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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
List Os Suspected Drug Users Destroyed

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
At least one drug user list has been compiled, prepared
and destroyed.
According to Student Senator Bill Watson
(Hume-Graham) the action resulted from a verbal and
emotional student out-cry that climaxed in the office of
David West, coordinator for student conduct.
GADDUM SECTION of Hume had been listed.
The students were very disturbed. They were
complaining, Watson said.
At the time I met with them, Watson continued,

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY
Vol. 63, No. 82 University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, February 12, 1971

LAOTIAN INVOLVEMENT
'News Blackout Cited
At SMC Plaza Rally

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Assignments Editor
In the wake of
announcements of U.S. troop
involvement in Laos, the SMC
sponsored an anti-war rally in
the Plaza of the Americas at
noon Thursday before an
estimated crowd of about 80.
Wayne Heiber, spokesman for
the recently chartered campus
organization read from a United
Press International (UPI) press
release as passersby stopped to
listen.
HEIBER ATTRIBUTED
minimal public protest against
expansion of the Southeast
Asian war to a news blackout.
WAYNE HEIBER
... spokesman for SMC

He claimed reports from UPI
and the Associated Press
conflicted in their treatment of
military activity. He also blasted
The Alligator for poor coverage
of the Laotian situation.
The national SMC is
sponsoring a nationwide student
antiwar conference to be held in
Washington, D.C. on Feb. 19-21,
Heiber said. The Gainesville SMC
is sending a delegation to the
conference.
Heiber asked that those
interested in going should attend
Sunday nights SMC meeting to
be held in the Reitz Union
where transportation would be
discussed.
REPRESENTATIVE FROM
Veterans for Peace spoke on the
Winter Soldier Investigation
held in Detroit, this past Jan. 31
Feb. 2. The investigation
involved the testimony of about
100 veterans of the Vietnam war
on alleged incidents.
According to a Vietnam
Veterans against the War
spokesman, My Lai is not an
isolated incident. He said
future testimony in various cities
in the nation including
Gainesville will be held.
As students walked through
the Plaza selling copies of The
Eye, a Gainesville off-campus
newspaper, Erin Todd spoke on
the Gainesville Research
Collective (GRC). According to
Todd, the function of the GRC
will be doing research on the
research being done for various
defense projects.
ACCORDING TO SMC
coordinator Lynne Edelman,
research on defoliants is being
performed at the UF in
conjunction with the College of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.
We have a legal right to get
the war machine off campus,'"

they were about to make an attempt to take it to court.
But we got together and went over to West's office to
plead with him to destroy the list after receiving it. (Tlfe
list was still in the hands of Hume housing officials.
THE ONLY ASSURANCE that West would give the
group, according to Watson, was that the list would not be
used against the individuals unless they had a serious
drug problem.
The students, unsatisfied by West's response, queried
him further but could not get any assurance that the list
wouldnt eventually end up in the hands of federal
authorities.
Any court, Watson said, could subpoena the list

Miss Edelman said. She said we
should convert the ROTC
building to a day care center.
Around the state, reaction to
U.S. involvement in Laos was
subdued. A peaceful rally
drawing an estimated 400 to 500
people was held at the
University of South Florida
according to Mary Ellen Moore,
editor-in-chief of the USF
Oracle.
At Florida State University,
an estimated 200 people
attended an SMC rally
Wednesday according to FSU
Flambeau managing editor. He
attributed the small turnout to
cold weather and controversy
concerning the firing of 26 FSU
employes.

By ROBERT ROTHMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Tom Clark said Thursday
possession of marijuana was a
personal crime as is gambling
and prostitution and such
actions between consenting
adults should not be a crime.
Justice Clark made the
comments held at a press
conference held in Tigert Hall
Thursday. After being
introduced by Julius R. Julin,
dean of the College of Law,
Clark immediately threw the
conference open to questions.
ASKED IF he thinks there is a
need for judicial reform, Clark
answered that there is a need for
modernization, a greater use of
data processing equipment and
more use of cross disciplines. He
said he felt such changes would
result in securing quicker

Clark Views Possession Law

after it was given to West. This is placing the i aJent in a
position where his name can be listed on totally
unfounded, unknowledgeable evidence.
AS AN ALTERNATIVE, Watson began preparation of
a resolution, to be submitted to the Student Senate
condemning the university drug policy of listing
suspected users.
But Watson removed the bill himself, stating at the
time, It needed further study.
The truth was that there was no more need for the
(SEE'POLICY,' PAGE 3)

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TERRY WALTERS
SOFTNESS
What is softness? To Vivian Synder, lUC, softness is a young
kitten. Softness, however, is not a kitten's extended claws. Vivian's
kitten has taken interest in the photographer and is about to
"scratch" its way over to get a better look.

. .v '>' vV,
v-si&s f YIHUKm
/->
JUSTICE TOM CLARK
... holds press conference
disposition of cases. He
suggested a 90 day limit for
criminal cases.
Another question posed was
how he would handle the
disruption of proceedings in a
courtroom by the defendants.

Justice Clark responded that
prior to the trial, the judge
should meet with the lawyers to
set the format and the expected
behavior of the defendants
during the trial.
Disruption is not a
recognized defense in trials, the
court has to have decorum in its
operations, Clark said.
CLARK ALSO expressed
hope that the lawyers would
control the behavior of their
clients during the trial.
The questions then turned to
the penalties imposed for
possession of marijuana. Clark
said this is a personal crime, as
is gambling and prostitution. He
said he felt that such actions
between consenting adults
should not be a crime, and that
he would be willing to test the
abolition of such crimes on an
experimental basis.
(SEE 'CLARK/ PAGE 3)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, february 12, 1971

S
*
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**

I






Conservation 7O
) j
From Swamps
To Capitol

By ALAN SANDLER
Alligator Correspondent
} and
JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
I
The fight to save our environment was brought out of
the swamps and streams and into the political arena when
Floridas Conservation 70s Inc. (C-70s), the nations first
conservation lobby group, was formed a little over one
year ago.
Until then, it was up to the bird-watchers and garden
clubbers to holler when they came across pollution and
environmental degradation, but now C-70s is the group
for political activism And \\ effective activism at that.
C-70S CONST' TS of a group of citizens concerned
about obtaining a quality environment in Florida. Their
goal is to support and propose sound legislation that will
protect Floridas existing environment and promote
future environmental quality.
For the first time in our nations history, a group of
citizens have banded together to save their environment
from the exploiting interests that have dictated
environmental policy in the past.
To do this, all the people behind C-70s
conservationists, housewives, legislators, scientists,
businessmen sportsmen contribute their talent and
support.
IN THEIR FIRST year of operation, with the help of
the little people in the state, as well as a few dedicated
legislators, C-70s established an incredible track record by
passing 41 of their 55 bill package of environmental
legislation.
Among these bills are: provisions for an environmental
education coordinator, an environmental inventory, the
nations toughest oil spill law, strong protection of the
alligator, and controls on the use of harmful pesticides.
Mr. Lyman Rogers, president of C-70s says the bills
will stand as a national example, and that the 1970
session was the beginning of a new era of responsiveness
to the public interest, among state lawmakers.
JUST RECENTLY, C-70s has been influential in halting
the construction of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal and

COMPRAR CASA
puede resultar
* MAS. BARATO QUE
PAGAR ALQUILER
I nformese con
COOUDGE DAVIS REALTY
373-2200
Pregunte por George Daniles, (Assoc.)
Despues de las 7 p.m.: 373-1214
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements anc! to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
, several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

rrf

stopping the planned use of the chemical Mirex in North
Florida for control of fire ants.
In the upcoming legislative session, C-70s intends to
match the gains of 1970. This year the emphasis will
include funding of last years legislation, and proposing
fewer new bills. C-70s will either sponsor or support
legislation in the following areas:
Research of pesticides in relation to the brown
pelican
Adequate funding for the environmental education
act, the environmental inventory, and for aquatic weed
research and control
Abolition of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal Authority
Study and overhaul of the existing drainage district
statutes
Solid waste disposal legislation
Study of submerged lands
C-70s is a non-profit corporation that is supported
entirely by donations. It needs your help and support.

Tree Planted For Tu Bi Shevat

By JAN GODOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Its not just a single tree, but
the many you put in the
ground, Dr. Robert Stanley,
forestry professor told a small
group gathered on the Reitz
Union Lawn to celebrate Tu Bi
Shevat, the Jewish Arbor Day
Tuesday afternoon.
The people were there from
Hill el, the Jewish Student
Center, and the Environmental
Action Group to plant a tree in
comemoration of the holiday

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and to show their concern for
the environment.
MENTIONING THE large,
almost barren expanse of land at
the lower part of the slope, Dr.
Stanley said, this is a place to
put trees.
Rabbi Michael Monson spoke
about the religious aspect of the
holiday, saying that the first
chapter of Genesis mentions
ecology, The earth brought
forth vegetation, plants ~. and
trees bearing fruit... each
according to its kind. And God
saw that it was good.
He then helped to throw some

WHAT YOU CAN DO:
The success of C-70s in its first year is proof that
concerned citizens can truly direct the course of local
government. But it takes mow/ to carry on the
struggle. Unfortunately, ecologists havent yet bred a
money tree. Local conservation groups have launched a
fund-raising and education drive for C-70s. Local
merchants are contributing environmentally safe
products to this project. Buy a C-70s bumper sticker
and display it during the 1971 legislative session.
Bumper sticker: und further information can be
obtained fro l the Environmental Action Group, 323
Reitz Union, phone 392-1635.

dirt on the Jerusalem thorn tree
that Dr. Carl Whitcomb of the
Department of Ornamental
Horticulture provided to plant.
Oranges, representing the fruit
of trees, provided by
Servomation, were given to
those watching the ceremony.
Stanley also talked about a
program currently in progress in
Israel. Students may have a tree
planted in their name in Israel
by sending $2.50 to Harry
Ein.se berg', c/o Hill el
Foundation, 16 N.W. 18 Street,
Gainesville, 32601.



ACLU May Review Drug Policy

bill, Watson said. In the end, we got what we wanted.
Following their meeting with West, Watson had
approached the Hume administrator, and asked him not
to turn over the list.
According to Watson, Hume administrator Ed
Kormanyos decided not to give it to West, and told me
he would not turn in a list until student affairs had
clarified the meaning of the word suspicion. Only then
would he compile names and only those substantiated
by definite evidence of drug use.
THE ONLY WAY a student should ever be listed,
Watson said, if hes been caught red-handed.
Watson warned though, that students who had been
busted in the past might be naturally suspected and

CLARK ...

jj^OMPAGEO^JJ
Justice Clark also said he felt
federal judges should pay more
attention to what happens to a
defendant after he leaves the
courtroom. He said that as a
result of the judges not finding
out what happens to these
defendants, there is a lack of
knowledge as to whether the
Kinstler To Speak
At Santa Fe Gym
By KATHY ROBERTS
and
JANET OLES
Alligator Staff Writan
Attorney William Kunstler
will speak at 8 tonight at the
Santa Fe Gym to help the
Gainesville Defense Fund raise
money.
The Defense Fund is an
organization attempting to raise
money to establish a bond
collective according to
spokesman for the group, Rafeal
Betanourt.
THIS SEEMS like the only
solution to the problems with
area jails, commented (me
organizer. The inequities of the
legal system which result in
many persons rotting in jail
while awaiting trail will be met
with the money collected.
Receiving SSOO for his speech,
Kunstler will talk about his most
recent cases and legal
experiences. He is presently
defending Angela Davis, tire
Kent State twenty five and the
Berrigans of the East Coast
Conspiracy.
The Santa Fe Gym is located
at 1001 S.E. 12th St., and those
people needing rides can go to
the Southern Leather Company
at 112 W. University Ave. at 7
pjTL
Tickets for Kunstlers speech
are sl, and fifty cents for
Saturdays concert. They can be
obtained at the Plaza of the
Americas, the Information
Booth (across from the Hub)
and at the door.
II I LOVE J
Y PUSSYWILLOW Jf

sentence imposed on the
offender served its intended
purpose.
CLARK SPOKE about a
computer system being set up in
Davis, California which will
provide judges with a basis for
which their sentences can be
made. It will provide knowledge
as to what happened to previous
offenders after different types of
sentences were given.
Also mentioned by Clark were
halfway houses. These are
houses to which the offender
would report each night. During
the day, he would be free to
hold a job and more or less be
on his own.
Clark felt this was favorable
to sending first time offenders to
penitentiaries, which he refered
to as graduate schools of
crime. Offenders sent to them
are forced to live with hardened

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their names could be sent down on strong suspicion.
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has also
considered reviewing the drug memos legality. Henry
Solares, vice president of the student body, said, I spoke
to Lou Tally, a law student involved in the ACLU, who
told me they were interested in reviewing the matter.
BEFORE THE LIST was destroyed, Watson said,
we were considering going to court, and we felt the
ACLU could lend us some assistance.
I told West that a list, which could get into the wrong
hands could ruin a persons life. I threatened to take the
matter to court. What the hell can they do with a list of
suspected users, unsupported by evidence?
According to Watson, West told the students that the
purpose of the list is not to get the experimenter, but
to try to help the habitual user. I didnt believe him,

criminals whose influence affects
these first time offenders, Clark
said.
The conference closed with a
question about the use of state
and federal loyalty oaths. Clark
said he presently feels they have
no material effect on employees.
This is a change from die time
when he was attorney general
and helped write some of these
oaths.
Justice Clark will be giving
seminars on Legal Ethics and
lecturing on Law in the
Courts during his time here. His
visit to UF will continue until
Feb. 26 and he will return the
week of May 9.
The Distinguished Visiting
Professor program of which
Justice Clark is a part is
sponsored by the Alumni
Association and the College of
Law.

