Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
T?oSA

Vol. 63, No. 72

Baez In Concert

By VICKIE RICH
Alligator Copy Editor
Joan Baez, folk singer and
nonviolent activist, will appear
in concert and in lecture Sunday
night at 8 in Florida Gym. Her
appearance is co-sponsored by
Accent *7l and Student
Government Productions.
Miss Baez has become a
leading activist for nonviolence
as away of life, trying to create
what she calls the revolution
a society in which the sanctity
of life transcends all other
values, including nationalism.
She does not separate her
musical activities from her social
and political affairs..
IN 1964, she began refusing
to pay the amount of her
income tax that would go for
defense spending. The
government has been collecting
it anyway, usually by deducting
it along with a nonpayment
penalty from her income.
Working with others, she
established the Institute For The
Study Os Nonviolence in Carmel
Valley, Calif, in August 1965.
She began to travel and
organize for the Resistance,
whose members refuse induction

AAUP: UF Lacks Academic Freedom

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the conclusion of a four-part
series analyzing die investigation
qnH conclusions of the American
Association of University
Professors into the lack of
academic freedom on the UF
campus.)
By -RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Conditions at the UF are not
conducive to the protection of
academic freedom for
non-tenured faculty members,
the report of the AAUP
investigating committee said,
nor, as indicated by recent
developments, especially in

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

into the service, in 1967. It was
here that she met her husband,
David Harris, who is presently
serving a three year jail sentence
for resisting the draft.
- MISS BAEZ says the only real
question of this century is How
do we stop men from murdering
each other, and what am I doing
(SEE 'BAEZ/ PAGE 3)

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Paul Parker, president of Teamster local 385 of Orlando, said
Wednesday night that if the Teamsters do not have a majority of the
non-academic personnel signed up by the end of February, the union
will stop organizing efforts at UF
Parker indicated UF is testing ground and if the Teamsters Union is
successful here, it will try to organize workers in other colleges and
universities in the state.
JOHN McLAUGHIN, Teamster representative at UF, said a major
organizing drive for the Teamsters will start on the campus
immediately.
The meeting, which was held at the Episcopalian Student Center,
was attended by slightly more than 40 people, of which roughly one
half were workers.
Among those in the audience were Service Employes Union

\I! ilt: U< >r

regard to the loyalty oath, for
faculty members generally.
THE SITUATION was now
beyond the limited scope of the
Dr. Marshall Jones controversy.
Specifically, the AAUP had
turned its investigation towards
the general state of academic
freedom and tenure on campus.
A second investigating
committee of the Association of
American Law Schools came to
inquire into the circumstances

Teamsters Organize Drive

University of Florida, Gainesville

CLUBS MAY ORGANIZE
Temporary Permits OK

By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Writer
Lester Hale, vice-president for
student affairs said Thursday
afternoon he is approving the
actions of the Committee on
Student Organizations and
Social Affairs concerning
temporary permits for student
organizations.
The guidelines are as follows:.
TEMPORARY PERMISSION
to function for those students
seeking recognition as student
organizations is limited to
meetings for the purpose of
formulating the organization,
electing officers and drafting a
constitution and by-laws.
Temporary permission is
limited to 30 days. Functions
such as rallies in the plaza or
elsewhere or meetings for

ANALYSIS

surrounding the dismissal of
three UF faculty members in
late November, 1969, for
refusing to take loyalty oath.
TWO OF THE THREE
professors, Lee Lamborn, an
assistant professor of law, and
Evan Suits, an interim instructor
in the Department of
Psychology, were parties to
pending litigation challenging
the constitutionality of the oath
requirement.

mimiii i iiiMMMiiiiMimiimii nil ij ;
ft
Â¥ Bk
mil '' pISpL
WILLIAM G. CROSS
... advisor to organizations
discussion of general issues or
sponsoring of any other public
activities are prohibited under
temporary permission, to insure
that proper procedures are
followed in this matter. Contact
should be made with the advisor
of student organizations, William
G. Cross, Room 314 of the Reitz
Union.

Business Agent Dave Smith, and the president of the SEU, Willie Bell
Richardson..
IN ADDITION,.three members from the personnel staff were also
present, and were identified to the people attending the meeting.
Parker told the workers that if they experienced any kind of
harassment from the personnel division at UF to contact him. We
will take action then, he said.
Parker"said the Teamsters were ready to go to court if it was
necessary to stop any harassment of workers by administration
officials if it occurs.
Parker said the Teamsters had sent about 3,700 letters to UF
employes and were already getting some response from them, in the
form of signed cards accepting the Teamsters as their bargaining agent.
Parker said the Teamsters could negotiate a contract which includes
other unions. Even if the workers want fourteen unions we can get a
contract for all of then, Parker said.

The AAUP immediately
accused the university of
departing from the principles of
due process and strongly urged
that the three faculty members
be reinstated and that full due
process, substantive and
procedural, be accorded them.
OConnells response was to
deny any violation of due
process because pending
litigation in no way affects
enforcement of the questioned
statute.
OCONNELLS OWN personal
view was that a citizen has the
right to attack any law
applicable to him but also has
the duty to obey that law even
while contesting it. OConnell

I /
Vt x

Friday, January 29, 1971

i
P'4 ang; :*:'^HHH|m^
MSWBaVi&aa^^Bag*
Wat jUMF -"'^^^v
m .&m.
LESTER HALE
... approves guidelines
Hale has mailed a letter to Dr.
Frank Maturo, chairman of the
Committee on Student
Organizations and Social Affairs,
to inform him of his approval.
He has called Cross to give him
permission to lift the
moratorium on temporary
permits that has existed since
the end of last quarter.

claimed state legislation requires
any state employe who refuses
to sign the loyalty oath to be
immediately dismissed by the
governing authority.
The stdge was set for a battle
strikingly different than the
Jones case.
OConnell accused the
investigating committee of
inadequate investigation.
According to OConnell, the
chairman of the AAUP
committee had spent less than
24 hours on campus and had
joined a committee of the
Association of American Law
Schools, which had already
(SEE or CONNELL/ PAGE 3)



Page 2

!, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

Barge Canal Has

Years Os Discourse

(EDITORS NOTE: In an
effort to inform and motivate all
of us toward* environmental
action, the Environmental
Action Group JTAG) and The
Alligator begin This series of
in-depth '.ftudies of
environmental problems. The
first of these mtkk.B deals with
the Croa-Fhali Bane Canal.)

* ALAN SANOLEft
Author ctftmpy.
The C r ojis -F1 o ridi
Navigational Canal began as an
idea over 150 years qgo. Phillip
II of Spam, Andrevjf 'Jackson and
John Q. AdamS are attributed
with makyig early proposals.
In itraore recent history, she
canal praiect has beei£Urted
several fiutfs. (935 the
project gained impetuous mainly
as a. work-relief measure during
the Depression. On September 3,
1935, the Am|ryCh|| of
Engineer begin exeawtao#
even aNv dm UJS. Gaeingni
Survey rapmrbad thnt
result ftom cutting through 40
miles m Qc aia
Limestone
THE POUXWHC year, alter
$5.4 million had been spent,
appropriations and work
stopped dye to an unfavorable
report from die Department of
Commerce.
President Lyndon Johnson
officiated at construction
starting ceremonies February 24,
1964. At that time completion
was scheduled for i 970, at a
proposed cost*of $164,600,000.
This cost? is closely tied to the
beqefit-to-cost ratio. This means
that the benefit to the taxpayers
should equal or exceed the cost
to the during the
lifetime of the project.
IN 1958, the Corps listed the
benefit-to-cost ratio as 1.01 to 1
or a profit ratio of only one cent
on the dollar.
SomShow, by 1963 the ratio
had jumped to 17 cents on the
dollar and today the Corps
proudly states that the canal will
profit 46 cenft on every, dollar.
The Coyjs newly estimated
cost is $185,200,000, but
approximately $20,000,000 in
interest changes on capital costs
during construction should be
added. This brings-the grand
total of construction cost to
$205,200,000.

