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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
EDITORIAL
Tuition Incra|^H
As education costs continue on then >;*
soars, each seems to be trying too^y]
: e u ir A -h..tt tbit to j
[be problem is that soon .?& : '*j
in 1967 a Florida student : y
--n b ast redus uill tosM '-A --A' -fV *;* .;
jJ
We are aware that only HJM .*
v T no* . 1 '-V *\' *1 *^j
The most feasible, long-range *T v Xi j
Although the special session of thelSH
emergency measure which would have
immediately, we think legislators should reconsider th^R
A special election could be planned. The additional moral flli
the corporate income tax, if passed, would then be
September, 1972.
Chairman of the UF economics department, Dr. Irving
predicts from the projected revenue for 1970 that a
tax would yield at least SIOO million. Thats almost
total UF 1971 budget. A I
In a private poll recently released it was found
Floridas voters interviewed would vote for the
Now its up to the legislators to give them a chance.
But, since the extra money could not possibly in time
to budget for the next school year, emergency taken.
These would have to include a restructuring of un^^^Rmorities.

Rafii
s\ ft" AhCWL
Vol. 63, No. 95

FOR OVERTAXED STUDENTS
Tuition increase: Another Burden

By MICHAEL J. CAHLIN
AllHutor Staff Writer
There are many reasons for
the proposed increase in
tuition, Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder said.
One of them is a lack of
funds to meet the needs of the

Askew Hasnt Taken Stand

Gov. Ruebin Askew will look long and hard at all
other options before recommending an increase in
student fees, said his Governmental Assistant for
Education William Maloy.
At present, the governor has taken no specific
stand on a student fee increase as such, Maloy said.
THE GOVERNORS major thrust in the area of
education in the budget is to get the tax reform,
Maloy said. "Unless this can be done, education will
suffer and higher education will be seriously
affected.
The problem of funding for education is tied to
the overall financial picture, and the thrust is

UF PRESIDENT Stephen C. OConnell predicts
additional funds will become available .page 2
THE DECISION on a tuition increase will
be influenced by the question of an
activities fee hike .page 2

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY
University of Florida, Gainesville

existing seven universities in
Florida. We havent been able to
meet the needs of these
universities and there is now the
added burden of two new
universities being built in Miami
and Jacksonville.
BASICALLY THEY
(legislators) dont have the

toward a broader base of funding, Maloy said.
Askew wants to highlight to the legislature the
issues of establishing which priorities are really
wanted in the budget program and funding them
appropriately, Maloy said.
"The governor believes it is the perogative of the
Board of Regents to consider tuition increases.
Programs should be adequately funded from the
state but he realizes that there are necessary costs
that may not be funded through the state and the
only option for funding necessary programs may be
a fee increase, Maloy said.

5 Inside This Section

LEGISLATORS, WHO hold the key to the tuition
increase, will discuss the problem at the session to
convene in April page 23
REGENT VICE Chairman Louis Murray predicts a
sls to $25 increase tuition increase per quarter
starting September 1971 page 23

money to finance the seven
universities due to an inadequate
tax structure of Florida.
A short run solution,
Uhlfelder said, is taxing the
already over burdened student
with an additional increase in
tuition.
The Council of Univeisity

: llv Bu! miss!
' rJ P
IJ Pre sorely needed elsewhere
-.PjfIHHHPor; riUv dternoon
and uatk But
PJ P Wauburg. 1 ifty cents from each
WzM P
J "V? u RJ R measures. The Athletic Association
can do without Wauburg for
RBy we are going to need more money. And we are going
PRi a great deal of it. The only way to secure enough money
PrJPBd be to find a new source of funds.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell says he is confident more
money will become available.
We hope it will be through a corporate income tax rather than a
tuition increase. Forty three other states now have either a corporate,
or a corporate and personal, income tax.
Florida has neither, but it is time we followed the lead.Gofporations
here have gotten a free ride for a long time.
Now they have to start helping to pay to educate the top notch
personnel they hope to employ in the future.

Presidents has called for a sls
state-wide tuition increase.
The sls was broken down
into three categories, according
to William E. Elmore, vice
president of administrative
affairs:
$lO for capital outlay,
which would include new
buildings and fixing of others,
$3 for student activities
and services, which includes
funds for health services,
$2 for scholarship.
THE PROBLEM, according to
Uhlfelder, is if we cant meet
the existing needs of the seven
universities, how can we build
two more?
In ten years, Uhlfelder
predicts, Florida will have nine
mediocre universities, due to the
shuffling of college funds to
meet all the existing
requirements.
What we are trying to do,

STUDENT BODY President Steve Uhlfelder
suggests some alternatives to the tuition
increase page 24
AN OPEN letter from Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder concerning the education crisis .. .page 24

Wednesday, March 3,1971

Uhlfelder said, is to show the
legislature that the student is
already overburdened financially
and an increase in tuition would
only cut out another bracket of
students eligible to meet the
existing financial cost of a state
university.
State-wide the need for an
increase in tuition varies,
according to the requirements of
the university.
From a survey taken last fall
obtained from entering freshman
and transfer undergraduate
students, approximately 17 per
cent of their families earn less
than $7,000 a year.
Unfortunately, the students
dont have enough political
power, Uhlfelder said, and the
increase will probably be passed.
What were (Student
Government) trying to do is to
keep it down.



Page 2

!, tto Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3, 1971

OConnell Confident Funds Will Come

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Assignments Editor
Austerity the tightening of purse strings means
many things to many people.
But to the president of a state university with an
enrollment of 22,000 and upwards it means making
sure that finances are juggled around to maintain
the normal functions of a university.
WE WILL HAVE to have increased funds, said
UF President Stephen C. OConnell. And well get
them.
OConnell was confident in his expectation
despite a cutback by the state legislature of
$1,848,463 for the remainder of the fiscal year
which ends June 30,1971.
In order to make ends meet the holdback of these
funds has been absorbed'by expected salary savings.
This is money saved as a result of positions either
not being filled or being filled at a lower rate than
the budget called for.
ACCORDING TO OConnell one of the major
consequences is a severe cut in the number of new
faculty positions. He said the UF can only expect
Education and General Budget allocations for 10
new faculty positions in 1971-72 academic year.
This would include all departments of the UF
with the exception of the J. Hillis Miller Medical
Center, the Institute for Food & Agricultural
Station and the Graduate Engineering Education
System.
Another consequence of the money squeeze is a
crisis situation with respect to rental expense funds
for the computer and other personal service funds
for several other activities.
OCONNELL REQUESTED SIOO,OOO from the
Board of Regents to pay off a computer rental tab
incurred through an eight-month delay in
Tallahassee in authorizing the UF to purchase a
research computer. As yet the funding for this has
not come through.
Another source of capital other than direct
funding from the state legislature comes from
student tuitions. At present Florida students pay
$l5O per quarter to attend four-year institutions in
the state university system.
The Council of Presidents of the state universities
voted in January to recommend to the Board of
Regents that tuition be raised to $165 per quarter.
The proposed breakdown of how the money would
be spent is as follows:

Increase Hinges On Activities Fee

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
The possibility of a tuition
increase for UF student hinges
on a decision by the Florida
Legislator to accept a request for
an increase of the students
activity fee.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell sent to the Board of
Regents last month his
recommendation to raise the
activity fee at UF $4.70.
THE PRESENT activity fee in
the state of Florida university
system is $32.50.
However, the Board of
Regents do not have the power
to raise the activity fee, because
it will increase the present $l5O
tuition students now pay. That

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
AHlgator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
hsertlon.

fee is the above mentioned
$4.70 which OConnell said is
needed to maintain existing
programs in the areas receiving
funds from the activity fee.
The question of the activity
fee has been taken up at UF,
with two groups reviewing UFs
activity fee; two different
recommendations have come out
of these groups.
ONE RECOMMENDATION
made by a presidential
committee to review the activity
fee, is the above mentioned
$4.70 which OConnell said is
needed to maintain existing
programs in the areas receiving
funds from the activity fee.
On the other side, a student
committee appointed by
Student Body President Steve


For issuing revenue certificates totalling $25
million in building improvements, $lO.
For the construction of student activities
buildings such as student unions and infirmaries, $3.
For scholarships and loan funds for
disadvantaged students, $2.
OCONNELL VOTED against the proposed sls
increase. He said the $lO allocated for capital outlay
should be used by the individual university
contributing, rather than pooling money in a general
fund as was proposed.
Our building needs are mammoth, OConnell
said. He went on to explain that the newer
universities such as the University of South Florida,
the University of West Florida and the proposed
Florida International University to be built in South
Florida would have priority in using the capital
outlay funds for construction of new buildings.
Older institutions such as UF and Florida State
University (FSU) would more than likely have to
use the money for capital improvements of already
existing structures rather than for constructing
needed new buildings.
COMMENTING ON the reasoning behind his
negative vote for the tuition increase, OConnell
said, The UF should get back the proceeds from
our students for our own use.
OConnell cited other necessities that siphon off
existing monies, particularly the need for greatly
improved health facilities for a burgeoning student
population on the sprawling UF campus.
The need for adequate medical care prompted
OConnell to request $3 million from the legislature
to expand facilities.

Uh If elder recommended the
present activity fee be kept at
the same level, with the
Infirmary retaining the biggest
share, cutting the other areas.
Now athletics receive $3.75 of
the activity fee. Student Health <
Services (Infirmary) receives
$ 13, SG receives 4.97, the Union
receives $9 (of this, 50 cents go
to Wauburg maintenance and 50
cents for the public functions
office of the Union) and Student
Publications receive $1.58.
AT THEIR January meeting,
Athletic Director Ray Graves
told OConnells presidential
committee if there were a
tuition increase he would ask foi
25 cents more.
Following suit, William Rion,
director of the Union, said his
unit would request $1.35 more.
Uhlfelder, who has criticized
any kind of tuition increase, told
OConnell, if an increase was
going to come anyway, SG could
use 25 cents more.
THE INFIRMARY, asked for
an additional $2.37. Dr. Wilmer
Coggins, director of Student
Health, cited increases in
medicines and personnel as a
criteria for asking for more
money.
Student Publications asked
for an increase of 39 cents. That

would bring the allocation for
publications to $1.97 which
OConnell rounded off at $2.
OConnell said he would send
the suggestions to the regents.
RIGHT NOW the Board of
Regent s is considering a
proposition presented by the
Council of Presidents which
asked for a sls tuition hike in
all state universities.
Any action taken by the
regents will have to be taken to
the Florida Legislature, which is
the only body authorized to
approve a tuition hike for the
universities.
OConnell said he had voted
against the recommendation of
the Council of Presidents
because the money would be put
in a pool, rather than giving the
money to the school from which
it came.
O CONNELL HAD suggested
to the regents earlier they give
the universities power to set
their activity fee, with regards to
their needs.
The other side of the story is
the recommendation which the
committee, which was headed
by former Alligator Managing
Editor Harvey Alper,
recommended cutting money
from athletios, the Union,
Student Publications and the*

THE liST goes on. At present the UF has no
facilities where events of a cultural nature may be
presented, OConnell said; this partly due to the
defeat in a student referendum last spring by which
students voted against a $6 tuition increase, the
proceeds of which would have gone toward the
construction of a University. Activities Center
complex including convention and performing arts
facilities.
OConnell said he regretted the defeat of the
center in the referendum. He said the only other
possible source of funding was from the state
legislature and ruled out the possibility of any
monies being appropriated to the UF at this time
for the construction of such a coliseum.
Despite the present financial bind, OConnell is
currently involved in attempting to secure funds for
Project I, which is the proposed addition of 895,000
gross square feet for the Health Center at the UF.
THE EXPANSION will provide for the
establishment of a College of Dentistry, an
expansion of the College of Medicine and a College
of Veterinary Medicine. According to OConnell this
will be the largest single project in the state
university system.
Project I will allow an increase in the number of
medical students from 64 per class to 140 per class.
The expansion in the number of students will be
partly due to a program which will permit students
from FSU to come to Gainesville after the first year
of medical school at FSU and complete their
medical education here.
Currently the state of Florida is without a College
of Dentistry. Initiation of Project I will permit the
education of a student body of about 600.
IN DECEMBER 1969 the Board of Regents
allocated $12.5 million for the project with an
additional $19.7 million grant coming from the
National Institute of Health.
However, construction costs are increasing and
delays in awarding the contract will probably result
in higher costs for less usable space. As a result,
OConnell is currently attempting to obtain federal
funding.
From the bread-and-butter necessities of running
the UF to streamlining progressive measures for the
future, it is clear that money is needed. And as
OConnell said, Well never have all the funding we
need.

Union, to give a bigger share to
the Infirmary.
A REPORT released by the
student committee on Feb. 8, of
this year, recommends the
share of athletics could be cut to
$3.40 from $3.75 because
during the past several weeks
this agency (the Athletic
Association) has demonstrated a
newfound ability to raise money
through new sources.
THE UNION share was also
cut by the committee, which
suggested the 50 cents going to
Wauburg, and the 50 cents going
to the Public Functions office of
the Union could be cut without
direct effects upon Union
operations.
The committee also
recommended economy at all
levels be achieved to keep costs
of Union operations down. The
suggestion for the Union share
was SB, $1 less than they receive
now.
The committee said in the
report SG could be cut back 25
cents to $4.72. The report noted
this would not cause the
cancellation of any programs,
but all SG programs would have
to be cut in some small way.
the last cut
recommended by the committee
was 15 cents from Studeit
Publications.



