Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
M
4p
-A

Vol. 63, No. 99

UF Employe Dismissal Protested

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Director of Personnel Robert Button said a review
would be held on the dismissal of Claudia Mae Williams,
an employe in Hume Area, following a protest by her
co-workers Thursday.
Employes from Hume and Graham areas protesting her
dismissal signed a petition Thursday passed around by Dave
Smith, business agent representmg the AFL-CIO.
BUTTON MET with the employes Friday. He talked
with them about whether Miss Williams had the right to a
review of her case by the State Career Service Council
(SCSC) and whether she had been informed of any
complaints against her.
Button said a review would be held this week about
whether housing management had informed Miss Williams
of the complaints against her and if her supervisors had
attempted to help her correct her mistakes.

Poverty: Pride Hinders Needed Help

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Staff Writer
Poverty is a big word that
includes many people. Those of
us who dont fit into this
category often dont know
where to begin to combat
poverty.
Mrs. Frances is
fighting poverty in her
community of Windsor, a small
town outside Gainesville. She
has been collecting clothes,

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TERRY WALTERS
LITTLE DANIEL NOBLES OF WINDSOR
... plays outside his home amid a junk pile

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

PERSONNEL DIRECTOR TO REVIEW FIRING

furniture, books and anything
else usable that people dont
want anymore. She distributes
these articles to nine families in
Windsor.
MANY PEOPLE in Windsor
are on welfare and can't afford
clothes, Mrs. Connelly said. The
Salvation Army gives them
clothes, but they have to pay for
some of the clothes and after
awhile their pride keeps them
from going there for help. A few

University of Florida, Gainesville

Miss Williams was dismissed because of complaints by
students about her work. However, Miss Williams said she
had never received any complaints and her co-workers said
she did a good job. Her job is emptying trash baskets in
Hume. Miss Williams was told Thursday not to report to
work after March 12.
SMITH, AT THE meeting Thursday, along with Willy
Richardson, president of the Service Employes
International Union of which the employes are members,
said Miss Williams had right to a review of her case by the
SCSC.
If employes are listed as permanent for at least six
months, they are eligible for review by the SCSC.
However, Miss Williams has been listed as permanent as of
Sept. 28, 1970. As a result, her six month probationary
period ends March 28.
The employes protested since Miss Williams has been
working full time since June 1970, she should be eligible
for a review.

others are even too proud to
accept welfare.
The children are the ones
who suffer, Mrs. Connelly said.
If they don't have clothes, their
parents keep them home from
school. The kids need to know
that someone cares, she said.
Students at UF throw so
many things away that these
people could use, she said. A
few residents of Diamond and
Corry Villages call Mrs. Connelly

The employes did not strike in protest. They just met
to sign a petition.
Button said neither Smith nor the SEIU are recognized
by UF.
UP UNTIL Sept. 28, Miss Williams had been listed as a
temporary employe.
Button said that at the meeting with the employes
Friday he explained the situation and the employes were
apparently satisfied Miss Williams had not completed her
six-month probationary period.
Smith said petitions protesting Miss Williams dismissal
would be circulated among employes around campus and
students at Hume.
IT WAS REPORTED in The Alligator that employes
from Simpson, Trusler and Hume residence halls walked
off their jobs at 4:15 to hold a meeting with Smith.
Subsequently, Button said he received calls inquiring
whether there had been a strike by employes.

when they see their neighbors
put worthwhile objects in the
dumpster. She has found lamps,
radios, clocks, sheets, clothes,
mattresses and books that have
been thrown away. Students
throw away things that Mrs.
Connelly and her neighbors cant
afford to buy.
MRS. CONNELLY has been
helping families in Windsor for
the nine years she has lived
there. There is so much to be
done that she can no longer
handle it all herself. She is
appealing to students to donate
the useful articles they no longer
want, but that can be of great
use to someone with no money.
Clothing and other articles
can be brought to the Bible
Book Store at 10 E. University
Ave. or you can call Mrs.
Connelly after 5:30 pjn. at
372-5269.
Most people in Windsor are
average, and they really cant
help each other financially, she
said. Mrs. Connelly said
that the students can help by
donating the things they would
throw away.
THE WELFARE families in
Windsor have many children and
others take in foster children.
Mrs. Connelly has had foster
children and says that the
welfare allotment for each child
isnt enough money to raise the
child. She gives a lot of clothing
to these families.
One family that doesnt
accept welfare has six children at

* /

Tuesday, March 9, 1971

home. The husband does odd
jobs and makes a small amount
of money. The heater in their
house doesnt work, and they
dont have enough food. Mrs.
Connelly had helped keep the
children in school with the
clothing donations.
Another family doesnt have
running water in their house.
The washing is done outside,
with an old wringer washer. The
water comes from a hand pump.
Many families have chickens,
turkeys and gardens to
supplement their food supply.
Gardens are hard to raise,
because the soil is sandy and the
nutrients must be added.
The welfare residents of
Windsor are constantly looking
for new thrift shops and other
ways to subsist. UF students
could help them greatly by
collecting usable articles that
they would throw away.
Mm
GAINESVILLE POLICE
sergeant says marijuana
possession and sale daws
outdated ..... page 5
Classifieds 12
Editorials .10
Entertainment .11
Movies 13
Page of Record 6
Sports 14



, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 9,1971

Page 2

Watch Gator
Advertisers

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the*
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second Class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

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*
The sights and sounds of the
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weekend were enough to delight
the senses and imagination of
any little girl or boy.

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Photos By Tom Kennedy



Group Seeks
Anlipollution
Strategies

Krishna, Vedic Study
To Hold Love Feast

By TIM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Krishna House and
Vedic Study Club will sponsor a
love feast Friday night in the
Plaza of the Americas and is
inviting all members of the
university community.
Admission is free.
THE KRISHNA HOUSE is
part of the Hare Krishna
Movement which was founded
by his Divine Grace A.C.
Bhakti ve danta Swami
Prabhupada. Krishna House
members worship the teachings
of Lord Chaitanya, who,
according to David Liberman,
4JM, president of UFs Krishna
House, is God.
Lord Chaitanya appeared in
India 500 years ago, Liberman
said, he was the last major
avitar to appear on earth.
An avitar, Liberman
explained, is a being with
god-like qualities such as Christ
or Buddha, only lord Chaitanya
is God.
FRIDAY NIGHTS love feast
is being held in honor of Lord
Chaitanyas birthday. Liberman
assures the occasion will be a
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Activists with ideas are wanted by Environmental
Action, Inc., a Washington based group formed to
focus concern upon what it calls the environmental
crisis.
According to its current newsletter, the group is
sponsoring an ecotage (from the words ecology
and sabotage) contest.
THE ORGAINZATION wants to know tactics
that can be used by concerned citizens to stop
corporations or institutions from polluting,
exploiting or otherwise threatening the survival of
the earth and its inhabitants.
The first place winner will be given a trip to
Washington, D.C., to receive the Golden Fox
award, named in honor of the so-called fox of Kane
County, Illinois who has been harassing polluters.
His actions have included hanging on a railroad
bridge a 60 foot banner that said, Were involved,
in killing Lake Michigan UJS. Steel. He has also
blocked industrial drainage systems, sealed off
polluting smokestacks and dumped the effluent

very auspicious event,
featuring nectar, sweet balls, and
other Eastern vegetarian
dishes.
All those attending are
encouraged to arrive at 6:30
p.m. the feast begins at
moonrise and to bring incense
and musical instruments. Among
other things, the feast will
feature group chanting of the
Hare Krishna Mantra:
Hare Krishna
Hare Krishna
Krishna, Krishna
Hare Hare
Hare Rama
Hare Rama
Rama, Rama
Hare Hare

I am a TRINITARIAN
I sought my SoaL,
but my soal I
couldn't see.
t I sought my God
but my God eluded me.
I i sought my Bizofberz
and I found ALL THREE.
A Our youngest seminarian helps the
prisoner, the addict, the alcoholic,
the retarded, the migrant
the left out. We don't all
directly touch the poor.
Some teach, staff parishes,
HPreach, do research work.
-V* Vi Come live the generous love
V* of the
Father Joseph I
Grey Rock, Garrison, Maryland 21055
Dear Father Joseph,
I Tell me about your way of life.
| Name
I age |
Address
J City i State Zip : J
(check preference) Priest Brother

Mr Beau Jangles
Clothes For You

PIZZA
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376-3354
Free-hot-fast
Delivery
2 FREE Italian
Salads with each pizza
Delivery from
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FIND IT y t\X
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS \Kh^)

treated sewage of a corporation in the lobby of its
headquarters, the newsletter said.
ENTRIES MAY range from simple ideas which
embarrass corporations to more complex plans for
stopping corporate irresponsibility.
Rules are as follows:
Entrants may submit more than one idea.
All entries must be typewritten, double-spaced.
More than one person may work on an entry,
but only one representative can receive the award.
Length should be limited to 100 pages.
Only tactics received by April 20,1971 will be
judged.
All submissions become the property of
Environmental Action and may be reproduced by
the organization.
Second place prize is an ecology library, and 10
third place winners will receive copies of Profiles in
Corporate Irresponsibility and Earth Tool Kit.
Contest entries should be mailed to Ecotage,
Environmental Action, Room 731, 1346
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.
20036.

