Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I? uEi
Ad Amtum.

Vol. 63, No. 86

WEST CLAIMS MEMO A MISTAKE
Housing Withdraws Drug Memo

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Housing Division has
rescinded its own drug
enforcement memo, following a
campus-wide outcry over the use
of the words suspected users.
It was ail a mistake, said
David West, coordinator for
student conduct.
THE MEMO, ISSUED last
January by Division of Housing
Assistant Director Fred E. King,
read, The residence
administrator is to transmit

Proposal For Attorney
Rejected By OConnell

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writr
A student government (SG)
proposal to supply a full-time
attorney for student needs has
been rejected by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said the proposed plan
was as feasible as it couldve
been.
THE PROPOSAL would have
created the position of a
students business manager and
attorney. The function of the
person selected for the job
would be to act as counsel to SG
in contracts, suits, complaints
and negotiations involving legal
matters.
We worked for three months
to research this thing and make
it as acceptable as possible to the
administration, Uhlfelder said.
Now were told the plan is not
feasible and I have to wonder
about the ridiculous excuses
given against the plan.
OConnell defended his
decision against the plan.
WE APPROVED plans for a
: ?" Vl
DELANEY, BONNIE and
Friends and the Pacific
Gas and Electric coming
Saturday page 3
Classifieds .? 14
Editorials ................ .IS
Letteis .9
Movies ~15
Sports .22

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

immediately and in writing the
names of users, suspected users
or pushers and related pertinent
information to Mr. David West,
coordinator of student conduct,
with a copy to Mr. Fred King
(marked personal and
confidential).
West said the whole statement
was a misunderstanding,
explaining that King had just
mis-interpreted an earlier
memorandum issued by UF Vice
President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale.
The memorandum has never

.jft-. .M .M---
-- .M---
UHLFELDER O'CONNELL
business manager two years ago,
but President Uhlfelder sought
to tack on a dual capacity of
attorney to the post, OConnell
said.
Obtaining a business manager
is agreeable and desirable,
OConnell said, But its just not
feasible to have one individual
counsel 22,000 students... past
experience shows that it cant be
done.
OConnell said he suggested
that Uhlfelder confer with
officials of the Gainesville Bar
Association to set up a legal
referral service where students
can find out where to best find
help to their legal problems.
UHLFELDER countered
OConnells reasoning and said,
In a nutshell, we dont need a
business manager as much as we
need an attorney.
Uhlfelder called attention to
the need for an attorney for
students and criticized this
decision to deny students
something they really need.
Students, like other members

University of Florida Gainesville

been in effect, and is not now in
effect, West said, although for
two weeks the suspicion
memo was regarded as
unqualified housing drug policy.
THE GENERAL
CONFUSION and out-cry that
ensued following publication of
an Alligator article and the
compiling of several lists across
campus, resulted in certain
housing officials refusing to
submit any names until the word
suspicion was clarified.
Kings latest memo began,

of society, will undoubtedly
have legal problems at sometime
in their lives OConnell said.
But we, as a university, cant
satisfy all the individual needs of
individuals on campus.
FUNDING FOR the proposed
dual position was to have come
from the student activity fee.
The funny thing is that
money isnt the problem here,
Uhlfelder said. OConnell
realizes the money for the
position includes both the duties
of a business manager and an
attorney in one person.
Uhlfelder said OConnells
decision to reject the plan
centers around our inclusion of
the position to deal with
(SEE 'UHLFELDER/ PAGE 10)

Regents Making Study
Os Graduate Programs

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
A study of graduate work to
stop indiscriminate
proliferation of masters degree
and doctorate programs is being
undertaken by the Board of
Regents, according to State
University Chancellor Robert
Mautz.
Mautz said that the board is
spending $5,000 on this study
and also the board has recently

As you know misunder misunderstandings
standings misunderstandings have arisen from my
memo ... of Jan. 25th. In order
to clarify this situation, I would
like to refer you to and ask that
you follow Dr. Hales memo of
Jan. 14...
It went on to repeat word for
word Hales original drug

Mgtmm
wHmmp ' wv
; : #Si. ", >MH
KEVIN MORAN
VOYAGE INTO NOD
On a voyage into the Land of Nod these two students seemed
to have given up paddling and are drifting the rest of the way.
When a guy's tired, no storm can stop him when he's set sail for
sleep.

! analysis'
refused to start several
post-graduate programs.
HOWEVER, A recent faculty
poll by UF Self Study Office
showed that 64 per cent of the
faculty agreed with the

v i3BT # x

Thursday, February 18, 1971

enforcement policy statement
which emphasized only
knowledge of drug involvement
was proper cause for reporting
names and alleged incidents.
BUT THE NAMES mean
nothing, West said. Its only
specific incidents students are
involved in that concern us.

statement: To an increasing
extent, UF should become a
graduate, professional and upper
division university.
This brings up the question of
the advantages versus the cost of
graduate research at UF and
what kind of balance should
exist between upper division and
graduate work and the lower
division.
The main question according
(SEE 'BALANCE/ PAGE 10)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 18,1971

GEN. KINZER:
'My Salary Is Well Earned

N
TOM KENNEDY
THE FiOfl|PA ALUQATOR is ..the official, student newspaper of the
University- of Fio*loa and Js published five times weekly except during
June, duly ahd'August vyhen it's publishe holidays and ewaih periods: Editorials repr'fes.ent' only the official opinions
of theft authors. Addreis cofreSpondenci to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601>
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (l) after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be rei|Mjmible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduTld to run
several times. Notices lor correction must be given before the next
insertion.

By TERRY TENENBAUM
Alligator Staff Writer
After what he termed unprovoked and repeated
attacks, retired Brig. Gen. John Kinzer was ready
to retire again. But his resignation was not accepted.
Kinzer, who is a UF graduate assistant, was going
to give up his assistantship because his acceptance of
the salary has been questioned. Kinzer said he is
currently preparing a new manual on student
rights, responsibilities and regulations.
I AM ALSO making studies on how to
reorganize the office of student affairs to better
provide services to students in solving their problem.
I also take actions on routine student petitions,
he said.
Kinzer, 52, graduated from the UF in 1940 with
a BS in agriculture and with a distinguished military
graduate commission as a second lieutenant in the
U. S. Army.
During World War 11, Kinzer participated in the
airborne landing in Southern France and four
subsequent campaigns.
After serving in Japan from 1946-49 as an
airborne battalion commander he attended the
career course of the Army Artillery School and
served for one year on the schools faculty.
HE THEN ATTENDED the Command and
General Staff College and served three years on that
faculty.
Duty in Europe was followed as a student and
teacher at the Army War College from 1958-59.
this assignment he attended
George Washington University and earned an MA in
international relations.

AFTER SERVING a year in Vietnam, he
returned to the United States to command the
Army Civil Affairs Group at Ft. Gordon, Ga. from
1966-67.
He then went to Naples, Italy as assistant chief of
staff of the Plans and Policy Division of NATO.
Kinzer decided to come to UF while on a visit to
Gainesville in May reviewing a ROTC parade.
AT THAT TIME, he was offered a teaching
position by Dr. William Moore, chairman of the
comprehensive logic department, if there was an
opening. ~
He then went back to his duty station in Naples
where he retired in July.
After considering various job offers, including
one from George Washington University, I decided
to come to UF to earn a doctorate degree in
education, Kinzer said.
I AM A STUDENT trying to update past
experience and translate it into modem higher
education which I see as being important,
challenging and relevant to my experience and
qualifications, he said.
Kinzer said he sees his relationship with other
students as a continuation of the same kinds of
relationships in which you substitute variations in
perspective between generations rather than
nations.
The functions I perform are facilitated by my
experience, as suggested by the relationship of
communications problems common to my last
military assignment and my present experience with
students, Kinzer said.
My assistantship salary is well earned, I think,
he said.

.***,*** ***,**,
*
: Kinzer Resignation :
: Not Accepted ;
* .
* Brig. Gen. (retired) John Kinzer resigned his graduate assistantship
* Tuesday, but his resignation was refused.
* Kinzer said he submitted the resignation because he became the r
* object of unprovoked and repeated attack by The Eye (an
* off-campus publication), by John Parker in his Alligator column and +
M in an Alligator editorial. +
* KINZER WAS referring to the fact that The Alligator questioned
* his receiving $3,500 a year as a graduate assistant while receiving a
* retirement pension in excess of $ 17,000.
* The objections raised about the recent hiring of Kinzer are based on
* suspicions and irresponsible rumors according to James T.
* Hennessey, director of the UF Office of Student Affairs.
* Though Kinzer was hired by UF Vice President for Student Affairs
* Lester Kale, Hennessey was instrumental in hiring Kinzer.
* THE ONLY consideration used in hiring graduate assistants is the
M quality of the individual, according to Hennessey. +
+ Everything else being equal, though, who do you hire, your friend *
* or your enemy? Hennessey said. +
* It is important for the campus to realize there has been no
* violation of any rules, he said.
*
* + * + + ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ +4

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7 am a student trying
to update past experience
and translate it into
modern higher
education which I see as
being important,
challenging and relevant
to my experience and
qualifications.
*
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SGP Presents 'Biggest Rock Show

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government
Productions (SGP) presents in
concert Saturday might the
original Delaney, Bonnie and
Friends along with the Pacific
Gas and Electric in the Florida
Gym at 8 and 10:30 p.m.
As a husband and wife team,
Delaney and Bonnie Bramletts
music has been described as
Anderson Hall
Fafe Still
Undecided
No decision has been made
whether to replace Anderson
Hall, according to William Jones,
Associate Director of Physical
Planning.
A consultant firm from
Jacksonville was hired by the
Office of Business Affairs to
develop the loss figures
resulting from damages caused
by fire Jan. 6. E. C. Kenyon and
Co. put the total cost of
damages at $236,000.
THIS FIGURE is now being
reviewed by the business office
and the State Fire Fund, which
acts as an insurance company.
Jones said it will not be known
for another week to ten days
how much money the university
will receive from the State Fire
Fund.
Jcmes said that the university
would like to replace Anderson,
but the money is just not
available to do this. Still though,
no final decision has been made
whether to go ahead with repairs
or to replace the building,
according to Jones.
Richard Schiffli, Assistant to
the Vice President in the Office
of Business Affairs, said that he
felt repairs would be made in
view of the tight money
situation.
I lihellT I
RADIAL TIRES
I For American, European I

rooted in "the natural
gospel-folk-country traditions.
ACCORDING TO Delaney
and Bonnie their friends are just
as much a part of the music as
the writers. They define friends
as people who want to be
together to do the same thing
and who can enjoy voices and
good music especially when
its Bobby Whitlocks organ and
voice, Leon Russells piano, Jim
Keltners drumming, the horns
of Bobby Keys and Jim Price,
Carl Radles bass, the voice of
Tita Coolidge and whoever else
shows up.
Other musicians are included
in the friend concept. When
Delaney and Bonnie opened at
The Whiskey in Los Angeles for
three nights in March, Steve
Stills, Dave Crosby and Buddy
Miles showed up and played
with them.
Also appearing with Bonnie,
Delaney and Friends Saturday
night is the Columbia group,
The Pacific Gas and Electric.

|b
you qualify
for bankings New B
M Breed?
Theyre young. Our average new officer is 26. Theyre flexible.
The kind who rush out to meet change. Theyre self-starters.
Because they know stagnation is not our style.
BH We need managers. You need a job. Does this suggest anything
A to you? Why not see C&S, the billion-dollar bank at the
A crossroads of the South? Where 80 out of the top 100 M
A U.S. companies bank. M
A C&S Don Roc how will be on your A
A campus next week. Like to meet him? jM
Check with your placement office now!
cgs
A The Citizens and Southern Banks in Georgia M
j
k I
I l b^

THEY DESCRIBE their
uniqueness as a band saying Its
not just the blues we play, and
its not just soul. Its soulful
isometric, sounds like rock, but
not just rock ... Its something
special that belongs to P.G.& E.
The members of P.G. & E. are
Charlie Allen, lead singer; Ken
Utterback, lead guitar; Ron
Woods, drams; Frank Petricca,
bass and Brent Block, guitar and
bass.
A large measure of P.G. & E.s
excitement comes from the
musical interplay between
Charlie and lead guitarist Ken
which is extemporaneous.
Both of these groups are just
dynamite, says SGP Chairman,
Bruce Levine. Missing them is
missing the biggest rock show to
date this year.
Tickets for the concert are on
sale at the Reitz Union Box
Office and Recordsville in the
Mall for $2.25 and $2.75.

