Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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All Amiw*.

Vol 63 No. 73

SG Requests $4.97 Again

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government will not
ask for an increase in their part
of the activities fee for next
year.
According to Student Body
Treasurer Tom Melcher, SG will
ask for the same $4.97
allocation from the activity fee.
THE PROJECTED 1971-72
budget of SG reveals an increase
of $31,484.95 based on
attendance figure projections for
that academic year.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder suggested Friday to
Activity Fee Committee
Chairman Harvey Alper that the
money not being held in reserve
be used for purposes other than
renovating Camp Wauburg.
Uhlfelder said, although
administration officials would
like to see the reserve fund used
in its entirety for Wauburg, it
was the intention of Student
Government to use part of that
money for other purposes, such
as the Loan Fund, expansion of
the Baby Gator Nursery and
improvements in the
dormitories.
WE COULD also use it for
the infirmary, Uhlfelder said,
noting the infirmary is in need
of capital improvements.
Uhlfelder contends although
Camp Wauburg can be put in
usable shape, there are other
priorities which should be
looked at first, such as the loan

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Apollo 14- Good Ride To Mystery?

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI) U. S. space pioneer Alan B.
Shepard and two rookie astronauts blasted through ominous dark
clouds Sunday and set out to give Apollo 14 a good ride to a lunar
valley Americas last ill-starred moon mission never reached.
Ttey, in docking their command ship with the lunar lander Sunday
night, overcame a problem that would have forced cancellation of
their landing on the moon.
A cheer went up in the control room at Houston when reported
that had been a good hard dock.
SHEPARD AND his rookie co-pilots, Stuart A. Roosa and Edgar
D.Mitchell, tried for almost two hours before getting the Kitty Hawk

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

ACTIVITIES FEE MEETING


STEVE UHLFELDER
... no group refused money
fund, the nursery, the infirmary
and the work study program.

Hale To Submit SG Report
To Board Os Regents

By MORGAN ROOD
Alligator Staff Writer
and
BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Writar
A report on Student Government to be submitted
to the Board of Regents by Lester Hale, vice
president of student affairs, became the latest in a
series of incidents widening the gap between UF
administrators and student government, according
to Steve Uhlfelder, student body president.
According to Hale, The Council of Student
Affairs of the Board of Regents was requested to

University of Florida,. Gainesville

Uhlfelder said if money had
to be cut out of the budget,
Accent would be one of the first
SG agencies to be cut.
ALSO, COURSE and Teacher
Evaluation could be funded by
the office of academic affairs
since it is an academic
function, Uhlfelder said.
I am in favor of cutting all
the money for Homecoming, but
that is a personal opinion,
Uhlfelder added.
We have tried to be more
conservative in some areas, in
order to make room for new
organizations, such as the Black
Student Union, the
Environmental Action Group
and the student attorney,

command ship linked up with the lander Antares.
The lander still will come in for close inspection before a moon A
landing is attempted, but the immediate problem of the ships not 7
latching together was corrected, averting at least for the time the
spectre of another Apollo 13.
The blastoff came at 4:03 p.m. after a 40-minute countdown hold Q
caused by the threatening clouds over Cape Kennedy where an
estimated half-million persons watched the fiery start of the fourth 1
U.S. mission to the moon.
It was the first venture into space for Shepards co-pilots, Air Force
Maj. Stuart A. Roosa, 37, and Navy Cmdr. Edgar D. Mitchell, 40.
Shepard made a brief sub-orbital hop 10 years ago to win a spot in
history as the first American to fly in space, but illness kept him from
a much-dreamed second flight until now.

submit a report from each campus describing the
structure of student government. Hale said, This
occurred immediately before and after the
Christmas holidays, and I was asked to prepare
other reports at the same time so there wasnt
enough time to get together with Student
Government. *
AS SOON as I got together with Uhlfelder, two
weeks ago, I gave him what I had prepared and
asked him to make any additions he wanted, Hale
added.
Uhlfelder now has Hales report and vill add his /
(SEE 'HALE/ PAGE 2)

Monday, February 1, 1971

Uhlfelder said.
WHEN ALPER confronted
Uhlfelder with the possibility of
cutting down SGs budget, he
(Uhlfelder) said he was against
SG being cut because this is the
only money that is totally
control ed by students.
What you take from us will
go to another area where it is
not student controlled,
Uhlfelder said.
We can get along with what
weve got. But I think SG should
have more control complete
control over the entire
activities fee budget.
UHLFELDER POINTED out
(SEE 'ALPER/ PAGE 2)

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Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1, 1971

Alper: AA Can Raise Own Money

qnJ
SG had cut a lot of what he
termed waste, from spirit
hats to rah rah things for

| UF Sleep Research
I ......... !;
j Makes Study In Time {
: By Alligator Services
jij When astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., Stuart A. Roosa and ij
ij Edgar D. Mitchell took off at 4:03 p.m. Sunday for their ij
jj nine-day jaunt into space, they had another problem few people ij
think about- sleep. jij
jij Consider the plight of the worn-out space traveler; after hours jj
ijj of strenuous mental work, theres nothing better than a good jjj
jj nights sleep.
TROUBLE IS, where hes located there is no night or day, no
quiet evening hours, no familiar low roar of traffic to lull him to
jj deep. The dock is virtually meaningless from his point of view. :ji
jj The sun doesnt rise at 6 a.m. nor set at 7 p.m.; noon is no :ji
jij longer high noon. jjj
jjj Sleep researchers Dr. Wilse B. Webb and Harman W. Agnew jjj
ij Jr. at UFs Thomas W. Bryant Space Sciences Research Building ij
ij are attempting to find answers to some of these perplexing :
ij problems facing astronauts. ij
ij A major problem being approached is that of the 24-hour ij
ij monitoring of space flights. Simply put, there are things ij
ji aboard a space capsule which have to be done at a certain time, ij
ji And all die scheduling in the world cant prevent the awakening ij
ji of an astronaut by ground control to perform the necessary ii
i I
j: THUS, QUESTIONS arise as to whether mans normal j:
j: terrestrial cycle 7&-hours deep, 16%-hourse awake is ji
jj: adaptable to conditions imposed by outer space travel, j:
ij Immediate conclusions indicate that it is not, according to a ji
ij recent research report by Webb and Agnew. ji
ij Why? Because the astronaut, who has most of his life dept ji
ij for IVi hours without interruption, is suddenly in space and ji
ij expected to perform complex duties during this normal deep :j
ji cycle. ij
ij The effect of such interruption has already been seen on ij
ij Earth. Businessmen, for instance, who travel internationally on ij
jj jets through several time zones in short periods of time, need ij
j from one to several days to recuperate from the flight so that ij
j they can effectively carry out their business duties. Without the ij
> recuperation period, stress sets in and business suffers, Agnew $
i said. I
jj THE AGNEW-WEBB approach to these problems involves jj:
:ji deep subjects who volunteer to live in isolation chambers on j:
:ji a schedule completely different from normal routine. For ji
j: example, a subject may be permitted to deep in his isolation :ji
jjj room (without windows, clocks or other references to the jjj
ij outside world) only from 8 a.m. or 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. §
j:j Total isolation, of course, is the key to the program. The list jjj
jjj of social and cultural factors that affect our sleeping and waking jjj
jij periods is endless. jij
jij Food served at the universitys isolation chamber, for jij
j instance, must be anything the subject requests. If he asks for a jij
j;j steak dinner at 3 a.m. (outside time, of course), he must get it. jij
jij If he is given a pizza instead, he may well (and accurately!) jj
jj conclude that the local pizza palace was the only restaurant ij
j; in town open. Obvioudy, he could easily figure out what time it ii
ji was from such an error in the program, Agnew says. 'i
ji But while steak and pizza may be a few of the problems in $
ji simulating space while still on earth, the major goal is to find a ji
:j deep-work cycle which will better fit what is required of todays ji
ij astronauts, say university deep researchers. ii
if $
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

football games to trips made by
SG officials. There have been
no debts incurred and the
Rathskeller is in good financial
shape.
Uhlfelder said no student

CAMPUS CONE
FREE DELIVERY
SUNDAY-THURSDAY
CALL 372-3890

group had been refused money
by SG. If a group was not
included in the line-item budget
being passed by the Student
Senate, it could come back for
special requests as needs arose
during the year, he said.
After the Friday hearing
ended, Alper indicated the
Activity Fee Committee will
release a five pronged report in
which we will consider the needs
of the Athletic Association, the
Reitz Union, Student
Government, the infirmary and
Student Publications.
HE SAID the groups which
the committee investigated were,
in some cases, spending money
where it didnt really need to be

HALE ...
Efbom page owTj|
own comments to it. The report will be submitted
to the Board of Regents next Wednesday. All of the
states universities will submit reports made jointly
by their student affairs chairman and their own
student governments.
Uhlfelder stated, This is unfortunate, but aside
from Hales report which we finally were informed
of, I feel that President OConnell and other UF
administrators have tried to avert Student
Government, on issues that directly affect the
students.
Uhlfelder cited a Senate Ways and Means
committee meeting in Orlando and a Board of
Regents workshop in Tampa as examples of Student
Government being uninformed.
I CAN UNDERSTAND Uhlfelders feelings
about that, Hale commented. Chancellor Robert
Mautz, of the Board of Regents, picked out various
university presidents and student representatives to
speak in Orlando. It wasnt reasonable to have each
school speak on each subject.
Hale said UF President Stephen C. OConnell was
assigned to speak on the nature of student
self-government. When asked if it might have been
good for OConnell to talk to Uhlfelder before
presenting his speech, Hale said, I had given him
some information and President OConnell has been
around Student Government long enough to present
a good speech on the subject. Nevertheless, Hale
said, It might have been good to talk with
Uhlfelder.
Jeff Warren, Florida Blue Key president was
invited to Orlando but Uhlfelder was not invited.
At a Board of Regents meeting in Tampa, Senate
President Jerry Thomas was investigating, according
to Hale, Whether students were over-participating
in university policy decisions and establishing their
own morals.
JEFF WARREN, Blue Key president, was asked
to speak on Gator Growl. There was controversy
whether it was obscene or not, according to
Thomas.

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spent.
He singled out Camp Wauburg
as being one of the areas.
Wauburg is eating up 50
cents per student per quarter,
in addition to a considerable
amount of money which is
earmarked for Lake Wauburg in
the reserve funds. I think if we
are working on a bare bones
situation we might consider the
possibility of phasing out
Wauburg as a fee drawing
activity.
We are going to take another
hard look at the Athletic
Association and the fact that it
can apparently raise money if it
needs to. Perhaps we will be able
to recommend the Athletic
Association be cut, Alper said.

