Florid! AUigator, Monday, April 5,1971

Veterans for Peace
protest Calley verdict

By DARRELL HARTMAN
Alligator Writer
Chanting rich mans war, poor mans fight, and
singing Country Joe and the Fishs I Feel Like Im
Fixing to Die Rag, about 30 Veterans for Peace
marched on the James Van Fleet Hall, the ROTC
building, Friday.
Starting from the Plaza of Americas, the group
converged on the ROTC building and rededicated it
to Lt., William Calley in protest of the trial and
verdict.
After taping Galley's name over Van Fleet's, Don
Albuiy, a member of Vets for Peace, said in a short
speech atrocities such as at My Lai were the result
of the war itself and the policy behind that war.
The Vietnam war is a civil war with no
distinction between civilians and soldiers, said
Albury. We're not going to say Calley is innocent,
but its a raw deal to blame one man for My Lai. No
atrocity like that can be the result of one man."
Vets for Peace member John Hoyt said he didn't
know if the march accomplished anything, but that

+ the 1971 seminole
the 1971 seminole
is now being printed,
and will be distributed
on campus in a month.
dont wait until theyre
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at the hub. watch for salesmen
' v;/*V. *y. -
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an exciting new look at the
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the story of a student, of an individual.
1971 seminole
' w

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it was part of the nationwide feeling. This is just
one more effort, he said.
V..
Col. Jeie Hudson, director of Air Force ROTC
said he personally felt the Calley trial was fair and
conclusive.
Six highly qualified officers heard 45 witnesses
for 13 days, said Hudson. I don't think there
could be any contrary conclusion.
Hudson said there was a difference between
murder, which is the willful, wanton taking of life,
and deaths resulting from the normal process of the
war.
Col. Robert M. Atkins, professor of military
science, would not comment on the Calley trial, but
said he favored the Vets for Peace giving their
opinions as they did.
The right to protest is part of the American
scene, said Atkins. That's what were fighting
for

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By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Board of Regents member
Milton N. Weir resigned from his
post Wednesday saying the job
required more time than he
could afford.

The Boca Raton realtor and Press Secretary to Governor However, Pride said he does
banker said Sunday, 1 didnt Reubin Askew, Don Pride said not know if the blade member

Margol chosen Accent chairman,
promises a balanced program

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Rodney Margol, 3JM, has
been selected by a five-man
committee as chairman of
Accent 72.
Margol brings two years of
experience with Accent to the
chairmanship. In his freshman
year, Margol served as assistant
public relations chairman and he
was speakers chairman for
Accent 71.
Margol has promised more
major speakers during spring
quarter of next year, though
most of the speakers visiting UF
will again be scheduled during
the winter months.
Accent 72 will again strive
for balance, Margol promised,
but not at the expense of
student funds. Accent is
funded by the student body.
According to Margol,
conservative speakers tend to ask
a higher price for appearing on a
college campus.
Accent 71 received a great
deal of criticism from the
Florida State Legislature, Margol
pointed out, for concentrating
on such radical personalities
as Jane Fonda, Abbie Hoffman
and Joan Baez. Four bills have
been filed in the legislature to
restrict radical speakers from
state campuses and as chairman
of Accent 72, Margol stated he
would oppose this legislation.
Concerning the new
appointment, Accent 71
chairman Ed Boze stated: This
year the selection was made
three months before the old
Accent staff leaves office, to give
the new chairman time to pick
his staff and learn the office. Im
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Weir leaves Board of Regents

have the time to dedicate to it
(the Regents job).
Weir was appointed to the
Regents last year by
ex-Govemor Claude Kirk and
still had eight years left of his
nine year term.

very happy with the choice the
committee made.
The committee also selected
Dave Winton, 3AS, as vice
chairman of Accent 72. Winton
served in Accent 71 as program

w*
A few years ago San Francisco discovered love, flowers, c j i
beads, long, long hair and psychedelic music. 3 Clay sale
A few months ago Ralph Gleason called writer-singer- ONI Y
guitarist Boz Scaggs the citys most important musical T
phenomenon since that time'/Boz has one of the most popular
local groups since the early days of the Airplane... He sings $O 99
with a true wail and can reach right off an LP and take you JL
with him...Boz Scaggs may be the next San Francisco-based
artist to make it really big.
Which is what will probably happen with the release
of Boz s first Columbia album,"Moments. J
f'T'
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the Weir resignation caught the
governor by surprise.
Pride said Askew plans to
name a black member to the
nine-member body which
oversees tho running of the eight
state universities.

chairman.
Applications for students
interested in Accent positions
can be picked up at the
Activities Desk, on the third
floor of the Reitz Union.

to the Regents will be selected
to replace Weir. Weir said he had
no comment to make about
the selection of a black man to
serve with the Regents.
That (the selection of a
Regents member) is a decision
for the governor to make, it
should be his (Askews) own
man, Weir added.
The next Regents vacancy will
come in January of 1972, when
the term of Miss Elizabeth
Kovachevich of St. Petersburg,
expires.
Florida National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People officials had urged Askew
to appoint a black Florida A&M
University professor to the
Regents.

Monday, April 5, K7l, Tha Florida Alligator,
T ft

Regents Chancellor Robert
Mautz, commenting that it
would be improper for him to
suggest anyone for the job, said
he did not think the governor
would look at one of the
universities for a replacement for
Weir.
i
United Press International
said the Regent from Boca
Raton devoted a minimum of
three days a month to the job
and quoted Weir as saying that
although the job (as a Regent)
was a challenging experience and
very enlightening, it was hard
to see accomplishments for the
work done.
You see no progress, Weir
said. The institution of
education is so deeply rooted
and ingrained that it takes too
long to change it.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator. Monday. April 5, 1971

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Draft board still granting
25 deferments to students

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Mrs. Florence Hudson of the Gainesville
Selective Service Board assured local residents that
the local draft board is still granting 2S deferments
for undergraduate students, despite an
overwhelming endorsement by the House Armed
Services Committee to end the 2S classification.
On March 16, the Armed Services Committee,
under the chairmanship of F. Edward Hebert, D-La.,
tentatively approved a halt to student draft
deferments by a vote of 31 to one. The actual
wording of the legislation will empower the
President to abolish the deferments without the
approval of Congress. Congress will probably vote
on the question sometime during the current
session.
High school and undergraduate college students
are currently eligible for the 2S draft deferment.
Weve received absolutely no information on
this subject, Mrs. Hudson stated, and we will
continue to issue the deferments.
In a letter to The Alligator, printed March 30,

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Pools open

Pools were formally opened
to UF students Saturday at
Graham and Broward areas.
Students possesing picture IDs
will be admitted to these areas
without charge. ID cards will be
collected at the gate and
students' names, addresses and
student numbers will be
admitted to a poolside register.
ID cards will be returned to the
student upon his exit from the
pool area. All students wishing
to use the pool facilities are
required to take a soap shower
before entering. Shower facilities
are available at each pool. No
one will be admitted to these
areas in street clothes or

Photos by Phil Cope

1971, Mr. W. L. Lowe of Jacksonville encouraged
students to write their congressmen, senators and
the President to express disagreement with the
committees decision.
Lowe was critical of students for being Apathetic
on this issue. Lowe further complained students
should remain within the system rather than riot
and cause disorder.
The letter was sent to four or five college
newspapers Lowe said, in hopes that it would stir
up some sort of reaction.
The trouble with you kids, he continued, is
that you riot after its over (injustices), but youre
apathetic while it happens.
I feel kids should get their education while
theyre young. I dont believe in an all volunteer
army but Im concerned about my sons and other
peoples sons losing a chance for an education.
Unless Congress rejects the proposed plan, 2S
deferments will end on June 30 of this year. The
armed services committee also voted to extend the
draft two years rather than four and rejected a bill
co-sponsored by 87 members of the House of
Representatives to end the draft.

'

cut-offs. Proper bathing attire is
required. No more than 220
people will be allowed per pool
area in order to comply with
state health department
regulations, so it is possible some
students may have to wait to be
admitted. Wives of married

students may use their own or
their husbands' picture IDs. All
children under 12 must be
accompanied by a parent.

EXPLO72
UF, April 14
advance tickets on sale
~ DANS KIN
LEOTARDS
and
TIGHTS
AVAILABLE AT:
UCHTERS
IN THE MALL
HEADQUARTERS IN GAINESVILLE FOR DANCEWEAB
THIS SUMMER TAKE A GOOD TRIP
DON 7 LET IT BE A BUMMER I
SPEND THE SUMMER IN EUROPE I
from Miami June 15,1971 via Pan American I
Leave Nassau via International Air Bahama
Arrive Luxembourg June 16
Get A Student EuraUpass I
Dniy 5 125.00, if you are under 26
Fly to Miami September 7,1971 I
Air Fare $290.00
plus $3.00 U.S. departure tax I

Flower
Arranging t
Classes
\* y
Thursday, from April 8 to
May 27 7:00 to 9:00 pm
room 118, Union
Instructor: Joel Buchanan
$7.50 Register at the first
class
sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz
Union



Anderson repairs now in progress

By DEBBY MERMELL
Alligator Writer
Anders(m Hall is not dead yet.
Calvin Greene, director of the Physical Plant Division
confirms that patchwork repairs now in progress wiU be
continuing for a month to six weeks or until minimal
adjustments are made.
The main concerns for reconstruction at the moment
are damaged light fixtures, plaster repairs and a new paint
job.
Ihe chief objective is to restore the first three floors of

Fla. college editors
give opinions
oa Colley response
A generally negative response
to the conviction of Lt. William
L. Calley Jr. by students in
Florida was the opinion of
university editors around the
state.
Dave McMullen, editor of the
FSU Flambeau, said students of
all political persuasions were
generally against the trial and its
outcome.
Jose Quevedo, managing
editor of the Miami-Dade Junior
College Falcon Times, said
pro-Calley letters to the editor
were pouring in and that an
editorial critical of the trial
would appear next week.
Laurence Scofield, a reporter
for the University of South
Florida Oracle, said there was a
tremendous negative feeling
among the staff,* but that there
were no overt actions of any
type against the trial.
Camil on Dialogue
Scott Camil, a member of the
Vietnam Veterans Against the
War will be on Dialogue Tuesday
night. He will speak about the
Winter Soldier Investigation
which will take place Wednesday
at noon in the Santa Fe Jr.
College Southeast campus
auditorium.
Camil said the investigation
wiU review testimony by
Vietnam veterans about
atrocities they have taken part
of, or have witnessed.
Dialogue can be heard on
WRUF-FM at 11:30 pm Calls
are welcomed from the listening
audience at 392-0772 or
392-0773.
I Quarterly I
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I 1

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Anderson Hall using the least expenditures. The building
was self-insured by the state and UF received $240,000
from the State Fire Fund. Os the amount settled on,
$25,000 is being used to repair the 58-year-old had and
the remainder of the money will be used on a new project
which will eventually replace Anderson Hall.
A permanent structure has not yet been discussed. The
state fire marshall requires major repairs to such an extent
that it would not pay to try to restore Anderson Hall.
Greene said he hopes to procure more money from new
legislature appropriations.

