Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Fo bi
Ad Ammu.

VoL 63, No. 74

CONTROL OF SPEAKERS

Legislators Attempting
Campus Crackdown

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
An attempt will be made at
the next Florida legislative
session to prohibit any
university personnel from
sponsoring or permitting any
speaker .. who advocates
destruction of public or private
property, or violent overthrow
of the government.
Representative Ray Mattox
has authored the prefiled bill
that will come before the next
legislature.
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder called the bill a
farce
Theyre attempting to
legislate morality, Uhlfelder
said, by imposing their own
views on the general public.
If convicted, the
responsible person could be
penalized by up to six months
imprisonment, or handed a fine
of up to five thousand dollars.
STEPS ARE being taken
to improve protection of
vending machines -on UF
campus page 5
Classifieds 8
Editorials 6
Letters 7
Movies 8
Page of Record 10
Sports 11

By RONNIE SACHS
Alligator Staff Writar
It takes less than an hour to
get to Raiford State Prison from
here. Last Wednesday Jessica
Everingham (editor of UFs
literary magazine The Florida
Quarterly) and I had an
appointment to meet with a
handful of inmates there who
are very much involved with
writing.
If youve never been to
Raiford,-or for that matter any
state prison, the trip there is
filled mostly with thoughts of
what you expect to see.
JESSICA AND I have seen
enough James Cagney prison

Prisoners Write Os Life, Love, Loneliness

! The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

UHLFELDER KIBLER
THE PRE-FILED bill defined
those responsible as anyone
who, operating or administrating
any state university, public
school, public auditorium or
other publicly funded meeting
facility, knowingly sponsored
or permitted the speaker to
appear.
According to Uhlfelder, the
prefiled bill was not only an
attempt to punish the individual
who speaks which I am
against but also the person
who brought the speaker.
How am I supposed to know
what the person will say?
Uhlfelder asked. The law would
be unconstitutional.
IT WOULDNT curtail me
I would force the issue; bring it
to a test.
Uhlfelder claimed that any
speaker has the constitutional
right to advocate the violent
overthrow of the government, as
long as he doesnt advocate an
overt act.

flicks to let our imaginations run
rampant. The fact that Raiford
has been the subject of
numerous news stories and
editorials in recent months
because of supposed poor
facilities and inmate treatment
did not make us any more
comfortable in our journey.
But we approached the
appointment with curiosity, if
nothing else, as we drove under underneath
neath underneath a grill sign that coldly tells
visitors the STATE PRISON is
not far away.
We waited in the plush and
thoroughly modern
administration offices for Gerald
Thorp, an English instructor at
the prisons school. When we

University of Florida Gainesville

The prefiled bill came on the
heels of recent controversy
surrounding such speakers as
Abbie Hoffman and William
Kunstler, appearing on Florida
campuses.
Following their appearance,
D. Burke Kibler 111, chairman of
the Board of Regents said, I
deplore the presence of these
people on our campuses,
(Hoffman and Kunstler) but,
nevertheless, I respect the right
of students and faculty to hear
these people if they so desire,
provided, of course, these people
behave themselves while on our
campuses.
According to Kibler, the
Supreme Courts definition of
the first amendment, right to
freedom of speech, insures
radical speakers the right to
speak on Florida campuses.

TEP Fraternity Gets Off
With Four IFC Reprimands

By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligator Writer
i .
The Interfraternity Council
(IFC) said they let the Tau
Epsilon Phi fraternity off easy
by handing down four
reprimands at its first and final
hearing Jan. 31, concerning
TEPs pledge roadtrip, which
occurred early Jan. 24.

Alligator

received clearance, Thorp led
us outside we were about
to enter a little world where
some men spend the rest of their
lives.
THORP GAVE us a short
tour of the prisons school which
offers courses in subject areas
from shoe repair to government
studies. Some of our more
dramatic reservations were

HI -%| # .
COUNTDOWN H,LCOPE
... three, two, one, zero, ignition, liftoff Apollo 14 is on its way to
the moon. Having overcome one major difficulty already, the docking
of the Lunar module Antares with the command ship Kitty Hawk,
could have possible difficulties in the lunar landing.

THE 50 MEN who live in the
TEP house have no open house
priviledges for the remainder of
the quarter. Girls may enter the
fraternity house, but must
remain within the public areas,
such as the living and dining
areas.
On a whole the fraternity
must give 200 man hours of
work to Alachua County. The

Viewpoiiit

relieved by the total informal
atmosphere of quiet.
We entered a small conference
room where six inmates were
introduced to us. These men
were the purpose of our trip.
They have been judged by
society as criminals, their crimes
ranging in severity from murder
to breaking and entering. Their
sentences range accordingly

V 1 f X

Tuesday, February 2, 1971

fraternity must submit to the
IFC a revised pledging and
initiation program. The last
thing the TEPs must do is pay
for all damages for that nights
incident.
David Simon, TEP chancellor,
was present to receive the
reprimands inflicted upon his
fraternity. He had no comment
to make.

from several months to life.
We sat and we talked and
Jessica and 1 began to see that
these men were individuals.
There wasnt a James Cagney
among them. Instead, they were
all intent on expressing
themselves, and had found a
worthy medium in writing.
ARCHIE DAVIS wasnt sure
about how he became interested
in writing. He said that his
motivation came from articles I
have read or actual experiences I
have had in my life more than
anything else.
I do know that I didnt write
or even think of writing until I

(SEE PRISONERS' PAGE 4)



Page 2

, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, February 2,1971

Files Show Connally Receiving Fee

WASHINGTON (UPI) John
B. Connally Jr., President
Nixons choice for Treasury
secretary, received at least
$225,00 while governor of Texas
from the Sid W. Richardson
foundation, records on file with
the Intemtal Revenue Service
showed today.
Connally said through a
Treasury spokesman that he
would have no comment on the
matter.
THE FOUNDATION was
established by Sid W.
Richardson, a Fort Worth, Tex.,
oil millionaire who died in 1959.
The foundation now holds
extensive oil properties through
Richardson's will.

Astronauts Clear
ForMoon Landing

Space Center, Houston (UPI)
Apollo 14s astronauts got
clearance Mopday to try for a
landing on the moon Friday
morning when a problem with
their spacecraft disappeared as
mysteriously as it popped up.
I feel excellent, 47-year-old
Alan B. Shepard told ground
controllers when he awoke late
in the day, a few hours after the
decision had been made to let
him and Edgar D. Mitchell go
ahead with plans to explore an
ancient moon crater.
SPACE OFFICIALS
announced their decision after
hours of trying without success
to determine why the astronauts
had so much trouble docking
their command ship with the
lunar lander.

Co£e%£ <&tin

Daily entree special 52$ iupl
Daily pastry special 19$
Featuring color T.V. & Jukebox on free play
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published seml-wee'kiy, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Tax exempt organizations like
the Richardson Foundation are
required by law to file financial
statements with the IRS. Unlike
individual and corporate tax
returns which are confidential,
the filings of foundations are
open to public inspection.
The Richardson Foundations
statement for 1966 showed the
organization was indebted to
Connally in the amount of
$225,000 from Sid W.
Richardson,s estate. The 1967
filing showed the debt had been
reduced by $75,000 during the
year to $150,000 while in 1968
the debt was down to $75,000.
The 1969 statement showed the
debt had been retired in full.
CONNALLY WAS governor
of Texas from 1963 to 1969.

Chester M. Lee, mission
director, said the clamps that
were supposed to hold the two
moonships together might have
been jammed with a sliver of ice.
Apollo program manager
James McDivitt agreed that it
probably was some foreign
object that kept the devices
from locking Sunday night.
Shepard, Americas oldest
astronaut in active service and its
first man in space a decade ago,
left no doubt he was enjoying
his first flight since then when
he reported in.
I feel excellent. I slept
soundly for four or five hours
and intermittently for another
two.

The Texas Constitution
prohibits a governor from
receiving compensation,
reward, from any outside
activities.
The New York Times quoted
Perry R. Bass, a director and
chief spokesman for the
foundation, as saying that the
payments were for work
Connally had done as an
executor of Richardsons $lO5
million estate following his
death in 1959.
The newspaper quoted Bass, a
nephew of Richardson, as
saying: Those were executors
fees. That was a helluva long
time ago.

ip i
iLsir t>
I % k **% |||?
w
jm I
m ill
; I ~j Li\
..... ... f

Let It Be as Joan Baez, talented songstress,
lecturer and non-violent activist performs before a
full house in Florida Gym, Sunday night. Love Is
Just A Four Letter Word but Miss Baez stressed
the fact that this four letter word should be shared
by more people in the world and less emphasis

SERVING
ITALIAN FOODS
& TT FEATURING:
y \ SHOPPERS SPECIALS
M, 44, SPECIALTY SANDWICHES
6 (IlarmUtma b 3 delicious salads
A A DOMESTIC & IMPORTED
Qaaden of gating j§ wines and beer
SERVING CONTINUOUSLY
|i Ks 11 am to 8:30 p.m.
r>wS|.Vn CONGENIAL
* Tjjgr CONTINENTAL
IN THE MALL ATMOSPHERE

THERE WAS no indication
whether Connally had
completed his work as executor
of the will before he was named
Navy secretary by President
John F. Kennedy in 1961, the
Times reported.
At that time, Connally
indicated he had not received
any payment for his work as a
co-executor of the estate. He
said he entered into an
agreement with his two fellow
co-executors that he would not
receive any fee while he was
serving as Navy Secretary.
At a hearing last week before
the Senate Finance Committee,
on his nomination to be
Treasury secretary, Connally
scoffed at public reports of his

PEACEFUL FOLKSINGER

should be put on a three-letter word WAR. Her
songs and words shared with the audience sent
many home deep in thought; hopefully to remain in
thought till we can achieve peace among people and
nations.

vast wealth in oil. He said his
current oil holdings amounted to
only the magnificent sum of
$7,240.
Sen. Russell B. Long, D-La.,
Finance Committee chairman,
said he had understood it cost
Connally $1 million to dispose
of holdings that might have
with his duties as
Treasury \ecretary. Connally
said later the\ cost was less than
Longs figure \although it was
substantial. \-
Senate records showed that
Connally was questioned about
his compensation from the
Richardson estate on Jan. 18,
1961, when he appeared before
the Senate Armed Services
Committee for confirmation as
Navy Secretary. That was 16
months after Richardsons
death.



