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The Florida alligator

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The Florida alligator
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Summer gator
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Daily bulletin
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the students of the University of Florida
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Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
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Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
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Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
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Has occasional supplements.
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Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY
Vol. 63, No. 81 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, February 11, 1971
PRESIDENT ALLOWED S7OO
' _ / ; 1
Expenditures Limited
By Student Senate

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
After two weeks of being
shifted through committees, the
Maximum Campaign
Expenditure Law was passed by
the Student Senate Tuesday
night.
The law limits campaign
expenditures of candidates
running for student body
president and vice president to
$700; for student body
treasurer, $150; and chancellor
of the Honor Court, $ 150.
CANDIDATES RUNNING
for chief of the traffic court are
limited to $75 and those running
for any of the other smaller
offices, such as traffic and honor
courts, or student senate seats
are limited to S3O.
The bill also limits the
campaign expenditure of
political parties to S2OO. That
total party expenditure means
party advertising, in which all
the candidates of that party are
named.
Violations of this law will
cause the candidate to be
disqualified by the Honor
Court.
THE LAW also empowers the
Honor Court to disqualify the

Soldiers Say They Were In Laos

See Related Story Page 4
SAIGON (UPI) U.S.
soldiers at Khe Sanh in South
Vietnams northwest comer said
Wednesday at least 100
American ground troops have
joined the offensive into Laos on
security missions and fought
Communist forces there. U.S.
headquarters in Saigon denied
the report.
The American ground
involvement in the three-day
Laos drive was reported as waves*
of U.S. Air Force 852
Stratofortresses dropped tons of
bombs ahead of South
Vietnamese troops cutting across
the communists Ho Chi Minh
supply trail in Laos.
US. CASUALTIES in the
Laos offensive were placed
Wednesday at 16 killed, two
missing in action and 42
wounded. South Vietnamese

entire upper slate of a party
(president, vice-president,
treasurer, chancellor and traffic
court head) when such a party
is found in violation of this
law.
ei ' ''
The senate also approved the
budgets for the Public Functions
Authority, the Florida Blue Key
Speakers Bureau, the Council of
International Organizations and
the University Religious
Association.
A $36,000 budget was also
approved for Student
Government Productions. Os
that figure, $3,000 are
appropriated for use by the
Rathskeller.
GATOR GROWLS budget
also received a nod from the
senators who approved the
$5,000 tab to be used by Growl
officials to get fireworks
($2,000) and to pay the physical
plant ($3,000) for equipment
used by what the Growl officials
term the largest
student-produced, student-run
show in the world.
A resolution concerning the
drug policy recently enacted by
UFs Housing Department was
not brought to the senate floor.
ACCORDING TO Sen. Bill
Watson, more study needs to be
done on the policy. He urged

losses, according to official
reports, were 22 killed and 65
wounded. Fifty-five Communists
were reported slain.
Four-thousand more South
Vietnamese troops were
committed to the Laos offensive
Wednesday, bringing the task
force strength to 10,000 men. A
U.S. force of 9,000 men, barred
from entering Laos under
official policy, was supporting
the offensive on the South
Vietnamese side of the order but
there were no strictures on
American airpower.
IN TWO GROUND clashes in
Laos early Wednesday. South
Vietnamese troops reported
killing 33 North Vietnamese.
Field reports said six South
Vietnamese Rangers were killed
and 17 wounded.
North Vietnamese gunners
threw up anti-aircraft fire

students to contact him for
action concerning the drug
policy. Watsons number is
392-8789.
Second readings approved by
the senate were the $9,963 for
an FM radio station, and $1,500
for operation of the Legal Aid
and Defender Clinic.

Uhlfelder Makes Public
Organization Money List

By JAN GOOOWN
Alligator Staff Writer
' 7
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder, following a petition
filed to the Honor Court
Tuesday by the (YAF) Young
Americans for Freedom for
misappropriated student
funds, made public Wednesday
the complete list of
organizations that he has given
money to this year.
YAF charged that Uhlfelder
went beyond the scope of his
authority in paying the $66.41
defecit of the Student
Mobilization Committee (SMC)

described as absolute murder
at American helicopters assisting
the South Vietnamese, and at
least four were shot down.
Crews of two of the downed
helicopters were whisked to
safety by compatriots operating
under the muzzles of American
guns. One rescued man fired his
Ml 6 rifle at the enemy with one
hand as he clung with the other
to the rocket pod of a departing
AHI helicopter gunship, UPI
correspondent Robert E.
Sullivan reported.
MEANWHILE, FAR to the
north of the allied push in Laos.
North Vietnamese forces
intensified pressures on Laotian
ann> headquarters at Long
Cheng on the Plain of Jars. The
commander of the Laotian
defenders. (Jen. Vang Pao. flew
to the capital of Vientiane to ask
(SEE 'LAOS/ PAGE 4)

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WORLDLY WARES
Reza Fayazi shows some of the native wares at the Iranian exhibit
on the second floor of the union. It's all part of International Week
and runs through Saturday when the festivities are climaxed at the
International Ball. Tonight, two foreign films will be presented.
"Casanova '70," a Brazilian film, is showing at 5:30 in the Union
Auditorium and the Indian film "Aparaparajito" can be seen at 8 p.m.
in the Medical Center Auditorium. The International Festival
tomorrow night at 8 p.m. in the University Auditorium includes
dancing and singing in the form of a talent show. See related story
page 5.

with student activity fees, from
a special presidential fund.
SINCE SEPTEMBER,
Uhlfelder said he has spent
approximately S4OO from the
fund in the following way:
$33 for a rental bus for use
of transfer students
$25 to move a piano from
the Rathskeller to Jennings
$3.60 for stamps used to
help push the 18-year vote
$l2O for the Billy Mitchell
and Gator Guard Drill Teams,
for transportation to Tallahassee
for the gubanatorial
inauguration
$52.19 for the Rose
Community Center for publicity
$66.14 for the Student
Mobilization Committee to pay
a past debt
According to Uhlfelder, the
student body president is given
SISOO each school year by the
Student Senate from student
activity fees to be used as he sees
fit.
I TRY to use the money
based on an emergency and need
basis, Uhlfelder said. l would
do it for anyone on campus who
is facing a similar situation. I
personally disagree with the
philosphy of YAF. but if they
needed the money, I would give
it to them.
SMC asked for the money
from Uhlfelder after the Senate
voted not to pay the debt. The
debt was a result of a bill owed
to the Reitz Union from last year
for printing and use of rooms,
incurred by a student who is no
longer in school. Uhlfelder
payed the money directly to the
Union.
YAF is asking the Honor
Court for an interpretation of
the authority of the student
body president to use the fund.
Mike Carr. YAF Chairman,
said. The fact that 1 disagree

1 | m 'T wPt
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Wm
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-
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DAN STEVENS
... to review petition
with SMC helped to galvinize me
to action, but I dont agree with
students being forced to fund
political action groups, even if it
is indirectly.
THE BOARD OF MASTERS,
a part of the Honor Court that
consists of five students and has
power to interpret provisions of
the constitution or interpret acts
of student body officials in the
light of the constitution, will
meet Sunday or Monday night
to review the petition according
to Dan Stevens, Board of
Masters Chairman and Honor
Court Chancelloi.
The Gator
NEW UF registration system
creates confusion and
complaints as appointments
are received page 2
Classifieds 12
Editorials g
Entertainment 18
Letters 9
Movies 12
Sports 20



Page 2

!, Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1971

Grade Requirements Cause Question

By JANET QLES
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Affairs
Committee which serves in an
advisory capacity to President
Stephen C. OConnell, agreed
yesterday to give full
consideration to a uniform

Dorm Security Adequate
According To UF Officials

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Chief Audie Shuler of the University Police
Department (UPD) said Wednesday ten men officers
are on duty between 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 a.m., and
there is no increase planned in spite of the alleged
rapes of Feb. 2.
Shuler was responding to an Alligator article on
Wednesday concerning basic dorm security. Other
officials also commented on basic dorm security
measures and lighting.
SHULER SAID there are two shifts covering the
3:30 p.m. to 7:30 a.m. time slot. On these shifts
there are three foot patrolmen, equipped with
radios, and four patrol vehicles in operation, two
covering the dorms and classroom areas, one
covering the outlying campus areas.
There is also a police sergeant on both shifts and
one lieutenant on both shifts.
Shuler said the three foot patrolmen cover the
whole campus and check the outside of the dorms.
THESE MEN COVER the classrooms and dorm
areas, with more emphasis on the womens dorms
than the mens, said Shuler.
Shuler said the patrolmen dont go inside the
dorms, but occasionally one might check in with a
resident advisor (RA) on duty or with a
nightwatchman.
ln general the protection is adequate and we
have had no complaints from the dorms or RAs
Shuler said.
SHULER SAID the biggest security problem in
the dorms was with the residents.
Primarily the breakdown of dorm security is
with the residents leaving inside and outside doors
open or unlocked, said Shuler.
Director of UF Housing, Harold Riker, said his
department will recheck physical facilities in
relation to security measures, and says he wants to
enlist the help of dorm residents in the support of
security measures.
PROVIDING MAXIMUM security for the
residents can only be accomplished with the
assistance of the residents, Riker added.

YDs To Meet Tonight

UFs Young Democrats will
meet tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
room 355 of the Reitz Union.
Sen. Bayh To Appear
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-Ind.) will
be appearing Feb. 16 at 11 a.m.
in the Plaza of the Americas as
part of Accent 7l.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements anc! to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

siatement cf eligibility for
participation in extracurricular
activities.
As it now stands, the
scholarship requirement for a
non-athletic student to take part
in outside activities is the
maintenance of a 2.0 grade point
average per quarter. However,

Plans are being made to aid in
the publicity for the appearance
on the UF campus of U. S.
Democratic senators Birch Bayh
and Harold Hughes. In addition,
plans are being made for a major
voter registration campaign for
voters between the ages of 18
and 21.
The meetings are open to all
students and those interested in
becoming members.

II IN DEPTH U
The maintenance of outside lighting is the duty
of the Physical Plant Division, and is handled by
Lawrence Hodgins, a supervisor with the UPD, and
his department.
HODGINS SAID approximately SIB,OOO a year is
spent on lighting on the UF campus. There have
been projects in the past to improve the lighting,
and there are more improvements planned for the
future.
THERE ARE CERTAIN places somebody
doesnt consider adequate now, in some cases this is
due to the growth of shrubbery or the building of
new buildings in the area,said Hodgins.
Benjamin Bennett, a building service supervisor
for housing, said the report of outside lights not
being turned on in Tolbert area was mysterious to
him.
All of our light systems are photo-electric cells
or 24 hour clocks, so no one should have to turn
them on or off, said Bennett.
PHOTO-ELECTRIC lights are triggered by the
approach of darkness when the normal daylight
drops to a certain level. Lights equipped with 24
hour clocks are simply supposed to turn on every 24
hours. These are being installed on campus because
clock types are constantly damaged.
BENNETT SAID he received no complaints from
RAs in Jennings concerning the lighting behind the
girls dorm, but he received complaints from
operators walking to work at the telephone center
behind Jennings.
There are six lamps at the service drive between
Rawlings and Broward, but these lamps, are not
lamped (this means the light bulbs are removed) at
the request of Rawlings residents, who are bothered
in their sleep by the lights, Bennett said.
Bennett said if the residents at Rawlings and
Broward want the lights on they only have to ask.

athletic students, subject to
scholarship requirements set
forth by the Southeastern
Conference are required to
maintain only a 1.6.
THE REAL ISSUE, stated
one committee member, is one
of creating two kinds of citizens
the athlete who is provided


Mud crutch Shows at 9:00 & 11:00pm 9
9 Saturday 13th 9
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9 50< single girls. 9

with cushions to survive
academically and the non-athlete
who is thrown to the wolves.
According to Bob Berrin,
representative from student
government, the general
consensus among students
questioned is that requirements
for eligibility be equal for
everyone whether involved in
SEC athletics or any other
extracurricular activities.
Going a step further, Dr. Ruth
Alexander recommended that no
student be deprived of
participating in co-curricular
activities regardless of
scholarship standing, and that
this stipulation be removed.
TO DEPRIVE a student of
participating in an activity is in
essence depriving him of learning
opportunities, she related.
Especially in view of the
student whose co-curricular
activities enhance his academic
course of study.
Before submitting any
recommendation to
administrative officials the
committee plans to hold an open
meeting in the next two weeks
with students directly involved
in a question of priorities
addressing the group.
The committee in its
Wednesday meeting also agreed
to recommend to OConnell
Director of Student Health

Registration Complaints Begin
Registration appointment notices were received this week by UF
students, and already complaints have been voiced to the office of the
registrar.
The registrar is referring these complaints to student government.
The complaints have arisen because of the method used this quarter
for scheduling appointments.
THE STUDENT Senate recently passed a resolution which would
change the method of registration to a random, rotating system.
. In the new system, which will begin next fall, all undergraduate
students who have earned 145 hours or more will be assigned
appointments during the early part of advanced registration.
All other undergraduates will be grouped into thirds by social
security number, so they will receive an early appointment one
quarter out of three for the normal academic year.
The Council of Deans has approved this plan.
THIS QUARTER and during the summer quarter appointments will
be assigned at random.
If a graduating senior needs a course which he is unable to register
for, he should contact the department chairman.
Seniors who encounter problems should contact SG.