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MAUTZ

Warren was also asked to talk about speakers on
campus. When Hale was asked if Student
Government was contacted to have a representative
at the Tampa meeting to answer questions about
speakers on campus and other questions concerning
student participation, he said, I dont think the
question was raised. They just wanted a
representative from UF. I dont know if Student
Govemmentwas contacted or not.
Another case in point was a House Committee
hearing held in Gainesville recently. Uhlfelder said,
I had to find out about it from a legislator who
called me. I called OConnell to find out if I could
come and when I got there I found out that he had
already invited Warren and a girl resident advisor. It
was a public meeting, Uhlfelder said, so they
couldnt keep me out.
I brought up the tuition hike issue, Uhlfelder
said. If I hadnt been there nobody would have
brought it up. 1 didnt even know about.the meeting
until this legislator called me.
President OConnell is trying to go outside the
elected officials of government, Uhlfleder stated.
He realizes that we disagree on many things so now
its easier not to consult us.

HARVEY ALPER
... committee chairman

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HALE



WILLIE SANDERS:

By TERRY TENENBAUM
Alligator Staff Writer
Willie J. Sanders, one of the first black faculty
members in UFs J. Hillis Miller Health Center, is
building his own ladder of success rung by rung.
Rare indeed is the university instructor who has
gained his position through independent action
learned in other than the ivied walls of a college or
university, for in institutions of higher learning
today there is a priority on academic achievement in
attaining faculty rank.
SANDERS, 41, an instructor of anatomy in the
College of Medicine for two years, began working in
the Health Center in 1959 as a deiner one who
prepares cadavers for use in the anatomy laboratory.
He is presently the senior member of the
anatomy faculty in longevity of service.
From the beginning, Sanders interest in anatomy
lay far beyond his assigned custodial duties in
cadaver maintenance.
HE BEGAN reading anatomy books and
laboratory manuals. He listened to what was being
taught in the anatomy classroom. He talked to
medical students about what they were learning and
what they thought. Sanders has been associated
with every UF medical school class except the first.
By painstaking work and rigorous self-discipline,
Sanders molded himself into an expert of basic
human anatomy.
In 1963, Sanders approached the anatomy faculty
about the possibility of his working in the gross
anatomy laboratory. They agreed to give him a
chance.
THIS PROVIDED the stimulus for more
intensified self-study and he increased his expertise
to even higher levels.
By 1965, Sanders assumed greater responsibilities
in the anatomy department and was put in charge of

MHBpiMiiiiii
SANDERS

students.
He also assisted in a UF College of Dentistry
postgraduate course in head and neck anatomy for
dentists and oral surgeons.
Known to his students as Will, Sanders has
established great rapport with and is respected by
them for his knowledge snd easy going manner.
DR. FREDERICK KING, professor and
chairman of the universitys Department of
Neuroscience said, Willie Sanders is a truly
remarkable individual in that he has become an
expert in basic human anatomy through his own
drive and initiative. He has made great contributions
to our department and is an inspiration to all of us.
Since 1958, Sanders has been a consultant to the
State Anatomical Board, the agency responsible for
procuring cadavers for use in the state's medical

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A Rare Success Story

all cadaver dissections.
Medical, physical therapy and
occupational therapy students
often came to Sanders with
questions they had about their
gross anatomy course. He
usually knew the answers and if
he did not he knew where to
refer the students.
AFTER BEING promoted to
the faculty rank of instructor in
February 1968, Sanders began
his formal teaching career by
participating in the instruction
of gross anatomy and functional
applied anatomy courses and an
advanced surgical anatomy
course for senior medical


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THIS IS HOW IT'S DONE

With a helping hand from "Bones/' Willie
Sanders, instructor in the UF Department of
Anatomical Sciences gives students a quick review
of the anatomy of the human hand. Pictured left to

schools and was recently appointed as its executive
director.
Sanders is the co-author of several scientific
articles that have appeared in professional journals
including the Journal of the American Medical
Association and Archives of Surgery.
SANDERS RECEIVED his baccalaureate degree
from UF in December. He hopes to do graduate
work in anatomy and follow this with a career in
medical education.
The youngest of nine children, Sanders was bom
in Fort Motte, S. C. on a cotton farm where he
worked and lived until age 13. He then moved to
Columbia, S.C. to begin high school.
Quitting high school at 17, he joined the Navy
and served three and a half years.
REALIZING THE importance of an education,
Sanders earned his high school diploma after his
discharge from the Navy in 1949.
After completing high school, Sanders attended.
. the Hampton Institute in Hampton, Va. for two
years, earning an Army commission through ROTC.
Jr He then served 21 months in the Army, 11 of them
as an artillery officer in Korea.
After his discharge from the Army in 1955,
Sanders moved to Gainesville and worked in a
funeral home for a year.
In 1956, he enrolled in the Worsham College of
Mortuary Science in Chicago, completing his course
work in the same year. He then returned to
Gainesville and for two years was the manager of
the White and Jones Funeral Home.
In 1958, he bagan his career at UF working as a
derk in the campus book store.

Monday, February 1, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

right are: Cassandra Jones, third year medical
student; Tina Woolf, senior occupational therapy
student; Carol Carter, junior physical therapy
student and Sanders.

4
'He has made
great
contributions
and is an
inspiration
to all 9

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1. 1971

Action Taken On Firearms Control

By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Writer
The Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of Guns
on Campus compiled a list of
recommendations intended to
better police-student
relations and aid in solving UFs
firearm problem last June. Now,

Bill May Limit Campaign Spending

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
A bill to curtail campaign
expenditures in Student
Government elections will be
presented to the Student Senate
Tuesday.
If passed, a Campaign
Expenditure Law will take effect
which will limit candidates
running for student body
president and vice president to
spend not more than S4OO
during their campaign.
THE SAME BILL also puts a
limit on expenditure for
treasurer ($100), Chancellor of
the Honor Court ($75), Chief
Justice of the Traffic Court
($75) and a S3O limit for all
other offices.
The bill, if it becomes law,
will empower the honor court to
disqualify any candidates if
charges of fraud are
substantiated.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said Sunday the law, if
it goes into effect, will
encourage more students to
participate in SG.
IT (THE LAW) will cut out
the amount of expenditures
which have been extravagant in
the past. I think more people
would be willing to run and
participate if they did not have
to worry about the
expenditures, Uhlfelder said.
If it is uniform for
everybody, it will be fair for

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more than seven months later,
some of the committees
suggestions are evident oil
campus.
Police have been replaced by
unarmed personnel at campus
check-points and a Police Liason
Committee has been established,
in order to ease the tension

everybody (to participate in SG
elections).
He said one of the effects of
the bill would be to encourage
more individual participation of
the candidates in their campaign
instead of spending in
extravagant campaign
expenditures.
UHLFELDER INDICATED
past campaigns have been too
costly.
Last years (campaign)
wasnt as expensive as they have
been in the past. I didnt want to
spend the money I spent,
Uhlfelder said. But I still think
it was too much. I would not
want anybody to spend as much
money as has been (spent) in the
past.
Last year I spent
approximately $1,700,
Uhlfelder added. 1 definitely
think that was too much.
BUT IN ORDER to compete
with the primary competition I
was faced with, I had to do
something to combat (the
competition).
Uhlfelder said he favored
personal contact more. He said
good coverage by the press
would make the candidates
known to the student body.
The senate will also take a
look at the constitutions of
three groups, the Student
Association for Health, Physical
Education and Recreation, the
Business Affairs Advisory
Council and the Council on
International Relations and
United Nations affairs.
BUDGETS TO BE looked at

ARMED GUARDS GONE

between policemen and
students.
THE LIASON GROUP,
established by Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder, holds
get acquainted sessions twice
a week. These meetings are
attended by about 20 officers
and interested students. They
are informal and intended to

by the senators are Symphony
Orchestra, Mens and Womens
Glee clubs, University Choir and
the Gator Band.
Also, a proposal to fund a low
power, non-commercial
educational FM station will be
submitted to the senators for
approval.
The proposal asks for a
$7,000 appropriation from the
senate to be held until the
initiators of the station obtain

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show participants as people
rather than in their roles of
cop or long hair or
fratman.
A special training program for
UF policemen was proposed but
failed to materialize because the
Board of Regents lacked funds.
Special courses through
psychology, sociology and

official approval by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
the Board of Regents and the
Federal Communications
Commission.
The station would serve a
five-mile radius from the campus
and would broadcast music,
campus news and information.
The proposal has been made
by the Florida Radio Guild,
described in the proposal as an
unofficial group of UF students.

anthropology departments were
tied up by red tape.
The 16-page document of the
Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of Guns
on Campus advocated the
absolute prohibition of any
firearm by non-police persons.
Faculty and staff members, as
well as students, are covered in
this proposal.
Action was taken by the
Division of Housing this fall,
through a letter to all residents
informing them of gun
regulations on campus.
The University Senate
approved the proposed
disarming of personnel and
included this information in a
presidential memorandum and
the faculty handbook.
A. I. Shuler, chief of campus
police, sees the situation as
having improved quite a bit.
He points out there have been
no incidents with guns on
campus since these actions have
been taken.



Wiy nfC
HAI 9
HAPPENING
y IAM GO DOWN
BACK TO GODHEAD: Learn how to get back to our real home in
the spiritual sky by attending A Study in Vedic Literature, tonight
at 7 p.m. in the Catholic Student Center Library. His Holiness
Tridandi Gargamuni Swami will discuss Chapter Four of Bhagavad
Gita, 'Transcendental Knowledge.
SOUL FOOD: Krishna House offers food for the spirit in its daily free
food program featuring delicious prosadam. Enjoy this liberating East
Indian Vegetarian Love food today and everyday at 1915 NW Second
Ave.
RADIO FREAKS: Those interested in amateur radio are invited to
the Gator Amateur Radio Club meeting tonight at 8:30 in Weil Hall
room 525. Dues are $2 per quarter.
BE A FRIEND: Send a valentine (or a few!) in an unsealed envelope
to Valentines, Special Services, Sunland Training Center, P.O. Box
1150, Gainesville. Cards will be given out individually on Feb. 14.
More than 500 children need to know you care.
COLLOQUIUM PEOPLE: The Latin American Colloquium will
present Dr. Jorge Hardoy Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Colloquium Room
of Library East. He will speak on Urbanization in Cuba. The
meeting is open to the public.
GAMMA BETA PHI: The service and honorary sorority will meet
tonight at 7 in Union room 362.