Watson saici, but he assured us the whole suspicion thing
would be clarified. The further study Watson mentioned,
at the time of the resolutions removal, would be to see
what needed to be done, when and if the drug memo was
clarified.
AT PRESENT Watson is organizing an ad-hoc
committee composed of senators and interested students ip
investigate the entire drug policy situation, and eventually
to formulate a resolution to be introduced on the senate
floor.
I hope to have West appear before the Committee to
explain UF drug policy. West will be at Hume next
Tuesday evening.
Watson concluded, One thing Ill assure you, we will
not relax the pressure until present dormitory drug policy
at UF is changed.

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Friday, February 12,1071, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

. The Florida Alligator. Friday., February 12, 1971

Uhlfelder Responds To Faculty Poll

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first in a three-part series
dealing with the results of a
faculty poll sponsored by the
UF Self Study Office.
By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfclder has concentrated his
response to the results of a
faculty poll sponsored by the
UF Self-Study Office on two
specific questions, one
concerning departmentalized
testing and the other involving
student participation in
department, college, and
university decisions.
The results of the Self Study
Offices poll were released on
January 30, and included
responses from 1242 UF faculty
members on 122 statements
relating to the purposes of
education in general and specific
aspects of UF policy. These
results will be used to establish
goals and policy to present to
the Southern Association of
Colleges and Universities which
is responsible for accrediting UF

VAO Aids
Veterans
In Distress
By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Writer
Veterans in economic,
academic or personal distress can
seek help at the Veterans
Affairs Office (VAO).
The VAO, under the direction
of Dick Gentry, a fulltime
student employe, has been in
operation since the beginning of
the quarter.
J.T. Hennessey, assistant to
the vice president of Student
Affairs, said the office was
organized to handle special
problems of veterans and to
help them become aware of all
the benefits they have.
SOME OF ITS functions
include payment through
the Veterans Administration for
those veterans who are in need
of tutoring. As much as SSO a
month can be provided. Funds
can be advanced to the veteran
through Financial Aid on a short
or long-term loan, as many
tutors are unwilling to work on
the promise of payment.
Veterans who come to the
office for assistance in personal
affairs may be helped there or
referred to vocational
counselors, psychologists or
medical professionals,
depending on their needs.
Veterans needing help should
contact Dick Gentry in Room
123 Tigert Hall or call 392-1265.
, \

MORTARBOARD
ACADEMIC
ADVISEMENT
Weaver and
Broward Lobbies
Monday Night
Feb 15 at 10 PM

every ten years. The poll is now
being studied by 80 different
committees from various areas
and disciplines around the
campus.
UHLFLEDER REACTED
favorably to the faculty answer
to the statement Machine Machinescored
scored Machinescored examinations fail to
reward the verbally oriented
mind in comparison with
quantitative and memory
orientations. Sixty-one per cent
of the questionaires agreed with
this statement and 19 per cent
opposed it. We are going to
continue to push for elimination
of standardized testing, said
Uhlfelder, and added that he felt
the departmentalized tests were
not a true measure of
proficiency.
Students should have greater
responsibility in department,
college and university
educational decisions proved to
be an area of disagreement
between the SG president and
the faculty members who
returned their reactions, of
which 28 per cent agreed and 64

.\ lk.OcA- V.V v C/A *> * *v\ >/'
>i*

1 ANALYSIS |I
per cent dissented.
Professors dont have much
faith in students. Its sort of an
elitist effort on the part of the
faculty, Uhlfelder stated, they
should accept a students
opinion with as much respect as
they would anyone elses.
THE POLL revealed heavy
faculty opposition to quota
systems for minority group
students to insure a proportinate
amount of integration. I think
we almost have to discriminate
to get more people from
minority groups here, Uhlfelder
said.
Weve treated one group of
people unfairly for so many
years, he continued, that
there should be more efforts to
recruit these people, especially
to make up for a problem which

has been in existence for so
long.
By a count of 28 per cent to
63 per cent, those polled
rejected the idea that
promotion and tenure should
be based largely on effectiveness
in teaching rather than on
research and scholarly
production.
THE SG president rebutted:
Weve got to get away from this
publish or perish idea, and
start looking at the classroom.
The most important quantity of a
professor is being able to teach
and to allow students to get
something out of his class.
The professors also favored
making UF more prominent as a
graduate, professional and upper
division university by 77 per
cent for and 13 per cent against.
Uhlfelder dismissed this issue by
stating that most professors
would agree with the satement
because there is more money in
upper division and graduate
work. In a more serious vein,
Uhlfelder expressed his belief
that a university benefits from

strong undergraduate program,
and that a basic foundation for
graduate education had to be
provided.
Uhlfelder confessed that the
majority of the questions in the
poll did not effect SG, but felt
that many of the results come
out adversely to the way
students feel.
Were going to do what we
feel the students want us to do,
said Uhlfelder of his
administration, not what the
professors want us to do,
because they (the faculty) differ,
I feel, from legitimate student
views.

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Shuler Denies Pressure In Rehiring

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Chief Audie Shuler of the
University Police Department
denied that outside pressure
from the press was involved in a
recent controversy over students
being dismissed from their jobs
as checkpoint guards.
Shuler said it was decided
about two weeks after the
beginning of this quarter to hire
permanent personnel and
compare their performance with
that of students.
THE MAIN reason for hiring
students in the first place was to
get uniformed police officers off
the checkpoints to free them for
other duties, not to provide
students with part time jobs.
Also it was thought that it
would be better public relations
not to have policemen at
entrances to the university to
greet visitors Shuler said.
It was decided last quarter to
try using students at the
checkpoints on a trial basis.
A PROBLEM of unmanned
checkpoints came up during
exam week and also at the
beginning of the quarter.
Shuler said there was a heavy
turnover of students on the jobs.
According to Shuler a lot of
knowledge is necessary for the
job. Those that man the
checkpoints need to know the
locations of all the buildings on
campus, where to find certain
people, and the parking
regulations.
BECAUSE OF the difficulty
of scheduling with students, it
was decided to use permanent
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personnel at two of the four
checkpoints and compare the
performances of students and
full time help.
The three students who were
replaced were told they would

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be given the first choice of
working if any vacancies
developed.
Shuler said he was not aware
the two women hired were
relatives of one of the campus

REPEAT OF A SELLOUT!

policemen until after they were
liired.
He said the two women were
qualified and they probably
heard jobs would be available
from someone in the department

\ p j} (' > v1 i f Ifif* v t n i ?L\. -w
Friday, February 12, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

and applied for the jobs at the
Personnel Office in the Hub.
Shuler said the only purpose
of hiring permanent personnel
was to try and do the best job
possible for the university.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12, 1971

Valentines Change Through Years

B/TERRY VENTO
Alligator Writer
Have you ever noticed how
your manner of celebrating
Valentines Day changes as you
get older?
As a child you spent entire
afternoons addressing bundles of
little cards for all your
classmates. In the classroom, a
special box, decorated in red and
white, overflowed with an
abundance of messages. Maybe if
you had a secret admirer youd
be gifted with a little box of
candy.
AS THE YEARS skipped by
and you approached your teens,
self-consciousness and shyness of
the opposite sex dwindled your
valentine giving to a bare
minimum. You were perfectly
contented with eating the candy
hearts with messages on them,
and if you were really brave, you
sent a card anonymously.
Soon your fears began to
subside, and in your middle teens
you found a few persons you
really cared about. Perhaps you
sent a few cards and made
homemade surprises for those
special few.
Now youre in college. You
may have many you like to date,
just one special someone or a
new spouse. You still give
valentines and still eat candy
hearts, but sometimes a single
rose or a romantic candlelight
dinner for two can say all thats
needed. The message is conveyed
no matter what your style,
Valentines Day is a time for
love.
JUST HOW DID this
association of Valentines Day
with love come about?
There are various theories
about how the name of
Valentine came to be connected
with the day on which lovers
send tokens to one another, said
George W. Douglas, author of
The American Book of Days.
One is based on the belief
throughout Europe during the
Middle Ages that birds began to
mate on Feb. 14.
THOSE WHO DO not think
that the old opinion about the
mating of birds is sufficient to
explain the connection between
St. Valentine and the lovers
suggest the association grew out
of the similarity between the
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Norman word galantin
meaning a lover of women, and
the name of the saint. They
think that Galantins Day with
the initial g frequently
pronounced as v, led to
confusion in the popular mind.
When the custom of sending
Valentines to loved ones reached
great proportions and the post
offices were established, the mail

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Class rings
Watch repair
Jewelry repair
1802 West University Ave.
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2 blocks from Hub 373-1025

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was crowded with the sweet
messages every year.
The stores o r fered them in
various designs and at various
prices. Comic valentines, some
of which were coarse and vulgar,
could be purchased for a cent.
In the early part of the present
century the Chicago post office
rejected 25,000 such on the
ground that they were not fit to
be carried through the mail.
By the first third of the

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of sending valentines was
observed chiefly by children and

PUBLIC NOTICE
AN RCA QUADRASONIC SYSTEM
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for children.
Children must be getting older
even' year.



' By Carol Brady_
ATLANTA REVISITED: Rose Community Center presents films
of the Atlanta Pop Festival plus rock and country sounds by
Celebration and Brotherhood Saturday night at 8 p.m. in the
University Auditorium. Donation is 50 cents.
MORTAR BOARD: Mortar Board is sponsoring academic
advisement for early registration. Representatives will be present
through Feb. 15 at 10 p.m. in the lobbies of Weaver and Broward
Halls.
SWAMI ON RYE: Krishna House is now offering delicious
prasadam three times daily (7 a.m., noon, and 7 p.m.) at 1915 NW
2nd Ave. Everyone is invited.
WILLY BOY IS HERE: William Kunstler will speak tonight, 8 p.m.
at Santa Fe Jr. College. Music will follow by RGF and Mudcrutch.
BAHAI RAP: Those interested in finding out more about the
Bahai Faith should attend a meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. at 22 NW
21st St.
WAR ON WAR: There will be a meeting of the Student
Mobilization Committee To End the War Sunday at 7 p.m. in Union
Room 346.
AROUND THE WORLD: CIO International Films tonight in the
Union Auditorium at 8 p.m. No charge. Catch them Saturday night at
the Flagler Inn for 50 cents at 9 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE: Campus Crusade for Christ is holding College
Life Sunday night at 9:13 p.m. in the Rawlings rec room. Their
Leadership Training Class will be held tonight at 7 p.m. on the third
floor of the Union.
STAMP-IN: Environmental Action Group needs people to help
stamp Conservation 70s stickers. Come by the office tonight from 7
p.m. on and stamp!
BIBLE SPEAKER: Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship will present
George Hunsberger tonight at 7 p.m. in room 349 of the Union. A
party follows at the Gainesville Community Church.
FLICK OUT!: Turn in all films for display in the Plaza before Feb.
28 to Room 310A, Union, or call 392-1619.
NO QUACKS HERE: A lecture on Ethical and Moral Problems in
Medicine will be held Sunday night at 7:30 p.m. in the Catholic
Student Center Lounge.
MUSIC: UFs Department of Music is sponsoring its third annual
Florida Jazz Festival Saturday, February 13, in the P.K. Yonge High
School Auditorium.
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and for your convenience- BankAmericard or master charge

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Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12,1971

he desire for safety stands against every
SVi great and noble enterprise.
EDITORIAL
Bring Back
The Rack
The Alligator is beginning to see the light about prison
reform.
At first, we were for it. We saw that a change in our penal
system was necessary. The prisons were not doing the job.
There were too many two-time, three-time losers rotting
away. They were not being rehabilitated. And people were
leaving prison with more knowledge about crime than they
had when they entered.
We do not have to be hit over the head.
Mack S. Futch, the first assistant state attorney from
Gainesville, has shown us the error in our ways.
Recently, Mr. Futch wrote this letter to Time Magazine:
Sir: The Shame of the Prisons is another example of
the overwhelming permissiveness that pervades our entire
society today. As a prosecutor whose jurisdiction includes
the two main branches of the state prison system, I feel
somewhat qualified to take issue with the ridiculous
statements in your article.
If there is any deficiency in our penal system it is that
too few criminals are locked up and that when they are
imprisoned, they are treated with far too much
consideration for the confinement to be a punishment.
You tell them, Mr. Futch!
At first glance, we thought Mr. Futch to be a heartless
individual, particularly after the death last fall of an inmate
at the Alachua County jail, the recent death of an inmate at.
the jail in Dade County, and the generally poor condition of
the countrys jails and prisons.
But after much deliberation, we realize the man is right.
We are coddling our prisoners. By their crimes, these people
have shown that they do not deserve to be treated as human
beings.
Therefore, we recommend the following:
Bring back the rack.
Put torches on the walls.
Hire some ex-Gestapo members as interrogators and
prison guards.
While they are at it, quit coddling the people now
confined to insane asylums. Chain em to their beds.
We realize these measures appear a little harsh. But harsh
measures are needed. You cannot make an omelet without
breaking a few eggs. Mack Futch can tell you that.
. i
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k:V'" ' - 'P. I '<
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THe
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