The

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August wherr it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University. of Florida, Gainesville, .Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

ADDING TO THE economic
problem is the* unrealistic low
discount rate of approximately approximately-2.8
-2.8 approximately-2.8 per cent, if the current 4.6
per cent discount rate were
applied to the Cross-Florida
Barge Canal project, one report
states, this factor alone would
. render the project of dubious
economic value.
Other factors ane*the cost of
,byflding an Interstate 75 bridge
over the canal, the cost of water
weed control, the fact that barge
'traffic is outmoded and
Corps failure to consider the
value of the Oklawaha Regional
Ecosystem.
VV.W.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.'.VJW.'.
ECO-ALERT:
* 9
V.VAV.V.V.V.V.V. , MVAVW??VKW
The Oklawaha is the only large
wild~ £iea remailring that
sttpiMi the full spectrum of
pint and north-central floods.
matuult rrrr have
km* km iflgNrind. A
debriachritfl reservoir has been
created, miijp ad thaae areas,
the wild quality *f the
Mwiroimieiit has bean drastically
redugpt.
fm these reasons, the New
Yhlk-based Environmental
Defense Fund, (EDF) filed suit
in U.S. District Court in
Washingtdh September 15,
1969.
In June 1970, Interior
Secretary Walter F. Hickel asked
the Corps for a 15-month
moratorium on construction and
less than three weeks ago, Jan.
15, the Washington court, acting
on the EDF suit, issued a
temporary injunction halting
some phases on the canal work.
FINALLY Oft Jan. 19,
President Richard M. Nixon
ordered a halt in construction on
the entire canal project to
prevent a past mistake from
causing permanent damage.
The already damaged areas
can recover, given the proper
pollution control measures, the
removal of downed timber and
other debris, and time. The
region will once again support
high quality recreation and the
wild quality of the area can be
regained.
WHAT YOU CAN DO
Write President Nixon, the White
House, Washington, D.C.,

T 1 y $r m

20500, (202456-1414) thanking
him for halting the Cross-Florida
Barge Caftal. Ask the president
his plans for the canals future
and urge him to declare the
Oklawaha Region a scenic river
region and convert the existing
construction sites into active
recreation areas.
For further information
contact the Environmental
Action Group, 323 Reitz Union,
904-392-1635.
Its up to you.
Do it yourself.

AttvmvWWWftttSV.W. .WA\W.V.W.%VMV.V.V.\V.'.V.V. V
We have met the enemy and he is us. #f
With these words, the comic strip \ /'
character Pogo struck the heart of V J/
todays environmental crisis; for it is us,
you and me, who are the root cause. **~^**f

We have met the enemy and he is us.
With these words, the comic strip
character Pogo struck the heart of
today*s environmental crisis; for it is us,
you and me, who are the root cause.

"I RECOMMEND 1776
WITHOUT RESERVATION!
Clive Barnes, N.Y. Times
'mm W- Jtk IH B
IHv 1


THIS SATURDAY NIGHT
. ; . ... n
FLORIDA GYM 8:15 PM
Students General Public
$3.00 $4.00 Ticket* TWPTT DAY
$3.29 $3.00 on sale at: U YV DiU
t.T* *2.50 OFFICE
AStudent Government Production

route
\ol
I



OConnell: AAUP Report Inaccurate

completed a good part of its
investigation.
THE AAUP CHAIRMAN
denied that he had refused to
listen to anything further on the
loyalty oath matter. On the
contrary, the report said, the
Chairman believes that he was
supplied all the relevant
information by the law school
committee, which was also
investigating the dismissal.
University representatives had
requested further discussion of a
recent revision of the
universitys tenure regulations.
The AAUP report concluded
that the university should have
given the dismissed faculty
members a hearing to resolve
several questions and issues
among which were:
the reasons for their
(Lambom, Suits and Miller)
refusal to comply with the
statute
the history of the loyalty oath
(including prior actions and
consequences taken on it)
the risk to the faculty
members of loss of standing
the actual legal hazard to the
administration in delaying action
in the form of dismissal pending
the outcome of the litigation
OConnell said he has made an
attempt to bring to a speedy
resolution the constitutional
questions involved.
THE PLAINTIFFS based
their plea, the bulletin read,
on, among other things, the
irreparable damage they felt
would come to them if
discharged and the doubtful
constitutionality of the oath.
According to OConnell, all
action was taken before the
dismissal.
The AAUP pointed out t%at
when the plaintiffs submitted
an application' for a temporary
restraining order in the lawsuit,
the Board of Regents opposed it,
and counsel for OConnell would
make no comment on the
matter.
The AAUP considered the
Lambom incident an example of
the general lade of academic
freedom on campus, and in
particular emphasized the need
for reform. Tenure was the
major rallying point.
THE EXECUTIVE

f MILK SHAKES
! BUY one 1
l[ W i GET another FOR 5< ]
|V l GOOD through 1
TO-' ~ w>, Y JANUARY 31 |
* I Campus | BATIDOS DtFRUTAS TROPICALES |f
I \oaeJ MANGO MONTECADO |
1 \ J MAMEV GUANABANA |
FREE DELIVERY |
SUNDAY-THURSDAY |
CAMPUS CONE j
1226 W. UNIVERSITY AVE [
2 (Between Second Genesis & Bench and Bar)
| PHONE 372-3890 2

COMMITTEE of the local
chapter of the association had
prepared a Statement of
Recommendations for the
president.
The statement identified the
inadequacy of present
arrangements for the conferring
of tenure as one of the major
problems.
Specific recommendations for
change included the recognition
of the right of tenured
department faculty to vote on
the chairmans recommendation,
the election of an all-faculty
review board on tenure cases and
the presidents obligation to
state in full his reasons in writing
for overruling any departmental
recommendation for tenure.
The UF Personnel Board, at
present, is charged with the duty
of recommending or not
recommending tenure.
According to the AAUP the UF
board can not be considered an
impartial and experienced
personnel committee.
THE PARTICULAR
RECOMMENDATIONS
presented by the local chapter of
the AAUP were not embodied in
a Board of Regents revision of
tenure policy in January, 1970.
It was, according to the Florida
State Conference of the
Association, a strenthening of
the tenure system along lines
constant with AAUP norms.
However, it actually opposed
certain changes introduced by
the Council of Presidents.
The AAUP repeatedly
castigated the university for the
present system in which the
president has the overriding
power in the tenure, or not to
tenure battle.
As long as the president,
the report concluded, retains
the substantially nonreviewable
prerogative of rejecting faculty
recommendations for tenure, on.
grounds like those relied on in
the Dr. Jones case, it cannot be
said that conditions at the UF
are conductive to the protection
of academic freedom for
nontenured faculty.
OCONNELLS RESPONSE,
to veritably the entire report,
has been to denounce their
conclusions as based on
inaccurate and distorted
presentation. The UF, *
OConnell said, does feel the
revised report is sufficiently

accurate or thorough to serve as
a basis for such conclusions.
OConnell went on to refuse to
accept any decision made by
the AAUP.
AAUP censurship is the most
serious action the AAUP can
take against a restrictive
atmosphere of academic
freedom. It is only taken after
all other conceivable measures

BAEZ. ..

with my life to help stop the
murdering?
If you hang onto violence,
you have something that kind of
carried people through all these
centuries. And if you go along
with it even in a nuclear age
you figure it might carry you
through this, too. But if all
recourse to violence is taken
away, youre forced to really use

SUNDAY JANUARY 31
a. 8:00 p.m. in FLORIDA GYM
"A SONG AND A RAP WITH
JOAN BAEZ
in concert
TICKETS $2 00 PER PERSON AVAILABLE AT JWRU BOX OFFICE
presented by SGP

have been exhausted.
Censurship would mean UF
listing, along with 25 other
colleges and universities, in the
quarterly bulletin.
Placing the name, the
report emphasized, of an
institution on this list does not
mean that censure is visited
either upon the whole of the
institution or upon the faculty,

your mind to search for
alternatives. And youre forced
to acknowledge, and this is what
I mean by revolution, that no
man has the right to do injury to
another person or to be an
accomplice in the doing of
injury. This means you have to
recognize that everybody is
equal and theres no such thing
as an enemy, she said.
Described by many critics as
being natural and real and pure
and honest, a member of an

Friday, January 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

but specifically upon its present
administration.
OConnell commented in the
bulletin, The conclusions
reached by the AAUP
investigating committee
constitute serious criticism of
university procedures, which
could create severe repercussions
at the UF itself, causing its
reputation to suffer elsewhere.

audience once said of her, Baes
may not be fashionable or hip
But shes discovered the secret
She always knows who she:
coming as.
Miss Baez has made a total ol
13 albums and in 1968 hei
autobiographical book
Daybreak was published.
Tickets for the Joan Bae2
concert are printed for 7:30, bul
this is an error and the concert is
actually scheduled for 8.