GOOD MON., TUES ONLY
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Monday. April 5, Tha Florida Alligator,

Little difficulty in restoration has been encountered.
Progress has been made since the fire on Jan. 6 and
completion of repairs is in sight.
Many administrative activities continued from the
offices housed in Anderson during winter quarter. Some
individual faculty and staff members moved to temporary
quarters along with the students who were reassigned to
building R.
Following work on the ground floor of Anderson, UF
will proceed with repairs in the first and second floors so
that other classrooms can be restored as soon as possible.

Page 7



!. Th# Florid* A Higator, Monday; April S. A971-

Page 8

Editorial
White Knights
dont whitewash
Whitewash does not a white knight make.
Especially when it is the knight who is doing the painting.
We are sick and tired of hearing candidates claim to be
the cleanest I am the only candidate who wont make
deals.
They all make deals from school politics all the way to
national elections. Its the only way to get elected.
But this year, The Florida Alligators First Annual
Shining White Knight Award must go to Student Body Vice
President Henry Solares.
He is trying his darndest to keep the untarnished image of
a nonpolitico the independent who was forced out of the
race because he had no bloc support.
We agree it would be difficult, if not impossible, to win
without bloc support. But that isnt the point.
If Solares is truly concerned with the welfare of the
student body if he is the white knight of the independent
student then he should have run anyway.
Charlie Shepherd did in the 66 presidential race and
won.
But now, Solares is an unhappy man. He wanted to be
president, and he cant.
Recently, we blasted the same bloc voting system at
which Solares is pointing the accusing finger. This was taken
by some as an endorsement for him.
It wasnt.
Although Solares is qualified -on paper we feel there
are other things besides paper qualifications which must go
into an Alligator endorsement.
And it is here, we have questions about Solares as a
candidate. For when it became obvious he couldnt win, he
qualified at the last minute just to see the politicos jump.
Solares said the whole thing was an April Fools joke.
We dont think it was funny. It was an unwise thing to do
politically, and probably killed any hope Solares might have
had of running in the future. Politicos, as most other
people, dont like being made to squirm.
There are other things, but we dont see much sense in
going into them. Solares withdrew and under the
circumstances we think that, at least, was the right move.
We still have four candidates running for student body
president. These are the people The Alligator will
concentrate on. Although we have said two of these
candidates received Florida Blue Key support to enable
them to run, we did not mean to imply they werent
qualified.
In this election, as in past elections, the dirt is flying. All
parties are claiming Alligator support. And each candidate is
trying to cloak his activities in whitewash.
But we havent been fooled by it. We arent expecting a
white knight to come charging up to the third floor of the
Reitz Union and seat himself in the presidents chair. It
doesnt happen that way in politics.
Each side presents their unbiased account of the
election and issues. It is then up to the voter to distinguish
whitewash from truth.
This year, as before, it might be difficult, but it can be
done.
And, maybe some day, with help from the voting
students, we will have a real white knight.

The
Florida
Alligator

fcHnyjjj I # agwr." T I M f*fa V (

We cant relax this spring

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
Yes, it is springtime, and the
weather is beautiful, and
wouldnt it be nice if we could
all forget the things that need to
be done and make this a
springtime of inactivity?
For many of the students on
this campus, the entire year has
been one of inactivity, i.e. going
to class, taking tests, eating,
sleeping and minding their own
business. Its a cruel world
outside, but those students
choose to ignore that or they
might even be among that great
many who are ignorant of the
fact that being on campus is not
being in the real world.
Rude awakening time. All of
the campus' good students, so
versed in the routine necessary
to live in books, bring home the
fruit of their knowledge
measured by a grade point
average.
They are the cream of our
crop, we are told, and that
would seem to indicate to any
reasonable observer in the real
world that it's been a pretty
poor harvest.
1 see visions of gators tubing
their way down the river and
flocking to Cresceijt Beach,
fulfilling the role relegated to
them by a society that feels
comfortable creating
stereotypes.
We are college students and
that fact is accompanied with
the standard notions the public
at large holds regarding the way
we look, what we do and where
were going.

Phyllis Gallub
Editor-In-Chief

Gary, Grunder
News Editor

m m
9k IP fl
'
And thats my next question
- where are we going?
Im beginning to accept the
reality that our generation is not
so drastically different from
those before us. We have grown
up under different conditions
and had the benefit of more
timesaving devices, but we face
our springtime with the same
lethargy and passiveness that has
plagued those who laid on the
beach before us.
So where lies the difference?
I will offer what I think is an
obvious and binding truth
while the campus gets into its
spring retirement from the
problems, the real world lives
on, and oh, how it lives. c
Soak up the sunshine or the
printed matter in your books,
but b are that there are
hundred mouths and eyes
that are etching from a
distance, a jrt distance which
separates what we do and what
we should be doing.
Would you feel any guilt at
relaxing this spring?

Ken McKinnon
Managing Editor

Perhaps a short reminder of
what you already know will help
you make that decision.
The world discriminates
we see it in this nation, as close
to us as this university.
Problems beset us so
massive that to feel frustrated
and sobered by their degree can
be justified, if youve spent the
effort to try and remedy them.
Current atmosphere among
us makes it acceptable to drop
out and cite the administration
and the government as so evil
that no good can ever be made
to emerge while they are
present.
i
Cloak yourself in an attitude
that you tried, and failed, and at
the ripe age of 18-22 have
decided to chuck the effort from
here to eternity.
But there are many of us who
will find it their way, and thats
a little tragic.
I would suggest a useful
springtime of inquiring into
action you can take as an
individual Samson volunteer
tutor, EAG member concerned
with cleaning the environment,
weekly work at the county jail
or joining the newly organized
Union of Florida Students,
which is a group that will try to
effectively deal with individual
problems as they arise.
Just some suggestions for you
to look at and probably reject.
But as you settle back in the
shade and start to ponder
absolutely nothing this spring,
please dont fool yourself into
thinking youre any more with
it than the generation of the
sos and their stagnant idiocy of
eating goldfish and living a
death.

\



Morch
Editor:
The March symbolizing the
War Against Repression through
Gainesville, Starke and to
Raiford, is past history now. We
jolted both Starke and the
officialdom at Raiford. It was
done peacefully by the grace of
God and not by the help of His
representatives.
Out in the streets and in front
of hostile, insulting armed
guards at Raiford were angry
young blacks, bursting with the
frustrations of a life of
repression and some added

Speak of radicalism or UF,
never the twain shall meet

By ATILLA ILKSON
When one speaks of radicalism
at the University of Florida, one
is speaking of two things
radicalism and the University
of Florida; for never the twain
shall meet.
That the administration will
do its utmost to keep the terms
exclusive was demonstrated
during the fall quarter. The so
called radical activities were
performed behind the backs of
administrators who did
everything possible to frustrate
them once they found out.
The appearance of William
Kunstler, Abbie Hoffman and
even Marshall Jones, along with
the continued presence of Bob
Canney marked the beginning of
die offensive to legitimize
radical thought on the university
campus.
One often wonders if the
establishment over reacted in
these situations. The legitimacy
being sought, that for the
expression of radical ideas, has
been grudgingly conceded in
most educational institutions
outside the South. The
concessions given by
administrators elsewhere averted
violent confrontations with
radicals and the liberals, who
would have backed up the
radicals if such free speech were
ever denied.
At the University of Florida
the administration seems to be
winning the battle to control the
ideas being expressed on campus
against those who would have no
restrictions of expression of
ideas. However, the temporary
victory gained by the
administration in that arena is
certainly overwhelmed by the
number of students it pushed
into the radical camp. In a sense
the Establishment loses its own
legitimacy when the regents say
they abhor the presence of
people on the campus who have
every legal right to be on this
campus; when those people in
responsible positions give us
not a rebuttal to the radical line
but merely an ad hominem
attack of speakers and when the
university administration will
not tolerate the presence of
groups such as the Florida
Student Movement (FSM).
Perhaps the fight to keep FSM
on this campus showed more
Am anything eke the attitude

READERS FORUM

indignities along the march.
The absence of the white men
of the cloth who could have
checked flashing tempers, put
these young people in
unnecessary jeopardy. Then too
the weight of clergymens
positions would have greatly
added to the strength of the
march.
If marches against poverty
and repression are the business
of anyone, they are the business
of the clergy. But there was not
one in sight. You either gather
with Me or you scatter.
Remember?
Roy Mitchell and his
coworkers handled the march