Ad AmiiuM
Vol. 63, No. 95

IN BAUGHER MURDER TRIAL
Inmates Testimony Stirs Debate

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
MACCLENNY The trial of
19-year-old Teriy 0. Grubb
began here Tuesday with defense
and state attorneys arguing over
the admissability of statements
the defendant supposedly made
to Alachua County Jail inmate
Carlos Joiner.
Joiner, in late afternoon
testimony for the state, told
Assistant State Attorney Eugene
Whitworth that on the night that
ended in the death of
25-year-old inmate William
Martin Baugher, Grubb was
tearing up a sheet and later
commented to his cellmates
were going to have a hangin
party, too ..
IN HIS OPENING statement
to the jury, Whitworth said he
would prove that on the evening
of Sept. 21, a television, outside
the cell where death would later
come to Baugher, was showing a
Gunsmoke episode which
depicted a hanging.
Joiners testimony alluded to
the program and Grubbs alleged
subsequent actions.
BAUGHERS HANGING
body was found suspended from
the top of his cell door at
approximately 4 a.m. on Sept.
22, a sheet tied around his neck.
A Grand Jury investigation of
the death resulted in a bill of
indictment charging Grubb with
premeditated murder in the first
degree.
The jury was asked by Circuit
Court Judge John Crews to leave
the courtroom during much of
Joiners testimony. Defense
Attorney Herbert Schwartz
objected to Joiners answers
being used as admissable
evidence, claiming the state had

Federal And State Grants Running Low

By CARLOS J. LICE A
- Alligator Staff Writer
There may be a job squeeze
developing on the UF campus
because federal and state grants
lllliiMiiiilMii!
STUDENT ORGANIZED,
managed and maintained
FM radio station is now
being planned page 14
Classifieds .16
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies .*. .17
Sports 19
Whats Happening 6
jti > 3QJ v \i u.j}it*jik i.ii *w i

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY
University of Florida, Gainesville

CARLOS JOINER
... found Baugher's body
failed to establish corpus delicti
(facts constituting or proving a
crime) and could not then use
supposed statements by Grubb
as evidence.
AFTER DELIBERATION,
Judge Crews sustained the
objection, ordering the
testimony stricken from the
record.
In early statements, Joiner
testified that on Sept. 22 he
walked through the cellblock at
almost 4 a.m. where Baugher,
Grubb, Robert Waddell and
Donald Curry shared a cell and
saw Billy (Baugher) hangin in
the cell.
Joiner said Waddell and Curry
were prone on their bunks while
Grubb was sitting up and
staring at the body.
JOINER SAID that when he
asked Grubb, What did you do,
hang him?, Grubb made no
reply.
The large portion of the

for student jobs are running low,
UF Director of Financial Aid Ira
D. Turner said Tuesday.
Turner indicated one of the
reasons for money running out
from federal grand is for the
July-December, 1970 period
roughly $190,000 was allocated
from federal funds (work study
program) but the figure for the
current January-June (1971)
period is roughly $130,000.
ACCORDING TO a Student
Government spokesman, 20
students have been laid off from
jobs within different
departments at UF.
However, Turner said there
might be some relief in sight for
those students when his office is
informed, by the director of the
siir uhl znoi!n>j\\
afternoon'session was devoted to
testimony by Alachua County
Medical Examiner Dr. Robert E.
Klein. Klein performed an
autopsy on Baughers body the
day of the death.
THE CAUSE of Baughers
death, according to Klein, was
... a lack of oxygen due to
constriction of the passage to
the lungs by a type of rope
around the neck.
In cross-examination of Klein,
Schwartz asked if there was any
evidence that could establish
that Baugher was dead before he
was suspended from the top of
the cell door.
Klein answered no and
testified that there was nothing
to indicate a violent struggle.
KLEIN EXPLAINED his
answer by elaborating how his
coroners report found no
recent bruises or lacerations on
the body within 24 hours of
death.
Whitworth and Schwartz
argued over the defenses right
to seek Kleins opinion regarding
whether he could determine if
Baugher took his own life or was
the subject of a violent death.
The state contended that
Schwartz* question invades the
province of the jury.
JUDGE CREWS upheld
Whitworths objection on the
grounds that Unless there isn't
any testimony or other evidence
that would be offered or
presented in respect to the
manner in which the decendent
met death, the question was
not in order.
Klein testified that Baugher
... was alive, at least partially
conscious or sub-conscious,
when he was suspended from the
cell door.
Baugher, according to Klein,

college work study program of
new money.
WE CAN START referring
students for jobs under the work
study program by April, as soon
as we are told (by the federal
work-study program) of how
much money is available,'* he
said.
The administration is making
all efforts possible to divert
available funds to the
departments which are running
short of money, Turner said
and added that UF is trying to
fill the gap until more federal
funds are available.
Another factor which is
adding to the deminishing funds
is that student salaries had to be
raised to meet federal minimum
wage standards, Turner said.
There is, however, a further

Art By Simon Barnot
JUDGE JOHN CREWS LISTENS
... as Grubb's attorney Schwartz questions Klein

was 5-feet 7-inches tall and
weighed approximately 150
pounds.
IN TESTIMONY regarding
the appearance of the body
during his examination, Klein
said Baughers head was shaved,
nick marks were visible on the
scalp, and a dark bruise was
visible on the left side of the
neck.
The first witness for the state,
Ronald Hinson, is a jailer at the
Alachua County jail. In his
testimony he said that Joiner
informed him that an inmate
was hanging.
When Hinson went to
investigate the reported death in

problem compounding the job
shortage on campus. State funds,
under the OPS account (Other
Personnel Services), are also
running low.
IT IS FROM the OPS account
that student jobs come from.
The result is that if not all the
money the different
departments of UF requested is
given, but the jobs have been
given out, a decision has to be
made whether to fire the excess
students, or let the students
work until the money runs out.
CONSEQUENTLY, when the
money does run out at the
middle of a quarter, students
may lose their jobs, since more
often than not the decision is
made to let all the students hired
work until the money runs out.
A *What some of die students
t

\ J
x? iSn y
Wednesday, March 3 i 971

the cell he found Baugher
hanging ... with his back to
the cell door and his feet on
the floor.
HINSON SAID that in days
after the death Grubb was put in
.. a back ce11... to try to
keep him from hurting himself.
Grubb, according to Hinson,
had cut his wrists and threatened
to hang himself in days after
Baughers death.
HINSON SAID a straight
jacket was put on Grubb, but
later he was taken out of the
jacket and put in a cell with
(SEE 'EXAMINER/ PAGE 4)

(who have lost their jobs) could
do, is to come to the Office of
Financial Aid to get a job
(SEE'GRANTS/PAGE 4)
IRA D. TURNER
tome relief in sight
.nr.lis-c



Page 4

The Florid* Alligator, Wednesday, March 3, 1971

Examiner Says 'No Evidence Os Violence

two other men to protect him
against himself.
The only other witness to
testify Tuesday was C. E.
Sitaway, identification officer
and photographer for the
sheriffs office.
Sitaway identified
A*ateir Paat
To Road Fro*
Ns Collection
By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Staff Writer
James William Lee, Jr., an
amateur poet who experiments
with his writing will read a
collection of his free verse
poems tonight at 7 p.m. in the
Reitz Union lounge.
Lee has been in the Navy, he
was one of the original members
of the Black Student Union, he
tutors English in the critical year
program, and is attending UF on
a scholarship.
After graduating in August,
Lee wants, to work in New York
and continue his education.

GRANTS ...

PAGE ONe||
transfer to a department that
still has money from the OPS
account left, Turner said.
Another solution the office is
working out, Turner said, was to
shift some of the money which
is in excess in some departments
to other departments whose
students are in danger of losing
their jobs because their OPS
funds have run out.
TURNER CLAIMS the job
situation on campus right now is
critical on both areas (OPS and
federal funds) and that it will
get worse.

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photographs he had taken of
Baughers body as it was in the
cell after Joiner had cut it down
from its hanging position.
EVIDENCE SUBMITTED by
the prosecution included
numerous photographs of
Baughers body and the cell,
strips of the sheet found around
Baughers neck, a rag found in
Baughers mouth, and a scaled
floor-plan of the cellblock in
which Baughers cell was
located.
Jury selection lasted the
entire morning session, a jury of
11 men and one woman being
sworn in at 11:48 a.m.
Whitworth said in his opening
Too Poor To Pay Fine?
Cant Be Jailed For It
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Supreme Court ruled Tuesday
that a man cannot be sent to jail
because he is too poor to pay a
court-levied traffic fine.
The unanimous decision by
the high court reversed a lower
court ruling in which Preston A.
Tate was sentenced to 85 days in
the Houston, Tex., prison farm
after he said he had no funds to
pay six traffic fines totalling
$425.

He expects the federal funds
will take off some of the
pressure of the job squeeze, but
those funds will not totally
alleviate the job shortage on
campus for students.
He said UF had been hit
hard this year by the
legislature, since it has received
10 per cent less OPS money than
during the 1969-70 academic
year.
Student Body Undersecretary
for Legislative Affairs Shelly
Stevens, said the job shortage on
campus is being investigated by
the Student Senate Information
and Investigation (I&I)
committee.

statement that the prosecution
would convey to the court the
last 72-hours of the life of
William Martin Baugher.
IN SCHWARTZ
counter-statement the jury was
advised to listen closely to all
testimony in the case. It is not
the last 72-hours of Baughers
life for which Terry Grubb is on
trial, he said.
Judge Crews recessed court
until 9 a.m. today. The jurors
were forbidden to read any
newspaper accounts of the case
or those reported in any media.
Grubb, dressed in a light blue
pin-stripe shirt and a narrow
blue tie, sat quietly throughout
the proceedings, occassionally
trading remarks with defense
attorneys.

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THE TRIAL is expected to
last at least through tonight,
possibly carrying over into
Thursday.
The maximum penalty for
Raiford Rally
Cancelled
The rally supporting Raiford
inmates, shceduled to be held in
the Plaza of the Americas,
Tuesday was called off due to
circumstances beyond anyones
control, said Lynne Edelman, a
member of Student Mobilization
Committee.
We found out after midnight
and the Alligator had already
gone to press, but it will be held
at a later date, Miss Edelman
said.

era lecture Notes
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first-degree-murder is death if
the jury hands down a guilty
verdict without a
recommendation of mercy.
Originally slated for hearing in
Gainesville, the case was moved
to Baker County by Judge Crews
following a request by Schwartz
for a change of venue.
An impartial jury, Schwartz
held, could not be found in
Alachua County, following
extensive press coverage of
Baughers death and subsequent
investigations.

Mr. Beau Jangles
Has Bullet Belts!
C lothe s For you



SMC Plans* Antiwar Programs

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
I expect at least a half a
million people to be in
Washington, April 24, for the
march, said Harris Freeman,
secretary and steering committee
member of the Student
Mobilization Committee to End
the War in Vietnam (SMC).
In an emergency National
Antiwar Conference held in
Washington, D. C. February
19-21, the SMC planned their
spring actions, protesting the
continuation and escalation of
the war in Southeast Asia.
THE CONFERENCE,
according to Freeman, was
attended by over 2,000 delegates
from 40 states. These delegates
represented all factions of
American life that support an
immediate withdraw!. This
included womens groups, GJ.s
Veterans Groups, organized
labor, and students from
campuses around the country.
After discussion, the delegates
voted overwhelmingly in support
of a legal, peaceful broadly
based march and rally in
Washington, D. C. and San
Francisco, April 24, according to
Freeman.
UFs SMC will implement the
following actions in the
Gainesville area.
March 8 lnternational
Womens Day
March 15 Anti-draft
Actions Day
April 2,3, and 4, will be
SMCs first major spring action.
On these days local meetings and
rallies will be held to
commemorate the late Martin
Luther King as a peace activist
and a fighter for human rights.
The main purpose of this,
according to Freeman, will be to
unite antiwar groups and the
black community organizations
for a common cause.
FOLLOWING THIS will be
the march on Washington, D. C.
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SMC will be providing rides,
according to Freeman.
Buses will be chartered and
the price will be as cheap as
possible, Freeman said. The
more people that go the cheaper
it will be.
Local rallies and
demonstrations will mark the
first anniversary of the deaths
and San Francisco April 24.

UPD Chief Shuler Terms
- r
Alligator Bullet Story Unfair

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
University Police Department
(UPD) Chief Audie Shuler says
he feels the story entitled New
UPD Bullets Termed More
Lethal which appeared in
Fridays Alligator (Feb. 26) was
unfair and showed the new
bullets from a bad viewpoint.
The article in question said
the hollow point bullets now in
UPD use were less dangerous to
innocent bystanders than the
steel-nosed bullets UPD formerly
employed because the
hollow-points do not ricochet.
THE NEW BULLETS were
reported to be more lethal to a
victim in the opinions of two
local gundealers and a physician
from the Shands Teaching
Hospital than were the old
bullets.
The sole purpose for using
this particular round of

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of four Kent State University
students on May 5.
The last event held by SMC
will be May 16, G. I. Solidarity
day. It will focus on a unifying
of goals between civilian and
GJ. antiwar movements.
SMC will also be initiating the
formation of a Gainesville Peace
Action Coalition.
Freeman explained, The

ammunition, Shuler said, is
that it will not ricochet or will
ricochet much less than the old
bullets.
Officers of the UPD are only
permitted to fire their pistols to
save their own lives, to save the

Study Abroad in Florida State
University System Study Centers in
London and/or Florence. Earn two
quarters of University Credit in
Humanities and Social Sciences
between June 15 and December 15,
1971, for less than $2,000.00.
Write: Dr. Wayne Minnick, Arts and
Sciences, Florida State University,
Tallahassee, Florida 32306

antiwar sentiment in this
country encompasses far more
than students. It covers all layers
of the American population and
the Gainesville Peace Action
Coalition will try to unite all the
antiwar forces in Gainesville.
This includes UF faculty, the
black community, veteran
groups and other people
interested in ending the war in
Southeast Asia.

life of another person, or to kill
an animal that is suffering
incurable pain.
We intend to hurt an
individual who is trying to kill a
person or a policeman, Shuler
stated.