.Pandora
i FLUTED
Some Early Greening
I I By JOHN PARKER^J====d

Its book review time, kiddies.
The book, Greening of
America by Charles Reich, a
Yale law professor, may be the
most important book to come
along in the last few years
(forgive my review rese).
I cant take credit for
discovering it. It was assigned in
a course. Besides, it has been on
the best seller list for awhile.
What brings it to mind right
now is the fact that there were
all of 50 people yesterday at a
Laos rally in the Plaza.
WHY?
When Cambodia was lowered
on us last year we went into the
streets and got clubbed and shot.
Laos arrives with all the
double talk and political
smellines:* of one more fiasco
and we gather 50 together to
lament. And most of them were
bored to tears.
I WAS.
Sorry, but thats the result of
several years of trying to move a
wall with repeated blows of ones
forehead.
Which brings me to Reichs
book. He calls this weariness of
confrontation Conciousness
III. It is a description of a .new
life style, a new set of values.
IT REJECTS Conciousness 11,
the organization-type man who
verbalizes reform and liberalism,
but who lives the life of a
Madison Avenue automation. It
further rejects Conciousness I
the early traditional American
values which dictate that
nothing but hard work and fear
of God are worthy values.
BUT NEITHER does Con 111
espouse confrontation. As a
matter of fact, it points out that
confrontation is bound to end in
frustration.
What Con 111 does say is to
avoid, the establishment
i ]A? aim v.. ><.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

% rjr
whenever you can. Decide your
own values and actuate them as
best you can. Be with your own,
live as you may, fight the system
when feasible or worthwhile, but
mostly just avoid hassles.
It is a positive reaction to the
sickness of this society, rather
than the negativism of
confrontation.
JUST WHAT is the sickness of
the society? It is all part of the
same seamless web.
The corporate state as
Reich calls it, has no need for
human beings, just consumers.
The society creates the needs in
consumers through their various
mass media, and then they fulfill
those needs. Poverty, the war,
pollution, are all part of this
never-ending struggle to fulfill
the needs that we create in our
consumers.
Consumption as away of life
had to fail, according to Reich,
because it really doesnt do what
it is supposed to do. The GTO
that is supposed to bring sex and
love and happiness, in reality
brings an overpowered,
under-engineered financial
burden. Result: frustration.
- -* . *y\ Ivfd*J: v' j f \j f(
i* :>jr, b, ts

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

SO THEN you confront the
corporate state, try to make.it
responsive, make it stop creating
horror, stop building things
people dont really want. And it
doesnt stop. It has momentum,
the sanction of law to protect
itself. Result: frustration.
The product, says Reich, is
Con 111. You can play it any way
you want. You can be an IBM
systems analyst and a flaming
radical at the same time. The
reason is that since your values
arent geared toward blatant
consumption, you dont feel the
ambition to advance. You LIKE
being a systems analyst and a
flaming radical at the same time.
OR YOU can go the
commune route and simply leave
the corporate state.
Or you can get into activities
in places where others like you
are working; welfare, legal aid,
underground press.
But the main thing about Con
HI is that it is self-sustaining. It
satisfies the basic human need
for happiness and fulfillment. It
sees the direct results of its
efforts, unlike confrontation
which sees only an unchanging
machine.
So, do Con 111, Reich says,
and the basic beauty of it will
attract others. Finally the
culture will be so strong that the
institutions which govern it will
have to change and adapt.
YOU CAN see it already in
some ways. Marijuana laws are
virtually ignored. Opting out of
the split level middle class is no
longer avant garde. The
Institution is showing signs of
cracking down on polluters.
That may be a little too happy
for some die-hard cynics to buy,
but lets fact it.
Dunbar said it best: What
else is there?
' (;**>.*
*l f \t.fS t V
* l i A *, j ;



In Defense Os Uffie

By BRUCE ALPER
Alligator Columnist
The complaint filed recently
with the Honor Court by the
Young Americans for Freedom
(YAF) which charged that
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder misappropriated
student funds by going beyond
the scope of his authority in
using a special presidential fund
to pay the $66.41 deficit of the
Student Mobilization Committee
(SMC) has not the least basis in
fact, legal or otherwise.
Uhlfelder was unquestionably
correct when he stated:
Unfortunately, I think the
whole issue is a political, rather
than a legal, argument.
YAF is not in favor of SMC
and what it stands for. Naturally
it has chosen this issue merely as
a means to express its
disapproval of SMC and Mr.
Uhlfelders own personal foreign
policy orientation.
Now I myself do not believe
Uhlfelder acted properly in
paying the SMC deficit. I do not
believe that such an
organization, when it faces
financial distress and being
basically politically oriented,
should receive student funds.
Clearly, Uhlfelders own

Vets
EDITOR:
The Alligator for Monday,
February 1, 1971 contained an
article about the new television
equipment which has been
obtained by the UPD for the
filming of illegal campus
disorders. In the article it was
implied that Chief Shuler said
that the Veterans for Peace were
responsible for the student
takeover of Walker Auditorium
during the Kent State Strike last
May.
As an example he cited the
takeover of Walker Auditorium
(now Carlton Auditorium) by
the Veterans for Peace after the
Kent State disruptions last
spring.
The statement is erroneous in
respects: (1) I personally
spoke with Chief Shuler shortly
after I read the article and he
reassured me that he had not
made reference to the Veterans
for Peace in such a context. (2)
The true facts are that the VFP
has never participated in nor
advocated acts against university
property or forcible disruption
of university functions. We did
urge students to boycott their
classes as a symbol of solidarity
with those who are sick of and
sickened by the war in Southeast
Asia. We did not attempt to
forcibly prevent those who
wished to attend their classes
from doing so nor did we
attempt to prevent those classes
from being held. In regard to the
Walker Auditorium incident in
particular, two of our members
were instrumental in persuading
the people who had captured it
that the best course of action for
them would be to leave before
the 7 p.m. deadline that had

personal prejudices and
predilections led him to render
SMC the necessary financial
assistance. Beyond this, we must
recognize his own intense and
sincere concern that any student
organization, when it faces
financial problems, should not
ipso facto have to lose its
charter. In fact, SMCs financial
problem was only nominal. In
retrospect, anyone who knows
Uhlfelders feelings on various
issues and problems, as I do,
knows that he is a most warm,
sympathetic and intensly honest
human being.
After considering all of these
factors and then to infer or even
to state directly that by his
action Uhlfelder has violated
the intent of the student body
constitution as charged by
Mike Carr, President of YAF,

READERS FORUM

been set by President OConnell.
I have no idea where Miss
Jedrusiak became so ill-informed
and I find it distressing that
someone on your staff would be
so careless in the use of
damaging statements of. this
kind. I must insist on behalf of
the Veterans for Peace that some
sort of retraction be made. I
have tried to contact Miss
Jedrusiak through your offices
and have had no success. I hope
that we may avoid this type of
problem in the future.
DAVID E. CHANDLER
Veteran for Peace
Hart's Hair
EDITOR:
It has just come to my
attention that one of my
students, Mr. Hart, is the same
Ralph Hart who has been kicked
off the tennis team because he
refused to get his hair cut an
inch or two shorter. In my
judgment, based on his
performance during sixteen
weeks in my classroom, Mr. Hart
is a fine young man and a
student of good quality. Since
his stand is more praiseworthy
than the coaches recent
authoritarian pattern of
behavior, I think the student
body and the faculty should
take action on his behalf.
This episode is unfortunately
not an isolated one. Remember
the student who was not allowed
to participate in a rifle match
because his hair was too long?
(Davy Crockett, would you
believe America has come to
this?) Both cases remind me of
my professor from Germany,
who had been put in the coal

and to also charge that he
exceeded his authority, cannot
be accepted as true.
Uhlfelder clearly has the
constitutional and legal
authority to act as he has. He
may have acted in away some
disagree with but this is only
political opinion not based on
any legal or constitutional
grounds. Mr. Uhlfelder has not
violated any law or provision
pertaining to the conduct of his
office, has conducted himself in
such a matter as to be in keeping
with the letter of such laws, and
has in fact done no legal wrong.
To criticize Uhlfelder in good
faith, without resorting to false
accusations is proper and
perhaps at times even necessary.
But to hold in any manner that
Uhlfelders action in the case of
his paying the SMC deficit is a
violation of any statute, law, or
provision is to becloud the issue
with partisan chicanery and
individual ill will.
Now, in the face of this most
unjustifiable and malicious
attack upon Uhlfelder by
members of the Young
Americans for Freedom, all of
us, including myself (his most
frequent critic), must rise to his
defense; for justice, reason, and
conscience demand it.

mines by Nazis. He used to say
in the 1950s that the two most
conformist countries in his
life-experience were the USSR
and the USA. Here we professors
spend months in the classroom,
trying to instill a little
individuality in our students,
only to find that elsewhere on
campus there is pressure far
too much pressure to
conform, conform, conform.
Discipline? No. The coaches
have confused discipline what
is clearly necessary to make the
individual function well as a
member of a team with petty
tyranny a la Gessler, which is
the imposition of their personal
whims upon another individual
simply because they hold some
power over him. If the coach
worries that a player might miss
a shot because of hair getting in
his eyes, he can legitimately
order him, in the name of
discipline, to wear a hair-net
but not to cut off the hair that is
part of his personality and his
being. His hair is his, not the
coachs.
This undue emphasis on short
hair is a spill-over from the
shavetails of World War H.
The military demanded short
hair, mostly as a means of
breaking down the individuality
of the recruit, with the larger
aim of accustoming the soldier
to instantaneous and unthinking
obedience to battlefield orders.
Are the coaches unaware that
even the military, powerful as it
is, has felt obliged to yield
ground on the question of hair?
Shaven heads proved to be a
needless irritant, and pictures of
Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S.
Grant supported the opinion
that courage and skill are not

p***> CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS******
| The idea is to keep it mowed and it looks just like |
\ regular grass.

imparted by shaving brush or
scissors.
If the coaches say that a
long-haired person cannot truly
represent the UF, let them count
heads; then they might give
better representation to
minority groups than they have
in the past. Where is their sense
of values when they kick players
off for having long hair, and
allow our university to be
represented by good clean
crew-cut American boys who
cheat on exams or do shoplifting
at J.M. Fields?
President OConnell has

Watch
That
Cheese J
By REG CROWDER
Alligator Columnist
Supporters of lightened penalties for users suffered a major
defeat this week when the National Institutes of Mental Health
said it could not in good conscience rule out the possibility
that cottage cheese is harmful.**
We just dont know for sure,* said the institute spokesman.
It may come as a surprise to some. We have "had cottage cheese
with us in one form or another for centuries.
What is frightening now,* he said, is the accelerating rate
of cheese abuse in our society, especially among college
students.**
He said some institute research points to the danger of
addiction.
We have found that of a group of 1,000 persons who have
taken cottage cheese, fully 981 used it again within 90 days. At
the end of a year, all but one had used it.
Not only did they keep using cheese, but a tragically high
number went on to Mozzerella, Lumberger, Munster, and several
kinds of Swiss cheeses which are turning up in this country.**
The institute plans to take its finding to Congress, along with
a plea to ease treatment of users and shift the emphasis of
cheese control to the pushers or Big Cheeses* as they are
known in the underground.

Friday. February 12, 1971, Thaf(Dricta Altfgator,

expressed a disinclination to
intervene; appeal to the courts is
long and costly. If we stand idly
by and watch injustice done,
then we too share in the guilt.
There is one step that students,
faculty, and staff can easily take
to stop the Prussian-type
mentality on our campus:
Refrain from buying any tickets
to any athletic event until the
coaches have a change of heart.
JOHN W. PRICE
(short-haired, by my choice)
Associate Professor of Humanities

Page 9



Page 10

I. Tha Florida AIM gator, Friday, February 12,1971

By ANDREW BANKER
Alligator Entartainmant Writer
Their music, their music is
really nice. They sound
like ... I like their back beat. 1
dont know how to describe it,
but ..' uh ... its just their
music!
I got all their
albums . theyre really
together this group. And 1 tell
you, Id pay anything to see em.
Id pay up to fifteen, twenty
dollars to see this group.
ON THE surface, either of the
above statements can be taken as
uncorrupted enthusiasm for
ones favorite rock group. But
beneath the rabid exterior of the
average rock mind there is a
force at work so subtle as to be
unnoticable, yet so prominent
that it manifests itself on every
other page of underground pulps
and pop glossies.
Although some might have
different labels for it,
commerciality is this
ephemeral giant in the
sometimes story book world of
rock and a working definition
might go as follows:
C ommerciality refers to
techniques employed in the
recording, arranging, performing,
and selling of rock music that
either conform to old, familiar
formulas or that result in
predictable patterns for a
calculated effect upon the
listener.
In practice, the commerciality
principle is nothing but a
re-statement of the old show-biz
axiom Give em what they
want (or what they think they
want) and make em scream for
more, more, more! Top4o
radio stations have stuck to this
slick package philosophy for
more than a decade but only in
the last few years has
progressive music, formerly
thought by record companies
and their unscrupulous
entrepreneurs as unsalable, been
taken into the commercial fold.
Ironically, spokesman for the
progressive movement, mostly
musicians and their managers,
have declared themselves free of
top-40 commerciality when in
fact they have developed their

I
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Godding & Clark
2ND AVF. & 2ND ST, SE.