GUEST COLUMN

of the various members of the
university community to free
speech.
The administration was
willing to tolerate the FSM as
long as it remained small and did
not bring itself to the attention
of the campus as a whole.
However, the appearance of
William Kunstler, attended by
nearly 4,000 people, followed
by equally successful
engagements by Marshall Jones,
Bob Canney and Abbie
Hoffman, coupled with the
grumbling of the state
legislature, set the
administration after the FSM.
Despite all the accusations of
misbehavior against the
organization the Committee on
Student Organizations and
Social Affairs deemed it
advisable to allow the
organization to exist on campus.
However that was not good
enough for Vice President Lester
Hale and President Stephen
O'Connell. The reasons cited by
the vice president were: some
quote or other by Bruce Ellis
about breaking all the rules,
he never said that it was another
speaker who has no connections
with FSM; The intrusion at
Norman Hall by a group
including the FSM vice president
(thats me) ;... even though it
did not reach the point of
officially being declared
disruptive as a matter of fact
that demonstration was
officially declared undisruptive
by both Dean Emmett Wiliams
and Vice President Harry Sisler.
All these charges, and more
were answered at a committee
hearing to the satisfaction of a
panel of nine faculty and
students and yet Mr. Hale saw fit
with less information than the
SOSA to reject a charter. I think
if it were up to Mr. Hale he
would have no organizations on
campus at all. During one
interview I had with him he
asked me why it was necessary
to have FSM and to demonstrate
at Norman Hall altar the firing
of Bob Canney. He asked me
why individual students without

very well, but in such a battle
with strong opposition and
inherent dangers, all possible
hands are needed.
The university authorities
should have been there too, but
they seem to choose to be on
the side of repression rather than
freedom.
Evelyn K. Samras
Fro speech
Editor:
By the Bill of Rights the
American people are guaranteed
freedom of speech, press,

an organization could not be as
effective. After delivering a 10
minute lecture on the
importance of organization in
American politics I gave up.
It would take a great deal of
effort to convince me that no
political considerations were
involved in the killing of the
Florida Student Movement; and
that no pressure was exerted
from OConnells bosses. I still
happen to believe that
educators, not politicians,
should determine the rules and
formulate the decisions for
running a university. OConnell
is first a politician and, second if
one can stretch the meaning of
the word, an educator.
The repression that the UF
administration practices does
nothing but alienate students
from legitimate channels.
However the FSM members are
still students on this campus and
they will be ready and willing to
organize and support a relevant
cause when one arises.
Whether the administration
resizes it or not radical speakers
will still be on campus. There are
still organizations which dont
accept the EstsbUriunent line
such as the Black Student Union
and the Veterans for Peace not
to mention Accent.
Also, more likely than not
there will be several more
organizations like the FSM
applying for charters this
quarter. Whether or not the
administration will handle these
new organizations with the same
arbitrary and authoritarian
manner it handled FSM remains
to be seen. If it does it may be
lucky enough to suppress them
again without too much trouble,
but unless the administration
changes its policies and does it
soon, one of these years, if not
this year, it may have a full scale
confrontation on its hands. It
had one two years ago when the
Southern Student Organizing
Committee was denied a charter
in a manner similar to FSM.
Only 60 persons were arrested
then. How many will go the next
time?

religion, and assembly. In
Russia citizens do not have these
rights. In the Gainesville Sun a
few weeks ago this item
appeared:
Andrei Amalarik, author of
the Anti-Communist book Will
the Soviet Union Survive until
1984? has been sentenced to
three years in a Russian labor
camp.
Informants said the sentence,
on a charge of Ottering
falsehoods derogatory to the
Soviet state and social system
was handed down in Sverdlovsk
Thursday.
Americans must guard against
erosion of the freedoms which
we have. In what direction may
events be turning here?
Jane Fonda speaks in
Gainesville asking people to
organize against the war.
Joan Baez speaks about
non-violent resistance to the
draft and hence to the war.
Abbie Hoffman encourages
people to come to Washington
to demonstrate if we are not out
of Vietnam by spring.
The freedom that people have
to speak their minds is a basic
freedom. But the Board of
Regents is reportedly thinking
about screening campus
speakers. Joan Baez said on TV
that the city of Miami cancelled
her auditorium reservation and
made every effort to prevent her
from coming there. Last year
Kunstler couldnt find a place to
speak in Jacksonville. At the
pace events are going are we to
pick up the paper some day and
find that someone has been
charged with uttering
falsehoods derogatory to the
American system? The above
people are about to be penalized
for their utterances with the
passage of the Board of Regents'
regulation of speakers.
The right of assembly is a
basic freedom. Last April at
Kent State University students
were demonstrating against our
involvement in Cambodia. Three
students were killed. The Grand
Jury put the blame on the
administration and the students.
What is the nucleus of a
democracy? The average citizen
is supposedly vested with the
power to participate in his own
government. The U.S. Congress
has recently passed a law
lowering the voting age to 18, at
which age young people can also
marry, pay taxes, hold jobs and
fight wars. Lawfully, college
people should be full citizens.
In a democracy can such
average citizens be exposed to all
kinds of ideas and be expected
to make a wise decision? Can
average people listen to diverse
political opinions and come to a
good collective decision? Can all
kinds of speakers be presented
on a college campus George
Wallace and Ralph Abernathy,
Abbie Hoffman and General
Hershey, Martha Mitchell and
Madelline Murray OHara,
William Kunstler and Robert
Sheldon, Tricia Nixon and Joan
Baez? In my opinion the answer
is: Yes!
To answer a criticism
regarding a balanced program,
in order for a balanced program
to be presented on the
campuses, it is the responsibility
for conservative interests to
bring conservative speakers, not

Monday, April 5,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

to ban liberal speakers.
Some students will go in one
direction politically, and others
will go the other way, but on the
whole, in a democracy, the
majority should make a good
decision. That is not to say that
the majority is always right, but
if criticism is not suppressed,
then the discontented will
always be able to present their
own views, and if they are right,
they will eventually win. We
would expect to continue to see,
as we do now, a swing to the
right followed by a swing to the
left. But if criticism is
suppressed, the pendulum is
likely to get stuck in one
position or the other, depending
on which party has the power.
For democracy to to work, an
absolute should be absolute
freedom from suppression. For
myself, I am a believer in
democracy.
Anne Rees
Solaris
Editor:
I have withdrawn as a
candidate for student body
president and would like to
express the reasons for my
actions. As many people well
know I was a serious candidate
for the office a few weeks ago
but since the powers to be on
this campus refused to grace me
with their nod I felt it would be
suicadal to run against two bloc
supported candidates.
I registered on April 1 as a
joke. I achieved my objective of
disclosing the true colors of
many politicians while at the
same time receiving independent
encouragement. For those who
forgot the date, their actions as
well as their words spoke for
themselves.
I am of the sincere belief that
my running mate and myself
were the best qualified
candidates for the job but the
realities of campus politics
forego qualifications for power
structure. I urge all students,
both greek and independent, to
examine carefully the candidates
presented to them, their
qualifications and their
platforms. Listen to all views
and when you decide remember
people may be able to tell you
how to vote but the ultimate
decision in the voting machine is
yours.
Henry Solares
Vice-president
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer diows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for space.
Any waiter interested in
submitting a regular column is
asked to contact the idtgr and h*
prepared to show samples of life
work. Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
1 considered for use se guest
J

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 5, 1971

Gerhardt: pollution costs

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Staff Writer
A
\ r
In a press conference held
Thursday Paul H.
Gerhardt, chief economist with
the Air Pollution Control Office,
Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA), Washington,
D.C., stated his concern with the
problems of estimating social
costs, economic costs of control
and trying to arrive at some
solutions with the problem of air
pollution.
Gerhardt explained that along
with the EPA, he is working in
the area of motivating incentives
right now.
The biggest problem today,**
Gerhardt said, looking at it
from an economist's viewpoint,
is damage costs due to air
pollution. It costs Pittsburgh
$20,000 a year just for clean-up
costs alone." $
In relation to its effect on
health, Gerhardt drew an
analogy between air pollution
and cigarette smoking.
Cigarette smoking affecting
health costs the U.S. 5.3 billion
dollars a year while air
pollutions effect on health costs

Lam issues report
on Laotian offensive
SAIGON (DPI) Communist gunners damaged 608 UJS.
helicopters during the six-week Laos offensive, shooting down 104 of
them, Lt. Gen. Hoang Xuan Lam told South Vietnams Senate
Defense Committee in a report made available Sunday.
Lam, commander of the South Vietnamese Laos operation, also
said about 450 American servicemen were killed supporting the
Laotian drive.
Os the 104 helicopters Lam reported shot down, about
half... were abandoned in southern Laos," he said.
Lams statement was the first disclosure of the number of American
helicopters struck by Communist ground fire in the operation. The
U.S. Command has never made available statistics on damaged
helicopters.
With a force of 30,000 men, we sacrificed 1,400 personnel
(killed). This is not a heavy figure if we accept the doctrine of
necessity of sacrifice. Given the odds and what we accomplished, the
casualty figure should have been higher. Not one of our battalions was
rendered inoperative or considered wiped out in southern Laos. Only
four or five of more than 30 battalions suffered approximately 50 per
cent casualties," Lam said.
Lam said South Vietnams President Nguyen Van Thieu ordered
him only to disrupt supply centers and then move on in Laos,
rather than try to hold territory.
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HmR
Paul Gerhardt
... environmental economist
the country 6-8 billion dollars a
year."
Gerhardt stated the nation
spends 16-20 billion dollars per
year on air pollution damage.
With our estimating
procedures, he added, by
1975, the cost of just air
pollution control alone will be

as much as 3-5 billion dollars per
year.
In order to make the people
themselves control air pollution
the EPA is working on incentive
motivation solutions according
to Gerhardt.
At present in this country,
Gerhardt explained, many
people are losing money on the
no work days which are lost
because of air pollution. If we
could make the businessmen
understand the economic value
in controlling pollution along
this line then probably many of
them would be more than
willing to spend a little extra
towards this cause."
Another way of motivating
incentives for people to work on
pollution control is by providing
them with profit motives
according to Gerhardt. He
explained that this could be
done through jail sentences,
large fines and perhaps by
placing taxes on pollution.
In these ways, Gerhardt
said, the businessmen would
find it more profitable to spend
a little amount on pollution
control rather than a large
amount on fines, taxes and
economic losses from a jail
sentence."
Gerhardt explained one of the
incentive policies which is in
effect in the state of New Jersey.
On the New Jersey pollution
permit system, if a factory
owner is found polluting the air
he is fined $2500 per day until
he presents a plan which will
stop the pollution. At the time
the owner puts his plan into
action for pollution control he
may then petition to get up to
90 per cent of his fine money
back.
When asked how college
students can help with the
pollution problem, Gerhardt
replied, students can help

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.' ; 'n
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available at local bookstores all quarter

through she education of facts
on pollution, its damages and
control costs.
Gerhardts responsibilities
with the EPA include the
development of methods and
procedures for examining
prospective costs and benefits of
air pollution control and for
possible economic incentives to
supplement legislation.
Gerhardt was educated at the
University of North Carolina and
Harvard University.
Gerhardt also spoke Thursday
afternoon to a seminar group as
part of the Department of
Agriculture Economics technical
seminar series which is being
held February-May 1971. The
topic of the seminar was
Economic Inducements to
Pollution Control and
Environmental Protection.
According to Richard Conner,
assistant professor in the
department of agricultural
economics, the aim of the
seminars is directed to graduate
students and professors to
become more aware of technical
analysis of economics and
decision making for
environmental quality. However,
any of the seminar programs are
open to the public.