UF Students Help Sunshine School

By JANE CATO
Alligator Writer
Sunshine School is a home
away from home for some 30
retarded children daily.
Sponsored by the Alachua
County Association for
Retarded Children, the school is

mk LtkmStimt mT*
ijj -j|p|jg / yjbyfl
ii BBgp^.

fiffi W pfAM*,****^
E)pagsrte &via&vf |& ct&sese&AKg tyS < /' SL,CE Mslk, etnoceiAVt, mum
wegrten gAZAMe 4?£<[ / MAiVAae £& I ff 2 i e>w#>** ffwe*, &wm£
SEms
I TSSSLmSr f# *** J?**£L T &l*smVC
msnS£m**f 9 t I 354 /z*~3stPr- r &utess
A ffotWVl99M*MieiSi) f9l ? />fSWt ~ 2s& 4 (Z? oz.)
Bgy
I m*> & ****w&***K~/&t/6** VSvcmvwrrr \|
ErttyjSSl*s*u*o >* MPKtewr- 7 I
I 7&SM* wwmmtrp>AW. I
I tgtftSS, /iUtMSFgfI, ftVLS>Mg f If (JEM 7V£ Cote*"* *-&**) /M\
I CMMB&M, (gJMSZP W m\ f J/MtM
I

attended by children ages 2-16.
LOCATED ONLY two blocks
away from the UF campus, at
107 NW 15th Terrace, several
UF students help Mrs.- Delia
McClelland, director of the
school, and her four aides.
Sunshine School provides a

place for the training of
pre-school and school age
children who are too severely
retarded to attend public
schools.
In a two story house provided
by the Episcopal University
Center, morning and afternoon
sessions, as well as an all day
ART EXHIBIT
UF graduate art students are
presenting an art exhibition at
the Micanopy Center of Modern
Art Feb. 5 through March 2.
Live music and refreshments will
be provided at the exhibition
opening, Friday at 8* p.m. Most
of the art work at die exhibition
will be for sale and includes
recent works in painting, prints,
photographs, sculptures,
ceramics and drawings. The
annual event is open to the
public. Contributing graduate
students are: Larry Payne,
ceramics; Bob Beach, Mike
Krone, Nelson Meyer, Steve
Moore, Bill Shirley and Bogdan
Swider, paintings; Gay Burke,
John Craig, Ken Jones and
Claudine Laabs, photographs;
and Neil Kalmanson, Kent
Mikalsen and Pat Rowan,
sculpture. Gallery hours are 1:30
until 5:30 p.m. every day except
Monday, when it is closed. The
Micanopy Center of Modern Art
is located in Micanopy 8 miles
south on Highway 441.

care program, are conducted.
THE CHILDREN are trained
in areas such as language,
self-help skills, visual perception
and social adjustment.
UF students help the children
by testing them, for example,
with pictures of animals.
Working daily with the child,
helps him to learn by not
breaking the routine.
Mrs. McClelland believes
Sunshine School provides a
greater advantage to the child
than a large training center,
because the child is able to live
at home, thus receiving
individual family attention, as
well as training.during the day.
TUITION FOR the children is

Annual Engineers Fair
Needs Beauty Queen

Calling all beauties! The 26th
Annual Engineers Fair is once
again sponsoring a beauty
contest to decide the 1971
Engineers Fair Queen.
Each of the 16 societies in
engineering sponsors one girl
with the final queen being
crowned at the awards ceremony
April 17. The 16 societies are
now in the process of narrowing
down to one representative.
The only qualifications are
that the girls must be single and
have a 2.0 average. The engineers
prefer undergraduates but there
are no rules stating this.
All interested girls should
contact Dave McClaskey,

Tuesday, February 2,1971, The Florida Alligator,

determined by the parents
income and number of
dependents. The school also
receives aid from the state's
Division of Retardation, the
United Fund, and private
contributions.
Although Sunshine School
does not need volunteers at the
,
present, they do need toys and
books.
A girls bicycle is especially
needed, as well as balls, tricycles,
wagons, dolls, or any other toys
in repairable condition.
Open House is held on the
second Thursday of each month
from 8-5 p.m.

chairman of the contest
immediately at 378-7543 or
392-6038. Deadline is February
16.
Badger Brush
The long, stiff hairs of bad badgers
gers badgers once were used to make
shaving brushes.

THE TRAIN IS
COMING!

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 2,1971

PRISONERS ...

started to stay in here, he
explained.
I asked Archie if I could read
some of the writing he has done.
Its poetry, and its also a very
personal thing for Archie. And
as 1 read I began to feel that this
man Archie Davis did a great
deal of thinking. His words
speak clearly in his poem This
Prison.
The walk of this prison oppress me;
Yet it k not the prison of stone and
steel
But the prison of mind.
Insanely I hare battered my soul
against
these invisible walls and ban,
But I am forever entombed here.
I hare cried out for freedom,
But throughout all the cosmic
universe
my voice goes unheard.
Now it k too late as the paralysis of
incoherence overtakes me.
I pace my cell of mind
alone ... unheard."
NOW, JESSICA and I were
thoroughly involved with talking
to these men in the short time
we had, reading as much of their
work as we could, and trying to

i I £ ¥ I -
: I 'M, *r : I mi
b .. a a i s s
. f "1 if
INMATES' MAIN LIVING QUARTERS
... commonly referred to as "the rock

let them know what we thought
of their thoughts.
They were anxious to receive
criticism of their work, and
seemed to be groping for ways
to improve their ability to
communicate through the
written word.
Harold Kemp spoke of writing
as a means to keep in touch
with what happens out on the
street.
I MAY BE confined here,
but I always know whats going
on in the world, he said.
And his poetry deals with
firmly held convictions on the
future of black people in
America. Harold is working on a
book with another inmate, Jim
Blair. Combining their talents of
writing and art, the book
includes dramatic work such as
this excerpt:

Stud-Ease
Lecture Notes
CEH for PS 212
CHN CY2O2 APY2OO
CBS CY 202 CY 201
ATG 201 STA 320 MS 102
MID TERM SPECIAL!
buy them at:
1638 W. Univ. Ave.
(next to Spanish Main)
Buy the notes for one course and
get a 20% Discount.

... We must and shall obtain
Liberty,
Justice, and Dignity.
For such k our necessity ... our
destiny I
Depend not upon the society of our
fellowmen;
Nay! Despised as we are,
Help will not come from them.
We shall die alone.
Therefore we must act
as if we were alone."
Their thoughts are not happy
ones.. Many deal with memories
of the past, and in some cases
dreams of the future. But the
effect of the present is felt in
almost all of them.
JOHNNY HUNTERsees
writing his thoughts down as
the main way I can express
myself... there arent a lot of
people to really talk to.
And perhaps Johnnys
thought is saddening, for prison,
with all the men who are said to
have so much in common, is still
a very lonely place.
"I see the agonies of time,
a sadness
of dreams denied
and sorrow...
These men have not forgotten
love that they knew. And their

memories of their loves are
warm, and sentimental, and
wandering.
MARIO PETACCIA writes
more fiction than poetry, and
calls it ... away to really
express thoughts that have been
buried a long time.
But Marios poetry, in one of
his works entitled Sometimes,
tells of the love he has known.
Sometimes,
When I walk the empty streets at
night
I stop for a moment
and listen for your laughter.
There are times at daybreak
When I watch the sunrise
and overwhelmed by its beauty
I turn suddenly to glance at you.
Awakening
is the hardest part.
My eyes are full of sleep,

FREE TRANSPORTATION TO
CAMPUS CONE
HUME 10 AND 40 minutes past the hour
WEAVER 15 AND 45 minutes past the hour
TOLBERT 20 AND 50 minutes past the hour
MURPHEE 25 AND 55 minutes past the hour
SUNDAY-THURSDAY 7 TO 12 p.m.

*
**
i -4et'
"4% A- jp II | /h\i H |
, -. r \s\/ V* ;
** /** I r ' i I I
pppr-iv ~
9 W? 7
- -ir rmisiiii iiir-nm-iir i' '
iSw 9 .- -'> ****'
* ~ *,
- * ''S',**/' A I*7 |

I stretch lazily
and reach out for your warm hands.
It k not easy to remember
youre not here.
My mind knows
but my heart
forgets.
*
It is difficult to read thoughts
as stirring as those and not feel
somewhat ashamed for what I
expected to find in the trip to
the prison. With each piece
Jessica and I read we were seeing
that these men have something
very good to offer people.
THEY ARE untrained, but
eager to learn. They have
something to say, but need to
know that someone wants to
listen. But most importantly,
they are extremely talented.