Gym Remodeling Planned

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Staff Writar
Plans for remodeling Florida
Gym to include an adequate
number of fire exits and the air
conditioning of the gymnasium
auditorium are underway,
according to R. W. Munson,
university physical planning
consultant.
Munson stated, After the
State Fire Marshall made the
announcement that only 1800
people could legally be seated in
the gymnasium auditorium, the
UF executive committee
authorized the physical planning
offices to begin drawing up plans
with architects. These plans had
to include more fire exits to
comply with the national fire
requirements of the 'Life Safety
Code.
ACCORDING TO Munson,
the new plans allow 5,000
people legal the Florida
Gym at one time. Munson also
stated however, that these plans
for the seating of more people
could not be feasible without
the additon of an air
conditioning system also.
The UF gym, Munson said,
was constructed in 194849
and no improvements have been
made to it since. The
modifications include the
construction of a number of new
exits and the installation of an
air conditioning-heating
system.
The architects plans allow for
three new exits on the first floor
of the gymnasium and four exits
on the upper levels. All the
modification does Munson
explained, is to bring the
Florida Gym up to the
requirements of the building
cq#
THE FLORIDA GYM project
bid was awarded to Charles R.
Perry Construction Company of
Gainesville on December 22,
1970. Fischer, Broward and
Shepard from Jacksonville,
Florida have been named the

architects for the project.
According to Munson, Perry
Construction Company was
lowest bidder with $679,200 for
the total cost of the project. The
State Bond Amendment Funds
of 1967-69 are paying for the
gym modifications.
As soon as the notice to

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New Dean Sets Goals

By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Writar
The creation of an active
partnership utilizing the skills of
the legal practitioner, the jurist
and members of the UF
community has been set as a
goal of the College of Law by its
new dean, Joseph R. Julin.
Dean Julin spoke Friday night
at a banquet concluding the
activities of Supreme Court Day.
Guests of Honor at the banquet
were the justices of the Supreme
Court of Florida. Those who
attended the banquet were
members of the Eighth Judicial
Circuit Bar Association, the
College of Law faculty and the
John Marshall Bar Association,
sponsors of Supreme Court Day.
JULIN GAVE two brief
answers to the role of the law
school in the legal process. First,
he said that it will be more
expensive than in the past.
Secondly, he said that ventures
into the real world by legal aid,
and activities of the faculty in
law revision placed the College
of Law in the heart, instead of

proceed has been announced,
Munson stated, which should
be issued shortly through the
department of UF general
services, construction of the gym
modifications will begin within
next two weeks. All
remodeling should be completed
by October 15,1971.

the threshold, of the legal
system.
He said that tradition has not
permitted any real
communication between the law
schools and the Bar but the
events of today differ greatly
from the traditional approach.
This College of Law has
taken and will continue to take
action to provide a course of
study which incorporates theory
and practice; something
unobtainable where isolation is
the ruling principle, he said.
THE MAJOR contribution of
the law school is the training of
men and women in a
comprehensive and basic
foundation on which to build a
satisfying professional life, he
said.
I hope we will not lose sight
of another equally inportant
objective the development of
individuals who know how to
listen without hearing only that
with which they agree; who
know how to analyze without
attributing to the printed word
more value than that to which
the authors train of thought is
entitled; and who know how to
communicate effectively not

ATTENTION STUDENTS
* Arc your lecture notes
. \ ' depressing to study from? ***
* Do you wish there was a Qy
w f*. reliable way to get material 0p
v which is presented in a lecture
< you missed because of .2
sick new? A*' 3
* Are you too busy with An
taking notes to comprehend g Cfc ~ what is presented? <
n Would a quicker, easier and yi 'Jy*
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help you? STA 32q
If you answered YES to any one of these questions,
we are announcing the opening of an EASIER way to study.
The Actual Current
STUD-EASE
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STUD-EASE Lecture Notes are taken from current lecture classes
and are available the day following the lecture presentation at 1939
W. University Ave., next to the Spanish Main. The prices range from
19 cents to 39 cents depending upon the frequency of the lecture
meetings per week.
I MID-TERM SPECIAL 20% DISCOUNT Buy all thT
notes for one course and get a 20% Discount.

Monday, February 1,1971, The Florida Alligator,

only with those who support the
speakers own conclusions, but
with those one seeks to move
from a contrary position, Julin
said.
The Justices of the Florida
Supreme Court participated in
panel discussions earlier in the
day at the Law Center. Judge
Richard W. Erwin, the lone
dissenter in the corporate tax
decision last week, was the only
absentee.
The visit began with a
hamburger lunch on the Law
Center lawn and then moved
inside for some informal panel
discussions on the criminal
defendants right to assistance in
addition to counsel at public
expense and the wrongful
death act in Florida.
The panel on indigents rights
was moderated by Federal Judge
William A. Mcae -a former
Rhodes scholar from the
University of Florida.
Scotland 801 l
-
Alexander Graham Bell was
bom in Edinburgh, Scotland, in
1847.

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Fabruary 1,1971

No Customers
In For Peace
By TOM NELSON
Alligator Writer
Invent a better mouse trap and the world will beat a path to your
door; write a peace treaty to end the war in Vietnam and you wont
have a customer. Even if you get Jane Fonda to promote it.
The treaty, being circulated by the United States National Student
Association (USNSA) is touted as the combined effort of U. S., North
and South Vietnamese student union representatives. Jan. 23, Miss
Fonda said that anyone who wanted to sign the treaty should see
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder. We did.
THERES NO petition for students to sign, said Uhlfelder, but,
we do have a copy of the treaty. He struggled with the stubborn
paper, scrunched in the lower right hand drawer of his desk.
No one has come to my office asking about it. I signed a copy and
sent it to the USNSA. He searched through his desk and produced a
yellow carbon.
Anyone who wants to make a petition can come to my office and
Xerox the treaty, he said.
WE PICKED UP a copy of the treaty and these are the terms.
The United States agrees to:
Totally and immediately withdraw from Vietnam and set a date
by which all troops will be gone.
Not interfere in the internal affairs of Laos and Cambodia.
Oust the Thieu-Ky-Khiem regime.
The Vietnamese agree to:
Cease firing immediately.
Discuss release of American POWs.
Discuss procedures to guarantee the safety of withdrawing
troops.
Discuss procedures to guarantee the safety of U.S. sympathizers.
Form a provisional government to organize democratic elections.
Not interfere in Laos or Cambodia.
According to the treaty, your signature means you pledge to take
whatever actions necessary to insure its implementation and
acceptance by the U.S. government.
4 Cars Damaged
On Frat Row

The driver of a 1960
Oldsmobile, traveling east on
Fraternity Row, sideswiped one
car and pushed another into the
rear of a third unoccupied
parked car.
The four car accident
occurred at approximately 9:15
p.m. Saturday in front of the
Chi Phi fraternity house, 1
Fraternity Row.
JMhemfter of the Oldsmobile,
William D. Bradley, 55, of 923
S. E. 7th Ave., was unhurt but
taken to the J. Hillis Miller

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Health Center for observation.
The extent of the damage to
the three parked cars totaled an
estimated $2,850, according to
University Police Officer C. H.
Hobbs. Damage to the
Oldsmobile was estimated at an
approximate S3OO, according to
Officer Hobbs.
Bradley was charged with
drunk driving, careless driving
and causing a major accident. He
was also charged with hitting a
fence earlier in the evening on
S.E. 7th Ave. doing an estimated
S4O damage.

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TTC Considering Testing Changes

By TOM CORNELISON
Alligator Staff Writer
University College, recently
the target of academic reformers
from all areas of UF, is seriously
considering reforms in its
departmentalized testing
program.
The UF Curriculum
Committee has received requests
from Gail Merein, secretary of
affairs and Henry
Sol a res, student body vice
president, to discuss the
abolishment of departmentalized

Fellowship Offered
In Administration

By BILL SYMINGTON
Alligator Writer
Have aspirations of running
your state government ever
cropped up in your future plans?
IF YOU ARE an American
citizen and have completed or
will complete a bachelors degree
by June of 1971 in any
recognized major, then you
could be eligible for a $4,540
fellowship in the area of Public
Administration.
The fellowship has a total
"value of $4,540 for single
students and $4,940 for married
students. The stipend is $3,300
and $3,700 respectively with the
remainder consisting of
remission of tuition and fees at
the cooperating universities.
x Beginning in June, the fellows
will be serving an internship with
a department of the state
government in Alabama,
Kentucky and Tennessee or with
a federal agency in the south.
During the academic year, they
will be taking courses at the
Universities of Alabama,
Kentucky and Tennessee.
For information and
applications, students should
write to Coleman B. Ransome,
Educational director, Southern

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testing. The"t question of
departmentalized tests was
dropped pending the decision of
the fate of University College
(UC). UC is still with us and the
testing issue has been revived.
IN THE 35 years of
University College, states
Franklin A. Doty, retiring dean
of UC, we have experimented
with just about every form of
testing known to man. Doty
went on to praise the former UC
policy of 100 per cent
departmentalized testing saying,
It provided an atmosphere freer

Regional Training Program in
Public Administration, Drawer I,
University, Alabama 35486.
The deadline for submission
of applications is March 1,1971.

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from evaluation, testing and
grades than it ever was after we
started classroom testing.
Currently, UC departments
allow up to 50 per cent of their
evaluation in the classroom by
individual instructors, with the
Comprehensive English
department giving 100 per cent
of a students grade in class.
Comprehensive physical science
students receive all of their
evaluation fr om the
departmentalized tests.
A task force studying testing

B &ATQR3:
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B REACH
!(PEOPLE W V T
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-_S

reform has been appointed by
Doty. The task force includes
Dr. John McQuitty. UF
professors Ray Beirne. Travis
Carter, Clarence Derrick, Kay
Eoff, John Kilby, Samuel Gould
Sadler, Fred Shenkman, Frank
Taylor and Joseph Vogel and
two students yet unnamed,
though Miss Merein has been
invited to participate by Doty.
This group will undertake
four objectives:
compilation of a detailed

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Monday, February 1, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

written exposition and summary
of current UC testing
techniques;
study pertinent literature
on grading and evaluation;
confer with consultants
from various colleges on campus
and off campus on student
evaluation,
o and recommend specific
improvements, innovations, or
experiments in testing in the
several departments.
June 15, 1971 is the target
date for completion of the
project.

Page 7



Page 8

y The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1, 1971,.