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Lack of energy changes EAG role

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Emphasis within
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) will shift from a
manpower agency to an
information organization,
according to Brad Raffle, newly
elected president.
There does not exist a
sufficient amount of student
energy to undertake continuing
action programs, Raffle said.
He cited the aluminum can
recycling project EAG
conducted in which continuous
help is absolutely necessary. We
are not able to either generate or
maintain enough student
concern with the environment to
be an action organization, he
explained.
Hie role of any college
organization should be to
motivate citizens, including
students, to urge those with the
power to undertake
environmentally sound policies.
EAG plans to accomplish this
through publicity, seminars,
literature distribution and any
other forms of communication,
Raffle said.
You cant do this, he
explained, unless youre
informed and in the past, I think
if anyone would make a real
criticism on environmentalists, it
was in their lack of energy in
getting the facts and becoming
informed on what they were
cirticizing.
EAG has had its share of
XT"
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pottery
leather goods
needlework (
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wood carvings
beaded flowers
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Union Ballroom & Gallerias
April 5 & 6 11am to 9pm
Sponsored by the JWR Union

criticism lately. Leadership has
been a problem. Raffle, who
previously served as president,
fall quarter 1970, replaced Alan
Sandler who recently graduated.
Sandler, in turn, had replaced
Hal Barcey who resigned from
the group in early March,
refusing to comment on his
action.
More recently, in a letter to
The Alligator, Edward Lucker,
4ED, wrote to voice my
disappointment in the EAG on
campus because they have not
taken more of the initiative
in educating the people of this
country and in raising money for
Conservation 70s.
Lucker also complemented
junior and senior high school
students for their interest and
work in helping the
environment.

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The letter in The Alligator,
Raffle says, is nothing but a
criticism about the student body
of UF and at the same time
praise for junior high and high
school students who have
worked.
Any campus organization is
nothing more than a reflection

CARNIGRAS
April Bthrul6

of the interest in the activities. I
think that Mr. Luckers
criticisms are valid, but
misleading because it lacks any
investigation on his part as to
why EAG has been unable to
effectively run action
programs.
According to Raffle, EAG has
not been able to do so, because

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Monday, April 5,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

of a lack of man power, and the
EAG can more effectively
operate as a centralized
information storehouse and
distribution center.
In the upcoming weeks, EAG
will concentrate on Earth Week
activities, and Conservation 70s,
the state conservation lobby,
Raffle added.

Page 11

%



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 5, 1971

Benjamin Franklin seminar course offered

v*v.vv.v.v.v.v*v.v
Jr
iV
The course will be
rather general and we will
study the time through the
personality. We will also
study how people lived and
the psychology of the
time.
Seymour Block
§
1


Med student wins essay award
for experiments with cyclic AMP

An essay by Warren E. Ross, a
second year medical student at
UF, has won the 1970 Medical
Student Essay Award in
Pharmacology.
Ross is one of eight students
selected in the United States and
Canada to receive the award,
which is sponsored by the
American Society of
Pharmacology and Experimental
Therapeutics.
Ross' essay was concerned

Florida Experimental College

starts spring registration today

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Assignments Editor
For those interested in
courses outside UF, the Florida
Experimental College is
registering people for the spring
quarter today, Tuesday and
Wednesday from 9 ajn. to 4
-' p.m. in front of Library West.
Fees are $2 for as many
courses as one registers.
Beginniiig an Alternative
Learning Community is one of
the new courses offered in the
curriculum. This refers to

both
sides
now...
1971
seminole

By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
The World of Benjamin Franklin, is a seminar course being
offered this quarter by the Conprehensive American Institutions
Department.
Professor Seymour Block of the Chemical Engineering Department
will be leading his seminar course in discussions every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday fifth period. The course title is CSS 194.
This course was not listed in the course print out for spring quarter
and there are still openings in the course. In this course Franklin will
be examined as a Renaissance man: revolutionary, humorist, ladies
man, journalist, politician and as a human being.
We will study the time through a versatile personality,
commented Block.
Through the study of Franklin, students in the course will study
Colonial America, England in the 18th century and France under the
rule of Louis XVI.
In this course the students will become acquainted with the leading
personalities of the 18th century. Franklin's effects on America will
also be.considered in the course study.

with his investigations about the
effects of cyclic AMP on the
metabolism of various drugs in
rats. His research was conducted
in the laboratory of Walter
Oppelt, M J>.
His studies show that male
and female rats react differently
to the cyclic AMP, which is a
chemical substance that
mediates many of the hormonal
reactions to stress within the
body.

alternatives to the public school
system, particularly in
Gainesville.
Yoga and Meditation, an
introduction to the basic
philosophy, is also among the
course offerings.
Another subject up for grabs
is Seminar in Communal
Living in an agrarian commune
in the Florida countryside.
For normal neurotics,
according to the course outline,
a Love Encounter Group is
being offered. This will involve
l< becoming a mote loving person
by sharing, touching and caring

Original essays by medical
students which deal with the
pharmacology of a
therapeutically useful agent or
other biologically active
chemical are eligible for the
award.
The award marks the third
consecutive year in which a
student in the College of
Medicine has been awarded this
honor.

and is limited to 12 participants.
Bicycling, volleyball and a
spring health kick with
Eastern and Western approaches
are being offered for those
looking forward to participating
in spring activities.
For those who miss
registration, members of the
Experimental College can be
reached through the Center for
United Ministries at 376-7539.

<
guysH|^^hgals
750 fIBBBBBBoe
AT THE RATHSKELLER

The course will also take into account Franklins relations with the
French and his influence on their revolution.
The science of his period will be studied as well as his contributions
to it.
The course will be rather general and we will study the time
through the personality. We will also study how people lived and the
psychology of the time, commented Block.
The study of Ben Franklin is a hobby of Blocks. Block said he
thinks it is an excellent opportunity for him to share his ideas and
many hours of research on Franklin with others.
It gives me an opportunity to stimulate myself and others by
sharing the subject matter with them, Block commented.

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&. PHIL COPE
I Tree climbing
pl Tree climbing, that favorite pastime of every kid, was tried out
5 Sunda V b V Stein, lUC, and Cathy Williams, lUC. Ah, yes,
jj Spring activities have begunl
Election help needed
I Anyone who is interested in working as a co-worker in the spring
elections should report to room 305 of Reitz Union between 3:30
p.m. and 5 p.m., today through Thursday.
1 Spring elections will be held on April 21 and workers will be paid
51.35 per hour.
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OConnell names committee
on womens opportunities

By BE-KY LLOYO
Alligator Staff Writer
An 11-member committee to study opportunities
for women on campus has been appointed by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
We need to make certain that in all things we do
on this campus women are afforded equal treatment
and opportunities. This committee is appointed to
determine whether women are so treated and to
make recommendations for improvement where
needed, OConnell said.
The committee will investigate six areas:
Equal treatment and opportunity in
employment practices at all levels.
Equal treatment and opportunity in existing
educational programs.
Whether the existing curriculum is adequate to
meet modem-day needs of women students.
Whether placement office provides equal
opportunity and service for women graduates.
Reasonable conveniences in womens living
areas.
Equal opportunities for women to participate

Charitable
Kentuckians
The Honorable Order of
Kentucky Colonels-appointees
of Kentucky governors over the
years-announced charitable
grants totaling $225,618 for
1970, an increase of $3,930 over
the previous year. The largest of
48 grants was $58,616 to the
Cerebral Palsy School in
Louisville, Ky.

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Monday, April 5, 1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

in student government and extra-curricular
activities.
OConndl said he wants the committee to hold
public hearings on campus and expres its views on
other issues and subjects. The committee should
finish its work by late May.
Faculty members of the committee are Dr. Marna
V. Brady, professor of comprehensive logic: Dr.
Carolyn Griffis, assistant professor of social
sciences; Mrs. Irene Thompson, assistant professor,
and Dr. Motley Deakin, associate professor.
Comprehensive English.
College of Education Dean Bert Sharp and
William Stensgaard, assistant director of physical
plant are the administrative members.
Mrs. Geraldine Salley, personnel technician, and
Mrs. Yvonne Soper, staff assistant in the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences, are Career Service
members.
Nancy Wolfson, education senior; Renee Dodge,
University College freshman; and Henry Stark,
graduate student in agriculture, are student
members.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

'
*
* .
FOR SALE
PANASONIC tape recorder model
rs76os, 3 speed, sound on sound $65.
ALSO engagement-wedding ring set,
33 caret S7O. 378-4940 7 pm
{A-st-107-p)
Surfboards for Sale or Rent Weber,
Oceanside or RBR. Will also make
you a custom surfboard Call
392-8328 or 392-8402 (a-st-106-p)
TENNISI rackets balls rest ringing and
lessons all at lower prices call Bob
Jackson 378-7841 (A-st-106-p)
Ten speed racer SSO, new also set of
weights, 120 lbs. S2O call Jim
378-8322 student (A-3t-106-p)
Yamaha *7O dt-1 Endura excel, cond
call 734-0869 after 5 PM
(A-st-107-p)
Girls 3 speed bicycle good condition,
phone afer 3:30 3763616
(A-3t-107-p) '*
1970 Yamaha Enduro 250 cc 6,000
mi S6OO. call 376-4185 (A-st-107-p)
Stereo 8-tr Cartridges Recorded
Premium Quality Low-Noise Tape
80-min (2 or more albums)
$4,46m in $2.50 Includes tape & 1
day service Don't be fooled by cheap
imitation Guaranteed Quality
378-5916 night (A-st-107-p)
SONY compact stereo system, HP
-188. with or without speakers.
Excellent condition. Call Marcia at
378-9064 (A-2t-107-p)
For Sale-1968 Honda 160 Scrambler,
good condition, S3OO call 378-9934
also portable stereo, Admiral, 40
watts $75 (A-2t-107-p)
E&xEttfijrw] 2:00
tAN EXQINSITE AND siso I
BEAUTIFUL FUJI! £ I
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n n
o KMr.f-riifii o
w IBBaMBEBMaI w
AT: 1:30 A 7:30 DAILY
NOW PLAYING!
, AT: 1:26-3:30-b:35-7:40 & 9:45
dSfr- He blew th e Desert Fox to Hell!
raj) m Rfchapd
3 Burton
WgjjkW Raid an
BW* Mammal
uT A UWIVERSAi PICTURE TECHNICOLOR* gjg