A
A m
-v.
K UR
|r
DELANEY, BONNIE AND FRIENDS
... in concert Saturday night

Thursday, February 18,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 18,1971

Hale Surprised At Evident
Faculty Opinion Uniformity

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Vice President of Student
Affairs Lester Hale expressed
surprise in the uniformity of
faculty opinion evident in the
results of a recent poll
conducted by the UF self-study
office (Alligator, Feb. 10).
The poll was conducted last
November and the results were
revealed on January 30, it
consisted on 122 questions
concerning goals of education in
general and various aspects of
(JF policy. It (the poll) might
lead to some recomendations by
the self evaluation committee
stated Hale, in reference to UFs
upcoming reaccreditation by the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Universities. Opt of 2250
questionaires distributed, 1242
were returned and formed the
self-study results.
1 One statement on the
questionaire read: Students
should have greater
responsibility in department,
college and university
educational decisions, 64 per
cent of the responses disagreed
with the statement. According
to Hale this answer does not
indicate faculty opposition to
student participation in UF
matters.
I think if the statement had
been worded participation or
input rather than decisions in
department, college and

Interhall Schedules
Amsterdam Flights

A charter flight to Amsterdam
for faculty, staff and students
will leave Jacksonville June 16.
Interhall Council is sponsoring
the flight and anyone interested
may sign up in room 322 of the
Union. The round trip price is
$240. There are 120 seats
available and Interhall urges
anyone interested to sign up
early.

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offer good while supply lasts

ra liUrn" irTfif'ii
LESTER HALE
... interprets faculty opinion
university educational decisions,
you would have a different
answer.
Hale stated further that a
university was like a business
with the students as consumers
who, though the university must
work for them, are not allowed
to actually run the business or
dictate policy. As many ways
as can be devised to obtain
student perspective and
involvement in university
matters will be used, Hale
assured, but that doesnt imply
that students will be the
ultimate authority in decision
making. It would be folly not to
get their perspective on things.
Within the limits of his own
definition; the UF Student
Affairs Vice President feels the
UF faculty tended to give
conservative answers. If you
think of conservative as

The return flight is scheduled
for Aug. 31.
Interhall also has information
on jobs available in Europe.
Everyone on the flight will be
free to do and go where he
desires after he lands in
Amsterdam as long as he is back
in time for the return trip. A
deposit of SIOO is required for
reservations.

supporting the status quo as
opposed to liberal being the
wanting to create innovation and
change, Hale continued, I
think there is a tendency at this
institution and other institutions
to be cautious about changing.
Hale added that gradual changes
were generally advantageous to
impetuous decision because,
in his words, progress may be
slower but quick decisions arent
always sound.

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2409 S. w. 13th St. 372-680? |



Student Senate Fails
, i r
To Act On Viet Resolution

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
A resolution backing action to
end the Vietnam war failed
Tuesday night in the student
senate after some sharp debate
among senators.
I think it (the resolution to
end the war) was mildly written
in that it was not strong
enough, Sen. William Whitley
said V/ednesday.
BUT WHITLEY contends the
resolution was too strong for
some senators who he claims are
in favor of the war in Vietnam.
There is a small group in the
senate with a lot of power,
Whitley said.
However, Senate President
Rick Horder said a special
committee had been appointed
by the senate to write a similar
resolution.
HE SAID student attendance
at the meeting of that
committee is encouraged to
know the views of students in
reference to a resolution to end
the war in Vietnam.
At the time the Alligator went
to press, the time and place for
the meeting was not known.
Interested students should call
the senate office at 392-1665
where information about the
meeting will be available.
Another resolution
introduced by Whitley, backing
free speech at UF, was passed by
the senators.
THE RESOLUTION attacks
derrogatory comments made to
deny the right of people to
speak freely on public
property.
Some Florida legislators seem
to have been upset with the
appearance of radical speakers in
student-sponsored events at UF
and Florida State University.
The resolution said the
Accent 7l program had been a
balanced one, representing
political views from different
parts of the political spectrum.
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7 think it (the
resolution to end the
war) was mildly written
in that it was not strong
enough. .
$
William Whitley :|i
. "w*
BE IT resolved that we will
stand firmly behind our right of
freedom of speech on this
campus, we will actively and
strongly oppose any
encroachment of the right to
speak of any student, faculty
member, administrator or any
other person who wishes to
speak on our campus,
concludes the resolution.
Budgets passed by the senate
Tuesday night, were:
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Dialogue, the Blue Key
sponsored radio program,
Cheerleaders, John Marshall Bar
Association, Benton Engineering
Society and Zero Population
Growth.
The senate also voted $125
for use of the Miss UF pageant,
and approved second readings on
the Maximum Campaign
Expenditure Law, and Interhall
Council transfer.
A resolution recommending
the establishment of a
one-quarter comprehensive
ecology course was postponed
until further investigation could
be done on the matter.
Budgets for the Billy Mitchell
Drill Team and the Gator Guard
were struck from the senate
agenda, and will come up later
for review by the senators.
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(By the author of Rally Round the Flag, Boyr ... DobirCillin. .. etc.)
ESP; or Extra-Sensory Pollution
Physicists tell us there are three basic forces at work in the uni universe:
verse: universe: matter, energy and chopped liver.
But I, for one, am no longer satisfied with this narrow definition.
How do physicists classify ESP? Certainly it falls into none of these
categories, but just ps certainly it exists. And not as a mere theory; ESP
is a proven, demonstrated fact.
For example, how many times have you walked into a place you
never saw before and yet recognized everything? How many times have
you known the exact words someone was going to say before he ever
said them? How many times have you been absolutely Certain some something
thing something was going to happen hundreds or even thousands of miles away
and, sure enough, it did?
Let me tell you about a case I am fortunately able to document.
Some years ago I went fishing with my dear friend Donald L. Fromkiss
at a virgin lake deep in the Canadian wilds. It was hellishly difficult to
get there, but we did not mind, for the moment we dropped our lines
we each caught a splendid crappie. Mine weighed just over 300 pounds.
Donalds was somewhat smaller, but by far the friendlier.
Imagine my surprise then when, before we could throw our lines
back for another try, Donald suddenly leaped up and cried hed had a
premonition that he must go home immediately. He could not tell me
why. He only knew that some one or some thing was calling him back
and he had to go at once. Apologizing profusely, he left me alone on
the lake and portaged to the nearest town (Moose Jaw, well over a
thousand miles,_and poison sumac every inch), and there he chartered
a Ford Tri-Motor and flew home.
Well sir, at first he felt like an utter dolt. Everything was perfectly
normal at home. His wife Edith was quietly reading The Sensuous
Woman. His son Herschel was taking his daily glassblowing lesson.
His dog Trey was eating his leash.
And yet the premonition would not leave Donald. Carefully, he
went through the house, inch by inch, room by room. Sure enough,
when he got to the back hall he suddenly heard a faint whimpering
noise outside. He slang open the door. And there, by George, he saw
where the whimpering was coming from: someone had left a basket on
the back stoop!
Well sir, who can blame Donald for crying a cry of joy and tri triumph?
umph? triumph? What a find! A whimpering basket! Thats something you dont
see every day, let me tell you!
so today, as you know of course, Donald L. Fromkiss and
jHis Whimpering Basket is one of the highest paid acts in show busi business.
ness. business. Next Sunday, in fact, he completes his 84th consecutive year on
Ed Sullivan.
As for me, I too was a beneficiary of Donalds ESP, for when he
left me alone on the lake I figured I would get to drink all not just
halfol the goodly supply of Miller High Life Beer we had brought
along, and as you know of course, Miller High Life is never so welcome
as it is on a tranquil sylvan lake while a flock of Canada geese darkens
the sky above. Os course, Miller isnt bad in a noisy bar either while a
flock of American coeds darkens the jukebox. For that matter, its even
great in the dorm while your cruddy roommate darkens the tub.
But as it happened, I never did get to drink all our Miller High
Life because I forgot how well sound travels across a sylvan lake. No
sooner did I pop my first can of Miller whenlo and behold!-ten
Mounties galloped out of the forest singing seleetionsjrom Rose Marie!
. Os course, I shared my Miller with them, and gladly, because I know
its hard being a Mountie, especially if youre an alto. And so by the
time they polished off my Miller and said adieu, we were all fast friends.
One of them, in fact, let me slide down his hat.
* *
We, the brewers of Miller High Life Beer and the sponsors of this col column,
umn, column, are like the Mounties in one respect: we too always get our man manthat
that manthat is, if our man wants a beer that always makes it right Miller High
Life, the Champagne of Beers!

Thursday, February 18, 1971, The Florida Alligator,.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 18,1971

21st Latin
American
Conference
To Open

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GAINESVILLE MALL f / fIM B
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The 21st Latin American Conference opens today
with economists and educators presenting their
views of Latin American economy.
All discussions will be in rooms 361 of the Reitz
Union.
TODAYS SESSIONS will feature David Felix,
who will discuss problems of Argentine economy at
8 a.m., and Werner Baer, a professor from
Vanderbilt University, who will talk on the role of
public-owned enterprises in the industrialization of
Latin America at 10:20 a.m.
Following these talks there will be a luncheon in
Ballroom A of the Union, where William E. Carter,
director of the UF Center for Latin American

Studies and Robert Lanzilloti of the UF College of
business Administration will talk.
After the lunch, the talks will resume, and will
feature Vito Tanzi from American University, who
will present his paper on Theory of Tax structure
development and the design of tax structure policy
for industrialization. Harley Hinricks of the
University of Maryland will talk about taxation
reform within the Latin American Common Market
nations.
At 8 p.m. at night, the University Gallery will
present an exhibitionof pre-Columbian art from Peru.
The conference will continue through Saturday
with more speakers to be featured.

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WILLIAM E. CARTER
... director of studies center



Experience To Encourage Awareness

By JANE CATO
Alligator Staff Writer
If youre interested in
becoming more aware of your
existence and the existence of
others, Experience in
Awareness is for you.
Sponsored by the Division of
Housing, the day-long program is

Sunland Center Boasts
25 Member Marching Band

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Staff Writer

Sunland Training Center has a
25-member marching band
which performs under the
direction of UF graduate Dennis
Blackburn.
Many of the instruments
which the students use were
collected by the UF Veterans
Club last spring and summer.
The instrument drive initiated
Two Fiats Collect
Unnoeded Clothes
For Delinquents
By JANE CATO
Alligator Staff Writer
Dont throw away those
unneeded outgrown garments
that are hanging uselessly in
your closet.
A clothes drive is being
sponsored this week by Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity and
Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority.
CHILDREN IN A home for
delinquents in Trenton, Fla., will
be the recipients for clothes
collected.
Funded by the Florida Youth
Foundation, the home has found
[it difficult to purchase suitable
-clothes for the children, ages
12-17, with the money allotted
to them.
Posters and boxes for
collection of the clothes are in
the dorms and in fraternity and
sorority houses.
The clothes drive will run
through Friday and cooperation
of the students will be greatly
appreciated.
Off-campus donors should
contact the Phi Gamma Delta
House at 372-9454 and someone
will pick up the clothes.
The FSU Flying Circus is Coming

designed as a fun-filled day in
which people can meet others
and discover an awareness of
themselves.
THE EXPERIENCE will be
held in the Reitz Union
Ballroom, Feb. 28, from
9:30-3:30 p.m.
Slides and music will greet the
expected group of 300 students

then resulted in 12 pieces valued
at S9OO.
THE DRIVE IS on again to
answer the increasing interest
displayed by Sunland students.
Brass and percussion instruments
are most needed, but any piece
can be used in the music therapy
program at Sunland.
A member of the Veterans
Club, which is composed of over
25 x-servicemen, will pick up
any donations. If you have an
instrument to give, call Ron

0 Are your lecture notes
poorly organized and
q|£ depressing to study from?
If you answered yes to this question we are announcing the opening
of an EASIER way to study.
The Actual Current
STUD-EASE
ch N2S2 lecture notes
cV in 1730 W. Univ. Ave. APY 200
We are now providing fast professional Xerox service
for single copies, theses and dissertations.
373-4584 8:30 am to 11:00 pm

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le CALL IN YOUR ORDER FROM 11:30 TIL 7:00 V
jC 372-9303 or 372-9473 >

as they enter, followed by a
large group sensitivity activity
led by Paul Schauble, counselor
psychologist.
A dramatic interpretation of
the Little Prince will be given
by Bill Kline, of the Student
Mental Health Organization.
THE GROUP will then divide
into 13 groups for activities that

Wohl (378-3110), Paul Roberts
(378-0153) or Dennis Blackburn
(373-1378).
Its amazing to see the
pleasure playing gives the kids,
Ron Wohl, who is heading the
drive, said, It seems to mean a
great deal to them.
The Sunland marching band
practices twice weekly and
occasionally appears in
performance. Their latest
concert was in mid-December at
the Gainesville Mall.

will include yoga, sculpture,
biking, folk and modem dance,
and cultural music.
Poetry, nature hiking,
sketching, drama, and finger
painting are also among the
planned activities.
After lunch, which will be in
the Ballroom, 30 groups will
experience awareness groups.
IN THESE SMALL groups of

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FO/? THE BEST SEAFOOD V* / /
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THE CENTER of MAN
A POT POURRI OF TRANSCENDENTAL
EXPERIENCES
Conference Room
Hornes Motor Lodge 175
Dr. Alan Monkewicz
An Introductory weekend to various aspects of the
transcendental experiences, e.g. Yoga (Hatha), Astrology,
Tarot Cards, Kundalina Yoga, Zen and Altered States of
Consciousness.
Friday-Feb. 19, 1971 8:00 10:00 P.M.
Saturday Feb. 20, 1971 10:00 1200 Noon
200- 4:00 P.M.
7:00 9:00 P.M.
Sunday Feb. 21, 1971 10:00 1200 Noon
2:00 400 P.M.
$3.00 per session or $15.00 for the weekend

Thuraday, February 18,1971, The Florida Alligator,

10 people each, discussion will
ensue on the activities of the
morning.
The program will close with
group singing.
Students can sign up for the
Experience from now until
Feb. 19, in their dormitories.
Resident advisors in each
dorm are responsible for posting
the lists on which students sign.