ImlFsmn
ITO TAMPA I
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I THRU SERVICE I
TO SARASOTA, I
FT. MYERS I
Trailways
527 W. University I
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JB|| St. Petersburg 5.50 w
7 convenient trips daily
Ft. Myers 8.80
H| Fast Thru service |B
Jacksonville 2.55
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: '1; Panama City 8.85
iM The only Thru service M

Tuasday, March 9,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

DFSDFD

Page 3



Page 4

; Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, March 9,1971

Sabbath Prayer Service Held For Jews

By TERRY TENENBAUM
Alligator Staff Writer
Let My People Go was the
theme of a sabbath prayer
service and community rally
held at the Hillel Foundation
Friday night during which
university community leaders
spoke to an overflow audience
of 550 on the persecution of 3.5
million Russian Jews.
Speakers included Gainesville
Mayor Perry McGriff, UF Arts
and Sciences Associate Dean
Harold Stahmer, Father Michael
Gannon, Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder and Dr. Irving
Goffman, professor and
chairman of the UF economics
department.
OTHER SPEAKERS
INCLUDED Dr. Jerald
Bernstein, associate professor of
neuroscience; and Rabbi Michael
Monson, director of the Hillel
Foundation the UF Jewish
center.
On behalf of the city of
Gainesville, McGriff told the
audience that we are deeply
sorrowed because of people not
being able to worship in the way
they know is right. I would like
to express our concern as people
not of the Jewish faith that we
are behind you and will help in

Estimates Put Student Food Stamp
Use Near 350 Households

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligrtor Writer
The Alachua County Food
Stamp Program estimates that
nearly 350 student households
are using food stamps this
quarter.
A household is defined in
terms of living under the same
roof and is not restricted to
related families.
A FEDERAL BILL presently
submitted to Congress would
eliminate aid to unrelated
families, but this policy change
is not yet official, according to
Mrs. Ruth Chandler, a worker in
the food stamp program.
The amount of aid given a
household is dependent upon
the total income of members,

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(|Hfi§it
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FATHER MICHAEL GANNON
... common bond in one God
any way possible.
Speaking as a student, as a
Jew, as an American citizen and
most importantly as a human
being, Uhlfelder said students
and students in general, worry
and are concerned about issues
that take place within their own
environment and forget about
those across the sea who share a
common bond.
REFERRING TO THE plight
of the Jews of the Soviet Union,
Uhlfelder said not many people

adjusted according to the
member of dependents in the
household.
Tuition and the cost of
supplies are deducted from
student incomes before they are
evaluated for eligibility for
stamps.
In addition to limited
incomes, a household cannot
possess over SI2OO in liquid
assets in order to qualify.
Student loans and parental aid
are considered income by the
food stamp office.
A TYPICAL STUDENT
family of three with a combined
income of $230 a month and
deduction of SSO a month for
tuition and a pro-rated
deduction of $lO a month for
books, would have to pay S4O in

have true freedom. I think that
this is our most precious gift, for
if we dont have freedom of
religion and freedom of
association, we really arent
anything regardless of the
materialistic benefits we may
have.
Unless we can develop an
awareness between individuals so
that we can feel for individuals
and can understand their
grievances and can understand
what our fellow man is being
oppressed about, then we really
arent human beings and really
dont have freedom.
For unless we can care, we
arent true human beings,
Uhlfelder said.
FATHER GANNON spoke of
the common bond of Jews and
Christians in praying to the same
God and the common cause of
both religion in fighting religious
intolerance.
Professors Bernstein and
Goffman, both of whom visited
the Soviet Union last summer
for academic conferences, dted
their first-hand observations of
the persecution of Russian Jews
and of the inability of Soviet
Jews who want to go to Israel to
get permission from the Soviet
government to do so.
Goffman spoke of the lack of

order to receive SB4 worth of
food stamps.
The stamps are accepted by
almost all Gainesville grocers
without a time limit on their
use.
Last month food stamps
brought $250,000 worth of
business to Alachua County,
Mrs. Chandler said.

o,,er 9od at 'CIA/ io cl
sw 13 st. SW 13 St.
I jS 22A HUT I
I V
COUPON) T f
Tossed Salad I
H Italian
r OC ALL WEEK LONG
K French Dressing -coupon valid march 9 thru 16- H
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HR I's Ini ? m Jpf M'mJMM] Ms 0m
Hi Iff I if 'HI' I w ~jg
Y 'i x* s Y " ~f v.**
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DR. IRVING GOFFMAN
... visited U.S.S.R. last summer

concern that Jews showed in the
late 1930s when the likelihood
of the annihilation of European
Jewry became known.
THIS LACK OF concern,
among other factors, led to the
eventual slaughter of six million
Jews by the Nazis.
Since that time, Goffman
said, Jews the world over have
vowed that never again would
such a holocaust be allowed to
happen.

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FREE Music Literature
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I wept that night (after
visiting a Russian Synagogue),
and made a pledge never
again, Goffman concluded.
Asked about his reaction to
the Let My People Go rally,
Rabbi Monson said: I was truly
overwhelmed by the outstanding
student support for the Soviet
Jewry rally. I think it shows the
real concern of the university
and Gainesville communities for
the persecution of the Jews in
the Soviet Union.



GPD Detective Advises Lower Penalties

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Assignments Editor
I IThe
The IThe laws are outdated with
relationship to possession and
sale of marijuana, according to
Detective Sergeant Charles
Snowden of the Gainesville
Police Department (GPD).
Speaking last week at an open
meeting of the Student
Government sponsored
Marijuana Study Committee
Snowden said, The sale of
marijuana should be taken out
of the uniform narcotic law.
IT WAS the last open meeting
in which the public was invited

Gainesville To Have Eastern
Airlines Jet Service In April

By CARLOS J.LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
' a
Gainesville will have jet
service starting April 25,
according to Eastern Airlines
Vice President for Florida and
the Caribbean Capt. John
Halbert.
The service, Halbert said, will
consist of two daily DC 9 flights,
one to Miami and one to
Atlanta. Both flights will be in
the afternoon.
THE FLIGHT as now planned
Study Rooms
To Opo During
Final Exam Woek
The following are classrooms
available for study during final
exams from March 13-19.
Rooms 109, 125, 127 Little
Hall, rooms 227, 229, 230
Mechanical Engineering
Building.
'riiese rooms will be open to
students from 9 pjn. to 8 ajn.
on the designated days.

PINNA PERFORMANCE MOTORS
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to express its views on the
subject of marijuana. The
committee is preparing a report
based on the social, legal and
medical aspects of marijuana
use.
The report will be presented
to the Florida state legislature
when it convenes in April to
recommend legislative changes
on current laws dealing with
marijuana possession and sale.
Although Snowden was not
speaking as a representative of
the GPD he said it was his belief
that his views concerning
marijuana offenders were typical
of other members of the GPD.
Someone is going to have to
change the laws pertaining to

will also include Tallahassee, but
by September Tallahassee will be
dropped from the schedule and
the flights will be as originally
planned from Miami, to
Gainesville and Atlanta and
back.
The Eastern vice president
indicated the scheduling for jet
flights to Gainesville is not a
test; because the airline has no
intention of dropping the
flights.
Halbert said Eastern will have
to keep the turbo-prop twice
weekly Electra flights, since the
Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB)
has maintained the airline has to
continue serving Ocala.
EASTERN, MEANWHILE, is
trying to drop the Electra
flights, and has appealed to the
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marijuana in reference to
possession and sale;theyre both
in the same statute, he said.
They should be separated with
different legislation on the two
categories.
ALTHOUGH SNOWDEN said
he did not feel marijuana should
be legalized, the penalities
should be lowered from a felony
to a misdemeanor at least in the
case of first and second time
offenders.
He also said that gifts of
marijuana should not be
categorized in terms of penalties
along with sale of marijuana.
We dont have the men or
the resources to enforce the
law, Snowden said.

CAB to let them drop Ocala
from their schedule.
The basis for dropping the
service, Halbert said, is that
Ocala is still served by small
airlines such as Swanee and
Executive.
However, small airline carriers
can drop a city from their
schedule without consent from
the CAB.
Halbert said the facilities at
the Gainesville airport are
adequate enough to handle the
new service.
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"I HAVE PERSONALLY
come in contact with people in
possession of marijuana whom I
did not charge. I have been able
to send them to other places for
help such as the Corner
Drugstore or Dr. Gervais (of the
mental health clinic).
Snowden commended the
methodone maintenance

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Tuesday, March 9,1971, The Florida Alligator,

program in existence in
Gainesville. Methodone is used
to treat heroin addicts as a
substitute for heroin.
The committee will meet for
the last time Friday to formulate
plans for the report which will
be released at the beginning of
next quarter.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 9,1971

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

GRADUATE COUNCIL
The Graduate Council will meet
Thursday, March 18, at 1:30
p.m. in Room 264, Graduate
School and International Studies
Building.
ROTC DEPOSITS
Former and current ROTC
students who have not received a
refund of the uniform deposit
are asked to report to the ROTC
Supply Facility so refunds may
be processed. Uniforms and
materials not returned by those
students no longer in the
program will be charged against
the deposit before any refunds
are made.
The Supply Facility is open
Monday-Friday from 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. and 1:30 to 4:30
p.m. Deadline for processing
funds is March 31.
PROCESSING GRADES
Faculties of the various
academic units should follow the
schedule below in approving
candidates for degrees for winter
quarter commencement, March
20:
1. Grade Sheets should be
completed and returned to the
Registrar's Office by 12 noon
Thursday, March 18.
2. Grades for candidates will
be available from the Registrar
by 9 a.m. Friday, March 19.
3. College faculty meetings to
pass on candidates should be
scheduled for Friday, March 19.
4. Colleges will post lists of
graduates by 8 a.m. Saturday,
March 20, with honors or high
honors indicated.
GRADUATING SENIORS
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
LOAN BORROWERS
If a graduating senior has a
National Defense Student Loan
or a S.A.F.E. loan, he must
complete the exit interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep accounts current.

AUTO LOANS AVAILABLE I
faculty I

UNION MANAGERS
Members of the Union Board of
Managers will be in the Arts and
Crafts center Thursday, March
11 at 8 p.m. to hear comments
students may have concerning
the operation of the center.
STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRE
Results of a questionnaire for
testing student attitudes on a
wide range of topics are reported
by the Self Study Office of the
University of Florida. The
questionnaire consisted of 78
statements that a mixed group
of students scored in five
categories from "strongly agree"
to "strongly disagree." 1,421
students scored the
questionnaire, which was
presented for completion in
classes meeting at the third
period on January 18. The
distribution by class was 333
Lower Division, 920 Upper
Division, 132 Graudate, and 36
did not indicate classification.
Although randomness of
representation was desired and
attempted, a scientific sampling
technique was not employed.
Hence, the results are presented
merely as a survey of attitudes
of over 1,400 students in the 12
U F colleges enrolling
undergraduates.
Strong agreement (5 to 1 or
more) was given the following
statements by the respondents.
Items are numbered as on the
questionnaire.
I) Most students prefer to
live off campus (80% agree, 7%
disagree).
4) The faculty should
stimulate and develop the
capacity of students for
self-directed, independent study
that will continue after
graduation (89%-3%).
5) Students should have wide
latitude in selecting courses
taken toward a degree
(79%-15%).
8) Teaching at the UF is as
good as or better than at the
high school I attended
(74%-15%).
II) Most professors are
available to their students for
help with course work when
requested (79%-11%)
19) Foreign students are
welcomed and well treated on
the campus (62%-8%).
27) The majority of students
are not as active in campus

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

activities as would be desired
(73%-8%).
31) The advanced or
pre-registration system is
successful (80%-12%).
36) The UF faculty should
make students aware of great
social problems and the channels
open to correct the related social
conditions (77%-10%).
42) Opportunities for
undergraduates to earn credit
through independent study or
research under faculty guidance
should be expanded (84%-3%)
53) Professors seldom miss
class and then usually provide a
substitute (87%-5%).
54) Most professors treat
their students fairly in class and
in examinations (82%-9%),
56) Departmentally oriented
courses should be available as an
alternate choice to
comprehensive courses as now
taught in University College
(69%-6%).
62) UF campus publications
keep students well informed of
campus events (82%-10%).
A preponderantly negative
response was given by student
replies to the following
statement:
35) Students should be
admitted by quotas to assure
proportionate representation of
minorities (14% agree-67%
disagree)
The 1,421 student
responses may be compared with
the responses of 1,242 faculty
members (about 60% of the
faculty) to a group of statements
that were used on the faculty
questionnaire and repeated on
the student questionnaire. For
the following statements, both
student and faculty responses
were in agreement by at least
two to one for. Statements 4,5,
36, and 56, quoted above, may
be included in this category of
joint approval.
26) The University should
increase emphasis upon the
performing arts and other
cultural aspects of student and
faculty life (student response:
51% agree -18% disagree).
43) It is of first importance
to prepare students for a
vocation that gives reasonable
assurance of employment upon
graduation (60%-28%).
44) The honors programs
have proved successful and
should be extended to a much
increased percentage of
undergraduates (35%-11%).