£m aws grind the poor, and rich
m men rule the law.
gSfi Oliver Goldsmith, The Traveller
EDITORIAL
Corporate Taxes
' A IST A
Are Democratic
We are taught about democracy from childhood. It is part
of the educational process.
We are told that democracy is all that is good. It is what
distinguishes this country from others. It is freedom.
As we learn from our high school civics lessons,
democracy is government by the people, either directly or
through elected representatives. It is rule by the ruled.
But we learn from experience that democracy is only an
ideal; that it probably does not exist at all.
We view the war in Southeast Asia and know that we do
not like it. And we discover that we are not alone in our
dislike. The majority of Congress has voiced its opposition
to our activities in Indochina. And we read a Gallup poll
that says Joe Blow does not dig our intervention there
either. But we still are there. It does not seem to matter
much what the people want.
And then there is Gov. Askew's corporate income tax
proposal, the subject of today's editorial. Because like in the
Vietnam war, it appears that the wishes of a few interest
groups concerned may frustrate the wishes of the people.
To get right down to it, Gov. Askew was elected because
of his plans for tax reform. True, many people voted for
him only because they had their fill of Claude Kirk. But the
corporate income tax was Reubin Askews trump
card ... and the people wanted it.
But now a few powerful interest groups and lobbyists are
fighting it. They do not want Gov. Askews tax amendment
to be even placed on a state-wide ballot May 4 for approval
of Florida voters. And there corporation lobbyists have
been able to put the pressure on many of our legislators in
Tallahassee.
As Gov. Askew pointed out in his inaugural address,
Florida has one of the poorest tax structures in the country.
We have stacked burdensome consumer taxes and property
taxes on middle- and low-income families while granting
special tax favors to the politically influential,*' the
governor said. In fact, the small businessman in Florida pays
more than his fair share. Measured against all personal
income, he supposedly pays more than small businessmen in
45 other states. Direct corporation taxes, by this scale, are
lower in Florida than in 48 other states.
As it is now, Florida's taxes are meant to soak the poor.
Gov. Askew presented what he called a white paper to
the Legislature last week which showed that a family of
four earning $3,500 pays 15 per cent of that income in state
and local taxes. A family earning $50,000, however, pays
only 4.6 per cent of that in taxes. The corporate income tax
would take some of the burden away from the lower- and
middle-income consumer.
It is now all up to the Legislature. The corporate tax was
debated last week in committee; today it moved out to the
floor. To get Gov. Askews tax amendment on the ballot,
three-fifths of each house will have to vote for it 29 of
the 48 member Senate and 72 of the 119 member House.
We hope these legislators will keep in mind the reason for
their being in the state capitol: to serve the people and
presumably to carry out their wishes.
That is democracy.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Your directive on streamlining the government? I think it got lost in the red tape
As Don Wright Sees It
Revenue sharing

Alligator Staff
Dwite Valiants John Parker
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Stav* Strang Joan Dalton
Wire Editor Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor. Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686. 87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

- *******
Phyllis Gallub
V'jnaoing Editor
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

Student Publications
Business Staff
*
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices. Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
C. R. Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. 5. Dupree
Advertising Manager uoc
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



ft *>n \ .' -ft. >;.& >g* "" : ? :^
I READERS FORUM |

JC Nonsense
EDITOR:
Jesus Christ! Jesus Christ!
Jesus Christ! As a mediator of
strife, counselor of struggling
souls, savior of the righteous,
and sure cure for almost
anything. I marvel at the profits
Madison Avenue could make if it
ever suceeds in having him
bottled.
This whole fundamentalist,
Jesus Christ nonsense must
stop! Christianity of course, as
we all must agree, has a beautiful
ethic and a tremendous amount
of substance. But for heaven
sakes, must it all be put so
simplisticly?
Love does not come from a
declaration of faith in anytning,
hedonism or asceticism, a Hefner
or an Augustine.
To those who can achieve
Christian happiness and love by
a simple declaration to Christ,
congratulations. But to the other
99% of Adams children, I think
we all hope and realize that true
Christianity can reside in the
most atheistic of men, that those
who are truly wise came to their
wisdom through living life, not
limiting it with artificial fears.
The worlds only Christian did
not die on the cross, as Nietzche
said. He lives on now, as the
driving force behind those who
desire to live life truthfully, not
limit it to catch words.
ART MARR 3AS
Wonderful
EDITOR:
IFC would indeed be proud to
present the musicians shown in
the photograph entitled
Captions Outrageous (January
27). They are a valuable national
resource, members of the New
Orleans Preservation Hall Band.
De De Pierce is on the far left.
(He is totally blind). Several
members of the band made
beautiful music at the 1968
Festival of American Folklife
held by the Smithsonian
Institution in Washington D.C.
Theyre wonderful.
Lucy T. Briggs
Frats
EDITOR:
I would like to take this
opportunity to liiake a few
comments about *a letter by Joel
Jenett which appeared in
Mondays Alligator, which
concerned an excessive amount
of noise made by certain
fraternities during a bowling
tournament at the Reitz Union.
Its interesting how Mr. Jenett
concludes from one incident
that the greeks on our campus
are a manifestation of
brotherhood in its most empty
form. Im sure that if Mr.
Jenett took the time to discover
some of the positive aspects of
fraternities, he would see that
there is more right than wrong.
Too often on many issues, we
look only for the bad,
overlooking the good.
Concerning the specific
incident, it would seem to me
that the fault would lie on
the Intramurals Department, for

scheduling two tournaments
(bowling and billiards) at the
same time. All things considered,
even if those greeks in the crowd
were making too much noise,
condemning the whole
Fraternity System is not the
answer.
BOBBY WILLIAMS
More Frats
EDITOR:
I am writing this in reference
to Mr. Jenetts letter of Monday
Jan. 25. It seems as though
many people have nothing better
to do with their time than
slanderize greeks. A question
comes to mind. Why? I suppose,
however, it is easy to answer.
Besides slanderization being in
style, greeks are easily
identifiable by the fact that they
wear their jerseys around,
proudly I might add. I wonder if
Mr. Janett would have felt so
moved as to write to you of his
complaint if the loud cheering at
the bowling lanes had been
elecited from a crowd of
interested onlookers other than
fraternity men. And then again,
he failed to complain that the
Reitz Union had no more sense
than to schedule these two
events together.
Mr. Jenett tried to shame men
for standing behind their team
and showing enthusiasm for
competition when this is one of
the outstanding qualities of the
greek system, ie ... someone
there to lend support when you"
need it.
Also I believe Mr. Jenett to be
completely out of line suggesting
that fraternities are directed
exclusively towards themselves
on the basis of a single incident
such as this. When greeks spend
their time painting, rebuilding,
and fixing dilapidated areas of
our city and surrounding cities?
give free, hundreds of pints of
blood to the hospital when it
otherwise costs them sls a pint
to get; whe IFC sponsors frolics
for the benefit of the student
body and engages in many other
worthy projects which one could
End out about if he CARED
enough to do so; I wonder where
a person can get off thinking
they are directed exclusively
towards themselves? w
In closing, let me say I think
the key problem in
misunderstanding the greeks is
lack of communication, an'
unwillingness of confrontation.
May I suggest that in the future
when you have a complaint
about the greeks and truly aspire
to a solution, that you take it
where it counts the most; To the
IFC or Panhellenic offices. They
are located on the same floor as
the Alligator, that is, the third
floor of the Reitz Union.
BECKY GAYLE 2UC
Ripped Off
EDITOR:
This is the second time I have
been ripped-off by the
University so I think it is time
some noise was made. To
explain the details of my first
mishap with the Administration
would take more than the Page

"V \ V"*. V v v v-v V CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS v\\\v\\\\vvvv\\vv\v
i -1
And this little baby is set up to grind Les Hales coffee beans.

of Record, so I will forego that
for now.
Yesterday I was laid off from
my job. Since the start of the
quarter I have been working the
7:30-10:30 shift on one of the
check-points for the campus
police. It wasnt a very
rewarding job so I am not
broken up about being replaced.
I just dont approve of the way
it was handled. Last week a
woman was added to my shift.
She had never worked at a
checkpoint before so I explained
all the inane little decal details.
She worked with me two days.
The following day her sister
arrived on my post and I trained
her. Both are married and
neither are students or the wives
of students.
Today I learned that I had
been laid off. My roommate who
is financing her education by
working was also replaced. Not
only were we replaced by the
same two women I had trained,
but I was not even notified of
my dismissal. I had to call the
police station and inquire.
As if have stated before, it
wasnt the easiest job and I am
not poverty-stricken, yet, some
people who were laid off do
need the money. I feel there was
an injustice done. The reason we
were given for our dismissal was
that we were replaced by people
who are able to work full time. I
see little difference whether a
person works 3 or 8 hours,
although a person working a
shorter shift niight be more
efficient and less bored.
I like the two people who
replaced us and I dont want to
cause them trouble but it just
doesnt seem right. I was
previously under the impression
that jobs were made available
specifically to the students in
order to help defeat rising
tuition costs. Perhaps I am
mistaken about that. I just hope
that I still get paid for the
month I worked.
I almost forgot the most
interesting fact. The two women
that replaced us are sister-in-laws
of one of our own "Campus
policemen.
SHIRLEY LASSETER 3AS

Hershey
EDITOR:
Well, masochists, General
Hershey made it here last week.
This old soldier who had
weathered (?) many storms took
his verbal stand towards an
audience that was interesting but
disappointing.
General Hershey did not lose
that war on last Wednesday eve.
His 77-year old wit and
experience was very adept at
countering the misdirected
verbal blast against The War and
war which he stands for. The
anti-war persons there could not
rile this man. His tough hide
accepted their twig lashings and
flashed back with his bull whip.
Organization, that forefather
of productivity, was not present.
Sporadic ideas adhered *to by
only certain sections presented
themselves ineffective in
disrupting for a goal. Only
entertainment for the listening
occurred.
Can persons learn from this
experience? Will they realize,
that to achieve a goal they have
to organize, that if they really
want to achieve a goal, a
sacrifice of time and effort is
necessary instead of
spontaneous, individual acts?
But if masochism is their goal
instead of achieving something
then go ahead and hit your
singular head against the wall
instead of a powerful unity. But
that individual act will not
accomplish much. Constant
battering is not the means to
achieve goals, instead, organized
Big Blasts are the only
effective way to achieve success.
PETE HOBBS
Loans
EDITOR:
I feel that the time has come
for you and your staff, as well as
the student body, to take a firm
position on how we feel
concerning the* financial aid
crisis that now faces the
University of Florida and all

the Florida

other Institutions across the
country.
I, Victor Stern, along with
other interested people, have
done our best to get things going
concerning the FEDERALLY
INSURED LOANS.
The time has now come in
Washington to present before
the Congress and Senate,
legislation that will directly
affect the outcome and interest
of all those concerned who seek
financial assistance in order to
further their college education.
It has been inferred to me
through the Managing Editor
and other staff writers, that
students are too lazy when it
comes down to writing their
congressman to tell them where
they stand, not only on this very
important issue, but other
matters as well. I disagree
wholeheartedly, and you have
no right to make this choice for
them.
The Student Financial Aid
Office has asked me to ask you
to be kind enough to list in your
paper the names and addresses
of those Congressmen students
may contact in order to let our
representatives in Washington
know where we stand.
To make the assumption that
this article would be, I quote,
A Waste of Time as your staff
has inferred to me, tells me only
one thing! That its time for you
and staff to close your doors!
You are no longer representing
the interests and welfare of your
fellow students, other students
across the country, but your
own self interests which will
in the end result not only in
defeat for yourselves, but for
everything that my cohorts have
worked so hard to achieve. The
right to stand up and be heard,
the right to express our feelings,
whether they be on financial aid
or any other issue facing this
country of ours.
I conclude by saying that its
been a pleasure to fight for
something I believe in, and I
hope that you will also begin to
meet your responsibilities to see
that you and your staff are in
support of those ideals I have
previously mentioned.
VICTOR G. STERN

Page 9



Page 10

i, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1, 1971

UPD Acquires Video-Tape Camera

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
ARigator Staff Writer
Everybody is a star, at least
through the lens of the
University Police Departments
(UPD) newly acquired
video-tape camera.
According to UPD Chief
Audie Shuler, the Sony camera,
valued at $1,500, will be used
primarily as a training device in
the Police Recruit School.
PRIOR TO THE arrival of the
camera Vice President for
Business Affairs William Elmore
said the camera would be used as
a police tool in the event of
demonstrations.
Shuler said the camera would
be used in the event of campus
demonstrations only if a crowd
is unlawful or if it tries to take
over a building.
As an example he cited the
takeover of Walker Auditorium
(now Carlton Auditorium) by
the Veterans for Peace after the
Kent State disruptions last
spring.
SHULER SAID participants
would be warned via a
loudspeaker system before the
camera would be used.
The camera would hot be
used at peaceful events like the
Fonda speech, Shuler said.