Page 7



. The Florida Alligator. Thursday, February 18, 1971

Page 8

TTi bstinacv and vehemency in opinion arc
YjG/SsSii the surest proofs of stupidity.
Bernard Barton
EDITORIAL
Students Denied
Legal Counsel
A Student Government proposal to furnish the student
body with a business manager who would also serve as an
attorney was rejected by President OConnell this week.
This proposal would have given students legal counsel in
any problems they might encounter with landlords,
merchants, and individuals.
The attorneys function would not be to provide a
cure-all for every problem that arises, but at least would
have assured students that someone would be near to help.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelders reaction was,
They dumped on the students again.
We find it hard to disagree with him.
Funding for the proposal was to be taken from the
student activity fee. Money, often cited as the reason for
axing worthwhile proposals, could not be used as a reason
for defeating this one.
President OConnell did not object to the method by
which the position would be funded. Neither did he object
to having the position deal with business matters.
His objections came in the form of a protest against
students having an attorney of their own.
Its just not feasible to have one individual counsel
22,000 students, President OConnell said.
Perhaps hes right.
Maybe its better that 22,000 students on this campus
have NO ONE to go to for counsel in legal matters.
By the same argument we could offer that poverty
stricken families who have never seen the inside of a
doctors office should not be included in a health care
program until there is a doctor for every patient.
Obviously, both statements are ridiculous.
We think the justification given for rejecting this proposal
is poorly veiled in a fear of giving students too much
control over their own lives.
Just think ... a student who is more aware of his legal
rights in certain matters is less likely to take some of the
dump he encounters either from the university or the
outside community.
One of the most eye-opening gauges of how bad this
decision was is in the proposal itself.
In a five page document listing the duties, purpose, and
necessary details of the proposal the point is made that for
the same money, the position would function in business
AND legal matters of the students.
By rejecting the proposal because of the inclusion of legal
counsel duties, President OConnell has denied students a
chance to solve some of their own problems.
And in the process, he has given students an added reason
to doubt the ability of his administration to take action on
worthwhile projects.

M I i jfiar :
Aha! Felling better, I see

The Sam Pepper Phyllis Gailub
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Alligator
The future is not a Jeff Klinkenberg Ken McKinnon
gift: it is an achievement Associate Editor News Editor %
IVlant To Make This Oaystau
Cleax... Vle K're T\)lum& All Os
Out Os S.E.Asia
And TgiACiThtm VlrrH Tlipmk
Friend, Spro Ant>
=3= FLUTED COLUMNS l_=l
Bouquet of Sanities
I I By JOHN PARKER=J====4

On the opposite page today
we are all treated to the typical
anti-abortion rationale.
Many are the guilt-bestowers
to whose tongues come quickly
words like murder and
infantacide.
Indeed, it is hard to counter
their very technical arguments
without using nebulous and
fallible reasoning like balance
of evils or justifiable
wrongdoing, all of which
admits some kind of fault.
FOR THOSE of you who
dont happen to think of
abortion in the same category as
My Lai, and yet want something
a little more stable than lesser
of two evils 7 in your intellectual
diet, I offer this bouquet of
late-blooming sanities.
The murder-shouters are
insanely obssessed with the
precise technical moment of
conception. To them, that
moment signifies that all the

Alligator Staff
Marian Jednistak John Parker
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
M Strang Carl Crawford
* lre Editor Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

universe is in accord, that here a
life has begun, and let no man
say otherwise.
That is a chemists way of
looking at life.
WHAT THAT view overlooks
is a much more important
element in the creation of life
than the mere uniting of two
cells.
It is the uniting and desire of
two people to make a new life.
It is a spiritual thing. A
conception in the mind. A

resolve to bring a life into the
world and love it, nourish it,
care for it.
WITHOUT THIS spiritual
unity, there is an agreement to
make love and nothing more.
Anything that happens outside
that is an accident there should
be an opportunity to stop it.
There are so many babies in
the world already who need
help, I couldnt bring myself to
add another one, someone once
told me.
There is beauty in that.
Humanity in that.
READ THE other side. It
talks of inconvenience, of
murder.
It talks of love, and is
unloving. Os humanity and is
inhumane. Os the meaning of
life, while condoning living
death.
Hopefully we are beyond
listening to those voices.
There are too many babies
now that need help.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392 r 1681,
82, 83 or 84 fj Jj
C. R. "Randy" Colerflfen
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



GUEST COLUMN
Abortion: Rationalization?

By BLAISE PICCHI
I am often amazed by the
ability of people to rationalize
anything to suit their purpose.
The recent and ever increasing
roar for the legalization of
abortion is an example. What
sophistry can permit people
living in this culture to
rationalize away homocide? Ive
heard the arguments. Its not
murder, the abortionist will
say, because an embryo in its
first trimester is not human; or,
It is not a viable fetus. All will
admit that such an embryo can
be found in the human female;
we know what that embryo will
become in time. So if it is not
human, what then is it? A wart?
And if killing such an embryo is
not homocide, what is it? The
removal of a cancer? If killing
the tadpole is not the same as
killing the frog arent we shaving
our rationalization too close to
be rational? You will find that if
you kill all the tadpoles there
will not be many frogs. Is not,
then, killing a tadpole frogicide?
Therefore, if abortion is to be
argued, let us argue it as it is:
The legalization of a deliberate
and planned homocide. One
should accept no rationalization
on this point. Self delusion is
not the strongest of virtues and
if the abortionist tries to argue
from the view that the human
fetus is less than human he is
either deluding himself or trying
to delude those he wishes to
persuade.
Indeed we have a population
problem that will soon reach
immense proportions. But is the
solution to that problem the
denial of 5,000 years of cultural
evolution and the reversion to
that which we consider barbaric.
The ends do not justify the
means. If we can accept abortion
as a means of population
control, then why not also kill
deformed or retarded infants
after birth?
Its plausible, isnt it? Why
not elderly people when they
reach, say, age 70 and are no
longer useful?
SUCH IDEAS are
preposterous to western culture

f~

but if we can rationalize away
one exception to the rule, why
not more and greater exceptions
later when the times get tougher.
Perhaps such a homocidal
foot-in-the-door will be
harbinger of the Brave New
World. Legal systems tend to
pyramid their rationalizations.
There are others who
seriously argue for abortion for
the convenience of the mother.
The unabashed, selfish egotism
of this position is amazing. In a
legal system where a fetus can
own and inherit property, the
mother is demanding the right to
terminate his life because his
birth would inconvenience the
parents. The abortionist
wouldnt dare argue for the right
to kill the child after birth, at
least not yet, but he has picked
upon some ritualistic moment in
the pregnancy when it is
permissible to snuff out the
childs life on the rationale that
he isnt killing a child nor even a
human being but some thing.
Perhaps the abortionist gets his
strength from the saying out of
sight, out of mind. What a
paradox when our legal system
guarantees a fetus property
rights but not his life!
I AM not a conservative but 1
do believe that liberalism can go
as far as to become excess and
excess is corruption and
decadence.
The legalization of abortion is
a crime against humanity and, if
nothing else this nation is
committed to a humanitarian
ideal as no other nation in
history. It has been the
progressive deviation from that
ideal for various well meaning
causes that has led this nation to
the turmoil and trouble of these
times. The long-haired,
disheveled, protesting youth is
the real American. He has been
shaped by this land and the
history of its people. In that
history are the seeds of both
good and bad; of the very
pinnacle of the humanitarian
dream and the abyss that
pragmatism can be. It will be
typical of his Americanism if he
can delude himself into the same

hypocritical rut he protests in
his elders. Unless he makes some
effort he can be guilty as they,
embracing the rationalized,
pragmatic delusion in the name
of the well-meaning cause.
Is the war in Southeast Asia,
fought to prevent the spread of
totalitarian communism, no less
well-meaning than the
legalization of abortion as a
means of population control,
family planning, welfare
reduction, and the prevention of
embarassment for the unwed?
Yet, how enigmatic that the
same people who shout down
one can cry out in favor of the
other. Or that the same people
can advocate the end of capital
punishment and the beginning of
abortion. What motives move
these people? Is it just the
popular cause to support
because it is the newest, sounds
convenient and everyone else
seems to be supporting it? Have
we come to the point that we,
like cows, all moo in unison
simply because another cow or
two is mooing?
THROUGH PRAGMATIC
expedience by means of homely
rationale our generation is
capable of diving too deep into
the practical abyss of well
intended horrors. Yet within this
generation as none other are the
seeds of the second great Age of
Enlightenment. The first
produced such giants as
Jefferson, Locke, Payne, Adams,
and Franklin whose thoughts
and deeds shook the world and
brought about the birth of the
humanitarian ideal in the
institutions of man. Will our
generation bring about a
recommitment to that ideal, not
only in our own country but, by
our example, throughout the
world, or will our old age be a
mockery of our youth?
What I am saying is simply
this: There are basic human
values; One of them is
humanitarianism; Do not
rationalize it away in the name
of ANYTHING; Do not deviate
from it EVER; Accept no golden
lies that would do either.

CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS***
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"Look, fella. I'm no redneck, but you go in without
a cap and you *re gonna clog up our drains.

READERS FORUM

Slip Os Fools
EDITOR:
In Mr. Vazquezs defense of
Mr. Alvarez in Feb. 11 issue of
the Alligator, he comitted the
same error Mr. Hart comitted on
his so called attack on the
character and personality of
Carlos Alvarez. Vasquez does
not know all the justifications
and reasons for Mr. Harts
actions. I contend that Mr.
Harts character is in good stead
and needs no defense.
Mr. Alvarez is a fool. He let
himself be the vanguard for the
grievances of the other athletes
who did not want to prejure
themselves. The All-American
name carried weight, but the
person himself, a seemingly
conscientious and sensitive
person, is still susceptible.
Mr. Hart is a fool. He made
the error of supposing the ideas,
the principle? he was fighting
for, were even worthy of
personal losses, financial as well
as emotional; foolish to consider
it possible to change the
institutionalized traditions of
such a self-righteous
organization.
Mr. Alvarez and Mr. Hart
made the same error, that of
attempted change.
These two fools tried to
change an organization that is
bent on the necessity to win, to
draw larger paying crowds, and
larger monetary contributing
alumni, disregarding
individualism & humanitar humanitarianism.
ianism. humanitarianism. An organization full of
figureheads, yes sir men, and
Doug Dickey who is nobodys
fool!
I also contend that I am a fool
for even entertaining all the
proceeding fools.
DAN-YELL C. LANDUM

Thursday, February 18,1971, The Florida Alligator,

The War
EDITOR:
As everyone must know, the
President of the United States is
committed to a total military
victory in Indochina or the
destruction of this nation, which
ever comes first. Killing, death
and destruction is riping through
Loas, caused by our government.
This country is emotionally
exhausted. Weve been morally
wounded, economically crippled
and our society has been ripped
limb from limb. Young and old
have been tricked and used by a
cruel and faithless president. So
faithless in the people that a
newsblack-out was ordered over
us. We want the war to end,
were tired of rallies and parades,
JUST END THE DAMN THING.
Well, who is going to do it?
Nixon has proved that he will
not. We must do it, we must
keep trying. We must get the
Senate to say; No ground troops
No aircombat No bombing,
shelling No fighting No
killing. We must have the senate
say Everbody OUT BY 72.
Senator Chiles is a new senator,
he will be influenced by letters
of people who point out the
evils of the war. Lets give him
the word, write to
Senator Chiles
U.S. Senate
Washington, D.C.
And dont stop there. Rap
with people about the war. The
best place to start is with your
parents and relatives, get them
to write to congress. We cant
stop, because if we do the war
will get even worse!
WILUAM E. WHITLEY