Jessica and I listened as these
men spoke of how greatly they
would like to have a writers
workshop established at Raiford.
They want professional criticism
of their work, an opportunity to
receive training from
accomplished writers or
teachers, and a chance to have
their work printed ... to share it
with other people.
But, while a workshop would
be a productive way for these
men to create and develop their
abilities, efforts to secure such a
workshop have met difficulty.
A LACK OF funds and
administrative red tape have
been cited by the inmates as
contributing to the difficulty in
getting a workshop.
We have a lot of talent here
that mav never get to the
outside, said inmate Warren

GRILLED SIGN SIGNALS 'STATE PRISON'
... Rarford isn't far up the road

Williams. We dont know what
to do with it, but we cant forget
that its here.
Warren has written several
poems, a few of which will
appear in the next issue of The
Florida Quarterly.
THORP, IN his role as an
instructor, has done as much as
possible to encourage the
inmates to continue their writing
efforts. He called the idea of a
workshop one of the best
rehabilitative services that might
be employed.
But people are hesitant to
turn loose funds to serve the
creative interests of prisoners,
Thorp said. Its not seen as the
sort of thing taken as a good
expenditure.
Perhaps many people would
not view such a workshop as a
worthwhile undertaking. It
seems people are comfortable
with a preconceived notion that
a man in prison has nothing to
offer his fellow man. It seems
that to have been judged a
criminal relegates a man to a life
not only of confinement and
loneliness, but even to one of
denial of any ability he may
have.
THE WORK OF these men at
Raiford should serve as
testimony that they do indeed
have something to offer, and
that they also have ability worth
developing.
If funds are so tight, perhaps a
volunteer workshop is the
answer. These men want a
workshop, regardless.
John Adams, another of the
inmates we sat and talked with,
writes of the future with hope
and optimism, not the despair
and frustration that might easily
overcome a man serving a life
sentence.
IN HIS WORK, Pandoras
Child, that optimism is
expressed.
I looked down into
the guiltless blue eyes of a child
and received a glimmer of hope.
For there I saw
the beautiful future of mankind
And it saw me
as only a man.
Jessica and I thanked the men
for what they had truly done for

UNDER A DOLLAR DOES IT AT THE
I COLONELS
TpScSn Kaih COLONEL'S SPECIAL
FREE DRINK > 2 90 CHICKEN
Mashed Potatoes 1 ROLL
1 Roll
KENTUCKY H?fIrCHICKEN AT
AND 114 SW 34th ST 372-3649

us. By exposing us to their work
we met great talent, and men
who deserve a chance to be
heard.
WE LEFT, driving back the
way we had come. We might
have expected to be a little
depressed at this point of our
trip, but to the contrary, we
were happy, and excited, and
eager to share what we had read
and had learned.
As we drove away, they
entered the main Raiford living
quarters, commonly known as
the rock. And they settled
down to an evening of
conversation, or contemplation,
but something that they would
write about.
Does anyone want to hear
them?
Phomy Matrimony
CAIRO, Egypt (UPI) When
a government official
empowered to perform
marriages and grant divorces fell
ill, his bus driver son decided to
take over his duties here.
For five days he merrily
married scores of couples and
divorced others.
Though Islamic leaders upheld
the marriages and divorces as
valid by their religion,
government officials say that
under the law the bus driver had
no power to officiate at the
proceedings and the couples will
have to go through the process
again.

THE TRAIN IS
COMING!
In>.u.i ~.!3Lik*L..kiA v 'jLnrSJB
MU*. Jl



Vending Service
Gets Protection
'< A
-v L
By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Writer
Steps are being taken to improve vending service on the UF campus
in the area of machine protection, Steve Johnson, University Vending
Manager, said Friday.
We are hoping to alleviate the break-ins in the next 30 days,
Johnson said.
MOST OF THE abuse to vending machines is not caused by UF
students, he said.
Lt. Gene Watson, investigator for UPD, believes the vandals are
mainly juveniles and has the names of several which are presently
being investigated as possible offenders.
Outdoor and ill-secured machines, which are a frequent target for
night break-ins, will be enclosed and secured. These include the
machines at McCarty Hall, the Hub, Walker Hall, the Research
Library, and the College of Journalism.
Dean Rae 0. Weimer, special assistant to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said $1,700 was needed to wall in the vending area at the
Hub and installing protective gates in the Walker area costs $4,500.
MACHINES HAVE been removed in several areas where damage
was continuous. Johnson said he hopes securing of vending areas at
night will enable them to replace these machines.
Otis Jones, director of auxiliary services, said, The damage to
these machines is more important than the money we lose that is
taken. For example, a Coke box is SSOO and a coffee box costs
$1500.
Depending upon when a machine was last serviced, a candy or
drink machine may yield $5.00 to $25.00, and a cigarette machine as
much as $65.00 or $70.00.
WOMETCO, THE largest vendor on campus, since December 12th,
1970, has lost SBOO in money and products and was forced to spend
SIOOO for the repair of its machines.
To be open soon, the new commons building in the Murphree area
will house 10 additional machines.
Johnson noted two other improvements: -_
An out-of-service sticker, which states that a repairman has been
called, is supposed to be placed on machines which have been
reported as malfunctioning. The sticker is to be removed by the
repairman.
Refunds will be available and malfunctions may be reported at
seven additional locations: Walker Hall, Norman Hall, Holland Law
Center, Reitz Union, the College of Journalism, Weil Hall, and the
Dietary Office in the Shands Teaching Hopsital.
Johnson said the whole vending system is much better now than
in the fall. He said there is a better communication line with the
dormitories.
NEW BOOK
NEW AKmVAIS
The New English Bible
Lady Bird Johnson: A White House Diary
Crews: This Thing Dont Lead To Heaven
Garrison: A Heritage Os Stone
Brilliant: Portrait Os Israel
Elder: Crisis In Eden
Cranshaw: Khrushchev Remembers
Woodruf: Vessel Os Sadness
Bell: Escape From Addition
Gordon: Baby Learning Through Baby Plan
(in both hard-back and paper)
"CMdsgy: The Panama
store hours Bam Bpm Sat. 9am *l2 noon
C CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE
151 B ...located in the Hub

ATTEND FREE
I
Youll Increase Your I
Reading Speed I
On The Spot! ~ I
A Limited Time Only! I
|
World Famous Evelyn Wood Youll see why President I
Reading Dynamics offers you Kennedy invited Evelyn Wood 3
a free glimpse of what its like to the White House to teach ||
to be able to read and study his advisors and the Joint 11
much faster Chiefs of Staff how to read m
faster.
Youll actually be taught how Youll hear what the faculty
to read and study faster during members of one of Americas
the exciting Speed Reading foremost colleges says about
Lesson. Evelyn Wood, and watch them
read fast!
We want you to decide for your- Youll find this Special Free of
self the value of becoming a fer of increased reading speed
Speed-Reader, Evelyn Wood to be an exciting and unusual
style. experience.
For a limited time we are offering a
Special Speed-Reading Lesson to
provide you with a glimpse of what
its like to be able to read and study
substantially faster .. and you'll
actually participate in the
techniques that will improve your
reading and study speed on the
spot!

I Free mid mom Lessons! I
I Today and Tomorrow I
I 3:00,5:30 & 8410 I
I 1125 W. University Avenue I
372-1600 S
I 2vehfK7VoU READING DYNAMICS* I
Pjt|| 'V- iv* . Sgjg
I next to Donigans I

s'iut- z f-p-itnij" w v awigr r anr
Tuesday, February 2, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>. Th* Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 2,1971

ET he newspapers! Sir, they are the most
villainous licentious abominable
Sy infernal not that I ever read them
PM no I make it a rule never to look into a
newspaper.
R. B. Sheridan, The Critic
EDITORIAL
Bad News Gone
Just For A Day?
Ever since Spiro Agnew started pointing out that
newspapers use those big headlines to deliberately attract
attention and sell newspapers, the journalism profession has
been under fire.
People are sick of reading about murder, they say. They
are sick of reading about how many American boys are
killed in Vietnam. They are sick of editorials pointing out
various inequalities in the United States.
They want to read some good news.
Okay. As a public service today to those readers tired of
reading about unhappiness, The Alligator today presents
some things that have made us smile recently.
The Accent 7l program was one of the best ever. It
gave us Louis B. Hershey, Dr. Nathan Wright, Max Rafferty,
Jane Fonda, Frank Mankiewicz and Joan Baez. Accent will
have a difficult time next year topping this winters efforts.
The Committee is to be commended.
That plans are being made to do something about the
dilapidated Florida gym. R.W. Munson, the universitys
physical planning consultant says the gym will be remodeled
with plans to include an adequate amount of fire exits and
air conditioners. The renovation of the gym is long overdue
and we are delighted that something is going to be done
about it.
That President Nixon ordered a halt in the
construction of the Cross Florida Barge Canal. President
Nixon said he was halting the project to prevent a past
mistake from causing permanent damage. Now if he can do
the same in the Indochina.
That Sen. George McGovern continues to criticize our
war efforts in Southeast Asia. Told that Mississippis Sen.
John Stennis had recommended further escalation of the
war, McGovern said, Any Senator who would advocate
that kind of action at this stage should be right up in front
leading the troops himself.
That A1 Capp continues to write a nationally
syndicated column. We may not agree with him, but he sure
makes us laugh.
That the UF basketball team ended its on-the-road jinx
Saturday night with a victory over Georgia in Athens. The
Gators are now 6-10 and coach Tom Bartlett says they are
improving.
This is the good news for today. We hope there may
come a time when editorials like this can be written every
day.
Last of the big spenders