46) The UF library that I use
has given me satisfactory service
on essentially all occasions
needed (64%-22%).
50) I would recommend that
my brother or sister ("son or
daughter" on faculty
questionnaire) come to the UF
(61%-20%).
67) Students benefit from
the national reputation brought
to the UF by highly qualified
researchers and scholars
(64%-16%).
69) A high priority should be
assigned to a "center for the
performing arts" for plays,
concerts, and other cultural

staff personnel
column

RETIREMENT
Q. Is an employee who reaches age 65 but has not served 10 years
with the University entitled to any pro-rated retirement benefit?
A. The first requirement under any of the state retirement plans, Plan
A, Plan B, or the new Florida Retirement System, that an employee
must meet to be eligible for retirement benefits is that he have 10
years of full time service credit with the state. He would, however,
still be able to receive a full refund of his contributions when he
resigns.
Also, under the new Florida Retirement System, there are other
benefits that may accrue to him while he is a member that make it act
as an insurance policy for him such as the disability and widow's
benefits.
LAYOFF
Q. I was paid from grant funds for three years and then the grant
expired and was not renewed for two months. During those two
months I continued working my same job but was paid from OPS
funds. Someone told me this meant I had a break in service and when
the grant was renewed, I started over as a new employee. Is this
correct? I did not miss a day of work during this time.
A. Prior to the Layoff Policy announced October 14, 1970, the
conditions you describe would have resulted in a break in service for
you if you did not exercise your rights under the existing seniority
policy. The seniority policy, which was published in the Staff
Handbook, explained that an employee must exercise his right under
the policy within 10 working days of the layoff or this right would be
forfeited.
You see, placing you on OPS status is the same as a layoff. The
personnel policies for staff employees apply only to those paid from a
state or grant line in the salary budget. OPS funds are a temporary
fund source. Under the new layoff policy, any employee who is laid
off automatically comes under the jurisdiction of this policy. If an
employee is not placed in another position in accordance with the
procedures of this policy prior to the effective date of the layoff, he
would not be considered to have had a break in service if reemployed
by the University or another state agency within 12 calendar months.
Should there be any possibility of this happening again, you should
discuss your rights with your supervisor or department chairman at
least a month in advance of the grant expiration.

The University Calendar will be
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G-72 Union.

events (57%-19%).
71) The UF should aid
students in achieving satisfaction
in their campus social lives as a
factor in personal development
(63%-14%).
The percentages quoted for
and against each statement fail
to add up to 100%, because a
box was provided for the
student to check "no opinion";
also, students occasionally
omitted an item. Additional
detailed information regarding
the student questionnaire can be
obtained from the Self Study
Office, 334 Tigert Hall,
Telephone 392-2321.



Black League Publishes Newspaper

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
- :<> a
Black people are getting it
together** with a new
underground newspaper, The
Black Experience.
The first eight page issue was
published Saturday by the
Leagues of Blackness, an
off-campus black action group,
according to Charles E. Goston,
Chancellor of Information for
the staff, and UF student.
OUR MAIN GOAL,** says
Hyper-Annual
Tournament
Set Thursday
By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Fifth Hyper-Annual
Occasional Tournament will be
presented this year by Pat
Rowan*s freshman design class
Thursday at 9:46 a.m.
The exhibit will be on display
at the Plaza of the Americas.
THIS ARTISTIC happening**
will consist of structured art in a
legitimate art form. The groups
main concern is the interaction
between the group and viewers,
and translating some imagery
back and forth.
This is the design class final
project and final exam. Their
project will be judged by a
selected group of art professors,
and they will need the
participation of the student
body at the Plaza for discussion
purposes.
Certain elements are
prepared for the exhibit, but
most of it will be a surprise. The
script which sets forth a bare
outline will not work if we know
or see it beforehand, said Jess
Simpson, 3rd year education
student, enrolled in the class.
The exhibit will be a
happening. Nine students are
enrolled in the class, the
students and teacher are way out
people. Im sure all who come to
the happening will be pleasantly
surprised and interested in the
exhibit, Simpson said.

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Goston, is to instill and project
the black formulation of black
information to our black people
and those who are concerned.
Black people are having
injustices done to them and
what they read in the Gainesville
Sun and other papers is not the
truth, he added.
Featured in the 15-cent paper
are articles concerning the
Leagues of Blackness* free
breakfast program for children,
alleged police harassment and
black accomplishments.
THE BLACK EXPLOSION
Staff thinks that the
establishment and underground
papers arent serving the black
community properly.
The -establishment papers
usually get the viewpoints of
authorities and the middle-class
white person, Miss Betty J.
Stewart, staff member,
explains. Once in awhile theyll
do something like the incident at
Book Exchange
To Begin Buying
And Soiling Texts
Student Governments Book
Exchange will be collecting
textbooks to sell next quarter
from 1-5 pm. March 16,17, and
18 in Room 306, Reitz Union.
There is a 10 cent charge on
each book collected for sale.
BOOKS WILL BE sold spring
quarter from Room 306 in the
Union on March 26, 29, 30, 31,
and April 1 and 2.
Students are urged to use the
book exchange instead of selling
their books to a bookstore. The
objective of the exchange is to
help students get the best prices
in buying and selling used texts.
If the book exchange does not
have a book desired by a
student, it will make an effort to
find it.

mm'
/j:-;;'
M bl
' I I Bf s;
CHARLES E. GOSTON
... Chancellor of Information
Raiford, when it gets to the
point of exploding.
Goston says that The
Alligator serves basically as a
record of university activities,

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while noting that on a rating
scale of coverage about blacks,
excluding the Black Explosion,
The Alligator would be
considered the best, then the
Eye, an underground paper and
then the Gainesville Sun.
ABOUT THE EYE, Miss
Stewart commented, The Eye
is catering to young whites, with
articles about dope and cops.
They really dont care about
whats happening to black
people.
Goston noted the need for
blade staff members on local
papers, at the same time saying
that a black paper serves the
great necessity for information
for the black community.
Between 4,000 and 5,000
copies of the first issue were
printed according to Goston.

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Tueeday, March 9.1071, The Florida Alligator,

The papers staff is composed of
UF and Santa Fe Junior College
students and will be published
twice monthly.

Mr. Beau Jangles
Clothes For You

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School, a
fully accredited University of
Arizona program, will offer, July 5 to
August 14, art, folklore, geography,
history, political science, language
and literature courses. Tuition, $160;
board and room, $155. Write Dr.
Juan B. Rael, Office of Summer
Session, University of Arizona,
Tucson, Arizona 85721.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tfca Florida AMgtor, Tuwday, IMi, 197 t

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
JUSTICE.
It is not an absolute ... not
one of those few things which
maintains a level of consistency
that can be relied upon.
TO THE CONTRARY, justice
varies considerably with regard
to specific cases and
circumstances.
In our American system of
justice we have written
objectives to keep in mind. We
have standards that are applied
to efforts of the system, in order
to seek the truth.
But, in our attempts to
ascertain the truth, justice finds
itself strained at all
ends... strained to the degree
that imperfect men are involved
in making judgments of each
other.
A CASE IN point the trial
of Terry O. Grubb.
Grubb, an 18-year-old former
Alachua County Jail inmate,
went to trial March 2 and 3,
charged with the first-degree
murder of fellow cellmate
William M. Baugher.
Baugher was found hanging
from the top of Iris cell door last
Sept. 22... a sheet tied around
his neck, a rag stuffed in his
mouth and his head shaved.
A GRAND JURY
investigation of the death in
October resulted in a bill of
indictment for Grubb, charging
him with strangling Baugher to
death in the 4 x 8 foot cell that
housed four men.
I waited with great interest
for the trial to come. Last week,
journeying to Macclenny, I saw
justice play its part in the life of
Terry Grubb.
Two days of sensational
testimony from jail inmates were
presented to the 11 man one
woman jury. Accounts of
sodomy relations of Grubb and
cellmate Robert Waddell with

JURY Os 11 MEN AND ONE WOMAN IN MACCLENNY
... declared Grubb guilty of first degree murder in jail death of Bill Baugher

lIIMHHi I

Baugher including detailed
descriptions of how 25-year-old
Baugher was forced to
participate against his will.
IN THE STATE vs. Terry 0.
Grubb there was little doubt
that the defendant very likely
was the man responsible for
Baughers death. And, in spite of
testimony by Alachua County
Medical Examiner Dr. Robert
Klein that the death was a
suicide ... in my opinion,* the
jury returned a guilty verdict,
recommending mercy.
I watched Terry Grubb as the
courts clerk took the written
verdict from Judge John Crews
and read it aloud. Then I saw
Terry Grubb, who had seemed
very much unaffected by any of
the testimony in the trial, slump
in his chair.
Judge Crews told him to stand
and then informed him he was

Trial Bv Jury: Is Our

sentenced to spend the rest of
his natural life in the state prison
at Raiford.
FOR THE FIRST time in two
days I saw Terry 0. Grubb
submit to emotion, his glassy
eyes fill with the tears he would
choose not to shed.
Only an hour earlier, the jury
had left to deliberate, attorneys
went to make-shift offices in the
Baker County Courthouse to
wait, and Grubb sat in the
courtroom thinking.
1 had met him once
before ... during a tour of the
Alachua County jail last October
which Sheriff Joe Crevasse
guided me through. I was
introduced to him as we came to
a cell in the back of one of the
cdlblocks.
AT THAT TIME he was
congenial and greeted the sheriff
and myself. It was difficult not