Page 9



l. TtW'Rarida AlUgttpr/TbvWd**, Fto*iry4B. -t*7l

Page 10

Uhlfelder: We Really Need An Attorney

PAGEOWe||
counseling students in legal
matters.
SG OFFICES receive two or
three calls a day, according to
Uhlfelder, from students who
have tenant-landlord problems,
consumer gripes, and troubles
with legal consequences.
SG personnel are not in a
position to give these people
legal advice ... we really need

Balance Between Divisions Needed

to Harold D. Hanson, dean of
the graduate school is, Why
should advanced graduate work
be supported by the taxpayer of
this state?
TO ANSWER THIS question
Dean Hanson said, The
difference in academic prestige
between universities is largely
due to the evaluation that is
made of their advanced graduate
activities, i.e. their research.
Hanson said the cost of
educating a graduate student is
about $9,000 per year, three
times the cost of educating an
undergraduate per year.
However, according to
Hanson, money from grants and
contracts to graduate research is
about $22.4 million per year,
most of which is expended in
research related to the graduate
program. So for about the 3,000
graduate students, about $6,000
or $7,000 is provided for each of
the necessary $9,000 per year,
through grants and contracts.
ACCORDING TO Hanson,
this means the cost to the state
of educating a graduate student
is not any more than the cost of

New AG Course To Concern
Pesticide Use In Agriculture
By JANE CATO
Alligator Staff Writer
Pesticides, often thought to be a dirty word to pollution fighters, is
the topic of a new course being offered by the Department of
Agriculture.
Entitled Agricultural Chemicals and the Environment, it was
designed to acquaint the student with the total picture of pesticides.
EIGHT OUTSTANDING scientists of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences will present lectures pertinent to agricultural
chemical needs, the hazards involved and the future outlook for
non-chemical measures.
The course will be on the pass-fail system and no prerequisite is
required.
Since AG 200 has just been approved, it is not listed in the
published Schedule of Courses for the Spring Quarter.
Students can register for the course by adding it during regular
Registration on March 27.
GREENS BARBEQUE
Specializing in barbequed beef,
pork, ribs, A chicken
Sandwiches and plates
P a
412 S.W. 4th Ave. 373-2454

an attorney, he said.
Uhlfelder said the proposal
was one of the top priority
matters he wanted to have
passed.
WE CLEARED UP the
problems that have existed in
past years with business matters,
and while we may from time to
time need the advice of a
business manager, the students
need an attorney much more,
he explained.
The proposal was an attempt

educating an undergraduate.
Also according to Hanson, the
cost of research per year is about
$23.4 million. Since grants total
$22.4 million, The major cost
of research, which is the
expensive part of graduate
training, is borne by outside
sources.
Hanson then stated, You
must understand that this can
only happen when the school is
good enough and the faculty is
good enough to attract as we do,
20 odd million dollars of outside
funding.
Further, this shows that
money expended by the state on
our quality research program
results in a substantial sum of
money being brought in to
support our operation as a
university, Hanson said.
BEAR IN MIND that there is
no such thing as spontaneous
generation of funding. We get
our grants only after the most
careful scrutiny and evaluation
by national boards and
committees of proposals
submitted by our individual
faculty members, Hanson said.
What are the benefits of
graduate research?
In answer to this Hanson said,
In our graduate seminars and

to meet the real needs, not the
secondary ones of the students
Uhlfelder said. And what
happens ... they dump on the
students again.
Uhlfelder said only four
schools in the country presently
have a student attorney, but
that doesnt mean we cant start
something new here.
AN ADDITIONAL benefit of
having a student attorney would
be to let community merchants
know that taking advantage of

mm jhb:. jjjgHS
FRANKLIN DOTY
... society needs graduate work
our research laboratories at UF,
we are working on the universal
problems of pollution control,
information retrieval,
environmental preservation and
even trying to help some of the
blind to see.
ACCORDING TO Hanson UF
has produced more Ph.D.s than
any other school in the
Southeast.
Glen Seaborg, Chairman of
the U.S. Atomic Energy
Commission has stated, The
strength of its graduate school is
probably the greatest single
factor in determining how much
a state or region will benefit
from tomorrows science and
technology. There is no
investment in the future that
will yield a bigger social and
economic dividend than the

FOLK NIGHT xTV
featuring :
Johnny J. Hines Show
Deb Nustard
George Ellis
The Magic Mushroom
The Al McCall Blues Band
Ken Williams '' /
Mark Smith / /
Dave Luce /
25C Admiision \f- r \ /
if i /
fjl
Thursday fab. 18 9:00-100AM f\ 1
At the RATHSKELLER

students wouldnt be as
unchallenged Uhlfelder said.
Secretary of Legal Affairs
Mike Pugh wrote over 150
letters in the three months he
researched information for the
proposal.
The finished proposal was in
the form of k five-page report
that enumerated the method of
selection, duties of the office,
and funding procedures for the
position.
PUGH SAID he was greatly

money building centers of
excellence in graduate learing
and research.
But what about the
undergraduate level? It cannot
be ignored or the graduate and
upper division levels will suffer,
according to University College
(UC) Dean Franklin Doty. We
should have more graduate
work, the society needs it, my
only reservation is that it should
not be at the expense of the
highest quality undergraduate
work, Doty said.
TO IMPROVE THE quality of
the undergraduate work, Doty
said the main investment
necessary for UC should be in
the direction of holding down
the size of classes. Doty also says
he would like to double the
honors program.
Both Hanson and Doty agree
there should be a reasonable
balance between upper and
lower divisions. According to
Doty, the graduate student is
only as good as his education as
an undergraduate. Hanson agrees
that there cannot be a strong
graduate school without a solid
undergraduate base.
Hanson also believes that the
undergraduate school benefits
from the graduate program and
this is an added advantage to the
role of the graduate school.
HANSON STATED, Our
undergraduate school is a better
one academically because of its
close association with the
graduate program. It is a natural

disappointed in OConnells
decision to reject the plan.
We even watered down the
proposal and compromised on a
few things that we thought
might be objected to by the
administration, he said.
Uhlfelder said plans are
continuing to set up a legal
referral service and an attempt is
going to be made to raise
private funds through a
foundation for a student
attorney.

process which feeds the benefits
of a strong graduate program
into the general undergraduate
education. The direct benefits
involve added resources in terms
of faculty, staff, students,
computer facilities, and so on.
Vice President of Academic
Affairs, Dr. Frederick Connor,
said that there is a trend among
persons in authority in the state
of Florida in favor of a
system of higher education in
which the traditional four-year
college is broken in two. The
responsibility for the first two
years, or lower-division, under
this bisection is turned over to
the junior colleges, and the
responsibility for the last two
years remain with the
universities, which then become
upper-division universities.
The results of the faculty poll
'show UF faculty to be in favor
of this happening.
However, Dr. Connor
disagrees with this. In a speech
to the Board of Regents Connor
stated, In respect to the
four-year students, the alleged
logic and efficiency and
economy of the separation of
lower and upper division colleges
will not hold up, and the
educational losses are
considerable.
Our conclusion is that two
years are simply not a long
enough period in which to
establish optimum programming
and staffing in university level
work, said Connor.



Vm
a fresh idea from PUBLIXI
m mKF>kA,- i % __
ePPM||
No limits! Nothing else to buyl f
XIL $1.98 Value
Heres your chance to get a complete set of
e%/ y these handy food savers at savings of 50% or more I
These laboratory-tested, air-tight food savers has been int/oduced, its available for the rest of the
[ bear the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. offer at the same low price.
You've seen them advertised in McCalls and Woman's
Day, too, but theyVo never before been ovoiloble Ever r P i#ce * "conditionally guaranteed .... dishwasher
from retail stores at these low, low prices, "* OBd unb, okabl - Ut H "> oH on d My of Publix,
where shopping is a pleasure!
A So get several of each item, each week. Once an item
\\ L HERES THE SCHEDULE: _
\ \ l l I MARCH 18-24 /]2 0L tumblers
\ jm, UUI / regular 6 forsl.sovalue each iik i v/mmi nf \i
\ Bfi / FEBRUARY 18-24 / PIE SAVER """" § 111 Ilf] Ijf ll
\ J||3l regular $1.98 vatos 790 MARCH 25-31 / CAKE SAVER J [||lpA
regular $2.49 value 790 111 L r.Tr Tft /|
f y FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3 /
XJJXV regularsl.49value 590 *tA
APRIL 1-7 / BREAD SAVER 890
< X> MARCH 4-10 / COLD CUTS SAVER \J A
_ A (sandwich loaf size) regular $2.49 value i
regular $1.98 value 790 BBBBBBBBHBBBauHBBBBBaeaHeeBHHMH
MARCH 1117 / 4A-OZ. && jIS§L-s A^ft \\ MARCH 11-1/ / wnr fpl3*\ SQUARE FOOD SAVER SET 49V I
\y> Wb-tUSab. W £4 (!pa.,3!SB) msbr SUtr.hr | |

Thun fey, FArwry H, flTt, Th* Flarida AMptar^

Page 11



Page 12

irThoFlmldi SMcitui, Thursday, Februmy IS. IS7I

oenyday Jtow. P*Ucei,! 7?c)r 7/V iV HB2ffi£B
MCold Duck Champs 415 1-99
EVERYDAY LOW BRICE! Oe.p Cleaning
All PCtCrgCllt '7** $| 95 Mateus (Import) 4/5 ... $1.99
A % T EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Cote-Ripe Unpeeled | | T f ]
WliOl ApriCOtS < 29* this weeks SUPERSEAL special 1 k^E^B
(VIRYDAY LOW PRICE! Rreekfait Club
Evaporated Milk ... 13* die CIUED
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! brand Strawberry | IF AD V [ll I
Preserves 59
Bath Tissue :?!*/ ~ '-A WPO^H
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI Meet'* ft. jwnQ MJa|||lAdEA||j
Tenato Sauce vr 25*^S£^Ag^S
M EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!
Comet Cleanser :.:18 c I -J 11
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI Ocean Spray I O k
Cranberry Cocktail.. c: 75 c I #Mv mcis ?2ir ~
IVI.TB.V low rmeu Fri.w.l I 9 to CCD IF , U
m m HROo I WED. NOON, FEB. 24,1971
900 rood oodooooddd 7* 13* I REGULAR $1.98 VALUE quantity rights
RESERVED
|o| if costs no more
W to enjoy the
Happy Difference atPbhfix
CL /1.. CJ |L+ IVIRYDAY LOW PRICi! Flour Ij rlBuX
hmttaNgoiMWpt: Bisauick -62* lk*:JlMtt^B3l
Orange Juice a* 1 29* *vrvdayiwpric *Â¥. rur mmmmmm^Pj^flHflMl^^^^Hnn|r~
Strawberries r 39 c Coil SIIQQI*
campbeirt cream of SHRIMP IVKRYOAY LOW PRICII FAP Fruit
soup sr 49* Cocktail # r2B*
fTZKtn, ~ EO< .virydat low .Kie1)...0. FRESH-BAKED-ON THE PREMISES!
V,WI WCRtfl phi- dr GAINESVILLE MALL
rsr... Green Beans ?m wnw>i-n*nni
Coffee Rich 7*o*2s* W W with Ptuap Jky SaMae A Candied fruit
Staaffer'a Prapen LOW PRICii Eeft-Plp Acaerted Cetera HOt CI*OSS BURS
Spinach Souffle'... i?47 Paper TOWeIS ,, 25* 6 -39*
CheeseFizxa 77 Apple Sauce
English Muffins * Ph. 27* nffll r.lW??!ff9 1 Bar Cake
*2?* 5r75 l~"~l I Stanley bench pfane | MHIFIB
Bit-O-Honey VS 37* B ) PC u
Cadbary* Aaaerted Cbecefete
Candy Bars -.37*
r ;
Fan Oul Heatonm ftpt.
nr I bam (Wuee Uifc j
Heato. & Beauty Auk tTCG#|iH r Potatoes 5*42*"
shampoo ;.v 79* |l|| Grapefruit .... .... o
ExcodrinPM -v.*i ViH 1?J f Pascal Celery 15
Right Guard ... 90F l. 7 Orange Juice .. 59 <