Services Wilmer Coggins
suggestion that the student
health fee be considered a
separate entity free from any
connection with student
activities fee.
COGGINS OUTLINED the
budget problems which faced
the Student Health Service and
felt convinced the only way to
face these problems would be to
separate and increase the student
health fee.
This measure was
recommended by Coggins last
year to UF President, Stephen C.
OConnell, but the suggestion
was denied and no increase was
allotted for the service. Severe
financial problems resulted for
the service this year, according
to Coggins.
Coggins further stated that it
was his personal opinion that
OConnell is dedicated to
supporting the football program
above any other consideration
and this brings us into direct
conflict in funding the Student
Health Service.
The Student Affairs
Committee after reviewing
Coggins suggestion voted to
recommend the measure to
President OConnell, and by
separating the fees said they
hoped, OConnell would look
into the specific increases.



Latin American Conference
To Discuss Fiscal Policy

By ELLI MOSS
Alligator Staff Writer
Educators and economists
from the United States, Latin
America and England will come
to UF Feb. 17-20 to participate
in the 21st annual Latin
American conference.
The theme for the conference
is Fiscal Policy for
Industrialization in Latin
America and will be held under
the auspices of the Center for
Latin American Studies.
DR. DAVID GEITHMAN,
Nixon Welcomes
Astronauts Back
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon Tuesday
welcomed the Apollo 14
astronauts back to earth and
expressed the thanks of a
grateful nation for their exploits.
Shortly after the three
astronauts arrived aboard the
USS New Orleans, Nixon
telephoned them to offer his
congratulations on their trip.
Once again earth has
welcomed back its own and I
join people everywhere in
rejoicing both at the safe return
of astronauts Shepard, Mitchell
and Roosa and at the successful
completion of their mission,
Nixon said in a White House
statement.
He watched the splashdown
on a television set in the office
of an aide adjacent to his oval
office.

in concert
BBH
Pacific Gas & Electric
V ~.V: :^ : -\\ : '-:l-
Recordsville in the Mall presented by SGP
m

assistant professor of economics,
is conference chairman. He has
been working on the conference
for the past eight months,
designing topics and selecting
participants.
The conference will consist of
10 major papers and 20
discussant papers by
distinguished economists and
social scientists. Other activities
are also scheduled.
According to Dr. Geithman,
the people presenting the papers
all have excellent reputations.
Two of them, Richard F.
Musgrave of Harvard and
Nicholas Kaldor of Cambridge
are among the top 10
economists in the
world.
This conference is the first
of its kind, stated Dr.
Geithman, in that it addresses
directly the problem of
implementing fiscal policy for
fostering industrialization.
Latin America is trying to
industrialize, explained Dr.
Geithman, in order to raise the
standard of living.
The conference will include
10 ninety-minute sessions,
opening with a half-hour
presentation by the author of a
major paper.
A LUNCHEON will be held
Feb. 18 at 12 noon in Ballroom
A in the Reitz Union.
An exhibition of
pre-Columbian textiles from
Peru will open at the University
Gallery on Feb. 18 at 8 p.m.
with a lecture by a national
authority on art textiles.
Another luncheon will be held
Feb. 19 with an address by
Willard L. Thorp, distinguished

visiting professor and professor
emeritus from Amherst College.
The keynote address for the
conference will be by Hollis
Chenery, economic advisor for
the president of World Bank at
8:30 p.m. Feb. 19.
Sessions will be held in rooms
361, 362, and 363 of the Reitz
Union.
All interested persons are
invited to attend.
ABOUT 200-300 other top
economists, social scientists,
government officials, and people
with private business concerns in
Latin America will also attend
the convention.
Keep An Eye
On The Fly
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Os all the insects in the world,
musca domestica is probably
mans greatest enemy.
YOU KNOW him as the;
housefly but maybe you dont [
know just how serious a health
threat he really is, cautions the
California Medical Association.
Flies may spread dysentery,
summer or infant diarrhea,
typhoid fever, tuberculosis and
trachoma.
THE FLYS SIX feet have
bristles and sticky pads and his
proboscis (nose) is hairy, so that
germs are readily collected and
passed on when the fly lands on
a person, his food or
surroundings.

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Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11,1971

Page 4

LAOS....

for reinforcements and U.S.
tactical air support during an
expected siege of Long Cheng.
In Cambodia, the third arena
in the expanded Indochina War,
bitter fighting was reported
between Cambodian troops and
Communist forces on Highway 7
about 37 miles northeast of the
capital of Phnom
Government
were rushed to the scene from
the nearby town of Skoun.
In Phnom Penh, reliable
sources close to the government
said Cambodian Premier Lon
Nol had suffered a stroke that
paralyzed half his body. An
official communique said Lon
Nol, a 52-year-old general who
has been directing operations
against Communist invaders in
his dual role of defense minister,
; was ordered to stop all activities
: for medical reasons.
i
i
i UPI CORRESPONDENT
: Kenneth Praddick filed a

dispatch from Khe Sanh,
| operational headquarters for the
: Laos offensive, on the
i involvement of U.S. ground
: troops.
i
Braddick said the U.S. troops
: were a force of about 100 men
i
: from the 3rd Platoon, Delta
j Troop, 7th Battalion, 17th Air
: Cavalry. He said the unit was on
i the ground in Laos at times
: during the past three days,
: operating as members of an
: aero-rifle group that is flown
: by helicopter into areas where
: ground forces are needed on
short notice. A U.S. Army
: captain at Khe Sanh told
\ Braddick that the Americans

flown into Laos had gone there
\to hook shot down helicopters
;! to recovery aircraft and that
j: troops of South Vietnams elite
: Black Panther Division provided
: security for them.
i

Enlisted men at Khe Sanh
said, however, they had been in


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U. S. TROOPS
... in South Vietnam

Laos on such missions and had
engaged Communist ground
troops on at least one occasion.
IN SAIGON, a spokesman at
U.S. headquarters issued a flat
denial that aero-rifle platoons
had been landed in Laos. He said
that to his knowledge no U.S.
ground-to-air coordination"
specialists, known as
Pathfinders, had gone into
Laos. He added that Americans
who might be on the ground
briefly in Laos to recover
helicopters would come under
guidelines covering
s e arch-an d-rescue SAR
operations.
Official spokesmen would not
go into specific details on SAR
operations, but American
military sources said there is
considerable latitude on steps
which may be taken to rescue
down crews. They indicated that
such steps might include the use
of American personnel if
necessary.
The U.S. sources also said that
Americans are involved in
reconnaissance activities on the
Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos, and
that Green Beret troops have
been conducting them for the
past five years. There were
reports this week and last week
of U.S. reconnaissance missions
across the border in Laos in
connection with the South
Vietnamese drive.
?

--

y''"'? r f V .... NORTH VIETNAM
1 sh / V
Plain of Jans Hanoi
S Long Chong C f
r Vientiane
C \ Cm// of
\ LA OS \. \ Tonkin
THAILAND ) \ k
LAOTIAN OFFENSIVE / O \
( A
US troops allegedly in Laos: 100 C# Khe Sanh
\ -\vs \
U.S. Casualties in Laos as of \ fb, i V-x V
Wednesday: 16 killed, two J jk Da Nang
missing, 42 wounded. / 1 | \
South Vietnamese casualties: / % J
22 killed, 65 wounded. o*** \ S. VIETNAM
Communists killed: 55 /
CAMBODIA \
Troops committed to the
Laotian offensive: 10,000
U. S. backing up offensive:
9,000. AREA OF OPERATION
... in the Laotian offensive

Laotian Invasion Spurs
SMC Rally At Noon Today

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
In view of the recent United
States supported Laotian
invasion, the Student
Mobilization Committee to end
the war in Viet Nam (SMC) is
sponsoring a rally Thursday in

the Plaza of the Americas at
noon.
The purpose will be to prove
to the UF students that the war
is being escalated rather than
de-escalated as Mr. Nixon keeps
promising according to SMC
spokesman Wayne Heiber.
A SPOKESMAN FROM the
Veterans for Peace, who will be
speaking on the Winter
Soldiers Investigation which
took place last Jan. 31 Feb. 2
in Detroit.
Richard Johnson of the
Gainesville research co-operative
will be speaking on War
Related Research, covering
alleged campus complicity with
the war.
SMC is also trying to get a
representative from the Black
Student Union (BSU) to speak
on the black man and the war.
FINALLY SMC will talk
about their future plans on the
UF campus and what other
SMCs across the country are
planning.
Topics will include the
National Student Anti-War
Conference Feb. 19-21,
sponsored by the SMC, at the
Catholic University in
Washington, D.C.
Ten delegates from UF will be
there to discuss the future SMC
demonstrations, the war and war
related'topics such as the

problems confronting GJ.s
returning from active service an 4
the difficulty in getting a job or
getting back into school.
THESE PEOPLE WILL be
paying their own way for the
most part, a bill running
anywhere from $25 and up,
though the SMC will pay a small
percentage for people who cant
afford it at all.
The National Peace Action
Coalition, which sponsors SMC,
is also planning a huge march on
Washington and San Francisco
for April 24. SMC will be
chartering buses and making all
necessary arrangements, for all
interested persons, Heiber said.
With all its activites on and
off campus, SMC is also facing
other problems in the form of
financial difficulty.
Money is very scarce,
Heiber said, and with sending
delegates to Catholic University
Feb. 19, and the march on
Washington on April 24, we are
just going to have to raise more
money somehow.
HEIBER ESTIMATES SMC
will need somewhere around
SSOO to accomplish all of its
planned activities.
Plans are also in the making
now for a Peace Action
Coalition on campus.



Finalists Chosen
In Beauty Contest
By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Staff Writer
Three exotic beauties were chosen as finalists for the Miss
International Beauty Contest Tuesday night displaying singing,
dancing, and instrumental talents.
Tinny-Ye Hung, representing the Chinese Club, Harpreet Kaur
Taunque from the India Club, and Cheri Atkinson sponsored by the
Persian Club, were selected from six participants.
THE QUEEN will be announced at the International Ball to be held
in the Flagler Inn Ballroom Saturday night.
Miss Hung is a graduate student in Food Science. Interested in all
sports, she also enjoys music, Chinese paintings, and traveling.
Miss Taunque came to UF in September 1970 from northern India.
A graduate student in nutrition, she plans to return to India to work
as a dietitian. She enjoys dancing, reading, and swimming.
MISS ATKINSON, from Pensacola, models for the University
Shop and enjoys singing. Interested in meeting people, she is an
undergraduate in social psychology.
As one of the events celebrating International Week, the contest
was combined with an international fashion show in an effort to
introduce the habits, customs, and dances of the foreign students.
Assistant Dean of Men, Donald D. Mott, Josephine West, staff
assistant to the vice president of student affairs, and Mrs. William
Rion judged the girls on beauty, personality, and talent.
In talent competition, Miss Taunque performed a traditional Indian
Dance to the music of Ravi Shankar, Miss Hung played the trombone,
and Miss Atkinson sang People.
International Week is the main event for the Council of
International Organizations (CIO). In addition to the talent festival at
8 p.m. Friday in the University Auditorium, the CIO will sponsor the
International Ball Saturday at 9 p.m. in the Flagler Ballroom.