'**# _ ,.
FOR SA LE
-x-X;X-x-x-x-x-x-x-x->XvX-x-x-x-r-!-x-.'
Stereo: Scott 342 c 110 watt fm
receiver with case. Still under
warranty. Cost $325 new- now $215.
SSO Super ex head phones s£&
378-9192 (A-3t-107-p)
WATERBEDS. 319 West University
Ave. 11:30 5:30, Tues. Sat.
Waterbeds of Gainesville.
(A-st-107-p)
STEREO zenith circle of sound
perfect cond. extras Include hdpns.
worth $260 selling for $175 40 watts
call Barry 378-3029 (A-3t-107-p)
1969 Honda 350. 2000 actual miles.
Street scrambler, excellent
mechanical condition. Hardly driven,
only SSOO. call Steve 373-3480.
(A-st-107-p)
BMW 600 cc rolls royce of
motorcycles fairing rack 6 gal gas
tank tools good mech condition turn
signals $775 66pm 378-0181
(A-4t-107-p)
ALL PHONO NEEDLES ARE
AVAILABLE AT MUNTZ STEREO
319 NW 13 ST (A-15t-107-p)
305 HONDA superhawk engine
completely rebuilt, new chain &
sprockets realty excellent condition
$375 see at the Cycle Works or call
373-4080 (A-3t-107-p)
8 TRACK TAPES PRE-RECORDED
3.99* largest selection we also trade,
buy 8 sell, new 8 used tapes
TRADE-A-TAPE 14 nw 13 St.
(A-15t-107-p)
HONDA 350 cl, 1970 model, Only
3000 MILES, EXCELLENT
CONDITION $650. call 392-8785
after 7 p.m. (a-3t-106-p)
3 handraised, housetrained, lovable Vi
Siamese kittens need good home,
they have had distemper shots, call
Georgia, 378-7334 evenings, student
(A-3t-106-p)
AQUARIUM, 20 gal, air pump, two
filters, light, heater, gravel, plants, 12
assorted fish. $50.00 call 378-5192
after 5:00 p.m. (A-st-106-p)
ELECTRIC GUITAR two
pick-ups, vibrato tailpiece, with cord
8 case 560.00. call 378-5192 after
5:00 p.m. (A-st-106-p)
For Sale Vista 10 speed bicycle good
condition only 2 months old call
373-3279 ask for Lae $60.00
(A-st-106-p)
1966 125 cc Vespa scooter with wind
screen very good condition phone
378-3254 $l5O (A-3t-105-p)
Stereo 8-tr tapes. Any 2 albums
$3.50 Professional equipment used.
All tapes guaranteed Call 373-3611
Ask for Jonathan or leave message
(A-10t-105-p)
Benjamin stereo with miracord
turntable 100 watt amp and two
scott speakers, cost $550 new. need
money, will sell for S4OO call Jack
376-1481 (A-st-105-p)
HONDA cb-160 In excellent
condition $350 or best offer 804 w:
unlv. ave. afternoons (A-st-105-p)

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 5,1971

FOR SALE
Stained glass lamps, tiffany style and
box lamps, many colors and sizes, do
it yourself or ready to hang easy, fun
and stylish. call 376-2195
(A-st-105-p)
Doberman Pinscher Puppies AKC
Registered males $125 call 378-8067
(A-10t-103-p)
SUPER SALE Blank 8-track 80 min
tapes 6 for $9.95 MUNTZ STEREO
319 N.W. 13 St. (a-20t-89-p)
4-Sale: Kawasaki Mach 3-500 cc
motorcycle 1970 well cared for, in
good shape, asking $750 with extras
call Jim, 373-2771 (A-st-103-p)
COMPARE BEFORE YOU BUY All
New Student Desk 29.50 2 dr. files
19.50 4 dr. files 29.50 USED arm
exec, swivel chair 19.95 JR Office
Furniture Co. 6205 S. Main St.
376-1146 (a-25t-103-p)
BE gentle, be kind, to that expensive
carpet, clean It with Blue Lastre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-IFC)
Triumph 1955 custom 650. must sell_
Immediately! helmet and cover too.
445 or? 372-0380 Bob 1236 nw 3rd
ave. (A>3t-106p)
MOBI LE home on lot for one or two.
SISOO with screened patio, ac, extra
room, new oven. I mile from campus.
Low rent, free garbege pickup, water,
and sewage. 376-8082 (A-st-108-p)
for sale 5 pc. gordon silver service
$200.00 call 372-6539 before 10a.m.
ea. day (A-st-106p)
140 watt Scott amplifier (deluxe
pre-amp and power amp) $l5O. call
Rick at 392-2651 or 372-6167
(A-3t-108-p)
must sell, girl's bike, 26", 3-speed,
basket, lock and chain, good
condition, $25. call 378-6725.
(A-3t-108-p)
nikka 8-track recorder-player deck,
cost $135 new. need money so will
take S9O. In perfect condition.
392-8399 (A-st-108-p)
35mm edlxa reflex camera with light
meter, 35mm, 85mm, 135 mm,
50mm, lenses SIOO call Dana
392-1691 poioroid model 150 $25
(A-st-108-p)
Panasonic 8-track stereo tape player
system, needs adjustment, perfect for
student who can fix it himself, must
sell, call Sue 2-7678 (A-st-108-p)

GLAUBER ROCHA SERIES
The Reitz Union's Film Classics Committee is presenting these
films, never before shown in Gainesville, by the exciting Brazilian
director, Glauber Rocha.
One of the few "national dnemas to emerge in the last decade is the
recent cinema of Brazil. It accurately reflects the sodal fervor and
progressive nationalist commitment of a new generation coming to
maturity in a stagnant, dictatorial oligarchy shored up by American capital
and based on poverty, oppression, and cultural and political colonization.
Apart from being one of its most original and prolific filmmakers,
Glauber Rocha is also the leading ideological spokesman of this movement,
Brazils famed Cinema Novo. This organization of young and sodally
committed film directors aims to develop an indigenous, sodally relevant
Brazilian cinema, free of domination by foreign (especially American)
capital, drawing its themes and esthetic preoccupations from the countrys
heritage and need for transformation. "To make film, Rocha maintains,
"is to make a contribution to the revolution, to stoke it, in order to make
people in Brazil conscious of their condition. This is the tragic origin of our
new cinema. Our origin is our hunger as well as our most profound
misery because it is experienced rather than artistically imagined. Our
esthetics is the esthetics of cruelty, i.e., of primal instinct. It is
revolutionary.
Black God, White Devi Monday, April 5 winner of the Critic> Prize at the
1966 Acapulco Festival
Antonio Das Mortes Tuesday, April 6 & Wed, April 7 winner of the Best
Director Award at the 1969 Cannes Film Fsstival

FOR EE BIT
Female roommate wanted
$46/month French Qtr. 113 call
378-9057 (B-st-106-p)
NEED TO SUBLET TODAY female
to share townhouse Hawaiian Village
stop in 162 or call 3768037 pool
A/C laundry (B-st-106p)
SUBLEASE Tanglewood apt 2
bedrooms IV* baths dishwasher
disposal 190 a month furnished
available immediately call 3760910
(B-st-106p)
Male roomate wanted spring qtr at
Hawiian Village pool tv S6O a mo. +
1/3 utilities call 372-8923 after spm
(B-4t-107-p)
Need 1 female roomate for
Gatortown apt. 259 $45 per mo. no
deposit call 3766708 spring quarter
(B-st-107-p)
Get a liberal education by rooming
with a hlppe, a jock, and an
intellectual, university gardens trace
37.50 a mo. 3766353 (B-st-106-p)
Very convenient close to campus apt.
to be subleased by April 5. two
rooms, air conditioned for only 125 a
month, call 3763117 and ask for
Jacqui (B-3t-106-p)
to sublet 2 bdr furnished, has
everything, carpet, air, 1% bath, pool,
available Immediately $l7O/mo
392-1520 tanglewood no. 'B3
(B-3t-106p)
Room for rent 3 blocks from campus
kitchen priv central air quiet 60 a
month utilities Inc 304 nw 15th st
3768122 (B-2t-107-p)
Apartments for summer qtr. close to
campus, pool, air-conditioned.
$1168240 per qtr. university apts.
1524 nw 4th ave. apt. n, 3768990
(B-10t-108-p)
Sublet 1 br ac apt. quiet out of town
103/mo. call 3763739 after 5 prairie
view apts. (B-3t-106p)
1 bdrm furn apt 144.56 per month,
summit house 26d. after 5:00 call
3763262. before 5:00 call 392-2017.
(B-3t-106p)
Sublet 2 bdrm twnhse furn apt avail.
June 15 $45 a month call 373-4394
fr quarter apt 67 (B-st-106p)
Sublease one bedroom furnished apt.
lease until June close to campus 1904
sw 14 terr. 373-4520 call anytime
available April 16 $l2O a month
(B-st-106p)
WANTED
:xj\-xx-:-:-:v:-x ; :xx ; :xXx ; xxX ; :-: : x : :
Roommate, call 3763408 or come
by 142 landmark, male (C-st-107-p)

WANTED r
Female roomate (1 or 2) wanted for
two bedroom apt on 16th ave ac &
color TV. also interested In
subleasing if interested call 378-1237
(C-2t-103-p)
Need 1 roommate Immediately three
bedroom house on 55 st call
378-6407 (C-3t-107-p)
Female roomate needed for
immediate occupancy at La Bonne
Vie apt $54 plus V utilities call
378-4403 (C-3t-107-p)
2 male roommates wanted large 4
bedroom house nw section cable tv
private or semi-private bedroom S4O
per month utilities incl. 378*6810
(C-st-107-p)
Female roommate needed for nice
apt. close to campus. $52.50 per
month, pool, a/c. Call 378-7080.
(C-SMO7-P)
Female roommate Landmark Apts
poolside Available immediately Call
373-2240 (C-st-105-p)
Girl roommate wanted May Ist 37.50
+ Vi utilities Close to campus Call
Brlgld at 378-9391 (C-st-107-p)
ojpiiip[frN
W !3 !L W \
SHOWS Paramount
1:30-3:30-5:30 Pictures |
7:25-9:2 presents |
the laugh I
I S
(itatter Kotthnu |
: BtineMoyj
IRwlfr
/l ACADEMY (ffl
I wtmuirumt shows \
| nUMIIMIIURS 1:30 \
t BEST ACTRESS * I
I Jon* Alexander
| BEST ACTOR
| James Earl Jonm* 8:30 f
** LAST
days
Ui W. Wwnlli 4w. \
SUMMER-3-05 \
8:25-9:45 %
PLUCKED-1:30 1
feSi-StRO \
I U MfILM OOTWeUTORS WC PRESENTS
'.TUCKED";
\ GINA LOLLOBRtGIOA &
* p£
f Once to every young man
| comes a summer ue this |
i l| J 'm SWEDISH SUMMIT
| 5 (0101 f
\ FLORIDA ONLY #
\ ALL SEATS $1.25 /
ALL DAY +
EVERY DAY fT