, :
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN
HptQiil HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
S 3 B *S=- pul
lb #lll a C;';:^
1 1 | X*l I. <:|A
Swift's Praaiiaai Prtn Iml Rib w
Swift's Praaiiaai Issslws
&Vi -OJlute nlU*!. .. zs9'
mmme aha rbbmne^
***hlA Mwts laaf ar
Wy Lh.
DslKUxi Sliest
, * V.. Tasty Kitcbaa-frask
K|JLAvjA|j|2LjjkaE * j?I AAocorom Sci ci 39
*< Sar--ea^
:fj|| RSaGa SaaGwich Traati
o.ir>-trash ^ c fancy snacks or to
f v aa 1 ~a
Tamptaa whip
Assavtad Ptaaars Ssafaa Traat, ftarMa
o- - \
if . ;'. *_ ~ ;..*

SI Pll BKfX pi
Hwaalw ... UkaiMH

Ttan*y, Fafamwy If. I*7l, Tlw Florida AlUprtor.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

a****
FOR SALE
1968 VW one owner, Excellent
condition. $1,395. Must see to
appreciate. Radio, heater. Landmark
Apt. 54. 373-3537. After 5:00
(A-2t-85-p)
4 Tires For Sale size E7B 14 (735 14)
Call 372-6623. (A-2t-85-p)
Volksbus for 400.00 or best offer
call 373-1243 or come by 1015 SW
7th Ave. (A-st-85-p)
Sony TC-130 stereo cassette -corder
with 4 90 min. tapes and extra long
wire for extension speakers. Call
392-7236 or 392-9685 (A-85-2t-p)
B & W TV 21 INCH EXCELLENT
CONDITION $55 CALL 378-9130 or
376-1611 x 359 (A-3t-85-p)
Console phonograph with AM-FM
radio med. style fantastic condition
SIOO or best offer ph 372-0290
(A-3t-85-p)
Army dress blue uniform like new
tailored by Esquire coat 38 pants
32-31 Bancroft cap size 7 cost sl2
9.95 call 372-3638 (A-st-82-p)
Master pool cue & dbl. case $65. 2
ping-pong pdls. $2 @ $3.50 both. 4
ft. blk. light $lO. call 378-0181
(A-st-83-p)
Students DONT BE FOOLED I We
guaratee the lowest prices New
walnut finished student desk, now
$27.50, bookcase with glass doors
$19.50, 2 drawer flies $19.50, Used
solid oak swlvll chairs with castors
$19.95 J R OFFICE FURNITURE
620 S. MAIN STREET 376-1146
(A-15t64-p)
Brand New Kent classical guitar with
case, retail $l3O, will take SBS or
best offer, also good snow ski
equipment for sale 392-9000
(A-st-85-p)
1966 BMW Rolls Royce of motor
cycles." touring fairing 6 gal tank
turn signals USA dbl. seat 2 helmets
ex. mech. cond. $775 378-0181
(A-5t63-p)
MUST SELL going into service, 1968
Honda 160 recently overhauled, new
crank and top end Job asking $375
call JACK NASON 373-3435
evenings (A-4t-83-p)
QE 12 Inch portable TV brand new
UHF-VHF never used SBO 373-2145
after 5 (A-st-81-p)
1968 Triumph Trophy, New tires &
battery, Looks & runs good. Contact
Steve at 1236 NW third Ave or call
3726380 (A-3t-84-p)
GOOD DEALSI white GE clean
portable dishwasher, zenith b&w tv,
electric hair setters, swinger camera,
will bargain 372-1656 after 2
(A-st-84-p)
IF carpets look dull and drear,
remove the spots as they appear with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Electric upholstry shampooers
also available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
HONDA Super Hawk 305 cc excellent
condition, Just over hauled, like new
and a steal at $375. Ph 373-4080 or
see at the Cycle Works 1220 S. Main
(A-3t-86-p)
TV Zenith 17" b&w portable with
stand $95 Sony Stereo Turntable
Amplifier and speakers $l5O both
only one year old. Mens bicycle S2O
Boston Rocker $lB Phone 378-8401
(A-5t66-p)
Love for sale. smth bassett, very
affectionate. All grooming supplies
Included. AKC registered. Please call
3786556 (A-5t66-p)
YAMAHA PIANO Must Sell going
overseas. Was $995, ask $675 or best
offer. Only one year old, condition as
new. Consul. (A-3t-87-p)
5.38
I ,,,< Sy- 1 741 9.44
Michael
diSSf 1
VNr in
Get Carter
2 DON'T
MISS IT!
... 2:21 4:43 7:08 9:33
r There 1
was a_
crooked
i man... :

FOR SALE
Gibson E 5335 electric guitar, hollow
body, perfect shape list price. $475
will sell for S3OO. Call Allen at
376-4734 anytime. (A-3t-86-p)
*65 CORVAIR CORSA: Wh. conv
top with burgandy body 4spd.
180 hp. new everything: around
$750: call Scott @ 372-5254 Lv.
name and no. (A-st-86-p)
Standard size crib, best quality
mattress, perfect condition $45 -;
3-way portable crib sl6 without
pad call 378-4126 (A-3t-86-p)
FOR RENT
Available Immediately!! modern
effeclency apt. sublet to June full
utilities Included N 0.418 1225 SW
Ist Ave. Call after 3 376-1521
(B-3t-84-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished air
conditioned apt; pool, laundry.
Available early In March, lease runs
through Jun. 14. call 3766115
(B-st-82-p)
Sublease Fr. Quarter Apt. One
bedroom town house, available March
21. call 378-4555 (B-st-82-p)
-Female Roommate wanted La Bonne
Vie townhouse Apt. 346 307 SW
16th Ave. Please phone or come by
373-4230 (B-3t-84-p)
1 male roommate needed Gatortown
apartments call 3766333 for
Information or stop by apt. 219
(B-st-83-p)
Room In house Private entrance
kitchen privileges close to campus
$65 a month call Guy 378-8418
(9-5t62-p)
Large eff. apt. a/c, pool etc. Easy
walking distance from campus.
Sublease starting spring qtr. Suitable
for one or two. Phone 373-3149.
(B-2t-86-p)
Need female roomate. Own bedroom
near campus no lease $55 per mo. +
Vi util. Call Mary 378-2552 1932 NW
2nd Ave. (B-3t-86-p)
Female Roomate Wanted To Share 2
Bedroom Apt. Alr-Cond., Heat Pool,
Laundry S4O mo. + V. utilities Call
372- (B-st-85-p)
Female roommate for spring quarter
to share room In 3 bedroom apt. $47
per month la bonne vie apts.
378-5812 (B-5t65-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished apt. air
cond. Close to campus 120.00 mo
call 376-1815 (B-4t65-p)
Sublet furnished 1 bedroom (twin
beds) apartment; air conditioned, gas
heat, patio. $l3O mo. Immediate
occupancy. 3766626 1918 SW 14th
Terrace (B-10t-80-p)
Large 2 bedroom apt. central heat &
A/c furnished N. of Mall 145.00 mo*
call Martle or Gay after 5:00
373- (B-st-84-p)
Female Roomate wanted beautiful
new house on lake own bedroom Feb
rent S3O rent for March S4O. Call
373-1372 (B-3t-84-p)

Todays |
more for your money meal I
moisorrs
CAFETERIA I
FEATURE} I
I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND I I
I MACARONI |
O | ALL YOU CAN i Q A j §
l l EAT! 7 V|5 I
| I FRIDAYS FEATURE I 1 I
5 PORK CUTLET PARMESAN I §
a I is i
and j
I YELLOW A A X
j RKE 99{ j I
Lweieil|aeieieiaiJl l
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtII 8 FREE PARKfNG 1
moisons
CAFETERIA ... beyond comparison! I
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall Jm

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 18,1871

Page 14

WANTED
Female roommate: Spring quarter
away from the noise of campus. A/c,
central heating, big kitchen, 43.75 +
V. util call 3736706 (C-st-86-p)
Female roomate for Village Park
N 0.55 spring & summer qtr. move in
any time, pool air etc. 378-8668
$42.50 + util. (C6t-86-p)
Roomate wanted landmark apts, 2tvs
2 stereos and tape deck, lots of
parking space 47.50 mo. -4- util. Feb.
free call 378-9382 move In notf
(C-3t-86-p)
Female roommate: Spring quarter In
2 bedroom Landmark apt No. 167
March rent Is free. Please call
3786592 after 4pm (C-st-86-p)
Need one male roommate for spring
quarter In the Place. Rent $75
Including utils. Call 373-3519 at
anytime. (C-st-86-p)
Female to sublet room at La Mancha.
S7O Includes everything. Call Jan at
372-8700. (C-st-85-p)
One male roommate for Spring
Quarter French Quarter Apt. 88,
$45/mo. plus Vi utilities. Call
378-4784 after spm. (C-st-85-p)
Female Roommate: large apt with
fireplace available now 421 NW 15
St. S4O plus utilities Call 378-9958
(C-st-82-p)
Female Roommate to sublet room In
modern alr-conditloned apartment
only S4O a month 835 NE 4th
Avenue call 373-1754 (C-4t-84-p)
1 female roommate needed 2
bedrooms 2 baths $48.75 + utilities
La Bonne Vie apts. Sin City call
378-4757 (C-st-84-p)
1 or 2 coed roommates for apt. close
to campus, pool, your own private
bedrooms! Call Debbie or Esther at
372- (C-st-84-p)
2 female roommates to share 2 bdrm.
Gatortown apt. with 2 girls $47.50
per mo. + Vt util. Call Michelle
373- or 376-9647 (C-10t-84-p)
Need female roommate F.Q. apt.
46.25 + utilities; large bdrm. move In
now rent paid thru Feb. call
378-4614 (C-st*B4-p)
Female roommate wanted, F. Q. apt.
93, $46.25 + util., ceil 372-7835
after 1:30 p.m. (C-st-82-p)
Female Roomates wanted for 2
bedroom apt. (Summit House)
beginning Spring quarter. Call
anytime 373-2980 (c6t-81-p)
La Bonne Vie: 1 female roomate
needed for 2 bedroom apt. rent
51.50 mo. study lounge, rec. room,
tennis, & pool. Call now 3786969.
(C-7t60-p)
Complete front-end assembly to fit
250-500 cc motorcycle. Preferably a
305-350 Honda. Need other body
parts also. Call 372-2748 after spm.
Roger (C-st-85-p)
Male Roommate Immediately large
apartment La Bonne Vie 57.50 a mo
and Vi utilities, all the conveniences,
call Larry at 373-2384 (C6t63-p)

DRY CLEANING
UR TO 8 LBS- $230
WHILE ATTENDANT IS ON DUTY
318 S.W. 16th Ave.
(NEXT TO COTTONS MIN-A-MART)
MELODY CLU B
4130 NW 6th St
features
COUNTRY ROCK
AND
19< DRINKS FOR LADIES
7 TO 8 PM
Wednesday-Friday-Saturday
Beer, Sandwiches And Games
People Play
"Where the in crowd goes out
shows So ( MEtyj GREAT
WEEK!
** Oleal
John Marieytay Millaod
2ss! DM
I diary I
| Sto**&*q6e/ * a mad
wtm housewifel
a frank perry film
W W. Vmhenlti Am I
AND At least I know who I was I
MYRA BRECKINRIDGE when I got up this morning, I
but I think I must have changed!
several times since then.
- Ali 's Adventures in Wonder lend. I
JJq le'iCwi/oii B
mm
I ,|J iBl! i
I ALL SEATS $1.25 JtK "B
Special Matinee^^A^B^UN^^^^^**|
I "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;Xcxx*XvX*?x*&*>x ; !*£X'X-&*x-X-x*x*X'
j_j pr* y jp> ~WJ\.
Part-time or full-time employee
wanted. Apply in person between 3
and 5 PM at Arbys, 1405 SW 13 St.
(E-2t-86-p
Experienced Pizza Pie maker Cali
373-3379 sos appointment
(E-2t-85-p)
PART TIME senior advertising major
to do ad copy for electronic
instruments contact Bob Qarrett at
378-9130 or 376-1611 x 359
(E-3t-85-p)
Listeners wanted again! Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call LeVan
between 8 and 5 for appointment.
392-2049. (E-12t-84-c)
a
a
AUTOS
Austin-Healey 100-6 recent engine,
excellent mechanical condition. Body
and interior in very good condition.
$550. call 373-2726. (G-st-84-p)
61 corvair new tires 1403 ne 18 ave
75 dollars after 5 pm (G-st-84-p)
NOWPLAYING!
AT: 1:45-4:20-7:00-9:40
WALT DISNEY
PRODUCTIONS*
' if [G]S2*
! 9JC Nan Ooe*r Product**
NOW PLAYINGI
AU 1:35-3:35-5:35-7:38^35
K Jm
|(ESS33ajE
Thursday, Feb. 18... 5:00 &
Friday, Feb. 19 ... 7:00 & 10:30
Saturday, Feb. 20... 7:00 A
10:30
Sunday, Feb. 21 ... 12:00, 3:30.
7:00,10:30
Union Auditorium SI.OO
Special sound equipment Just or
2001 buy advance tickets Friday
from 12:30 to 4:30 at 2nd floor
box office.
sponsored by JWR Union