Wednesday, March 3, 1971, The Florida Alligator,!

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319 NW 13th
378-2331
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Page 5



Page 6

i, TlwYlorida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3; 197 T

CHRISTIAN RENEWAL: Senior
Gator Rocky Doddridge will
speak on Spiritually Speaking,
Whats Happening In The
World, tonight at 9:30 p.m. in
Room 357 of the Union, at the
meeting of the Student Christian
Renewal, formerly the
Charismatic Student Fellowship.
ALL CAVE MEN: The Florida
Speleological Society meets
tonight at 7 p.m. in Room 347
Reitz Union. Contact Bill
Oldacre at 378-3010 for more
information.
HIGH I. Q.?: MENSA, the
internationally known
organization for people with
high I.Q.s, meets tonight and
every Wednesday night at 9 p.m.
at the Windjammer, 520 SW 2nd
Ave.
OVER THE OCEAN
BLUE ...: (in Gainesville?)
After last weekends regatta
victory over the University of
South Florida, the Gator Sail
Club will meet tonight at 7:30
p.m. in the Union to chart plans
for next weekends regatta.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE: The
Arts and Sciences Student
Advisory Committee meets
today in 101 Little at 4:30 p.m.
It is the last meeting of the
quarter. Students with problems
are welcome.
VEDIC VERDICT: Attend A
Study in Vedic Literature,
tonight at 7 p.m. in the Catholic
Student Center Library.
KRISHNA, BLESS YOU!:
Vegetarian Love Feasts are
served daily at 1915 NW 2nd
Ave.
UTTLE DONKEYS: The Young
Democrats will hold their
weekly meeting this Thursday in
the Union, to discuss Regional
Conference and Membership.
SMILES, NOT NEON: The
Mystical Magical Metaphysical
Experience will visit the Plaza,
Thursday from 2 to 5 pjn.
Come together and share some
brotherhood.
URBAN RENEWAL: The
final meeting in a series of Urban
Design Dialogues with UF
Graduate Research Professor
Leonardo Ricci will be held
tonight at 9:30 in room 1038 in
the Architecture and Fine Arts
Complex.

RAPPS
373-3377
373-3378
Free Delivery
Mon. Thurs-4:00 on
Fri, Sat, Sun-12
Noon on
CALL NOW!

WHAT'S HAPPENING

PERUVIAN REFORMS: The
Latin American Colloquium will
sponsor a panel discussion on
Peru tonight at 8 p.m. entitled
The Reforms How Effective,
How Leftist?, in the Latin
American Colloquium Room of
library East.
HUMANITIES STUDY: Study
sessions in humanities will be
held in 273 Weil Thursday night
at 7 p.m. Dr. Lewis Haines will
moderate.
THE LION IN WINTER: A
superb movie, starring Peter

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The speakers are by Advent Corporation, and though less
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This speaker costs notably less than many of the speakers
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But it would not have been possible to use a speaker such as
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A speaker with the low-bass reproduction ability of the
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Amplifier power is significant only in terms of the amount
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OToole and Katherine Hepburn,
will be shown in "he Union
Auditorium, Thursday night at 7
and 9:45 p.m. Admission is 50
cents.
VETERINARY BANQUET:
There will be a banquet with the
Auburn Veterinary School
Interview Team Sunday at 6:45
pjn. in the Arrendondo Room.
Tickets are available from Mrs.
Hall, Room 1001 McCarty Hall.
All students considering
Veterinary Medidne should plan
on attending.
A ROSE BY ANY OTHER

NAME: Rose Community
Center presents two sweet
smelling bands, RGF and Lynard
Skynard at the University
Auditorium on Friday at 8 pjn.
Admission is 50 cents.
RUMMAGE AROUND: Come
to the Rummage Sale Thursday
from 10 ajn. to 5 p.m. at tire
Presbyterian Student Center.
Bring some goodies too!
CANT AFFORD A HUACK??:
Three films on todays Cuba will
be shown Thursday night a 7
p.m. at the Presbyterian Center.

to fill your living room and your head with music. (If
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But the SX99O has more than strength it has finesse. Its
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But no component is an island, each is a piece of the whole,
and if your turntable rumbles, it rumbles for thee theres
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Rumble, wow, and flutter are unthinkable also inaudible.
The DUAL 1215 automatic turntable simply adds no sound of
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The tone arm is a precisely-balanced, low-mass affair that
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SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 A.M. 'TILL 9:30 P. M
A ___ -- ----- - ; 1 -.- --. ; - --- i

Wednesday, March 3,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3,1971

Page 8

v* < %v*. ; *. i'* , ri4i"
punishment fit the crime.
William Gilbert
EDITORIAL
Paying Heavily
/
For Unjust Law
If you are caught with marijuana in your possession in.
the state of Florida, and convicted, it is quite possible that
you spend the next five years of your life in prison.
And you may consider yourself lucky. If you are
convicted in Texas, you can get 15 years.
Possession of marijuana a felony. Not only is an
offender subject to fine and imprisonment, he will probably
find it difficult to gain employment when he is released.
And while in prison, he will rub elbows with murderers,
rapists and other criminals.
It does not seem fair: a prison sentence for the possession
or use of marijuana. A weed, cannabis sativa.
In our opinion the penalty does not fit the crime. And it
is a crime only because society says it is a crime. Society has
been known to be wrong before. We recall a gent named
Columbus who was repeatedly shot down in Italy because
he kept insisting the world was round.
Evidence has yet to prove that smoking marijuana is
dangerious to health. A John Mitchell-driven report by the
Federal Narcotics Bureau did blame marijuana use for
criminal behavior, alienation, bad grades, delinquency and
early or steady dating.
Yet even the president of the National Coordinating
Council on Drug Abuse Education blasted it, and claimed
the report was political, designed to please the Silent
Majority.
A thorough analysis of marijuana will take several years.
But in the meantime, it is wrong to make marijuana use of
possession a felony.
If marijuana use/possession is a felony, then we believe
the use of alcohol should constitute a felony.
After all, alcohol has been proven to be physically
addictive and as Sen. Harold Hughes pointed out when he
was here last week, there is a $9 billion loss in this country
due to dismissal from jobs and absenteeism due to
alcoholism, and that 50 per cent of the prisoners in our jails
and prisons are there directly or indirectly because of
alcoholism.
There is a drug problem in this country. But the problem
is the people who push heroin and mescaline drugs that
have been proven dangerous not the people who smoke a
little grass. It is not right that marijuana be linked with
these drugs. Too many people are paying the price of the
unjust penalties with their futures.
The state legislature is in a position to do something
about it during this session. We hope the legislators examine
the facts, and make their decisions based upon these facts
not emotion. We implore them not to play politics.
We believe the penalty for marijuana usage or possession
should be reduced to a misdemeanor, if not eradicated.
The legislators should keep it in mind that their kids
might be the next ones to be busted.

p ttWMWWj
>
The recent bombing of the capitol building besides being
senseless, unjustified, illogical, reactionary, and anarchistic
also means that a lot of people who need to use the
bathroom won *t be able to ...

=t- FLUTED COLUMNS Cjjgl
Hemingway And Me
I 1 By JOHN PARKER=J====I

They talk about me in English
class.
I guess that is the epitome of
something or another.
I used to sit in English class,
and we talked about other
people. Usually hacks.
Hemingway, Faulkner, Zazu
Pitts. You know the crew.
ONCE I remember turning in
a paper about a story called
The Use of Force by William
Carlos Williams. I said it was a
bad story. I said it 18 different
ways. They were all very
convincing. The teacher, who
had liked the story up until that
time, changed his mind.
All the students who had
thought they liked the story,
changed their minds.
Me, after hearing my paper
read aloud to the class, I
changed my mind. I started
liking the story.
NO MATTER. What really
impressed me was what the
teacher said about my story:
This really impresses me, he
said chuckling.
You really put old Williams
on a procrustean bed, he said.
Oh, yeah? I said. I didnt

Alligator Staff
Marian Jedrusiak John Pnkir
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Stave Strang Carl Crawford
Wire Editor Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida, under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the florid a Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

B&r? ' :
BKilMMl my'*'" Ww
realize I had done that.
AS A matter of fact, this is
the best paper I have ever gotten
in this class, he said.
I gurgled, and leaned back
smugly in my chair, falling out
of the window into the flower
bed below.
But I gave you a C anyway,
he said. He seemed pleased.
I WANTED to know why, I
told him, brushing off a few
leaves.
Spelling, he said. Margins
off. These things are important,
you know.

.. y The
Florida
Alligator
The mture is not a
gift: it is an achievement
Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

No they arent. I saw a note
from T. S. Eliot in a tailors shop
in Princeton. He ordered three
suits.
So what?** asked the
professor, a man of wisdom.
HE MADE three spelling
errors, said me, a man of many
talents.
The professor still didnt
understand. T. S. Eliot was T. S.
Eliot, and I was I. Or was I me?
Anyway, he pointed out, T. S.
probably had secretaries and
copy readers and editors to
check out all of his material.
Not his notes to his tailor, I
pointed out.
1 still got a C on the paper.
WHAT IM trying to say is
that now I have secretaries and
copy readers and editors to go
over my stuff and take out all
the spelling errors and erase all
my chocolate chip cookie stains.
Theres even an old lady who
comes in at night to mop who
tells me whether or not my
prose is getting too prolix.
What Im trying to say, is all
you English and humanity
teachers, cut it out.
You had your chance.
Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681.
82, 83 or 84
C. R. Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
. Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



Jobs
EDITOR:
JOBS ARE NOT REPEAT
NOT SCARCE FOR
ENGINEERING GRADS. THEY
ARE IN FACT PLENTIFUL. I
nearly fainted with exasperation
and rage at your hopelessly
inaccurate article of February 24
on employment prospects for
engineering students.
I cant speak for Mr.
Slobodkin but I can speak for
the nearly 37,000 engineering
graduates of 1970 at the BJS.
level and above who are reported
by the Engineering Manpower
Commission. Its summary says:
The engineering graduating
class of 1970 enjoyed good
employment prospects despite
reported cutbacks in several
industries and a general decline
in recruiting activity. Altogether,
92% of the graduates had
definite commitments when
they left school, while another
4% were still considering job
offers. Only 4% had no job
offers or other plans. This figure
is substantially higher than in
recent years, but is consistent
with the situation that existed in
the late 1950s and early 1960*s
... Average salary for a new
Bachelors Degree in Engineering
was $10,330 per year... **
Furthermore, ECPD
accredited schools (like the
University of Florida) show
higher mean salaries, a larger
percentage of graduates going on
to further study, and a smaller
percentage without job offers
(3%) than do other schools.
I challenge you to find
another discipline which has less
than three per cent of its
graduates working outside the
area of their principal training
and education. Furthermore,
you inference that B.S. grads are
going to graduate school in
increasing numbers because they
cant get jobs is patently false. In
1970 17% went on to graduate
school, lower than the 25% of
1965, 26% of 1966, 25% of
1967, and 18% of 1968. These
percentages were caused by the
draft laws and partially account
for the extraordinary number of

*X 'THOUGHT JjQU

1 READERS FORUM'

job offers received by the
remaining grads in those years.
Everyone has heard the scare
stories about middle-aged
engineers out of work in the
aerospace industry because of
the great government budget
cuts of the last few years but
they are only part of a much
larger picture. Demand for new
young engineers in most
disciplines remains high. More
broadly and flexibly educated
than ever before they are much
less susceptible to obsolescence.
The best estimates indicate a
nationwide demand for B.S.
engineering grads which exceeds
the production every year for as
far as anyone dares predict.
Any student interested in
looking at these numbers is
invited to come see me in the
Nuclear Sciences Center.
I respectfully request that you
print this letter to counteract in
some measure the damaging and
inaccurate picture presented by
your article.
EDWARD E. CARROLL
Associate Professor
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Gay Lib
EDITOR:
John Parker:
After reading your article on
Gay Lib, I noted that you had
even less to say than you
thought.
You are quite right in your
assertion that there is little
anyone can do to change an
individuals* bigotry or
predilections, but you failed to
mention that most of these are
acquired during childhood from
wise and protecting
heterosexual parents. Without
such loving guidance there
would be far less hate in the
world today.
You are also right that
changing homosexual laws
would not grant instant
acceptance. It would, however,
grant recognition, and by no
longer fearing recognition as a
gay person, one could develop
his potentials and add
substantially to a society which,

having realized that they are not
dealing with so much of a
minority as they would like to
believe, would gradually accept
him, if only as an inferior. I
cannot speak for other
homosexuals but I personally
could care less whether or not I
am ever accepted. What I do care
about, is the possible penalties I
face for being what I am. I
personally refute all the
heterosexual psychiatrists who
tell me how side I am and that I
am a product of my
environment, needing only a
cure and sympathy for my
malady. Shed no tears for me! I
was bom gay, I am gay, and I
always will be gay and any true
gay person who isn't afraid of
himself or society will say the
same thing. I am what I am and
that's all I ever can be.
Your strongest argument, that
gay peoples lives revolve around
sex, is indeed your weakest
point. A homosexual only
appears to be totally
preoccupied with sex because
that is the one facet of his life
which heterosexuals will not
accept, thus the most attention
is given to it. It is in fact, the
heterosexual who uses sex as the
hub of his universe. It is on sex
he bases normalcy. It is because
of his sex preferences that a

GUEST GRIPE
Hey, Is This Russia?