Making 'Em Scream For More

own, more insidious, breed of
hype (gimmicky or
high-pressure promotion).
Cl
EVEN SOME of Rockdoms
best artists like Crosby, Stills,
Nash, and Young, the Stones
and Eric Clapton are smothered
(and sometimes annoyed) by
heavy doses of promotion but,
by and large, it seems to be the
money-hungry, glory-crazed
amateurs of the business who are
the most eager to cash in on this
phenomenon and are least
bothered by it.
Feeding off the rock LP
market, easily one of the most
lucrative in the country, they are
the most commercial and
consequently least entertaining
propositions available. But
fattest and heaviest (in the dull
sense) of them all is Grand Funk
Railroad, an unlikely threesome
who make up in mind-boggling
volume and cheap, castrating
theatrics what they lack in
honest to goodness
musicianship. Known only to
their manager, Terry Knight, just
eighteen short months ago, they
were virtually assured a place in
advertising history (or at least in
Ripleys) when the shrewd
Knight had the trio painted on a
mammoth block long, sixty
foot-high billboard overlooking
Times Square in New York last
summer for the sum of
$ 100,000. This must be regarded
as Rockdoms Golden Calf and a
sign that the future spells doubt
for the Chosen People of the
New Culture.
As if this wasnt enough,
Knight authorized the
construction of an electric
bulb-readout sign near the
Hudson River plugging the
GFRs latest album at the time,
Closer To Home.
In what seems the greatest
insult the rock culture has dealt
itself yet, Grand Funk was to
have their egomaniacal cake and
eat it too: In the following four
month span from July to

j is the extra
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8 N.W. 16th Ave. |
t a ,<#> if

October, the group saw all four
of their albums turn to gold,
including their last, Live Album,
which was declared a million
seller the day it was released!
BUT BY no means is Grand
Funk the only slick operator in
town. Not as financially daring
but probably as filthy rich are
Led Zeppelin (dazed and
confused) and Ten Years After
(fast, but so what?), two English

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heavies of the Grand Funk mold.
The former has a particular habit
of showing up at scheduled
concerts when it feels like it and
once threatened not to appear at
all unless it got $20,000 more.
Other high-commerciality
attractions on the scene today
include Chicago, a brass-rock
band whose horn arrangements,
even after two best-selling
double-record sets, are still too
stiff and predictable, and the

ATTENTION STUDENTS!
CflApA) Would a quicker, easier and
w P Jr more efficient way of
Jfejgum studying help you?
K Then we are announcing the
f opening of an EASIER way
l to study.
JLL
The Actual Current J
% STUD-EASE %
*>' LECTURE NOTES %.
&
STUD-EASE Lecture Note* are taken from current lecture classes
and are available the day following the lecture presentation at 1730
W. University Ave.; next to the College Inn. The prices range from
19 cents to 39 cents depending upon the frequency of the lecture
meetings per week. Professional xerox copying also available.

Chambers Brothers, who hooted
and hollered to capacity crowds
here last November.
Unfortunately, this list is far
from complete but sufficient at
least to suggest this that big
business may just have enough
of a stranglehold on rock today
to decide which records we will
buy, which artists we will pay
money to see, and, most
regretfully of all, which we will
choose to enjoy.



Little Mary Sunshine
Begins February 15
The award-winning musical comedy, Little Mary Sunshine opens
Feb. 15 in the Constans Theatre.
The production will be the result of four and a half weeks of
concentrated rehearsals blending music, dance and dialogue.
DR. RICHARD L. GREEN, director of Little Mary Sunshine said
this is the first production undertaken as a joint effort by the Florida
Players and the UF Music Department. Dr. Delbert E. Sterrett is the
music director for the play.
Rick Boseyans play is a spoof of the operetta popular in American
in the early part of this century. The heroine, Little Mary, is played
by Elizabeth Green, and Reid D. Farrell plays the hero, Captain Big
Jim Warington. Randy Hugill plays the other male lead of Cpl. Billy
Jester.
Tickets are on sale at the Reitz Union box office. All seats are
reserved. Ticket prices for UF students are 75 cents, all other student
tickets are $ 1 and tickets for the general public are $ 1.50.

yf 1
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mu t^KSfIfEMftMtt l !^M
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HUB-1 HH i
Yehstadayawmytrbleseemedsofahaway.
.

Yesterday, all my troubles seemed so far away,"
wasnt recorded in a closet full of winter clothing.
Why should it sound that way in your room?
So after you kick in your stereo for cheating you,
play something familiar on a KLH Model 24 com compact
pact compact music system.
It'll be like hearing it for the first time.
You see, the 24 is a complete high-performance
music system. All the parts are matched up to work
together very precisely: the solid state amplifier, the
stereo FM tuner, the custom made turntable. Even
the cartridge and diamond needle.
But the true beauty of our system is the KLH
speakers: they make it happen.
Words arent frizzed up anymore,- even over FM.
You can unders'and the backgrounds; muddy thump thumping

UHIIIH
Ml iiih: mty

Bp ~^w
pr
I
.gdfl
jHI
4- .
REID FARRELL AND JIM WARINGTON
... in rehearsal for Little Mary Sunshine"

ing thumping turns out to be clever bass playing and mumbling
becomes do-wah-wahs-by a chorus you had only
read about on the record jacket.
And so that you can take best advantage of the
24, weve made the speakers separate from the
main control unit. Put them wherever they sound
best: on the floor, on a bookshelf, on a table. The
control sectionwhich neatly holds the turntable,
amplifier and the FM (or AM/FM) radiocan sit
next to your chair.
That's just about all we can tell you, except for
some technical information. If you'll write us, we'll
send you the whole story.
And one day, you may finally get to know
''Parsiesahjrosma 'irtim' really means.
Our address is 30 Cross Street, Cambridge,

/ 919 UNIVERSITY AVE.
FOR YOUR / GAINESVILLE 378 9805
/ ROOSEVELT MALL
PLEASURE / JACKSONVILLE 388 8539

Friday, February 12,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Massachusetts 02139. Or better yet, visit the KLH
dealer nearest to you.
This is the KLH Model 24 FM Stereo/Phono Stereo/Phonograph.
graph. Stereo/Phonograph. The suggested retail price is $319.95
(slightly higher with _AM/ FM stereo radio).
KI H
r.H PESEAPCH A* .D DE7E'..OPVftir COPPOpatrC
"A rourro't of .H P'.oarr k a- 3 To. com-nt Cc'iOo or

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12, 1971

Askew Promises To
Enforce Blacks 1 Rights
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Gov. Reubin Askew assured
Gadsden County blacks
Wednesday that their right to
register to vote and to be
considered for government jobs
will be enforced, but he was
unable to discourage their plans
to march on the state capitol
Thursday to air a long list of
grievances.
Askew said hell meet with
some of the elected officials of
the county, a rich tobacco
community 22 miles southwest
of the Capitol where blacks
outnumber whites.
We are going to march, said
Rev. James Orange, a Southern
Christian Leadership Conference
field representative.
The only thing that could
stop the march is for black
people to start getting city and
county jobs tomorrow and for
the voter registration books to
be moved to the courthouse
tomorrow.
The 40-minute meeting in the
governors office broke up when
Orange jumped to his feet and
stalked to the door after Askew
corrected a statement that black
children have the right to stay
out of school whenever they
want.

Demonstrations Mark
Opposition To War
CALIFORNIA (UPI) Demonstrators protesting the military
thrust into Laos burned a government car and beat a policeman
Wednesday near the University of California campus in Berkeley.
Several persons were injured and 14 arrested in a skirmish between
antiwar demonstrators and police in Boston.
Some 400 young persons marched on the White House in
Washington shouting Ho, ho Ho Chi Minh and One, two, three,
four, we dont want your ... war.
There were outbreaks of violence and vandalism in scattered cities
across the nation, but the first concerted round of demonstrations this
* the Indochina war did not match the intensity
followed the military move into Cambodia last
, -4
25 peiOTM showed up for a rally at Princeton University.
AfcH* 20 inntutors turned out in downtown Buffalo, N.Y., in a
bhwdinf whip eftttmt. About 50 braved freezing temperatures to
parade in front of Clevelands federal building.
At Kent State University in Ohio, where National Guardsmen killed
four protesters in an outbreak after the Cambodia incursion, the only
action Wednesday was a teach-in. About 50 students participated.
*!
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WORLD

Kent State Enrollment
Down For Next Fall
KENT, Ohio (UPI) Kent
State University reported
Thursday a 45 per cent decline
in freshmen enrollments for next
fall. The school blamed the state
of the economy on the decline
and said high school seniors were
waiting longer before enrolling
for higher education.
Four students were killed on
the Kent State campus by
National Guardsmen last spring.
Sharon Atkins Admits
Killing Sharon Tate
LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Susan Atkins confessed Tuesday
she personally killed Sharon
Tate, but that the whole thing
was the idea of state key witness
Linda Kasabian.
Miss Atkins gave the first
complete account of what
happened inside the Tate house
in testimony geared to
whitewash Charles Manson of
any responsibility for the
slayings.
The dark-haired young
woman said the pregnant actress,
Jay Sebring, Voityck Frykowski
and Abigail Folger were herded
into the living room where
Charles Tex Watson shot

HP*.

Sebring, then tied a rope around
his neck and linked it to Miss
Tates neck.
She said Watson told the
couple to lie on the floor and
directed the girls to turn off the
light.
They kept saying, please
dont hurt us, we wont tell the
police, Miss Atkins said.
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Wrap-Up

Nixon Observes
Lincolns Birthday
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon Thursday issued
a Lincolns Birthday statement
emphasizing that Abraham
Lincoln was founder of the
Republican Party.

Reitz Union
Games Area
Will Be Closed
Due to the Regional Games Tournament, the
Reitz Union Games Area will be closed from
6:00 pm Thursday to 6:00 pm Friday and
Saturday 9:00 am to 12:00 noon.
#<
Anyone Interested In Watching The
Tournaments Is Welcome.

One of the first things most
Americans learn about the
Republican Party is that it is the
party of Abraham Lincoln, the
GOP President said. As we
observe the anniversary of his
birth, it is appropriate that we
think again about the principles
he observed and how they can
be implemented in our time.



Communists Blast Drive Into Laos

PARIS (UPI) Communist
negotiators at the deadlocked
Vietnam peace conference
charged Thursday that the South
Vietnamese drive into southern
Laos was backed by 10 U.S.
ground battalions, including
infantry.

N. Vietnamese Battle
Allies At Long Cheng
VIENTIANE, Laos (UPI) An estimated 8,000 North Vietnamese
troops, battled with irregulars of the Meo tribe at three positions
around northeast Laos defense headquarters at Long Cheng
Wednesday. The Meo commander pleaded unsuccessfully with allied
leaders here for reinforcements and air support.
American officials said the situation at Long Cheng appeared to be
getting critical. The allied leaders, however, refused to provide Gen.
Vang Pao, the Meo commander, with the 10 battalions of troops and
the heavy U.S. tactical air support Pao said he needed to defend Long
Cheng, Laotian officials said.
The officials said Vang Pao estimated that, besides the 8,000 North
Vietnamese fighting his troops, another 12,000 were within easy
striuing range of the Meo base.
Laotian officials said there are about 35 Americans at Long Cheng,
fewer than one-tenth of the estimated 400 that were with the Meo
warriors during the bombing campaign against North Vietnam that
ended in 1968.

IIISCIIVER
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.. a I
Fashion Jowahy, all annas. 1^
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GAINESVILLE MALL \
/

U.S. Ambassador David K. E.
Bruce rejected the charges as
false allegations and gross
distortion.
Speaking to newsmen after
the 102nd session Bruce said it
was pure hypocrisy for Hanoi

and the Viet Cong to condemn
allied action in Laos and
Cambodia without even
mentioning the massive and
longstanding North Vietnamese
presence there.
Viet Cong Foreign Minister
Madame Nguyen Thi Binh told
the conference, On the
morning of Feb. 8, 1971, nearly
50 U.S. and puppet South
Vietnamese battalions, including
10 U.S. infantry, artillery and
armored battalions, supported
by U.S. air power, launched
massive attacks against the
ttotograpkers
Downd li Laos
SAIGON (UPI) A
helicopter carrying
photographers for United Press
International, the Associated
Press, Life magazine and
Newsweek crashed in Laos
Wednesday, apparently hit by
Communist gunfire. It was not
known if there were survivors.