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Me? Oh, just a tourist
= i FLUTED COLUMNS
The Plots Sicken
= I By JOHN PARKER=L====I

The plot by a covey of Nuns
to blow up the heating plant of
the Pentagon brings up some
important considerations.
First of all, exactly what
would be the net result of such a
well-laid plan if it did not go
astray?
A chilly Pentagon and a lot of
grumpy generals with sniffles.
Which is exactly the point. A
grumpy general with the sniffles
is much more likely to start a
war somewhere than a grumpy
general without the sniffles.
See the logic?
The solution is quite simple.
The revolutionaries are going for
the wrong targets. If you want
to catch a tiger, you dont begin
by pulling his tail.
If you really wanted to do
some good, here are some
schemes designed to hit the
establishment where it hurts:
Kidnap Spiro. Take him to

Alligator Staff
Denis* Valiants John Parker
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Slav* Strang Joan Dalton
Wire Editor Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications. if.ujtf
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publicatiom Suite
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Off ice phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.
T

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

\ >
Jm Vj
\ r7
\
a secret clinic somewhere and
give him a frontal lobotomy,
then slip him onto the front
porch at the White House in a
rocking chair. Hell spend the
rest of his term smiling and
saying, Bless you, Walter
Cronkite, Bless you.
Sneak novacaine into
Martha Mitchells Polident.
Kidnap George Wallace, try
to ransom him to Richard

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

Nixon. When Nixon refuses to
pay, sell him to the Black
Panthers.
Plant smoke bombs in the
Pentagon, set to go off
simultaneously. When they
explode, pass out tire irons and
yell Commie invaders! Then
sit back and watch military elite
bludgeon themselves to death.
On the local level, the
possibilities are endless:
Steal the bolts from Steve
OConnells erector set (thus
stopping production of the
Stephen C. OConnell Memorial
Activities center).
Kidnap Doug Dickeys
barber.
Program the University
College prog-grading computer
to consider essay answers.
Mow the astroturf.
You get the idea. Our
revolutionaries have good
intentions, they just need proper
guidance.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K.S. Dupree ..*
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 3924609



GUEST COLUMN
Jesus Christ:
By MICHAEL CONDRON
Attention all self-styled Jesus and Bible Freaks! Let me
recommend a few books for you to read. You might start
out with Hugh Schonfields "Passover Plot, following it
with its sequel, Those Incredible Christians, and do some
checking up on them in the library. Amazing! Youll find
that original Christianity is a far cry from the Pauline
version we practise today. You might even doscover that the
great mass of the New Testament is forgery, that many
things we hold as doctrines are actually pagan in origin.
Jesus never saw himself as God, only as a human messiah
to the Jewish people. He upheld the Torah, and never
diviated from essentially orthodox Judaism. It was Paul, in
his quest for converts, who threw out the Mosaic
requirements. The Council of Jerusalem was purely a
confrontation between the Pauline Christians and the
original Nazoreans (many of whom saw in Paul the
fulfillment of Christs warning against false prophets.)
Moving along a few years, we find the Roman church in
ascendency, trying to keep the various Christian
communities together in the face of Roman persecution. To
facilitate this effort, Jesus is deified, and orientation
focused more on a spiritual heaven than the earthly triumph
which Jesus, as a Jewish messiah, preached. Forgeries in the
names of the Apostles and rewritting of the gospels also
appear.
Now lets look at the Old Testament. Influences of the
differenct cultures to which the Jews were subjected can be
seen in the Scriptures. The original laws borrow much from
the Code of Hammurabi and other Babylonian beliefs. Why
is there no idea of a hell (or any type of underworld) until
the spread of Hellenic influences in the wake of Alexander?
And all you people who take your Bible word for word as
literate truth, kindly tell me why there are two different
accounts of the creation of the sexes in Genesis. I think it
more valid to view the Old Testament as 'political and
social, rather than religious document, recording the
development of a theocratic nation.
I am not saying that the contributions of
Judeo-Christianity are nil. On the contrary, without them I
doubt that western civilization could have progressed to the
degree it has. However, I think it is time for us to move into
a new era, as remarkably expressed in The Birth of God
by James Kavanaugh. Cant we throw away the Salvation
myth? Cant we realize that God put us here for the sole
reason that He loves us, and wants us to be happy? We dont
need messiahs, heavens and hells. We can become our own
messiahs; we can create our own heavens and hellrright
here. Cant we just accept as the only absolute that
commandment which is found in every major religion: Do
to others what you would like them to do to you? If we
did, we might all find the true peace and joy that Bible
Freaks are always talking about, but we will find it inside
ourselves instead of in a great man dead two thousand years.
The time to throw away the crutches is right now!

READERS FORUM


Frats Again?
MR. EDITOR:
I enjoyed reading the
pro-fraternity letter of Marc
Weiss on Jan 29, for it was a
perfect example of an emotional
greek on the defensive.
Mr. Weiss, I believe you
missed the point of my letter!
Your fraternity may, indeed, be
a place to go in times of trouble,
a place where you can find
everlasting friendships, etc.,
etc... You are, for sure, a part
of the fraternity system so
much a part that you cannot
objectively look at that aged
institution. You only view your
organization from within,
overlooking the fact that we can
see much from the outside.
From our vantage point, we
can see the brotherhood that
you yourself describe. It is
exactly this form of void,
exclusively directed brotherhood
that I have been putting down.
To repeat what I stated in my
first letter, In this void form of
brotherhood, those within the
framework of the fraternal
organization afford
consideration, while those
without are unimportant. Mr.
Weiss, you do, indeed, have the

upper hand as a functioning
part of fraternal life, in
describing the vulgar form of
brotherhood that you represent.
The fact that you see no
correlation between your
fraternity and my accusation, is
the fact that you are blind to
external reality! You are only
able to see what the fraternity
can do for you, and for itself,
but do not realize how you
collectively impose on people
outside.
The truth of the matter is that
the event I described did occur.
The fraternities did impose on
the other people in the Games
Area, even after being told they
were doing so. Thus, they
directly and openly showed their
lack of consideration for anyone
except themselves, as you, Mr.
Weiss, have shown in your letter.
You neednt look very far to see
how fraternity theory and
practice are contradictory
You need only to take the
initiative.
Incidently, I did not lose my
match on January 20, 1 but I do
feel that my pppoqqit,*nay tyive
had a better chance of winning if
given the chance by your mob of
noisy pigs!
1 JOEL JENETT 3AS

CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS 3Q8088Km%%.%%8M00
1 lyaftMUl i MWI
S 1 flip
I
JUk.... iM
Mil-; JH M
m tmm
~ m r vSnpt ,-r / ruu
ISSrm PF jfk .. jmrn y
S
Sure, the Board of Regents believes in freedom of speech. Its freedom of LISTENING
were against.

By RON SAWYER
Some time ago, in the small
village of Brainsville, near what
today is the University of
Florida, lived a miller and his
daughter, who was a student in
the fine college of Brainsville.
The village, although being a
center of learning for all the fine
arts, had a very strange
prevailing addiction for sports.
But not for all of the villagers
cared for the addiction as
though it were the only thing
known to educated man. Too
bad for them because of the king,
known simply as Sir Doug.
SO OVERWHELMING was he
that even those who at first
questioned his leadership
abilities, were soon under his
spell. Even efforts by a few to
unionize against him were soon
forgotten.
The miller, known as
athletics, was what appeared
to be the normal father. He
stressed time and time again, he
only had two goals; 1. to please
the king, and 2. to serve the best
interests of his daughter, the
student.
To reach these goals, he and a
few other villagers formed an
association, which he named
after himself, Atheletics
Association.
IT CAME to pass, that in
egotistical bragging the miller
pointed out that his daughter
could weave geld from nothing
but straw!?
- ."U ,4. tJ,
- hi. Z ?0 i>lKOcl 6
Sir Doug, hearing of the tale,
ordered the girl brought to him,
where upon she was locked into
a room with a spinning wheel

Tale Os Sir Doug

1
i ,C
I
and lots of straw, and ordered to
weave gold.
Needless to say, the poor girl
was afraid, for surely no one can
weave gold from nothing but
straw. But as she began to cry,
the door opened and in stepped
her father, atheletics.
TOTALLY IGNORING the
fate of his daughter, but wishing
to please the king, Atheletics
asked his daughter what she
would give him if he were to
weave gold from the straw, a
talent he possessed.
His daughter, the student,
offered her father her necklace,
where upon the miller weaved
until the room was full of eold.
u
Thinking that would be that,
the daughter awaited the king.
But when he saw what she had
done, the king only invisioned
more gold, and ordered more
from the girl.
And again she was afraid for
her life and began to cry. But
once more her father,
Atheletics, bounded into the
room and offered his help* iq
return for something.
ONCE MORE the student