Page 3



Page 4

. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
... to house new dental education program

By TERRY TENENBAUM
Alligator Staff Writer
Hopes for getting the
proposed Project I expansion of
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
off the ground were made a little
brighter yesterday when an
apparent low base bid of
$2,224396 was submitted for a
utilities expansion project
necessary for the enlargement of
the Health Center.
The apparent low base bid
submitted by Gay, Plumbing and
Heating of Albany, Ga. was
within the range budgeted for
the project, according to Health
Center Provost Edmund F.
AckeD.
THE PROJECT I expansion
will house the state's first college
of dentistry and will allow the
College of Medicine to increase
the number of medical students
it admits yearly from about 65
to 100.
Hie building program calls for
a five level basic sciences
building the communicore
north expansion which will
centralize the learning resources
for dental and medical students
for the first two years of training
and will allow for flexibility in
the educational programs.
It will also provide space for
multi-disciplinary programs

The Citroen.
Its so different
it will take
courage to buy it.
v- '-\v
nf l
After you get to
know it, it will take
courage to buy
anything else.
CITROiNA
EDS MEHARI
CITROEN SALES & SERVICE
4308 N.W, 13th Street
We Know The Value of CARS
You Know The Value
of SERVICE

through specially designed
classrooms, supporting facilities,
audio-visual systems, an
expanded library and animal
research quarters.
THE WEST EXPANSION
will house the new College of
Dentistry facilities.
A three floor addition over
the ambulant wing of the
Teaching Hospital will add about
90 beds.
Project I will expand the
medical outpatient clinics which
are in serious need of expansion,
according to Health Center
officials.
SOME DOUBT has arisen,
however, if the proposed Project
I will be built as planned.
The apparent low bid of
$36,900,000 for the north and
west expansions is about $8
million more than is available for
the project at the present time,
according to Ackell.
Efforts are now underway by
Ackell and other university and
state officials to obtain the
additional funds.
FINANCING FOR the project
is provided by $19.7 million
from the National Institutes of
Health and $12.5 million from
the state.

Friday, Saturday Sunday Jan 29, 30, 31
2nd Avenue Wishbone Store Only
Call ahead and have your order ready 376-9284
I Cigarettes
| All Popular Brands
I Smote yourself to death

1 Tp _W * 1 | '
If J3| rMBMi, J V i \ £ f
(WMw*T f i -4 < *rl
- .SSI Mwl : jit 1 fr. H i M
~ l | l-
~
COMM ICO RE BUILDING
... designed as extension to Health Center

Project I is the first step in a
10-year plan to ease the space
limitation which have for years
restricted the colleges of the
Health Center, according to Dr.
Jose E. Medina, chairman of the
Project I Building Committee
and dean of the UF College of
Dentistry.
He noted that although the
Health Center has pursued
research programs since its
beginning, no provisions were
made for research activities, nor
was any space planned for
interns and residents, nor for the
Colleges of Nursing and Health
Related Professions.
Planning underway ultimately
will ease the space shortage for
these units, he said.

New Building
Construction
Bids Submitted

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING
The National Shakespeare Co.
m February 6, 1971 in the
MpfIMHSUd University Auditorium at
ImBSOHR 8:15 p.m. Student tickets are
admission is $2.50 or $3.50.
MrJI Purchase tickets at the
Constans Theatre from
- noon-4:30 p.m. on weekdays,
sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union
********************************
! WANTS
I VON! j
*



Cheerleader
Chosen As
All-American
By JANE CATO
Alligator Writer
What do cheerleaders and
Pepsi-Cola have in common?
A lot, if you happen to be one
of those 12 cheerleaders chosen
to be on the Pepsi-Cola Pepsi-Colasponsored
sponsored Pepsi-Colasponsored All American
Cheerleading Team.
SUE STRATTON, a UF
cheerleader, was recently chosen
from six hundred entries as a
member of the All American
Team.
The competition has grown
tremendously in the past few
years according to Miss Stratton.
The country is divided into
twelve regions, with UF falling
into the Southeastern Division.
Preliminary judging
was accomplished by
photographs showing various
forms and technical jumps. Also,
a general interests application
and an essay on the meaning of
cheerleading to the individual
were submitted.
The American Cheerleading
Association was the judge.
We could also send in extra

information, Miss Stratton
explained, if we wanted to.
SHE SUBMITTED an essay,
which was a joint effort
formulated by the entire UF
cheerleading squad.
Entitled Theory on Crowd
Control, this essay will appear
soon in The International
Cheerleading Foundation
Magazine.
Twelve finalists were chosen
and were flown to Cypress
Gardens from around the
country for the final judging
that occurred Dec. 26-30, 1970.
SINCE MISS STRATTON
lives in Cocoa Beach, a private
car was sent for her.
We were treated royally,
she remarked.
During their stay, they each
had a private room in the
Cypress Gardens Sheraton Hotel
and were continually
interviewed by people in radio
and television.
t*
BILL HARAN, president of
the American Cheerleading
Academy, was the judge for the
finals.
All of the twelve finalist were
automatically members of the
All American Team, but they
were competing for the title of
Miss Cheerleader U.S.A.
They were questioned on
various phases of cheerleading
including history and
techniques.
For the final competition, the
cheerleaders were tested on their
ability to control a live crowd of
approximately four thousand
people who were visiting Cypress
Gardens.
Each contestant was awarded
various prizes, and Miss
Cheerleader U.5.A., Barbie
Blackwell of Indiana State
University was also awarded a
boat and scholarship.

Is*
iPQNKMf MM
*e*e*e*e*e*e*e* 'e'li
**********, g'.VeVe'eVe'.v!

iiiOrln in "i 1 ii | i~T i T i n
Wollensak 6100
stereo tape deck Sav9 over 540
offers a rich,
realistic sound! 136
Electro-dynamic braking Two-motor drive
Lay-in threading Die-cast aluminum chassis
Automatic reel locks Three speeds
Reg. Price 239.95
N w 166*5
Come hear
amazing Wollensak 6200
Two acoustic suspension stereo speakers
Lay-in threading Automatic shut-off, tape counter
Interlocked controls FM multiplex ready
Conies with two dynamic microphones, V reel of tape,
take-up reel "Two VUmeters BUY NOW
and SAVE OVER S7O
The incomparable
Wollensak 6300 USiSS? over S9O
Acoustic suspension stereo speakers Two-motor drive
Electro-dynamic braking Automatic reel locks
Lay-in threading FM multiplex ready
Complete with two dynamic microphones, speaker cables,
V reel of tape, take-up reel R *o Price 229.96
now 137
Come in and see these additional Wollensak values!
ModaC* \rs Reg Lirt Price NOW
- sea&D w* so
cocn Stereo Reel to Reel recorder oqq qc O7Q 90
WS>O with detachable accoustical 389,95 Z/ C> YU
speakers
AH Products carry a full guarantee!

SOME MODELS ON DISPLAY OTHERS STILL IN BOX FIRST COME FIRST SERVE BASIS
HURRY! SUPPLY LIMITED!

Gilnotilki laipti tltcimnici
WMMmmKMm
Never before have these recorders been offered at such fantastic low prices!