Cepon region of southern
Laos.
Replying at the session, Bruce
said, I reject your false
allegations and your gross
distortions about our activities
and intentions in regard to
Laos.
No American ground combat
forces or advisors will cross into
Laos, Bruce said.

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Friday, February 1? 1971, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12, 1971

* rj % a i i i i vi,*
Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

PUBLICITY ABOUT
UNION ACTIVITIES
Director of Personnel Relations
Robert A. Button has released
the following memorandum to
all staff employees:
Recently many news items
have appeared concerning
charges and countercharges of
what is and isn't the truth
among individuals who claim to
be representatives of labor
unions. The University has no
knowledge that any of the
charges are true, but it is evident
that the disagreements have led
to confusion among some
University employees. Many
employees have asked that the
University explain how this
controversy affects them.
The University has not given
recognition or bargaining rights
to any union. One representative
claims to have some 800 union
cards signed by employees. This
we seriously doubt. But, in any
event, it makes little difference
at this time because no law has
been established that would give
the University guidelines for
recognizing any union. There has
been no change in the official
position of the state government
which is that the University
cannot at this time recognize or
deal with any labor union.
While we do not deny the
right of anyone to join a union,
should he choose to do so, no
one should be led into thinking
that the union is going to set the
wages for any of the employees
at this University. These wages
are set on a state wide basis in
Tallahassee and are not
established by the University.
The money to finance these
wages and the increases
employees have received during
the past years has been provided
by the State Legislature. The
University, by working with the
Legislature and the Department
of Administration, will make
every effort to see that wages
continue to be increased. We do
not understand how any union
could make a statement that it
has the power to tell state
officials how the tax dollars of
citizens will be spent.
While the State Constitution
gives public employees the right
to join labor organizations, it
does not give them the right to
strike. One of the union
representatives has stated

| GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDITUNioN"!
for I

publicly that he is in favor of
state employees having the right
to strike. Os course, should this
happen, those employees on
strike would be subject to
immediate dismissal. We are not
suggesting that a strike would
occur here for we think that the
great majority of University
employees know that the
University is constantly striving
to improve the working
conditions and upgrade salaries.
However, we believe that it is
irresponsible for anyone to
suggest that public employees
should go on strike, in direct
violation of the law.
In conclusion, it is difficult
for us to understand exactly
what a union can do for
University employees since the
University's employee-employer
relationship is different from
private industry. It should also
be clear that any employee who
joins a union is not going to have
any advantage over employees
who do not. All employees are
treated equally now and will
continue to be treated equally in
the future.
UNIVERSITY STATIONERY
Vice President for Academic
Affairs Frederick W. Conner has
released the following
memorandum:
At the request of the
Administrative Council, I am
asking that deans, directors and
department chairmen remind
faculty and staff that University
stationery should not be used
for personal business. Several
incidents have come to light in
which the use of official
stationery has made a personal
matter appear to be of concern
to the University. Please see that
this kind of embarrassment to
the University does not happen
again.
MID-TERM EXAMS
Students registered in the
following classes are expected to
take the mid-term examinations.
Each must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security number.
CBS 261 MID-TERM
The mid-term exam for CBS 261
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 16,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

names begin with A report to
Bryan 120; B to Little 101 or
109; Ctp AFA 4,8, 10, 14, 16,
211, 213 or 219; D-E to Little
221, 223, 225, 235 or 237; F to
Little 207, 213, 227 or 233; G
to Little 201, 203, 205, 215,
217 or 219; H to McCarty 86 or
186; l-J to Walker Auditorium;
K-L to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7,
8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, or
18; M to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or
119; N-0 to Bryan 201, or 203;
P-Q to Floyd 104, 106, or 109;
R to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
S to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Little 113, 121 or 125; W-Z to
Leigh 207, 212 or 240.
CLC 141 MID-TERM
The mid-term for CLC 141 will
be given Wednesday, Feb. 17, at
7p.m. Students who last names
begin with A-K report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10,11, 12, 13, 14, 16 or 18; L-R
to Matherly 102, 105,108, 113,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119; S-Z
to AFA 4,8, 10, 14, 16, 211,
213 or 219.
CLC 142 MID-TERM
The mid-term exam for CLC 142
(including 14Y) will be given
Wednesday, Feb. 17, at 7 p.m.
Student whose last names begin
with A-C report to Peabody 1,2,
4,5, 7, 10 or'11; D-G report to
Peabody 101, 102, 112, 114;
H-M to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209; N-S to Flint 101,
102, 110 or 112; T-Z Floyd 104,
106, or 109.
CLC 145 MID-TERM
The mid-term exam for CLC 145
will be given Wednesday, Feb.
17 at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Little 113; B to Little 101;Cto
Little 109; D-E to Little 121 or
125; F-G to Little 207, 213, 227
or 233; H-J to Little 201, 203,
205 or 215; K to Walker
Auditorium; L:M to Little 221,
223, 225, 235, 237 or 239; N-Z
to Walker Auditorium.
PARKING COMMITTEE
The Parking and Transportation
Committee will meet Monday,
Feb. 15, at 3:30 p.m. in Room
101-A of the Architecture and
Fine Arts complex.

university calendar

Friday, February 12
I
Panhellenic Ball, Rathskeller,
9:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.
C. 1.0. International Music and
Dance Festival, University
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "CHE", Union
Aud., 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 p.m.
t>
Saturday, February 13
SGP: Orgone Zable, Rathskeller,
9:00 p.m. 1:00 a.m.
International Ball, Flagler Inn,
9:00 p.m.
Rose Community Center
Concert, University Aud.,
8:00 p.m.
Basketball, U of F vs. Kentucky,
Fla. Gym, 7:45 p.m
Union Movie, "Viva Zapata",
Union Aud., 5:30, 9:00,
10:30 p.m.
Faculty Club Valentine Party,
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Catholic Student Center
Lecture: "Ethical and Moral
Problems in Medicines", CBC
Lounge, 7:30
Sunday, February 14
SGP: Orgone Zable, Graham
Pond and Dorm Area, 2:00
4:00 p.m.
Florida Woodwind Quartet,
University Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Soul Music, Union North
Terrace, 5:00 9:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Un Chien
Andalon" & Nazarin", Union
Aud., 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 p.m.
Monday, February 15
English In Action, Baptist
Student Center, 4:00 8:00
p.m.
Union Movie, "Exterminating
Angel", University Aud.,
5:30, 8:00,10:30 p.m.

flornta quarterly :
(Dinging your way soon

The University Calendar will be
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G*72 Union.

Basketball, U of F vs. Tennessee,
Fla. Gym, 7:45 p.m.
Florida Players, "Little Mary
Sunshine", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, February 16
Accent 71, Speaker: Sen. Birch
Bayh, Plaza, 11:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, Union C-4, 7:30
p.m.
Florida Players, "Little Mary
Sunshine", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Audubon Wildlife Film: 'The
Real Yellowstone", Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
University Symphonic Band
Concert, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, February 17
Florida Players, "Little Mary
Sunshine", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Thursday, February 18
Union Movie" 2001: A Space
Odyssey", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00,10:30 p.m.
Florida Players, "Little Mary
Sunshine". Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Friday, February 19,
SGP: Blackfoot, Rathskeller,
9:00 -1:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "2001: A Space
Odyssey", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00,10:30 p.m.
Florida Players, "Little Mary
Sunshine", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Rose Community Center
Concert, University Aud.,
8:00 p.m.



Leo: Feeling your arms around me,
strong yet gentle. Looking Into your
eyes, seeing them laugh, Saying all
the things I'd never thought I'd say
tike "I love you" I need you,
Wanting to share my lift with you
Now, on Valentine's Day, Forever.
(J-lt-82-p)
Dear Snow White, You have made me
the happiest girt In the world. I'll love
you always. Love, Dopey. Come on
over and celebrate V. Day.
(V-lt-82-p) c

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\ p ?;=?a Uisi H \ rsi */\/ */// /
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if*A / To Nod, my very own Yoga Turtle I \ %+ivS, \ \
]VU/T V*V*X /V / Love Only You. Its here for the X .A X X? JBzSr
PQ!/m- 'd *o \V 4 X*V r / Whole Wide World to see I LOVE X \V% >f DEAR KOKO, Remember me? I*m NVS \
/ ,|/ X/'/ _e the cat that loves you tool Happy X ilWl/jn \J X An
X BoobJJ Dbo*(V?t B2 LOV *' Your > \
Deb: Happy Valentines Day. I love Ns \X*
\dUU/n}\JrtL lllt D / you very much. Remember only 130 vA'j\ M
'XS&JvZdL lllt'ff turfd* / days left until 6/25/71; then we will \\wo 'V
V _?n i'i! A
A&**' / (V-lt-82-p) X>AV*e
/ xX's; l
//// / \'X^>
>p.v / MEK, 2/14/71 allows me to tell you X'b*|> %
Paul Regret, Surprls. ~l l,! L', 90 ?ryo7SJ: y |^TS'Th,n nS; \ \V>. TO MY DIRTY OLD MAN: after five
look for snow the *un, until we >/ ?nd jca \ Valentines Days. I love, you more
find .everything.. Move you, The Frog V/ v *Vv more. Love JCA V than ever. Ill work cpuazlee with you
X tv it ez-p> forever. Y.D.B. (V-lt-82-p)

Dr. Justin Von Thiessjng: Thank you
for giving me four months of your
life. Youre my everything. l|| be
loving you always Fleepy
(V-lt-82-p)
Bee-bee, I love you on this our first
Valentines Day together. Hooray for*
last September 19th, and all the good
times to come Boom-boom
(V-lt-82-p)

Love you

Pat Even though I doubt 111 ever
love another, HI know i loved you
and that will be the greatest joy of
my life. My love for you will only
make me happy, not sad, not
regretful. I can only wish you the
greatest happiness in your life and
know my love will continue, forever
to bring me Joy and pleasure and
warm memories. Jeff (V-lt-82-p)

Friday, February 12,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Kube 6 Buddy: friendship Is being
there when I need you. I love you
both for being there. Happiness 81 I
agree that you are made for each
other. Remember, love is never
having to say youre sorry. Happy
Valentine's Day. Ail my love always,
Laurie. (V-lt-82-p)

Heldie Happy Valentines to a
beautiful green eyed lady. Thanks for
all the GREAT time may there be
many more. LOVE STEVE
(V-lt-82-p)

Page 15



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SA LE
Yamaha 305 1969 excelent
condition. Luggage rack windshield
and 2 helmets. $550 firm, cash.
392-0731 or 372-2119 (A-6t-77-p)
Stereo tapes 8-track & cassettes Now
at a special low price of $3.50 for
any 2 albums on one tape. Call
Jonathan at 373-3611. (A-st-80-p)
Pioneer SR-202 reverberation
amplifier, has been operated only one
hour. Cost SIOO brand new, asking
$75 or best offer. 376-6131
(A-4t-79-p)
TREAT YOURSELF! Visit areas
most beautiful and complete sporting
goods store. Low prices. B & 8
SPORTS CENTER 5310 N.W. 13th
ST. 378-1461 (A-st-78-p)
Twin bed with frame very good
condition $20.00 Call 376-3771
(Ann) (A-3t-80-p)
GUITAR STRINGS: Close Out Sale
$1.25 and $1.75 While they last
Muntz Stereo 319 NW 13th St.
(A-st-80-p)
SALE: 8 track blanks 80-minutes
FULLY GUARANTEED 12 for
$20.00 Muntz Stereo 319 NW 13th
St. (A-st-80-p)
8-track car stereo plus several tapes.
$45 call 376-0642 or 392-2000 ask
for Grady (A-3t-80-p)
Stereo: Ampex cassette withspkrs. 2
Fisher spkrs.; BSR turntable.
Together or separately. All new.
SSOO value-only $370. 378-9192
(A-3t-80-p)
Stero equipment Benjamin Micracord
7-70 turntable sansuitr7o7A stero
tuner and amp Sony 250 tape deck
criterion 200 A speakers SSOO
373-4311 (A-st-80-p)
1970 Triumph 650 Trophy perfect 2
mo old $llOO 372-0380 Mike 1968
Triumph 650 Trophy, good running
good looking $750 372-0380 Steve
(A-3t-80-p)
GUITAR HARMONY
SOVEREIGN, steelstrlngs, large
body sos t-sh e I l-case S6O
376-5190(a-st-81-P)
1968 Honda exc. cond. w/helmets &
rack $175 will talk price call Ben
392-7427 (a-3t-81-p)
Yamaha combo organ, cost $650,
asking S4OO. 2 cabinets w/12in. spkr.
$35 ea. 4 10 In. JBLs in spkr. cab.
S2OO 120 bass accordion $l5O
378-8659 (a-st-81-p)
1970 Honda 750 cc. My own one
owner in perfect condition. Only
3400 ml. Gold colored. $llOO. Call
David at 373-4397. will finance
(a-st-81-p)
Scott 342-c 110 watt FM-Receiver
still under warranty S3OO new, yours
for S2OO call Herb 373-3615
(A-st-78-p)
Sears 2500 BTU air conditioner. 4
months old. $250. Call 376-9096
evenings. (a-4t-81p)
Stereo with 2 speakers RCA TV good
cond. call 373-2520 (A-3t-82-p)
8 Track St ereo Tape Player with
AM/FM radio with headphones and
17 groovy tapes everything In
perfect condition-sell or trade for 10
speed bike Call 376-7829 (A-lt-82-p)
FOR RENT
Need 1 male roomate for Vz of large 2
bedroom house. Call 373-3060 after
6 p.m. (b-4t-81-p)
Need 2 conservative roommates
LaMancha. Available June. Call Lori
378-8337 (B-80-3t-p)
MALE Roomate Wanted Univ
Gardens Apts. Bldg 712 Apt. 101
372-0491 Anytime (b-st-81-p)
1 Bdr Apt 1 block from Tigert slls
Mo. move In 2/15 1216 S.W. 2 Ave.
no. 24 call 372-5133 nites or before
10 a.m. days call MGR 372-7111
(b-3t- 81-p)
Sublet furnished 1 bedroom (twin
beds) apartment; air conditioned, gas
heat, patio. $l3O mo. Immediate
occupancy. 376-8626 1918 SW 14th
Terrace (B-10t-80-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished
apartment air conditioned pool only
$l6O/mo. available March 1 call after
6:00 pm 378-0796 (B-3t-80-p)
Must sublet Gatortown apt. 126 2
bedroom call 378-1728 available
Immediately (B-3t-80-p)
Sublet one room apt for guy kitchen
facility util, and cable TV included
$76 call 373-3105 (B-79-st-p)
Sublease Fr. Quarter Apt. One
bedroom townhouse, available March
21. call 378-4555 (B-st-82-p)