Tuesday, February 2,1971, The Florida Alligator,

produced gold for the king, and
felt she should now go free.
Sir Doug was so pleased in
seeing another room full of gold
for his boys, that he got even
bigger and better ideas.
It seems that at that time in
history of sports, playing
surfaces were very hard to come
by. Mother Nature, in all her
wisdom had failed to create a
suitable texture on which boys
could play.
Even as powerful as the king
was, he knew that the millers
daughter and fellow students
were tired of giving their best
effort in support of his boys, so
he dared not ask again, so soon
at least, for the daughter to be
locked into a room to do his
bidding.
SO THE king, hoping to get
around the situation another
way, promised all the students
that they had done their share
and would surely never have to
pay even a plug of gold for his
new playing surface.
But the daughter, the student,
was afraid, for she had learned
through past experience, that
the king often did things under
disguise, (while school was not it
session he had made great
announcements concerning the
students welfare in concern to
sports)
Why, he had even
discontinued the age-old practice
of allowing the villagers to bring
their own refreshment to the
sports events, so that he could
sell his own brew -for three
plugs of gold (which equals
about 25 cents today).
MORAL: f Never trust those
claiming they really have your
interest at heart, unless past
performance proves their
promise of value.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
YAMAHA ENDURO 250 1970
Excellent woods bike extras TV
portable b&w Like new Dave
376-7146 After 5 PM (A-st-68-p)
PEAVEY PA system 400 watt peak 4
chan. 2 Inputs/can reverb 2 spk
cabinets 2 15" JBLD 130s/cab $825
cash Bill Taylor ac 904 245-2525
Bel levlew, Fla. I will call u
(A-st-71-p)
100 watt amp garrard turntable two
speakers 12 in. woofers roberts 997
tape recorder with tapes best offer
must sell call 376-6187 after 4pm
(A-st-71-p)
Must sell 2 5" speakers enclosed in
walnut cases for just $23; also Gibson
electric guitar will go for only $l5O.
Call Wm. at 376-0406. (A-st-70-p)
Sansui 2000 amp. $225, 2 Sansul 200
speakers SIOO each. All used only 10
hours call 378-0381 after 5:00
(A-st-70-p)
Guitar Martin D2B plush lined
hardshell case new cost S6OO take
best offer over $335 372-5928 Ken
(A-10t-70-p)
1969 Honda CL9O VERY GOOD
includes helmet and car racks S2OO
call Ken 373-3028 (A-st-70-p)
1970 Honda 750 excellent condition
$1295 call 376-6059 after 4:00 pm
(A-st-70-p)
Add color to your pad. stained glass
lamps, do it yourself or assembled,
kits complete with precut glass, lead,
.solder, wiring, chain 376-2195
(A-st-70-p)
Fender Coronado electric guitar with
case and Heath two channel amp
with reverb $325 call 392-7251
(A-6t-72-p)
My own 1970 Honda 750 cc. Gold, in
perfect condition. Only 3400 mi Best
buy around at only $llOO. Call
David or Bob at (373-4397)
(A-st-72-p)
Craig model 2404 reel to reel tape
deck. Need bread will bargain yellow
double breasted zoot suit bought at
MGM auction 378-0908 (A-st-72-p)
Canon ft ql camera f 1:2 lens 4
months old. over $340 new now
$220 phone 372-3977 (A-st-72-p)
DRUM SET Sacrifice $l6O and
COKE MACHINE (really) S3O also
HONDA mo-ped always runs only
$65 call John at 378-8061.
(A-st-73-p)
Changed my hair color. 100% human
hair blonde fall for sale. Best offer
takes it. Call 378-0959. (A-2t-73-p)
2 8.45 x 15 Wide tries on Ford rims
S3O. Also 2 adapters to fit Ford rims
to 5 lug V. W. $lO. Or buy all for
$37. Call 378-6490 (A-2t-73-p)
1969 Yamaha 100 Twin recently
rebuilt: new sprockets, clutch, tires,
pistons and rings S2OO or Best Offer
Call 372-3090 (A-st-73-p)
1969 Cougar xry conv power steering
brakes hi perf 351 leather upholstry
S2BOO 373-4303 (A-st-73-p)
Royal Aristocrat typewriter.
Excellent cond. $75. new/now $35.
Royal Parade typewriter. SSO.
new/now $25. Poor married student!
Call 376-4124 (A-2t-73-p)

NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:20-3:30-5:4(^7:50-& 10:00
ELLIOTT I
GOULD I
HIS BEST SINCE I
M-A-S-H |
IN A DAVID L. WOLPER Production
"I LOVE MY...
WIFE
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR" [R\gS>
NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:50-3:57-6:04-8:11-& 10:181
Something else" from
IPANAVISION- I
[R| METROCOLOR* Sm I

FOR SA LE
Blonde human hair fall. Orig S4O
now $25. was blonde for 1 mo. but
didnt like, now brunette so must
sell, call 378-0655 after 4 pm.
(A-3t-73-p)
For sale typewriter chair. Excellent
condition. Light weight for home
use. Call 373-4779 after 5 pm sls
(A-2t-73-p)
KLH model 11. An integrated
component system In a portable
package 6 yrs old- price Vz new cost
SIOO. 378-4016 after five.
(A-st-73-p)
Sound of music portable stereo with
head set. beautiful sound only S4O.
mens wet jacket, perfect cond. $lO
girls helmet $6. call 373-1908
(A-st-73-p)
Keep your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Electric upholstery
shampoos also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-tfc)
Scuba diving equip, including tank,
regulator, wet suit, fins, mask, weight
belt and snorkle asking S2OO or best
offer call 372-3750 June leave no.
(A-2t-74-p)
CONN OBOE New Corks and Pads
SBS Call Peirce 373-2228 (A-4t-74-p)
Free 10 wk male kitten very active
trained on sand good home wanted
call anytime 392-9644 or 392-9631
free free lovable tiger cat (A-2t-74-p)
FURNITURE arm c(ialr, 2 end
tables, coffee tables single bed,
lamps-good condition- Call 378-5107
after 6:00 pm (A-3t-74-p)
Sony TC -20 car cassette player, 2
6-inch speakers, headphones for SBS.
Cost $l6O 8 mo. ago. Call Doug at
376-3061. Dynamite set up
(A-st-74-p)
English Bulldog Puppies AKC reg.
Championship Bloodlines. Males and
Females available call 378-9808
(A-st-67-p)
FOR RENT
Two bedroom apt. Gator town. $lB5
a mo. call 378-5753 after spm
(B-st-73-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished apt. at
University Gardens trace for spring
qtr. Occupancy by 4 people 47.50
per mo. Call 378-2848 apt 718-309
(B-st-73-p)
Must sublease 1 bdrm. apt. >/z block
from campus. Call 378-5852 or come
by apt. 139, 1216 SW 2 Ave.
(B-lt-74-p)
female roommate needed. 350 La
Bonne Vie; V* rent and utilities call in
after noon 378-6797 rent Is paid till
Feb. 15! (B-4t-74-p)

r i
Todays
more for your money meal
atmoisorrs
__CPFETE R| fi
T TUESDAY'S FEATURE "|
golden fried CHICKEN I
lALL YOU CAN EAT I
r j 99< i ?
1 1 WEDNESDAY'S I §
£ I FEATURE I £
~ I FISH ALMONDINE WITH I
| HUSH PUPPIES |
! FRENCH FRIED 94 d I
1^ POTATOES T
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons
CAFETERIA beyond comparison! ]
L_ 2620 N.W. 13th Stieet in the Gainesville Matl Jm

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 2,1971

Page 8

WANTED
1 male roommate needed for La
Bonne Vie apt, immediately or spring
quarter, call Don 378-9536
(C-st-72-p)
Male Roomate to share three
bedroom house near law school no
deposit Feb -free call 373-1296
(C-st-72-p)
Need cheap transportation; bicycle
motor, -etc. In fact, if you have
anything at all interesting to offer,
give a call. LOVE. 378-3972.
(C-3t-72-p)
Roommate wanted female beautiful
new house on lake-, own bedroom,
$53.56 mo. Call 373-1372.
(C-3t-71-p)
Roomate wanted to share apt., 3
blocks from campus with male grad,
A.C., pool, 46/mo, call 376-3733.
(C-st-71-p)
Male rommate, own bedroom in 2
bdrm Apt. $70.00 + 1/3 utilities.
Frederick Garden Apts. 376-9740,
Charles (C-10t-71-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cyiinthla between 1 and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
CYCLE anywhere from 175 cc up in
any condition for cheap, call Mark
392-7253. (C-3t-73-p)
Progressive jazz musicians drummer
organist lead guitarist pianist for
audition call Ray Mobley 378-3237
or 372-1444 to leave name & number
(C-7t-73-p)
Female roommate needed in March
to share townhouse Landmark Apt
47.50 per month call 372-8493.
(C-st-73-p)
Need female roommate for F. Q. apt
46.25 month plus utilities call
378-4614 Move in now. (C-3t-74-p)
FREE MEALS + SMALL SALARY!
Why not cook for us. 378-9813 after
5:00 (C-2t-74-p)
Modest accomodations for
male. . .visitor for february. spare
bed will do. Call Beetle 376-6043 or
come by Landmark 61 (C-2t-74-p)
x\vxvx-x\vxvx-x-x*x-x-x*x-x-x-x-.
HELP WANTED
x:'x>:*Â¥:W^
SUMMER JOBS -for rising juniors,
seniors and graduating seniors. S7O
per week. Library Intern Program.
Brevard County Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Orlando St. Pet. Make
appointment through the Placement,
office. Interviewer on Campus Feb.
6. No obligation. (E-st-73-p)
Part time job work own hours at own
convience. For further information
call 378-4091 ask for Ed (E-3t-72-p)