>. < H
~ m
II if
NEW WOLLENSAK 4800 lll^
A cassette stereo recorder with reel-to-reel
recorder sound!
Unique compression-loaded speakers
Interlocked controls Suggested List Price 229.95
Separate record level meters taui 17^55
Full-size motor and flywheel wW if
Two dynamic microphones, speaker SAVE OVER SSO
cables and one blank cassette
NEW!
Wollensak 6150 stereo tape deck
for professional recordings!
Powerful pre-amplifier with fixed and controlled outputs
Two-motor drive Open front threading NOW
Exclusive Record Bias Selector for optimum tape perfor- l Q 050
mance 3 Heads Exclusive electro-dynamic braking Iww
NEW! Wollensak 6250
for professional recordings!
Exceptional amplifier with high power output of 62 watts
Two-motor drive 3 Heads
Wollensak 6360 for professional recordings! $l5O I
Four track stereo with separate acoustic suspension cube speakers
Exceptional amplifier with high power output of 62 watts dynamic (IHF) power
@ 1% harmonic distortion with 8 OHM loads 3 Heads
Two-motor drive Exclusive Record Bias Selector

Friday, January 29, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



I, The Floride Alligator. Friday, January 29,1971

Page 6

STUDENT SUPPORT ASKED
i
Congress To Hear Insured Loan Bill

By JENNIFER RICH
Alligator Writer
The main thrust of a three
year struggle to make federally
insured bank loans easier for
students to obtain is now
coming to a head. The bill
providing for this will soon be

2^/f^'
r*t ark A-g
jfyK iL
.#M£Vg 4 iHF
|ft -a 1 Mai ill I- J % \
TERRY WALTERS
DONT FENCE US OUT
Angry Jennings residents burned Dean Clifford Boyd of the
physical education department in effigy Tuesday because he refuses to
leave open a short cut most Jennings residents take en route to class.
Dean Boyd had a fence erected blocking the path that runs along the
tennis courts across from Jennings after Jennings residents tore the
lock off the gate barring entranoe. Jennings dormitory dwellers want
to be able to walk the straight and narrow path to save time and to
avoid cold and rain.

VISIT ONE OF THE SOUTHS LARGEST JEWELRY
# CLASS RINGS
# Finest Quality
Fastest Service
Right Price

Mi
DIAMONDS
Orange Blossom %
Jabel
li
# Girard Perregaux
W Wyler
31 mi g Bulova
Accutron
ajragfcV Caravelle
Seiko
and many more
*
FRATERNITY JEWELRY
Sorority Jewelry Sfejr J
Favors,
GUARANTEED WATCH AND JEWELS REPAIR
K
Done by our craftsmen in our v owb shop.
Ho6et/>tof}
Open every Night to Christmas
Bank America 9:3OAM-BPM * Master Charge
Monday Saturday #>
, £, ~ v
*
8 South Main Street
In the Center of Downtown Gainesville

submitted to Congress.
Now is the time for students
to become involved said Ira
Turner, director of Student
Financial Aid. Students need to
write letters, send telegrams or
even call and talk to their local
Congressman and let him know

that they are concerned and do
want the passage of such a bill.
IF PASSED, this bill will
make student loans easier to get
by having a Federal agency buy
the bank notes on loans from
the banks. Presently, banks are
wary about accepting student
loans because their capital is tied
up for 4 or 5 years until the
student graduates. We hope
with the passage of this bill that
banks will be irore willing to
accept student loans, said
Turner.
Currently, 6 bills are before
the Education Committee of
Congress concerning federally
supported student loans. A bill
will be drafted by this
committee and then sent to
Congress where, if passed, will
then be sent to the
Appropriations Committee
which will decide the amount of
money to be given to the

I The UF Board of Student Publications
I Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
I AjDply For the Following Positions .
I Editor, Florida Alligator
I Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
I Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
I Summer (Term IV) 1971
I Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
I *wyv
I Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
I Sumrrrtff (Term IV) 1971
The Board of Student Publications shall choose J
the term of office after full deliberation
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
1 You do not have to be a journalism major.
I General Instructions
I All applications are to be picked up and
I returned between 8a m. and 4 p.m. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union.
-B- v j Applicants must return the original plus two
I copies of the completed application prior to
4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 19.
I e
I For further information, call Mr. Alan Whiteleather,
I 392-1680

program. The next three weeks
is the crucial time, said Turner.
This bill will effect student
loans for the next 3 or 4 years.
A one man crusade for an
improved student loan program
has been carried out by yictbr
Stern, 3BA. Stem, who lived in
Miami, applied for a loan and
was turned down. He then wrote
Washington to complain. A few
days later he received a phone
call from Herbert Klein, advisor
to the President. Since then,
Stem has been working with the
Financial Aid office concerning
this matter.
Congressmen need to be
armed with letters and telegrams
so that they can go to Congress
and support this bill, said
Turner.
FLORIDA DELEGATION:
Sen. Lawton Chiles, Old

Senate Office Bldg.; Sen.
Edward J. Gurney, 5105 New
Senate Office Bldg.; Rep. Robert
L. F. Sikes, 2269 Rayblim
House Office Bldg.; Rep. Don
Fuqua, 434 Cannon House
Office Bldg.; Rep. Charles E.
Bennett, 2113 Rayburn House
Office Bldg.; Rep. Bill Chappel,
Jr., 1131 Longworth House
Office Bldg.; Rep. Louis Frey,
Jr., 1315 Longworth House
Office Bldg.; Rep. Sam M.
Gibbons, 430 Cannon House
Office Bldg.; Rep. James A.
Haley, 1236 Longworth House
Office Bldg.; Rep. C. W. Young,
1721 Longworth House Office
Bldg.; Rep. Paul G. Rogers, 2417
Rayburn House Office Bldg.;
Rep. J. Herbert Burke, 1127
Longworth House Office Bldg*.;
Rep. Claude Pepper, 432
Cannon House Office Bldg.;
Rep. Dante B. Fascell, 2160
Rayburn House Office Bldg. All
offices are in Washington, D. C.,
20515.



~'By JAN GO DOWN
KARMA-FREE FOOD: Krishna House presents its daily free food
program featuring delicious prosadam (East Indian vegetarian love
food.) Everybody welcome, 1915 N.W. Second Ave. at noon.
HANG-UP WELCOME: The UF Psychological Counseling Center is
organizing personal and marital counseling groups. The personal
groups will focus on hang-up according to the interests of group
members. The marital groups focus on issues such as giving and
receiving affection, expressing anger and feelings of emotional
distance. Phone 392-1578 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Monday.
MUDCRUTCH FANS: Rose Community Center presents Mudcrutch
and Johnny Hines tonight at 8 in the University Auditorium.
Donation is 50 cents.
ROCK AND ROLL ON THE PLAZA: to RFG AND RIFF. Its free
fron! 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
FOLK*FEST: Free tood with Johnny Hines, John and Nate at 1 p.m.
in the plaza on Saturday.
HASSLED: by your landlord? The Greater Gainesville Tenants
Association is forming. Get off your apathy and give them a chance to
help. Call Mike Pugh at 392-1665 or 378-5603.
ORIGINAL HIPPIE: David Hoyt, who studied for many years unaer
the great spiritual masters of the East and was one of the early leaders
in the Haight-Ashbury hip movement will explain his experiences in
finding God through Jesus Christ today from noon to 4 p.m. in the
Plaza and tonight at 8 in the Union Ballroom. Saturday he speaks at
the Catholic Student Center at 9 a.m. and again at 8 p.m.
SUNDAY MUSIC: Mr. John S. Kitts will be featured in a bassoon
recital as part of the faculty recital series, Sunday at 4 p.m. in the
University Auditorium. Admission is free.
COLLEGE LIFE: will occur Sunday 9:13 p.m. at the Pi Kappa Alpha
house W. University Ave., across from the handball courts. Everyone
is invited.
WHATS HAPPENING?: Beginning next week, Whats Happening will
run Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Deadline for your organizations
notice is due two days before publication.
BA Students Form
Advisory Council

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Staff Writar
Students from the College of
Business Administration have
formed an advisory board to
help students with any kind of
academic problems according to
Steve Schuman, board member.
The purpose of the advisory
board, Schuman stated, is to
promote effective
communications between
students and faculty. And, in
addition, the Business
Administration board wants to
initiate more interaction
between business students and
the rest of the university and
community.
BOARD MEETINGS are held
Wednesday evenings at 6:30
p.m. in room 223 in Bryan Hall.