EDITOR:
I learned quite a bit today
about the quality of our judicial
system, and jails. AH the charges,
pleas, and rumors must be true.
My experience is trivial
laughable compared to the
ordeals others are put through
daily. Perhaps laughing at my
experience will help you cry for
others.
On Feb. 9, at 7:15 pjn. I was
stopped by a policeman because
I didn't have a license tag on the
back of my car. I had found it
missing that morning it must
have rattled off. The policeman
gave me a ticket because he had
radioed in the description of the
car etc., to check if it was stolen.
I had the registration with me at
the time. He apologized and
told me not to worry, just tell
the judge the tag rattled off, and
that I reported it and got a new
one. I did. I've got a lost tag
sticker on the back of my
windshield to prove it.
Today I went to court. I was
so sure all I had to do was tell
the judge the tag rattled off, and
I got a new one that I didn't
bring any money. I was asked
how I pleaded guilty or not
guilty. I wasnt quite sure the
question was applicable given
the situation, but I went along
with the legal formalities and
said, Guilty. The tag rattled
off, and I got a new one. As
you can see I rehearsed those
lines.
Judge Ira J. Carter had
rehearsed his too. He said
$20.00.
I was stunned T go to school
on the GJ. bill and $20.00

0 sorrv, /sod, shaving your ankles wont keep you out a
8 of the army. fi

homosexual is despised, not
because he acts or looks
different. (There are exceptions,
swish, swish, but there are also
some pretty far out heteros!)
I was particularly glad to see
that you put feared into your
gay little note. It is truly a
phenomenon that a group of
people are feared for doing with
the same sex, the exact things

might as well be S2O million. In
fact, my telephone was
disconnected last week because I
didn't have any money.
I looked at the judge and
calmly said, What for I had
no way of stopping my license
plate from falling off.
He said, You pleaded guilty.
$20.00. Smart man.
Then I plead not guilty. I'm
not guilty. I'm changing my
plea.
He said, $20.00
That's absurd!
$20.00.
Are you kidding -for
what? He was unmoved.
I didn't blink my eyes twice
before the long arm of the law (a
fat red neck cop) escorted me
out of court to jail.
On the way I couldn't help
but tell the policeman what I
thought. You poeple really
take yourselves seriously too
seriously. Power it must be
nice to have so much power.
If you dont like it here go
to Russia, he answered.
You're kidding thats
something out of a joke-book
isnt it? You don't really think
like that. That's the dumbest
thing I've ever heard.
He did think like that.
When we got to jail the
policeman told the jailer what I
was there for.
I said, Yea, can you believe
it. $20.00 for losing a license
plate for two days.
Dont yea me! Its sir to
you.
I slapped myself in the head.
Oh no, not another one all
the way down the line. You
people are just over-come with
yourselves.

Wednesday, March 3,1971, The Florida Alligator,

those afraid are doing with the
opposite sex. It makes
rationalizing witch burning and
Hitlers (fear and ignorance) that
much easier.
Yes, JP. Im afraid that this
time you really blew it (er,
excuse me).
Name Withheld

I spent 8% hours in jail. They
wouldn't let me make a phone
call, wouldn't tell me what I was
charged with, or anything. My
wife had to walk two and one
half miles from work because
they wouldn't let me call her.
Finally when the shift
changed and I had been fed
my beans and rice, (that's real
too), the new jailer let me call.
I had a new charge public
profanity. $35.00 bond. Judge
Ira J. Carter had passed down
the word not to let me make a
call, or let me out. He had
personally called the jail. The
new jailer told me this when he
was letting me out in front of
witnesses.
I also had to pay a $22.00
fine.
I'm the first one to admit my
actions were irrational. If I
would have had $20.00 to throw
away on a couple of loose
screws, I would have paid it.
You don't even have the right to
question Judge Ira J. Carters
arbitrary decision. I didn't
intend to lose my tag, but when
I did I got a new one. I don't
consider that a $20.00 crime.
This is the type of man we
have sitting in judgement of
other people. A man so childish
he sends word down to have my
rights violated. I should have
kept my mouth shut like a
good German, and paid the
S2O 00. I didn't believe it
yesterday but now I do.
Freedom is a jojke -a sick joke.
Im really glad I've never
committed any serious crimes
unfortunately others have.
DONALD R. SHINE 4AS

Page 9



Page 10

* The Florida Alligator, Wednesday,'Merely 3,' 1971

Hillel Foundation Plans
'Weekend Os Solidarity

By TERRY TENENBAUM
Alligator Staff Writer
A Weekend of Solidarity With the Jews of the
Soviet Union will be held on March 5*6, according
to Rabbi Michael Monson, director of the Hillel
Foundation the UF Jewish student center.
The activities planned for the weekend will aim
to make the university community more aware of
the plight of the more than three million Jews in the
Soviet Union, Monson said.
MONSON CITED several examples of how the
present persecution of Jews in Russia closely
parallels that of the Jews by the Nazis which
eventually led to the slaughter of six million
European Jews:
Jews are treated as a nationality rather than a
religious group by the Soviet government, but they
are denied the right to develop their culture while
other nationality groups are encouraged to develop
theirs,
in the whole of the Soviet Union there are less
than 60 synagogues for 3.5 million Jews and some
have had no rabbi for a number of years.
IN MOSCOW there is one synagogue for 500,000
Jews. (In Miami there are nearly 60 synagogues for a
Jewish population of 220,000).
It is a prison offense to have anything in
Hebrew even a Bible in a Russian home.
There is no such thing as kosher food.
Assembling in a Soviet home for prayer is
forbidden.
THE WEEKEND'S program will begin at the

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Hillel Foundation on Friday evening at 8 p.m. with
sabbath services followed by a mass community
rally.
Speakers at the rally will be Dr. Jerald Bernstein,
UF associate professor of neuro-science, and Dr.
Irving Goffman, professor and chairman of the UF
economics department.
Both of these professors visited in the Soviet
Union this summer and will share their personal
observations," Monson said.
SABBATH MORNING services on Saturday at 10
a.m. at the Hillel Foundation will be followed by a
community luncheon and Torah study session.
The Torah is a parchment scroll containing the
Old Testament in Hebrew and is the basis for all
Jewish doctrine.
The theme of the study session according to
Monson, will be based on the scriptual reading for
that morning, which reminds Jews of all generations
to remember what the enemies of Israel have done
to them through the ages.
JOSEPH YANICH, director of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry will participate in the
study session.
The weekend's activities will culminate on
Saturday evening at 8 pan. at the B'nai Israel
Synagogue, 3115 NW 16 Ave., with a special
program conducted by the Gainesville chapter of
the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization.
The entire Gainesville community is cordially
invited to all of these events, concluded Rabbi
Monson.

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Wednesday, March 3, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

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Wadnaaday, March 3, 1971, The Florida AMijHar,

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wadnasday, March 3,197

Advocates Discuss Proposed
a -- S t ' ;/
For Campus FM Radio Station

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
Plans for a student organized,
managed and maintained FM
radio station are presently
working their way through legal
and administrative channels.
According to electrical
engineering student Mike
Hooper, Student Government
(SG) has appropriated funds for
a private, non-commercial
educational FM station to be
organized by students.
THERE IS a real need for a
student run radio station, 4
Hooper said, because WRUF is
not sufficiently answering the
desires of the students.
The controversy over WRUFs
programming has quietly raged
for two years.
In March of 1969 a group of
faculty and student members
petitioned for more classical
music on WRUF, causing an
addition of 15 hours a week.
WRUF DISC jockeys initiated
an underground rock program in
April of 1969 which was aired
four hours a week.
The program was increased to
12 hours a week in February of
1970 due to overwhelming
response to the progressive rock
show.
A referendum passed by the
student body in October of
1970 requested that WRUF
programming be made more
student oriented.
STATION DIRECTOR
Kenneth Small said that the
referendum was unclear and
pointed out that WRUF was
broadcasting 17 hours a week of
underground music.
Today, WRUFs underground
rock show is on the air 21 hours
a week, from 11:05 until 2:30
Monday through Friday nights
and from 10:30 p.m. until 2:30
pjn. on Saturday.
The term student oriented
should be qualified, Small said,
I consider such programs as
Dialogue and Campus Monitor
student oriented.
WRUF IS licensed as a general
service station and transmits in a
35 mile radius which means,
according to Small, that it serves
graduate students, commuters,
the general public and
on-campus students.
According to English
professor Dr. Motley Deakin,
there are valid reasons for both
rock and classical programming
since WRUF must cooperate
with other departments in airing
music and training announcers.
The controversy, Deakin said,
assumes that there is a division
between learning and pleasure.
Deakin suggests shifting popular
music programs to prime time
while increasing the quality of
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classical programs. He takes &
model Berkeleys KPFA.
THE NEW student station
would, according to Hooper,
offer a solution, since its format
would focus on progressive rock
and popular tunes.
We would not compete with
WRUF, except for its rock
show, Hooper said, but would
hope to supplement WRUFs
programming by offering an
alternative to students.
In order to keep the station
completely student oriented
Hooper plans open mike
programs and student polls.
THE STATION will employ

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only student volunteers, and,
except for official monitoring by
the FCC, will be totally student
controlled.
We are now seeking approval
from the Board of Regents,
Hooper siad, which involves
appearing before the Regents
Education Media Committee for
review.
A FEDERAL BOARD
representing the Federal
Communications Committee
(FCC) must grant permission to
construct after reviewing the
case, and after the station is
technologically ready to
broadcast, must issue a license.
This will take about eight

months, mostly waiting,
Hooper said, and the earliest
we could be on the air is the end
of fall quarter, 1971.

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Environmental Soap Sales To Begin

By SUZANNE KLINKENBERG
Alligator Staff Wrilar
A project in which junior high
students will educate housewives
in saving their environment will
be initiated soon by five
students from a sociology course
studying community
involvement.
UF students Joan Spiegel,
Bruce Freid, Michael Gordon,
Debbie Meltzer aird Alan
Trupkin are organizing the
project as part of the SY 599
course with Assistant Professor
Harold Hunter.

Gainesville City Commissioner
Calls For 'Noise Ordinance

By JAMESXHAPIN
Alligator Corraspondont
Gainesville City Commissioner
Courtland Collier called for a
city ordinance to deal with
noise pollution, in a speech
Monday night at the Florida
State Museum.
Collier, who spoke before a
meeting of the Environmental
Action Group (EAG), said that
the noise ordinance, in its
formative stage, breaks down in
to three main parts:
There are certain intensity
levels at which sound should not
be permitted.
Certain areas of the city
should be permitted higher noise
levels than others.
Higher sound levels should
be permitted during the day
than at night. (Present suggested
quiet hours are 9 p jn. until 7
a.m.)
WE WANT an ordinance that
is both functional and
reasonable, and reflects the
opinions of the public, Collier
said, But we cannot regulate
the quality of sound, only the
intensity.
Electronic amplifiers,
motorcycles and trucks are the
noises that Gainesville residents
complain about most, according
to Collier.
The major question involved
is deciding what noises are
damaging, Collier said, For
tills I asked Dr. John F. Brandt
for assistance in formulation of
the ordinance.
DR. BRANDT, research
assistant professor of speech,
who also spoke at the EAG
meeting, indicated that the
human auditory system is
tough.
For every loud noise, you
experience a temporary hearing
loss from which you do
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THE STUDENTS are
purchasing a completely
environmentally safe all-purpose
soap from the Shakely Corp. of
California, manufacturers of
environmentally safe products.
The soap is wholesaled under
the stipulation that it cannot be
sold over the counter in stores
but only house to house.
This ensures person to person
contact for educating the
community in environmental
protection.
THE FIVE UF students are
working with a local junior high
to arrange the sale of the soap.

normally recover, Brandt said,
But if you are exposed to loud
noises over an extended period
of time, I guarantee permanent
damage.
Dr. Brandt said that noise
pollution isnt funny and if
Gainesville is going to have a
noise ordinance, it better be
enforceable.
Besides ear damage, a very

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ill PHOTOGRAPHY
1915 NW 13TH ST ___
Phone 372-2512 IBQII|
1

The bottles of soap, which cost
$1 from the manufacturer, will
be sold by the junior high
students door to door for SI .50.
Twenty-five cents of the
profit will be a commission to
the young salesmen and the
remaining 25 cents will be
donated to the League of
Blackness, to be used in setting
up a ghetto breakfast program.
The purpose of the project is
threefold: educating the
community in pollution control
on an individual level, providing
young students with the means
to earn money and contributing

heavy noise environment can
constrict blood vessels and cause
some unusual psychological
reactions, Brandt said.
A possible exception to be
included in the ordinance might
be permission of some higher
levels of sound for limited
duration, Collier said, but the
proposed ordinance is due for
considerable debate.

to the breakfast program. Miss
Spiegel said.
Were going to try to make
this a continuing thing. Miss
Spiegel said. If it works out the
Hogtown Corp. will take it
over.
The bottles containing the
soap will be recycled also.
Housewives will be asked to
retain the bottles and salesmen

JUL i BTIAKHOUBB^
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99 c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
| Sears |
Save $50.07
Compact Refrigerator
for Dorm Room or
Apartment
Reg. $149.95 f\f\ OO
5.9 cu. ft. V-l Vs OO
This Weekend Only. %~r
Ideal for your dorm room or apartment for extra
refrigerator space. Keep cool snacks for the hot summer.
Features push-button defrost, zero-degree freezing and
adjustable cold control. Slightly damaged. In our freezer
department.
Use Sears
Easy Payment Plan
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Bach
TOP OF THE MALL
SHOP AT SEARS Cpq rc 1420 N.W. 23rd. Blvd.
AND SAVE OCcllo Shop Daily 10 amtil 9:30 pm
Phone 378-2531
SEARS. ROEBUCK AND CO.

Wednesday, March 3, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

will return to refill them with
the completely environmentally
safe soap that can be used for
clothes, cars, floors, face or even
brushing teeth. Miss Spiegel said.

FAT Albert
is coming!