X-X.-X-XvX-X-X-X-XX-X-.X-X-X-X-X-.X-X
HELP WA
Part or full-time sales help needed
$3-5/fir guaranteed to service
established customers set your own
hours call between 7 & 9 pm
378-0421 or 378-0121 ask for Ed.
Car needed (E-st-71-p)
X'X.'XX*X'X*XvX*X-X-X-X-XxXxX-Xx
AUTOS
1967 VW bus rebuilt engine blue and
white good condition SIOOO. Call
378-5756 or 372-8682 (G-st-70-p)

| THE A>CH A /t
| NATIONAL |
I SHAKESPEARE |
| COMPANY
\ presents I
i Saturday, February 6 at t
i the University Auditorium, y* y
| 8:15 p.m. IWJ \
Y Student tickets are SI.OO and $2.00 i
i General public tickets are $2.50 and $3.50. i
0 Purchase tickets at the Constans Theatre from A
A noon 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. \
h Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union /
PW^W 1 T -4ig|W^
- WEDNESDAY
February 3
Steve McQueen
- 3 SHOWS OCI
Mm
pm vHHHIEV 1
10:45 PM admission Presented by SGP jj
Ml ioZzat>JS£i
The Twelve Chairs
is uproarious fun!
Any true fan of
comedy tS
hasto
see itl
A wild ind hilanous chase tor a fortune in jewtlt B £
A SIDNEY GLAZIER Production
A Mel Brooks Rim RON MOODY'Stn
EH Color UMC P!CTURS A ttwienof UftlVfftSAL MARIOH COWVUTHW OOCr
^^^^HIGHEST
RATING
> Wanda Hale. New York Daily News
; JBfe" mnnHmHmmHn
I itimm ( I i a itk* a* 2:06 3:58 5:50
I JACK NICHOLSON t*b as
i f? FIVE Efts* PIECES"
II t ¥ KAREN SUSAN ANSPACH E

AUTOS
VW 1965, 1966 Engine and
transmission, radio, heater, good tires
S7OO. call 372-1821 (G-st-73-p)
1967 Saab $475 firm call 372-1935
after 6 pm (G-3t-72-p)

THE TRAIN IS
COMING!



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
1965 FALCON 3 Speed, Blue with
white convertible top. Looks and
runs good. $650 or best offer. Call
Gary at 378-9752 (G-3t-71-p)
1969 VW bus. excellent condition.
S2IOO. can be financed, phone
372-1371 between 7:00 and 9:oopm
(G-3t-73-p)
1970 VW yellow, factory air, 12000
miles, top shape, radio. 1995 call
372-8835. (G-2t-73-p)
1966 Austin Healey Sprite a second
car Infrequently used but runs
smoothly has radio and heater only
SBSO call 373-2750 aft spm
(G-4t-73-p)
Austin-Healey 6 cyl. great condition
throughout. S6OO. Many parts
available separately. 373-2726
(G-st-73-p)
MG MIDGET MK 11 1966, good
condition w/ radio, heater, wire
wheels. $875 or best offer. Call
378-5889 after 5 (G-3t-72-p)
67 Firebhrd 326 cu. in. Automatic,
Air, DlCc brakes, radio, Power
steering SI6OO 376-0160 (G-st-72-p)
67 MGB 33000 ml. new;
transmission, batteries, muffler, good
condition, will trade, must sell, need
money, below wholesale SIOOO.
378-3972 (G-st-72-p)
1966 SKYLARK, 37500 miles, R, H
AC, full power, Immaculate
condition everything works, $1250,
call David 376*6874 (evenings)
(G-st-74-p)
PE Ft SONA L
J.P. Happy Birthday sweetheart I may
many more come your wayl Love
you more each day! DN (J-lt-74-p)
Precision wheel balancing! Alt work
guaranteed. Mags a specialty.
$1.50/wheel. Why pay $2.25? Call
HaviS 378-2957 (J-st-70-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
Truck on over to Laurents Books
and Demlan's Leathers for your ZAP
Comics and a game of Foosball.
Pepsi's stilt a dime. (J-st-71-p)
Molly at Mudcrutch from Penn,
where are you? send me your ph. no.
John, the part Injun In the Hawaii
surf shirt. Mobile City lot 388
(J-3t-73-p)
Phi Sigma Sigma sisters beware: but
not of your pledges! Take heed, its
been publicized, watch out or you'll
all be Phantomlzed! (J-lt-74-p)
TURN ON TUNE IN and order out
from NEW DELHI DELICATESSEN
378-8656 Check this paper for menu.
378-8696 (J-lt-74-p)
The Palace, a natural foods restaurant
is now open at 14 S.W. Ist St. Come
over and eat the kind of food that
makes you healthy wealthy & wise.
(J-4t-73-p)
vsf' 7
/mm A
\smmj
18ANDOVM!
CMf
l JSrtllffliiliiSl

Tuesday, February 2,1971, The Florida Alligator,

£xJ:X:X:X:X:X:X!X:X:X?X;X*X*XX-X-Xv.
PERSONAL
; :-v-:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:XvX:X*XvX:X:XvX*
Marital and personal groups! The Us
Psychological Counseling Center is
organizing personal and marital
counseling groups. Their personal
groups will focus on hang-ups
according to the interests of group
members such as failing to establish
satisfactory personal relationships,
dropping-out or staying in the
establishment, and feelings of
personal dissatisfaction. The marital
groups focus on issues such as giving
and receiving affection, expressing
anger and feelings of emotional
distance. Phone 392-1578 from 9
A.M. to 4 P.M. today, Wednesday
and Thursday. (J-lt-74-p)
LOST Sc POUND
LOST: Small brown zippered
notebook in vicinity of med center
on Wednesday. Need papers. Reward.
Call 378-0632 (L-3t-74-p)
Lost: Navy blue knit poncho with
gold buttons. High sentimental value!
Reward! Please call 378-0367.
(L-3t-72-p)
Lost: Black alligator wallet with All
of my ID's; Plaza Theatre Friday
night! Please return to 974 SW 16 Av
by any way possible! (L-3t-72-p)
Lost: Pair of gold wire rim glasses in
black and white case. If found please
call 373-3623. Reward for return
(L-3t-72-p)
Lost pair of black frame reading
glasses In brown case near matherly
or univ. plaza shopping area. If
found, call 376-0121. (L-2t-73-p)
SERVICES
Stereo tapes 8-track & cassettes Any
2 albums $5 Buy 2 third Vz price.
Free pickup & delivery call Jonathan
373-3611 or leave message
(M-st-70-p)
HORSES BOARDED: This areas
finest boarding facility box stalls
lighted ring miles of trails superb care
convenient to unlv 373-1059
(M-st-72-p)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfC)

I mvon-wtmmi- hSSm SCARES I
I PLUSTHE LITTLE RASCALS 1
I SHOWTIMES AT 7:30 9:40 11:50 I
I FREE AT THE I
I BENCH BAR |

SERVICES
XylyXv^
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
8-track cartridges Custom recorded
Two or more albums on 80 min tapes
$5 inc tape guaranteed satisfaction
1-day service John 378-5916 nights
(M-st-70-p)
Typing done; themes, thfsls, etc.
Guaranteed accuracy and neatness.
Electric typewriter $.50 per page
Phone 378-7493 good references
(M-lOt-69-p)
Paint your dingy pad or doghouse,
inside or out no job too small. Can
really slap It on, student with student
prices. John 372-4427 (M-3t-74-p)
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medic-legal-psychologic, open Sat. &
Sundays, 3265 Virginia St. No. 1,
Miami, 4466583 appointments.
(M-25t-72-p)
Have your motorbike tuned by an
experienced mechanic, extremely low
rates on hondas, suzukis, kawasakis
and yamahas. call John, 392-7026
(M-st-70-p)
Will give your child loving care In my
home. S.W., fenced back yard, sls
weekly, pre-school preferably
376-1780 (M-3t-73-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at and grad of Bklyn
College, N.Y. Term papers, theses,
dissertations, 50 cents and up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft. 6
(M-4t69-p)
Your portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yourself in action at school
start at $35 call 378-4824. Harden
(m-10t-70-r)
lstXumlA N.W. 13th Ph. 372-95238
Drtwe-fn Theatre Aoreas from Mall
ffirwraTfTCTriNo
MRMmMnAiifl early
ce |
I ADM.SI.2S AMBPH \
2OOI A SPACEIaNNE OF THE I
jOPYSSEY IthOUSAND PAYSI
Hevery iH|W before Biso p.m. and
Saif 6 San. Matinee* at Penthonaa
| $ and PentbeuM $ only. Rapular I

Page 9

W/ANWAVAVAVAV.V.V/iVVUNVtVAVA
SERVICES
Spanish tutor. $2 an hour. Typing in
Spanish 50 cants a page. Call Eliseo.
378-6927 (M-lt-74-p)

I 1 Valentine's Classified ll
I I SI.OO for 4 lines ll
V 11 Room 330 JWRU II
*or use classified coupon (campus mail) MS
p Deadline: Feb. 8 Mi
*Be sura and indicate
Classified
. 1 Starts
tomorrow! I
WH STORY'IS 1
A PHENOMENON!
There has been nothing like it in a I
generation! And nothing like its star,!
Ali MacGraw, to remind the world of I
the kind of stars that used to glisten!
in Hollywood! Her appealand that!
of TOVE STORY'is strong enough!
to counter gravity! -Time Magazine I
JKHhI -Vincent Canby, I
New York Times I
H|HK "ONE OF THE YEAR'S I
New York Daily News I
A HOWARD G MINSKY ARTHUR HILLER Production
I John Marley&Ray Milland n segal ARTHUR HILLER I
| HOWWO6.MWSKY WIDSOOfN FRAffiISLAI iPiawMmK BB I
|saseiaK>MMwMeiwiieiiw l cai'| I
)^!ieu33@sN i AsT 3 days
HUWWYI
AND BREEZY!" K HtSiIIHS|9H
shows UNBK
B momm the big bounce;
7: JTRMGHU "^rSSS^rUBfSS*"
V 0-30 ONLY
ALL SCATS SI.2S
ALL PAV-KVERY DAY

Coming Feb. 5 6
g roove
tube
it s really off!