EUROPE-
Summer'7l
Go to Europe next summer at lowest rates
published, - $250 per person. Scheduled air
service* guaranteed to operate Going June
17, Return Sept. 3. Don't be disappointed
book now to assure yourself of space: For
further information call the professional
travel agents at:

(( ( jyj TRAVEL
SERVICE,.,
927 NW 13th St. 376-4502

The meetings are open to all
interested students from the
college of Business
Administration.
An advisory table has been
set up and is manned in the hall
of Matherly from 10-12 noon
everyday, Schuman said. The
advisors are stationed at the
tablq to answer questions that
students may have on academic
problems, tutoring or any other
advisory assistance available to
the Business Administration
students.
The advisory board is broken
down into committees and
departments. The five
committees include a curriculum
committee, a grievance
committee, a capital
improvement committee, a
public relations committee and
an administration committee.

GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. J 3th Street
the .^B3h
IN-FASHION STORE I
BT.y
r ' v. jlPwr- C r ; s
I '* : 1 .* wm ;
1 : H
HOT PANTS! I
The newest in Fashion-always at LERNER SHOPS-HOT
PANTS
A one piece short set with matching skirt cover-up. All H|
trimmed *with grograin ribbon and dyed to match pearl
buttons.
Perfect for our warm weather in Celenese Amel Print IB
Jersey-washes like a dream packs without wrinkles. ||.
Other styles in Polyester or Cotton Knit. |jj||
>. i
STYLE SHOWN $18.99 B
> jSIB

It s easy to be fashionable...just charge it'

Friday, January 29,1971, Tha Florida AlKflator,

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

BSi JL he silent colossal National Lie that is the
support and confederate of all the
Wtyrannies and shams and inequalities and
unfairnesses that afflict the peoples
that is the one to throw bricks and
sermons at.
Mark Twain,
My First Lie and How I Got Out of It
EDITORIAL
UPD Timing
A Little Off
Like Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder, we find it
odd the way the University Police Department enforces UF
parking regulations.
Last Saturday, for example, 10 cars belonging to students
were towed away during Jane Fondas speech. Yet during
Monday nights basketball game, illegally parked
automobiles and there were a lot of them outside the
gymnasium were left alone.
Uhlfelder called it inconsistent. We find it that, and
very curious.
By the admission of the Chief of the department, Audie
Shuler, UPD has not been doing its job. Shuler said,
Basically, weve been rather lax on enforcing the parking
rules. As the events get bigger, more people attend and
hazards increase.
So when Jane Fonda considered a radical by many
people for criticizing the system paid us a little visit last
weekend, the UPD suddenly decided it had been lazy long
enough. But golly, the UPD hustled and bustled, ticketed
cars and had them taken away.
Let it be made clear that we are not criticizing the police
department for enforcing the law; we are delighted that it is.
If those 10 cars were illegally parked, they deserved to be
towed to that old car lot in the sky and at the owners*
expense.
But we do criticize UPDs timing.
Frankly, it smacks of an effort to harass students and we
do not believe we are being paranoid when we say this.
Laws are not enforced during basketball games because
alumni and Gainesville residents make up a large portion of
those in attendence. The university does not want to do
anything that might alienate these people, obviously,
because it needs their support. But students are sitting
ducks and for the most part, powerless. And students can be
replaced far easier than disgruntled supporters and their
dollars.
In short, we hope that if Chief Shuler sticks to his
promise that parking, violations previously overlooked,
will now be enforced the regulations will pertain to
people other than students.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

t=jjp= FLUTED COLUMNS
Woman s (sigh) Lib
I |Wm i By JOHN PARKER=E===I

Womens Lib.
Here goes the 2 9 billionth
piece on that tired old subject.
Now were all wondering if there
could possibly be ANYTHING
that hasnt been said about it?
Right?
Tension mounts as the vast
readership is suddenly on the
edge of its collective seat (seats?)
wondering exactly which way
Fluted Columns will go on this
dynamite issue.
THE ENVELOPE please. We
hold: BOTH WAYS.
Thats right ladies and
gentlemen, once more a tight
comer has been evaded by a
clever Steve OConnell-type
ambiguous answer.
Sorry, but its true. Try to
find someone who is AGAINST
womens rights. Your
grandfather, right? He doesnt
count. He sits in a rocking chair
yelling Maude, come turn up
my hearing aid.
WE ARE a society very adept
at verbalizing certain values.
Free speech, free press, right of

Alligator Staff
DtiM Valiant* John Parkar
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang Joan Driton
Wire Editor Assistant Assignment Editor
: n .. v \,
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

V
\Sa. I
seif-determiniation. We all agree
people should have those rights.
We just dont want anybody
trying to EXERCISE them.
So what do women have to
bitch about? Job discrimination?
Yes. Hopefully that is on the
wane.
Being viewed as sex objects?
Sure. So are men. Its just that
each side plays the exploitation
game a little differently.
WHICH BRINGS me to my
main contention.
There is no such thing as a
womens struggle just as there
is no such thing as a black
struggle.

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

All the fights for freedom and
rights going on in the country
are part of the same war.
IT IS not black vs. white, or
women vs. men, but (please
forgive this ninth grade English
class reference) mans
inhumanity to man.
Sure blacks are discriminated
against. But then again,
EVERYBODYS discriminated
against. The skin color just
makes you an easier target.
Women, with certain physical
attributes (hopefully) are in the
same boat.
Open a door for a lady? Why
not? Open a door for another
guy? Same deal. Why not make
it a rule that whoever gets there
first opens the damn door for
the other person?
In short, we dont need
womens lib nearly so much as
we need a little more simple
humanity.
Brother Sigafoos will now
take up the offering.
Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager ~
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



Boredom
EDITOR:
Disbelief is reading an article
by John Parker on Happiness,
or Boredom. How exciting it
would be to read prose by
Parker on What bores the
intellect? Everything. Does
education become so demanding
that consideration and patience
are forgotten? Is redefinition of
problems in society worth taking
up one editorial page in our
paper? Has pessimism taken the
place of realism?
What is uniqueness? Boredom,
the mile run, the belief that God
is drunk? I believe that the
pressures for uniqueness have
become so great that conformity
replaces uniqueness, and
uniqueness and conformity are
one.
I love John Parkers works but
I respond more effectively to
comprehendable solutions than'
to pessimistic rhetoric.
Please Mr. Parker, when you
see a broken pencil, dont
propose to throw it away and
cuss its worth lessness, try to
sharpen it and make it an
instrument of society.
JOE SHEPPARD (lUC)
Frats: Con
EDITOR:
It is with great disillusionment
that I read of the continual and
juvenile pranks being
perpetrated by so called
fraternity men on this campus.
However, seeing how from year
to year these dubious actions
continue, I have formulated the
following plan which could be
instituted on this campus for the
redemption of our malicious
Greeks.
A giant fortification could be
established around fraternity
row with the distinction of being
called Sigma Zoo. This would
contain the wild inhabitants of
this locale while the
administration would seek out
people (you might say
missionaries) to go unarmed into
this area and redeem these
aborigines. Os course they would
need and be provided with a
standard text entitled,
Teaching Evolving Primates
(sometimes abbreviated as TEP)
and thus perhaps given time the
taming of a once inhospitable
place will become a reality.
Thus you have my plan which
should be implemented with all
due haste yet I still say, thank
God (I wonder if he is a Greek?)
that Im a GDI, a GOOD
DECENT INDIVIDUAL.
JOEL FLEISCHER (4AS)
- i..
Frats: Pro
EDITOR:
On these pages two days ago,
I was horrified by the
narrowmindedness of one ofthe
letters. It plainly stated that the
fraternity system on campi ,a
* -.U-V .11 it
fbtemplifies. IV* base where he