Page 15



£4 '&£* Z2. tvt- **>* W TW; V-T *" **,-*-" *93 f V" y *7; *3 *" i""
r -i-* a. ... . r

a* _
- #
a a aaaaaaaa a a a a a a a a a a a a aa_
FOR SALE
WATER BEDS ultimate In sleeping
comfort. Call 372-7178
Students DONT BE FOOLEDI We
guaratee the lowest prices New
walnut finished student desk, now
$27.50, bookcase with glass doors
$19.50, 2 drawer files $19.50, Used
solid oak swlvll chairs with castors
$19.95 J R OFFICE FURNITURE
620 S. MAIN STREET 376-1146
(A-l St-84-p)
''l a4
ADULT HIT i;:" MMaOUIT HIT M
jjWj !*/( VI 111 I. trt|M K I M.t/II II-

BB BB
IPS Til
IL Awyjl
nyl /111 4 11414'
4 STARTS SUNDAY: A 3-D MOVIE FOR
| ADULTS: SWINGTAIL WOW! I
n l^nF
o KsiUiLli&xJ o
AT: 1:40-3:40-5:40-7:40 & 9:40
PETER SELLERS GOLDIE HAWN
in
*lfor&aGfeib&§joqp
Screenplay by TERENCE FRISBY based on his original play
Executive Producer JOHN DARK Produced by M.J. FRANKOVtCH and JOHN BOULTING
Directed by ROY BOULTING COLOR From Columbia Pictures
n mm
w BWWIW
AT: 2:25-4:15-6:06-7:56 & 9:45
\Wm jiij
adHtW ui x ijfcj.^esrwTi^cMMjraTaafcm
jmm

FOR SALE
8-track cartridges custom Recorded
80-min Capitol tapes, 2 or more
albums $4 Inc. tape or will beat any
competitive offers 378-5916 nights
(A-st-92-p)
Walnut console TV 23. Ex. CondT
Best Offer 378-5925 After 6:00
(A-st-92-p)
MILLIONS of rugs have been cleaned
with Blue Lustre. Its Americas
finest. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooer now
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfc)
BBW TV zenith, screen 20 x 15
cabinet model. $45 call 378-0518
(A-2t-94-p)
Fender Bandmaster amp & bottom 2
12 bass speakers. 2 yrs. old & In
excel, cond. $250 call Dan at
373-1143 after 7 p.m. (A-st-94-p)
Mobile home for sale, 1969
Park wood 12x52, air conditioned,
furnished* carpeted. Excellent
condltlonl Call 378-7165 evenings
jA-7t-92p) ..

Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3,1971

X*X*X # X*X*X # XvX*XvXvX*XvX:XvXvV
FOR SALE
THREE Used Gates cartridge tape
playback units plus one
Record-Amplifier unit. All heavy
duty Radio station models. Will sell
separately. Call WUWU, 378-2060
(A-2t-94-p)
Doberman Pinscher Puppies AKC
Champion Stock Warlock line 7
weeks old only males left from
$125.00 phone 378-8067 or
378-8045 (A-10t-94-p)
SURFBOARD oceanside 70; 6 10
used 5 times new $165. will
sacrifice S9O (consider trade 4
turntable or speakers); Magnavox
Stereo for S7O. Call Betty 378-6548
after 5 pm (A-st-94-p)
Gibson sg standard electric guitar
retail price was $390. will sell for
$175. ItS in really good condition
call 376-3683. ask for Wiley
(A-3t-94-p)
Leaving town must sell honda 305
$350 or best, all offers considered,
sound mechanical condition. David
372-5091 (A-2t-94-p)
SUPER SALE Blank 8-track tapes
6 for 9.95 MUNTZ STEREO 319 NW
13 SL (A-30t-88-p)
Get ready for spring, two 10-speed
bicycles for sale, a ralelgh record for
$65 and a sears for $45 call 378-0992
anytime. (A-3t-94-p)
1966 HONDA 160. Good condition.
$185.00 or best offer. Call 376*8484
after 1:30 P.M. (A-7t-94-p)
Bosch A Lomb monocular
microscope. Best offer, call 376-7670
(A-st-93-p)
Out of sight 36 black light. Great
buy only S2O. Almost new. Call John
at 378-3566 anytime. (A-4t-93-p)
Golf Clubs 1 iron through pitching
wedge 3 woods Power Blit stiff
aluminum shafts D-4 SIOO. Call Chip
378-5503 (A-3t-93-p)
Add a new dimension to your stereo
with a 4x2 ft Light Organ. Lights
flash to music on any stereo, great
with a black light. Jim 373-3028
(A-3t-93-p)
Panasonic reel to reel tape recorder.
SIOO.OO Call Jim at 373-3615
anytime. (A-st-93-p)
Sofa-bed, chair and otoman set,
brown tweed, one year old, bought
set for $l5O but must sell, call
378-1298 anytime for Info, excellent
condl (A-st-92-p)
Stereson Bass Amp 200 watt and
Gibson ebo Bass Guitar and Turner
Microphone. $500.00 or best offer
above this price. 392-7204
(A-st-91-p)
Electronics Experimenters!! All kinds
of state of the art solid state devices
and accessories available at:
Technical Assistance Unlimited 717
NW First St. 376-0624 (A-10t-89-p)
RUMMAGE 3-7 pm apt 127 Colonial
Manor 1216 SW 2nd Ave 1 cent to
$1 BARGAINS records, books,
sweaters, MORE 373-3874
(A-st-91-p)
FOR SALE 1970 Motorcycle
Yamaha 350 Call 392-0393 or See at
Campus Credit Union Office 1200
SW sth Avenue (A-St-95-p)
Shag Rug 2 mo old 10x12 SSO. Also
2 Dressers 30-40$ Each Adi. Easy
Chair $25 Shelves $lO Must Sell by
this weekend. Call 376-5667
(A-lt-95-p)
Kawasaki 250 Enduro bike, special
shocks, expansion chamber, has abt
30hp. Like new condition. Price
$550 will bargain call 378-4180
(A-3t-95-p)
MUST SELL 1967 Ducatl lOOcc
Scrambler 850 miles ex. cond. used
on trails luggage rack GREAT BUY!
call Jerry 392-6914 $175 (A-st-95-p)
1968 honda CL 175 scrambler 6400
ml. excellent condition, tool kit,
S4OO. call Jerry for more Info.
376-1127 (A-3t-95*p)
water BEDS. 319 W. University
Ave. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Mon. through
Sat. Waterbeds of Gainesville
(A-st-95-p)

jofcmeievMCpMANM&aMMnrniM
fcratOM fjg] KMHABN6 H6PBURN
* *MAnHfpu
Thursday, March LION IN L
4... 7:00 & 9:45 WIMTCD
Friday & Saturday,
March 5 & 6 ...
7:45,10:30
Union Auditorium 50
buy acfrance tickets on Friday
from 12:30 to 4:30 at 2nd *Al £kt
floor box office
Sponsored by the J.W.R. Union ~

FOR SALE
Used furniture, student work table
sl2, dining table sl2, glass sewing
table S4O, Call 372-6846. All pieces
in excellent condition & sturdy.
(A-3t-95-p)
WATERBEDS at peoples prices, the
lowest in hogtown. jumbo S9O,
round SIOO, king S7O, queen $65,
full S6O, twin $55. Call 372-6846
(A-3t-95-p)
Guitar-Yamaha copy of Martin
DC-18 also motorola B&W portable
T.V. Guitar SBO T.V. $45 call
378-1241 (A-3t-95-p)
New monach smx stereo tape
player with am-fm radio 80 dollars
must sell call 378-3560 after 1
(A-3t-95-p)
*66 Mustang new engine new carb.
new tires new Insp. sticker runs great
call Paul after 6:00 pm 378-3743
(A-st-95-p)
Scuba Tank for sale, 42 cu. ft., K
valve, Also, two hose single stage
regulator, Bac Pac. All for S6O Call
373-3440 after 5 (A-2t-95-p)
1969 HONDA CL 350, excellent
condition, extra parts and helmet,
high bars, velocity stacks, extra
chrome, call Tom at 392-7003
(A-st-95-p)
4 puppies 4 sale 2 males, 2 females 6
weeks March 3 type: cute + cuddly,
sad eyes, droopy ears cost: loving
home call 373-3108 after 6
(A-3t-95-p)
Refrigerator Works Fine. $25.
Kitchen Tables and Chairs, Cheap.
373-2934 (A-lt-95-p)
FOR RENT
3 blocks from campus for one or two
people air conditioned pool available
todayl 60 per month 373-1819 in
home at odd hours so keep trying
(B-2t-95-p)
Sublet large 3 bdr house near campus
air cond available spring quarter
378-6890 (B-4t-95-p)
Room In private home for mature
male students. Line and maid service.
Central heat/ac. Seperate entrance
off-street parking. Call 376-5360
(B-Bt-95-p)
Male roommate wanted spring qtr at
Unlv Gard Trace AC pool cable TV
S4B a month + 1/3 utilities call
378-8993 after 5:00 (B-10t-95-p)
Female roommate the Place 67.50
mo Incl util private bedroom spring +
summer qtrs avail early March call
Sheryl 372-7296 any reasonable hr.
(B-3t-95-p)
One male roommate for spring
quarter. La Mancha Apts $75 month
utilities Included pool walk to
campus. 372-1339 or 376-9432.
(B-3t-94-p)
Male Roomate wanted. $35 per mo.
+ 1/3 utilities. Parklane apts. call
373-3573 available spr. and sum. qts.
close to campus (B-st-93-p)
Sublet sum. 1 bedrm. apt. a/c gas
heat 1 bik. from campus $l2O mo.
Colonial Manor Apts. N 0.92 call
Connie or Lynda 373-2967
(B-3t-94-p)
2 girls need 1 or 2 roommates spring
quarter for 2 bedroom apt., central
heat, ac, pool. Share monthly rent of
$165. Call 378-8634 (B-3t-94-p)
Beautiful 4 bdrm. House only a few
months old nice neighborhood with
no hassles from the neighbors
reasonable rent call Nora. 378-3733
Leave name and number (B-3t-93-p)
Sublet 1 apt (Mar 20 Sept. 71)
furnished; l bedrm; a/c heat $l2O
close to Med Center; back patio
children and pet OK; quiet area Call
373-1103 1906 SW 14 Terr.
(B-st-95-p)
Peace and Quiet. Like It? If so, and
youre looking for a home, call
378-6831 after 7 pm. $l3O a month,
1921 SW 14th Terrace. (B-st-92-p)

FOR RENT
Urgently need one female roomate
for Spring Quarter N 0.112 Village
Park overlooking pool June rent
already paid. Call 376-6187 anytime
(B-St-92-p)
1 Male Roommate Needed.
Gatortown Apartments. Rent Paid
till March 15 Take Over Now And
save call 466-3309 FREE June rent need 2 coeds to
sublease landmark apt for spring qtr
you pay Just 47.50 + util for 2 mos
live 3rd month rent free 373-2268
(B-st-91-p)
Need 1 female roomate for spring
quarter. 1 blk from campus $55 mo.
+ >/2 utilities call 378-5898
(B-st-91-p)
HERE IT ISI A Studio apt. Modern,
well sum, A/C, pool. No. 418 1225
SW Ist Ave. Ph. 376-1521 or call
mgr. 378-2221 lease to Juri.
(B-st-91-p)
Need two female roommates for
Spring and Summer quarters
Landmark Apt. 109 $47.50 plus
utilities Call B on or Barb 372-9886
(B-st-91-p)
Hawaiian Village, sublet 2 bedrm.
unfrn, A/C, pool, w/w carpets,
dishwasher, disposal, $l5O mo. Avril
Apt. 1. Call 376-6974 after spm
(B-st-94-p)
Female roommate for spring quarter
to share room in 3 bedroom apt. $47
per month la bonne vie apts.
378-5812 (B-10t-85-p)
Room/apt, A/C, maid & linen service
share bath & kitchen, cable tv ext.
only $76/mo. Includes all utilities
one block from campus at No 6 102
NW 13th St. Call Den at 376-9389
(B-3t-93-p)
WANTED
Wanted: two roomates for Spring
quarter. University Gardens. $67.50
per/mth. call Fran 373-4377
evenings. (B-st-92-p)
Female roommate spring Or. for
trailer; near med center, own room
$55 per mo. Vt utilities call 378-4196
(C-7t-90-p)
2 male roommates for spring quarter
to share 3 bedroom a/c house.
Furnished. Grad students preferred.
$57.50/mo. ea. + utilities. 372-1349
(C-st-91-p)
Female roommate to share nice two
bedroom Summit House apt. spring
and summer quarter. Pools, close to
campus, air cond. Call 373-2980.
(C-st-90-p)
Male roommate needed. Village Park
Apartments. Available now.
$47.50/mo. Call Darryl at 392-0505
or 378-0043 (C-4t-95-p)
1 or 2 roommates wanted for nice
apt with carpeting, dishwasher, pool.
Start spring quarter at La Bonne Vie
Call 373-1228 (C-st-95-p)
Female roomate needed landmark
apt 174 available Mar 29 47.50/mo
color T.V. 2 pools dishwasher etc.
376-2184 (C-Bt-95-p)
Wanted one male roommate. Fully
furnished two bedroom apt. $l2O +
utilities for the whole qtr. call
372-6812 for Info, ask for Chris.
(C-2t-95-p)
Male law student air conditioned
furnished single room or apartment
with kitchen maximum S7O
372-2392 (C-3t-95-p)
Need 1 female roommate for Spring
close to school 405 N.W. 14th St.
only sllO for Spring call 373-3786.
(C-2t-95-p)
1 roommate to share 2 bdrm. apt.
summit house 1700 SW 16th Ct. now
cheap 45.00 per mo. Including utility
call Immediately 376-2048
(C-3t-95-p)
3 female freaks needed to sublet 4
bdr apt near campus air cond pool
S7O mo. Ind utilities (C-4t-95-p)