IIC Requests Reports
To Aid UF Publicity

The Information Investigation
Committee (IIC) is trying to get
all campus organizations
sponsored by UF to submit a
summary of all services rendered
to the commuity for the purpose
of publishing a nationwide
promotion book.
The book, according to Shelly
Stevens, a member of the
committee, will state the good
of UF organizations to
counter-act the bad publicity UF
has been receiving lately.
LETTERS WILL BE sent out

INTRODUCING OUR NEW...
rge r Bq s /
Our Biggest burger w
with a giant ONLY M r
order of fries f J
INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL
pprr 15< Coke with purchase
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1728 West University Ave

to all the organizations asking
them to t submit a\list of all
campus and community projects
they have or will be involved in.
It will the
reputation, Sffcyens said, |that
the long haired student doesnt
do anything.
The information should be
returned no later than March 1,
to the Student Government
office in the third floor of the
Reitz Union with the heading
marked attention IIC.

fg W JB
W ******* m
Rs -IJB
mm \ & Jmk
I I 'll
HARPREET TAUNQUE
... representing India Club

NOW...
YOU CAN HAVE JE
A NEW DRESS SIZE B
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Complete ifl jF .IBBi
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only ach .. mtSn
Per Week
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mt 65 To Call
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I TOU ARC A DRESS SIZE *h/ason^
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m § ts 22 ~ Pf A SIZI i* Mar. 30 r mautuc ebze
S-S if C) E-P MANAGEMENT INC 1971 OIVIUNI Via rKsC
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! ____ Your Complimentary Trial Visit & Figure Analysis
Mt. Salon hours: 9 am 9 pm Saturdays 9 am 4 pm
>s. Elaine Powers figure salon
1240 N.W. 21 st Ave.
f Master Charge BankAmericard

CHERI ATKINSON
... of Persian Club

Thursday, February 11 r 1971, The Florida Alligator,

I If ***
I F' T \ i

1111 s
TINNY-YE HUNG
... from Chinese Club

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11,1971

100 Seniors
To Visit
UF Campus

CSS Topics Expanded

By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Writer
The Department of Social
Sciences has been experimenting
with expanding its curriculum
for the past three years. In
response to student interest in
ihis .cptjjses ngw
number ten.
Chairman of the Institutions
Department, Dr. Herbert J.
Doherty, says these courses are
an attempt to diversify the
offerings in the social sciences.
BASICALLY, the CSS 194
topics serve two purposes.
According to Doherty, they
create a vehicle which the
teachers can use to do what they
want to do outside the regular
Institution course providing they
have students who want to
participate.
The. courses also give the
students an opportunity to
explore a particular facet of the
social sciences as they may
replace their last quarter of
institutions with one of these
courses.
DATSUN
Drive a Datsun... then decide at:

GODDING & CLARK
115 S.E 2ND ST.
378-2311

By JENNIFER RICH
Alligator Writer
Seniors from 100 high schools all over Florida are
coming to the Union Feb. 26. This will be the
beginning of a three day introduction to college
life for the seniors.
College Preview, sponsored by the Reitz Union,
will hold its third annual program Feb. 26*28.
ITS MAIN purpose is for the student to get an
idea of what university life is like, both
academically and socially, said College Preview
Chairman Susan Roberts.
Started three years ago by a student, one of the
biggest advantages of this type of program is that
seniors will be able to see the UF from a students
viewpoint.
Letters with application forms are sent to high
school principals, guidance counselors and
newspaper editors explaining the program. The
students pay SIO.OO to cover the cost of the
program. This year 225 seniors are coming to the
University.
THE SENIORS live with college students during
their three day stay and attend classes while theyre
here. They are given a choice of staying in dorms or
fraternity and sorority houses.
During its three years of existence the overall
theme of the program has changed.
There has been a shift in the last two years
toward the academic side of campus life, said Miss
Roberts. In this years program an academic forum
will be held with academic advisors and the students
will get a chance to speak with the deans of the
colleges.
The biggest change in this years program is the
time. In the past, it was held during the third
quarter but the date has been moved up to give the
senior more time to make up or change his mind
concerning the college he will attend.

Dr. Carolyn Griffins was a
pioneer in this expanded
curriculum. She taught one of the
first CSS 194 courses offered at
UF, which dealt with changing
values. Dr. Griffins is teaching
the course entitled, Dissent and
Protest in the 1960s and
f
HER CLASSES will study
major protest movements of this
time in relation to the type of
dissent employed, and its
success.
Each student will be able to
concentrate on a particular
protest, she said.
Dr. Griffins sees the new
course offerings as a valuable
experience, but regrets the
curriculum is still in the
experimental stage and is not
able to reach all the students.
ANOTHER EXAMPLE of the
courses offered by the
department is Inter Interrelationships
relationships Interrelationships in the Social
Sciences, taught by Dr. Wallace
M. Nelson.

Reitz Ufiion
Games Area
Will Be Closed
/ \
Due to the Regional Games Tournament, the
ReiU Union Games Area will be closed from
6:00 pm Thursday to 6:00 pm Friday and
Saturday 9:00 am to 12:00 noon.
/ Anyone Interested In Watching The
Tournaments Is Welcome.

Dr. Nelson explained that m
the comprehensive institutions
courses, the social sciences are
studied in isolated units.
There is a definite linkage
(among them), he said.
IN HIS course he will try to
relate each of the spetific
institutions.
includes two books, but the bulk
of the students work will be
concerned with independent
study and class reports.
According to Dr. Nelson, the
wider range of offerings is good,
as it provides more options for
the student.
Other topics offered in
program are: Female America- 4
The Kemer Report: Jfiree
Years Later, Politics./In the
Writings of Novelists,
Preliminary Explorations in
Deviant Behavior Man-Land
Relationships, /Womens Lib:
A Critical Examination and
Economic development, the
Third Wpnd and the United
Nations.

A QUESTIONNAIRE is given out at the end of
the three days and the seniors are asked to give their
opinions about the program. This is done to
improve the program for next year.
This is not a regular orientation, said Miss
Roberts. It is designed to cover the aspects of the
university that the student doesn t get in
orientation.
According to Miss Roberts, whether a student
dicides to attend the University or not, it is still a
success because it exposes the student to aspects of
university life.

UNDER A DOLLAR DOES IT AT THE
If COLONELS
COLONEL'S SPECIAL
2 PC CHICKEN
1 ROLL
69<
KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN AT
214 NW 13th ST. 376-6472 AND 114 SW 34th ST 372-3649
1 r, s
OD | ML
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[_ \ \ Monday Saturday
UA I 11:00 2:30 p.m.
5:00 9:30
y I Sunday
Jll.OO 9:30 p.m.
BESTSE^OOD^ p/
nj /CAMPUS SPEAKER l H
nifty- Yvottne C. Dell, who teaches
II I f r our English Department, will :^^P
tt I re /*d an original television script which
|| he has written. The reading is on Hh
II 1 / Thursday. February 11 at 7:30 p.m. in I
H m*' the Union lounges. Sponsored by J. I H|9B
ill Wayne Reitz Union. J
ML___ PF* *-'
'' I 1 1 s
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY I
ONE DOUAR SANDWICH |
SKCIAL |
* Turkey sandwich, french fries f; I
large schooner Bud or Schlitz I: I
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Large schooner Bud or Schlitz l
|UaCH ORDER ONIY ONI DOUAR J I
% ,* # m

77iij is not a regular
orientation. It is designed
to cover the aspects of
the university that the
student doesnt get in
orientation.
- Susan Roberts



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WASHINGTON STATE RED OR GOLDEN DELICIOUS SPECIAL!
Apples 25 c
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Celery LARGE STALK 15
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Lettuce LARGE HEAD 25 c
MEDIUM SIZE YELLOW SPECIAL!
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WORTH SI.BO CASH OR 1,000 EXTRA TRADING STAMPS mra 5 lim '' 1 coupon w/sr.so m.,. ~d.r >' 4 u ll 1 c# p n w/s7.jo .r mo,. o,d*r L7
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Cupmr .*. rtirou.. 17. 1.71 ..W ihr.wfb F,b |_ Alf P TnACP M HI VS

Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1971

S conservative government is an
organized hypocrisy.
Disraeli
!
EDITORIAL
YAF Raises
Phony Issue
The Young Americans for Freedom have been raising a
big stink lately because, it says, UF Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder misused student funds.
The YAF believes Uhlfelder went beyond his authority
when he allocated $66.41 to the Student Mobilization
Committee for a debt it incurred.
The truth is, Uhlfelder has done nothing wrong. The
Student Senate has granted him $1,500 through a special
presidential fund. It is within his power to allocate this
money in what he believes are emergency situations and
without approval of the Student Senate.
The SMC would have lost its charter had it not been able
to pay its debt. Uhlfelder obviously believed this to be an
emergency.
If the YAF was in a similar position, we believe Uhlfelder
would grant it money, even though he has said he does not
agree with the organizations political philosophy. And in
such a situation, we would wager that the YAF would not
turn down the dough.
This all smells like the YAF is trying to make a political
issue of it.
We find it curious, however, that the YAF did not object
when Uhlfelder granted $l2O to ROTC in January when it
requested funds to participate in Gov. Askews inauguration
Many people consider ROTC to be what YAF chairman
calls a political group and disagree with its existence on
campus. But the YAF did not let out a peep about ROTC.
Our advice to the YAF today is this: if it would like more
limitations to be placed on the student body president, then
direct attention to the Student Senate. This is the body
which gives the president the power to allocate funds.
Do not raise false issues, YAF. If you want something
changed, work through the proper channels. It is the
American Way.
§ mmoiys / V Ay Tm
i JP- i Ji M/1h
l W "jW § f \ W |Bls| \ wi if

The
Florida
Alligator
The future i not a
gift: it is an achievement

- -.. 1 J ,
M SII a & f I
T mZJ
m niilWmMf 11 yiPal
- iKw- al{r/wr
-~,"i FLUTED COLUMNS i=-s
777 V 777
I WAS
A Teenage Radical
UyUU UUI i
== I By JOHN PACKED ll

I asked columnist Frank
Mankiewicz when he was here
for Accent what he thought the
big failing of the younger
generation was.
He didnt hesitate a second.
YOURE NOT very
academic, he said.
Although he was elated that
we had the gumption to ask
questions and dissent and reject
twisted values, he maintained
that we had attained no sense of
history.
The point is well taken.
WE ARE the consumers of
pre-fab learning. Television
packages things up in nice neat,
easy to swallow capsules of
laughter and simple formulas.
We take Humanities and learn
the great works of art from a
computer.
Formal education is doled out
in compressed ten-week
packages.
IF SOMETHING is not
memorizable for the final, it is
of no importance educationally.
You read Kurt Vonnegut,
said Mankiewitcz.
Guilty, I said, so whats wrong
with Vonnegut?
Nothing, except that Conrad

Alligator Staff
Mariat Jednai* John Part,.,
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Wire Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auso.c
the Board of Student Publications. s P'ces of
Editorial. Business. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suit,
third floor. Reitz Union. ""cations Suite,
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of th^
or .hr * of .hr ,K.r and no, .ho* of Vs ,o,^'

Sam Pepper
F rvGbict
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

£ A
r**
said the same thing better. The
difference? Slaughterhouse 5
goes down smooth, no
intellectual muscle strain. It
takes some effort to get into
All Quiet on the Western
Front, or Red Badge of
Courage.
EASY TO swallow, as well, is
the rhetoric of the modern day
rebel. His long hair and blue
jeans are to be understood as
credence symbols for any claim
or theory that he may bring
forth.
You can go around spouting
about people getting

Phyllis Gallub
'jrfeoino Editor
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

ripped-off and busted and
about what the pigs are up to
and you can convince yourself
that you have dedicated your
life to an ideal.
Untrue. You have dedicated
your life to having long hair and
talking too much.
Granted, there arc evil forces
loose in the land.
Granted, none of the old
methods have been spectacularly
successful at taming them.
BUT THERE is no relief to be
found in a lot of people hanging
around with nothing to offer but
tired phrases.
In short, once you decide to
be a Radical (capital R) then
that is all you are and there is
little you can offer to the
movement that a million others
like you cant.
But a radical is a different
story. You may be a Bill
Kunstler radical, and AlbeftT
Sweitzer radical, or a Madelyn
Murray radical.
And then when you do your
song and dance, you might get
an audience.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
V :
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. 5. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392*1609

/c/jjjP** ? v^A



GUEST COLUMN -
White Folks
still off track

By KIP SMITH
SG Secretary of Minority Affairs
Sometimes I wonder how long
it wHI take white folks in this
country to realize how
backwards they are. And of all
the backward white folks
around, we seem to have
collected some of the
backwardest for the
administration of this university.
One area in which they are
outstandingly backwards and
behind the times is in their
attitudes toward Black people. I
have witnessed a shift in
attitudes over the past four
years, and even though theyve
improved, theyre still way
behind and way off track.
UPON MY arrival here, I
witnessed the abrupt departure
of a visiting Black law professor,
after receiving phone calls
threatening the lives of himself
and his family, courtesy of the
local red-necks; I witnessed the
transfer of an African grad
student, after being harassed,
intimidated and spat upon by a
couple of honky fraternity
queers, and numerous similar
incidents which ultimately
persuaded me to stay and fight it
out.
And now after a few years, a
few laws, a few confrontations,
and a few HEW investigations,
the scene has changed.
From overt racial hostility,
our university now looks at
Black people with a sickening air
of pa t r onization and
paternalism. It wishes to portray
itself as the salvation for all
aimless, wayward and misguided
Black minds and bodies.
WHY DOESNT somebody
tell them that the attitudes and
objectives of Black people have
changed drastically in the past
several years and that we can see
beyond their insincere liberal
smiles.
Two stories published in the
Alligator last week vividly
illustrate the idiocies of this
university. The first dealt with a
Black man, Willie Sanders, who
began his UF career 13 years
ago. This man, with two years of
college, an Army commission,
and a certificate from a college
of mortuary science was placed
in the bookstore as a clerk. But
as progress would have it, he was
soon promoted to being
custodian for old dead, moldy
white bodies down in the