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SHULER
Another possible use for the
camera would be in monitoring
vending machines for cases of
vandalism, Shuler said.
FILMS OF THIS type are
admissible as court evidence.
The video unit, which arrived
last week, consists of a camera, a
play-back and a video-tape
recorder.
Prior to the purchase of the
video tape unit by UF, the UPD
borrowed the citys equipment
for use in campus disturbances.
ACCORDING TO Lieutenant
Dudley Gordon, education and
training officer, the camera will
be used in a series of police
training script filmings.
He said the tapes are
especially beneficial to new

PRIMARY TRAINING DEVICE

Camera
'not for
peaceful
events g
.IIIIIIIHIIHIS
.tUIIIUUNniIII*
officers just out of training to
show them their mistakes.
The police recruit class takes
turns at playing various roles
from any of 20 professionally
written scripts.
ONE OF THE scripts
describes a situation involving a
patrolman on duty in the early
morning hours. He comes across
a Puerto Rican man about 30
years of age. The script says,
Play out this situation as you
would on the job.
The camera will also be put to
a use in making regualr training
*Â¥ilms.
According to Shuler the
UPDs film history is good, but
limited.

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TOM KENNEDY
TRAINING FILMS
... help show police their mistakes



i fpHHBHp m j3|H| mfflffim h hh b lliiSH I m 9B b
LARGEST SELECTION OF JEANS IN GVILLE
FEATURING Mh SLACKS
EBB /ft :|V) Bi
irV w
huge SELECTION il I\ I GIGANTIC variety
OF OUTRAGEOUS jf \/f J OF COLORED
jv KNITS -4 ]f I T-SHIRTS
V /1 / TOPS- V 1
BELTS-HATS WORK SHIRTS
1249 NW 4th AVE 372-6189 OFF 13 ST BEHIND THE NEW MUNTZ STEREO
OPEN 10 ANMONDAY THRU SATURDAY

Monday, February 1, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1,1971

CAMPUS CRIER I
V I J M SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT I
1 S.G. Tutoring Continues I
B f The Student Gov't Tutoring program is still in operation. Any student wishing to be tutored I
I or offer their services as a tutor should call 392-1665 and obtain the necessary information. B
I .v.v.v.v.v/.v.v.v.v.v.v.
I I CAMPUS CALENDAR I
m February 3
February 1
B I Black Student Union
I General Dames Meeting, Arts I
I I & Craft, C-4 Union, 8:00 8:30 pm
H Gator Sail Club Meeting, B
B m P m Union-346,7:30 p.m.
I .Ombudsman Has The Answer I
M B Have a problem, question, or just plain need help the Ombudsman is at your service. All you 9
t I need do is to call 392-1650 to find assistance. B
I I This Week At The RAT 1
m The fl** I
B M 7:00 9:15 11:30 I
-'"w\
Wed. The I
V ti I
B I THE BIRDS THE BLOB I
B\
j
B X
I I Student Tutor Society Offers Help I
Physical science loosing you? Calculus confusing you? Free tutoring in these and many
I other subjects is now being offered by Sigma Tau Sigma, the Student Tutor Society.
Applications are available in the Office for Student Development, Room 129, Tigert Hall.
I I Bulletin Space Available 1

I Any student may use bulletin board space. All you need do is apply for it on the third floor
1 of the Student Union. B

B
I Accent 7l Presents I
m '
B I Hiram Ruiz, Chairman of the Gay Liberation Front at F.S.U. will speak at 8:00 P.M. in the
I University Auditorium on February 4. B
I B
B I Draft Counseling I
1 The Student Gov't Draft Center is in full operation. If you have any questions, problems, or B
I even suggestions you can make a personal appointment by calling 392-1665. B
I I Consumer Protection I
X 1 The Student Gov't Office of Consumer Affairs urges all students with any consumer
V complaints to report these to this Office. If the complaints are valid they will be dealt with
1 accordingly. Call 392-1665 and ask for Lee Schwartz.
sf|B-.. B B
B 1 ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE I
| THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH .si
I WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. ..
:r 1
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS 1
STUDENT GOVERNMENT L



I horp: U.S. Foreign Policy Confused

By JANET OLES
Alligator Staff Writer
Visiting Professor of Economics Dr. Willard Thorp, in a recent press
conference, surveyed the current international economic scene and
offered his assessment of the inflationary condition in the United
States today.
Speaking on international economics, Thorp stated that U S nolicv
on foreign investments, foreign assistance and foreign involvement has
changed drastically in recent years.
"OVER THE LAST five years, Thorp said, "our policies of

Blr v
x sp\ ; v
WILLARD THORP
... thinking too much of selves

explained Thorpe, they will in turn block our trade to them. And
Im afraid this will happen if we continue with our efforts to protect
the employment force.
One of the main problems, according to Thorp, in solving these
problems is a government comprised of different departments with

Sears Offers
Tax Service
Sears, Roebuck and Co. is
offering individual income tax
preparation service in the
Gainesville area starting in
January.
Sam Hendrickson, manager of
the local Sears store, said, Since
virtually all of our customers are
taxpayers, we think it makes
good sense to offer personalized
income tax preparation service
in our store.
FULLY TRAINED income
tax return experts will be
available at a center within the
store to work personally with
taxpayers in the preparation of
their returns, Hendrickson said.
Computational accuracy of the
completed return is guaranteed
and all information will be held
in strict confidence.
The income tax preparation
center in the store is now
opened 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.
It will operate through April 15.

I lIRELLI I
RADIAL TIRES
I For American, European I
" 4

direction in these fields have
been eroded and the picture
today is confused. It is difficult
to even give an outline of
Americas foreign policy.
Thorp attributed the lag in
foreign investments to a case of
contrary interests on the part of
the consumer and producer and
said foreign investments had
succeeded in turning labor
toward chronic isolationism.
The .. consumer wants the
products from other countries,
but the producer is afraid
foreign imports will detract from
his market. As a result, the
producer is clamoring for
protection which would include
a cutback in foreign imports and
many countries might object.
UNDER OUR relationship
with foreign countries, if we
block their trade to us,

iDaily entree special 52( & u P |
Daily pastry special 19( I
|_ Featuring color T.V. & Jukebox on free play

fIHHHHHHB MH 4\* V ** / .**
tv* Bl M 1 bmb mm $
'.,. *
v
,-.
, HI HHi bHH % 6 Hb
>< c s l u*'^^^ r Hp MEN'S LADIES' 1
|Men s Flares.: Shoc S I
$ *vv,>>v:. W >>v.. BIBSUSI&H $ Fancy patterns orig $8 NOW 5.99 Shoes Bostonians orig. 18.00 NOW 10 99 &
v solid colors and stripes
! in bUtt " & zi^^._..':'^j?*?. 0 NOW 699 Boots, special group orig 22.00 NOW 10.99 i|
j Mens Sweaters §
;Ij >m mw;v.v.v.%v.v.v.v.v.v.vX ;,*. V-neck, long sleeve, your choice >: LadieS SweaterS-VHStS
;.' of 100% wool or 100% acrylic in NOW 5.99 j£:
:! a variety of colors orig sls-18 Belted longsleeve and $
j: Mock turtle, scoop neck, & cardigans sleeveless orig. sl4-16 NOW 599 $
long sleeve and sleeveless. Belted to 9.99 :$
j! and unbelted orig sls-18 if j l!*J' £
j>y.w*wj*wjwj*:i .' QOIOS Uresses-Jumpers >.
£ i Men $ Suite ? :g
Double breasted, wide lapels. NOW 49 99 2 P*ce knits. Woolens-acrylies NOW 12.99 S
_ .. . *V.yy chiffons, crepes orig. S2O-46 to 99 90 8
Dacron and wool for year round wear. Orig. S9O 19 4y.yy
! v^v.v.*.v.*>M9>y*wv.%v.v.%w.v.%%v..y w
ijMens Sportcoats i ?Ladies Lingerie!;
;.
, j*j
Double breasted. Corduroy shorty night gowns and pegnoir sets-lounging $:
in camel and chocolate... .orig. $37.50 NOW 24.99 NOW 599
>: .w^^w^.wav.v.wee. rf.77
?Mens Accessories Bras an d orig $4-,o NOW 2.99-5.99 :?
f .*>:*:-.-.-x.v.v.v.%v.*.'.-.v.v.w.v.-.-.w.w.v. y.v.v.v.^-v.v.v.v.v.v/.v.v. ft
! sock< orig $1.75 now 99< I Ladies Suits I I
Shirts orig SB.OO now 2.99 |
C.P.O. Shirts orig $13.00 NOW 6.99 Checks, plaids, solids origSs2-65 NOW 29.99 I
Corduroy Shirts orig $15.00 NOW 9.99 A S
! Windbreakers orig $15.00 NOW 9.99 Tunic suits A-line and pleated NOW 14.99
Shoes orig $21.00 NOW 14.99 skirts knits and bonded fabrics orig S2B-46 a 21.99 Jjj
IQ bb 1
1620 W. Univ. Ave. University Plaza ::

each holding different and often contrary vested interests.
Attempting to resolve this conflict of interests, the President last
week appointed a Council on International Economic Policy which will
determine national policy while striving to override vested interests.
THORP ALSO called the political side of international relations as
important, if not more so, than the economic side, and charged that
our political image had been tremendously damaged in recent years by
our interests. We are thinking too much about ourselves, he claimed.
We must realize we are living with other countries and because of our
wealth, we can have a tremendous impact on other countries provided
they feel we are not always acting in our own short-range interests.
The former assistant secretary of state closed his talk on
international affairs by calling the situation now a crisis in respect to
our general attitude, but ended with an optimistic note.
I LIKE TO think the U.S. in domestic and foreign policy is
behaving well enough so other countries can feel we want to help
them and can talk to us about their problems.
On the subject of inflation, Thorp referred to the condition as a
self-continuing operation, which is hard to stop at any one point.
He called two to three per cent inflation inevitable and favored
government intervention over wage-price control as a realistic
solution.
The government has a number of ways of controlling inflation,
asserted Thorp. One device Id like to see would be that of keeping
prices down and opening the door to a number of exports. It is the
government s responsibility to try and keep the economy running
without major unemployment and without inflation.
Presently, Thorp is teaching a graduate level seminar at UF in
Current International Economic Problems.
His economic background is varied. During his career he has served
in a wide variety of governmental posts, including director of the
United States Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce and director
of the consumer division of the National Emergency Council in the
3os. During the President Harry Truman and President Franklin
Roosevelt years,* he was deputy assistant, then assistant secretary to
economic affairs. Under President John Kennedy, he was appointed
ambassador to Paris. Currently, besides holding his position of faculty
member, he is also serving as a consultant to the United Nations in
administrative management.