SwS'Xw



'

WANTED
Need female to sublease F. Q. apt.
a#; 25 + util. Large bedroom move in
now -cait 378-4614 (C-St-91-p)
Female Roommate needed Landmark
Apt. 37 Available Mar 1 47.50/mo
373-3107 (C-st-92-p)
Liberal female roommate for 2
hedrm Williamsburg townhouse
No 11 52.50 + utilities call
372- X 245 830 to 4:30 or
373- anytime (C-st-92-p)
Need 1 female roommate for spring
quarter village park N 0.30, $65.00
plus utilities call 376-8119, Caryn
or Susan anytime (C-3t-93-p)
Female Roommate for apt one block
from campus. S7O plus utilities.
378-5727 or 376-0942. Unda
(C-st-93-p)
Female roommate for La Bonne Vie
townhouse $53.75 immediate
occupancy rent paid until Mar. 15
call 378-4403 after 5 ask for Kathy
(C-st-93-p)
Joining PEACE CORPS 3-21-71,
female roomate needed V? block from
campus $55/mo. + % util, call
Barbara after spm 373-3827
(C-3t-93-p)
Couple wants 1 bedroom apt for spr.
and summer near campus phone after
6 pm 372-4166 (C-3t-94-p)
2 Female roommates to share
bedroom with private bath in
Hawaiian Village 2 bedroom apt. $55
plus utilities. Call 373-3964
( C-10t-87-p)
One roommate wanted spring qr. to
share room in a 2 bedroom apt. S3B
mo. + 1/3 util. Avail 22 March easy
walking distance from campus call
3 78-9728 (C-st-93-p)
Looking for apartment for next
quarter Prefer grad student. Call after
7 pm June 376-3085 (C-lt-94-p)
Ft*.
I wti . w. im u. v iyl #
3MT:
Indnitef I
SHOV S: ; Best Pietiri *:
J:2S : Best Actress :
>:25 : Best Actor
;* : IHhcraw*
l: 25 ;
list Seder
*. Jeha Ihrley t .*
ciNt *. Jlay MtUuMi. *

[. : WINNER 9f %
vs:; ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATION J
l Actress
: of n:
I THE YEARS I
; 10 BEST! ;
* dlarv
of a mad*
Housewife
'
rows-/ 10 \
oo :iaunum x
oo : mrntms f:
15 including JL
BKtPictara:
: JcL Bk Actllr :
JGeorge C.Scott;
Karl Malden
: iiTMTTONI
Florida Theatre Only
.75* To Age 17
*>1.25 Age 17 A up/
% ALL OAV /
*

WANTED
hip couple or single wanted
immediately for two bedroom
duplex, ac/backyard /carpeted your
share 75.00 + utilities call 376-3281
- Marc (C-2t-94-p)
Heads wanted for cutting styling and
reconditioning free hair analysis.
Redken organic hair care products
trlsh carol and cindy now working
miracles at trishs hair house.
372- (C-st-94-p)
Straight male roommate for spring
Qtr. SIOB. starlite apts. N 0.821 good
clean rooms near campus, central air
condit. and heating, call 378-0452
(C-st-94-p)
Two females to share 3 bedroom apt.
on the pool-spring quarter
Williamsburg apts. call 378-0518
(C-2t-94-p)
Female roommate. Three blocks
from campus Approx. $56
(negotiable). 421 N.W. 15 St.
378-9958 (C-st-94-p)
2 female romates to share 2 bdrm.
Summit House apt. with 2 girls
Spring Qrt. $45 per mo. + utilities
call 372-4157 (C-3t-93-p)
1967 VW blue needs body work and
master cylinder engine in excellent
condition 700 or best offer call
373- (C-lt-95-p)

t #
HELP WA NTED
HOMEWORKERS. Envelope
addressers and mailers. Send stamped
envelope & 25 cents to GWL
Enterprises, 640 Cobb St., Athens,
Ga. 30601 (E-2t-95-p)
Male or Female to work part time
Want clean-cut, hard-working
individual at new BOOKLAND
bookstore. Contact Mrs. Poe at the
Mall. Ph. 378-0551 (E-lt-95-p)
Extra money?" Fla. licensed
physicians, residents, fellows etc. to
work weekends in general hospital In
Palatka excellent pay If interested,
call K. Santl, M.D. 328-2784
weekdays for further details
(E-st-95-p)
Listeners wanted again I Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call LeVan
between 8 and 5 for appointment.
392-2049. (E-12t-84-c)
Big strong freeks wanted for security
at rock concerts, call 373-3842.
>E-st-91-p)
AUTOS
for sale 1969 Simca very good mech.
cond. very clean good cheap trans.
Must sell! call 376-9356 or 378-4827
Ask for Ron (G-st-95-p)
SHELBY GT 500 1967 low mileage
Call Dave English 376-0739
(G-st-91-p)
Spitfire *64 with late engine. & hard
and soft tops and T.C. 8 wheels with
good tires engine stage 2 $595 call
378-8483 (G-2t-94-p)
Antique. 1950 Dodge, 4dr, fluid
drive. Current & inspection, excellent
condition. S2OO 392-2871 or
376-8987 (G-st-94-p)

Todays ]
more for your money meal I
moRR isons
CAFETERIA I
WEDNESDAYS FEATURE]
J FISH ALMONDINE WITH |
g I HUSH PUPPIES A e | o
< I R v4l i ?
* FRENCH FRIED "T J >
* I POTATOES J
| j THURSDAYS FEATURE j §
~ BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND i
MACARONI a
! ALL YOU CAN / I
L_eat.l 1-Zij I
I LUNCH-11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons
CAFETERIA .. beyond comparison! I
k 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Wednesday, March 3, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS
1969 Austin America 1300 cc, auto/4,
speed, twin carbs, driving lamps,
talbot mirrors, radials, radio, heater,
low milage, one owner, priced below
book at; $1250. Call 378-3343 after
6 p.m. (G-3t-95-p)
60 VW New tires, battery, brakes,
Dec. inspection. Complete
maintenance records. S3OO cash call
373-1697 after 5:00 pm (G-3t-95-p)
68 Opel Kadett fantastic condition
both engine and body wise. S9OO or
best offer, call Jim Kaan at 372-9319
(G-2t-95-p)
Corvair Monza 1963 Good Body,
Good Tires, Doesnt run. For repair
or parts ss7sss See Behind 408
N.W. 15th St or call 376-5667
(G-lt-95-p)
VAN Chevy Greenbriar, Screens,
Curtains, etc. Runs Well Good
Camper, Good Condition SSOO or
best offer Must Sell 376-5667
(G-lt-95-p)
1970 Karman Ghla Excellent
condition R/H S2OOO or best offer
call 376-6680 after 5:30 PM
(G-st-91-p)
Alfa romeo 65 1600 velole ex race
car streetable many spares Included.
$995.00 or make offer. H. Matthews
Jax, Fla. Tel 904 388-3030
(G-st-92-p)
68 Volkswagon, black, sunroof, real
clean, SI3OO, Phone 378-7773
(G-3t-93-p)
1969 Lotus Elan 2 plus 2. AM-FM
radio, radial tires, 7000 miles,
white/black Interior. Excellent
condition. $4495. Steve Biezer 904
353-5988 Office 904-744-2367
Home Jacksonville (G-3t-93-p)
1969 VW equip, to handle hurst,
empi, radials, konis. Like new cond.
$1750. call Gary 392-7275
(G-st-93-p)
PERSONAL
Riders Wanted: Driving to EL PASO
TEXAS plan to leave March 15th. If
Interested call Jennifer 378-8528
(J-st-94-p)
Need a place spring qtr? one girl
wanted to share room in 2 bdrm apt
pool, fully furnished, convenient call
373-3026 or 376-7852 anytime
(J-st-94-p)
FREE WINE GUIDE Free Wholesale
Catalog. Hundreds Brand Name
Products At 30%-50% off Write
UNIVERSITY INNVESTORS, Box
50022 Dallas, Texas 75250
((J-3t-93-p)
Work or have classes In the Med
Center? Girl roommate needed for
spring/summer quarters. Apt. 88 In
Williamsburg. Call Bev 373-3230
(J-st-94-p)
Rock out with RGF in their first
concert in university aud. Fri. March
5. 8:00 PM. Donation of 50 cents to
the Rose Community Center
(J-4t-93-p)
Sex Is best on a water bed. now here
from Innerspace Environment,
special offer for students, for
information call Elliott 373-3144
(J-13t-90-p)

Page 17

x^XyXyXyX-i-XyryXyXyXyXyXyX-x-
PERSONAL
****** ******** **#****
Tlrea of apt living? CLO has openings
for the spring 1 block behind Krystal
only $195/qt for room and 3 meals
a day. Vince at 376-9473
(J-23t-75-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer. Electrologist. ..
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039-
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
For the best and lowest priced bike
repairs see Charlie at 1036 NW 10 St
4-9 pm (J-l lt-92-p)
Michael, I love you more than I love
the sun. Do you remember?
(J-3t-93p)
GAINESVILLE GREEN decals, just
in. Magnificent leather jackets and
pants, even though Its too hot. Low,
medium and high-rise bluejeans, some
with buttons, all (count'em) ALL
SIZES. Silver studs, hundreds of
patches and appliques. More
carburetors Just arrived. Incense In a
dillion scents. SUBTERRANEAN
CIRCUS, 105 W 7th St. ooen til 10
nightly (J-3t-95-p)
If your head Is into the environment
get the environment into your head
redken acid-balanced, biodegradable
Trishs Hair House an City 372-7159
(J-lt-95-p)
Reward black wallet lost on Monday
please return to me I'm lost without
It, give me a break. 392-7509 towers
b" 1107 (L-2t-95-p)
REWARD S3O Lost wallet, great
sentimental value call 392-8903
(L-3t-95-p)
, m m m a*taaaaagaaat*g*t**g*l*l
LOST db FOUND
found: man's wrist watch at Gym.
describe and claim, call Jerry
376-2709 (L-3t-93-p)

Sebastians Shop Volkswagen Repairs
This Months Special for VW Drivers
Tune Up
Points, plugs, condenser, compression
test adjust carburetor,
Reg. sls Special price fj
Sebastian's 535 SW 4th Ave. and
take advantage of this special phone 376-9381
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They hated the preacher for what he said,
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Starring RAT BOONE as David Wilkarson with ERIK ESTRADA JACKIE GIROUX
DINO DtfIUPPI JO-ANN ROBINSON Screenplay by 00N MURRAY and JAMES BONNET
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FEATURES... 1:40 3:35 5:30 7:30 9:30
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lost <& FOUND
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found: 2 pairs wire rim GLASSES
one pair with case from Or. Tannon.
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$25.00 REWARD. Lost Gold Charm
Bradet Great Sentimental Value Call
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SERVICES
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto*Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378*7330. Now! BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (m*tfc)
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medic-legal-psychologic, open Sat. &
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XvXv



iFv >

Page 18

lTh Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3,1971

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Florida attorneys who hold
f ull-timc government offices,
including members of congress
and governor, must withdraw
their names from law firms or
run afoul of the new code of
professional responsibility, the
Florida Bar Association said.
The bars committee on
professional ethics said in a new
advisory opinion that full-time
public officials should
disassociate themselves from
their law firms during their
terms of office.
Although Gov. Ruebln Askew
and Atty. Gen. Robert Shevin
sold their interests in law firms
when they took office, it was
not required by law, and it has
been traditional in the past for
congressmen to continue their
associations with private law
firms.

World Wrap-Up

Agnew: It's Too Early
To Talk About '72
WASHINGTON (UPI) Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew said
Tuesday it would be premature
to speculate on whether he will
again be President Nixons
running mate in 1972.
He was asked in a copyrighted
interview with Lucian C. Warren
of the Buffalo Evening News if
he or Nixon had given any
consideration to that matter:
Agnew replied: Its not only
premature from his standpoint, I
think he would be very
uncircumspect if he would make
a determination as to who
should be his running mate now.
I really havent given a lot of
thought to it yet.
U.S. Air Raids Cut Ho
Chi Minh Trail In Half
SAIGON (UPI) U.S.
military sources said Tuesday
the South Vietnamese drive into
Laos had frustrated Communist
plans for a dry season offensive
The Citroen.
Its so different
it will take
courage to buy it
After you get to
know it it wIH take
courage to buy
anything else.
CITROONA
ED'S MEHARI
CITROEN SALES & SERVICE
4308 N.W. 13th Street
Wo Know The Value of CARS
You Know The Value
of SERVICE

ACCORDING TO FBA
State Officials Must Leave Law Firms

Former Sen. Spessard
Holland, who retired last year,
always had his name at the head
of his law firm although he did
not practice during several
decades in the U.S. Senate.
A majority of the state's
present senators and
congressmen are attorneys, but
the bar office here said it had no
idea how many actually were
still listed as partners in their
firms.
The attorneys among them
are Sens. Lawton Chiles,
(D-Lake land), and Edward
Gurney, (R-Winter Park), and
Reps. Lou Frey, (Orlando),
William Chappell, (Ocala), Sam
Gibbons, (Tampa), Claude
Pepper, (Miami Beach), Dante
Fascell, (Miami), Paul Rogers,
(West Palm Beach), Charles
Bennett, (Jacksonville), and J.

and that U.S. air raids had cut
truck traffic on the Ho Chi Minh
Trail by half. UJS. helicopters
flew more South Vietnamese
into Laos today.
Spokesmen in Saigon said a
650-man South Vietnamese
battalion was flown in today by
a fleet of American UHI Huey
helicopters to an area southwest
of Route 9, the road that is the
axis of the South Vietnamese
drive across the Ho Chi Minh
Trail.
The reinforcements were the
first marines to go across the
border in the drive by 16,000
infantry, paratroop and Ranger
forces. Military sources said all
of South Vietnams three marine
brigades from 10,000 to
13,500 men had been moved
up to staging areas inside South
Vietnam and held in reserve.
1700 Lbs. Off Grass
Seized At Airstrip
CHICAGO (UPI) Federal
agents Monday seized 1,700
pounds of marijuana at a

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Herbert Burke. (Port
Lauderdale).
A bar spokesman said that
although the opinion is only
advisory it carries great
weight. The spokesman said he
did not know who requested the
advisory.
But the bar advised public
officials who are attorneys that
under the new code, adopted
last July by the state Supreme
Court, they must dissassociate
themselves from law firms if
they hold positions that do not
allow them to actively and
regularly practice law.
The code says that a lawyer
who assumes a judicial,
legislative or public executive or
administrative post or office
shall not permit his name to
remain in the name of a law firm
or to be used in professional
notices of the firm during any

suburban airstrip and arrested
four men, three of them from
Florida, on smuggling charges.
John G. Evans, regional
director of the Federal Bureau
of Narcotics, said the plane
landed at the Du Page County
airport before dawn Monday. It
was kept under surveillance until
later in the day, when three men
joined the pilot and began to
unload the marijuana, Evans
said.
The seizure was one of the
largest in Chicago history, Evans
said, and marked the first time
authorities have confiscated an
airplane being used to transport
drugs.
He said the marijuana was
worth about $1 million at retail
prices.