"WE'S MAklM 1 A I'ST hes CHEWIN' (T HEo
V7 GonwA f*MP or ni-X..."

bottom of the Med Center.
(Now what self-respecting,
ignorant white person would
have been given such a break.)
For 13 years, this university has
been preaching to this man
about hard work and diligence
and patience. And now, finally,
he has been awarded a B.S.
degree and the rank of faculty
member, when in reality he
should probably be Head of the
Anatomy Department or of the
entire Med Center by now.
WITH ALL due respect to Mr.
Sanders, this is a disgrace. But
13 years ago, a Black man would
not demand and could not
expect any more than this.
The second story deals with a
younger man, a Black freshman
athlete. This one is a classic and
tells of how this man was
discovered (Hail Columbus!)
to be a track star in his P.E.
class. This same young man, in
his high school excelled in track,
band, basketball and grades.
Here at UF, hes a member of
the Gator band and wanted to
play basketball (his first love).
He tried out and made the
freshman team, but conference
scholarship regulations made it
impossible for him to play.
Instead, the Lords of the
Athletic Dept would have him
run track. After all, they know
whats best. Maybe in 13 years
he can be captain of the track
team.
Nathaniel Jenkins is fast,
agile, confident, and 6-5 and
would be an asset to any
basketball team (indespensible
to ours) and yet the Gator
recruiters come back from long
trips to Kentucky with big,
clumsy crackers. Jenkins was less
than a 100 miles away in
Jacksonville.
But due to the change in
attitudes and expectations of
Black people (which has
apparently gone unnoticed
around here) and to the racist
and backward nature of the
people who run this place, the
UF will probably lose Nathaniel
Jenkins and future Willie
Sanders to more receptive
environments.
Why doesnt somebody get a
big, Black whip and run through
the administrative offices of this
university and rudely awaken
the dozing liberals who sit
therein and let them know that
theres a revolution in the
making?

jjWWXVXXVXXWXXWV CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS
\ All right now, which one of you is wearing the polka dotty underwear?"

Camelot
EDITOR:
John Parkers Friday column
was typical of the emotion
ladden support the Kennedy
family enjoyed politically this
past decade. Bob Kennedys bid
for the Democratic presidential
nomination deserved support
and victory for his stand on
Vietnam ... yet within the
realm of Camelot there was a
sad paradoy.
Bob Kennedys major issue
the war in Vietnam was ironic.
While President John Kennedy
set-off the Orwellian forces, our
nations military. At the time of
his assasination John Kennedy
had already incorporated the
tactics of his court favorites, the
military intellectuals and the
pseudo literary social scientists
of his time.
It is a generalization, if not a
modern fact, that our corporate,
burueacratic institutions are
sluggish. Given direction they
move however. By Nov. of 1963,
the war in Vietnam was almost
inevitable.
To John Parkers
emotionalism and loss, one can
only answer ... John Kennedy
and his brother died serving their
country. Every day in Vietnam,
PFCs and privates die too. If the
idealism of our democracy and
too were intact, there
would be no emotional
difference. There is the pomp
and circumstance of politics;
however left or right, there is no
business like show business.
The flags on the coffins were
the same ... only their jobs, not
their emotions were different.
Camelot was a political myth;
the Vietnam war is a political
reality born of that myth. Peace
In Vietnam now or at least soon.
HALL CAN, Jr.
SP4, Emeritus
Bust
EDITOR:
Sunday morning we received
news concerning the bust of two
people smoking frass at the
commons building of Murphree
Area Saturday night. Upon
hearing this news, we began to
fully realize what a rip-off this
university system is. We
personally observed quite a

READERS FORUM

number of people (students and
possible non-students) who were
either drUhk or under the
influence of alcohol. Why did
the police decide to arrest two
pot-smokers and leave the
drinkers unmolested?
During the Christmas vacation
we were all psyched up over the
college life here at the university
and advised several of pur
friends to transfer here. But if
this police harassment continues,
we will re-advise our friends as
to attending this school, and we
will transfer to a liberal-minded
school even if it means
transferring oitt-of-state.
R.C. BRUSH lUC
DANNY HARRIS 2UC
LEVERT BAKER 6AG
JOHN BENTLEY lUC
Alvarez
EDITOR.
A few lines to answer Ralph
Harts attacks on the character
and personality of Carlos
Alvarez:
First, Hart asks Who is
(Carlos) to dissolve the entire
Leage of Athletes by himself?
As a matter of fact, Carlos did
not abolish the league during or
after his meeting with Dickey.
Carlos merely communicated to
Dickey that the matter would be
put to a vote at the next league
meeting, and categorically stated
that a vote by the league
members would be the decisive
voice.
Next, Hart states, Besides
what does Carlos have to worry
about? Anyone, able to read
and comprehend, the extent of
bad publicity received by Carlos
for his relation to the League,
could easily ascertain an answer.
Also the possibility exists that
Dickey could make Carlos
participation in the team next
year only de jure and not de
facto.
In addition, Hart contends
that, (Carlos) is very
wishy-washy. To properly
answer the validity of this last
statement, one must first
establish a definition of the term
wishy-washy and then
determine if it fits the character
and personality of Carlos
Alvarez.
Wishy-washy is defined as

/*!(. "'.L' i-k ff 3
Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

lacking character or
determination.
Following I present a few
facts for your evaluation which,
after proper consideration, will
help you place both personalities
in perspective.
Ralph Hart:
Drops his lawsuit against
the Athletic Association
because it is getting to be such
a hassle. (great determination)
The principles of the suit
are still the same and I hope Dan
wins, but I had to get out
because it was really getting to
me. (Excellent, let the other
guy carry the cross. Good
character.)
I want to transfer to some
other college and get out of
here ... the entire scene here is
really getting to me.
(Determination and character
without a doubt! When the heat
gets a little high, leave the scene
man.)
Carlos Alvarez:
Spoke against the
circumstances surrounding the
hiring of Doug Dickey and for
the retention of his old coaches
and friends (Note: Did not let
the other guy carry the cross)
Stated that due to
President OConnells unfairness
towards the team in the Dickey
affair, he would veto any
attempt to allow the President
to participate with the team in
the pre game tossing of the coin,
etc. OConnell did not
participate in those events this
year. (Note: did not decide that
he wasnt really behind this
thing)
Supported and obtained
many of the demands of the
league, although heavy personal
criticism was leveled against him
by both public and private
sources. (Note: Did not consider
it a hassle or decide he should
leave the scene when the heat
started)
Lastly, I would like to note
that the term wishy-washy is a
relative one. For its application,
one must obtain a standard from
which to evaluate that which is
lacking in character or
determination. I propose to
you that by using Harts actions
as a standard, the term would
become an anarchronism.
C. VAZQUEZ

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1071

Page 10

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Grapefruit 69* |TO\ Spicettes V-T 27*
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Pineapples 29*
Sweet Potatoes 1 Sunbeam Kisses. :.. 37-
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SggH Shampoo
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M .
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EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Household Bleoch
Ol< Wor < Gonoo or fIHVfIT^BSSffIHBWSSFVVYVWVJPVVVIVVMPVHMHI
Penny-Saver \l 25* German Salami tsr 49* aaffiMaaiMHiiraMmeiiM
.V,.OWJ, 1C,,W.. l C,,W.. 1- '< KOI Swill'* Premium Pr.ten .eel R.b or
Apple Juice jy 29* -..:!*f~J. 09na 59 Sirloin Steaks r *1"
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE 12" file Aluminum Ham Salad £!!d69 < Swii.'.^,...l^P,.y
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(fjfrvm(Jur Wine IkflL Mateus (Import) 4/551.99 Roast Beef each 59 C
17 Boones Farm A PP Ie Wine 4 5 89 c Fresh-Made Sandwiches,
Su^" ln 49< Cvvufd*, £o* Pmc*!
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Barda Unsweetened Florida
(Igjgp ev|ryday^ wp,ct!
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI Soft-Ply Asst. Colors
J CVIRVDAY LOW Bubble Club
|i| EVERYDAY LOW Flavors
FAP #303 J9 C
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! F&P Tender
Cut Green Beans . # 3 .n 3 l c
I>A\l*I I "IIAIyKIQf I JR dBBBh
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With Whipped Cream A Fresh Strawberries, f [JLgJLp OW)£ AACL MuWdflAg/ \J
Large S-inch Decorated Valentine LVPW <^ rW fj U^~ ** 1
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Cup Cakes GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER gainesviue mail westgate shopping center
3 39* lOM N. Main Smt MM HW. 1M SftMt W. UnivarsHy Anna. 34D. W
CANS
Tr v v

Thursday, February 11,1971. The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SA LE
Musical Instrument Speakers 100
watt rms university bass with 2
high-frequency horns, handmade, 4
yr warranty, cheap: call 392-8922
(A-st-76-p)
Yamaha 305 1969 excelent
condition. Luggage rack windshield
and 2 helmets. $550 firm, cash.
392-0731 or 372-2119 (A-6t-77-p)
TREAT YOURSELF! Visit areas
most beautiful and complete sporting
goods store. Low prices. B & B
SPORTS CENTER 5310 N.W. 13th
ST. 378-1461 (A-st-78-p)
70 Triumph Bonniville excellent
condition must see to appreciate runs
like a charm 1150 or best offer. Call
392-9973 or 373-2426 Stereo tapes 8-track & cassettes Now
at a special low price of $3.50 for
any 2 albums on one tape. Call
Jonathan at 373-3611. (A-st-80-p)
Pioneer SR-202 reverberation
amplifier, has been operated only one
hour. Cost SIOO brand new, asking
$75 or best offer. 376-6131
(A-4t-79-p)
For Sale: Schwinn 26" mens
lightweight bicycle, S2O Call
378-5852 or come by apt 148, 1216
S.W. 2 Ave. (a-4t-81-p)
Twin bed with frame very good
condition $20.00 Call 376-3771
(Ann) (A-3t-80-p)
GUITAR STRINGS: Close Out Sale
$1.25 and $1.75 While they last
Muntz Stereo 319 NW 13th St.
(A-st-80-p)
SALE: 8 track blanks 80-minutes
FULLY GUARANTEED 12 for
$20.00 Muntz Stereo 319 NW 13th
St. (A-st-80-p)
8-track car stereo plus several tapes.
$45 call 376-0642 or 392-2000 ask
for Grady (A-3t-80-p)
FISHER 4 5 0 t x STEREO
RECEIVER: 50 watts rms per
channel 175 watts peak power 6
mo. old-call after 5:00 376-5367 or
stop by 4001 NW 13th pi (A-st-80-p)
Stereo: Ampex cassette withspkrs. 2
Fisher spkrs.; BSR turntaDie.
Together or separately. All new.
SSOO value-only $370. 378-9192
(A-3t-80-p)

I a fine and moving picture ~s o
made with great
I Rabbit.mw".
FTTTzmrTzr
" KIRK.DOUOLRS HENKE fONDH
huhe coin mm ofli bora mm
a'wt 'k ; :;:;: ; :v: ; : ; : ; : ; : : : ; :-:-:-:-:--
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There wbh
a crooked
_, man...
jrm mum ictto J
M im* * <* 1
Jfcm <** o' *#w I
*- * ~ J 1 >
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; ,rv ~- C ',.. .i ... ~_ .' '' . >
.V ". tv;n' V^CWjCS?ft'\ ". ' "
"> '. ~. 'V. V iS{B%S&%
RA FIVE trattu jack Nicholson
r * w 'Btsa pieces I