Terry Grubb
This could mean the chair... I dont
want to get it for something I didnt do.
Its a good thing Waddell and t I arent
on trial for sodomy... wed sure be
convicted for that.

to notice a large bruise on his
face at that time. I was told he
had inflicted the causal blow
himself.
Now, months later, I sat a few
inches from him. He was not
handcuffed, and often covered
his mouth with his hand. His eyes
sometimes stared at the floor or
roamed incessantly.
He said he was nervous. Not
frightened. Nervous.
THIS COULD mean the
chair, he said.
It was not a time for light
conversation or pleasantries.
He started to talk about
Raiford and the recent trouble
there. His attorney, Herbert
Schwartz, entered the
courtroom and advised him not
to speak about Raiford.
WE CONTINUED talking
about him. Hes the second of

four sons bom to a large Ohio
family.
His older brother has been in
Vietnam for several months.
He said his parents were aware
he was on trial for murder, but
they dont really keep in touch.
HE NEVER finished junior
high school, dropping out after
eighth grade.
After two full days in the
courtroom, the light-blue
pinstriped shirt he was wearing
was showing wrinkles, but his
narrow tie was still high on the
collar.
He was quiet for a few
moments and then said Its a
good thing Waddell (former
cellmate) and I arent on trial for
sodomy .. wed sure be
convicted for that.
HE WAS MAKING reference
to the testimony by Waddell and
supportive accounts by other
inmates that told of forced
homosexual relations between
Baugher, Grubb and
Waddell... testimony that told
how Grubb, using a razor blade
and threats of force, coerced
Baugher into performing oral
copulation upon himself and
Waddell.
His hands, resting on the
wooden barrier that separated
the gallery from the attorneys'
desks, were not huge, but
swollen like fingers made
them look bigger than they
actually are.
Then he stared into my face,
looking coldly sober, and said,
I don't want to get it for
something I didn't do.
I TRADED places with him in
my mind and it was a little easier
to offer an unspoken sympathy.
I didn't bother to ask myself
if this man before me looked as
if he was capable of murder.
Theres some of that in all of us.
This man, however, was not
one with a healthy personality.
He was shown through inmate

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r System Infallible?

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testimony to be often cruel,
vicious and threatening. He had
a great power for vindictiveness.
THIS WAS A man who
seemed to lack control over
other men ... a man who, given
the opportunity to exercise any
kind of power over others,
readily misused it.
As early as last fall I had a
personal opinion of the relative
guilt or innocence of Grubb.
After hearing facts presented in
the trial I still believed he was

JfljH' : Gene Whitworth
We proved that there was a hanging, through
circumstantial evidence, and then, through other testimony
|L~ proved that Grubb admitted kilting Baugher.
r ; r-*~- :
Herb Schwartz £p^j§
Judge Crews is one of the finest trial judges in the Z/ v jw/// /[
country ... but / think he made a mistake... the court was jjjjS | JuL/y/ j
Art by Simon Bamot lmn\

probably guilty.
But, because of Dr. Kleins
testimony that, in his considered
opinion, the death of Baugher
was a suicide, I had reasonable
doubt.
LEGAL ARGUMENTS
between Schwartz for the
defense and Eugene Whitworth
for the state focused on
Schwartz contention that the
state had failed to establish
corpus delicti (facts constituting
or proving a crime).
Schwartz argued that the
testimony of witnesses to
sodomy relations and supposed
admissions of guilt by Grubb to
other inmates was not admissible
evidence because corpus delicti
was not first laid as a predicate.
Whitworth had consistently
countered with statements of
how eventually his witnesses
stories would establish corpus
delicti.
AND CONSISTENTLY Crews
ruled that the state was in order
with its presentation of
evidence.
Two full days of that
objection by Schwartz ended
with the lawyers giving the jury
closing remarks before Grubb's
fate would be left to the jury.
In my own mind, though I
was convinced that Grubb
played some part in Baugher's
death, I realized that I could not
vote him guilty had I been a
juror.
JUSTICE DEMANDS a
compliance with standards and a
recognition of certain

responsibilities the state must
discharge in bringing a case to
court. Among those
responsibilities in criminal cases
is an initial establishment of
corpus delicti.
In the State vs. Terry O.
Grubb, that responsibility of the
state was not fulfilled beyond a
reasonable doubt.
After one hour and 27
minutes of deliberation, the jury
rendered Grubb guilty with
the recommendation of mercy.
I could not have concurred in
that verdict.
THERE WERE at least two
major reasons that should have
constituted grounds for
reasonable doubt in the minds of
reasonable men.
Dr. Kleins testimony that
Baugher's body showed no signs
of violence that immediately
preceded death, that no signs of
a struggle were found on the
body, and that the death was a
suicide was testimony that
should not have been discounted
by reasonable men.
Secondly, in spite of
testimony by states witnesses
that Grubb forced Baugher into
acts of sodomy, tore a sheet up
and made it into a rope the night
of the death claiming Were
going to have a hangin' party
too, and supposed subsequent
confessions of guilt by Grubb, at
no time did a witness establish
Grubb as the source of Baughers
death.
PERHAPS, I thought to
myself, people can justify this

JUDGE JOHN CREWS
... overruled many of defense's objections

conviction by looking at the
overwhelming evidence against
Grubb, his probable guilt and an
accompanying belief that this is
enough to legally convict a man.
Our law is more objective
than that.
A man accused of a crime is
innocent until the state can
prove that, in fact, it was he who
committed the crime.
SUSPICION IS not enough.
The sensational nature of the
Grubb trial most definitely had
to play a part in the jury's
decision. Macdenny, a small
rural town, was not accustomed
to hearing some of the harsh
realities of jail life, i.e. violence,
sodomy, tragic death.
Most of the inhabitants of
Macclenny are life-long
residents.
WHEN ASKED what the
population of the town was, an
elderly woman who served as a
bailiff at the trial offered, It's
4,000, if ya count niggers and
dogs.
Whitworth, in presenting the
state's case, proved beyond
doubt that Grubb was not the
neighborly type. After months
in a crowded jail, however,
behavior becoming human
beings has not been known to be
standard.
If William Martin Baugher met
death at his own hands or
through the actions of Gmbb, an
outmoded,- overcrowded and
poorly staffed county jail must
share the blame.
TERRY O. GRUBB, a large
scar protruding blatantly from
the left side of his neck (a scar
self-inflicted with a razor blade),
has been denied a new trial by
Crews in a motion filed by
Schwartz.
Schwartz, in an interview
March 5, said he believes the
court was in error in allowing
testimony of witnesses to
elaborate on Grubb's sodomy
relations "without first
establishing corpus delicti.
Judge Crews is one of the
finest trial judges anywhere in
the country, Schwartz said,
"but I think he made a
mistake.
THE JURY'S verdict,
Schwartz said, would have been
the same anywhere ... because
of the error of the court in
allowing the testimony that was
distasteful to the jury before

Tuday, March 9,1971, Tha Florida All leaser.

corpus delicti was established.
Schwartz expressed
confidence in his belief that a
higher court might see the merit
of his argument apd reverse the
decision.
Law is a very delicate tod,
he explained. As Churchill said,
a trial by a jury of lay citizens of
the community is not a very
good system of justice, but no
one has come up with a better
one.
WHITWORTH, assistant state
attorney, said in an interview
Monday that the state did
establish corpus delicti enroute
to securing Grubb's conviction.
"Without an eyewitness
account a corpus delicti can still
be established, he said. We
proved that there was a hanging,
through circumstantial evidence,
and then, through other
testimony, proved that Grubb
admitted killing Baugher.
Whitworth said that a man
cannot be convicted only on
statements he reportedly made
to another person.
HOWEVER, Whitworth said,
It's all intertwined. A corpus
delicti is proved not only
through circumstantial evidence
but also through the defendant's
statements to other persons.
Dr. Klein's testimony that the
death was a suicide must be
regarded as an opinion,
Whitworth said. The jury is not
bound by an opinion.
Law is a fascinating
intangible ... capable of growth,
interpretation and
misinterpretation. While it is
designed to help rule the
inadequacies of men, it is often
plagued by some of its own.
TERRY 0. GRUBB... 18-
years 01d... now a convicted
murderer ... to spend the rest
of his natural life in a prison...
I don't question the
preparedness, sincerity of intent
or effort of either side in the
trial. Each gathered data and
testimony which provided proof
of the competency of each.
But, after having seen justice
in one of its more crucial plays, I
do question our own fallibility
as men and our precarious
position in attempting to do the
'right thing.'
For, in the end, the system's
flaws are merely manifestations
of the flaws in a much more
complex system that of
humanity.

Page 9



Page 10

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuasday, March 9,1971

A nimals are such agreeable friends; they
05A: no questions, pass no criticisms
EDITORIAL
Seek Realistic
Cost Estimates
Gov. Ruebin Askew announced last week that the
proposed UF College of Veterinary Medicine is too
expensive and recommended that $200,000 be allocated to
seek better alternatives.
We agree that every effort should be made to research
and develop any conceivable alternatives.
But we find Gov. Askews contention that the proposed
college of veterinary medicine is too expensive, and thus
unjustified, to be premature, unsupported and in all
likelihood inaccurate.
No reliable or official cost estimate for the vet school has
ever been cited.
An official planning committee, reporting to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell, was organized several years
ago to study two necessary objectives for a Florida
* veterinary school.
4
The first was to determine how the college could
effectively be incorporated into the present university
structure. The second was to choose a dean.
Both objectives have been completed. Dr. Charles E.
Cornelius, former dean of veterinary medicine at Kansas
State University, has been hired as the new dean, and a
unique program drawing upon the strengths of both the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center and the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Science (IFAS) has been developed.
But the area of specific costs, building size and faculty
needs is still unresearched. This is Dr. Cornelius prime
objective in the next year. No true estimate has ever been
developed or cited by the planning committee.
Gov. Askew, however, has said that in view of his
information, the school is too expensive. We question the
source of his figures because, according to Dr. E.T. York,
chairman of the official veterinary school planning
committee, no figure has at any time been given to the
governor, legislature or Board of Regents.
Thus, cited figures of an overall $24 million cost, and an
estimated $43,000 individual student cost per year can only
be based on unofficial and unreliable information and must
be considered invalid.