AUTOS
FORD GALAXY 1964 Good
condition, power steering, heater,
radio, top grade new tyres $495 or
best offer Phone 378-8401
(G-st-86-p) S~
65 GTO, 4 Speed,OafiT^ Green,
Engine Completely Rebuilt Feb. Ist.
New Clutch and Carb. First SBSO
take it. 392-7187 after 6pm
(G-st-82-p)
69 BMW 2002 air cond. 4-speed 2
new radiais very good cond. $1995
67 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE good cond.
$750 378-0308 evenings. (G-st-85-p)
SUCH A DEAL! must sell 59
Rambler in great mechanical shape
for super low price of $75. also a
good stereo for SIOO. call 372-7531
(G-st-82-p)
67 Dodge Coronet 440 wagon fact
AC PS PB pwr rear window air
shocks 4 new polyglas tires v-8 uses
reg gas 3-seat model asking SISOO.
373-1524 (G-st-83-p)
1968 Cougar xr7 lime-green with
wht. top. excellent cond. power str.
fact. air. 302-VB. $2450 call
372-4360 and leave name & phone
no. (G-st-82-p)
VW 1966 DEPENDABILITY for
$550, recently tuned, new brakes,
good tires. 376-3295 ask for Joe after
5:00 (G-st-83-p)
Porsche 3568 1961 green good
condition SI2OO 376-0114 evenings
(G-st-83-p)
>X:-;-xX:X;X:X:XX\:XvX\vXvXvX;X'v
PERSONAL
Lonely male needs loving female, call
John at 392-7120 (J-2t-86-p)
Sweetiecums, How would you know
about the bar girls? Bridge lesson
next quarter, diet tommorow and
love for you always 208 DTG, LL
(J-lt-86-p)
The idiots of the world have united
to announce that Bronco N. loves
John. With love. The Mouse
(J-lt-86-p)
Help! Desperately need ride to Miami
Feb. 24 returning Feb. 28 call Sydel
392-7649 evenings (J-3t-86-p)
Gainesville Artisans Market original
pottery, leatherwork, knitting, and
sewing, and beautiful graphics all
handmade by local artisans tps W.
University Ave. (J-st-86-p)
Drawing and painting taught In
private studio. Work at your own
pace. Individual instruction designed
to develop your interests. 373-1947
(J-st-86-p)
Rick Happy 5 months! We're really
great together. This weekend was
super-fantastic, but we've only Just
begun to have such great times
together. Next the regency! I love
you so much my little honey bear!
2-18-71 dct (J-lt-86-p)
Coeds Be a Gator Greeter Fla.
Cicerone applications may be
obtained at the Union information
Desk during this week. (J-st-83-p)
Melissa; I missed the day, so sue me. I
love you, here, there, and everywhere
and have only just begun Tom.
(J-2t-85-p)
WANT A CHEAP THRILL? get
clacking 50 cents Call 392-7396
from 3:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m.
(J-3t-84-p)
Lonely Aquarian witch stuck in
Minnesota wilds wants supercool tall
dark lean hippietype men to write
her. Interested? 373-3482 (J-3t-84-p)
SEX? It is true we carry a full line of
equipment for most any sport, but
lets be reasonable! BAB SPORTS
CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1461 (J-st-83-p) v
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer. Electrologist ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)

i S
I Advertise
flv WW i * .-*s* 3|
| its good business |
| /
< 2
!, ; ,j|

Thursday, February 18,1971, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
:;X:X;X;X:X::y>tt>wx;X:X'XwWv*x
Tired of apt living? CLO has openings
for the spring 1 block behind Krystal
- only $195/qt for room and 3 meats
a day. Vince at 376-9473
(J-23t-7 5-p)
Tenants! Organizers now forming the
Gainesville Tenants* Assoc. For
information call Mike Pugh at
392-1665. Get off your apathy
(J-15t-79-p)
To Alvin W, room 642 I dig you.
Fabulous Fanny (J-3t-86-p)
V.V.'.V.V.V.V.V
LOST FOUND
Reward: Greenish-brown zippered
pocketbook lost, need desperately!
also, a white change purse inside.
Call: 392-7632 (L-st-84-p)
Navy blue purse missing in Fr. Qtr.
area. If found please call 372-5554 or
return to Fr. Qtr. apt. 53 Reward!
t.D.s needed. (L-3t-84-p)
Lost: gold medalion. 1 7/8 in. dia.
Arles and Scorpio signs on front,
engraving on back, high sentimental
value. Call 378-2251 reward
(L-3t-85-p)
Found. Girl's brown hexagonal
glasses found near Univ. auditorium
on Sunday Call 392-0306. Ask for
John (L-3t-86-NC)
Lost Friday nlte in vicinity of
Murphree Area long hand crocheted
blue and white scarf sentimental
value call Barbara at 392-7808
(L-lt-86-p)
LOST: female, light brown dog with
leather collar near NW 2 Ave. 18st.
Answers to name of Squiggly please
call 376-2721 (L-2t-86-p)
SIOO REWARD for any Information
leading to the whereabouts of a 66
VW metallic brown, green tinted
glass, airscoop on back, good year
racing tires, driving lamps, wood
dashboard. Please notify UPD or call
376-6575 (L-st-86-p)
FOUND: Diamond ring near north
entrance of bandroom Thursday
night call Pat 2-7879 or Kim 2-7167
(L-3t-86-nc)
SERVICES
CUSTOM PAINTING really wild
metal flake, lace jobs and candy
colors Done on motorcyles get your
bike painted while Its cold. See Steve
at the Cycle Works 1220 S. Main.
Really reasonable prices (M-st-83-p)
Typing at its best by former NY
secretary. Speed & accuracy. Term
papers, theses, dissertations 50 cents
& up. Barbara Coaxum 373-4363
(M-4t-77-p)
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medic-legal-psychologic, open Sat. &
Sundays, 3265 Virginia St. No. 1,
Miami, 446-6583 appointments.
(M-25t-72-p)
8-track cartridges custom Recorded 2
or more albums on 80-mln Capitol
tapes. $4 Inc tape or will beat any
competitive offers. 378-5916 nights
(M-st-85-p)
Wedding rings and other body
ornaments sculpted and handcrafted
In silver, gold, and other materials.
Very reasonable. 373-1947
(M-st-86-p)

Page 15

SERVICES
: ; Xt>X!X*>>>x*x-:-x*:*x£X:*x*XvX ; x*
Your HONDA wont run?? -Steve at
the CYCLE WORKS will pick it up
FREE. Call him at 373-4080 for the
best and least expensive service for
your Honda. (M-st-86-p)
STUD SERVICE AKC registered
black mineature poddle ribbon
winner good confirmation &
disposition guarented resolt,
373-1059 evenings (M-st-86-p)
HORSES BOARDED finest care &
facilities convenient stalls pasture
tack room wooded trails lighted ring
beautiful grounds 373-1059
(M-st-86-p)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge, (m-tfc)
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at & grad of Bklyn College,
N.Y. Term papers, theses,
dissertations. 50 cents & up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft 6
(M-4t-66-p)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)

; mSI! I
MpTismu^^B
._ __ ; >. . -- :
1 ~v ; If / |g 9'-V^->'
V
fMAI CB tW B 9
moram 9
.* v',-l 9 where you get a break M.
on steak and
"verything else
I I
'* Love is a funny feeling; it makes a young man want (
l to call a girl by his last name.
wSSS^m*'"' I

*#
SERVICES
Rubys Alterations apt. 217-100
N.E. Bth Ave. 376-8506
, (m-st-81-p)
smith corona typewriter repair 50%
off let a factory trained mechanic do
It call Sam between 9-1 392-9041
free pickup and delivery (M-st-81-p)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
Paint your dingy pad or doghouse.
Any room $13.00. Student who
knows his stuff. References. Call
John 372-4427 eves. (M-3t-84-p)
9 9
I Cycle Works I
1 Now Has I
I A Phone! I
I 373-4080! I



Page 16

, The Florlde Alligator, Thursday, February 18* 1971

^~ r t WINN DIXII STOES. INC.-COPYRIGHT- l71 }*i> \SPECIALS!^
FANTASTIC ARROW SALE!
ARROW WHITE & YELLOW SAVE 25c ARROW
,Towels...5 s lNapkins.... s 10 c
Limit 5 Roll* With $7.50 or More Purchase Exc. Cig.
SAVE 25c ARROW ASSORTED (1300 Sheet.) SAVE 1 lc ARROW
Tissue.... 5 *l Napkins.. 3 ~ s l
Limit 5 Pkg*. With $7.50 or More Purchose Exc. Cig.
faueT...6 ~ s l tissue ...8 88 c
/ ::::: 11 B,^y@3s^
I ASTOR : ismm D p SOUTH / \ TOMATO &f POTATO
COFFEE #§ Mayonnaise |f§f| CATSUP % n CHIPS
Uwitl limit I With 7.300. M Purchoi. I.tludi.g R C .[OULA. O* 01.
Van 591 l I I I ill
PALMOLIVE 10c OPE M M SOFT DRINKS NRB lii;n wm. *7. JO oMr. *.* l c.g I- fe DEL MONTE TOMATO Is S MUSSELMANS FILLING
\LiquidDetg. s 48J 59 'J yJuice 3 \gherryJPie i^B 3B^
INSTANT COFFEE SAVE Sc DEEP SOUTH FRESH CUKE SAVE 17c CRACKIN'GOOD TOASTER DIXIE DARLING REG BROWN N SERVE & SEEDED
Nescafe $ 1 39 Chips . 39 c Pastry 3 S I OO Rolls. .2 39 c
VAN CAMP W/BEANS DEEP SOUTH FRESH KOSHER MAC A RONI CHEDDAR DIXIE DARLING ENGUSH
Chili .. 3 S I OO Dills ... 59 c Dinners -1 Muffins 2 49 c
KRAFT 1000 ISLAND O'SAGE DIXIE DARLING POUND, PLAIN, MARBLE A RAISIN DIXIE DARLING APPLE
Dressing $ 1 00 Peachess s= S I OO Cakes 2 S I OO Strudel a 59 c
SPRAY "409" GLENN FARMS PIECES & STEMS DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE SAVE 22c LYKES VIENNA <-
Cleaner 58 c Mushrooms4^s $ l Bread 2 59 c Sausage 5 $ 1 00
V V 11,11
Fgjl DETERGENT ELBOW # S HOMOGENIZED 1
JUICE pi TIDE Im? Macaroni jL MILK
l I IN. l l PLAITIC l
SAVE ScTHRtPTY MAID PIE I I HUNT SNACK PACK FRUITS OR I I NESTLES I SAVE 21c ALL VEGETASLE
\Crisco 0i1.., tr 98*J
ASTOR FRUIT THRIFTY MAID CS S WK GOLDEN THRIFTY MAID PORK & SAVE 17c THRIFTY MAID THROWN STUFFED
Cocktail... .4 s *1 00 Corn 6 S I OO Beans 4Ss S I OO Olives 3Js S I OO
THRIFTY MAID SLICED THRIFTY MAID CUT SAVE 21c PUNCH SAVE 17c CRACKIN' GOOO
Beets 6s s l Gr. Beans .. 4 sss S T OO Detergent... is 68* Dixie Pies .. 3Ss *l
Tomatoes N 33* Dog Food 3 33* Disinfectant.... 1 39 Cinnamon Crisp 'ts 47*
VAN CAMP N.O. KIDNEY SEANS OR SWITCH GOLD MEDAL PL & SR NABISCO TOASTETTES
Spanish Rice ... Ss 25* Cat F00d...'. 10 Sm 99* Flour .5 65* Pop-Ups 5s- 39*
VAN CAMP MEXICAN JIM DANDY (5-16. 77c) (10-LS. $1.35) MAXWELL HOUSE SUNSHINE
Chili Beans .... '& 21* Dog Chunks 25. $ 2" Coffee 99* Cnip-A-Roos ... 'is: 59
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday l 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