Mr. Eeau Jangles
Has Bullet Belts!
Clothes For >OO

period in which he is not
actively practicing law.
The bar comm i 11 e e

Poetry by James Lee
IJwMM by James William Lee, Jr.
The time is now,
Yesterday was and is,
if you go, or have been.
You are older or younger,
if you look, or have seen.
Wednesday March 3
7:00 pm Union Lounges 122/123
refreshments will be served
* sponsored by the J.W.R. Union
FLARES
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Men sizes 30 to 38 waist & in all lengths
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interpreted the rule as meaning
"substantially" active in the
practice of law.



The
Florida**
Alliga tor

plod, Hedgecock To Share
Vacated Second Base Job

By SIM SMITH
Alligator Correspondent
When last years baseball team
captain Leon Bloodworth played
his last game at second base it
appeared that John Flad would
move right into that slot. Its not
so certain anymore
Despite Flads fine
credentials, Mark Hedgecock
may be starting on March
Hedgecock played at Brevard
Junior College last season and
batted .275 Florida is the only
school I ever considered playing
for. The Satellite Beach native
feels that his chances of breaking
into the starting lineup are
pretty good. He is currently
hitting .352 in practice. Im
working hard on the double play
situation right now, said the
junior physical education major.
JOHN FLAD is another one
of the boys who came all the
way from Madison, Wis. to play.
He was a flanker on the
freshmen football team but
decided his size was more
conducive to baseball.
Flad hit .353 for Madison
Edgewood High School and
managed a .355 average last year
for the B team. But his hitting is
somewhat off so far this year.
John is a dedicated player and
hell start hitting again, coach
P.A. Lee said. Coach Lee also
considers Flad the fastest runner
on the team.
Id have to say that
Hedgecock has the edge right
now, head coach Dave Fuller
said. Fuller plans to platoon the
two players during the first
seven games before making his
decision as to whom will be the
Gator second baseman this
season.
* *
For only the second time in
modern Florida baseball history
co-captains have been elected by
the Gator baseball team. Will
Harman and Tony Dobies will
share the honor and the duties
of captaining the team.
The balloting left Harman and
Dobies seperated by only one
vote. Only the coaches know
who was in the lead. The team
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had decided before the voting
that if two men were within five
votes of each other there would
be co-captains.
IT WAS IN 1960 that last saw
captain chores shared for UF.

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Perry McGriff, an All-America
second baseman and now mayor
of Gainesville, and Don Fleming
were the co-captains then.
Before that it was back in 1912
that saw such a development.
It was one of the greatest
thrills of my baseball career,
Harman said. A lot of good
ballplayers have held down the
captain slot before and he is very
proud to have received such
an honor.
Tony Dobies, appreciated the
fact that the team had such faith
in him. He also considered it a
very high honor.
Coach P.A. Lee felt that the
players made excellent choices
in Dobies and Harman. Both
the players and the coaches trust
Will and Tony to do a great
job, Lee said.

01 f :XJX'X

Buck up for finals
with this Dominos Pizza Spociall
BIG 12 Pizza£l
with any one item
LARGE COKE A
Deluxe Pizza Pepperoni, mushrooms, ham
green pepper, onion Add $1.20
FREE DELIVERY CALL 376-2487~

i - 11 i<
Wednaaday, March 3,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3,1971

Br v i?i| '- V, -Jt >: '.*''
SB WF '^^plflgS^^SlP
sy w.v.liP :-:-y> v f-;: YBPQPF
I *H. \?F IKjH
L'
JU Dolphins
Get NCAA Bid
JACKSONVILLE (UPI) The Jacksonville University Dolphins,
runnerup to UCLA in the NCAA tournament last year, accepted an
invitation Tuesday to play in the NCAA tournament for the second
straight year.
The eighth-ranked Dolphins, who are 21-3 for the year, will meet
either seventh-ranked Western Kentucky or Miami of Ohio in a
mid-east sub-regional contest at South Bend, Ind., March 13.
ITS A REAL challenge for us, Jacksonville Coach Tom Wasdin
said, completing his first season after being elevated from an
assistant coach. Were real proud of our players.
The first step to win the national championship is to get a bid.
Now all we have to do is win five straight games and were national
champions.
The Dolphins, led by 7-foot-2 Artis Gilmore, utilized a race-horse
attack in averaging over 100 points per game this season. The only
losses came at the hands of Western Kentucky, Wake Forest and
Houston.
THE SURPRISING Dolphins made it to the NCAA finals last
season before bowing to UCLA, 80-69. Wasdin, who succeeded Joe
Williams as the Jacksonville coach when Williams moved to Furman,
said this years team has a different personality and it is hard to
compare the two clubs.
We still enjoy playing basketball, Wasdin said. We still hustle
and scrap. This is one of the best shooting teams in the country. We
are not quite as big and strong as last year but we may be a little
smoother.
The Dolphins championship hopes were dimmed in the last two
weeks when they lost play-making guard Vaughn Wedeking and top
reserve Greg Nelson with ankle injuries. Wasdin hopes to have both
back for the NCAA tournament.
| 2445 slvM3Sy^^^^B
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everything else Ji
I
The man who can smile when things go wrong has
probably just thought of someone he can blame it on.

Battle Under Board*
Has Ups And Downs

Ed Lukco (33) is seen passing
off to a teammate inside the key
while West Virginia's Larry
Harris defends. Lukco came into
the game after Tony Miller was
given a technical foul after
shouting at one of the officials.
In the photo at the right,
Robert Agee (54) grabs one of
seven rebounds he had in the
game. Agee came off the bench
in the first half and quickly
added four points to bring the
Gators closer to the
Mountaineers. Agee finished the
game with 14 points, his best
production of the season.
Photos by
Tom Kennedy

FAT Albert
is coming!

Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy ft
Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
"Tgun dealer, Micanopy.
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Sailing Club Downs USF

The Gator Sailing Club took
advantage of the fickle Lake
Wauberg winds to smash the
University of South Florida
Sailing Club, 43-75, in a dual
regatta last weekend.
Winds and overall conditions
were excellent, possibly with the

Ali To Weigh-In
Near 220 For Bout

MIAMI BEACH (UPI)
Muhammad Ali planned a final
workout here Tuesday before
heading for New York and his
heavyweight title fight a week
from tonight with Joe Frazier.
Im in shape and I feel great,
an thats what counts, Ali
Cassius Clay said following a
spirited workout Monday filled
with his usual chatter.
ALI SHADOW-BOXED,
punched the bags and worked in
the ring, all the while telling the
onlookers at the sth Street Gym
I can whup that Frazier, no
matter what I weigh. Man, Im
gonna take him.
Ali is likely to go into the ring
at his heaviest, probably around
220. The heaviest he has fought
before was 215.
Hes lookin good. Im not
worried about his weight,
manager Angelo Dundee said.
THE FORMER champion has
lost the fat that ringed his waist
when he began training for the
Frazier fight. He looks trim and
fast in his workouts.
The fight is scheduled to bring
Ali and Frazier $2.5 million each
in a guaranteed payoff. The
Madison Square Garden bout
will be televised nationally and
TANK TOPS
ypspjjJp

Stripes, solids,
Florida imprints,
plains. S-M-L-XL
$3.50 & 4.00
GATOBSHOP
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W. University Av^.

breeze being too brisk as many
boats capsized during Saturdays
races.
THE GATOR skippers were
just too experienced for the
newly formed USF club as they
took 14 first place positions and
won seven out of eight races in

internationally via closed circuits
into theaters.
The fight will be beamed
abroad by satellite.
Clint Roland won the
Ist Franks Sub Base
Sub-Eqting Contest.
He ate 1% Periscope
Subs. Sign up for
the second contest
and eat your way
to success.

re£ ,on,ato creamy cottage cheese H
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W* a tender whole green pepper stuffed with meat and ~^^B
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lB center cut pork chop\ cooked IK]
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mBVr seasoned beans french fried potatoes
macaroni and cheese baked potato
NmjflM buttered whole kernel corn

the low point winner
competition.
Gator Commodore Craig
Yandow won the flying junior
class with teammate Bill Conners
finishing second. In the sunfish
division, Gator Helen Herr just
edged out teammate Roger
Rukin for first place honors.
This weekend, the University
of Miami Sailing Club will send
12 members to compete with
the Gator club in a regatta that
promises to be very close.
Miami has beaten the Gators
three times in the last four
meets, but UF racing team
captain John Tack said that the
club has the momentum and
ability to even up the record.
bush vw
Specializing In
Service And Repairs
On
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376-4261

j! .>
International Golf i
: $
: §
Proposed By Player |
!
ATLANTA (UPI) South African golf pro Gary Player
announced Tuesday plans for an International Junior Cup Golf
Tournament at the proposed Atlanta country club he
represents.
Player said the first such tourney is expected to be held in
1973. Ground for the new club, International Golf Club
Limited, is expected to be broken this spring.
Player and former Gov. Carl Sanders, board chairman for the
dub, made the joint announcement and Player said the
tournament would help him attain one of his goals.
My ambitions when I retire are ranching and youth work,
he said. This is a long-time dream of mine. I feel that we have a
contribution to make toward international good will which is so
important in these troubled days.
GOT A SICK LITTLE FOREIGN
CAR ON YOUR
We've got the parts so you can
make it better, or you can bring
it to us and we'll fix it for you.
YATES AUTO PARTS

Wednesday, March 3,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3,1971

PROVIDE LAST MINUTE EXCITEMENT
UF Cagers Run Close Gaines

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Floridas brand of basketball
isnt the kind that excites a
person throughout the game.
This has been known for some
time. But no one can say the
1971 Gators werent exciting in
the final minutes of a game.
Take for instance the fact that
UF has now played in five games
this year that were decided by
one or two points.
BEGINNING WITH the
Houston game in December, (the
Cougars won that one 61-60) the
Gators have played all five of
those close games in Florida
Gym.
How many can foget the
triple overtime against
Vanderbilt that was decided on
Tony Millers last second jump
shot, an 84-82 victory for the
Gators?
Next in line was the

WILLIAMS POPS 21
{Baby Gators Roll |
$
$ Steve Williams 21 points paced the Gator freshman team to a |:j
come-from-behind 73-69 victory over Indian River Junior
:j: College Monday night in Florida Gym. :jj
The frosh evened their season record to 11-11 with just one
game to play, that coming Saturday night in Florida Gym when
they take on the Alabama freshmen at 5:30 p.m.
$ THE BABY GATORB-were down by six at the half, 35-29, :ji
but came back strong in the second half, outscoring Indian
:j: River, 44-34.
Doug Brown was next highest for the Gators, after Williams,
hitting 17 points, while Malcolm Meeks added 15. jj:
ij: It was the freshmens third straight victory and seventh out of
j: their past nine games.
V.V'V.VX l Xv>>XwX>K A%Wj.K Ki K Wi *ffi ;w. X

The law league basketball
championships will be held
tonight featuring the Personal
Fouls challenging the
Ballbusters.
IN ORANGE LEAGUE
fraternity handball action, Sigma
Chi received a big boost when a
protest of their Lambda Chi
Alpha match was approved and
the Lambda Chis were forced to
forfeit their match. The move
could push the Sigma Chis far
out of reach from the rest of the
league. It stretched their lead for
the moment to 87 points over
second place Sigma Nu.
In games held Monday, Phi
Delt stormed all over ATO, 3-1.
Bob Bolt was the only winner
for ATO as the Phi Delt doubles
team dominated the match.