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1971

a a
*
a** __
FOR SA LE
x:;vx>vxvx i*x->x\*>;*xv xv>x*x xv:
Stero equipment Benjamin Micracord
7-70 turntable sansuitr7o7A stero
tuner and amp Sony 250 tape deck
criterion 200 A' speakers SSOO
373-4311 (A-st-80-p)
1970 Triumph 650 Trophy perfect 2
mo old $llOO 372-0380 Mike 1958
Triumph 650 Trophy, good running
good looking $750 372-0380 Steve
(A-3t-80-p)
GUITAR HARMONY
SOVEREIGN, steelstrings, large
body soft- she 11 -ca se S6O
376-5190(a-st-81-P)
1968 Honda exc. cond. w/helmets &
rack $175 will talk price call Ben
392-7427 (a-3t-81-p)
smith corona typewriter repair 50%
off let a factory trained mechanic do
it call Sam between 9-1 392-9041
free pickup and delivery (a-st-81-p)
Yamaha combo organ, cost $650,
asking S4OO. 2 cabinets w/12in. spkr.
$35 ea. 4 10 in. JBLs in spkr. cab.
S2OO 120 bass accordion $l5O
378-8659 (a-st-81-p)
NIKON FT, black body, 50 mm 1.4
lens. $250.00, or best offer. Call
3 76-05 54 and ask for Kevin.
(a-lt-81-p)
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre
way from carpets and upholstery.
Rent electric shampooer $1 electric
upholstery shampoos also available
Lowry Furniture Co. (atfg)
1970 Honda 750 cc. My own one
owner in perfect condition. Only
3400 mi. Gold colored. $llOO. Call
David at 373-4397. will finance
(a-st-81-p)
Scott 342-c 110 watt FM-Receiver
still under warranty S3OO new, yours
for S2OO call Herb 373-3615
(A-st-78-p)
Sears 2500 BTU air conditioner. 4
months old. $250. Call 376-9096
evenings. (a-4t-81p)
FOR RENT
I.;.;.;.;.:-;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.
Need 1 male roomate for V 2 of large 2
bedroom house. Call 373-3060 after
6 p.m. (b-4t-81-p)
Need 2 conservative roommates
LaMancha. Available June. Call Lori
378-8337 (B-80-3t-p)

FOR RENT
MALE Roomate Wanted U "*
Gardens Apts. Bldg 712 Apt. 101
372-0491 Anytime (b-st-81-p)
1 Bdr Apt 1 block from Tigert slls
Mo. move in 2/15 1216 S.W. 2 Ave.
no. 24 call 372-5133 nites or before
10 a.m. days call MGR 372-7111
(b-3t- 81-p)
I
m^Yqll
* 11 1
B Ini rm ill rll Imm i
U ,every night before 8:30 p.mand II
i "- Ma *hee* at Penthouse IS
t Penthouse 3 onty. Regular li
V

SSSH.
UNDEAD
TEN YEARS AFTER
CRICKLEWOOD GREEN
STONEHENGE
LIST $4.98
NOW
$2.99
otSTmeorco tv
WifkWM

LP IN THE OPEN 10 AM-9 PM
|Vt?ttJWj*lL t MALL WONDAY-SATURDAY
"UNIVERSITY CITY'S HOftflEof The NIOST Complete L IN Eof DISCOUNT DISCS"

***********************
* winging your way soon
Viva Zapata
This is an account of the life and struggles of the Mexican
revolutionary leader, Emiliano Zapata: His opposition to the Diaz
regime, his overwhelming desire for education, the political
intrigues of the period (1909-1918), Zapata's appointment to the
presidency, his betrayal and death form the substance of the film.
Starring: Marlon Brando, Jean Peters, Anthony Quinn
Union Auditorium Saturday, February 13, 1971 5:30 8:00 10:30
50 cents sponsored by the JWR Union buy your tickets in
advance Friday, 12:30 to 4:30 at 2nd floor box office

10
Years
After
RECORD
SALE
'WHILE THEY LAST

fM
a A.
V<>: y. ,v-r\
v.. AlWjp

WATT
LIST $5.98
NOW $3.99

1H LHI inIH >ll \*i W
I
SALE
WILL LAST
THURSDAY
FEBRUARY 11
THRU
SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 13
KidkV/I/SIM



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ISSSSnHSSfiBK
NOW PLAYING!
AT 1:46 4:20 7:00 & 9:40
They challenged an
untamed 41|
landl
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TkeWHPCbunny]
TECHNICOLOR 9
NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:35 3:35 5:35 7:35 & 9:35
m S WMA

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featuring : /0M
Deb Nusta *. II jf "X.
Tedrow & Shapiro
George Ellis /
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David Luse f
PLUS OTHERS \
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Thursday Feb. II 9:00-J:00A M
At the RATHSKELLER
better business 4 ways
Like bringing the product or service to And like making business more responsive
the student. We help thousands of to the needs of their customers. We help
students find what they want through them to find out what the student wants.
advertising. K
Advertise in the Florida Alligator.
Like uniting the academic and business
communities. The two worlds most If you've got something to offer...so do we.
students live in come together on our
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Like letting the student compare before Allicmtnv*
he chooses. We help students plan their loriGa AlligttWli
time and expenses. We help them save
money. An ACP-rated All-American College Daily

Thursday, Fabmary 11,1971, Tha Florida AlKgator,

f or rent
****** *''* ,, '***t*'',* t *, X*!*' ,,, **'***t*i*''.'/l*i*
Male roommate wanted to share two
bedroom Univ. Gard. Trace apt. bldg.
I* i? 4B mo- + 1/3 utilities.
call 378-8993 after 4pm (B-st-77-p)
Sublet furnished 1 bedroom (twin
beds) apartment; air conditioned, gas
heat, patio. $l3O mo. Immediate
occupancy. 376-8626 1918 SW 14th
Terrace (B-lOt-80-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished
apartment air conditioned pool only
$l6O/mo. available March 1 call after
6:00 pm 378-0796 (B-3t-80-p)
Must sublet Gatortown apt. 126 2
bedroom call 378-1728 available
immediately (B-3t-80-p)
Sublet one room apt for guy kitchen
facility util, and cable tv included
$76 call 373-3105 (B-79-st-p)
WANTED
HELP! I need someone fluent in
French for translation work. Call
378-1112 or come by room 405 in
the new International Studies
Building (c-2t-81-p)
Female grad student searching for
roommate. Townhouse nr. campus
$75 per mo + */z util must like
puppies call 373-3108 after 6:30
soon! (C-st-78-p)
Need extra money? I need a pretty
female model Call 392-8377 for
information (c-lt-81-p)
Female Roomates wanted for 2
bedroom apt. (Summit House)
beginning Spring quarter. Call
anytime 373-2980 (c-6t-81-p)

Page 13

WANTED
Male rommate, own bedroom in 2
bdrm Apt. $70.00 + 1/3 utilities.
Frederick Garden Apts. 376-9740,
Charles (C-10t-71-p)
Need female roommate, F.Q. apt.,
46.25 plus utilities, large bdrm. rent
paid thru Feb. 15, call 378-4614
(C-st-79-p)
Wanted roomate for Point West Apts,
all the modern conveniences pool air
conditioning etc. call 378-9947 ask
for Joe (C-st-79-p)
Male roomate wanted for spring qtr
available March 5 (pay from April 1)
Landmark Apt 83 ac + pool. 47.50 a
mo call Rich: 372-9764 (C-2t-80-p)
Need 1 female roommate for spring
and summer quarters. Landmark Apt.
32. Call 373-3207. August rent free!
(C-st-80-p)
Male Roomate. French Quarter No.
77. $45. per mo. On pool, central air
and heat. Call Laird at 372-5254 or
leaVe message at 378-6092
(C-st-78-p)
La Bonne Vie: 1 female roomate
needed for 2 bedroom apt. rent
51.50 mo. study lounge, rec. room,
tennis, & pool. Call now 378-8969.
(C-7t-80-p)
Roomate Wanted Own bedroom in
3 bedroom house. Close to campus.
S7O per month utilities Included. Call
373-1575 (C-st-77-p)
2 male roommates wanted Large 4
bdrm house 2V2 bath fireplace central
heat privacy TV 42.50 per mo plus V
utilities 378-6810 (C-6t-77-p)

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help wanted
;X:X;X;X:-:-vX;XxX:-xXxlvX\vX:-V--Xvl
SCUBA divers wanted to work
weekends off Cedar Key for further
information drop by 104 NW 18th St
the job will be collecting seafood
(E-3t-79-p)
AUTOS
Mustang *65 v-8, 3 speed, good
engine, immaculate interior, good
tires. SBOO 373-1963 after 6:00
(G-9t-75-p)
63 Rambler or 61 Chevrolet Corvar
Camper Type Either one S3OO
378-8490 (G-st-78-p)
VW 1966 Good Condition SBOO
Heater Call Pam 392-9101
(G-st-78-p)
65 Valiant 6 cyl std radio good cond.
newly inspected $250 373-2145 after
5 GE 12 inch portable TV brand new
UHF-VHF never used SBO 373-2145
after 5 (g-st-81-p)
1964 VW squareback rebuilt engine
runs well. SSOO or best offer
373-1208 (g-2t-81-p)
64 Ford custom 289 V 8 auto. Trans,
radio, heater, good tires. Call
372-4598 or 392-0514 (G-st-78-p)
VW 1965 radio heater runs good new
tire must sellteaving phone 376-0388
(G-st-77-p) ;
66 TR 4 A overdrive wire wheels,
clean $1,150 376-8795 (G-3t-79-p)
67 Austin 1100 2 dr. Sedan S6OO.
Nice for student or second car. Good
shape, ph. 378-0184 evenings.
(G-st-78-p)
VW 62 needs work $250 372-7638
(G-3t-80-p)
Corvair beach/woods buggy good
motor, axil, clutch needs man. trans.
shortened & reinfornced body will
sell cheap make offer 376-8319
after-5 P.M. (G-3t-80-p)
Classic Bugeye Sprite 1959
roadster new top etc. excellent
condition throughout asking 550.00
378-1857 (G-4t-80-p)
65 Austin Healey Sprite British
Racing Green, Good cond. Best offer
over $550. Call Greg after spm. Ph
No. 3 76-2048 Must sale now
(G-3t-80-p)
Leaving Country! Must sell 6l Olds
4dr. HRDTP Suner $225 ph
372-7798 (G-3t-80-p)
1969 VW Bug. Good condition.
Red-black interior, radio and factory
installed 8-track stereo. $1,400. Call
378-5705. VP No. 6. (G-4t-78-p)
X;>X:>X;X;XvX;X:Xv>B!Xvl:£*X:X\\:Xv
PERSONAL
Demians Leathers/Laurent's Books
now buying used comic books, 2 1 /z
cents each, up to 1,000 from any one
person. (J-st-78-p)
Tired of apt living? CLO has openings
for the spring 1 block behind Krystal
- only $195/qt for room and 3 meals
a day. Vince at 376-9473
(J-23t-75-p)
Tenants! Organizers now forming the
Gainesville Tenants' Assoc. For
information call Mike Pugh at
392-1665. Get off your apathy
(J-15t-79-p)
Will drive your car to So. Calif, or
share driving + expenses. Have tools,
can do minor repairs enroute. male,
mature (alas, 30+), technician. P.O.
Box 13811 Univ. Sta. Gnsvl.
(J-st-78-p)
Bicycle Buffs We think it's time for
an afternoon bike rally, including
relays and races. Help us get It
together! Call 392-1655. (J-st-78-p)

[ fjiMiml iiiSf' .JsJmKmMfSk
wyHHvjB.SB^HB||HHIIi|I|BHK^akJSf
1 mm*mm dll JKk mmmm JL* c £jj^KJ M^L?
/;; llHiliiiiiliiiMiilSlllfiiiillili J^B
IHHHUHHHHHHHHHHHHhhH

PERSONA L
8-track cartridges Custom recorded
Two or more albums on 80 min tapes
$4 inc tape or will beat any
competive offer Experience &
quality, satisfaction guaranteed
378-5916 night (J-st-75-p)
Student travel, trips, charters,
Europe, Orient, around the world.
Write S.T.O.P. 2150 C Shattuck
Berkely Calif. 94704 or see travel
agent. (J-13t-58-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst...
. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
Sabine String Shop handmade
dulcimers, banjo lessons, repair on
fretted instruments, and discounted
accesories. in Gviile Artisans Market
378-1383 (J-st-78-p)
Making your valentine an
old-fashioned red-pink doily heart?
Or are you getting a $1.50 McCrory
special? Why not pin your heart to
the wall at the Union. The 2nd floor
gallery wall is reserved for valentine
messages. Come pin yours up on
Friday. For last-minute lovers,
limited supplies will be
provided. .make your own!
(J-st-78-c)
Fly to Fort Myers! leaving Friday,
return Sat pm. Commercial pilot, call
378-4859 and leave your name and
phone no. please. (J-2t-80-p)
Volunteers need for
Adopt-a-Grandparent Program. Call
SAMSON 392-1608 or come by 315
JWRU. (j-3t-81-p)
You will smack your lips over our
COLD TURKEY sandwich. And that
ain't no junk. Just call the NEW
DELHI DELI 378-8656 (5-lt-81-p)
GIRLS, HAVE A PROBLEM?
Hot line now in service. Confidential
answers and referrals concerning
birth control, pregancies V.D. and
related subjects. Call 392-1650
(j-3t-81-p)
Volunteer needed to tutor ambitious
70 yr. young woman in Eng.
grammar, reading, and writing. Call
SAMSON 392-1608 or come by 315
JWRU (J-2t-81-c)
LOST & FOUND
Lost Friday nite at Univ. aud. key
chain, with long leather streamers if
you found it please call Sharon
373-2287 (L-2t-80-p)
found a pair of brown rim glasses and
a small religious metal both found
at Little Hall, call Gary at 376-3061
(L-3t-80-p)