Page 10

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 2,1971

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public
Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union.
Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is
the previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous
Wednesday at noon.

MID-TERM EXAMS
All students in the following
classes are expected to take
mid-term exams and each must
bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will
be required to use his Social
Security number.
CMS 171 MID-TERM
The CMS 17X (6th period
lecture section) mid-term exam
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 9, at
7 p.m. All students report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 113,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CMS 17X MID-TERM
The CMS 17X (6th period
lecture section) mid-term exam
will be given Tuesday, Feb. 9, at
7 p.m. All students report to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 113,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
MS 201 MID-TERM
The MS 201 exam will be given
Thursday, Feb. 11, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with A-N report to Walker
Auditorium. O-Z report to Little
101, 109 or 121.
CY 201 MID-TERM
The CY 201 exam will be given
Thursday, Feb. 11, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with A-N report to Walker
Auditorium. O-Z report to Little
101, 109 or 121.
EXAM CORRECTIONS
In the Friday, Jan. 29, Page of
Record there were several
omissions in the mid-term
schedule for the following
courses.
CPS 122 MID-TERM
The CPS 122 (including 12Y)
exam will be given Thursday,
Feb. 4, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with A report
to Bryan 120; B to Little 101 or
109; Cto AFA 4,8, 10,14,16,
211, 213 or 219; D-E to Little
221, 223, 225, 235 or 237; F to
Little 207, 213, 227 or 233; G
to Little 201, 203, 205, 215,

I GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERALCREDiHjNioNI
" r - * : - ,
I LOANS AVAILABLE
1 faculty I

217 or 219;H to McCarty 86 or
186; l-J to Walker Auditorium;
K-L to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7,
8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16 or
18; M to Matherly 102, 105,
108; 113; 115, 116, 117,118 or
119; N-0 to Bryan 201 or 203;
P-Q to Floyd 104, 106, or 109;
R to Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;
S to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Little 113, 121 or 125; W-Z to
Leigh 207, 212 or 240.
CSS 112 MID-TERM
The CSS 112 exam will be given
Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with A report to Bryan 120; B
to Little 101 or 109; C to AFA
4,8, 10, 14, 16, 211, 213 or
219; D-E to Little 221, 223,
225, 235 or 237; F to Little
207, 213, 227 or 233; G to
Little 201, 203, 205, 215, 217
or 219; H to McCarty 86 or 186;
l-J to Walker Auditorium; K-L
to Matherly 2, 3,4, 5,6, 7,8, 9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16 or 18; M
to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 113,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0
to Bryan 201 or 203; P-Q to
Floyd 104, 106 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Little 113, 121 or 125; W-Z to
Leigh 207, 212 or 240.
GRE APPLICATION
DEADLINE DATE
Tuesday, Feb. 2, is the last day
for receipt by the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, N.J.,
08540 of the registration form
to take the Feb. 27, Graduate
Record Examination without
paying the $3 penalty fee.
STUDENT GROUPS
Temporary permission to
function for those students
seeking recognition as a student
organization is limited to
meetings for the purpose of (1)
formulating the organization, (2)
electing officers and (3) drafting
a constitution and by-laws.
Temporary permission is limited
to 30 days.
To insure that proper
procedures are followed in this
manner, contact the Adviser to
Student Organizations, William
G. Cross, 314 Reitz Union,
phone 392-1674.

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

RESIDENT ADVISER
POSITIONS
Resident adviser positions are
available for the 1971 fall
quarter. Applications and
information may be obtained
from the resident staff in each
area office or from the central
housing office.
These positions are available
to upper-division and graduate
students interested in people.
The position offers an
opportunity for learning and
growth in residence communities
and individual fulfillment
through working with student
interests, needs and concerns.
The pay is approximately
SIOO per month plus furnished
quarters. There also is a waiver
of out-of-state tuition where
applicable.
Applications must be received
on or before March 12, 1971.
HOLIDAYS
The holiday schedule for
University employees for the
calendar year 1971 has been
approved. State employees are
entitled to nine paid holidays
each year. This year the holidays
have been arranged so that
employees will enjoy long
weekends.
Friday, Jan 1, New Year's
Day
Monday, May 31, Memorial
Day
Monday, July 5,
Independence Day
Monday, Sept. 6, Labor Day
*Fr iday, Oct. 22,
Homecoming, half day
Monday, Oct. 25, Veterans
Day
Thursday, Nov. 25,
Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 26, day after
Thanksgiving
Thursday, Dec. 23, Christmas,
half day
Friday, Dec. 24, Christmas
*ln place of the half day for
Homecoming, a different half
day of group activity may be
substituted for employees
working outside Alachua County
at the discretion of the
department chairman.

staff personnel
column

IF YOU ARE A STAFF EMPLOYEE AT THE UNIVERSITY AND
HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT THE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
AFFECTING STAFF EMPLOYEES, PLEASE SEND IT TO 'THE
STAFF KEY" ROOM 240 HUB. IT IS REQUESTED THAT
QUESTIONS BE LIMITED TO THOSE OF A GENERAL NATURE
AND NOT INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS. SINCE SPACE
LIMITATIONS WILL NOT PERMIT US TO PUBLISH EVERY
QUESTION AND ANSWER, QUESTIONS WILL BE CHOSEN FOR
PUBLICATION BASED ON EXTENT OF INTEREST AND
TIMELINESS.

CLASSIFICATION AND PAY
Would you please advise
what the feeling is with
Personnel with regard to
procedure for the employee who
has been here over 10 years with
the same rating and now
maximum salary? If one is
satisfied with the job, gets along
with the people around them
and does not want to change
jobs, what do they do? Are you
not more valuable and worth an
upgrading or raise or both when
you have background and
experience?
A. Parts of this question were
omitted due to space limitations
but the answer will try to cover
all that was asked.
Loyalty is a quality that is
appreciated very much not only
by coworkers or immediate
supervisors but by the University
as a whole and employees
possessing this quality towards
their employer along with good
work performance should be
rewarded. But remember that
employer is the University as a
whole and that's where your
reward is available.
Just like any other business,
the University must operate on a
sound financial plan. The
classification of positions and
assignments of a salary range for
each position is part of that
plan. Positions are classified
based on what is required in
duties and responsibilities to get
a particular job done. The salary
range is assigned to the position
based on competitive wage rates
for similar work. As you can see,
this has nothing to do with who
may be in a position of a certain
class. Individuals are placed in
positions if they meet the

The University Calendar will be
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G-72 Union.

minimum qualifications and
have a good work and school
record. They progress through
the salary range by merit
increases. No increases can
exceed the maximum because
that maximum has been ruled as
the total dollars the position is
worth not the individual. Rate
adjustments such as we had in
September 1969 and July 1970
increase entire ranges and with
an increased maximum the
employee is again eligible for
increases to the new maximum.
Further relief for employees at
their maximum would be for the
state to approve each year an
appropriation for cost of living
increases based on the cost of
living index for this area. The
University has requested
consideration for this
appropriation but as yet, the
legislature has not approved the
request.
Once an employee has been
here a year, he is eligible to
apply for a promotion to a
position for which he qualifies.
Yes, this does mean retraining. It
also means offering an employee
a greater challenge, increased
responsibility, more difficult
work assignments. This means
higher pay. Should a Clerk I who
likes her job so much that she
prefers to stay there indefinitely
receive the same pay as a
Secretary III? If an employee
wants to stay in the same job,
that is certainly her choice to
make. But remember then, it is
not the University or the state
that is holding her back.
You brought out some
significant points that needed
clarification. Thank you for
writing.