EOR RENT
Room in house Private entrance
kitchen privileges close to campus
$65 a month ca'i Guy 378-8418
(R-st-82-p)
WANTED
HELP! I need someone fluent )r
French for translation work. Ca:
378-1112 or come by room 405 I
the new International Studie
Building (c-2t-81-p)
Female grad student searching for
roommate. Townhouse nr. campus
$75 per mo + V 2 util must like
puppies call 373-3108 after 6:30
soon! (C-st-78-p)
Female Roomates wanted for 2
bedroom apt. (Summit House)
beginning Spring quarter. Call
anytime 373-2980 (c-6t-81-p)
Need female roommate, F.Q. apt.,
46.25 plus utilities, large bdrm. rent
paid thru Feb. 15, call 378-4614
(C-st-79-p)
Wanted roomate for Point West Apts,
all the modern conveniences pool air
conditioning etc. call 378-9947 ask
for Joe (C-st-79-p)
Need 1 female roommate for spring
and summer quarters. Landmark Apt.
32. Call 373-3207. August rent free!
(C-st-80-p)

FLORIDA
QUARTERLY \
MELODY CLUB
4130 NW 6th St
/
features
COUNTRY ROCK
AND
19< DRINKS FOR LADIES
Wednesday-Friday-Saturday
Beer, Sandwiches And
Games People Play
"Where the in crowd goes out"
'
MilVillijliliawNivcKsiTv mmtomml! 1 llldl |i|| I
DONATIONS of 50 CENTS-ROSE COMMUNITY. BUIIDINQ FUND U 1
iiiiiiiiyiMiiwriiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimijiiiiniiii^

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12, 1971

X-X-..Xw.*Xw>s .*XwXw.W.w.*.V.V.
WANTED
Male Roomate. French Quarter No.
77. $45. per mo. On pool, central air
and heat. Call Laird at 372-5254 or
leave message at 378-6092
(C-st-78-p)
La Bonne Vie: 1 female roomate
needed for 2 bedroom apt. rent
51.50 mo. study lounge, rec. room,
tennis, & pool. Call now 378-8969.
(C-7t-80-p)
2 male roommates wanted Large 4
bdrm house 2V2 bath fireplace central
heat privacy TV 42.50 per mo plus V*
utilities 378-6810 (C-6t-77-p)
Male roommate needed spring qtr.
AC 2 pools very quiet $47.50 + V*
utilities grad stud prefer call Tom at
372-0539 5-7 PM (C-lt-82-p)
Female Roommate: large apt with
fireplace available now 421 NW 15
St. S4O plus utilities Call 378-9958
(C-st-82-p)
Female roommate wanted, F. Q. apt.
93, $46.25 + util., call 372-7835
after 1:30 p.m. (C-st-82-p)
V *
#*
HELP WANTED
Hairdresser part time or full time. In
the newest, most different beauty
shoppe in town. Rednecks need not
apply. Call 372-7159 Trishs Hair
House. (E-3t-82-p)

AUTOS
Mustang *65 v-8, 3 speed, good
engine, Immaculate interior, good
tires. SBOO 373-1963 after 6:00
(G-9t-75-p)
63 Rambler or 61 Chevrolet Corvar
Camper Type Either one S3OO
378-8490 (G-st-78-p)

DRY CLEANING
UP TO 8 LBS |2 SO
WHILE ATTENDANT IS ON DUTY
318 S.W. 16th Ave.
(NEXT TO COTTONS MIN-A-MART)
RjSJjri NOW AT... 1
1:53 3:50 5:47 m
I ''..a fine and moving picture 'wjjjw Ws[ Jf
/ made with great sensitivitylp^ M JB\ 1
/ Rabbit, mm /
/^^^m^CaarvAnjanetteCome|^^^^M
upon a time there
was a crooked man. When he
was good, he was very, very
good and when he was bad...
feature AT... wasmurder.
jhl
Ufa
Jag I W[ j tfl H H|gM
' WP 1 i
i| Htt I ::v l '';"B
>:>:': :-vm : -rSnfll i
: HiS s 1
: >C||:':\- ; ''; JIB 1
. BBn 1
| wk|
1
I
mcomi'Vobii^i|
. rj, n-y-.r/*'j rr rj, OdtQPQ
wap a #
crooked
man...
. TBN, L opt Zs sr# rsii
-- v 3*o' M f.~,t<3\ £l jpt * < f*n*n ceomo>r"
fU wr i* .y,j- .... _,: i - m ' '- 1
..-C &.>. ^V.ac^Ob?! *J*7y\ \rirn '' < :; '*' *.
crc jkz'zz a r O>l v i %*/,/ "' r '* % r '~,' r ' '* t i ( I^agsasl
. 4 4 *."* u M ** r *."
V -. * iMr #
>. ****. **'*'*" *'* \ v % v v

autos
VW 1966 Good Condition SBOO
Heater Can Pam 392-9101
(G-st-78-p)
64 Ford custom 289 V 8 auto. Trans,
radio, heater, good tires. Call
372-4598 or 392-0514 (G-st-78-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

x-x-x-x-x*xvxxxxxxx>xxx-^
AUTOS
65 Valiant 6 cyl std radio good cond.
newly inspected $250 373-2145 after
5 GE 12 inch portable TV brand new
UHF-VHF never used SBO 373-2145
after 5 (g-st-81-p)
1964 VW squareback rebuilt engine
runs well. SSOO or best offer
373-1208 (g-2t-81-p)
67 Austin 1100 2 dr. Sedan S6OO.
Nice for student or second car. Good
shape, ph. 378-0184 evenings.
(G-st-78-p)
VW 62 needs work $250 372-7638
(G-3t-80-p)
Corvair beach/woods buggy good
motor, axil, clutch needs man. trans.
shortened & reinfornced body will
sell cheap make offer 376-8319
after-5 P.M. (G-3t-80-p)
Classic "Bugeye" Sprite 1959
roadster new top etc. excellent
condition throughout asking 550.00
378-1857 (G-4t-80-p)
65 Austin Healey Sprite British
Racing Green, Good cond. Best offer
over $550. Call Greg after spm. Ph
No. 3 76-2048 Must sale now
(G-3t-80-p)
Leaving Country! Must sell 6l Olds
4dr. HRDTP Suner $225 ph
372-7798 65 GTO, 4 Speed, Dark Green,
Engine Completely Rebuilt Feb. Ist.
New Clutch and Carb. First SBSO
take it. 392-7187 after 6pm
(G-st-82-p)
SUCH A DEAL! must sell 59
Rambler in great mechanical shape
for super low price of $75. also a
good stereo for SIOO. call 372-7531
(G-st-82-p)
>XtX;X*X:XvXxXT*!*xivW vXSx*x*£v*v
PERSONAL
Demians Leathers/Laurent's Books
now buying used comic books, 2Vz
cents each, up to 1,000 from any one
person. (J-st-78-p)
Tired of apt living? CLO has openings
for the spring 1 block behind Krystal
- only $195/qt for room and 3 meals"
a dav Vince at 376-9473
(J-231-75-P)
Tenants! Organizers now forming the
Gainesville Tenants* Assoc. For
information call Mike Pug?* at
392-1665. Get off your apathy
(J-15t-79-p)
Will drive your car to So. Calif, or
share driving + expenses. Have tools,
can do minor repairs enroute. male,
mature (alas, 30+), technician. P.O.
Box 13811 Univ. Sta. Gnsvl.
(J-st-78-p)
Bicycle Buffs We think its time for
an afternoon bike rally, including
relays and races. Help us get it
together! Call 392-1655. (J-st-78-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst...
. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment, (J-44t-54-p)
Sabine String Shop handmade
dulcimers, banjo lessons, repair on
fretted instruments, and discounted
accesories. in Gville Artisans Market
378-1383 (J-st-78-p)
iaaaaeaaea
NOW PLAYING!
AT 1:45-4:20-7:00 8. 9:40
They challenged an
' rJr.
Walt Disney wodoctiow*'
THEWupcounnor 1
TECHNICOLOR I
NOW P^>WlNG^^^
AT: 1:35 3:35 5 35 7:35 & 9:35
v Jr j

Page 17

February 12,1971, The Florida Alligator, Page 17

-x-xw-xXvXjXwXrXrXrXyXvXvXv
PERSONAL
I:::::::::::;:::-:::::-:.:::-;;:.:::.:.;;;.;.;.;.;.;.;.:.;.;.-.;.;.:;;.;.
Making your valentine an
old-fashioned red-pink doily heart?
Or are you getting a $1.50 McCrory
special? Why not pin your heart to
the wall at the Union. The 2nd floor
gallery wall is reserved for valentine
messages. Come pin yours up on
Friday. For last-minute lovers,
limited supplies will be
provided. .make your own!
(J-st-78-c)
Volunteers need for
Adopt-a-Grandparent* Program. Call
SAMSON 392-1608 or come by 315
JWRU. (j-3t-81-p)
GIRLS, HAVE A PROBLEM?
Hot line now in service. Confidential
answers and referrals concerning
birth control, pregancies V.D. and
related subjects. Call 392-1650
(j-3t-81-p)
Volunteer needed to tutor ambitious
70 yr. young woman In Eng.
grammar, reading, and writing. Call
SAMSON 392-1608 or come by 315
JWRU (J-2t-81-c)
n
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

mm 4EV.
His true story is one of the great stories of our
century. He created violence every moment
he lived. Our intention is not to merely call him
a good guy or a bad guy- but to tell it like it is.
It makes a damn oood movie.
Starring Omar Sharif & Jack Palance
Union Auditorium Friday, March 12
5:30, 8:00, 10:30 50<
sponsored by the J.W.R. Union
buv advance tickets Friday from 12:30 4:30 2nd floor box office
hmimam
Viva Zapata
This is an account of the life and struggles of the Mexican
revolutionary leader, Emiliano Zapata: His opposition to Diaz
regime his overwhelming desire for education, the political
intrigues of the period (1909-1918), Zapatas appointment to the
presidency, his betrayal and death form the substance of the film.
Starring: Marlon Brando, Jean Peters, Anthony Quinn
Union Auditorium Saturday, February 13,1971 5:30 8:00 10:30
50 cents sponsored by the JWR Union buy your tickets in
advance Friday, 12:30 to 4:3oat 2nd floor box office Jsi
} V 1 l*:' v
U. ' 1 ) T" 111 "'! r '. 1111,11

PERSONAL
::X;XvX;:;X:X;X:X;X;X;X:X:X;X:X;X:Xv..
JLM Happy Valentine's Day and
every day! Vou have my heart when
will u give it back? Never I hope I
love you bunches! Little One
(JV-lt-82-p)
Barry, its been a beautiful quarter so
far. Thanx for all youve done for me.
happy valentine's day. Love, your
mini-chick (JV-lt-82-p)
Cookie would you mind being my
Valentine? You dont know me, but
weve had classes together. Love and
Peace. Blue eyes & Brown hair.
(JV-lt-82-p)
I
l|L ACROSS FROM MALL
/Vu 1 1 II
wm
^mHousE^l^^rfSusEfsW
I ODYSSE PACE I LOVING |jl I
I every nlglit bofei! :30 p.m.^nd 1
!**' * Matinee# at Penthouse U
f Penthouse 3 only. Regular