FREE TRANSPORTATION TO
CAMPUS CONE
HUME 10 AND 40 minutes past the hour
WEAVER 15 AND 45 minutes past the hour
TOLBERT 20 AND 50 minutes past the hour
MURPHEE 25 AND 55 minutes past the hour I
SUNDAY-THURSDAY 7 TO 12 p.m.

February 1, 1971. Tha Florid? Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Y'
YAMAHA ENDURO 250 1970
Excellent woods bike extras TV
portable b&w Like new Dave
376-7146 After 5 PM (A-st-68-p)
English Bulldog Puppies AKC reg.
Championship Bloodlines. Males and
Females available call 378-9808
(A-st-67-p)
Diamond solitare with band local
appraisal value with papers for
insurance $705. 78ct. best offer ask
for Vic 8-5 376-8443 (A-st-69-p)
PEAVEY PA system 400 watt peak 4
chan. 2 inputs/can reverb 2 spk
cabinets 2 15 JBLD 130s/cab $825
cash Bill Taylor ac 904 245-2525
Belleview, Fla. I will call u
(A-st-71-p)
Books: College English: the first
year, English study guide, CPS 121,
122, CSS study guides 111, 112 call
372- (A-st-69-p)
100 watt amp garrard turntable two
speakers 12 in. woofers roberts 997
tape recorder with tapes best offer
must sell call 376-6187 after 4pm
(A-st-71-p)
Round front china closet, chase
lounge, set 4 & 6 chairs, tea wagon,
round oak table, piano, book case.
Antiques & oddities. 6110 S.W. 13th
St. Closed Sundays. (A-4t-70-p)
Must sell 2 5 speakers enclosed in
walnut cases for just $23; also Gibson
electric guitar will go for only $l5O.
Call Wm. at 376-0406. (A-st-70-p)
Sansui 2000 amp. $225, 2 Sansul 200
speakers SIOO each. All used only 10
hours call 378-0381 after 5:00
(A-st-70-p)
Guitar Martin D2B plush lined
hardshell case new cost S6OO take
best offer over $335 372-5928 Ken
(A-10t-70-p)
1969 Honda CL9O VERY GOOD
includes helmet and car racks S2OO
call Ken 373-3028 (A-st-70-p)
1970 Honda 750 excellent condition
$1295 call 376-6059 after 4:00 pm
(A-st-70-p)
tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bobcats ocelots skunks parrots hawks
snanes lizards turtles for Sale trade or
buy Kongo Pet 475-2546 (local)
(a-16t-55-p)
Good buy on a 63 Corvalr. Runs like
a dream. S3OO or best offer. Call
373- after 10 pm. (A-4t-70-p)
Add color to you? pad. stained glass
lamps, do It yourself or assembled,
kits complete with precut glass, lead,
solder, wiring, chain 376-2195
(A-st-70-p)
Fender Coronado electric guitar with
case and Heath two channel amp
with reverb $325 call 392-7251
(A-6t-72-p)
My own 1970 Honda 750 cc. Gold, In
perfect condition. Only 3400 mi Best
buy around at only $llOO. Call
David or Bob at (373-4397)
(A-st-72-p)
1967 Honda 150. Good condition.
Must sell immediatly. Best offer, call
378-3607 after spm. Ask for Steve.
(A-2t-72-p)
Craig model 2404 reel to reel tape
deck. Need bread will bargain yellow
double breasted zoot suit bought at
MGM auction 378-0908 (A-st-72-p)
'jmjSSSSSSSmwSSSjjjjjjm'
NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:20-3:30-5:40-7:50-& 10:00 1
ELLIOTT II
GOULD S |
HIS BEST SINCE ||
M-A-S-H [I
IN A DAVID L. WOLPER Prcxluction I
"I LOVE MY... I
WIFE I
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR' I
I NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:50-3:57-6:04-8:11-& 10:18|
* Something else from
VttedirectorrfjtAfjHl
i
I METROCOLOR mS I

Page 14

FOR SALE
Canon ft ql camera fl:2 lens 4
months old. over $340 new now
$220 phone 372-3977 (A-st-72-p)
Stereo Panasonic 7070 set. includes
radio AM, FM & FM stereo, 8 track
tape plus speakers, for more
information call 376-8878
(A-st-69-p)
FOR better cleaning, to keep colors
gleaming, use Blue Lustre carpet
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooers also
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
DRUM SET Sacrifice $l6O and
COKE MACHINE (really) S3O also
HONDA mo-ped always runs only
$65 call John at 378-8061.
(A-st-73-p)
Changed my hair color. 100% human
hair blonde fall for sale. Best offer
takes it. Call 378-0959. (A-2t-73-p)
2 8.45 x 15 Wide tries on Ford rims
S3O. Also 2 adapters to fit Ford rims
to 5 lug V. W. $lO. Or buy all for
$37. Call 378-6490 (A-2t-73-p)
1969 Yamaha 100 Twin recently
rebuilt: new sprockets, clutch, tires,
pistons and rings S2OO or Best Offer
Call 372-3090 (A-st-73-p)
1969 Cougar xry conv power steering
brakes hi perf 351 leather upholstry
S2BOO 373-4303 (A-st-73-p)
Royal Aristocrat typewriter.
Excellent cond. $75. new/now $35.
Royal Parade typewriter. SSO.
new/now $25. Poor married student!
Call 376-4124 (A-2t-73-p)
Blonde human hair fall. Orig S4O
now $25. was blonde for 1 mo. but
didnt like, now brunette so must
sell, call 378-0655 after 4 pm.
(A-3t-73-p)
For sale typewriter chair. Excellent
condition. Light weight for home
use. Call 373-4779 after 5 pm sls
(A-2t-73-p)
KLH model 11. An Integrated
component system In a portable
package 6 yrs old price Vi new cost
SIOO. 378-4016 after five.
(A-st-73-p)
Sound of music portable stereo with
head set. beautiful sound only S4O.
mens wet jacket, perfect cond. $lO
girls helmet $6. call 373-1908
(A-st-73-p)
>!*!*!*i!*X*!*X!*!*S!*X*!%X%*X*X*£X*X*X*X*.
FOR RENT
Sublet 1 bedroom apt air cond. heat
water included call 378-4687 $lO5
mo. (B-2t-72-p)
female roommate Mobile City. Own
bdrm, walk In cist $75/mo total call
Judy 376-4616 9am-spm (B-st-72-p)
Male roomate needed to share
Campus Land apt. rest of Jan. rent
free, S7O per month plus V 2 util call
378-2888. (B-st-69-p)
Two bedroom apt. Gator town. $lB5
a mo. call 378-5753 after spm
(B-st-73-p)
/mm&\
18 ANDOVER!
S CHECKED^^F

l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1, 1971

EOF? RENT
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished apt. at
University Gardens trace for spring
qtr. Occupancy by 4 people 47.50
per mo. Call 378-2848 apt 718-309
(B-st-73-p)
WANTED
1 male roommate needed for La
Bonne Vie apt, immediately or spring
quarter, call Don 378-9536
(C-st-72-p)
Male Roomate to share three
bedroom house near law school no
deposit Feb -free call 373-1296
(C-st-72-p)
Need cheap transportation; bicycle
motor, -etc. In fact, If you have
anything at all interesting to offer,
give a call. LOVE. 378-3972.
(C-3t-72-p)
Roommate wanted female beautiful
new house on lake, own bedroom,
$53.56 mo. Call 373-1372.
(C-3t-71-p)
Roomate wanted to share apt., 3
blocks from campus with male grad,
A.C., pool, 46/mo, call 376-3733.
(C-st-71-p)
Male rommate, own bedroom in 2
bdrm Apt. $70.00 + 1/3 utilities.
Frederick Garden Apts. 376-9740,
Charles (C-lot-71-p)


The UF Board of Student Publications
Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
Apply For the Following Positions ...
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
The Board of Student Publications shall choose
the term of office after full deliberation
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
You do not have to be a journalism major.
General Instructions
All applications are to be picked up and
returned between 8 am. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union
,\
Applicants must return the original plus two
copies of the completed application prior to
4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 19.
For further information;xaJMr. Alan Whiteleather,
392-1680 1- -'* *0 ?


WANTED
L,steners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cylinthla between 1 and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
CHEAP One male romate needed
Village Park Apts. TV and stereo All
meals cooked All dishes washed
$45.00 a month call Tom 372-1117
(C-st-69-p)
CYCLE anywhere from 175 cc up in
any condition for cheap, call Mark
392-7253. (C-3t-73-p)

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING
a National Shakespeare Co.
February 6, 1971 in the
University Auditorium at
jpMkl 8:15 p.m. Student tickets are
SI.OO and $2.00. General
)l J admission is $2.50 or $3.50.
Purchase tickets at the
Constans Theatre from
noon-4:30 p.m. on weekdays.
sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union

| 1 lie beauty
creating life, ntfll
s TfieKby
Maker^
- V ...



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
: ; X ; X*X ; x-x ; X ; X ; x-X ; x ; X ; X ; >x ; :-:-:w:X:X:
Female roommate needed in March
to share townhouse Landmark Apt
47.50 per month call 372-8493.
(C-st-73-p)
Progressive jazz musicians drummer
organist lead guitarist pianist for
audition call Ray Mobley 378-3237
or 372-1444 to leave name & number
(C-7t-73-p)
yyA r>
Part or full-time sales help needed
$3-5/hr guaranteed to service
established customers set your own
hours call between 7 & 9 pm
378-0421 or 378-0121 ask for Ed.
Car needed (E-st-71-p)
Part time job work own hours at own
convience. For further information
call 378-4091 ask for Ed (E-3t-72-p)
SUMMER JOBS for rising juniors,
seniors and graduating seniors. S7O
per week. Library Intern Program.
Brevard County Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Orlando St. Pet. Make
appointment through the Placement
office. Interviewer on Campus Feb.
6. No obligation. (E-st-73-p)
x-x-x-x-x-XvX-XvXi-J&X&XxXxXTX:!;-
AUTOS
1967 VW bus rebuilt engine blue and
white good condition SIOOO. Call
378-5756 or 372-8682 (G-st-70-p)
1965 FALCON 3 Speed, Blue with
white convertible top. Looks and
runs good. $650 or best offer. Call
Gary at 378-9752 (G-3t-71-p)
196 3 544 volvo engine + trans rebuilt
compieatly 2 months ago, new
dutch, radio, heater, interior great
must sell will take anything over
S3OO call 2-8483 anytime (G-3t-70-p)
65 Austin Healy Sprite, British racing
green, good cond. Must sale for
financial reasons. Call Greg after 5.
376-2048 (G-st-70-p)
68 CHEVY VAN: 250 engine,
43,000 miles. AM-FM stereo. Funky
transportation for $llOO. call
376-1711 between 5 and 7
(g-3t-71-p)
61 Rambler wagon Good condit.
New seat covers tires, battery, points.
$125 call 376-1974 aft. 5 (G-2t-72-p)
67 Firebird 326 cu. in. Automatic,
Air, Disc brakes, radio, Power
steering SI6OO 376-0160 (G-st-72-p)
67 MGB 33000 mi. new;
transmission, batteries, muffler, good
condition, will trade, must sell, need
money, below wholesale SIOOO.
378-3972 (G-st-72-p)
1967 Saab $475 firm call 372-1935
after 6 pm (G-3t-72-p)
MG MIDGET MK 11 1966, good
condition w/ radio, heater, wire
wheels. $875 or best offer. Call
378-5889 after 5 (G-3t-72-p)
VW 1965, 1966 Engine and
transmission, radio, heater, good tires
S7OO. call 372-1821 (G-st-73-p)
1969 VW bus. excellent condition.
S2IOO. can be financed, phone
372*1371 between 7:00 and 9:oopm
(G-3t-73-p)
1970 VW yellow, factory air, 12000
miles, top shape, radio. 1995 call
372-8835. 1966 Austin Healey Sprite a second
car Infrequently used but runs
smoothly has radio and heater only
SBSO call 373-2750 aft spm
(G-4t-73-p)
Austin-Healey 6 cyl. great condition
throughout. S6OO. Many parts
available separately. 373-2726
(Q-St-73-p)