It further seems unrealistic for the governor to suggest
spending any money to cut down a figure that has not as
yet even been officially estimated or studied. This can only
hurt Floridas progress towards curbing the acute need for
veterinarians.
We recommend the governor immediately re-examine his
figures before they become accepted and cited as common
legislative knowledge; or common executive hearsay.
For if the effort is not made to seek realistic and
justifiable cost estimates we can resign ourselves to
ineffectually looking on as the SBS million state animal
disease loss continues to skyrocket.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

f WT-BOT THE w (AKE[ J
STUDENT'S vJONT 1| (W-ajy
===3= FLUTED COLUMNS= L__p
A Little Pome
= 1 = By JOHN PARKER=£===3

isnt there a time
when you just plain get
tired
of neon streets
and plastic freaks
and churchs bells
and cigar smoke smells?
and isnt there a time
that you swear
if you ever see another
picture of
burning babies
you Tl throw up on
the next person you see
smiling?
and isnt there a time
when you watch Bob
Hope

Alligator Staff
Marian Jadrusiak John Parker
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang Carl Crawford
Wire Editor Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications. v
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Honda Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

m:
lit 1
I^'
and he evokes gales of
sadness
so you peer into the
silver box
and see the fat man
looking back
and you know you know
you know

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681
82, 83 or 84
C. R. Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department
call: 'w^

that there isnt any Hope.
and isnt there a time
when you ve said it all
once more plainly
and sit gasping
while the fat man stares
stupidly
and you can only reply
that is not what I meant,
that is not it at all.
and isnt there a time
love
when the poet has no
works left
much worse he has no
rhyme
and in the whole world
not one tear
and no one has the time
to say
isnt there a time
isnt there a time
isnt there a time



I ii PSlifpKFlip lil

Split Weekend May Be Cure For 'Exercise

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator News Editor
The decision to run the
Florida Players* last production
of this quarter, Five Finger
Exercise,** on split weekends
may serve a purpose exactly the
opposite of which was originally
intended by the decision.
The idea was to run the show
one weekend and if box office
sales were good and if the show
came off well, a couple of extra
shows could be added to the
six-night slate, say on Tuesday
and Wednesday of this week.
WELL, SOX office sales were
horrid and, to say the least, the
show didnt give anyone who
saw it something to rush to tell a
friend who didnt see it about.
So, the split weekend run can
now give Director Richard Lake,
an assistant professor of speech,
a few extra days to do a little
patchwork.
The major failure of the play,
as this objective observer can
best surmise, is the obvious job
of overacting done by John
Schatz, who portrays Clyde, the
son.
SCHATZ, a newcomer to the
theatre, plays the role of a
disturbed young man just
entering college, who desperately
needs someone he can relate to.
His problem is that he cant
break away from a father and
mother who have opposing
viewpoints as to the way he
should live and of his future
Marshall Breeze, who turns in
a respectable performance as a
young German who remains in
the household as a tutor for the
14-year-old daughter in the
family, seemed to have trouble
when he and Schatz were on stage
alone. He, more than any of the
other players save Jennifer
Pritchett as the daughter, carried
his character throughout,
however.
Sue Owens and Sam
IS
1 MON, TUES, WED 8,9,10 §
RUIN i
DRESSES
and X
LADIES* OR j
MBPS SUITS I
5 SHIRTS X
99<
with a dry-dning
order
Tropical Cloaners
402 NW 13th St.
{ 209 NE 16th Av.

Zimmerman, the mother and
father, did their characteri characterizations
zations characterizations fair justice, but certain
individual scenes with Schatz
proved trying for the two.
ONE PARTICULAR sequence
that comes to mind is in Act II
when Clyde has learned that his
mother and father have
dismissed the young German
houseguest. He desperately tries
to reach his mothers
nonunderstanding mind and,
failing to do so, falls into a quite
unrealistic fit of emotion,
weeping uncontrollably at her
feet. The inexperienced, but
conscientious Schatz* handling
of the scene left much to be
desired. This observer was more
occupied with Schatz* bit of
nervous overacting than with
what the scene was trying hard

;p|M|Dn|yDQQnnn^^^nnfenp r
.... __ ; __ __;L. Lj?L -' T.
L. 0.8. Presents a Lecture by
STOKELY CARMICHAEL
Tuesday, March 9, 8:00 P.M.
SFJC Southeast Center Old Ukolb High School
Tickets available at Reitz Union Box Office, or at Door
$1.25 Students $1.50 General Admission

ll
H I
RICHARD LAKE
... has time for patchwork
to communicate Understand
me. I have something to say.
The audience could not have
received the plays impact. The

less than two-thirds of a house
audience reacted to what were
probably meant to be the plays
most intense scenes with
nervous, but quite noticeable
laughter. When Gyde lies to his
father and tells him, at the end
of the first act, that he had
witnessed the foreign houseguest
and his mother kissing and
fondling one another, the
reaction seemed to be the kids
insane, instead of what it
should have been Clydes
inability to communicate his
need to be understood, to be
recognized as an individual.
Five Finger Exercise had a
number of marks against it
before it ever went into
rehearsals. For one, rehearsals
were overlapped with rehearsals
for Little Mary Sunshine, this
quarters first production. Lake

Tuesday, March 9,1971, The Florida Alligator,

was choreographer for that play
and there were only 20
rehearsals before opening night.
All these factors can be
attributed to a somewhat
lackluster production.
Five Finger Exercise can
say much more than it said this
past weekend. The split weekend
may just serve a much more
meaningful purpose. I would like
to see it again to see if it does.
Why dont you. Tickets can
be obtained at the Constans
Theatre box office for
Thursdays, Fridays or
Saturdays 8 oclock curtain.

Mr Beau Jang Clothes For You

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SA LE

£
c"'^
MUST SELL 1967 Ducati lOOcc
Scrambler 850 miles ex. cond. used
on trails luggage rack GREAT BUY!
call Jerry 392-6914 $175 (A-st-95-p)
Trailer Furnished SIOOO Total Price
Live In Or Rent Annual Income S6OO
378-8490 (A-st-97-p)
k : , x
.aR3 0| DhjmM.i^K
jVurrin^
Horlow, Cynthia P Caster Goldie Glitter
Andrea Whips, Fbtti Cokes, Lixie 8* Katy
"'Groupies' displays fantastic
personality in its foul-mouthed,
clever, patient, anxious, ugly,
beautiful, self-aware girls."
Roger Greenspun Times
Wednesday, March 10 &
o Thursday, March 11
5:30,8:00,10:30
Union Auditorium
SI.OO
Buy advance tickets Tuesday &
Wednesday from'l2:3o to 4:30 at
2nd floor box office
Sponsored by the J.W.R. Union

m
! the time has come,


9
If H /
jj and the
j Florida
I Alligator
i . is now
m

FOR SA LE
Students DONT BE FOOLED! We
guaratee the lowest prices New
walnut finished student desk, now
$27.50, bookcase with glass doors
$19.50,. 2 drawer files $19.50, Used
solid oak swivil chairs with castors
$19.95 J R OFFICE FURNITURE
620 S. MAIN STREET 376-1146
(A-15t-84-p)
HONDA 565 1966. Good
condition dependable. Great for
around town. $125 or best offer. Call
392-7253. If no answer dial
392-7254. (a-3t-98-p)
Doberman Pinscher Puppies AKC
Champion Stock Warlock line 7
weeks old only males left from
$125.00 phone 378-8067 or
378-8045 (A-10t-94-p)
1966 Yamaha 80. One owner,
female. Very dependable, new paint,
two helmets, inspected, ready to go.
Xclnt cond. $175 378-7872
(A-st-97-p)
NW NOW
AT: 1:40-3:40-5:40-7:40 & 9:40
A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
PETER SELLERS GOLDIE HAWN
VfiefieSa&r/
vfMySotq*
COLOR* From Columbia Pictures 4&13
AT: 2:25-4:15-6:05-7:55 & 9:45
LAST TIMES TODAY!
Jnmn
Groupie

!, The Floridl Alligator, Tuesday, March 9,1971

Page 12

FOR SALE
*(* i
**# w
v
1968 honda CL 175 scrambler 6400
mi. excellent condition, tool kit,
S4OO. call Jerry for more info.
376-1127 (A-3t-95-p)
WATERBEDS. 319 W. University
Ave. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mon. through
Sat. Waterbeds of Gainesville
(A-st-95-p)
1969 HONDA CL 350, excellent
condition, extra parts and helmet,
high bars, velocity stacks, extra
chrome, call Tom at 392-7003
(A-st-95-p)
Honda CL-100 1 970 under 2500 mi.
candy orange In like new condition
owned less than one year $325
w/helmeL 1519 NW 3 ave, call
376-8508 (A-st-96-p)
7 golf clubs & bag, pole lamp, iron &
board, study light, magazine rack
handbags, blouses (36) sweaters, 9Vi
m ladies shoes, books, etc. 373-3874
(A-st-96-p)
1970 Kawasaki Mach 111 500 very
good condition 3000 miles SBOO
contact Don 392-8718 (A-4t-96-p)
ZENITH CIRCLE OF SOUND
STEREO perfect condition with
extras sl49 Call Barry at 378-3029
(a-2t-98-p)
Yamaha 250 street bike less than
10,000 miles, new chain and stocket
excellent street and road
transportation S3OO or will bargain
378-2251 (a-st-98-p)
Aquarium and equipment 3O
gallons S4O or best offer call Pat at
372-1263 or stop by 1510 N.W. 55
St. (a-st-98-p)
TROMBONE perfect conn.
Constellation, worth $455, will
sacrifice for $325 Must Sell! call Rick
at 392-9524 call after 5 (a-st-98-p)
66 Mustang new engine new carb.
new tires new Insp. sticker runs great
call Faul after 6:00 pm 378-3743
(A-st-95-p)
IJ**.
I is w. w. im . V lyl *
SHOWS- A*
v3o : But Picture :
3:25 ; Best Actress :
: Best Actor :
9-25 : AliMac6raw AliMac6rawiOTT.
iOTT.! lIM j
Ml* e
JoheMarleyft .*
gp)o> *. j)jy Mitland, *
*
BBHilaOi--.
i wt *. w. im *
WINNER of
i ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATION
: Best JH:
Actress
shows ioNE OF
1:30 -THE YEARS:
3:10 : 10 BEST! :
5:15 *. diary
7:20 of a mad*
9:25 houaawlfa