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Male roomate needed for quiet one
bedroom frederick gardens apt.
Spring, or spring-summer 62.50/mo.
or sublet for Apr-Aug. 378-2058
(C-st-105-p)
Roommate wanted for the Place Va
month's rent free. 82.50 per month
call 373-4346 grad student preferred
(C-3t-107-p)
Two male roommates needed.
Immediate occupancy. SSO a month
376-4185 6 neat apartment
(C-st-107-p)
Male roomate wanted. Live Entire
spring qtr for ONLY $53.75 +
utilities. La Bonne Vie apt
townhouse 356. Call 373-3385
(C-st-105-p)
Roommate wanted for 4 bedroom
house private room 2a c cable TV V*
utilities 37.50 month call 372-3888
915 NE 11 ave (C-3t-106-p)
Female roommate needed
immediately! Share 2-todrm apt, a/c,
SSO/mo. + utilities. Only one block
behind Norman Hall. Call 378-8070.
(C-3t-106-p)
Student to live in and do housework
you pay S4O mo. this includes room,
board, utilities, etc. Quarterly rate
available, call 373-1759 (C-3t-106-p)
Roommates for 12x70 3 bdrm
mobile home stereo, air, pool, color
tv $55 plus utiL lot 132 pinehurst
park (C-st-106-p)
Female Roomate 1 bedroom,
airconditioned apartment. call
372- after 4:00 (C-st-106-p)
Male roomate (1 or 2) wanted for 2
bedroom apt. 512-9 (Pt West)
subleasing also available Call
373- 97 1 Female roomate needed for
immediate occupancy at La Bonne
Vie only 2 months rent for quarter
call 378-3716 (C-st-104-p)
$125 for entire quarter Male-own
bedroom in large house quiet and
close to classe. 372-9789 between
10pm and 10am. (c-3t-106-p)
Wanted one male roomate in 3
bedroom apt. Rent S4O/mo. 3 blocks
from campus rent paid till Apr. 15
1/3 ults. 411 b nw 15 st. 378-3972
aircond. bdr. now (C-st-108-p)
I
NITTY GRITTY DlflT BAND
SATURDAY APRI LI 7
8 PM FLORIDA FIELD
TICKETS
I Students G.P. Gate
I $3.00 $3.25 $3.50
AVAILABLE AT RECOftOSVILLE
RECORD BAR-JWRU BOX OFFICE

EVERYONE LOVES THE
BOYS IN THE BAND
AT THE RATHSKELLER
TONIGHT
SHOWTIME ADMISSION
7:15, 9:15 and 11:15 2St

WANTED
eeeeeeeeee
female roomate wanted for 1
bedroom furn apt. 26D summit
house. $72 per month + V? utilities
call after 5:00 378-3262.
(C-3t-108-p)
Apartments for fall qtr. close to
campus, pool a/c, SBO-130 per
month, university apts. 1524 nw 4th
ave. apt. n 376-8990 (C-st-108-p)
roomate wanted comfortable
apartment only 3 blocks from
campus. S3B/month plus soulful
roomates! call Ed or Cas 378-4526
(C-3t-108-p)
HELP WANTED
WRUF needs first phone radio
operators to cover the summer
months, if you will be in town during
summer quarter, please call Ed
Slimak at 392-0771 (E-10t-103-c)
Campus representative for Student
Travel Group. Good income and
discounts, send resume to Mr. Ray,
Anglo America Association, 60A,
Pyle St., Newport, Isle of Wight,
England (E-4t-105-p)
Advertising sales, production &
layout, general office, need talented
and/or experienced help with new
publications. 376-5716 after 5:30
pm. (E-st-107-p)
2 males needed part-time during day
to exercise, stand in braces, take to
class and read to a disabled veteran.
$1.50 an hr. 378-3489 (E-6t-107-p)
Sell advertising for the Gainesville
Guide Full or part time phone
372-9555 leave name and number
Male student drive elderly man in
1960 Ford manual shift. Tues. or
Wed. around 2 pm. Call 378-3282
after spm (E-3t-108-p)
x*x-:*x-:wX-x*XrX:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:-:X:X:
AUTOS

y.y.y.v.v.y.v.v.y.v.'.v.'.v.v.y.v.v.v.v
62 Rambler wagon, fact a/c, radio,
heat. Excellent economical
transportation. Must see to
appreciate. Must sell this week. S2OO
378-5738 (G-st-105-p)
MGA 1600 1960 excellent cond. new
top wire wheels paint radials good
interior correllas mechanically sound
S9OO serious offers only 372-2340
(G-3t-107-p)
1963 porsche 356 super chrome
wheels, am-fm-sw radio, michelln
radials. excellent condition. $2,150
or trade for vw camper 6B model call
378-5576 (G-3t-106-p)
CAMPER, step-van, self contained,
excellent condition, must sell fast to
pay for school 392-7305
(G-st-106-p)
Convertible Impala 1966 radio heater
Panasonic stereo and speakers
installed. $1200.00 or best offer.
378-3596 (G-st-106-p)
CONVERTABLE 65 corvair corse,
excellent shape 4spd. 180 hp cheap!
$697.23: call 372-5254 & ask for
Scott. (G-st-105-p)
Zazooks! due to unforseen deficit
spending my fiat 124 coupe must be
sacrificed, am-fm radio, sterfo,
5-speed trans., mechanically
impecable but it does need a waxing.
40 tho. miles. I want $2600 but Ill
settle for $2249. buy it. call
378-6376 bet. 5-6 pm. (G-3t-105-p>
1970 cutlass supreme, A-l condition
a/c, ps, pb, 30,000 miles, $2995
write Don Robinson box 801
Gainesville or call 376-1271 after 9
p.m. (G-st-103-p)
Volkswagen sedan 1969 white
excellent condition 23000 miles
SI4OO call Hans at 392-1461
(G-6t-107-p)

Monday, April 5, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

XXX*X-X*X*X M*XS >X*X X*X X X'X*X*XS
AUTOS
1968 VW Sedan, radio. Excellent
condition. Working hours call
378-1531 ask for Kris Buros. After
SPM call 376-8490 (G-st-107-p)
65 corvair monza 4 doors radio 8
heat new paint and 2 tires runs good
call 392-7178 make offer
(G-3t-107-p)
1967 396 ss chevell. Great condition.
SIOOO. Brand new Craig 8-track
stereo tape player. Cost me $l2O.
Best offer. 372-7104 evenings
(G-st-105-p)
62 vw bus new transmission rebuilt
engine excellent interior 376-1169
after 5:00 (G-st-108-p)
Volkswagen sedan 1969 white
excellent condition 23000 miles
SI4OO call Hans at 392-1461
(G-6t-107-p)
Â¥:X:X:X:X:X:X:XSrX:X:X:X:X:XrX:X:X:Xv
PE R SONA L
X:X:X:X:X:X:XtX:X:XxX:X:X*X:X:X£X:X
Free-9 week old. baby kittens, box
trained and very affectionate, phone
376-6131 between noon and 9 PM
(J-3t-106-p)
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (j-46t-106-p)
PLEASE HELP US!! five adorable
kittens are looking for homes! free,
boxtrained kittens make great easter
gifts call 373-3832 (J-3t-107-p)
Explore your natural creativity,
drawing is expressing your own
personal visual vocabulary, private
unique individual Instruction.
373-1947 (J?st-106-p)
Custom jewelry hand sculpted, cast
or fabricated gold, silver, or other,
modern made from old. wedding
rings w/speclal meaning, reasonable
373-1947 (J-st-106-p)
Married couples interested in
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate in a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths of your
marriage. Call now for a group
beginning this quarter. Its free.
Marriage and College Life Project.
Information at 392-1590.
(J-st-107-p)
Students are always welcome at
highlands presbyterian church, 1001
ne 16 ave. college crowd meets 9:45
am Sundays, church at 11 am
(J-st-106-p)
t
The Photoworkshopexcellent b&w
and color work at best prices,
passports, portraits, etc. Get fine
handcrafte*d SANDLES at .the
ETERNAL EXCHANGE 804 W.
University Ave. (J-st-105-p)
Two things are better on a
WATERBED. One is sleep. From
Innerspace Environment at
reasonable prices. call Elliott,
373-3144 (J-15t-105-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer.
Electrologist ... 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment.
(j-44t-54-p)
Get your books for Spring Quarter at
lower prices! Come to SG Book
Exchange Room 306 Union Mar.
29-Apr. 2. 1-5 PM and Save!
(j-st-103-p)
But you know it's hard to tell when
youre in the spell if its wrong or if
its real, but youre bound to loose If
you let the blues get you scared to
feel, and I feel like Im just being
born, exe ((J-lt-108-p)
BAHAMAS flying $35 rd. trip, need
3 pass., dates to be arranged.
DENVER $125 need 2 April 23? ST.
PETE $8 April 9 372-2419
(J-3t-108-p)