MmlfSltV 11 "
st VI A
SHOWS 3:25 H
I i
J ;f| : O^M:
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS I
J Mi Macfiriw vyii O'Neal >
1 J
I Salter J
i cao mwm I
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE :i# \ 2
IBH jy-H,
A HOWARD 6. MINSKY-ARTHUR HILLER Production
John Marteyt Ray Mil land ERICH SEGA I
I hWt| ImOmfntum MukScowlb, OncMh |
(HOWARD 6. MINSKY DAVID GOLDEN FRANCIS LAI ARTHUR HILLER \
nsrrr7m s. +
I SHOWS j STARTS
f |* EXAMINER
J marriage! J
-SATURDAY §
| REVIEW new vohk I
r i post
carrie snoaqress richard benjamin
i 1
i 1
l a frank perry film >
I A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR I
| PwwNw MmtrUh ~|
I WW. A" I
j
ofFn'huston
tAQUEL WELCH 1
I MYRA 1:45 I
| 5:35-9:25 |
| JOANNA |
Lii 6 7 25 --
ayjjr i
1 "THE MOST xjj* I
DAZZLING 2mr |
1 directorial |
| THEJTEAR:*
J Color by turn j I
FLORIDA THEATRE ONLY
! ALL SEATS $1.25
WLL DAY EVERYDAY
3 ; \7'.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS


a***
_a^a__a_aa_
PERSONAL
To my dearest Charles, I love you
very much. Happiness is a warm bed.
Yours forever, Lucy (JV-lt-82-p)
Dear, Lovely, Darling Marion thanks
for being sweet and nice have a
happy Valentines day LOVE Juan
(J V-lt-82-p)
Pine Cone our love is growing like a
pine tree. I love you. this much, your
pine cone. (JV-lt-82-p)
Liebchen, wenn du blst meinen Geist
lesen konntest. . Du bist immer in
meinen Gedanken. Glucklich
Valentinesschatz. Ich liebe dich.
(J V-lt-82-p)
DorsM! Happy Valentines Day!! I luv
u! Yours always, soccer. (JV-lt-82-p)
Scott B. still waiting for you to ask
me for that bike ride. Be my
Valentine forever. Love from afar.
K.S.M. (JV-lt-82-p)
PNB DWD MRG LBH GEJ GFJ BK
GKL JGM JQM TFO ASP TDR MS
JSS NT JUW RCW were nothing
without your love Ist floor Jennings
Ibc I] mk dl rlc cap (JV-lt-82-p)
FLAGUS FLAGUS FLAGUS
FLAGUS FLAGUS FLAGUS
FLAGUS FLAGUS FLAGUS
FLAGUS LOVE FLAGUS
(JV-lt-82-p)
Our dreams came true, Scizzzzio, and
I love you. Your Gunl. (J-lt-82-p)
Little Richard F. Happy 20th. Good
luck you'll need it! haha Just
kidding. Sending 3 big ones! Luv
Tlmberwoman. (J-lt-82-p)
Dearypue be my valentine always
because I will always be yours
Hubby (JV-lt-82-p)
Your stomach will thank you for
calling the NEW DELHI, dellscious
sandwiches, salads, pickle, halvah,
Juices and more 378-8656 (J-lt-82-p)
HUNDREDS OF pipes arriving dally
at the SUBTERRANEAN CIRCUS,
pipe capitol of the world. Blue denim
jeans, all sizes in stock. New this
week superfine blouses from Turkey
stereo tapes, $4.99. More patches
than anybody, anywhere. 70 scents
in incense. Five new dope books.
Comics by the bale. How can you
Just SIT there. Jump right up and run
down to 10 SW 7th St. TODAY
(J-3t-82-p)
~
LOST & FOUND
found a pair of brown rim glasses and
a small religious metal both found
at Little Hall, call Gary at 376-3061
(L-3t-80-p)
Lost It-brown wallet around ROTC
ME or ASE Bldgs, need ids and cards
please call Curls 378-0189 a*ap. lost
last week (l-2t-81-p)
Lost female Irish Setter Sat. nlte
Please call 376-6028 or 376-9011
(l-2t-81-p)
Found last week In ladles room, 3rd
floor of the Union: gold rim
GLASSES, call 392-1681 or come by
room 330, Union. (l-3t-81-nc)
Slide rule lost K&E decl-log with
name on case, reward call 378-6424,
will identify (L-lt-82-p)
Lost 4mth old basset with braided
collar & hurt leg with rabie tag also 4
mth old german Shepard afghan mix
both lost In old archer rd area call
378-9657 (L-2t-82-p)
Reward: greenish-brown zippered
pocket book lost, need desperately!
call: 392-7632 (L-lt-82-p)
Lost: ladles gold kent wrlstwatch
somewhere between union & stadium
sentimental value reward If found
please call Lynda, 373-4378
(L-4t-82-p)

.Jm&SSfi&Ssssi-. .jfc k i*A*J I j *^B
issfe- *S- $p in ifeingdPaHi i^^KMBBBk v&&Mtr£l jp> w fi
Bj|gj||HH^^M£y|g|B^H^H^
J ."i Z<* ''~a~ X *' U '' % T <'T 1, _. i 1 _., -a. ~

LOST St FOUND

* ####
Found In the S.W. section a white
girls bike, call 373-3431 (l-3t-81-nc)
SERVICES
Were wired for sight at tn*> smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)
Experience- journalism grad will
research, ec ~ type your paper tutor
In good writing style, better research
methods. Call 373-3723 (M-st-78-p)
Rubys Alterations apt. 217-100
N.E. Bth Ave. 376-8506
(m-st-81-p)
Your portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yourself In action at school
start at $35 call 378-4824. Harden
(m-10t-70-r)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmericard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)

j| KINGS CURB COUPON ||
|Vg ; 1430 s w l3th Street X> j
ix? Hamburger Platter Ip
j|l ifINGS/ and reg. Peps. 85*1.
Wood Host? SMO. value w/coupon I
j Check for Kings Royal Treats I
Ijg I B 9 savi everyday Both locations !6? |
W" Toda/s^^^^
I more for your money meal I
I moisons 1
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I moisons I
I CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison! I
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12,1971

.........'....../.'vlv/.*. V*V,V V.ViV*
SERVICES
Typing at its best by former NY
secretary. Speed & accuracy. Term
papers, theses, dissertations 50 cents
& up. Barbara Coaxum 373-4363
(M-4t-77-p)
smith corona typewriter repair 50%
off let a factory trained mechanic do
it call Sam between 9-1 392-9041
free pickup and delivery (M-st-81-p)
Term papers, reports, typed to your
specifications 40 cents per page D/S.
Theses 50 cents, D/S. Phone Mrs.
Tola Adenle, Flavet 111, 373-1003.
(m-st-81-p)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
Hogtown Photo Workshop. Get
together ideas for valentine photo.
All color and black and white work
at peoples prices. Eternal Exchange
804 W University 373-4311
(M-st-79-p)
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medic-legal-psychologic, open Sat. &
Sundays, 3265 Virginia St. No. 1,
Miami, 446-6583 appointments.
(M-25t-72-p)

a a *
SERVICES
Problem with your Honda? Call
John, 376-3171. Tuneup, $5 + parts
top end work, flats repaired, etc.
(M-3t-80-p)

(showtime i l i l
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AT BfABAWmE' UNDER 17 I
8:29 ADMITTED I
BEMIEATit bone- without
LUIS BUNEHESTIVAL
w A
Un Chien Andalou
In 1928 Luis Banuel and Salvidor Dali, two young
Spaniards recently arrived in France, teamed up to make
this film which has become the most widely discussed of all
surrealistic films. v
AND
i
NAZARIN
The Grand Prize Winner at the 1958 Cannes Festival. The
story of a defrocked priest, who, like Don Quixote, goes
forth on a pilgrimage believing that only among the
nameless poor can he fulfill his ideals and undo the wrongs
of others. Without a doubt this is one of Bunuels best
films.
Sunday, Fab. 14 5:00,7:30,10:00
Union Auditorium 50(
* VMjfl :
' 3M!S I
The Exterminating Angel
Bunuel long ago earned a reputation for castigating the
world and showing contempt for humanity. In this film a
group of affluent guests at a dinner party find they cannot
leave the sumptious drawing room where they have
gathered. They are wild by some inexplicable jinx. The film
investigates the repurcussions of their plight.
Monday, Fob. 15 5:30 8:00 10:30
Union Auditorium 50(
. spftfl SOre( j by tj,e JWR Union Classic
Films Committee

SERVICES
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Typing done. Accurate, good speller.
40 cents per page plus paper, call
Barbara 373-3724 or leave message
(M-lt-82-p)



The
Florida
Alligator

SEC Leader Kentucky Here Saturday

By MARTY PERMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Southeastern Conference
leading Kentucky adds to the
problems the Gators have
Saturday night as the Wildcats
make their only appearance of
the year in Gainesville.
Kentucky, currently on top in
the SEC by two games over
Vanderbilt and Tennessee
defeated UF earlier this year,
101-75, in Lexington, Ky. If it
makes any difference this time,
Wildcat coach Adolph Rupp will
not be with the team.
RUPP WAS sidelined earlier
this week with an infected foot,
and ididnt make the
Georgia-Florida trip.
Without Rupp, the Gators will
have to concentrate on stopping
Tom Payne, Larry Steele, Tom
Parker, Mike Casey ... the list
can continue because everyone on
the Wildcat squad can score.
Payne, the first black player
on the Wildcat squad, is a mere
7-foot-2. He wasnt
overpowering in the first
meeting of the clubs this year,
but reports floating in from
Lexington have the center vastly
improved since then.

*
jmbl mF M
TOM KENNEDY
HOLDING HANDS WONT HELP SATURDAY
... Kentucky invades Florida Gym with 7-footer

* *K
.' k

GATOR COACH Tommy
Bartlett wasnt exactly
overconfident Wednesday night
when he mentioned the
Wildcats.
If someone isnt shooting,
theyll (Kentucky) put someone
else in who can, Bartlett said. A
prime example was made in the
first game this year. Jim
Andrews, a 6-foot-11 sophomore
made the scene in the last half
and dominated play while he
was in the game. He scored 10
points within a matter of four
minutes.
Kentuckys height is a definite
edge. The first five, Payne,
Steele, Casey, Parker and Terry
Mills average over 6-feet-6. Mills
is the smallest on the first five at
6-feet-2.
THE GATORS will hope
Florida Gym, which has given
Kentucky problems the past few
years, does its job again. At
home, Florida has defeated the
Wildcats three times in the last
four years.
The .375 shooting percentage
against LSU Wednesday night is
characteristic of the Gators
biggest concern.

We just havent shot well at
all this year, Bartlett said. For
us to win, we have to have an
above average shooting night. If
we dont shoot above average,
we cant win. A .408
percentage is the worst in the
SEC and the Gators own it.
THE GATORS CURRENT
three-game losing streak doesnt
look to end in the next few
games. After Kentucky,
Tennessee arrives for a game
Monday night. Then, in the last
road trip of the year, Florida
travels to Mississippi to meet the
Ole Miss Rebels and Mississippi
State. And one knows how the
Gators play on the road one
win in two years away from
home.
Tony Miller, still leading the
club with nearly 16 points per
game, has had three bad games
in a row. A 4-15 from the field
marked the sophomores game
Wednesday night.
The past three games, while
Miller has been the object of
rival defenses, Tom Purvis has
been the scorer. Wednesday
night marked the fifth straight
game Purvis has hit in double

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Wmm,yx m I A. i
I niversity Ave. and Gainesville Mall Ij
Free Parking on First Federal Lot

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Friday, February 12,1971, The Florida Alligator,

figures. Hoover, Earl Findley and Gary
Bartlett plans to start the Waddell for the 7:45 p.m. tip off
same five of Miller, Purvis, Jerry Saturday night.
[
1 jSHy Student Special
W(With The Coupon) I
Our Regular 93< Steak burger |
.uncheon And Any 15t Drink
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CARS TRUCKS BUSES
SPKIAI ATTENTION TO INSURANCE CLAIMS
IMJMMAYt IMTAAAATIOM nil PTUAATB PICK B ft NUVWT
I 376-2558 I
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321 H.W. 4 IAST SIM AX.L. DVOT, PA. MK M CAINSVIUB

CHUCK KELLER
Sports Editor

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12, 1971

PUBLIC RELATIONS FOR UNIVERSITY
Cheerleaders Motor To Away Games

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
Deprived of SG financial
support during the fall quarter
hassle over student football
ticket charges and allocations,
the UF cheerleading squad is still
motoring along, attempting to
whip up enthusiasm for the UFs
sometimes lagging athletic
fortunes.
The athletes are all very
appreciative, head cheerleader
Susan Stratton said. Especially

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r? *>- >M:WB^^Slmmm^lS\ TOM KENNEDY
SUSAN STRATTON PROMOTES UF ON ROAD
.. made trip to Alabama on own money

NBA Record
Towering Wilt Chamberlain
holds the National Basketball
Association one-game scoring
record with 200 points, scored
on March 3,1962 while a
member of the Philadelphia
76ers.