I W. IMraraNy 4m. 1 *#
i
H suummm :
I Ov 9
4 :
9:30 :kst Mount I
e XC**twjlo* finwu 4
7*30 t DONALD SUTHERLAND :
,= ELLIOTT GOULD
l-J 20m CENTURY fO* PRESENTS
BUTCH CASSIOVANO:
J THE SUNDANCE KID ?
\ Florida Theatre Only#
.75 dTo Age 17 e
41.25 Age 17 up#
ALL DAY
*

FOR SALE
1966 HONDA 160. Good condition.
$185.00 or best offer. Call 376-8484
after 1:30 P.M. (A-7t-94-p)
SUPER SALE Blank 8-track 80 min
tapes 6 for $9.95 M'.JNTZ STEREO
319 N.W. 13 St. (a-20t-89-p)
Kid on the way! 35mm 2.8 kodak
range finder 20.00, for kit-10 watt
amplifier & 12 coaxial speaker
30.00, amfm sw porsche blapunkt
radio 40.00 all excellent call
392-3151 or 378-4264 (A-2t-99-p)
AR 8T stereo for car, home. Lock
system, converter, spkrs, tapes,
warranty. Cost S3OO, sell $lB5.
Unused VW header exhaust $25. Call
373-3537 (A-3t-99-p)
Portable typewriter with metal
carrying case $25. Portable
typewriter with carrying case sls,
373-4290 (A-3t-99-p)
Girls 5 speed Schwinn Suburban 5
Months old. S6O 392-8651 after 5
(A-2t-99-p)
Must sacrifice Panasonic cassette
am/fm, excellent condition year old
for only $60.00, half the original
price for financial reasons. Record
directly off radio while listening
fantastic reception, public address
system, mike, earphone, push-button
controls. Call now. Ken at 373-1542
(A-2t-99-p)
Stereo Sylvania 100 watt amp.,
Garrard changer, FM stereo,
air-suspension speakers, base, stand,
dustcover. Like new 5275.
392-7417 (A-2t-99-p)
6 string Aria classical guitar only 7
months old in mint cond. $65 will
throw in case for only $lO. Cal
Harvey at 373-3127 after 5
(A-st-99-p)
FOR RENT
v. .w.v/.\\%\v.v.v.v.v;v1v. , .v; ; ; .v;
-a
Male roommate wanted spring qtr at
Unlv Gard Trace AC pool cable TV
S4B a month + 1/3 utilities call
378-8993 after 5:00 (B-10t-95-p)
2 Bdrm furn apt available March 15
a/c heat, near campus. $122/quar.
Option for summer S9O. Call
378-4843 anytime. (b-st-98-p)
1 male roomate, spring summer or
both Landmark apt N 0.27 pool,
dishwasher, a/c, health club 47.50 +
Va utilities call 376-0529 (B-st-96-p)
Wanted: 1 or 2 female roommates for
2 bedroom AC close to campus.
$108.75 for spring quarter. Call
372-7624 (B-st-96-p)
Sublet 2 br furnished tanglewood apt
central a.c., pool, carpet, dishwasher.
Available spring qtr. $l9O mon call
378-0910 (B-st-96-p)
Sublease 2 bedroom apt. for Spring
quarter air cond. pool close to
campus University Gardens Trace
$l9O per month Call 378-2848
(b-Bt-97-p)
SINFUL apt In Village Park two
bdrm. with everything sublease
starting spring qtr. sum $l7O or
unfurnished $155 call 378-8061
(B-st-96-p)

r , 1
Todays
more for your money meal
a,moisons
__CPFETERIR
T TUESDAY'S FEATURE T
IGOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I
I ALL YOU CAN EAT I
!! 99*!?
I I WEDNESDAY'S I I
fe I FEATURE I 2
- I FISH ALMONDINE WITH I
| HUSH PUPPIES
| FRENCH FRIED 94 £ j
T
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8-FREE PARKING
mORRISOIVS
CRFETERIR beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

for rent
Roommate needed for "the place",
have your own- room right across
from tigert. live in comfort and
convenience for $82.50 per mo. call
373-4346 (B-4t-99-p)
1 male roommate spring quarter 1
blk from campus. Rent includes priv
bedroom, patio, dishwasher, utilities,
sauna, pool Call Neal 372-6272
(B-st-97-p)
ROOMMATE wanted for beautiful
tanglewood apartment with
everything. SSO/mo. + utilities.
373-3475 (B-st-97-p)
Sublet. Quiet, Comfortable, One
bdrm, A/C, patio, $95 per mo., NW
section, Call 378-6289 after 5 pm
(B-3t-97-p)
Sublet one bedroom, furnished, avail
March 25, pool, air conditioned,
sllO month, couples only, 373-2836
(b-3t-98-p)
Female Roommate wanted for spring
quarter one bedroom garage apt near
town $25 per mo plus V 2 utilities
Judy 378-5170 after 10 p.m. to 12
(b-st-98-p)
Sublet apt 2 rooms spring & summer
quarters $85.00 per month close to
campus furunlshed Call 376-8990
(b-24-98-p)
Female roommate to share single
bedroom apt for spring quarter.
Modern, well-furnished, A/r,
balcony, pool. March rent paid. Call
378-9879 (b-st-98-p)
Single room for male student 3
blocks from campus AC and
refrigerator 372-8929 after 2 p.m.
327 N.W. 15th Terrace (b-st-98-p)
Two bedroom two bathroom
furnished town house Hawaiian
Village from March 19 pool air cond
heat, suit four students or family ph
376-8107 (B-3t-99-p)
Need one female roommate for Spr.
quarter. French Quarter Apt. 17
Lease runs through June. Call
373-3539, anytime. (B-4t-99-p)
WANTED
2 roomies wanted at 352 La Bonne
Vie for spring quarter. 53.75/mo. +
utilities. Available March 20. Call
Marshall or Neil 378-7141.
(c-st-98-p)
Male roommate for spring qtr 2
bedroom landmark apt. 123 ac pool
sauna gym call 376-2768 (C-4t-96-p)
3 female freaks needed to sublet 4
bdr apt near campus air cond pool
S7O mo. inci utilities (C-4t-95-p)
1 or 2 roommates wanted for nice
apt with carpeting, dishwasher, pool.
Start spring quarter at La Bonne Vie
Cali 373-1226 (C-st-95-p)
Roomates for Spr. and Sum. share a
room for S4O or private rm. for S6O
monthly, call Wayne at 378-5900
Univ. Gardens Trace Apts.
(C-st-96-p)
Female r oo mate wanted for poolside
french quarter apt. March rent free,
only $36.75 a month, call 373-2209
anytime. (C-st-96-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Female roomate needed landmark
apt 174 available Mar 29 47.50/mo
color T.V. 2 pools dishwasher etc.
376-2184 (C-Bt-95-p)
Female roomate spring qtr. for
poolside village park apt. 48.00/mo.
plus V* util, call 372-5463 or come by
apt. 54 (C-st-97-p)
1 Female roommate wanted.
Olympia apts. $42./mo. + util. March
rent payed. Call Becky at 373-4318
(C- 3t- 97-p)
Male roommate needed. Luxury apt.
living at a reasonable price. 378-9947
(C-st-97-p)
Wanted: female roommates for the
place, luxury townhouse. S7B month,
incl. all included, call 372-6672 right
away. The best deal around
(C-3t-97-p)
1 female roommate univ gardens
4030 + utl. move In now call
378-2250 after 5:30 (C-4t-97-p)
We want a roommate, anybody
willing to pay 57.50 but you must
qualify cal* 3 73-2384 and ask for
Xavier (C-4t-97-p)
Two Female Roommates wanted
spring quarter. Beautiful 3 bedroom
apt. Own pool, carpeting. Rent Split
5 ways. no. 14 Williamsburg.
378-0518 (c-3t-98-p)
Female roommate needed now! Call
378-8037 Hawaiian Village
Townhouse (c-st-98-p)
1 Female Roommate needed for 2
bedroom Village Park Apt. for spring
quarter. Call 376-8608 (c-3t-98-p)
1 female room needed Spring Qtr
Point West Apts $58.75/mo +
utilities March rent paid Move In
after March 15 Call 378-5507
(c-st-98-p)
Male roommate wanted for 2
Br-2bath Le Bonne Vie Apt
available March 15 for spring &
summer qtr or spring qtr only. Call
376-8136 (C-st-98-p)
Village Park, 1 or 2 roommates from
March to June 20th, $125.00 +
$25.00 dp pool side phone
378-4857, 1 apt no. 67 female
(c-st-98-p)
Wanted 2 Female roommates to share
2 bedroom apt. S4O a month plus
utilities call 372-6547 or come by
Butler Gardens Apt after 9 p.m.
(c-st-98-p)
1 male roommate For spring quarter
SBS per month incl. utilities The
Place no. 105 call 378-2251
(c-st-98*p)
Roommate needed to share 3 Bd
home with 2 LW students, room of
your own. A/C, 135/qtr. + 1/3 utl
3 78-9239 Grad. stu. preferred
(c-3t-98-p)
Female roommate spring quarter
modern turn 2 bedrm apt a/c dose to
campus S3B/mo or $95/qtr call Lulu
378-2019 (C-2t-99-p)
3 female roomates for spring qtr
poolside VP apt. 42.50/mo + util,
move in immediately 378-8668 after
2:00 (C-4t-99-p)
Male roommate, french quarter apts,
share with two others, Dave
378-8163, apt. N 0.19 (C-4t-99-p)
Hip couple or single wanted to share
two bdrm apt. own room 70.00 912
S.W. 6th Ave. ac/carpet backyard call
Marc 376-3281 avail. Immediately
(C-4t-99-p)
roommate to share apt 2 blocs from
campus pool and color tv. come to
1530 nw 4th ave. only $46 per mo.
(C-4t-99-p)
Please 1 or 2 female roommates for
Mt. Vernon starting June 1. 115. or
57.50/mo. Townhouse, dishwasher,
Pool, central ac. 378-9939
(C-3t-99-p)
Heed two representatives, unusual
opportunity, ideal for coeds, young
housewives, permanent 12 hours
weekly. $35 salary plus commission,
apply at 10:30 a.m. or 2:00 P.M. 103
S.E. Ist St. (C-3t-99-p)
HELP WANTED
Senior Architecture Student to do
some drafting on a part time hourly
basis. Write letter to Roebuck PO
Box 1149 Gainesville, giving details
of qualifications and hourly rate of
compensation expected. (E-10t-96-p)