Page 15

X:X:X:X:X:XrX:X&X:X!X:X:X:X:X:X:X:Xx
PERSONAL


JER-youve given me 3 years of
happiness + love. I have wonderful
memories of yesterday + I look
forward to tomorrow, love always,
SML (your little aprii fool)
(J-lt-108-p)
J.C.F. If you know what I mean,
then do you undastand me now?
Youve proved your ambitiousness to
all. Keep it up. Love, MEK
(J-lt-108-p)
Auto stereo cassette player & tape
recorder; fast forward, rewind, tone
& balance control. Reg. $79.95, now
$59.95 new in box, includes speakers
New 8-track also. Reg. $49.95, only
$34.95. phone 378-2957.
(J-st-108-p)
Any individual or group wanting to
set up a game booth ($50.00) or set
or set up tables to sell at
CARNIGRAS call Jeff 376-9473
(J-st-108-p)
GOING TO EUROPE? We Have
Charter Flights At Peoples Prices.
Call 372-6846 (J-lt-108-p)
Pat Quigley's tutors meet mon. night
7:30 rm 355 Reitz Union for info
call Samson 392-1608 (J-lt-108-c)
DARIEN (J-lt-108-p)
LOST & FOUND
Glasses tortiseshell black case found
In eng. parking lot check with union
barbershop (L-3t-107-nc)
found green KNAPSACK. Identify
and claim at Lost and Found, rm.
130, Reitz Union. (L-3t-106-p)
HELP! gold wire rimmed glases lost
(possibly) In- rote courtyard
URGENT! call Janine 392-7806
(L-2t-108-p)
SERVICES
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmerlcard adn
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
Overseas Jobs for Students. Australia,
Europe, So. America, Africa, etc. All
professions and occupations, S7OO to
S3OOO monthly. Expenses paid,
overtime, sightseeing, Free
information. Write TWA Research
Service, Box 5991-K, San Diego, Ca.
92105 ((M-st-105-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
INCOME TAX RETURNS 35 n main
st. haber and budd accountants
378-9666 378-6127 (M-10t-107-p)
Experienced Spanish tutor native
speaker remedial arammar reading
exam conversation $4 an hour
373-2252 (M-3t-107-p)

| Todays ]
I more for your money meal I
at moRR isons
I CAFETERIA I
I I 1
I MONDAYS FEATURE
I CHUCK WAGON STEAK
I \ AND HASH A
f I BROWN M O > I p
5 POTATOES ****y | i
I i 1 11
I I | TUESDAYS FEATURE |
a I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I a
| ALL YOU CAN EAT |
! 99*:
I LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8 FREE PARKING
moisoivs
CRFETERIfI ..beyond comparison! 1
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall 1

FLORIDA QUARTERLY
JWT WU? ICIN' BORN
EDDY
g§3
MONDO
I I
I J t Jb
ACROSS FROf*
PKi s*r * 1
wtK.nr.s4 JHttHi-"
SHI
|L^ m COLOR M
THEj -f f_
JUtVW|*
amaMraimiM
pwSousi^PSTHousnr
Venice Helpful Stranger
-1



, The F lorid.AHg*tor, Monday, April 5. -1971.

Page 16

CAMPUS CRIER I
m t ill '"' J SPONSORED BY STI'DIiXT GOVERNMENT M
f\UJ LET MY PEOPLE GO j
I \ : V I .l^^^^B I
I IB > a I jB I
I I I
I I I
I I LET MY PEOPLE G 0... I
Ib B Tonite at 7:30 the one hour award winning documentary, "Let My People Go,"
B B will be presented free of charge at the Tau Epsilon Phi House. Everyone interested x 1
B I is welcome to attend.
I I APATHY I
j|: I Don't be apathetic, join Student Government and help out in the SG v B
B Elections this Spring.
I Anyone who is interested in working in the elections, may call |BBg| I
w Student Government at 392-1665 and leave your name and number for l jjfl BT f 1 I
Bill Watson. F
I % BY ANN JELL I COE
I | ANYONE FOR BADMINTON? I
I The University of Florida Badminton Club meets Wed., 8:00 P.M., at Norman
M I Gym every week. No fees all equipt. provided. For more information call
H I 392-6587 or 373-2573. I
I I BLUE KEY APPLICATIONS Jy *fL I
ft Applications for membership in the Florida Blue Key Honorary Fraternity are ftr innnnnni |Rk I
V B available at the various Dean's offices and at the Activity desk at the J. Wayne V w
H B Reitz Union. The deadline for them to be returned is April 19. Qualification luUULJ Lll \
H B Requirements can also be obtained at the activity desk. innii 7in ft
I AHKIL /iuiy/ropM
B 1 APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN ROOM 305 J. WAYNE REITZ UNION I
B 1 Ft >R CHAIRMAN OF STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIONS. dUaUltKx* JXrvOJJ I
I ELECTIONS WILL BE HELD WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7th, AT 3:30 P.IY. I
B I ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE I
B 1 THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON 5:00OF Earn I
1 WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
H I THANKS, V
ROBERT HARRIS 1
m DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS 1
. - STUDENT GOVERNMENT ft
. .- \ % ":



Monday, April 5,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Hughes seeks
international
war jurists

Nixons decision to review
Calley case well received

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif.
(UPI) The White House
reported Sunday a generally
favorable reaction so far to
President Nixons decision to
review personally the conviction
and sentence of Lt. William L.
Calley Jr.
A spokesman said telegrams,
telephone calls and letters
requesting clemency for the
young officer, sentenced to life
imprisonment for the murder of

VFW official calls
for Resors resignation

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
top official of the Veterans of
Foreign Wars (VFW) called
Sunday for the resignation of
Army Secretary Stanley R.
Resor for gross dereliction of
duty*' in the court-martial case
of Lt. William L.Calley Jr.
Herbert R. Rainwater, VFW
commander in chief, said the
Canon crowd
Warner Bros, signed up 1,250
natives of Padua, Italy, for
crowd scenes in The Priest's
Wife** which stars Sophia Loren
and Marcello Mastroianni.

J KeieemMe with the purchmte ' /
SraTf Hh / > LARGE-SIZE rtZZA ~ gfei,
Cw Limit l Pizza Hut IWW 'pA+Ui.Uit ffafe. j
DM.r *r fumtiy W|fctefr3Br T %izZA HUT PETE |ffl
Offer ma\ be uilbdrjun al
" T. >
Offer good through April 15
2109 NW 13th St. 1723 SW 13th St.
372-5295 378-5761

Page 17

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Harold E. Hughes,
D-lowa, said Sunday that he will propose creation
of an international commission of leading jurists to
set standards for assessing blame when innocent
civilians are killed in war.
I think this is essential now, said Hughes, a
potential contender for his partys presidential
nomination next year.
The senator said he would introduce a
non-binding sense of the Senate resolution
shortly after Easter providing for establishment of
the commission and for appointment of its members
by the leaders or Supreme Courts of each nation
involved.
Hughes, citing the great controversy surrounding
Lt. William L. Qilley Jr.'s conviction and the trials
of other U.S. soldiers in connection with the My Lai

22 South Vietnamese civilians at
My Lai, still were pouring in.
But he said the flow was not
now as heavy and generally
reflected approval of the
President's decision.
Nixon, described by his aides
as concerned about the low
morale among Galleys fellow
soldiers and anxious to
demonstrate support for UJS.
soldiers fighting a brutal and
confusing war, announced

resignation of Resor is the first
necessary step in mitigation of
the offenses of which Lt.
William Calley stands convicted
the murder of 22 South
Vietnamese civilians at My Lai.
Rainwater said Resor
deserted" Calley, the Army and
the nation during their time of
need.

Sebastians Shop Volkswagen Repairs I
This Months Special for VW Drivers
Tune Up
Points, plugs, condenser, compression
test adjust carburetor,
$9.95
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Saturday he would personally
intervene and make the final
judgement on Calley *s
punishment.
The case will come to him
after the normal military review
process is completed.
In announcing the President's
decision, White House aide John
D. Ehrlichman emphasized that
Nixon was in no way
commenting on the merits of the
case.
Nixon, ending a nine-day visit
to the Western White Howe,
spent most of Palm Sunday at
his residence completing a final
political situation in Southeast
Asia in preparation for hh next
troop withdrawal
announcement.
The announcement will come
at 9 pan. EST Wednesday in a
nationwide television address
from the Oval Office in
Washington. It will focus on the
rate of pulling U.S. troops out of
Vietnam after the current
withdrawal phase is completed
on May 1 at which time the
ceiling for American forces will
be 284,000 troops.

incident three years ago, said there now is no way to
evaluate the evidence against them.
For that reason, he said, the commission's first
task should be to study the entire problem of death
and destruction inflicted on civilian populations
since the end of World War 11.
After that, it could set forth new international
standards for protection of civilians during
wartime and establish principles of assessing those
national and personal responsibilities for failure to
adhere to the rules, he said.
As for the Calley case, Hughes said he believed
the decision by the court when it had the choice of
life or death, was a merciful decision. He noted
that Calley had been found guilty of premeditated
murder of 22 South Vietnamese civilians and said
obviously these deaths cannot be ignored.

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Hh -M
Sen. Harold Hughes
... deaths cannot be ignored



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 5, 1971

The
Florida
Alligator

Gator golf team runner-up
in Cape Coral Invitational

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Sports Editor
The UF golf teams
super-charged rally to short
circuit the University of
Houston winning streak blew a
fuse in the final round of the
Cape Coral Invitational Saturday
and the Cougars went on to win
their 17th straight tournament.
Houstons John Mills scored
rounds of 71, 69, 68, and 71 to
capture individual honors,
snapping former Florida star
Steve Melnyks 1961 record by
three strokes.
The Cougars posted a
four-day total of 1124, 28
strokes better than second place
Florida at 1152. The Gators
were followed by the University
of Miami with 1165 and FSU at
1178.
Mills was trailed by teammate
Tom Jenkins, who registered a
four round 282 for the
individual runner-up slot.
Florida sophomore Gary Koch
was third with a 283 tally and
Gator Andy North was fourth
with a 286.
Golf coach Buster Bishop was
personally satisfied with the UF
performance.
Youre always disappointed
when you dont come in first,
but I was very pleased with our
showing, he said. Houston
played very good golf.
And they did.
Besides Mills and Jenkins
placing first and second
individually, the Cougars
finished with two additional
players in the top ten. Tied with
North for fourth place was
Houston's Bruce Ashworth and

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PHIL COPE

A fly ball in baseball often times finds its way
through someone's expensive picture window,
sending the players into a scramble for home. But
the game shown is cricket and the participants are
merely shuttling between bases to score a run. The
dynamic duo of John James (left) and John Savory

GATOR SPORTS

fl Hk
mm
£
SI
Gary Koch
... third individually
Marty West of North Carolina.
Another Cougar, Burce Leitzke,
tied for the fifth place berth.
Koch fired a 72-69-70-72 to
pace the Gator effort while
teammate North tallied a
70-68-76-72 for his total. Team
captain Mike Killian added a
final round 76 and sophomore
Woody Blackburn posted a 73 in
Saturdays action to bolster the
team four-low total.
Thirty-nine teams competed
on Fort Myers Golden Gate and
Cape Coral courses in
tournament action. North
Carolina threatened the field
early, but the Tar Heels slipped
to a final tally of 1182 for fifth
place honors. Maryland was next
at 1187.
Long a producer of SEC
champions, Bishop says he is not
a conference conscience
coach.
Im only interested in how

Hit and run

(right), both associate professors at UF, had a
partnership of 50 runs in a match against the
Commdnwealth Wanderers Cricket Club (Nassau)
during the spring break. The UF dub battled
fruitlessly to a day-long draw.