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
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Tennessee upset here last month.
In that game, Earl Findley gave
the Gators victory when he
tipped in a missed shot by Jerry
Hoover with just one second
remaining in the game.
AND THEN this weekend, on
regional television, Georgia
defeated the Gators, 62-61. A
controversy erupted following
that game as to whether Tom
Purvis* shot had left his hand
before the buzzer sounded.
The Gators made it two-one
point games in a row Monday
night when they defeated West
Virginia 72-71.
UF was leading 72-69 with 17
seconds remaining to be played.
But Levi Phillips, who surprised
Gator coach Tommy Bartlett
with his performance, hit a
15-foot jumper to close the gap
to 72-71.
BUT UNLIKE Saturdays
Georgia game, the Gators didnt

Intramurals
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniwiiiiHumittiiuii BRITT CRITTENTON

GLASS /s OUR busvH^
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AEPi won its match with the Phi
Gams, 3-2.
In the Blue League, Delta Tau

have to worry about making a
last shot, because they were
leading. All they had to do was
stop the Mountaineers from
scoring again, which looking at
their shooting percentage in the
second half (.530) the Gators
werent doing too well.
So West Virginia called time
out with seven secohds on the
clock to set up one play. The
inbounds pass went to Dick
Symons who missed from eight
feet. Purvis grabbed the rebound
and the clock ran out.
GATOR SHORTS Hoovers
play on West Virginias Wil
Robinson was one reason the
Gators were able to rebound
with a victory after Saturdays
loss to Georgia. Robinson scored
only nine points in his lowest
point total of the
year . Robert Agees
performance the past three
games may bring him up into
consideration for a starting job
against Alabama in the final
game of the year Saturday. It
will also be the last one for
Agee, who will be graduated in
June. If Agee does start, it will
be his first time in a starting
lineup at Florida ...When
Tony Miller and Mike Heitz,
West Virginias 7-foot center,
were involved in a jump ball in
the second half, it was a battle
between old high school
teammates. The two went to
school in Garret,
Ind Findley got some sort
of revenge from last years
defeat to the Mountaineers. But,
he wasnt satisfied as he wanted
to win it big (last year West
Virginia defeated the Gators by
one point, 88-87).

Delta smashed KA for its first
win and Theta Chi failed to
show up against AGR.

4
WBb & MssL'Jmw*. -^IH
mHSp yIP
JERRY HOOVER
... holds Wil Robinson

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LEGISLATORS sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
Keepers Os The Purse Strings

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Either we raise the tuition, lower the enrollment or tighten an
already strangling belt.
The decision will be made in the end by the Florida Legislature.
The Board of Regents can make recommendations, student body
presidents can complain and those who will bear the brunt can write
anxious and demanding letters, but in the end the legislators will
decide.
And other than a prevalent refusal and reluctance to comment
before more information becomes available, an overwhelming need for
capital building necessities, demanding money from somewhere,
repeatedly emerges.
Lowering the enrollment was one of the few alternatives
mentioned, but even legislators admitted this was an unsatisfactory
solution at best.
The tax structure of Florida is inextricably tied up in any decision
or any alternatives the Florida legislature seeks.
The necessity for a tuition hike, Rep. William Andrews (District
30), said, might have been avoided if the emergency corporate tax
bill had been passed.
The corporate tax would place up to a 5 per cent gross income tax
on Florida corporations. It will come before voters in November,
1972. An emergency measure to allow the bill to be put on the ballot
90 days after passage was voted down by the legislature.
Senate President Jerry Thomas, although not opposing the right of
the people to vote on the bill, said he would not support it himself.
Gov. Reubin Askew felt he had a mandate from the people. I felt
he had that right. If I had opposed it, it definitely would not have
gone through.
Thomas reasoned that the tax would not provide an equitable
increase across the business board. If theyre going to tax anything
with an *inc. after its name, they should also tax the proprietors and
partnerships.
Either way, Thomas said, it would end up a consumer tax on the
people.
If you tax a business that is making a 2 per cent profit, 5 per cent
of its gross income, then they are just going to raise their prices.
Most legislators agree that effected parents and students wont have
to wait long before the issue comes before the legislature. The next
session, beginning in April, should deal immediately with at least one
proposal concerning a tuition hike.
The plan that has been mentioned most often is to ear mark the
tuition hike funds for capital outlays, i.e. buildings, improvements,
etc.
If and when the bill is passed, Andrews said, universities will
immediately begin selling bonds on anticipated income.
According to Andrews, the tuition increase could be anywhere
from $25 to SSO. More in the $25 range, though.
Steve Uhlfelder, student body president, questioned the use of
these funds if allocated. It might be an underhanded way for the UF
Tuition Increase
Probable Murray
By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Board of Regents Vice-Chairman Dr. Louis Murray said
there are not enough funds available for the state university
system, and he predicts a sls-$25 increase in tuition per
quarter, beginning September 1971.
Based upon an educated guess, I would say probably we will
end up the year this way, Murrary commented. I think with
all the needs of the state, the additional money isnt available.
Somebody is going to have to suffer.
ACCORDING TO MURRAY, the regents are taking a wait
and see attitude on the proposed tuition hike.
Were going to wait until the legislature convenes to see
what the posture of the legislature is prior to miking any
recommendations as to any tuition increases, he said.
If the legislature provided enough funds to economically
operate the university system without reducing quality and so
on, I think the board would not recommend an increase. But if
the legislature will not appropriate sufficient funds, we will have
no choice but to recommend an increase, Murray added.
Although he considers a tuition increase to be a last resort,
Murray thinks an iqaisase will become a reality saying, I just
rinnt i f t(ir wiii nAi hft able to get enough
(money).

to pay for the University Activities Center, the students soundly
defeated last year.
Andrews said he thought if a tuition hike was passed S2O out of
$25 would go towards capital outlays, with an activities complex very
low on priorities.
The UF should be considering many other projects prior to that,
Andrews said. The other $5 would be used by the UF itself, possibly
to cover the $4.70 student activity fee increase needed to stay at
present operating level.
A solution to the tuition hike, though, will not be as easy as
deciding how much the present state resident bill of $l5O a quarter
should be increased.
Uhlfelder has appealed to Rep. Terrell Sessums as to the feasibility
of the students being able to afford the hike at all.
The earning power of the student does not increase proportionally
with that of the rest of the state nor is it always sufficient enough to
completely finance his education, Uhlfelders letter read.
Sessums responded, In my opinion, we should substantially
expand our existing scholarship and loan programs to guarantee that
no qualified student will be deprived of a college education because of
present or increased tuition.
But many legislators dont even feel this would be necessary.
In response to Uhlfelders contention that a tuition hike might
mark the beginnings of a state university system only the wealthy
could afford, Thomas said, I dont think thats true. The tuition isnt
that high right now, and a tuition hike would only mean students and
their families might have to make some sacrifices. I got myself
through six years of college.
Andrews, in much the same manner, said, When you compare
tuition costs at state universities with that of most private schools,
you begin to realize that the state tuition isn't that great.
Why less than 25 per cent of the college costs are paid to the state
of Florida institutions, Andrews continued.
Legislators regard the question of whether more university funds
are needed as academic.
Os course we need more money, Andrews said. If we don't do
something soon, well lose the UFs dental school. Also there is a
general need for operation and capital outlay improvements.
The proposed UF College of Veterinary Medicine is also suffering
from a legislative belt tightening. A question before the upcoming
session will be whether or not to allocate building funds to the new
school or continue appropriating planning money.
The College of Veterinary Medicine would be one capital outlay
that would pay itself back faster than anything else, Andrews said.
We need one badly to cut down on the $60,000,000 a year
Florida loses in animals.
According to Andrews, although the college will educate and
prepare veterinary students, one of the primary purposes will be for
research and diagnostic purposes.
We have nothing in the state of that nature at present, he
continued.
The legislature will also have to incorporate into any tuition plans
they make a Board of Regents anticipated need for $300,000,000 in
the next five years, predominantly in capital outlays.
The money is now coming from the states general revenue fund,
but according to one representative, We cant get any more money
through that source.
The fund, constantly being depleted, is already providing
$lB-20,000,000 for university capital outlays.
To meet the Board of Regents projected $60,000,000 a year figure
Andrews suggested several alternatives, including increasing the gross
receipt tax on utilities, already earmarked for capital outlays.
We can always increase the sales tax to 5 per cent, Andrews said,
but Im strongly opposed to a tax of that nature.
A second proposal that will in all likelihood come before the state
legislature, is to limit the amount of money given to capital outlays,
and just increase operating expenditures.
Its one of the ideas, Andrews said, usually pressed by some
legislators, but were still going to need funds for building.
Before any legislator begins wrestling with the problem on the
house or senate floor, the University and Community College
Subcommittee will investigate all tuition hike or tuition alternative
proposals, and make their recommendations.
What is at stake is the possibility of a tuition increase that will bring
total tuition costs to over SSOO per year, a 100 per cent increase over
1966.
Students have already experienced a 73 per cent increase in tuition
costs since then.
No one is arguing whether or not money is needed. The legislature
is thus faced with a decision between increasing state tuition or
providing funds through a corporate income tax, personal tax
increases, elimination of all but the very basic exemptions or finally
an increase in all county taxes.
If none of these alternative measures are taken, Andrews warned,
and if a proposed tuition increase does not become law, the state
may be left with only one avenue lowering present enrollment
quotas.

v, % V
Wednesday, March 371971, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3, 1971

SG Offers Alternative Solutions

by MICHAEL J.CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government in its attempt to prevent a state-wide tuition
hike has proposed alternate solutions concerning UFs budget.
In a letter dated Jan. 18, to State Rep. Terrell Sessums, Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder wrote, I would like to express my
dissatisfaction with the recent discussion over the proposed tuition
increase at the state universities. I personally feel that student opinion
on this matter has not been sought out or heard.*
BECAUSE OF this proposed increase SG will not ask for more
allocations of funds.
The reason behind this is two-fold according to Uhlfelder.
The first is SG can exist on the present funds allocated to them.
The second and more important reason is SG does not want to
encourage excuses for the increase by asking for more money.
UHLFELDER SAID the only increase in funds for the activitie fee,
which is included in the tuition fee, should be given to the Infirmary.
A
One way to give money to the Infirmary would be to give it a
certain percentage out of the tuition increase. Right now sl3 out of
the $32.50 tuition fee goes to Health Services.
Another way would be to cut back in certain areas and take the
Health Service fee of sl3 and put it into a separate health fee that
would be flexible over the years.
IN THIS WAY a uniform tuition hike of all universities would not
be necessary, according to Uhlfelder.
In his letter to Sessums, Uhlfelder also wrote, I do not feel tuition
increases are a long-run solution to this problem (inadequate funding
of state universities.)
Uhlfelder, who has spoken to the Board of Regents on the problem
said, The tuition hike has not been proportional to a qualitative or
quantitative measure of education received over the period of the
increases.
He based this on the following figures:
A UF resident student pays $8 more than at any other
state-supported school in the Southeast.
A UF graduate student pays SBO more than at any other
state-supported school in the Southeast.

UF students are aware of the financial
crisis facing the state and higher
education. Tuition hikes, however, are
certainly not an answer to this current
dilemma.
Since 1965, tuition in state institutions
has almost doubled and the cost of
education has been continually increasing
for the last five years, while the amount
and quality of education in the state
institutions have remained constant.
Tuition at state universities is presently
$8 above the median cost at similar
institutions and ranks among the top ten
state universities in the country.
Already 50 per cent of UF students
receive financial assistance in order to
attend the university. It has been shown
that the greatest percentage of university
students come from the middle and upper
income brackets, while the lower income

The Alligator staff has put together
this special four page section on the
proposed tuition increase in the hopes
that students will want their parents,
other relatives and friends to know the
situation. Student Government has
volunteered to provide manpower and

,-r '
T

An Open Letter:

families who also pay taxes, are in many
cases unable to send their children to
college.
Every time there is an additional cost
placed upon the student and his family it
automatically eliminates other students in
the lower income bracket from attending
the university. I do not believe the state
universities were established primarily for
the wealthy. However, if tuition
continues to increase at its present rate,
the state universities may soon become
institutions for the financially elite and
this will definitely be a sad day for the
entire state.
STEVE UHLFELDER
STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT

postage to mail the edition to your
parents, as well as members of the Florida
Legislature.
Please print the address you wish the
section forwarded to, including zip code.
Fold the four page section in half and

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1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 1970-71 1971-72
Tuition costs per student for a year's education at a
Florida university. During this period, the cost of living rose
between 20 and 25 per cent due to inflationary trends.
And a UF graduate student pays sll more money than at
any school in the eight most populous states.
Uhlfelder points out the UF is in the top 10 per cent in tuition but
not ranked anywhere near that standing when it comes to quality.
UHLFELDER in his letter to Sessums said, I also question the
possible use of these new funds. He said even though there have been
increases in tuition over the past years:
classes are still overcrowded (and will be even more unbearable
next year when the university admits more freshmen),
there havent been any additional facilities, i.e., buildings,
the older buildings have not been renovated at this time, nor
have any plans to renovate them been submitted,
it is questionable whether the transportation system has been
improved
and finally, it is questionable whether the health services are any
better.
Other reasons against the tuition increase are also stated in
Uhlfelders letter. He said, The earning power of the student does
not increase proportionally with that of the rest of the state nor is it
sufficient enough to completely finance his education. Presently over
50 per cent of the student body at UF receives some type of financial
aid which allows them to attend the university. Further, 1 do not
believe that state universities should be in existence primarily for the
wealthy, but if tuition keeps increasing at its present rate the state
university may become solely an institution of the financially elite.
In response to Uhlfelders letter, Sessums wrote, I am inclined to
agree with your contention that tuition should not be raised until the
governors tax reform program is decided. If it fails, substantial
tuition increases may be required to maintain the status quo. If it
passes, some adjustment in tuition may still be necessary.
AT THE PRESENT time there are six bills before the Education
Committee of Congress concerning federally supported student loans.
To date, according to a letter released from SG, students have
experienced a 73 per cent increase in tuition within a short period of
time (five years). A proposed $25 per quarter increase would indicate
tuition costs have increased by more than 100 per cent since 1966.
According to UF Director of Financial Aid, Ira Turner, 12,000
students receive assistance outside of their earnings or that of their
parents. There are 750 students on work study, 1,800 involved in
state programs, 700 on loans and 800 with grants.
It should be noted, the letter goes on, that there is duplication
involved in recipients from these fields. Os the total there are 5,000
students who would fall under a category of high need.

then fold it again. Send the section
through the campus mail or bring it to
room 305 Reitz Union.
The effort it takes will be small, but
the results, we hope, will go much
further.