His true story is one of the great stories of our
century. He created violence every moment
he lived. Our intention is not to merely call him
a good guy or a bad guy- but to tell it like it is.
It makes a damn qood movie.
Starring Omar Sharif & Jack Palance
Union Auditorium Friday, March 12
5:30, 8:00, 10:30 50<
sponsored by the J.W.R. Union
buy advance tickets Friday from 12:30 4:30 2nd floor box office

Page 14

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1971

LOST <& FOUND
Lost female Irish Setter Sat. nite
Please call 376-6028 or
(l-2t-81 -p)
Found last week in ladles room, 3rd
floor of the Union: gold rim
GLASSES, call 39,2-1681 or come by
room 330, Union. '(1-3^81-nc)
Lost 1 yr old dog 40 lbs Shephard
like almost healed soar at coner of
mouth black body brown & white
markings answers to Snarful
378-4169 1116 S.E. 3rd Ave.
(2-lt-81-p)
Lost It-brown wallet around ROTC
ME or ASE Bldgs, need ids and cards
please call Curls 378-0189 asap. lost
last week (l-2t-81-p)
Found in the S.W. section a white
girls bike, call 373-3431 (l-3t-81-nc)
found: ladys wristwatch in
University Auditorium, identify and
pick up from M.A. Mathurl 392-2345
(L-3t-79-p)
Problem with your Honda? Call
John, 376-3171. Tuneup, $5 + parts
top end work, flats repaired, etc.
(M-3t-80-p)
SERV ICES
X:X:X-x*x*Xv-x-x-X-x-xx-xxx: ;: xx
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmericard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
four portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yourself in action at school
start at $35 call 378-4824. Harden
(m-10t-70-r)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
Hogtown Photo Workshop. Get
together ideas for valentine photo.
All color and black and white work
at peoples prices. Eternal Exchange
804 W University 373-4311
(M-st-79-p)
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medic-legal-psychologlc, open Sat. &
Sundays, 3265 Virginia St. No. 1,
Miami, 446-6583 appointments.
(M-25t-72-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)
Experienced journalism grad will
research, edit, type your paper tutor
in good writing style, better research
methods. Call 373-3723 (M-st-78-p)

SERV ICES
Have your motorbike tuned by an
experienced mechanic, extremely low
rates on hondas, suzukis, kawasakls
and yamahas. call John, 392-7026
(M-st-70-p)
Term papers, reports, typed to your
specifications 40 cents per page D/S.
Theses 50 cents, D/S. Phone Mrs.
Tola Adenle, Fiavet 111, 373-1003.
(m-st-81-p)

DRY CLEANING
UP TO 8 LBS $2 JO
WHILE ATTENDANT IS ON DUTY
318 S.W. 16th Ave.
(NEXT TO COTTONS MIN-A-MART)
-4l HU
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -3KX) pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* <> M n
i mi irn dodddo[][] >
xj Q) 3" 5
n
z

Q
!_ >
4* W Ni _
Q. q_ o o o 0 75
mmmm 0} OJ Q) O) Q) 2 Lft
**< <-<-<< 3
** CO W A
O - 2
vO 3 *
Q. ~
a. q o o a
O CL Q. CZ
i Bs' z
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Q Ct
O =3 §§ |
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(A 4
n n ~
mmmtmmm mmmmm mmmmmm i i
... _____ _____ I
to
>
m
2 O
S
_
_ _ N m
V

SERVICES
.V.V'.v.v.v.v.v.v.vivi'
.e.e_ee#.ee.e.e..e eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee**
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at & grad of Bklyn College,
N.Y. Term papers, theses,
dissertations. 50 cents & up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft 6
(M-4t-66-p)
Rubys Alterations apt. 217-100
N.E. Bth Ave. 376-8506
(m-st-81-p)



OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 3736 NEWBERRY ROAD
M A v" i " 0O ,o, '" / TO BIG STAR...
AND KEEP THE CHANGE!
| Tfie"post office game' [
I If you want stamps, we suggest you visit Y 0 4 \
I the Post Office. But if you want to save V \
I money, come to Big Star. We don't handle / \VI nn f \
I trading stamps because they cost money, fe-l; f/ /\ \ N 1 ] f'jfemtk
I And our job is to save you money, all week f f\
HITCH YOUR SAVINGS TO A STAR!
EXTRA VALUE BUY! U.S.D.A.: CHOICE BEEF I CEDAR FARM PORK SHOULDER I
CHUCK ROAST 58{ I CAN PICNICS I
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI FLORIDA GRADE "A" FRESH (POLY BAG) I 3 LB. $1 99 I
Whole FRYERS .29d
*+
I EXTRA VALUE BUY! I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF FULL-CUT I FROSTY MORN "DANDY" SLICED
ROUND STEAK , 98t| bacon I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! U.S.D.A. INSPECTED"HOUSE OF RAGFORD" 14 POUNDS AND UP I 1-LB. PKG. I
Grade'A' TURKEYSL29<| I
I EXTRA VALUE BUYS! I
Your Choko . Sunshin Brandi
EXTRA VALUE BUY I SAVE 5 ante ON CAMPBELLS EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 4 sank ON RED PACK
TOMATO SOUP car 10* CAN TOMATOES mjcan 13tl # green beans with pork I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI OUR PRIDE CHOCOLATE OR COCONUT EVERYDAY LW PRICEI SAVE 10 ON MR E I GREENS WITH PORK I
LAYER CAKES St 69t ICE CREAM <& 59t I I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 5 an ON RED GATE EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI MORTON ASSORTED FROZEN TURNIP GREENS WITH ROOTS
KIDNEY BEANS % 12* MEAT POT PIES 19t| .coilaro greens with pork I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI-SAVE 4 CENTS ON OUR PRIDE EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI INTERSTATE FROZEN POTATOES NORTHERN BEANS WITH PORK I
SANDWICHBREADIoaf 29t FRENCH FRIES sg- 19< I #PO rk and beans I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI OUR PRIDE HAMBURGER EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 50 can* ON
FRESH BUNS 33( FAB DETERGENT K NGS ZE 99t I your choice! 4Ai I
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 20 aen% ON COFFEE EVERDAY LOW PRICE-SAVE 12 CENTS ON WHOLE SUN |II A I
MAXWELL HOUSE SS 69* ORANGE JUICE ZZS. 12* I no. 300 can IHP I
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! -SAVE 7 cmt. ON SELF-RISING EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI-SAVE 3 CENTS ON FARM CHARM I SOVD Up To 7< IWW I
TRIANGLE FLOUR £ 0 B : 37* EVAP. MILK tallcan 13c I I
' EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE I EXTRA VALUE BUYI I
Cs-Mft-r fresh HOMOGENIZED GRADE "A I U.S. No. 1 TOP-QUALITY WHITE I
FULL I POTATOES I
BEER E 1.09 MILK"-$1.09 | g 49< |
SAVE 30< AT BIG STAR! HALF-GALLON CARTON
THKSUPERMARKETTHATSELL^TL|KM^S!

Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1971

Page 16

_ H. 1
PRICES GOOD THURS., FEB. 11 thru WED., FEB. 17
fyMtffyeeiaA TiuuAiiiHlll
Bread'7.... 2 59' vKJR Alflf (j W W Bflc
cMPHBciTIJ Jdn fk Br IV
D#*f If 0 i2pK CQc Sbtu liMm
IP| ms Ij J s> PKGS. M MH j I limit One With $7.50 or Mors Purchase Excluding Cigarettes
DIXIE DARLING COCONUT & PECAN BLUE
WHITE OR BOX
Rolls 2 59' * #TER
I ASTOR I I ASTOR I [ PILLSBURY GRAPEFRUIT
Shortening COFFEE FLOUR JUICE
B Limit 1 With $7.50 or Moro Purchase Excluding Cigarettes 8 B limit 1 With $7.50 or Moro Purchaso Excluding Cigarattos B B Limit 1 With $7.50 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarette*
Bk jb b s X
I I SAVE I I SAVE *JM
130' 1 134' I I
J I U
ARMOUR VIENNA PIPER TRASH CAN SUDDEN BEAUTY HAIR SAVE 20e NESTLES
Sausage 4-* $ 1 00 Liner.. 3ss S I OO Spray .. 49 c Quik ... -7
PLUMROSE DEVIL DEL MONTE PINEAPPLE CRACKIN'GOOD ASSORTED c- BRACH COMIC VALENTINE
Ham .. 3 S I OO Juice .. 3 S I OO Cookies 3 s l Candy a 79 c
MONOGRAM FANCY LONG GRAIN LANCE COCKTAIL FRISKIES CAT BRACH IMPERIALS CINNAMON
Rice .. .3 - 39 c Peanuts 4a? S I OO Food .. 7*- S I OO Candy .. 39 c
THRITYMAID CUT Q SAVE 30e MOUTHWASH DERAN ASSORTED CHOCOLATE BRACH CONVERSATION
Asparagus4 s l Listerine s l l9 Candy 3 a s l Hearts.. 39 c
Quantity Rights Reserved
winn wxii stoms. wc-corrwoHT-wt
C
TOMATO I Strawberry 11 fitsrssssi I "SSSEP I
CATSUP PRESERVES 11 P QIM ES MILK
I I I I "59" I
jar H Delicious
THRIFTY MAID DELICIOUS THRIFTY MAID THRIFTY MAID MIXED
PINEAPPLE. SAUERKRAUT $ fSjjo VEGETABLES $
SLICED A 20-ox. H \ SAVE 15Va-oz. / VTGrr** 4 / 16-oz.
CRUSHED Ts CANS B XjfS&j&r 20< CANS CANS
Pie Fillings .. .3 ft*. 39 c Macaroni 2&* 35 c Sliced Cukes ... * 47 c Instant Coffee.. is 03
SWai CREAMY FUDGE WELCH GRAPE JELLY 4 STAYPREE 10 PAD37c DOLE SUCED OR CRUSHED OR CHUNK
Frosting Sf- 39 c Grape Jam *.. 47 c Mini-Pads 99 c Pineapple ... .v ££ 43 c
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE open on Sunday 130 N*W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS it MAIN $t



'gak TOP VALUE
*3^
... Cy BORDEN'S SINGLY WRAPPED SLICED CHEESE
\ WHITE SLICED [ A -J ., QQC
. b BB b I # 77
ll( (11\| m I Bvl Cheese ... 2a.69*
KAifl [ Cheese . 45 c
SUPERBRAND GRADE "A" FRESH FLORIDA ALL WHITE
LGE. EGGS 2S& 89 c | Yogurt 4^ $ 1 00
i/ - \ :: \ \
GROUND BONELESS SHOULDER f PORK
BEEF ROAST ROAST
SAVE 70' SAVE I
I HALF OR WHOLE FRESH
i J 7:r. S V 9 J
FRESH ONE HALF PORK LOIN U.S. CHOICE GRADE A NEW YORK SUNNYLAND PORK BREAKFAST LINK W-D BRAND CUBED BEEF
Roast.. 59 c Strip Steak $ 1 39 Sausage s l" Steakettes $ l 5B
FRESH FULL QUARTER LOIN SLICED INTO PORK FRESH COUNTRY STYLE SPARE USDAJENNIE-O BASTED TURKEY lOeOFFANY
Chops .. 69 c Ribs .... 69 c Breast ~ 89 c Tarnow Pizza
FRESH CENTER CUT RIB PORK FRESH STANDARD FRENCH FRIED HEAT AND SERVE FISH COPELAND SLICED ALL MEAT
Chops .. 89 c Oysters -7 Sticks ... ss 89 c Bologna 69 c
FRESH PORK SHOULDER OSCAR MAYEfc SMOKIE LINK SINGLETON'S COCKTAIL CRACKIN'GOOD FLAKY
Steak .. 59 c Sausage -7 Shrimp 3-7 Biscuits 2ss 23 c
Quantity Rights Reserved
. WINN DIXIE STORES, INC. COPYRIGHTID7I
yimi iiy
ORANGE TEMPLE MEAT FRESH 1
JUICE ORANGES PIES LETTUCE
heads I
ESKIMO ICE CREAM POLY BAG RUSSETT BAKING SAVE 30c POLY BAG FRENCH FRIED AND DUTCH |
Sandwiches 2^ $ ly 2
HARVEST FRESH LARGE CANADIAN SAVE 4Fc TASTE O' SA PERCH W-D BEEP
Celery .... .2 stalks 29 e Rutabagas . 10 c Dinners ... .3 s l Steakettes pro 89
AU PURPOSE FILBERTS CORN OH
Apples .... 5 & 59* Margarine.. . 45* Waffles ... .2 89* Succotash .4 Sx *1 00
Onions .... 3> 29* Grape Juice. 39* Coffee Rich .4 s r Peas 5 *1 00
H0M0,,,, AUNT MINNIES OCVN.ED BIRDSEYE COOL B JACK'S COCONUT
Carrots ... .2 25* Crab 99* Creamy
CHCF BOY-AR-OCC FIELD TRIAL CHUNK PALMOLIVE AJAX LIQUID < 13-*. 3ft)
Beefaroni 'cSr39* Dog F00d... .10 99* Gold Soap 2EE 47* Cleaner 69*
IIM DANDY <34t.4Sc) PALMOLIVE OAtyY TiXIZC
Dog Ration .. 10 $ 1 23 Soap 3 S 39* Cleaner 69* Aqua Lotion ... 2s 39*
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441. HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.

Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligptor,

Page 17



Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11,1971

Hit Tune Written For Television Ad

LOS ANGELES (UPI) A ballad written as a ditty for
a television commercial for a bank is supplanting Oh
Promise Me at weddings.
Paul Williams, 30, the lyricist for Weve Only Just
Begun, said he received more than 50 requests to use the
song at nuptials before sheet music for it was even
published.
SEVERAL HUNDRED high schools and colleges have
asked permission to use the words as the theme for their
yearbooks.
Wiliams and his partner, Roger Nichols, wrote the song
more than a year ago when an advertising agency, Batt.en,
Barton, Durstine and Osborne, needed music for a
commercial for Crocker-Citizens National Bank.
The commercial features a short film of a wedding,
with ( the first two verses of Weve Only Just Begun

Turn On To Visual Impact,
Teach Yourself Not To Blink!

By JON HALL
Alligator Entertainment Writer
Unlikely as it may seem, one
has to learn to see films much as
you must learn to read, swim or
make love. Unfortunately, seeing
is not a skill taught or even
recognized by our dubious
educational system. You must
leam it on your own. It
probably seems like
double-think I mean, anyone
with EYES in their SOCKETS
can SEE after all, cant they?
Apparently not, since a
visually impoverished and
relatively mediocre film like
Five Easy Pieces can get rave
reviews from cataractal critics,
including the Alligators own
cinematic whodunits, while a
visionary masterpeice like
Fellinis Sartyricon slipped
through ol Hogtown with nary a
raised eyelid.
ITS NOT HARD to
understand. Even though this is
the television generation, most
people never leam to see. This is
why so many can watch a film
by Antonioni but fail to see it,
to recognize the visual depth of
his work.
As film makers come to terms
with the medium and leam to
use its cinematic forms of

Check with MALONE'S I
For Your
Textbooks Reference Books
Outlines Engineering Equip.
Magazines Art Supplies
Study Notes Paper Backs \
U of F Shirts U of F Jackets
MALONE'S BOOK & SUPPLY
1712 W. University Ave.
Mon-Fri 9:OOAM-8:00PM
<
Saturday 9:OOAM-4:OOPM
PARKING IN REAR

expression, we will continue to
watch them become more visual
and less literate. But to keep up
with and appreciate the new
films, you must first leam to
tune in your eyes.
AND HELP COMES in the
form of the Union Film
Committee. While it seems to be
the normal policy of the
rocking-center-twin-plazas to
supply mediocrity at any price,
the Union Committee attempts
to bring the best available films
from around the world at 1/3
the cost. The films are selected
by students for the students of
this university, not for profit.
Some of the best examples of
films growth have already been
shown this quarter, the excellent
Antonioni films last weekend
and Fellinis Sartyricon shown
briefly, and probably by
mistake, at the Plaza recently.
But here are more things to
come. This Sunday begins the
two-day Directors Festival of
films by the Spanish anarchist
Luis Bunuel. His earliest film,
Un Chein Andalou, was one
of the two important works of
the short-lived surrealist film
movement of the 30s. Showing
with it at 5:00, 7:30 and 10:00
p.m. is Nazarin, Bunuels

played in the background. As the newlyweds leave on
their honeymoon, the words, Youve got a long way to
go. Wed like to help you get there, flash across the
screen, and the name of the bank.
WE WROTE THE third verse for their second
commercial, Williams said. That one shows a man
leaving for his first day on a new job and his wife seeing
him off. We wrote a bridge between the verses and had the
song.
Mark Lindsay recorded it on an album, then The
Carpenters came out with the single, which has sold about
two million copies so far.
Williams, a small, round man with shoulder-lenth, fine
blond hair, began writing lyrics three years ago.
I WAS AN actor, he said, but I dont know if I gave
up acting or it gave me up.

ultimate assault on Christianity
as an impossbile code to live
by.
Exterminating Angel shows
Monday at 5:30, 8:00 and 10:30
p.m. and is probable one of the
eeriest films youll ever see,
treading a narrow road between
mysticism and symbolism
without falling into either. While
some of the events may seem
supernatural, they are not
intended to be but represent a
concentrated cinematic
statement of all the unseen and
unsuspected forces that
indirectly control the lives of
men. Dont ruin the film by
trying to analyze plot and
structure for Bunuel means for
you to sit back and let it happen
of its own, as any good film will.
If you find you have nothing
else to do this weekend, then try
turning on to films at the Union
Theater.
Learn not to blink.

f University of Florida Students, Faculty, & Staff: l
I Servomation Mathias, Inc. #
) V* Jr)/] University of Florida Food Service )
) cooperation with student government )
) ANNOUNCES )
sth Anniversary Special
/Meal Coupons Books -Reg. slsoo value 10% WSCOUHT}
1 Coupons can be used at all servomation I
1 snack bars and cafeterias. 1
( On Sale this week Monday-Friday )
J 8.00 am. to 4:00p.m. at the J. Wayne Reitz Union I
1 Ist Floor Lobby and Food Service Office Rm 160 1

He was filming The Chase with Marlon Brando when
he began fiddling with the guitar of a fellow cast member,
and wrote his first song.
He has had hits with Out in the Country sung by
Three Dog Night, The Drifter by Steve Lawrence, and
Someday Man by the Monkees. We've Only Just
Begun has been recorded by Dionne Warwick, Lawrence
Welk, Glen Campbell, Jerry Vale and Claudine Longet,
among others..
BEFORE THIS song my publishers called me a writer
of standards that never were hits, Williams said.
I try to write about the positive side of life. God
knows theres enough negativism, Williams said.
Im a rank sentimentalist and I like my songs to have
a message, but I believe a spoonful of sugar helps the
medicine go down.

COMPRAR CASA
puede resultar
MAS BARATO QUE
PAGAR ALQUILER
Informese con
COOUDGE DAVIS REALTY
373-2200
Pregunte por George Daniles, (Assoc.)
Despues de las 7 p.m.: 373-1214
ATTENTION STUDENTS
Qbeez f)
Are you too busy with taking
~ notes to Comprehend what is
Q presented?
jrftjny Jm Then we are announcing the
opening of an EASIER way
The Actual Current
X STUD-EASE" 6 X
LECTURE NOTES %
STUD-EASE Lecture Notes are taken from current lecture classes
and are available the day following the lecture presentation at 1730
W. University Ave.; next to the College Inn. The prices range from
19 cents to 39 cents depending upon the frequency of the lecture
meetings per week. Professional xerox copying also available.



Survey Shows Student Spending Trends

By MARIANNE MACIA
Alligator Staff Writer
and
TIMOTHY HENDERSON
Alligator Correspondent
According to a survey
conducted for fall quarter 1970,
by graduate research students in
the College of Journalism, UF
students spend a disposable
monthly income of over
56,000,000.
Based on the figures released
by the Marketing Department of
the College of Business
Administration and the
J ournalism graduate research
study, the results of the survey
indicate:
That UF students spent an
estimated $2,000,000 more in
the Fall 1970, than during the
same period a year ago.

Rathskeller To Present Folk Night
To Provide Budgeted Entertainment

By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Writer
Folk Night is the Rathskellers
latest attempt to provide
recreation for the budgeting
student. The program takes
place every Thursday night from
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Students can
audition Thursday afternoon

That among the highest
priority expenditure areas were:
groceries, 5921 ,000;
entertainment, S 319,000:
alcoholic beverages. 5162.000:
and cigarette-tobacco items,
$119,000.
That among the lowest
priority expenditure area was
that amount spent on
newspapers and magazines.
$64,000.
Each of the 31 expenditure
areas surveyed reflected a
substantial increase in student
spending as compared to fall,
1969 according to Mr. C.E.
Barber, publications operation
manager.
The increase of student
enrollment was considered in
projecting these figures.
Interviewing several UF
students on campus concerning

and that night during the show.
Audience response determines
next weeks returning
performers who are paid for
their services. Admission is 25
cents.
Rat manager, Tom Tedrow
said that this new activity is
designed to bring the student
back to the Rat. It offers
inexpensive entertainment and a

"It came radio in the late
afternoon and f/om the lirst note it was right.
Bob Dylan bringing it all back home again.
"TheniNew Morning [title song] came
on. Like ao'early mist. So clean, so sweet. This
must be sne day that all my dreams come true.
What aiove song! What a message to all of us
blinded as we are by paranoia, grimly trying
to see through the murk and the smoke and
blood. 'So happy just to be alive
underneath the sky of blue
"God its beautiful... it is the most
reassuring thing that has happened this year
of the bombings.
Ralph J. Gleason, Rolling Stone i

. i imm
Wt
I'" v&Ki
A DYLAN M^TERPI^S

the amount of money they
spend each week, most of them
agreed with the survey that their
biggest expenditure was on food.
Katy Gillespie. 2UC, spends
the most money on food each
week, approximately SB-10.00.
Jim West man, 3 AS, spends
the least amount of money on
gasoline each week -about 50
cents for his motor. He also
stated that the most he spent
was around 56.00 for food.
Sharon Moore, 2UC, spends
an extra 57.00 a week on food
for the weekends besides the
amount it costs her each quarter
to eat at her sorority house
weeknights -about
SSO-$60.00. She is a student
who spends her money s on
magazines and other
miscellaneous items

chance for talented students to
perform.
TOO MANY STUDENTS are
getting raked in town and the
Rathskeller has good equipment,
recorders, etc. They (the
students) should take advantage
of this (Folk Night), he
explained.
The Rathskeller was originally
opened three years ago to

Put simply, Ne* M--ning is a superb
album If poetry can a wr that must
be sent by telegraph, then this is certainly one
of Dylans foremost achievements as a poet.
Words, music, singing, piano work, all of the
highest order.
It seems almost superfluous to say that
this is one of the best albums of the year, one
of Dylans best albums, perhaps his best. In
good conscience, all I can really say is get it
yourself and prepare to boogie.
Ed Ward, Rolling Stone
Bob Dylan New Morning.
On Columbia Records
and Tapes

(approximately 53.00 each
week).
Mike Malone, a graduate law
school student, claims that he
spends the most money each
week supporting his family.
Most of his expenditures go to
pay for food and rent.
Tom Kennedy, 3JM and
Alligator photographer, spends
the largest money on
camera equipment each week,
up to S2O dollars. He pays for
his food by the quarter at his
fraternity house.
Saye Sutton, lUC, spends
approximately SIO.OO a week on
food and about $2.00 a week on
miscellaneous items.
Kwok-Yee Wong, 4AR,
spends about $13.00 a week on
food and $5.00 on gasoline. He
stated that he doesnt spend

provide a place for student and
faculty enjoyment and
interaction. It has grown
considerably this quarter,
featuring entertainment five
nights a week. Movies and rock
bands are included in the line
up.
All activities are low priced
and Rathskeller membership is
not required except for use of
the bar facilities.

Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

much more than that a week this
quarter because he is not taking
any studio courses. Last quarter,
he spent an extra amount of
money for his architecture
classes. Architecture supplies ran
up to about 525.00 on project
presentation weeks.
Alligator
Correction
I n an editorial published
Thursday, Jan. 28, The Alligator
incorrectly reported the Reitz
Union had incurred a $93,800
debt.
The $93,800 did not
represent a debt but rather a
projected deficit that could
occur if the Union continues to
operate on its present budget
during the 1971-72 fiscal year.
W.E. RION, Union director,
said earlier that to relieve this
deficit student publications as
well as four other union offices
may have to pay housekeeping
and utility fees to raise $23,000.
This figure was a combined total
of all five organizations.
The editorial also
inadvertantly stated Alumni
Service occupied the entire
basement. Alumni Services only
occupies part of the basement,
the rest is occupied by storage
and maintainence offices.
The Alligator regrets the
error.