Florida stands nationally, he
explained. Weve always been
able to come out seventh or
eighth in the nation and Im
quite proud of that fact.
Houston beat Floridas 1969
team record by 22 strokes in the
72-hole Cape Coral tourney.
The Gators next match will
be hosted by the victorious
Cougars in the Houston
All-American April 15.

S. Carolina falls, 12-0
Ruggers blank Gamecocks
for 13 th straight win

By GREG MACK
Alligator Correspondent
One of the winningest campus
teams, the UF Rugby Club,
trounced the University of
South Carolina 12-0 Saturday
afternoon on the R.O.T.C. Drill
Field.
The Gators easily won their
thirteenth straight match for an
impressive season record of
16-1-1. The only loss was to the
Gamecocks during fall quarter at
Columbia, South Carolina.
Forward George Rozelle
began the scoring by picking up
a loose ball and running 30 yards
for the three point try.
The second score was made

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TERRY WALTERS
Gator grabs ball from Gamecock Gerry Garte
... UF club defeats South Carolina, 12-0

by Tom Hester after a 60-yard
run and a perfectly executed
pop kick which helped him
sprint by the fullback.
John Young finished the
scoring with two penalty kicks
of 15 and 30 yards each.
The second half was a
defensive stalemate with neither
team posing much of a scoring
threat. Center Fitz Miller made
two outstanding mns, and
Young had a couple of score
saving tackles for the Gators.
Player-coach Phil Whyatt was
pleased with his teams
performance.
After winning last weekends
Gator Invitational Tournament
and with this defeat of South
Carolina, we have established
ourselves as the team to beat in
the Southeast, he said.
Whyatt was also appreciative
of the almost 300 fans who were
at the game. Wed like to have
twice as many fans out next

Unbeaten Georgia to meet
UF looking for 14th tennis win

UFs tennis team will meet
the top team in the Southeastern
Conference this afternoon in
Athens, Ga.
The Gators will meet the
unbeaten Georgia Bulldogs,
presently 13-0 with the addition
of Kenn Terry and Buddy Miles.
Both played real well in
Jacksonville Thursday, coach
Bill Potter said Sunday. I think
they will be able to take up
some of the slack left by
Addie and (Tony) Pospisil.
In that Jacksonville match,
the Gators captured all six
singles matches en route to a 7-2
victory."
We still havent found the
right combination in the doubles

Saturday for our last home
game.
The Gators also took the
B-game over U.S.C. by a score of
21-8. Mark McEvers, Tom
Brazwell, Miller, and Young all
scored tries for Florida. Tom
Porter added six points with
three conversions.
The ruggers will be playing
their last home game next.
Saturday on the R.O.T.C. Drill
Field with the A-team meeting
the University of Virginia in the
first game.
Virginia fields six full teams
and has been the perennial
winner of the Commonwealth
Cup, awarded to the best eastern
team each year.
The B-team will play a team
off a British frigate, the H.M.S.
Bacchante, which will be docked
in Jacksonville. The game times
are 3 and 4:30 pjn.

yet, Potter said. We played
well in the singles, but took only
one doubles in Jacksonville.
Last year, the Bulldogs
captured the only meeting of the
teams, 5-4, in Athens. A second
meeting here was rained out.
Gator Ski Club
meets Tuesday
The Gator Ski Club has
scheduled its first meeting of the
spring quarter for Tuesday, April
6 beginning at 8 pjn. in the J.
Wayne Reitz Union, room 346.
Everyone is invited to attend
as you need not know how to
ski to join.



Monday; Aprils, 197 T, The Florida Alligator,

UF cagers honored

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Sophortiore Tony Miller and
seniors Earl Findley and Tom
Purvis were the most honored
Gator basketball players from
the 1970-71 season at the annual
Gator Tipoff Club awards
banquet Saturday night in the J.
Wayne Reitz Union.
Miller copped the best
defensive player and best foul
shooter awards. Purvis was
named the most improved and
later was tabbed the most
outstanding player of the season
in a separate award given by the
Tampa Gator Tipoff Club.
Findley, was named the team
captain and was the top
re bounder on the season.
As expected, Jerry Hoover
was named the Hustlin Gator,
while Gary Waddell showed the
best sportsmanship over the

Gators split two
By SIM SMITH
Alligator Sports Writer
The Florida Gators rallied but fell two runs short and allowed
Auburn to escape with a 5-3 victory and a split of the two game series
here this weekend.
On Friday, UF battled back from a three run deficit to win 10-5
with Ray Hulls grand slam home run being the big blow.
Auburn took a quick lead in the first when Buck Baker cracked a
home run with two men aboard off Florida ace Tom Seybold. Right
fielder Mark Hedgecock doubled in the second and when the center
fielder misplayed the ball, Hedgecock scored to cut the Tiger lead to
H-
John Flad singled to deep short to start the Gator third. Following
an out Will Harman walked and Tony Dobies reached on an error to
load the bases. Hull then belted his third homer of the year over the
left field fence to put Florida in front, 5-4.
In the fifth, the Tigers issued Florida five walks to give the Gators
two runs without benefit of a hit.
John Suttons double and RBI singles by Harman, Dobies and Hull
were the big blows as Florida scored the games final three runs in the
eighth.
On Saturday, the Tigers jumped out to a five run lead with two in
the second and three in the fifth off loser Art Lee.
The Gators, with a 3-1 SEC record and still on top in the eastern
division of the SEC, will meet Fla. Southern Tuesday at 3 p.m. on
Perry Field.
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Page 19

year. Senior Robert Agee was
awarded a trophy for best
attitude.
Malcolm Meeks and Doug
Brown were tied in the voting
for the most valuable player on
the freshman squad.
Meeks also captured the best
rebounder trophy while Brown
was the most improved.
Others honored were Steve
Williams, best defensive players
and Meeks again as the Hustlin
Gator.
In a speech proceeding the
awards, Dr. Loren Young,
executive director of the
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
talked on athletics and its role in
life.
Dr. Young, who has held
Sunday morning services for just
about every professional football
team in the National Football
League, spoke of Lt. William
Calley.
Galley made a mistake.

People should face the facts with
love and forgiveness, but they
shouldnt make him into a
hero, Dr. Young said.
Vince Lombardi, the late
football coach at Green Bay and
Washington, was loved by Dr.
Young because, he was harsh
and tough on those who had the
most to give.
After he won the first Super
Bowl game, he told the press the
reason the Packers won was
because they had respect for
one another.
Lombardi paused a second,
thinking he had to add more
than that and then said they
had love for another.
For Dr. Young, and the full
house that attended, it was a
very articulate speech which will
be remembered for a long time.

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Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 5,1971

Bums picked to stop Reds
in National League West

With additional bats in the
likes of Duke Sims and Richie
Allen, the Los Angeles Dodgers
will be in the World Series again
for the first time since Sandy
Koufax retired in 1966.
Last years winner in the
National League, the Cincinnati
Reds, will not be the Big Red
Machine they were last year due
to many injuries that have hurt
the team this spring.
Bobby Tolan, hurt during the
winter playing basketball and
lost for half of the season; Jim
Merritt and Wayne Simpson, two
strong pitchers for the Reds,
both have sore arms; and Lee
May, tom ligaments in his knee,
will all hurt the Reds chances
early in the season.
In the 1970 campaign, the
Reds started out of a cannon
and continued that way until
they had clinched the western
division title early in September.
AUen has been the talk of the
spring for the Bums as he has
shown that he is eager to get the
season started, unlike when he
was with Philadelphia and he
wanted the season to be over so
he could go to the track.
Usually a first baseman, Allen
will be played in left field as
golden glover Wes Parker has a
stronghold on first.
The Dodger pitching, last year
hurt by the loss of Bill Singer for
the first 52 days of the season
and then later by a broken

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PERLMUTTER U
executive sports editor

finger, will be as strong as in any
of the previous five years.
Singer, Claude Osteen and
Don Sutton all will have more
runs to work with this year
instead of having to pitch a
shutout each time out to win.
Last year, the Dodgers
finished .001 percentage points
behind the Reds in hitting,
marking a vast improvement
over previous teams when a
walk, stolen base, error and
sacrifice fly made up a rally.
Johnny Bench is still with the
Reds and is the best catcher in
the majors
Atlanta and Houston both
will improve on last years
records, but will not challenge
the Dodgers.
New York, Pittsburgh and
Chicago will again battle it out
in the Eastern Division with the
Mets favored here.
Tom Seaver cant have
another collapse like the one he
had in September of last year
which killed the Mets chances of
making the playoffs.
Pittsburgh has Willie Stargell,
Matty Alou, Roberto Clemente
and A1 Oliver who can all hit
.300.
For the Cubs, Joe Pepitone

will help pitchers Ferguson
Jenkins, Ken Holtzman and Bill
Hands with his hitting.
When Los Angeles defeats the
Mets in the playoffs in October,
it will mark the seventh time
manager Walt Alston has made it
to the World Series.
Bucks romp
in NBA west
semi-finals
The Milwaukee Bucks routed
the San Francisco Warriors
136-87 Sunday afternoon to
capture their playoff series, 4-1
to reach the Western Division
finals in the National Basketball
Association.
The Bucks, led by Lew
Alcindor now will meet the
winner of the Chicago Bull-Los
Angeles Laker contest, now
standing at 3-3 after Sundays
113-99 victory by the Bulls.
In the Eastern Division finals,
the New York Knicks, defending
NBA champions, will face the
Baltimore Bullets, victors over
the Philadelphia 76ers, 128-120
Sunday.

Teammates
New York Mets Tom Seaver
and the Dodgers Ray Lamb
were one time pitching
teammates on the University of
Southern California baseball
team.
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