is very much mistaken and
uninformed.
First of all, I can not
understand how a person can
judge this aged institution when
he himself is not a functioning
part. On this point I have the
upper hand. I am a freshman
pledge of an on-campus
fraternity and do not see any
correlation between it and the
previously mentioned articles
accusations. I, as well as many
others, have found in my
fraternity, along with all hazing
and harassment, a new home.
It has become a place to
which I can go in times of
trouble, where I can find
everlasting friendships, leam
about fraternalism, (which is still
very much alive), and shape my
life. I am part of the fraternity
and it has become an integral
part of me and my education on
campus.
Excuse me if this sounds like
a pitch for pledging a fraternity
but I can testify along with the
other thousands of fraternity
members that it is all ture. Oh,
and by the way, if the writer of
the article putting down
fraternities could not play pool
on the night of Jan. 20 because
the fraternities were being too
loud all I can say is that it
sounds like a poor excuse for
losing.
MARC WEISS (lUC)
SMC
EDITOR:
I have often heard the
question, What can I, as an
insignificant individual, do to
combat the Vietnam war,
pollution, poverty, etc., etc.? I
believe an individual can
accomplish just about anything
if he will surmount his apathy
and actively strive for his goal. I
offer one suggestion to anyone
who sincerely desires to end the
Vietnam war and all wars, and
that is, join a group actively
seeking to end wars.
We are trying to establish a
chapter of the Student
Mobilization Committee (SMC)
here at UF but we have two big
problems: 1) those who want
peace dont seem to be willing to
work for peace, and 2) we have a
debt of S7O left over from last
year. If all of the several
thousand anti-war people who
listened to Jane Fonda gave one
nickel and 150 people became
active members, SMC would
become a strong organization on
this campus.
The price of peace is a small
sacrifice from many people. If
you want to end war do
something; join and/or
contribute to SMC.
*
FREDERICK REPLOGLE, (4FY)
Josh Again
EDITOR:
1 would just like to make a
few comments about the lovely,
touching letter from Mr. Charles
Riley that I read in the Alligator
vetterdav, which relegates
~a*stianity
make-believe and Mother Goose

READERS FORUM

(or was it W.C. Fields?).
Apparently, Mr. RUey didnt
bother to go to any of Josh
McDowells speeches on campus
last week. Or if he did, he either
deliberately misinterpreted or
didnt listen. Anyone who went
to hear Josh and went with an
open mind, trying not to let
preconceived and perhaps

CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS
I know you dont approve of my politics, General, but that's no reason
I eat my shirt.

Faculty Senate Reply

By BRUCE ALPER
Alligator Columnist
Last Tuesday, Jan. 26, the
biggest bunch of baloney I have
yet seen this quarter appeared in
a letter to the editor by a
member of the Faculty Senate.
Contrary to his statement that I
do not have the basic facts
straight about the Faculty
Senate it is obvious that it is he
who is in a bit of a muddle.
Our distinguished academician
wrote that the University Senate
includes students as well as
faculty members. He omitted
the fact that the five students
are only observers. They have no
vote, no voice, ho influence.
Our friend from the Faculty
Senate, obviously a master of
obfuscation proceeded to
declare: Actually the Senate is
in effect merely advisory. This
is not being enough for him, he
then threw in a red-herring by
stating that the Faculty Senate
has .. .no money to dispense.
Thank God for that! Anyway,
money has nothing to do with
its power.
According to page five of the
Student Handbook the
Universitys highest legislative
body is the Faculty Senate.
While the Faculty Senates
various committees may
function in an advisory capacity,
that body, when meeting as a
whole, is anything but advisory.
The Senate has jurisdiction
over all matters pertaining to
University-wide policies and
ioutuons not reserved to the

distorted notions of Christianity
interfere with their ability to
listen and evaluate saw that he
was plainly presenting away of
life for today, 1971, for anyone,
regardless of what his life may
be. He did not suggest that to
become a Christain means
mystical rituals, visions, and
halos in thy dark.

fly
!., m
President and his advisory
councils, and the authority to
legislate concerning such matters
and to make rules and
regulations promoting the
general welfare of university
students, faculty, and staff.
Even the Gainesville Sun
knows that the Faculty Senate is
virtually supreme and clearly not
merely advisory. Mr. Clif
Cormier, the Sun Education
Editor writing on Friday, Jan.
22, 1971 of the Senates recent
action of the University College,
stated: The UF Senate rejected
two separate proposals, one
which would have abolished the
college outright and another, a
compromise, which would have
placed curriculum supervision
under a council separate from
the college.
Just to further convince any
who may still believe our
outspoken academicians
statement that the Faculty
Senate is merely advisory,
here is another fi*t T o institute
tie tv

V h% *X ?. t io; A !.V>!'* f.rf"f i-
Friday, January 29,1971, The Florida Alliptor,

Christianity is the doctrine of
love ; this is irrelevant?
It seems to me that some
so-called liberal people are as
narrow-minded and unthinking
about and as prejediced against
Christians, as some people are
about blacks, boys with long
hair, etc ...
KATHARINE REAM 2UC

which were defeated, an
amendment to the universitys
constitution is required. This
requires an affirmative vote of
two-thirds of the Faculty Senate
members present.
Perhaps even more indicative
of the power of the Faculty
Senate is the fact that although
the University College was
established some 35 years ago by
the administration and without
the concurrence of the Faculty
Senate, the latter nevertheless
today has the final word on the
future of the University College.
In short, the University College
is under the constitutional
jurisdiction of the Faculty
Senate.
The faculty member who
wrote the letter I have herein
rebutted should take his own
advice and .should learn that
if you want to impress readers
you shouldn't start off with
basic errors that will be
recognized by half your
audience as ridiculous!
It is bad enough that the
Faculty Senate has as much
unchecked power as it does.
-However, it is far worse that one
of its members has attempted to
hoodwink the rest of us by
trying to conceal the true facts
and engaging in gross and
ungentlemanly distortions.
A final word to our confused
faculty member in the Faculty
Senate: If you cant stand the
heat, get out of the kitchen.
Better yet, get out of the
ii,. r
X k Jf

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29,1971

i'i ii n li" --, *y3?>Wi' "i '- f ~ wV *
tR HP : : .>,


Birth Control Information Available

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Birth Control information can
be obtained by contacting the
new Student Government hot
line which will be operative
shortly.
Right now, the information
can be reached by calling SG,
and leaving a number to which
SG personnel can call.
Housing Counsel
Available Now
Many students just dont
realize we exist as a counseling
service, Mrs. Eleanore Denny,
counselor for off-campus
housing said.
Many problems could be
avoided or solved if off-campus
housing students would take
advantage of the services the
Off-Campus Housing Division
provides, according to Mrs.
Denny.
The division also counsels
those students wanting to go off
campus for the first time. One
service provided is helping
students find housing
accomodations to fit their
individual needs.
I BIRTHDAY I
I SALE I
I LOW EVERY DAY PRICES I
REDUCED tVfH MORE!
II FRfg wm |l
1 9 *. t p.m. I
IMOHU HOMfwS
4820 N.W. 13th ST. |
I 378-1346 I

SHARON FRIEDMAN, SG
undersecretary for community
affairs, said the hot line will also
handle cases of venereal disease,
and refer students to doctors.
Miss Friedman said the
hotline will be a referral service
in which girls calling with
problems, either pregnancy or

SGP Sponsors 1776 Saturday Night

By JIM PARK
Alligator Corrmpondent
1776, winner of the Tony
Award and voted Best Musical
by the New York Drama Critics
Circle, will be at Florida Gym,
Saturday night at 8:15 p.m.
The author of the musical,
Peter Stone, has stated that
1776, although historical in