HELP WANTED
Extra money?" Fla. licensed
Physicians, residents, fellows to
work weekends in general hospital In
Palatka excellent pay if Interested,
call K. Santi, M.D. 328-2784
e !L k o= y ? for furt her details
(E-st-95-p)
X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X:X:X:X-X:X:X;X;XVX-
AUTOS
1965 Corvair Corsa 140 hp 4-speed
tape player, rebuilt engine &
transmission Wide ovals $575 call
376-9129 after 4:30 (G-st-96-p)
65 Chevy SS air rh at bucket seats
convertible good running condition
clean 396 engine asking 525 phone
376-0388 anytime (G-4t-96-p)
for sale 1969 Simca very good mech.
cond. very clean good cheap trans.
Must sell! call 376-9356 or 378-4827
Ask for Ron (G-st-95-p)
Ramblers 63 2 door and 4 door $250
Each Inspected 378-8490 (G-st-97-p)
PORSCHE 914 excellent condition
but some body damage best offer call
376-3865 (G-3t-97-p)
61 Corvan Chev Camper Type Van
Roll Down Windows Special $225
378-8490 (G-st-97-p)
1970 VW fast back, very good
condition. Radio, assume balance
$1736.70. 378-6755 after 6:00 PM
(G-3t-97-p)
66 Chevy Imp., white, black Int., air,
power steering, autotrans, r/h
excellent cond., just tuned, SI2OO,
call 376-1591 5:30 p.m. (g-4t-98-p)
MGB 68 coed must sell good
condition yellow convertible $llOO
call Jeanne 378-3518 (g-st-98-p)
VW deluxe van needs-overhaul body
in good condition. S7OO 378-9796
call after 12 a.m. (g-st-98-p)
1969 BMW 2002 2 dr sedan Air
Conditioned, two new tires, new
battery, 50,000 miles, very good
cond. Phone 378-0308 Evenings.
(g-st-98-p)
65 MG Midget New top. wtr pump
brakes. Custom Int and paint. Radio
heater. Just tuned, excellent cond.
SBOO. Call Mark Linden 373-3381
(g-st-98-p)
MUSTANG 2+2 1967, auto trans, air
conditioner, new polyglas white
letter tires, radio, just tuned, sharp
car in excellent condition, asking
SISOO call 378-5557 after 5 P.M.
(G-4t-99-p)
1964 Corvair Monza white,
automatic transmission, radio,
excellent condition. Student, call
378-5212 after 5 pm or weekends
(G-3t-99-p)
1967, VW excellent condition $925.
radio, stereo, tape & 5 tapes. Need
money for school. Zenith blue paint,
call Bill 376-9420 see at 117 NW 15
St. (G-3t-99-p)
1968 Fiat Spider Convertible call
378-5321 or after 6 call 454-1659
(G-3t-99-p)

BpBBBHHBHBBBHBBBBBBHB^^^B||^^^^^^BWpp^WWWpjJ^^|B|^BJIBMBWB|^BBBBMWBMBBjBBBM
PERFORMN^^^iy^Jj
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sensuous
si
i admitted mW ir J
* WILL iW^f
LIVE THROUGH I
T lo K nn OWDO KEYHOLE SHATTERING JV* |fl
J §

Tuesday, March 9,1971, The Florida Alligator,

:-xx-x-x-x-x-x-x*X:X:X;X;X:XvX;XvX:
AUTOS
X:X:X:XrXrX:X:XrX:X\-X:X*?Xvx-x-x-x-
MERCEDES-BENZ 220 SE, 1961
excellent condition, genuine black
leather Interior, sliding sunroof, new
Job* fuel-injected engine,
SISOO, call 378-8432. (G-4t-99-p)
61 ford falcon runs good, clean
passed inspection last year,
accessories, work, must see at 1236
s.w. 4th ave., apt. N 0.13, 378-6785,
make offer (G-4t-99-p)
x-;-xX:X;X;X:X:X!X:X-X*X:X:X;XvXxX:'
PERSONAL
^xXiXtXiivXxXrXrXrXwX^XtXtXtXxX
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer.
Electrologist . 102 N.W. 2nd Ave.
Call 372-8039 for appointment.
(j-44t-54-p)
Tired of apt living? CLO has openings
for the spring 1 block behind Krystal
only $195/qt for room and 3 meals
a day. Vince at 376-9473 (j-23t-75-p)
For the best and lowest priced bike
repairs see Charlie at 103-6 NW 10 St
4- 9 pm (J-llt-92-pr
Sex is best on a water bed. now here
from Innerspace Environment,
special offer for students, for
information call Elliott 373-3144
(J-13t-90-p)
GAINESVILLE green decals, just in.
Magnificent leather jackets and pants,
even though its too hot. Low,
medium and high-rise bluejeans, some
with buttons, all (countem) ALL
sizes. Silver studs, hundreds of
patches and appliques. More
carburetors Just arrived. Incense in a
billion scents. SUBTERRANEAN
CIRCUS, 10 S.W. 7th St. Open til 10
nightly. (j-3t-95-p)
Due to the RACES at DAYTONA
the CYCLE WORKS will be closed
Tues Mar. 9 thru Mon. Mar.l6
(J-3t-97-p)
Pack your knapsack for adventure!
Bicycle and camp in England. 30 day
tours $566 from Boston, $689 from
Miami. Includes air fare, bicycle,
camping equipment. Call us
376-7985 (J-7t-96-p)
EUROPE ON UF charter flight Jx
to Amsterdam June 16 to Aug 31
$240 rt call 392-1670 before March
13 (J-st-97-p)
People who make things the Union
is having another Arts and Crafts Sale
on April 5 & 6. Call 392-1655 for
more information and start creating.
(J-st-96-p)
professional DRAFT COUNSELING
Medical-Legal-Psychologic open
weekends Tel: 891-3736 2135 Ixora
Road No. Miami, 33161 (J-4t-99-p)
Edgar Cayce state cons. Mar. 19, 20,
21 Eustis, Fla. Call 373-2546 or
37 2- 7883 for Info and
transportation. (J-4t-99-p)
For once in my life I need no
conversation. All of my time 111
spend in fascination, exeter
(J-lt-99-p)

Page 13

XrXyXTXtXrXrXwXt^wXrXrXt/.rX;:::;:-:::-
PE RSONA L

.v.v.y/.:,>v.;.v.x,x.x;.^y.v.v.v.v.y.y.y
5X7 camp-out tent with sewed-ln
floor, zippered nylon screen door and
storm flaps $15.95. Camping
supplies. B&B SPORTS CENTER
5320 N.W. 13th ST. 378-1461
(j*st-98-p)
2 dogs free all shots approx 8 month
must give away contact David
Rotford 373-1043 111 N.W. 19 St.
No. 11 (j-4t-98-p)
Double Double, Toil and trouble,
Water guns, and rum balls too, See
those frozen daiguiris bubble. In
Sexy Janies birthday brew! Happy
21st Birthday, Sexy, and many
happy refills! Love, Lech. (J-lt-99-p)
DIANE ROTHWELL From Camelot
Call 378-2722 Its KATHY From
Berkeley Heights, NJ. (J-2t-99-p)
Sweetheart, Thanx for the circus, late
movies, Sunday afternoons, shopping
trips, smiles and kisses, and being
together again, your Valentine
(J-lt-99-p)
Term papers accurately typed fast
former secretary bklyn college nyc
50 cents $ up 373-1984 days
373-1429 aft. 6 (J-4t-99-p)
This April 21st Vote against apathy.
Vote for academic and administrative
reform. This time VOTE for
ACTIONIi! (J-2t-99-p)
LOST <& FOUND
Found Tuesday night young setter at
corner of 13th and univ. to identify
call 964-6520 or 964-6696
(L-3t-97*NC)
found: A KEY near the Union, call
392-1681 to Identify, ask for Lynn
(L-3t-97-p)
LOST one orange male cat In the
vicinity behind Norman Hall please
call 378-9176 (l-2t-98-p)
Found: play & the reader, Walt
376-3056 (l-3t-98-p)
FEMALE POODLE found In S.W.
area. Call 372-3284 to Identify.
(L-3t-99-nc)
Reward for return of girls brown 10
speed Schwinn Suburban stolan from
Little Hall March 4 Call 373-1623
after 4 pm (L-4t-99-p)
LOST My grandfathers antique
sllderule. Has a cracked hairline and
brown case. If found please take the
time to call 3733424 (L-99-3t-p)
SE RV ICES
GRAPHICS, RENDERINGS
BEAUTIFUL JON 378-8335
(M-st-97-p)
Expd Theses 8. Dissertations
Del-Ray Typing Service 50 cents and
up per page 3731984 days 373-1429
aft 6. (M-10t-80-p)

SERVICES
Term papers, reports, typed to your
specifications 40 cents per page D/S.
Theses 50 cents, D/S. Phone Mrs.
Tola Adenle, Flavet 111, 373-1003.
(M-st-81-p)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmericard adn
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
!; Patronize j
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Page 14

v The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, March 9,1971

SEC Mentions
&
2 Gator Cagers
For Academics
By Alligator Services
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. UFs Ed Lukco and Tony Duva were
mentioned in the recently released 1971 Academic
All-Southeastern Conference basketball team.
Lukco was named to the second team with a B plus average in
finance, while Duva, who has an A average in advertising, was
the only pick in the honorable mention class.
LUKCO AND DUVA, both seniors, saw limited action this
year with the Gator basketball team that finished its season
Saturday with an 11-15 record.
The first team boasts Ole Miss Johnny Neumann, B plus in
physical education; Kentuckys Mike Casey, B in geography;
Kentucky's Tom Parker, B in business; Auburn's John Menglet,
B plus in business and Tennessees Mike Edwards, B plus in
physical education.
Led by Neumann, the nations leader scorer, the first team
averaged 24.1 points a game out of the classroom.
NEUMANN HAD A 40.1 average, Mengelt, 28; Casey, 18.1;
Parker, 17.3; and Edwards, 17.4.
On the team are Tennessees Lloyd Richardson, Vanderbilts
Van Oliver, Georgias Barry Cohen and Mississippi States
Johnny Pearson.
A player must carry a classroom average of at least a B to
qualify for the Academic All-SEC. The five first teamers are
nominated for the All-America Academic team, selected by the
college sports information directors association.