i | fIBHP^
Suzanne Pleshette
SHOW TIMES 7:15 pm. 25< admission I
9:30 p m.
presented by SGP

wXTXtXrXtX^XrXtXtXrXrXrX^X::;::;;:-;*;::-
PERSONAL
Precision wheel balancing! All work
guaranteed. Mags a specialty.
$1.50/wheei. Why pay $2.25? Call
Havis 378-2957 (J-st-70-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist..
. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
Truck on over to Laurents Books
and Demians Leathers for your ZAP
Comics and a game of Foosball.
Pepsis still a dime. (J-st-71-p)
The NEW DELHI delicatessen
DELIVERS FREE 378-8656 giant
sandwiches, salads and more. Check
this paper for menu. 378-8656
(J-lt-73-p)
FRANCES baby doll. Just one year
ago. Its been fabulous and will be
even fabulouser in the future. ILYF
E A F A Luv-John (J-lt-73-p)
Theta Chis: Congradulatlons new
brothers. Now Its our turn to be
Initiated! Love, Your Little Sisters
P.S. PLEASE! I (J-lt-73-p)
The Palace, a natural foods restaurant
Is now open at 14 S.N. Ist St. Come
over and eat the kind of food that
makes you healthy wealthy & wise.
(J-4t-73-p)
Phi Sigma Sigma Pledges Beware!
You Aint Seen Nothing Yet. Phi Slg
pledges you will sign for a long time.
(J-lt-73-p)
Congratulations new TEP brothers!
you made it! You are now members
of the greatest fraternity on campus!
best always from a Bull pledge.
(J-lt-73-p)
Please help! Have lost expensive slide
rule not my own. 14" long, orange
leather case. Reward offered. Call
392-8297. Thanks. (J-2t-72-p)
Molly at Mudcrutch from Penn,
where are you? send me your ph. no.
John, the part Injun in the Hawaii
surf shirt. Mobile City lot 388
(J-3t-72-p)
:-:::::-:::::::::::::::x:: : :;::X:X:X:::X;X;::X:
LOST & FOUND
FCfUND: a purse found near
Mudcrutch farm during the weekend
Call Joyce, 378-9272 (Identify
contents) (L-3t-70-p)
Found: Brown leather glove near
graham area Friday. Contact Karen at
378-8629 or 392-0571 (L-lt-70-p)
Lost: Black alligator wallet with All
of my IDs Plaza Theatre Friday
nignti Please return to 974 SW 16 Av
by any way possible! (L-3t-72-p)
Lost: Pair of gold wire rim glasses In
black and white case. If found please
call 373-3623. Reward for return
(L-3t-72-p)
Lost: Navy blue knit poncho with
gold buttons. High sentimental value!
Reward! Please call 378-0367.
(L.-3t-72-p)
Found light meter at Graham pond
during Jane Fonda talk. Claim by
proper Identification. 373-2249
(L-70-3t-p)
Lost pair of black frame reading
glasses in brown case near matherly
or unlv. plaza shopping area, if
found, call 376-0121. (L-2t-73-p)
SERVICES
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electrtc Service, 1111 S. Mam
378-7330. Now! BankAmerfcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)

Monday, February 1,1971, The Florida Alligator,

SERVICES
:*:*:*w*^^
HORSES BOARDED: This areas
finest boarding facility box stalls
lighted ring miles of trails superb care
convenient to unlv 373-1059
(M-st-72-p)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
8-track cartridges Custom recorded
Two or more albums on 80 min tapes
$5 inc tape guaranteed satisfaction
1-day service John 378-5916 nights
(M-st-70-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfC)
Typing done; themes, thesis, etc.
Guaranteed accuracy and neatness.
Electric typewriter $.50 per page
Phone 378-7493 good references
(M-lOt-69-p)
Stereo tapes 8-track & cassettes Any
2 albums $5 Buy 2 third W price.
Free pickup & delivery call Jonathan
373-3611 or leave message
(M-st-70-p)
Your portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yourself In action at school
start at $35 call 378-4842. Harden
(M-10t-70-p)
Will give your child loving care in my
home. S.W., fenced back yard, sls
weekly, pre-school preferably
376-1780 (M-3t-73-p) .?
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medic-legal-psychologic, open Sat. &
Sundays, 3265 Virginia St. No. 1,
Miami, 446-6583 appointments.
(M-25t-72-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at and grad of Bklyn
College, N.Y. Term papers, theses,
dissertations, 50 cents and up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft. 6
(M-4t-69-p)

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Page 15

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Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 21,1971

A British Lord
Says He Uses
Marijuana Too

- 11 "
... i ...i '.' *'

Nixon Asks To Extend
Draft,Drop Deferments
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon asked Congress
last week to extend the draft for
two more years and appropriate
$1.5 billion to make the military
more attractive.
He voiced hope this would
help establish an all-volunteer
army by the summer of 1973.
In a message to the new
Congress, Nixon also renewed
his request for legislation that
would abolish undergraduate
student deferments and
exemptions for divinity
students. Congress refused his
request for this last year.
The President said the $1.5
billion would go for a 50 per
cent pay increase for enlisted
men with less than two years of
service and other programs to
enhance the quality of military
life.
He also proposed a national
lottery call each month that
would ensure relatively equal
draft liability throughout the
country instead of having each
local board call up whatever
lottery numbers it needed to fill
its quota.
4. ...
Egypt Prepares Itself
For Possible War
MIDEAST (UPI) Egypt
began preparing its population
recently for possible renewed
war with Israel when the current
cease-fire expires Feb. 5,
government officials in Cairo
said.
Israeli Premier Golda Meir
again reaffirmed that her
country will not withdraw from
all captured Arab lands for the
sake of peace.
I am not ready to make
peace with any Arab state within
DfflfllN
Drive a Oatsun... then decide at :

LONDON (UPI) Young people who use
marijuana have a new champion in the House of
Lords who says he smokes pot himself.
During a debate this month on Britains
proposed new drug law, Lord Gifford, 30, rose in
the house and confessed he smoke marijuana
while abroad on holiday and found it to be a
pleasant but not an extraordinary experience.
His fellow peers hardly blinked, taking it in
stride as they did when Giffords wife Katherine
strode into the House of Lords in a pink trouser
suit recently.
The lords were not unduly.shocked, Gifford
said in an interview with UPI. I didnt say so ii
the house but I smoke cannabis marijuana in
Morocco where it is frequently tolerated.
I smoke it entirely for personal pleasure, said
Gifford, a practicing barrister educated at
Cambridge. I find it entirely enjoyable.

the June 5, 1967, boundaries,
Mrs. Meir told a university
audience in Tel Aviv Thursday.
But she said Israel will not
resume fighting after the Feb. 5
deadline unless Egypt does.
At the same time Israeli
Foreign Minister Abba Eban said
that an end to the cease-fire
could jeopardize the United
Nations supervised peace talks.
There has been no fighting
between Arab regulars and
Israeli forces since the original
U.S.-sponsored cease-fire went
into effect last Aug. 7 and was
renewed for another 90 days on
Nov. 5. But clashes between
Israelis and Arab guerrillas have
continued.
Corporate Income Tax
Wins Committee OK
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
corporate income tax proposal,
centerpiece of Gov. Reubin
Askews tax reform program,
won the 144 approval of the
Ways and Means Committee
Thursday and went to the
Senate for a floor vote Friday.
Before the final roll call, the
committee rejected 12-5 a
proposal to put a ceiling on the
tax rate the legislature could
impose on business profits
should the people authorize this
kind of tax.
Action on the corporate tax

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measure ended a busy day for
the Ways and Means Committee
which earlier passed out
administration measures to get
the states medicaid program out
of hock by pumping in another
$6.4 million of state-county
funds.
EPA To Clean-up
Nations Waterways
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) will lead a
massive assault on cleaning up
the nations water by devoting
more than 80 per cent of its
next budget to grants for
building waste treatment plants.
The EPA, set up by President
Nixon last month to coordinate
and police the governments
antipollution efforts, will get
$2.45 billion in the new budget
he submitted to Congress Friday
for the fiscal year beginning July
1.
Exactly $2 billion was
earmarked for waste treatment
construction grants, double the
amount spent by the
government for such projects in
the current fiscal year.
Comparison with previous
spending is deceiving because
this is the first EPA budget. But
the $2.45 billion represents
roughly a 91 per cent increase
over the $1.28 billion spent last

The lords ended the debate by giving an
unopposed second reading to the new bill which
provides for tougher penalties for drug pushers
but lighter and more flexible punishment for
merely possessing or using drugs.
The House of Commons already has passed the
bill, which will become law if the lords give it an
unopposed third reading as expected. Gifford, a
Conservative-turned-Socialist, wants the use of
marijuana to be completely legalized. The new
bill revises the penalty for possession of the drug
from 10 years imprisonment or I,OOOL ($2,400)
fine or both to five years imprisonment or an
unlimited fine or both.
I dont smoke it frequently in Britain because
the current state of the law is not worth the
risk, Gifford said.
He is a hereditary peer whose ancestors
include eminent British barristers and a colonial
secretary for Australia.

year by government agencies and
programs now under EPA
supervision.
Administrator William D.
Ruckelshaus said his fledgling
agency fared very well at the
hands of Nixons budget setters.
We have about as much

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NEW and USED I
Dont miss this opportunity to add to 1
your personal library. The Bookstore 1
has a wide selection of new and used, I
hardback and paperback editions from 1
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EEI I
3| £3 located in the Hub
\ f-n

I smoke it entirely
for personal pleasure. I
find it entirely
enjoyable.
Lord Gifford

money as we could intelligently
absorb in the next year,
Ruckelshaus said.
Local governments and
private industry still must carry
the primary responsibility for
enforcing antipollution laws,
Ruckelshaus said.