Page 19



Page 20

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11, 1971

1970 STRIKEOUT ARTIST
UFs Seybold Gets Hot, Cold Luck

By SIM SMITH
Alligator Correspondent
Tom Seybold had too good of
a season last year to call him a
hard luck pitcher. He lead the
team to strikeouts and was
drafted by the Baltimore Orioles
last June and again this January.
Yet the 6-foot-3, 205-pound
Seybold didnt exactly get any
breaks.
TOM LOST two very tough
ball games to Tennessee and
FSU, despite pitching superbly,
coach Dave Fuller siad.
The FSU\ game was a
heartbreaking 1-0 loss in ten
innings. Against Vanderbilt
Seybold lost a no-hitter when a
two-out error permitted Vandy

The
Florida
All i^ator

Gators Well Represented
In Astrodome Track Meet

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
The largest number of Gators
ever invited to an indoor track
meet will be at Houstons
Astrodome over the weekend for
the prestigious United States
Track and Field Federation
Invitational.
Nearly one-third of the squad
of 57, 17 team members all told,
will leave Gainesville Thursday
at noon for the trip to Houston.
THE LARGE number of
Gators invited is significant
because of the prestige of the
meet (members of the top
squads in the country are
invited) and is evidence of
Floridas track prominence,
assistant track coach Roy
Benson said.
But the nature of the events
run at the meet might
surprisingly hurt the Gators
chances.
Benny Vaughn, described by
track coach Jimmy Carnes as the
sparkplug this year of the
ultra-successful two-mile relay
team wont be making the trip
because of the lingering effects
of a bad case of the flu.
WED RATHER have
Vaughn get well, and be ready
for the SEC meet, Carnes said.
He lost 15 pounds while he had
the flu. and were afraid to let
him run right now. J
Jack Stewart, another
member of the two mile team
will make the trip, but missed
'BUSH VW
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TOM SEYBOLD
.. Oriole draftee
to get their only hit, a scratch
single.

GATOR SPORTS

mHH
mI
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38: X&;: -.rWW!
- 11
' 'tMI
B' v
h
ROY BENJAMIN
... 'has potential'
last weeks invitationals because
of illness, and also might not be
up to par. Sprinter Bill Rennie
will join Vaughn in missing the
trip because of an illness.
This leaves UF thin in events
where they usually have a wealth
of depth, with a meet coming up
where not only the mile and two
mile relays are run, but also a

Buzz Fazio, world champion
bowler, will give two
exhibitions Saturday, Feb. 13
at 12:00 noon and 4:00 p.m.
His achievements include:
A record tying 300 game in the 1950 All
Star Tournament.
0 Five-time billing as All-American
e Reign as king of Bowling in Detroit 1955 X
First 800 series on live TV
Twenty-eight 300 games
FREE ADMISSION
Reitz Union Gomes Area ir^

Seybold played baseball and
football in his hometown of
Madison. Wis.. for Madison West
High School. I came to Florida
for the sun. I was tired of
freezing. he said. He played
freshman football for the
Gators, but after that he decided
baseball was his game.
HE NOT only pitched well
enough to break into the starting
rotation, but hit so well that he
saw a lot of action as an
outfielder and as a pinch hitter.
Tom will very definitely have a
future in professional baseball if
he does as well as he did last
year, Fuller said.
A pre-med student, Seybold

distance relay consisting of the
quarter mile, half mile, three
quarter mile, and mile legs and a
sprint relay consisting of two
220s, a 440, and an 880.
WELL HAVE to take the
personnel we normally make up
the mile and two mile relay
teams with, minus the people we
cant take, add a couple of
sprinters and distance runners,
and come up with four relay
teams, Benson said.
WeU have to count on our
two mile team plus score in the
individual events, Carnes said.
But the Gators have more
than a few outstanding
individual performers. Eamonn
OKeeffe, pole vaulter Scott
Hurley, long jumper Ron
Coleman, sprinter Roger Carson,
hurdler Henry Cummings, and
miler Roy Benjamin have the
potential for outstanding
performances, Benson said.
But what it amounts to is we
have an almost complete
inability to predict the results,
he said.

jopH|
DAVE FULLER
... impressed by Seybold
has twice declined pro offers in
order to finish school. Deciding
between medicine and baseball is
going to be a difficult decision,
he said. Apparently, it will take
a very good bonus offer if a
major league team hopes to land
Seybold.
The big hurler is optimistic

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about the upcoming season. He
believes the team has improved
its hitting, speed, and attitude.
LAST YEARS ace, Wayne
Rogers, an assistant coacli this
season, was outspoken in his
praise for Seybold. He appears
to be in great shape, and he is
working real hard. We will be
counting on him heavily this
year, he said.
Although Seybold said the
team has improved its hitting,
speed and attitude, there is one
big question mark for the Gators
their pitching strength.
Seybold is the only proven
thrower the team has.
I believe well have to get a
lot out of Thomas (Dave) and
Kowalski (Bob) plus come up
with a good freshman in order to
have a good year, Seybold
predicted.
The general feeling of the
team is that as the pitching goes,
so go the Gators. If correct, this
may make Tom Seybold the key
player on the team.

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Is WBA Power A Bit Too Much?

By WILLIAM GLASSMAN
Alligator Boxing Correspondent
In a statement released last month, the World Boxing
Association (WBA) withdrew recognition of Bob Foster as
light-heavyweight champion of the world. The WBA said
that Foster had not defended his title against the no. 1
contender in the six months allotted him to do so In
June, 1970, Foster fought no. 2 contender Mark Tessmen,
and then in November of last year he battled the
heavyweight champion Joe Frazier.
IT IS HARD to believe the WBA, which has blundered

-. 05.,. r- -JL'. v/ .
M. tO : >;V. *4. " i- . '' \ SvV > .4
'oAmrmmpnhp
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flavor I j^j

so badly in the past, still has the power to take a mans
title away, outside the ring.
In 1967, it was this organization that took Muhammad
Alis title, and was criticized world-wide for doing so.
What is the WBA going to do in March if Ali recaptures
the title from Frazier?
Getting back to the case of Bob Foster, there are many
other boxing organizations in the United States and world
that are not even associated with the WBA. There are
enough, however, to hurt Foster financially as well as hurt
boxing because of the split it will cause.
IT IS NOT realistic to think that all the other councils
and commissions will come together, but it would be a

Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

good idea for the United States to have one commission
instead of a lot of little state puppets.
Foster said he didnt fight the No. 1 contender because
the opponents manager wouldnt guarantee a specific
purse. Why should he fight? Without a guarantee for a
Fighters pocket it would be stupid for him to Fight,
especially after months of training and preparing for a
Fight. Foster could have been Financially hurt with a small
gate audience.
It is too bad that just when boxing is getting more
attention than it has had in the last decade, the WBA has to
show its true self, and be more of a detriment than a help.

Page 21



!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, February 11,1971

Page 22

Gymnastics Looking For Recognition

By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writar
Although gymnastics is not
recognized as a varsity sport in
the Southeastern Conference,
UFs Gymnastic Club Coach, Joe
Regna is still optimistic that it
will gain recognition.
Im very disappointed that
gymnastics is not a very popular
sport in the South and as a result

I r W '] ,i, \ I j '* -" S * 1 I ( I v I f ''
I
UN EVEN PARALLEL BARS LAURA HALL'S SPECIALTY
... she is half of the girls gymnastic club
I Intramurals \

Bristol Section of Hume Hall
captured the Dorm league
volleyball championship winning
twice, 15-11 and 15-3 over
Thomas F. Bristol featured the
play of Mark Schiverthoffer
while Tim Smith led Thomas in
a determined effort.
Bristol defeated Jennings 4
and South 1, enroute to the
championship. Thomas F beat
Grahams MacLachlan to reach
the finals.
IN LEAGUE basketball
action, the Personal Fouls,
featuring former Gator
letterman stars Gene Peek,
Richard Trapp, and Wayne
McCall have won both games in
their bracket.
McCall scored 19 points in a
49-36 win over the Nympho
Netters and Bob Bauer led the
team to a 43-25 victory over the
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it isnt considered a varsity
sport, Regna said.
WORKING WITHOUT a
budget, the Gator gymnists must
finance all of their expenses the
best way they can. Most of the
expenses are paid by the
individual club member.
Regna has been donating his
coaching services since 1960.
I do it for the enjoyment
and satisfaction of helping

Running Jackulators with 12
points.
The Ball Busters, playing in
bracket two whipped the Sea
Grapes 48-19 as Frank Saier,
pumped in 18 points. The
Busters came back and beat the
Walking Wounded in overtime
5047.
The Turnovers, in bracket

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athletes that are interested in
gymnastics, Regna said.
The gymnastic clubs record is
currently 2-2 and have two dual
meets left. This past weekend
the gymnists defeated Broward
Junior College and the Citadel.
UNDER THE circumstances,
Im pleased with the teams
performances. Were only a
pick-up team and must compete

one, are the only other
undefeated team as Roger
Balding Boiling continues to
bomb the bucket.
In the Engineering league,
Electric 5 is undefeated in two
matches. Other undefeated
teams include Industrial and
ENE.

against regular varsity teams,
Regna said.
Recently a petition has been
circulating to recognize
gymnastics as a varsity sport.
This would make scholarships
available to eligible high school
athletes.
I dont know too much
about the petition except that it
was started by several of the
players for more recognition,
Regna said.
SENIOR 808 CARR and
junior Leif Walter have been
leading the club so far this
season. Against Broward, Walter
captured five first place finishes
while Carr took four.
The Gator gymnists will meet
North Carolina and FSU in a
dual meet Feb. 20 in their next
match.
We appreciate the people
who came out to see the last
meet and hope there will be even
more there for our next one,
Regna said.

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4130 NW 6th St
features
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every Wednesday-Friday and Saturday
Melody Club has lots of room
for dancing, beer, sandwiches
and games that people play
MELODY CLUB
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... on gym club



LSU Defeats Gators, 86-74

BV MARTY PERLMUTT ER
Executive Sports Editor
Louisiana State University
without the services of Pete
Maravich for the first time in
three years in Gainesville, made
its return a successful one
Wednesday night, 86-74.
The inside shooting of Bill
Newton, LSUs 6-foot-9 forward
kept the Gators from any chance
they had of winning their
seventh game of the year.
Newton Finished the night with
23 points, high in the game.
FLORIDA, DOWN only
37-35 at the half, tied the score
on Earl Findleys basket at the
outset of the second half, but
never was close again. The
Gators made a run late in the

FOUR CAPTAINS THIS YEAR
T rack Team Goes 3 Better

Vlost UF athletic squads have a team captain,
right?
The UF track squad goes three better, however,
with two captains apeace for the track and field
events.
MOST TEAM captains are just figureheads,
track coach Jimmy Carness said. But our captains
have really helped the team.
The four captains, Jerry Fannin and Roger
( arson for the runners, and Ron Coleman and
Grover Howard in the field events help out in two
areas.

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TOM PURVIS
... 22 point night
game when they closed in on a
14 point Tiger lead.

They improve communication within the squad,
and they help provide some direction for the team.
With track events scattered as they are, its
impossible for the coaches to be everywhere,
Carnes said.
AND THESE boys have really provided
leadership. This team has a great attitude.
In addition to the captains, the track squad also
has a representative from each event on what Carnes
describes as a council for the track team.
These are two things weve worked on this year,
and I think theyve worked out real well. Its helped
the team to work as a unit, Carnes said.

Baskets by Dan Boe. Jerry
Hoover and Tom Purvis brought
the Gators to within six. 76-70.
But Tommy Hess, the smallest
person on the court at 5-foot-9
sank a big one-and-one foul shot
and killed the Gators.
We looked more agressive in
those last few minutes. UF
coach Tommy Bartlett said.
But instead of getting closer to
them, we fell further behind.
BARTLETT MET the
reporters in the hall outside the
locker room after a long 30
minute wait. He didnt comment
on why the delay.
Poor shooting could be one
reason the Gators dropped their
13 th game of the season against

six victories. An identical .375
percentage in the First half and
the second half couldnt
compare to LSUs .529 and
.667.
Purvis was tops for the Gators
with 22 points while Tony Miller
finished with 14.

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Thursday, February 11, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 23



Page 24

, The Florida Alligator. Thurtdav. Fh*rv 1 1 1971

The UF Board of Student Publications
- A ; t ... , '
Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
Apply For the Following Positions .
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
&
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
The Board of Student Publications shall choose
the term of office after full deliberation
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
You do not have to be a journalism major.
General Instructions
All applications are to be picked up and
returned between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union.
Applicants must return the original plus two
copies of the completed application prior to
4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 19.
4 M I.
For further information, call Mr. Alan Whiteleather,
392-1680