\ / A I I If" Quantity Rights Reserved
v >: 'V- ./ VALUt A.INN STORES INC -COPYRIGHT-197)
IUNHIIAHSIMB BOM
SOA CHOICIW-O g''g t L*' 1 USOACHO.CiW-D .RAND BONELESS w O M NO UJOA CHO c| Ull OUA lOIN SUCtB
1 E-Z CARVE RIB DELMONICO N. Y. STRIP 1 PORK
ROAST jsgSTEAKS STEAKS } 1 CHOPS
1 *£%} 59 porT $^ 39 I
20 C ~. 30 SAUSAGE I I
I '%£ $ 1 59 | I J^B'f
I | 1 18. | M I |I I
|| W-D BRAND BONELESS SAVE 70c lb. W-D BRAND EURE (10 lb. S4.> USOA CHOICE W O BRAND BEEF WD BRAND GROUND HANM-RAK
Sh'ld Roast..... $ l O9 Gr. Beef 3 $ 1 59 Chuck Steak .. 69* Round Steak ... 99*
FRESH PORK SHOULDER PALMETTO FARMS PIMENTO OSCAR MAYER'S PURE BEEF BORDEN'S CREAM
Steaks . 59 C Cheese ~ 69 c Franks .. ... 79 c Cheese 39 c
FRESH PORK SPARE BORDEN'S ALL FLAVORS KRAFT'S CRACKER BARREL MELLOW STICK COPELAND RANGER SMOKED SLAB (HALF OR WHOLE)
Ribs ... ... 59 c Yogurt .4 S I OO Cheese 69 c Bacon ... 39 c
SWIFT'S PREMIUM CORNISH GAME (IVi-LB. AVG.) FRESH FROZEN TURBOT WHITE FISH SUPERBRAND MILD DAISY STYLE CHEDDAR COPELAND KOUNTY KIST PURE PORK ROLL
Hens ..2 $ 1 69 Fillets .. ... 59 c Cheese ... 79 c Sausage -99*
FREEZER QUEEN ALL VARIETIES MEAT TASTE O'SEA PERCH FISH SUPERBRAND CREAMED COTTAGE TARNOW COOKED OR BAKED
Dinners 2 99 c Fillets .. 59 c Cheese 2 69 c Sli. Ham 59 c
-i jjgfpt*'-- I MUM MU
S _AU VARiniis u. s. No. 1 l CDCCU PIPE f quarters %
I MORTON MEAT ALL PURPOSE \ fflafete FRESH RiPE I SUPERBRAND |
I DINNERS j j Mazarine J
ml* 11 I
I H LB. H WM 1 i MoriYorinD
1 "-O'- BAG FIOBIDATFMBIE f Mte
| |,| MMw | Oranges..lo - 59 c | | 3~* 9fr H |
1 Oranges .. 5 & 49 e Apples ... 5 & 49* Onions ... 3 & 29* \Fish Fillets .. l£ 79*J
.NuLiiiHtniluUN SAVE 10c TAM* O'MALABO* lAVt 10c AMO* LONG CUT TBfNCHIBY ASTOB
- 99* Rutabagas .. 10* Fish Sticks... 69* Potatoes -39* Cauliflower 3ss 89*
Celery 2 29* Drink 3"~ $ r Shrimp 2 *2 Steakettes .. 89' Green Peas 5 l
Carrots 2 23* Margarine ~ 43* Waffles 49* P&za. 89* Babs l.imas.4 as M
9 C Seasoning Rice. % 33* Trash Bags.... S? 79*
Puffi Gelatins ..... 3 35* Syrup ......... X 77' Refill Cups TS? 49* Pitted Meat. 3 & 49*
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.
*y . >r * ,a- Aim ,'i*P fi> >d t

Thumtoy, February W. 'lO7l, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 17



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Fabruary 18,1871

Page 18

%
The UF Board of Student Publications
Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
4
Apply For the Following Positions .
**
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
jr
The Board of Student Publications shall choose
the term of office after full deliberation
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
*

You do not have to be a journalism major.
General Instructions
i
All applications are to be picked up and
returned between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union.
Applicants must return the original plus two
copies of the completed application prior to
4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 19.
"* v
For further information, call Mr. Alan Whiteleather,
3921680



SAVE EVEN MORE DURING A & Ps 10c SALE'
"SUPER-RIGHT" SELECT SLICED "SUPER-RIGHT" WESTERN CENTER CUT SUPER-RIGHT" BULK STICK
BEEF LIVER 39c PORK CHOPS 99c LIVER SAUSAGE.. *. 39c
SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN BEEF "SUPER-RIGHT RIB HALF (Loin Half Lb. 69c) CAP'N. JOHNS FROZEN
CHUCK STEAKS...* 69c PORK LOINS 59c SHRIMP COCKTAIL 3^*l
\ SUPER-RIGHT" FRESHLY (over 2V, lbs.) COPELAND'S ALL MEAT CAPN. JOHNS FROZEN
(ROUND CHUCK.. -79 c SLICED BOLOGNA £ 69c FLOUNDER FILLETS £79<
GRADE A FLA. OR GA. FRESH LEG OR BREAST ALL VARIETIES (Except Ham) SULTANA FROZEN QUICK FROZEN "TURBOT"
' - FRYER QUARTERS. 39c MEAT DINNERS r 39c FISH FILLETS 49c
national Bobemian 6*9t
CHICKEN BEEF OR SPANISH SPECIAL! .jk CHOW MEIN Toes., Feb. 23
Rice-A-Roni ... 3 SI.OO crackers '<£ 49c omwiHrribm.
AT AW! SPECWL! ~l b
Nabisco Ideal 12-ox. Choc. Pinwhoal Cakes or Choc. oj IfflilKriUiik
Sultana & Beans can I j
Martha White Mixes varieties) per pkg.
Bordens Potatoes pkg. //j B
Igj fl Vy Baby Candy Bar //L^
i J Bar Z 4" B
Dry /ff
* A&P Tomat auce can Sandwich
k p Appl can COOKIES
f Monte can 57C
/* Hersheys Chocolate Syrup 5Vi can I Vjjtfgbi
v uy > Cracker per pkg. .. I m % fl
Daily Cat or Dog 15Vi BbP C9b \sOi
i Northern Bathroom Tissue per I Ji jll^S^^& : "^..iril&P >
Doumak Miniature Marshmallows pkg.
00(1 Wyler Potato Soup Mix z Kn.bl.r Town H.uto
Yukon Beverages NR rftAi'KFRS
Gold Medal Pepper can DCTT -oUe
*1 j| Sunnyfield Frozen Waffles pkg. 33C
Ann Page Regular Lg. pkg. t MfR
#/ Ann Page Elbow Macaroni 6 oz. pkg. Be f BP
Cake 6/a pkg.
Bush Beans or All I
Vi 57c Swel Frosting Mixes LT 43c
ALL VARIETIES MORTON'S FROZEN ASST FLAVORS DUNCAN HINES LAYER SPECIAL! JANE PARKER (Orange-Coconut Pies 49c) PROTEIN 21 HARD TO HOLD OR UNSCENTED SPECIAL)
Cream Pies 3 £ SI.OO Cake Mixes '"' 39c Cherry Pies v 53c Hair Spray $.135
Maxwell House <~B9c Bouillon Cubes . 39c Twice As Nice r69c
Crisco Shortening .... 89c WWMtWiltt ||ttfijj||i||M
STAY FREE PREMIUM Vl'J JI (
M MalifiMweeAT Mini-Pads .... ~ 37c 99c Breeze Detergent . Jit#HTW^W#M
Heinz Baby Food .... ' 9c MMMRMBBV Wlsk Lk I |U Heinz Soups 4 27c WMWWtWWWM Fluffy Air 91c Yellow Omons 3 £ 28c
r DETERGENT DETERGENT _ _ _
IMBiiiMiiMf Coldwater Surf ... c 89c Condensed 'W .. *£C 83c BBBBBBBMI
rnTYVmHKvrI o E i E Dove Liquid 63c Lux Liquid 63c
"' K ... .. un riETC eiZ* OIP THIS COUPON!
PLAID STAMP GIFTS make #'' ur^sffg^-e
r M MM|lU||| XTWOBtI KtSmmTKs?ml HDCAiIC 1 With Thl Coupon When You Buy If
pj-l'lntif.lrum mix*mms uKtAmi j sanka instant coffee
iWstwCapsules9Br** iDeodorant tv. 89c * COME TRUE! ZX?
izsi£SJtx£*m*2£ L.e..

Thursday, February 18,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Fjoride Alligator, Thursday, February ,18,1971

Gurney Tells Os Offer
By Black Market
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Edward J. Gurney, (R-Fla.), said
Tuesday he was stopped on a
Saigon street and offered $ 1,250
worth of South Vietnamese
piasters for SSOO in U.S.
currency.
Gurney disclosed the incident
in a report to the Government
Operations Committee, lie said
it occurred in November, 1970,
While he was making an
investigation of black
marketeering and corruption in
Southeast Asia.
Gumey said he was walking in
the main section of Saigon with
his administrative assistant,
Charles Mangers, when they
were stopped by a black
marketeer.
U.S. Must Keep Its
Military MightNixon
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon said Tuesday
that despite the winding down
of the Vietnam War, the United
States must maintain its military
might until it achieves a reliable
arms control agreement with the
Soviet Union.
Speaking to about 2,500
members of the American
Legion, Nixon also said last
springs Allied incursion into
Cambodia was largely
responsible for giving the South
Vietnamese army enough
confidence to undertake its
present operation against the Ho
Chi Minh Trail in Laos.
It was the Presidents first
public statement about the
Laotian operation.
Colley Defense Admits
He Killed Civilians
FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI)
The defense conceded for the
first time Wednesday that Lt.
William L. Calley Jr. shot
Vietnamese civilians at My Lai,
but said he did not feel he was
killing humans.
The admission came in a
four-page statement
summarizing what Calley will
say when he takes the stand in
his own defense, possibly within
the next few days.
The statement said in part:
Lt. Calley ordered Paul
Meadlo, a soldier in his platoon,
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
R 378-5222.*
[MILLER-BROWN
! 42'*2 N W 13th ST.

WorlriT

to shoot and took part himself
in shooting some detained
Vietnamese on two
occasions... Lt. Calley will
testify that he believed he was
following orders to kill every
living thing in the village, the
statement said.
Belfast Youths Pelt
Troops With Rocks
BELFAST, Northern Ireland
(UPI) Youths pelted British
troops with rock-laden snowballs
Tuesday night in a Roman
Catholic area of Belfast and an
explosion and fire wrecked a
filling station on the outskirts of
the city.
A combined police and army
command post in the

I REPEAT OF A SELLOUT
AT MUNTZ STEREO DISCOUNT
Tape & Record Center
8 TRACK CAR TAPE PLAYER
IA B 1
Hjogj MODEL DS-700 SAVE
|| m T | mmunh s£ 00
HURRY! ONLY 100 TO SELL Sorry, no
* i i HIS 10W PMCBI Lay.A-W.yo
NO GIMMICKS on this
NO HIDDEN CHARGES Tremendous Sale
A 1 INCLUDES MUNTZ 1 FULL YEAR STORE GUARANTEE
I Bank Amerlcerd & Maiter Charge Not Accepted For Thw Sale.
I No dealers please LIMIT 2 per customer
DISCOUNT RECORDS A TAPES TOO!
MUNTZ STEREO 319 NW 13th St. £!*!*?*
I 10:00 AM 9:30 RM

wffltfe---
II? \Ur

Bally murphy area came under a
hail of snowballs packed with
big rocks. One youth was
arrested.
Reinforcements Sent
To U.S. Support Base
SAIGON (UPI) U.S.
commanders rushed
reinforcements Wednesday to
outnumbered defenders of an
American base supporting the
South Vietnamese campaign into
Laos. Field reports said
Communist troops were firing
from all sides despite heavy U.S.
air and artillery pressure.
The combat around Fire
Support Base Scotch 10 miles
from the Laotian border was
part of a pattern of heavy
fighting in mountain jungles near

Wrdp Up

the reactivated U.S. airstrip at
Khe Sanh, headquarters for the
9,000-man American support
task force.
Preliminary reports indicated
at least five Americans were
wounded in the battle near Fire
Support Base Scotch and
military sources said a U.S.
Army helicopter was shot down

GOT A SICK LITTLE FOREIGN
r CAR ON YOUR
HANDS?
We've got the parts so you can
make it better, or you can bring
it to us and we'll fix it for you.
YATES AUTO PARTS

near it Wednesday afternoon. No
casualties were reported in the
16th U.S. helicopter loss of the
10-day Laos campaign but five
Americans were killed in the
crash of a U.S. Army Chinook
helicopter near Hue Monday
night in an incident not related
to the South Vietnamese thrust
into Laos.



OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY v I mmm m m / m a^
Prices effective thru Tues.,Fb. 23, 1971 ...
I Our low prices are low everyday of the week-
Monday through Sunday. You save no matter
when you shop and you wont be bothered by
advertisements that say, Limit of 1 with a $5
M I x purchase. You save at Big Star from the minute
AN EXTRA VALUE BUY! ENJOY OUR SHANK PORTION
SMOKED HAM 39 ROUND STEAKS ~9B<| I
SLICED BACON ~39tf c *
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FLORIDA GRADE "A" FRESH
WHOLE FRYERS ~29<| , A El ;" SE I
AN EVERDAY VARIETY FOOD VALUE! FROSTY MORN OR COPELAND I lICSII vUIILL I
ALL-MEAT FRANKS-49<| ~1 8. AIL GRINOS EVEBYO4 J
BIG STAR EXTRA VALUE BUYS! I BAG ZQj, Jg* I
LIBBY'S IN BUTTER SAUCE FROZEN MUSSELMAN'S PURE DELICIOUS H JT W
LIMA KEANS 35 19( APPLE JUia SS
RED PACK BRAND ORCHARD CHARM NATURAL FLAVOR FLA.
UN TOMATOES X 1% GFRUIT JUKE SS 1
INSTANT COFFEE S' 9St CUNG PEACHES £ 25 J .... I
OUR PRIDE BROWN 'N SERVE ASSORTED SELF-RISING I AII ATP |l| 21 111 1121 fill A
FRESH ROLLS Sff 29* TRIANGLE FLOUR -St 37(1 AHUre nan, H a 9 ne I
Cold Duck
SHOP AND SAVE EVERYDAY LOW PRICES! s P .Bur. fm% IQQ
SAVE 50 4ON ECONOMICALLY PRICED SAVE 11 CENTS ON BIG STAR H dry | J f
FAB DETERGENT S!£ 99* TEA BAGS i&T 68*1 **
SAVE 6 i ON ORCHARD CHARM SAVE 6 CENTS ON MORTONS ASSORTED FROZEN
FRUIT COCKTAIL Si, 25< POT PIES tS
FRESH MILK Sit *l O9 ORANGE JUICE *jg
SAVE 10 CENTS ON OUR PRIDE ASSORTED FLAVORS Pack H I
ICECREAM S?n al 59* Budweiser BEER £ $1.1 5U Campbell*
i > WH ITE POtATOES 49c 1 Tomato Soup I
RED ROME COOKING RIPE SALAD r OB
APPLES 45* TOMATOES £2 z 25* I #1 can | I
FIRM LARGE ICEBERG PLUMP RIPE j
WEESm Ltnuct HEAD 18* I Strawberries MNT
THE SUPIRMfIRKET THAT SELLS IT LIKE IT IS!

Th Florida Alligator, Thunday, February 18,1971,

Page 21



The
Florida
Alligator

CONSIDERED FOR TEAM COACH
Carnes May Figure In 72 Olympics

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
It looks like the UF and head
track coach Jimmy Carnes may
figure prominently in the
preparations for next years
Olympic Games.
Carnes, 36, has been
nominated for a coaching
position on the U.S. Olympic
Team in recognition of the
outstanding 45-5 dual meet
record his teams have assembled
in his six years at UF.
CARNES WAS an Olympic
training coach in 1968, and
spent a month in Lake Tahoe
coaching track and field athletes.
He was an assistant coach for
the U.S. National Track Team
which toured Europe last year.
But his coaching duties might
not take him farther than
Gainesville for the next
Olympics since a little Olympic
Training Villiage is being
projected for Gainesville.
WHILE PLANS are still

Swim Team Competing In Georgia

By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writer
With one eye fixed on the SEC Championships
next month, the UF swim team will compete in the
three day Southern Intercollegiate Championships
beginning today in Athens, Ga.
The meet will conclude with the championship
events Saturday.
THE GATORS are expected to receive their
toughest competition from Kansas and Southern
Illinois. The remainder of the seven team field
includes Oklahoma, Vanderbilt, Georgia and
Alabama.
Were not too concerned with the boys locking
ahead to the SEC meet because they know enough
about this meet to overlook it, assistant coach
head Eddie Reese said Wednesday.
We know that there are some tough competitors
in this meet and we cant let up, he said.
GATOR FREESTYLER Bruce Wiffians will be

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JIMMY CARNES
.. Olympic coach
tenative, were working on a
little complex of apartments,
and trying to arrange for jobs in
the area for people who are
interested in coming here to
train, Cames said.
Two of the athletes who
might be relocated in Gainesville
are Villanovas premier runner,
Marty Liquori, and Wisconsins

competing against one of the top sprinters in the
nation, Kim Bolten from Kansas. Williams hold the
UF varsity record in the 100-yard freestyle with a
:46.7.
Steve McDonnell will be pitted against Rob
Dickson from Southern Illinois who is considered
by many to be one of the top butterfly swimmers in
the nation. As a freshman, McDonnell set UF
records in the 100 and 200 yard butterfly.
Bill Domey, Rick Dawson, John Plemons, A1
Whitaker and Mark McKee are entered in the 400
individual medley. This event will open the meet at
7 p.m.
The Gators will swim Gary Chelosky, McDonnell,
Bill Strate and Williams in the 400 medley relay.
In last years meet, Bruce Steiner of Southern
Illinois won the 1,650 freestyle event turning a time
of 16:50. This year the Gators Pete Orschiedt
hopes to better that time. His best time this year has
been a 17:00.

fifth ranked half-miler Mark
Winzenried who Cames got a
good look at last weekend in the
Astrodome Federation Track
and Field Championships in
Houston.
Winzenried scored about half
of meet winner Wisconsins
points and Liquori captured
every event he entered.
ANOTHER RUNNER,
William Mary miler Harold
Michaels was good enough to
beat Liquori in last years
Amateur Athletic Union
championships, and hes
interested in coming down here,
too, Cames said.
The reason for the interest in
training in Gainesville is our
weather is perfect for training.
Athletes like to train as a group,
and the UF can offer them the
facilities for training, plus the
attention our collegiate program
is attracting nationwide, Cames
said.
In fact, Carl Cooper, the

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 18,1971

Page 22

director of the United States
Track and Field Federation says
our program is five years in
advance overall of any track
program in the country, Cames
said.
THE MOST advanced track
program in the country receives
its next test tonight in Orlando
in an indoor meet at the Orlando
Sports Stadium.
The Sports Stadium, which
bills itself as Central Floridas
Half Astrodome, has an 11 lap
clay track which isnt very

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Sports Editor

fast, Carnes said.
But the main purpose of the
meet, whose other entrants are
from high schools and junior
colleges, is to give our boys
who havent run much indoors
some experience, and to
promote indoor track in the
state.
With our track program
where it is now, with people
writing us daily about coming
down here, wed like to be able
to sponsor some indoor meets,
Carnes said.



THATS THE BASKETBALL QUESTION
Coaches: To Stall Or Not To Stall?

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Editor
The subject of stall tactics in
basketball is being bounced
around by many collegiate
basketball coaches.
And among the pros and cons
of its moral legitimacy, UFs
head coach Tommy Bartlett
tends to agree with stall
opponents Adolph Rupp of
Kentucky, John Wooden of
UCLA, Press Maravich of LSU
and Frank McGuire of South
Carolina.
THE PROBLEM comes with
the rules that dont prohibit the
stall, Bartlett said. You cant
blame a coach who uses a stall,
as long as he follows the rules
and tries to win.
But the slowdown type of
game, unappealing to most fans,
has its limitations to the game of
basketball, according to Bartlett.
I think it would ruin the
game if it were done every
game, Bartlett said. But the
coaches today havent done it
enough to get the (NCAA) rules
committee to do something
about it.
COACH McGUIRES
Gamecocks are living examples
of what stall basketball can do
to a team that is ranked
nationally. They have lost three
stall games this season after
earning a spot in the nations top
10.
But then again a ranked team

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TOMMY BARTLETT
... prefers ball control
can withstand the slowdown
tactics. Tennessee State, sixth
ranked in the AP College
Division, rushed by the
Ogelthorpe deep freeze for a 7-4
win Tuesday night.
Personally,,! feel that the
problem should be handled by
the rules committee, Bartlett
said.
BARTLETT, as many
coaches, would like to see a
30-second time limit that would
require the offensive team to
shoot within 30 seconds after
possession. However, the rule
could be suspended in the last
two minutes of the game for last
minute lead protection.
Professional basketball has a
24-second limit. There is also a

30-second limit in international
basketball competition.
The NCAA has been real
hesitant to even talk about it,
Bartlett said. You would have
to try the change before you
could Find out how it would
work.
THE 30-SECOND rule, in
addition to eliminating stalls,
could ease the load of officials
who have to police several time
violations at the same time,
Bartlett said.
For example, the rule that
requires a team to cross
mid-court after possession in 10
seconds would be scratched with
the 30-second standard. The
official would only have to
ensure that the offensive team
would shoot within the
30-second ceiling.
Bartlett said that he would
think about stalling against a
team with an overpowering
advantage. But Ive never done
it yet, he said;
AND RECENTLY, the
Gators, with back-to-back losing
seasons, have run into teams
with overpowering advantages.
We have tried to control the
tempo of the game rather than
stall, Bartlett said. Controlling
the tempo means taking the
good shot even if it takes a
minute to get it.
In a stall, a team, most of
the time, passes up a good shot
and waits for a crip shot.

The Ron da Alligator, Thursday, February 18,1971,

Page 23



Page 24

1, Th Rorid* Alligator. Thursday. Fabruary 18,1971

UF Golf Team
To Open Season
In Winter Haven

A young Gator golf team
opens its 1971 season in Winter
Haven Friday in the Florida
Intercollegiate Meet, expected to
attract over 14 colleges from
around the state.
Coach Buster Bishop will
bring three freshmen, two
juniors and one sophomore with
him to the 54 hole event.
Newcomers Bob Bailey, Steve
Morgan and Gary Koch join the
UF contingent along with
sophomore Woody Blackburn,
and juniors Andy North and
Mike Killian, the Gators team
captain.
LAST YEAR we finished
second in the match to Florida
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Golf Links Are Home
To Suzanne Jackson
By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writer
Suzanne Jackson believes that a womans place in the world is not
in the kitchen but on the golf course.
Miss Jackson, one of the top players on UFs womens golf team,
does think, however, that competition between the male and female
sexes on the golf links is unfair.
I DONT think that women will ever be able to compete with men
in a tournament on an equal basis, Miss Jackson said, simply
because of the physical aspects.
I do hope that golf will become more popular among women, she
said. More women would be attracted to professional golf if they
offered more money on the tour.
The rewards for winning a tournament on the womens pro circuit
are far less than the riches received for capturing a title on the mens
pro tour.
As for Miss Jackson, she will pass up the career of a pro golfer for
another occupation linked to the sport.
1 WANT TO be affiliated with golf in some way, even if its
working for a golf magazine, she said.
The LaGrange, Ga. freshman has played with many of the lady pro
golfers and received a great deal of encouragement from them. They
were also quite helpful in correcting flaws in her game.
Mile playing in the Lady Carling Open, Kathy Whitworth helped
me with my game, both in execution and psychology, Miss Jackson
said.
MARY RYAN, coach of the womens golf team, has high praise for
her team.
Suzanne is a bright player and has a great all-around game. She
was having some trouble hitting th? baJU solidly just before the
Christmas break, but went home and straightened it all out.
The womens golf team currently has a record of 1-1. In. their
victory against Rollins, Miss Jackson captured her match posting a
score of 79. In their other match against Miami-Dade Jr. College, she
lost her individual match, shooting an 83.
Miss Jackson anticipates excellent competition when her team
meets other colleges in the state in the Florida State Collegiate
tournament. Following that tournament, the team will travel to
Georgia to participate in the National Collegiate tournament.
I think we have a real good chance to finish high in both of the
tournaments, Miss Jackson said.

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BUSTER BISHOP
... 'confident'
State University, Bishop said
Wednesday. We will nail them
to the wall this time.
The Invitation will have 36
holes played Friday, with the
low four players scores counted
towards the team total. The
two-day event will close with 18
holes Saturday.
I dont like the scoring in the
match, Bishop said. Team
scores will be taken by the low
four from each team every 18
holes. The low four the first day
usually composes the team
scores the entire tournament.
We have a good young team
and I am very confident this
year, Bishop said.

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