The
Florida
Alligator

UF Ends Losing Road Streak

By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writer
The Florida Gator basketball
team ended a drought Saturday
night.
After playing a year and a half
without a win on the road, the
Gators came up with a sound
victory over Georgia, 88-79, in
Athens, Georgia.
WE PLAYED a real good
second half and played good
enough in the first half to win
it, UF coach Tommy Bartlett
said. Neither team played that
well in the first half but we were
able to keep the lead.
Led by a 32-point
performance by sophomore
Tony Miller, the Gators chalked
up their second win in a row.
TONY HAS imporved
steadily as the season has gone
along, Bartlett said. He got
knocked down six or seven times
last night and got right back in
there. Hes a real hard-nosed
competitor.
In that rough game Saturday
night, several players had to
leave the game because of
injuries suffered during the
battle.
There was a lot of of blood
shed on the court but it was a
cleanly fought struggle, Bartlett
said. Everyone got knocked
around pretty well, but we came
out of it pretty good.
WE DIDNT expect Georgia
to come out running at us like
they did, but the boys were able
to adjust to it pretty quickly,
Bartlett said.
UF led only 58-57 with 7:53
remaining in the game but pulled
ahead on key baskets by
6-foot-10 center Gary Waddell
and a couple of lay ups by
reserve post Dan Boe.
Boe made a few early
mistakes and committed some
early fouls but he made up for it
with those two lay-ups, Bartlett
said.
ONE OF those mistakes Boe
made was a tip-in in the Bulldogs
basket. The 6-foot-8 junior
finished with 10 points for the
night. Other high scores for the
Gators were Waddell with 18
points and Tom Purvis, 12.
The Georgia freshmen team
defeated the Baby Gators,
74-62, after trailing most of the
first half. After an early second
half surge by the Bullpups, the
Gators pulled within 11 points,
but that was as close as they
could come.
The UF freshmen were led by
Steve Williams who scored 14
points and Don Close who put in
12.

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Specializing In
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DEFEATS GEORGIA 88-79

THE VARSITY Gators, now
6-10, face Auburn next Saturday
in Auburn, and then travel to
Vanderbilt to play the
Commodores.
Auburns a good ball team,
although they have had their
problems, Bartlett said. If
they can put it all together, they

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can be real tough.
The Gators, who defeated
Auburn earlier this year, will
concentrate on stopping John
Mengelt, the Tigers leading
scorer. Mengelt averaged 26
points last year.
Mengelt is a real tough ball
player and well have to stop
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES An ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Monday, February 1, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

him to win, Bartlett said.
Were going to prepare for
Auburn just as hard as we did
for Ole Miss and Georgia.
The win over Georgia and
Old Miss was a great boost to
our players and we have the
momentum going for us now,
Bartlett said.

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Sports Editor

DAN BOE
.. .gets 10points

Page 17



Page 18

:, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1, 1971

UF Has Hot Weekend

oy JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
A strong showing in New
Yorks Millrose Games, one of
the top indoor meets in the
country, plus an impressive
10040 dual meet victory over
Ohio State at Columbus, marked
a successful weekend for the UF
track team.
Eleven Gators won events at
Ohio State sweeping all events
but three as UF displayed
what coach Jimmy Carnes called
the best balance of any team
weve ever had.
INCLUDED in the win were
strong showings in the sprint
events where the Gators were
supposed to be weakest, but
where Tampas Henry Cummings
won the 60-yard high hurdles in
8.6 seconds, and Jerry Fannin
took the 70-yard low hurdles in
8.0.
UFs Nate Jenkins, recently
discovered in a campus physical
education class, and running in
his first track meet ever, also
showed promise of becoming a
top flight performer as he
Finished a strong second in the
60-yard dash to States Jerry

U h '* W.
._ v v. ; : Mr Wp
mm agsfeas:-..
v;vjijM&gi.
jjjj J
By
M \a\
YSIK
TOM KENNEDY
JACK MARSHALL ROLLS TIDE OPPONENT
... decisioned Craig Funderburg, 10-1
Swimmers Keep Streak

The UF swim team grabbed
its eighth straight victory
Saturday against North Carolina
in the Florida Pool, 63-40.
The Gator 400-yard medley
team of Jamie Murphy, Gary
Chelosky, Mark McKee and Eric
Hallquist, won the opening event
with a time of 3:43.2 and put
the swimmers seven points
ahead.
From that point on the
Gators had little trouble in
defeating the Tar Heels, taking
m
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

Hill, one of the top sprinters in
the country.
Perhaps even more impressive
were the results of the Millrose
Games described as the big
one by Carnes where the UF
two-mile relay team trimmed
track powerhouse Villanova, and
the Gators Scott Hurley
defeated former world record
holder John Pennel in the pole
vault with a jump of 16-feet-6.
ADDITIONALLY, EAMANN
OKeeffe Finished third in the
880, behind top ranked Winsor
Reid, as well as doubling with
the two-mile team in their
successful fun. The Florida
Track Clubs Frank Shorter and
Jack Bacheler finished second
and third in the two-mile run
behind former world record
holder Carey Pearce.
FTCs Ron Jourdan placed
second in the high jump with a
6-foot-10 leap.
The results are particularly
impressive when you consider
the Millrose Games draw the
best performers in the country,
Carnes said.
THE WIN over Villanova for
the two mile team of Jack
Stewart, Frank Betts and Benny

first place in all but three of the
13 events.
Ray Smith swept both the
one and three-meter diving
events. Pete Orscheit, John
Bosbyshell, Brant Bittner, Kevin
Keirstead, A1 Whitaker, Kevin
Smith and John Plemons all
scored victories for the Gators.

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Vaughn, plus OKeeffe, avenged
a week earlier loss to Villanova
at the Philadelphia Track Classic,
and reestablished the teams
claim to being tops in the
country.
Harleys win marked the
second time he has whipped
Pennel, and assured him of
remaining among the top ranked
vaulters in the country, as well
as being a big homecoming win
for Hurley, whos from Scotch
Plains, N.J.
Other winners at Columbus
for the Gators, excluding
Cummings and Fannin were Jim
Mims in the 300, OKeeffe in the
600, Dennis Bruce in the 880,
Vaughn in the 1,000, Betts in
the mile, Roy Benjamin in the
two-mile, the team of OKeeffe
Fannin, Hicks and Vaughn in the
mile relay, Jim Nelson in the
shot put, Grover Howard in the
long jump, Ron Coleman in the
triple jump, and Chuck Duff in
the high jump.

Wrestlers Sweep 3 Duals

A fired up Gator wrestling
team defeated Alabama, 26-11,
to complete a sweep in a
four-team round robin wrestling
match Friday night at Florida
Gym.
After rolling over Broward
Junior College, 23-17, and
Florida A&M University, 41-5,
UF stunned the favored Crimson
Tide, which met the Gators with
a 27-6 win over Broward and a
41-5 win over FAMU.
CHRIS CORDER*S 3-2
decision over Alabamas George
Landis in the 177-pound division
iced the final win.
The three dual wins brought
UFs record to 7-2.
We found out that afternoon
that earlier this year Alabama
had beaten Auburn, 29-11, while
we had only lost to them
23-14, coach Keith Tennant
said.
EVEN THOUGH Alabama
had recently beaten LSU, last
years SEC champ, we realized
we had a good shot against
them.
In the final match against
Alabama, Steve Gaines won a
forfeit in the 118 division,
followed by Gator wins in 126
class, a decision by Jack
Marshall; the 134 class, a

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UF'S CHUCK DUFF WINS HIGH JUMP
... clear 6-feet-6 at Ohio State

decision by Dave Rothman; the
150 class, a decision by Bob
Penna; the 158 class, a decision
by Jeff Shaffner; the 177 win by
Corder and the 190 class, a
default win by Don Zorich.
An extra team point was
added during the Rothman
decision, when the" Alabama
wrestler left the mat without
permission.
ZORICH WON three matches

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with a pin against Broward and a
decision against FAMU in
addition to the Alabama default.
Double winners included
Penna, Rothman, Gaines and
Corder. Both of Gaines wins
were on forfeits.
John Read, 118; Steve
Salzman, 126; Jon Barres; 142;
Chet Sanders, 150; Shaffner,
158; Frank Brezezinski, 167
took pin victories in the victory
over FAMU.



By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Editor
The easing of academic
requirements for athletic
eligiblity in the Southeastern
Conference was met with
approval by UF Athletic
Association officials.
The decision in Fridays final
day of the SEC winter meeting
in New Orleans brought the
conference to the academic
levels of most of the nations
athletic leagues.
BEFORE THE SEC decision,
athletes had to have the NCAA
requirement of a 1.6 projected
scholastic average on a 4.0 scale
in addition to the minimum
scores of 760 on the College
Board or a 17 on the American
College Test.
The old rule created a very
thin line, sports publicity
director Norm Carlson said after
returning from the meeting. An
athlete could be eligible by
NCAA rules but not eligible by
the SEC rules.
The SEC change will probably
usher in more black athletes to
the SEC schools, which in the
past have recruited blacks with
the 1.6 projection, but who
didnt have the minimum scores
on the two entrance exams.
THE COACHES, and the
athletic director have been for
this for a long time, Carlson
said.
UF operates under an
additional test barrier the 300
minimum score on the states
senior placement test, required
for entrance in all state
supported universities.
Although UF was pleased
with the academic change, there
were two pet proposals that
didnt make it through,
according to Carlson.

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SEC Eases Academic Rules

THE SEC defeated a proposal
to allow schools to schedule one
freshman football game off the
campus of the participating
schools.
We wanted to be able to play
one freshman game for
charitable purposes on a neutral
site, Carlson said
Carlson said UF was in
competition for exposure with
FSU and the University of
Miami, which as non-SEC
members, have been playing
freshman games and spring
contests all over the state.
BUT THE feeling in the
league is that they like the
present freshman rule because it
prevents the arguing with cities,
which want to have a football
game, Carlson said.
Another proposal, which
would have changed limits on
the number of scholarships for
sports other than basketball and
football, was tabled. The motion
sets limits on the number of
scholarships available to a school
at one time, rather than on an
annual basis.
For example, Carlson
Cowboys Pick Up
Gators Hadley
As Free Agent
Jim Hadley, a UF 6-foot-5,
250-pound defensive tackle,
whose college football career
was hampered by injuries, was
picked up Saturday by the
Dallas Cowboys as a free agent.
Hadley missed both the 69
and 70 seasons with injuries. The
7O injury almost ended his
football career, and at the time
his doctor doubted if he would
ever able to play football again.
Its a chance I really
wanted, Hadley said, After
the last two seasons I feel lucky
to get the chance to play with a
pro team.

explained that the UF track
team might now be limited to
awarding eight full scholarships a
year. Now if the athlete drops
out, flunks out, etc., the
scholarship is lost for the year.

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With new proposal, the limit
would not be on a yearly basis
but rather on the limit of
scholarships at one time.
For example, the track team
might not be able to have more

Monday, February 1, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

than 26 full scholarships used at
one time. If one scholarship
were dropped the school would
be able to add one more
scholarship that year to reach
the 26 limit.

Page 19



Page 20

l, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, February 1,1971

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