Track Additions Near

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
The refurbishing of the UF
track -a new track surface, plus
a one of a kind electronic pacing
system is on schedule.
It looks real good; the
resurfacing ought to be finished
this week," assistant coach Ray
Benson said.
THEY HAD some minor
problems with water getting into
the material, but it didnt cause
any great delay,
The pacing system, brainchild
of UF student Bob Bessette, is
also nearly completed.
Weve already had some trial
runs and the master control
board is almost completed.
THE NEW surface, Chevron
440, is being laid on top of the
old Grasstex track, also a
Chevron product.
The sl6 a square yard track
sold to UF at half price because
I RAINAUnRES I
I Fw ta*ric*n, Eurtpitn I

of the possible publicity
involved consists of several
layers of non-rubberized
material (where the seepage
problem occurred) overlayed
with rubber granules.
It ought to be finished in
plenty of time for the Florida
Relays March 26-27, Benson
said.
ONE TOP prospect the Gators
hoped would run on the super
track, Richmond, Va., prep star
Scott Eden, might run the track
but not for UF.
Eden, a 9:07 two miler, has
indicated hell attend Duke
because of Dukes undergraduate
bio-medical program.
But another top prospect,
Rich Langford, will be coming
here.

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TONY DUVA
... A average
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ED LUKCO
. .second team

LANGFORD FROM Albany,
N.Y., is the state class C cross
country champ, and has run a
9:15 two mile.
He actually ought to be a
little better miler than Eden,
Benson said.
On the debit side again, two
of UFs top performers are still
physically sub par.
Ace half miler Eamonn
OKeeffe, who nursed a vims
throughout the SEC meet
recently, has been in and out of
the infirmary.
Benny Vaughn, another
outstanding runner in both
individual events and the two
mile relay, is still suffering the
effects of a flu bug thats kept
him off his top form for a
month.

The
Florida
Alligator

GOLFERS WIN TOURNEY
North Leads UF

The UF golf team, sparked by
a six-under par final round by
Andy North, won the Seminole
Invitational Golf Tournament
Sunday in Tallahassee.
The linksmen defeated its
closest competitor, FSU, by a
healthy 26 strokes. The Gators
team total was 870, compared to
FSU*s 896, Alabamas 900,
Georgia Southerns 913 and
LSI/s 914. They were followed
by Memphis State, University of
West Florida, University of
South Florida, Miami, Columbus
College, Chipola Jr. College, Ball
State and Florida A&M,
NORTH FIRED a final round
66 and finished the 72-hole
event at 216 to capture top
individual honors. Other
individual scores for the Gators
were Woody Blackburn a 220,
Gary Koch, 221; Steve Morgan,
224; and Jim Smith, 225. The
lowest four scores counted in
team totals.
Coach Buster Bishops golfers
will now travel to Miami to
participate in the Miami
Invitational. In last years
tournament the Gators captured
the Miami title.
The Gator golfers will look to
the men that have carried them
through so far this year to lead
them in that tourney. Freshman
Koch, Blackburn, All-American

FAST CARRY OUTS
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Now serving the University of Florida the finest in
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SPORTS

MW -A fMtfRBS&i it NH
11
ANDY NORTH
... captures Seminole
North, team captain Mike
Killian, Smith, Morgan and Jim
McQuillan will face that task.

Mr. Beau Jangies
Clothes For You



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TOM KENNEDY
NEW LOVE SET

Bruce Bartlett UF's only starting senior tennis
player, is flanked by the new Love Set, an attractive
group of UF girls who helped umpire yesterday's
match with Columbus College. From the left are
Debbe Elstein, Linda Korey, Jeannie Grist, Ede

Lafeyette Hands Gators
Fourth Baseball Setback

By SIM SMITH
Alligator Correspondent
The Florida Gator baseball
team looking for its first win of
the year were unable to find it
Monday as it lost to the
Lafeyette Leopards, 6-2.
Florida, 04, will tackle
Lafeyette again today at 3:00
p.m. Bob Kowalski will start,
with Doug Corbett and John
Reich following him. Coach
Dave Fuller will continue to
throw three pitchers a day game
until SEC action begins.
TWO LAFEYETTE pitchers,
Jim Van Der Beek and Rich
Carter, struck but a total of 13
Gators and limited them to only
four hits.

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... slaps 2 hits

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University Plato

Lafeyette drew first blood in
the third when it scored one run
with two singles and the aid of
an outfield error. The unearned
run was the only one starting
pitcher Dave Thomas allowed.
The Gators got their only runs
in the bottom of the third
inning. Mark Hedgecock singled,.
Will Harman was safe on a
fielders choice and Steve Lewis
walked to load the bases.
NICK DEVIRGILUS then hit
a ground ball that the second
baseman found too hot to
handle and the error scored
Hedgecock. Rick Scarborough,
whose two hits represented half
of the UF output, then walked
to score Harman. Howard
Finkelstein hit a hard shot but it
was right at the second baseman,
and the Gators only scoring
inning ended.
Lafeyette added the tying run
in the fifth on two singles and a
fielders choice. Then in the
sixth the Leopards big first
sacker, Rex Peters, belted a
400-foot drive over the center
field fence with two men
aboard. Lafeyette never lost the
lead again. A single, a sacrifice
and an error gave the Leopards
one more run in the ninth.
Were just not being
aggressive at the plate, coach
PA. Lee said. Coach Fuller

Holiday, Gene Shapiro, Patti Potter, Bartlett, Tory
Baxter, Judy Gemsbacher and Carolyn Jones. Not
pictured are Mary Ellen Sorenson and Pamme
Miller.

blamed the loss on mental errors
and the lack of clutch hitting.

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Gators Defeat
Columbus Netters

Preparing for Fridays tough
battle with the University of
Miami, the UF tennis team won
its third match of the season,
with Mondays victory over
Columbus (Ga.) College at the
Florida tennis courts.
WITH ONE doubles match
still in progress at deadline, the
Gators held a 5-3 lead on the
strength of four singles victories.
UF dropped the first two
singles events, but rebounded on
the next four. Columbus
captured the first doubles
match, but the Gators won the
next to assure the victory.
In the No. 1 singles Steve
Campbell defeated UFs Ray
Hiedema, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2. Stan
Shanbron defeated UFs Tony
Pospisil 6-3, 6-3 in the No. 2
Singles.
THE GATORS* Ricky Knight
rallied to defeat Gilbert Rincon
1-6, 6-3, 64. In the next three
UF successes, Burce Bartlett
defeated Randy Scott 6-3, 64;
Rusty Addie defeated Amjid
Sheikh 9-7, 6-3 and Bing Nobles
defeated Hudson Garrett 6-1,
6-2.
, Campbell and Shanbom
opened the doubles competition
defeating Heidema and Knight

Tuesday, March 9,1971, The Florida AHigetor,

6-4, 6-0. Addie and Nobles took,
the No. 3 doubles, defeating
Sheikh and Gene Chappell 6-2,
6-1.
Pospisil and McCaffery had
won their first set in their
doubles match with Rincon and
Scott.
UF IS now 3-2 in dual
competition this year.
Columbus College in its
opening match this season, is
0-1.
The Gators are in action next
against the Miami Hurricanes
Friday at 2:30 p.m. at the
Florida Courts. Miami, which
won the Cape Coral Tournament
in which the Gators competed,
are rated the top team in the
state.
The Hurricanes have already
downed strong FSU, 8-1, earlier
this season. The Seminoles
defeated UF last weekend, 6-3.
After Fridays match, the
Gators will play host Saturday
to Presbyterian College.

Mr. Beau Jangles
Clothes For You

Page 15



Page 16

Ttw Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, March 9,1971

A
Swimmers Top 'Conference Best

By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writer
Tennessee is easily the best
in its conference.
Dont ask UF swim coach Bill
Harlan to verify that. You see,
Harlans swimmers refuted this
statement made recently by
Sports Illustrated and won the
SEC championship this past
weekend.
TO WIN that title the Gators
had to defeat the best in its
conference which they did by
eleven points. Gator
all-American Bruce Williams had
to outduel the fastest man
afloat, Dave Edgar, according
to the same magazine.
Edgar could only qualify for
the consolation division, which
is awarded fewer points than the
championship division, with a
slow 1:47.2 In the finals he was
beaten by Williams, who finished
with a time of 1:43.2 compared
to Edgars 1:44.2.
Edgar thought he could still
prove that he was the fastest
Rifle Team
Captures
Tournament
For the third time in the past
three years, the Florida rifle
team has destroyed opponents in
"the Annual All-Florida
Intercollegiate Tournament.
In the varsity competition,
the Gators were tops with 1054
out of a possible 1200 while
Florida Southern was second at
1039.
ROTC HAD a seperate
competition with the Gators also
coming out on top, 1039-886,
over second place Florida
Institute of Technology. UFs
Bill McCrory and Florida
Southerns Lester Austin were
tops win the individual class
with 271 points out of possible
300.
A total of seven teams
competed in the two day event
at the Gator rifle range. The
Gators had three teams, Stetson
two, while Florida Southern and
Florida Tech, were represented
by one team each.
M
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

COACH HARLAN PRAISES WILLIAMS
r

despite not being in the finals,
but Bruce still beat him, Harlan
said.
HARLAN DESCRIBED
Williams victory as one of the
critical points in the meet.
Tennessee seemed to get
weaker and we seemed to get
stronger as the meet went on,
Harlan said. If the meet would
have lasted one more day, we
would have beaten them by 100
points.
Harlan also had praise for
Brant Bittner and Kevin Smith.
BRANTS VICTORY in the
500-yard free was a big factor
and Smiths third place finish
also helped us.
It was a great team effort. The
whole team scored points for us.
Eddie Reese (assistant coach)
did a great job in preparing the

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BRAISED SIRLOIN TIPS OF BEEF 1.85 H
y tender sirloin tips from choice
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GRILLED CENTER CUT PORK CHOPS 2.15 H
JTh|T choice cuts from the center of the loin
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UTAH j\|l jaJ CHOICE T-BONE STEAK 2.55 N
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Brazil |a choice top sirloin steak 2.35 I
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seasoned green beans baked potato
french fried potatoes breaded tomatoes
Jerrys South
Jerrys North j 8
NW 13 St. nfffww

BILL HARLAN
... satisfying win
boys for the meet, he said.
In comparing this years team
with the 1966 championship
team, Harlan felt that this years
team was definitely stronger.

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WBL W v*#**'*
hwl j/r >1
ig|||R wmi
. .- &.
BRUCE WILLIAMS
... turning point
This years team was my best
even though the 1966 team
(another SEC winner) still has a
soft spot in my heart, Harlan
said.

mi H fSfck
EDDIE REESE
... gats credit
Sports Illustrated probably
lost the soft spot they had in
their heart for Tennessee and
replaced it with the 1971 edition
of the Gator swim team.