The
Florida
Alligator

FRESHMAN DISCOVERED IN PHYS. ED. CLASS
\
Jenkins Impressive In First Outing

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
One of the most promising
members of UFs talent rich
track squad just ran in his first
track meet.
Nate Jenkins, a 19-year old
freshman, who track coach
Jimmy Carnes describes as
having an abundance of raw
talent, played basketball at
Jacksonvilles Matthew Gilbert
High School.
BUT HE NEVER participated
in a track program, so Saturdays
dual meet with Ohio State in
Columbus saw his first meet
participation.
There wasnt much of a
track program at my high
school, Jenkins said. Besides,
basketball was my sport.
Jenkins came to the track
program after he ran a 10.5
hundred yard dash in his
physical education class. Not a
really exceptional time except
that Jenkins was running in
tennis shoes, and started
standing up.
WE HAD A hard time
getting Nat to come out,
Carnes said. He wasnt that
interested in track.
Jenkins was primarily
interested in his high school
sport, basketball. In fact, hed
made the freshman squad as a
forward, but was ineligible to
play because of conference
scholarship regulations.
I think Im a pretty good
basketball player. I got
scholarship offers in basketball
from Bethune-Cookman, Florida
A&M and some other schools.
JENKINS EVEN considered
transferring to another school
where he could play basketball,
until he became involved in
track.
Ive been playing basketball
for years, so I really wanted to
keep on playing.
But Carnes kept after Jenkins,
taking him along to the
December Senior Bowl meet,
and encouraging him to come to
track practice.
THE RESULT, unexpected
strength in the sprints, where the
Gators are supposed to be
weakest, but where Jenkins and
fellow freshman Henry
Cummings, plus senior Jerry
- Fannin, ran well for UF against
Ohio State.
CUMMINGS TOOK the
60-yard high hurdles, Fannin
took the 70-yard low hurdles,
and Jenkins took second in the
60-yard dash to top ranked
sprinter, States Jerry Hill.
I was leading halfway
Ihrwigh the taee, but I missed s

.
H WTm
: K';.'B *B -B** B: :

......
JIMMY CARNES
... kept after Jenkins
step and Hill beat me to the
line, Jenkins said.
Despite the misstep, Jenkins
ran a highly respectable 6.3
seconds, only a tenth of a
second behind Hills 6.2 seconds.
I THINK I can get lower,
down to about 6.1 seconds,
Jenkins said. If the world

I TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DKIWANdI
I SAVE! I
I I
I 1 STARKE, FLORIDA I
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
I WEEKDAYS BAM-6PM 1
I SATURDAY BAM IPM I
| GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT!
(t) VOLKSWAOCN Os ANdlC*. INC.
See Europe by bus.
ing one here is the man to see
about having one waiting for
Mr you in Europe. Your local au-
In fact, see Europe in your thorized Volkswagen dealer,
choice of buses. The new Volks- He'll arrange licensing and de dewagen
wagen dewagen Station Wagon comes livery and even, give you the
asa7-or9-seater.(The7-seater scoop on how to get it back
is standard and has an aisle all home.
the way through, like a bus It'll be nice to have a family
should.) bus with about twice the inside
There's room in the back of room of most conventional
the bus for 10 or 12 good-sized wagons. And VWs save you
valises. money on travel expenses. On
The man to see about buy- either side of the Atlantic.
[ MIXdSBROWN MOTORS, INC. /OV
4222 N.W. 13th ST. MU
I GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32601 authodizcdduu* i
I think we'd like to see Europe from aVW wagon. It sure beats running to J
catch a train or a plane or a regular bus. Send us your illustrated price Ust.
Name
| I
j Address. |
City State Zip § j
I -A

record in the sixty stays around
5.9, I might have a crack at
that.
Right now Im working on
smoothness and technique to
bring my time down. I really
didnt know a thing about
running until I came out here.
Carnes also has Jenkins
working on the high jump,
where hes already jumped
6-feet-5.
I USED TO hit my elbow on
the rim in basketball. I could
always jump pretty well
Jenkins said.
But at this stage, Jenkins
prefers running, and would like
to try the 100-yard dash or the
220.
The 60 is a little short. Im
6-foot-5, so the longer distances
would give me a chance to
stretch out a little.
Despite enjoying track
largely because of the coaches
who Jenkins describes as
exceptional hed still like to
continue playing basketball.

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Tuesday, February 2,1971, The Florida Alligator,

The coaches worked it out
so I could go to basketball and
track practice earlier this year,
CAMPUS CONE
FREE DELIVERY
SUNDAY-THURSDAY
CALL 372-3890

THE TRAIN IS
COMING!

-- __~gg_g -I
p^SATF-^
I- .'_ KA.\l()l'S NAME ~I
I I IAIR SLACKS;!
fcTASSORTED STYLES, rz_ ia
COLORS, AND FABRICS^!
TO
pfL CHOOSE FROM ~ -gj
L BELK UNDSEYaJ

CHUCK KELLER
Sports Editor

and I dont think it hurt me at
all. Id like to try it again if I
could, Jenkins said.

bush vw
Specializing In
Service And Repairs
On
VOLKSWAGEN
1311 N.W. sth Ave.
376-4261

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, February 2, 1971

Coed Recreation Answer
For Frustrated UF Men

C oed Recreation has the
answer for all men who are
frustrated about Womens
Liberation: If you cant lick em,
join em.
Get your partner and sign up
for Coed Badminton in the
Intramurals Office in Florida
Gym by 5 p.m., Feb. 16.
Whether your badminton is good
or your goodminton is bad
makes no difference. Feb. 21 is
the date, so sign up now and
avoid the rush!
SAHPER TEAMS start
bowling Wednesday afternoon.
Previous to the start, team A has
a cumulative point total of 370
points and is in first place. Team
I) is close behind with 340
points and team B stays in the
pattern with 310 points. Team C
trails with 230 points, but
havent had the breaks to go
with their luck.
Phi Mu has captured the
Sorority Blue League Bowling
Tournament. They went
undefeated due to the consistent
bowling of Lauralee Steers,
Gators Sixth
In Conference
After Victory
By Alligator Services
With its victory over the
University of Georgia Saturday
night in Athens, Ga., the Gators
climbed to sixth in the
Southeastern Conference
standings with a four and five
won loss record in the
conference.
Kentucky, despite its loss to
Tennessee last month on
regional television, is back in
sole possession of first place
with a 7-1 record, one game
better than the Volunteers 6-2.
Reigning in third place is
Vanderbilt, 5-2, with LSU next
at 4-3 and Mississippi State 4-4
all above the Gators.
OLE MISS Johnny Neumann
continued his bid for the
nations scoring title this year
with a 63 point performance
against LSU this past weekend.
It was the highest point total of
the year for the sophomore
sensation and enabled him to
open up a bigger lead in the
scoring derby.
Second place Austin Carr of
Notre Dame hit for 23 points in
a losing effort against Illinois,
and fell farther behind.
Leading scorer for the Gators
this year is Tony Miller, whose
32 points Saturday night was his
best production of the year. It
also raised his season average
close to 17 points per game.
m
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
378-5222
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

rllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllli^
Intramurals \
llliiiiiiiiliiiiiiliiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii BRITT CRITTENTON iiiki

Betsy Snyder, Patty Baldauf,
Susan Roberts and Brenda
Joyner. Miss Snyders
tournament average was 136.
In the Orange League, Zeta
and DG are tied for the title.
The winner of the playoff
between these two teams will
bowl against Phi Mu for the
Sorority Bowling Championship.
WITH THE bowling
tournament in its final stages,
basketball will be getting
underway with the first games
being this afternoon in Norman
gym.
Mallory appears to be the
victor of the Dormitory Blue
League basketball tournament
after soundly beating every team
in their league. Tina Lowell
stunned the opposition with her

Harvey Can't believe it!
finally found a golf course he
f heal the West f nd Golf
y West tnd can * fer v u a
mplete pro shop driving range
West you can golf days a I
student ate*
Mir dates and tell em Harvey
lint you.
W^ END
Golf
3 1 /2 mi. west of I-75
on the Newberry Rd
l 2445 S.W. 13 sT^^
SIRLOIN Pl'
. k A wher tu get a break M
l on steak and
everything else J
Hg It is better to know some of the questions SB
than all of the answers.

all-round playing ability. She
was backed up by several good
players, both offensive and
defensive.
The bridesmaids from
Rawlings will place second if
they manage to capture its final
game against Jennings
Wednesday afternoon.
In Dormitory Orange League
Basketball, Towers defeated
Graham last week to take the
title. The game was a close one
and very fitting for a
championship game.

THE TRAIN IS
COMING!

BRASINGTON'S
nil
USEDH-^^tfCARS
CADILLACS GALORE!!
An Exceptionally Fine Car!
1970 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD
BROUGHAM
White vinyl roof over Corinthian
blue with blue leather interior.
Temperature controlled heating and
air conditioning, automatic
headlight dimmer, light sentinel, tilt
and telescoping steering wheel,
cruise control, remote control
trunk release, AM/FM radio, split
front seats, power door locks.
$6695
1970 CADILLAC #
Sedan de Ville $6193
Glenmore Green with Gold Antique
Green leather interior. AM-FM stereo
radio, full power and air conditioned.
1970 CADILLAC
Sedan de Ville $5893
Four door hardtop, Sauterne Gold with
beige vinyl top and matching beige
interior. Air conditioned, full power and
factory warranty.
1969 CADILLAC & I
Fleetwood $ 5195
Unexcelled luxury, cost SB,OOO new. Full
power and all comfort options.
1969 CADILLAC
Sedan de Ville $4695
Wisteria with matching fabric interior,
trimmed in leather. Air conditioned, full
power, tilt steering wheel, AM-FM stereo
radio, cruise control. Only 25,000 actual
miles.
>. ~
1964 CADILLAC 77~1
Sedan de Ville $895
Choice of three. Four door hardtops, air
conditioned, plus full power.
BRASINGTON
Cadillac-Oldsmobile.lnc.
2001 NW 13th Stwt 378-5301