HA Marantz complete home entertainment component
system factory packaged for you for only $349.00. You save
$124.0Q on the price of the components that make up the
fabulous Marantz Model 28 AM/FM Stereo Receiver/Com-
Efj.lS. odel 28 System includes a Marantz
Model 26 AM/FM Stereo Receiver worth $219.00, two
Marantz Imperial IV Speaker Systems worth $l3B, the
famous Garrard SL-558 Record Changer with Shure Car Cartridge
tridge Cartridge worth $79.45, and a handsome walnut grained base
worth $25.50 and a smoke plastic dust cover worth $12.95.
nm* factory packaged for you for only
Come in and listen! 420 NW 13 ST 374 g 045
THE FIDELITY SHOP

just wanting to know about
birth control, can call.
We have the facilities, and
we can tell them exactly where
to go, Miss Friedman said. We
have doctors and psychologists
to talk to the people.
SHE SAID the birth control
information service will have
literature available on birth

nature, parallels todays events
at Kent State and colleges across
the nation.
According to Andy Smith,
ticket manager for Student
Government Productions (SGP),
the show started on Broadway
three years ago and is still
running.
Bruce Levine, director of
SGP, said that 1776 is part of
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES An ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

NEW COMMONS BUILDING
Murphree Area will celebrate the grand opening of it's new
commons building Feb. 5, 6 and 7. The building is located in
the courtyard between Thomas and Fletcher Halls, the area
formerly known as the Dust Bowl. It faces University Ave.
Charlie Jones, a counselor at Murphree, said, "Feb. 5, Friday,
we will have an arts and crafts sale. Saturday it will be Buckman
Derby Day, complete with a frisbee contest and tug of war."
Saturday night there will have a horror film festival," Jones
continued. 'The following week, a ping pong tournament will
be held." Inside the new commons building there will be a game
room, conference rooms, lounge, a T.V. room and the area
offices.

control to give the students who
might need it.
Miss Friedman said many
students in the past were afraid
of going for help, because their
parents might be notified.
However, this is not true of the
SG sponsored program.
Their (students) parents
dont have to be notified of

the Culture Series that brought
Man of LaMancha to UF last
year Each quarter SGP brings
at least two culture programs to
UF but during this quarter there
will be at least four and possibly
more, Levine said.
1776 is the biggest show
this quarter, according to
Levine, but on Feb. 12, the
National Ballet, from

Co££ea£ <&nn

iDaily entree special 52( & u P I
Daily pastry special 19( I
| Featuring color T.V. & Jukebox on free play I

what is happening to them,
Miss Friedman said.
She said eventually the
program will try to contact
private doctors to help students.
For more information,
contact Miss Friedman at SG,
phone 392-1699.

Washington D. C. will be here.
Malcom Frager, pianist, will
appear at UF on Feb. 28 and in
March, Phyllis Curtin, soprano
with the Metropolitan Opera will
be here.
Smith said, Half the house
for 1776 is already sold and a
sell-out is expected.
Tickets are available at Reitz
Union Box Office.



.
~
1 k I
* ' f I
: 0
A To me.
At Every spring they'd come.
B ,Mr i All colors they'd be.
: im i And smell so sweet.
K But no, not now.
K They come no more.
BBriL They don't live again.
W Like they used to be.
W And me.
m I must go on.
I flHk And live for them.
II ( So I wear that.
o Which stays with me.
Close.
To my body.
y c Like a part of me.
. Male.
A -hey fit the rimes.
I ( I And my mind.
iCS?* k, *J .To help me forget.
% ¥ That dreary mist.
M H That picked my flowers.
\ v r |- one
j One.
I-?g |i JEANS
*' 'L $ THE GUYS SUKKS GIRLS LCNE 0
I Second 1228 VV Univ. \ve.
I CmiAtic
? 373-2800 % 1

Friday, January 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

-. A M
. V
*
-
'. jL- k ....
f \ \ .... B
I A mV ;
I v
V/ /

By ANDREW BANKER
Alligator Entertainment Writer
F |y 0 Easy Pieces
features no cinematography of
the kind to enamor or even
amuse those whose tastes have
been jaded by everything but
Bergman, Cocteau, and an
occasional Fellini; nor will it put
an end to the quest of
intellectuals frantic for a new set
of ideas to hate the rest of
society with.
But it just may be the most
compelling entertainment to
come down the pike in a long
while.
THE STORY, superbly
assembled by Bob Rafelson and
Adrien Joyce, deals with a man
(Jack Nicholson) from a
prosperous Washington State
family of musicians who has
bitterly forsaken the routine
comforts (and pressures) of
home for the unregimented
rigOTS of life outside.
It is in this world that Bobby
(no longer Robert) Dupea
stumbles from job to job and,
predictably, from bed to bed,
although he has managed to
secure the pleasures of an
attractive lunch-counter
waitress, Rayette Dipesto (Karen
Black), and find a companion in
Elton (Billy Rush).
The action is sustained by a
fitful relationship between
Bobby and the former and the
contrasting easy-going nature of
the latter until Elton is arrested
one day for having robbed a gas
station. It is here the
uncompromising power of
Nicholsons performance takes
up the slack.
BOBBY, WHO has quit yet
another job learns that his father
is gravely ill and, at the tearful
imploration of his sister, agrees
to return temporarily to a life
which, after all, cant be much
worse than the one he had
chosen in its place.
Could it be that when he
rejected the lackluster
regimentation of piano and
ping-pong two years before he
was just replacing it with
another kind of regimentation in
the bed-hopping, the booze, and
the endless string of jobs?
He has been made a deeply
disturbed and sometimes vicious
individual and Nicholsons
piercing portrayal communicates
this ever so cogently.
IcWMOTTORNnUREI
I AND AUCTION I
I RETAIL SALES MON-SAT 9 5 I
I AUCTION EVERY I
I FRIDAY NITE I
441 So. AT WILLISTON CUT-OFF I
I 372-3991 I

'The Prodigal Son Departeth

STARS
JACK NICKOLSON
AND
KAREN BLACK
BACK AT the Dupea
mansion, Bobby finds
conditions, aside from his
fathers decadent health, quite
similar to the way he had left
them but for one important
detail: His brother, Carl (Ralph
Waite), has befriended a lovely
young woman named Catherine
(Susan Anspach), herself a
pianist who has taken, up
residence with him in the family
dwelling.
On day while Carl is away, she
and our Don Juan agree to meet
and the latter is persuaded to
display his much-heralded skill
on the piano. Catherine is
effusive in her praise but Bobby
insists that is was merely
contrived technique and thus
embarrasses her.
His speech becomes especially
corrosive at this point (I faked
Chopin just like you faked a big
response!) in a perverted effort
to impress his prey, who,
surprisingly, succumbs to his
seduction in a rare sequence that
strains the limits of credibility.
OTHERWISE, director Bob
Rafelson runs a right, honest
show that puts the viewer
through his paces, particularly in
the climactic scene involving the
family and Carls friends a
dizzying fusillade of faces and
shadows culminating in Bobbys
collapse on the kitchen floor
after a feckless struggle with his
fathers strong-armed attendant.

C.l. SPECIALS j
'* coke 5* y
With purchase of Kingburger,
cheeseburger, hamburger, or
burger basket.
Cafeteria line will be closed Saturdays
We will be serving luncheon and dinner specials including
vegetables on short order Sale good through Saturday 1-30-71
COFFEE SHOP CAFETERIA tUMM.rt
JSgIMgM wmwMww mmmMMkm
HMHWWW £**:&&&* bubbi
m{-\ 111 111111 S'i&SjHjKi}
[H
6:45 o.m. 12:00 p.m. 1728 W. University

Finding his new ladylove, he
asks her to abscond with him
but Cathering sorely refuses
because, she reasons, if he cant
love anyone else, including
himself, then he certainly is not
capable of loving her.
This leads Bobby to a pathetic
exchange with his father in
which he tries to prove his
capacity for affection by gushing
apologies but ultimately senses
failure in this endeavor too.
WISHING TO escape the
feeling of inadequacy now
instilled in him he beats a hasty
retreat from the estate with
Rayette (she had recently joined
him there) and the prodigal son
who had been restored to his
fathers house had now departed
from it, this time for good.
The big contribution of Five
Easy Pieces lies not in the
uniqueness of the films theme
(Certainly the failure of modem
man to achieve love and his
consequent desolation for this
failure has been exploited
before, as recently in Cassavetes
Faces), but its own pecuilar
treatment of this motif.
Thanks to the guiding hand of
director Rabelson and to
scenarist Adrien Joyce, an
absorbing air of tension and
suspense, interspersed with
scenes of explosive violence and
emotion, is maintained
effectively through the desperate
final outcome.
ALSO NOTABLE was the
films score which, through a
quaint blend of Wynette
(Tammy) and Mozart, incisively
illustrated the conflict grating on
our hero as part of two
environments. But despite all its

plusses, Five Easy Pieces may
easily have faltered were it not
for its actors.
Jack Nicholson and Karen