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coach Tommy Bartlett and the
basketball squad: they felt like
nobody appreciated them.
THE SQUAD is now funded
exclusively by the Athletic
Department to the tune of
$4,000 yearly, and Stratton
admits students hold ambiguous
ideas about the squad.
Theres no hassle from
students, but were aware people
look at us as part of the
establishment.

UNDER A DOLLAR DOES IT AT THE
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214 NW 13th ST. 376-6472 AND 114 SW 34th ST 372-3649

But if you want to promote
UF, cheerleading is a great thing
to do. Were public relations for
the university.
FOR EXAMPLE, the
legislatures have really weird
ideas about students; they think
theyre all freaks or something.
So when we show them
around during legislative
weekends, we have an
opportunity to show them
another side of students, Miss
Stratton said.
The squad of 12, plus six
alternates, is chosen in tryouts
beginning during the second
week of the spring quarter.
ABOUT 80 to a 100 girls,
and 20 to 30 guys usually come
out for the squad, Stratton
said. The girls usually have
some cheerleading experience,
but most of the men dont.
While people are usually most
aware of the squad during
football season, theyve also
been accompaning the basketball
team on the road trips where
there arent many Gator fans.
Thats the reason why we go.
We try to make as much noise as
we can, Stratton said.
IN FACT, they made the first
road trip of the season to
Alabama with their own
money left over in the budget
from football season.
But coach Bartlett liked the
idea so much, he told us he had
funds to pay for the trips.
W 7 e cant take the entire
squad, but we do take four
people from the group.
STRATTON, cheerleader
All-American, and a finalist in

the Miss Cheerleader USA
contest, said the biggest rewards
are meeting people from all
walks of life.

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Buzz Fazio, world champion
bowler, will give two
exhibitions Saturday, Feb. 13
at 12:00 noon and 4:00 p.m.
His achievements include:
A record tying 300 game in the 1950 All
Star Tournament.
Five-time billing as All-American
Reign as "king of Bowling" in Detroit 1955 X Shfa
First 800 series on live TV
Twenty-eight 300 games
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OLD On sm)
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And since we're representing
the university, and we are a
student group, we're working on
funding from SG again."



Wildcats Need Practice In Georgia

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA (UP!) The
Kentucky Wildcats are looking
forward to Monday s visit to the
University of Georgia.
Not that the eighth-ranked
Wildcats are particularly
concerned about the Bulldogs,
whom they figure to beat
handily, but the game gives the
Wildcats a chance to workout on
the court where his years
NCAA Midcast Regionals will be
played next month.
THE WILDCATS, 16-3
over-all, now have a solid two
game lead over co-runnerups
Tennessee and Vanderbilt in the
Southeastern Conference race
and are heavily favored to grab
their 26th title and another
NCAA berth.
Kentucky visits Florida 6-13
Saturday night and switches over
to Athens, Ga., and its date with
the Bulldogs 4-14 Monday.
Tennessee 154 plays the same
two foes in reverse order while
Vanderbilt 12-7 has a tough
Saturday mglit assignment at
Louisiana State 11-7 and then
plays Alabama 7-11 Monday.
THE SOUTHEASTERN
Conference cage race all but
ended Wednesday night when
Ole Miss, paced by a 46-point
performance by national scoring
leader Johnny Neumann, upset
Vanderbilt. Yhat left Vandy tied
with Tennessee at 8-3 in SEC
play while Kentucky is 10-1.
The Wildcats, who have seven
games left to play, must meet
Vandefbuilt on the read Feb. 27
but catch LSU Feb. 20 and
Tennessee March 6 both in the
friendly confines of Memorial
Coliseum where they seldom
lose.
o/ \Q
\ I / /

LwhSt everwma ;
To EOT JANE ? |P
usier jo .1 ,r there : ... f
Bette Davis and Joan Crawford /#,
m JULIE ALLRED DAVE WIII 9?:X f l
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and introducing VICTOR BUQNO u J,
FREE AT THE
BENCH BAR


j
JOHNNY NEUMANN
... 42.2 average
Although Coach Adolph
Rupp is ailing, the Wildcats are
playing championship basketball
these days. They have been over
the 100 point mark in each of
their last four games, averaging
110 in that span, with a half
dozen players in double figures
their past two games.
THEIR LONE conference loss
was 15th-ranked Tennessee,
75-71, back on Jan. 16.
Tennessee lost at Mississippi
State and at LSU and suffered
its most crippling blow 11 days
ago by losing AT HOME to
Vanderbuilt.
Vandys conference losses
were at Florida in triple
overtime, at Kentucky by 10
points and Wednesday at Ole
Miss.
LSU, making up for the
departure of Pete Maravich with
a well-rounded attack, also has
three SEC losses and traiL
Tennessee and Vanderbuilt by
only a half game.
THE BENGALS, who have
three of the top seven scorers in
the SEC, have lor home to
Kentucky by thru., points and
Ole Miss.
Neumann, the sensational
6-foot-6 sophomore who has
taken up where Maravich left
off, is running away with the
SEC individual scoring race and
is well on his way to the national
title as well. The Rebel
sharpshooter has 844 points in

20 games for an average of 42.2
Neumann has already become
the only SEC player besides
Maravich to reach the 800
plateau and should have little
trouble going over 1,000 in his six
remaining games.
MARAVICH, WHO set NCAA
scoring records in each of his
three years at LSU scored 1,138
points as a sophomore, 1,148 as
a junior and 1,381 as a senior.
Neumann would have to average
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49 points per game in his last six
games to equal Maraviclfs
sophomore mark.
That may not be as impossible
as it sounds. Neumann has
already played once against his
six remaining foes and he
averaged 42.5 against them the
first time around.
Auburn senior Johnny
Mengelt is the distant runnerup
in SEC scoring at 27.1.
The sixth-ranked Jacksonville

PUBLIC NOTICE
AN RCA QUADRASONIC SYSTEM
IS BEING DISPLAYED AND
DEMONSTRATED AT MUNTZ STEREO
319 NW 13 ST. 378-2331
Mtoi^toi^to^tototoH

Friday, February 12, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

(Fla.) Dolphins, probably will
meet Kentucky again in the
Mideast Regionals next month.
They met in last year's regional
finals with the Dolphins, who
lost to champion UCLA in the
national finals, beating
Kentucky, 106-100.
The other two regional teams
figure to be the Big Ten
champion and either
second-ranked Marquette or
lOth-ranked Notre Dame.

Page 21



Page 22

Thg Florida AlHgrtor, Friday, February 12,1971

Troubled FSU Swimmers To Meet UF

By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writer
Despite controversy surrounding the Florida State swim team, the
Serrrinoles will still be host to the Gator swimmers in a dual meet
Saturday at the FSU pool.
The FSU swim team voted on Feb. 1 to request the retirement of
their coach, N. B. Bim Stults, who the swimmers said was not
communicating with them. The Seminole swimmers decided to finish
out the season under Stults then let the schools administration handle
the possible selection of a new swim coach.
WE REALIZE that they (FSU) have their problems but Im sure
theyll be up for us Saturday, UF coach Bill Harlan said Thursday.
They have a couple of real tough freestylers and backstrokers.
After last Saturdays loss to Tennessee, the Gators, 9-1, rebounded
strongly by defeating Alabama Tuesday, 65-48, in Tuscaloosa.
Pete Orscheit set two new Alabama pool records in the 1000 and
500 yard freestyles, with times of 10:09 and 4:23.2, respectively.
BRUCE WILLIAMS broke the meet open swimming in the
100-yard freestyle. Going into the event the Gators held a slim 33-28
lead.
The Gators have three more opportunities to qualify individual

team members for the NCAA
Championships at lowa State
against FSU, in the Southern
IntercolJ' giate Championships or
in the SLC Championships-
Among those already
qualified are Gary Chelosky in
the 200-yard breaststroke, Bill
Dorney in the 100-yard
backstroke and the 400 medley
relay team.
Harlan is hopeful that
Williams will qualify in the
200-yard freestyle, Mark McKee
will qualify in the 200-yard
breaststroke and Williams and
Steve McDonnell will qualify in
100-yard butterfly.
Region Gomes
Resume Today
The region six games
tournament, which determines
the regional representatives in
bowling, billiards, table tennis,
bridge and chess for the
Association of College Unions
International Tournament to be
held later t* *?.s year, continues
through Saturday at the J.
Wayne Reitz Union.
Events scheduled for today
include the chess second round,
8 a.m. until noon; the first
round of womens bowling, 8:30
a.m. until 11:30 a.m.; a 9 a.m.
start for the second round of
bridge; the first found of mens
and womens table tennis
doubles, 9 a.m. until 11 a.m.;
the second round of mens
bowling, slated from 12 p.m.,
and lasting until 6 p.m. and the
second round of womens
bowling, beginning at 3:30 and
lasting until 6:30 p.m.
The second round of men and
womens table tennis doubles,
begins at 4 p.m. and lasts until 6
p.m.; the third round of mens
bowling, starting at 7 p.m. and
ending at 10 p.m.; the final
session of bridge, beginning at 7
p.m., and lasting until 11 pjn.
and the fourth round of chess,
I JUST &UJ? MM* HORN
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PHIL COPE
STEVE MCDONNELL SPLASHES AWAY AGAINST TENNESSEE
... hopes to qualify for NCAA 100-yard butterfly



HITCHCOCK CUTS DEFICIT
Wrestlers Traveling Light

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Editor
Coach Keith Tennant and his
Gator wrestlers are going to this
Saturdays four-team round
robin at Auburn just about 70
pounds lighter.
Doug lannaretti, 167-pound
class, and Steve Salzman,
118-pound class, will miss the
match which includes
Southeastern Conference powers
Georgia, defending champ LSU
and Auburn.
IN LAST weeks competition
in Atlanta, lannarelli dislocated
his ankle while Salzman suffered
a concussion.
However, the Gators, now 84
in dual meets, imported some
beef from the football team
with coach Doug Dickeys
approval. Freshman football
lineman Dave Hitchcock,
packing 215 pounds on a
5-foot-9 frame, started
practicing with wrestling team
Monday, and will make the trip
to Auburn for the unlimited
(heavyweight) division.
Hes never had any formal
wrestling training, but he has a
lot of innate ability, Tennant
said. With his strength and

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CHET SANDERS
... 150-pound class
speed he could be an asset to the
team.
THE TEAMS heaviest
wrestler is Don Zorich at 190.
The absence of a heavyweight
wrestler has forced the Gators to
either forfeit the event or use a
lighter man in past competition.
Hitchcock will be going
against larger and more
experienced heavyweights,
according to Tennant.
He will probably get some
needed experience for the SEC
Championship (early March),
Tennant said.
SLATED FOR action at

Auburn will be Steve Gaines,
John Read, 118; Jack Marshall,
126; Dave Rothman, Bill Read,
134; Jon Barres, 142; Chet
Sanders, Bob Penna, 150; Jeff
Shaffner, Tom Derrough, 158;
Mike Shewmaker, Frank
BrezezirrtJki, 167; Chris Corder,
177; Zorich, 190 and Hitchcock,
unlimited.
If Shewmaker, who might
have the flu, cant make the trip,
Tennant intends to move
Shaffner to 167 and Penna to
158.
Marshall, who missed last
weeks round robin with a
pinched nerve, will probably be
slowed, according to Tennant.
Corder, with a knee injury from
last week, will also be a bit
hobbled.
THE MEET will be our
toughest quad, Tennant said.
We could very likely come out
0-3 or we could come out 2-1.
This season UF has lost to
Auburn and Georgia and has
defeated Alabama, which had
downed LSU.
We could have beaten
Georgia earlier this season if we
could have won the 134 and 142
divisions instead of getting
draws, Tennant said.

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f-t .. : 1 r* i't\ ? .. ' -
Friday, February 12, 1971, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, February 12,1971

BONANZA SIRLOIN FIT
'THERE IS ONLY ONE'
RMWIIHI 2445 S.W. 13 ST.
BONANZA Take Out 378-0946 hs\ S§|)
"Congratulates the i I or/ 1
Player of the Week P/ayer Os The Week
# Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks,
chicken, fish, and our famous V4lb.
Bonanzaburger 100% beef, French
Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets B9
I Our steaks are served with a steaminq-hot, buttery
baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green
Steak Sandwich -1.19
Bunkhouse Special v? ib. 100% chopped
beef -1.39
9
Rib Eye 6 oz., tender cut steak
Steak Sandwich -1.19
I Sirloin Strip ll oz., savory, hearty meat,
Top Hand a 15 oz. T-bone for a huge,
rugged appetite 2.99
Tom Purvis
| I J This week's Player of the Week honors go to II
| \ ) post man Tom Purvis for his outstanding efforts in TT-TT?
f the Gators' matches with Auburn, Vanderbilt and ||
V\ The 6-foot-5 senior dropped in 27 points against TTOT?
Auburn, then 14 against Vanderbilt and finally, 22 rkJK
against LSU. STUDENTS
Purvis has been averaging (through the
ll| Vanderbilt game) 12.5 points a game.
HI
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Call 376-2487 9,2 IMARINF
Our superb cheese pizza 111 IfIUII 1L
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