UNDER A DOLLAR DOES IT AT THE
ja COLONELS
SNACK BOX COLONEL'S SPECIAL
-CHICKEN 2 PC CHICKEN
Mashed Potatoes
Gravy, £9s
KENTUCKY FRIEDCHICKEN AT
r 15% OFF ON
' j\mm\ i
| CSQ DIAMOND \
! NEEDLES :
- WITH THIS AD
1 WE STOCK ALL TYPES I
I IF YOU NEED A NEW NEEDLE I
, COME SEE US AT
THE FIDELITY SHOP
. 420 NW 13th Street
I THE SHOWSI
CONUNUE
I I
I jWIREE DAYS OF MUSIC AND FOOD! |j I
I K [FRIDAY,JANUARY29TH I
let your mind and body see and feel I
I1 | || MUDCRUTCHI I I
|S k /Jand the easy folk sounds of
1 both appearing at the JOHNNY HINES ||
I IS 8:00-12:00p.m. -donations-50 cents fS
I I ISATURDAY. JANUARY 30Th! I I
I I rSSi FREE ELECTRIC ROCK-OUT! 1 I
I m lie! I P o ** o *** music of:
II S r* R.G.F. AND RIFF | I
I 1 PLAZA AMERICAS 15P.M.- FREE FOOD!! I
I jj float down to the close of the festivities with:
1 JOHNNY HINES AND JOHNS NATE
I W k 3 performing in an \st
I 1 ACOUSTIC FOLK FESTRI I
I M ?^. R ADY FOR PLENT Y OF GOOD FREE FOODI IT
m I ARTS AT 1:00 P -M. IN THE PLAZA OF THE
I A U ER,CAS bring YOUR GUITARS! BRING YOUR IkF
I BRING YOURSELVES! jW
A ROSE COMMUNITY |

Black, both well-casted and
brilliant, head the list of
performers which also includes
Billy Rush and Fanny Flagg.



Getting Out
When Stuck
In The Sand

5 I
P HH 4
'
' <^pP I
v. v" ;' : B^^RupP^
i
Bfc'
P& > *..
HHL jgj# U
_,; ;
How to beat Hie system.

If Kooky Kat had the muscle to make a couple
of KLH speakers work, he'd roar instead of meow.
The simple fact is that even a fair compact music
system could produce a whole lot of music if it had
KIH speakers.
Now, we're not suggesting you use our speakers
with someone else's so-so system. We make our own
complete stereo systems and they're really special.
They all feature excellent solid state electronics
and come with either an FM stereo or an AM/FM
stereo radio. They're very nice looking and easy to
use. And best of all, they have great KLH speakers.
We admit theyre not very flashy. There are no
dazzling lights. Or fancy doohickeys.

HIGH
iimwmmimY
center

By TOM NELSON
-~ Alligator Writer
Few people who go to Cresent Beach are able to resist the impulse
to race their car up and down the hard packed sand. About half of
them get stuck. Heres how to get unstuck.
.
X. v /
First of all, you have to realize that the Firmest ground is a wide
strip between the ocean and the loose, shifting sand high on the
beach. Most people seem to think that the further they are from the
water, the safer they are. It aint so.
BY THE TIME a driver admits that hes stuck, the car is usually
buried fender deep at the rear wheel. Start by digging a long, sloping
trough both behind and in front of the wheels. Make sure the front
wheels are straight. Even after the car is moving sharp turns are a
mistake, they just cause it to become stuck again. Long, curving arcs
towards firmer ground, thats the answer.
Now then, the idea is to rock the car out of the hole its dug. Power
is not the problem. There are upwards of 400 wild, galloping stallions
under the hood but even they cant yank the car out. Traction is
whats needed and what you supply with your feet.

We figure the speakers are where the sound
comes from so that's where we put most of our effort.
And it pays off.
When you play the Beatles on a KLH compact
music system, they sound like a singing group in instead
stead instead of an animal act. And the Philharmonic sounds
as if all the musicians showed up.
We think you'll find all our music systems sound
quite different from the ones youre used to hearing.
Visit your local KLH dealer for a demonstration.
And tell him Kooky sent you.
Or write to KLH, 30 Cross Street, Cambridge,
Mass. 02139, for more information and a complete
catalog on KLH compact music systems.

Explain to the driver that when you rock the car forward he has to
give it a little gas. Tell him not to spin the tires (he will anyhow, they
always do). If there is anyone else in the car have them get out and
help push.
*
ONCE, WHILE HELPING a newlywed couple from Wisconsin, the
young wife bounced out of the car and gripped a fender.
jr jrYou
You jrYou just steer, honey, she commanded, I can push better than
you.
Healthy young critters they grow up there. Pushing cars can
broaden your horizons in other ways too. A lady last Saturday
explained in a rustic drawl, Weve never been stuck in a sinkhole
before. Somehow Id never realized the Atlantic ocean qualified s a
full-fledged sinkhole.
If you follow the instructions you can free any car in five minutes.
In addition youll command the respect of older men, be a hero to
small boys and the idol of nubile, suntanned, young girls save
yourself a sls tow charge, too.

*.. i :
FOR YOUR / GAINESVILLE 378 9805
/ ROOSEVELT MALL
PLEASURE / JACKSONVILLE 388 8539

This is the KLH Model 24 fM Stereo/ Phonograph.
The suggested retail price is $319.95 (slightl/higher
with AM/FM stereo radio).
Jk*
KI H
KLH RESEAPCH AND DEVELOPMENT COPPOPATION
*A t'cdemark of KLH Peseorch a rd Development Co^coro*c.n

Friday, January 29,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

; The Fforida Alligator, Friday, Jahiiary 29,1971

Notices it the University Calendar
may br submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public
Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union.
Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is
the previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous
Wednesday at noon.

MID-TERM EXAMS
All students in the following
classes are expected to take
mid-term examiniations and
each must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.
MS 102 MID-TERM
The MS 102 mid-term
examiniation will be given
Wednesday, Feb. 3, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with: A-K report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12,13, 14,16, 18.
L-Z report to Matherly 103,
105, 108, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118 or 119.
MS 204 MID-TERM
The MS 204 mid-term
examiniation will be given
Wednesday, Feb. 3, at 7 p.m. All
students report to Walker
Auditorium.
CPS 122 MID-TERM
The CPS 122 (including 12Y)
mid-term examiniation will be
given Thursday, Feb. 4, at 7
p.m.
Students whose last names
beginning with A report to Bryan
120; B to Little 101 or 109; C to
AFA 4,8, 10, 16, 221, 213 or
219; D-E to Little 221; 223; 225
or 237.
Others report as follows: F to
Little 207, 213, 227 or 233; G
to Little 201, 203, 205, 215,
217 or 219; H to McCarty 86 or
186; l-J to Walker Auditorium;
K-L to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7,
8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16 or
18.
M to Matherly 102,105, 108,
113, 115, 116, 117,1180 r 119;
N-0 to Bryan 201 or 203; P-Q to
Floyd 104, 106 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;Sto
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Little 113, 121 or 125; W-Z to
Leigh 207, 212 or 240.
CSS 112 MID-TERM
The CSS 112 mid-term
examination will be given
Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with: A report to Bryan
120; B to Little 101 or 109; C to
AFA 4,8, 10, 14, 16,211,213,
227, or 233; G to Little 201,
203, 205, 215, 217 or 219; H to
McCarty 86 or 186; l-J to

j
I faculty I

Walker Auditorium.
Others report as follows: K-L
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16 or 18; M
to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 113,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110, or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Little 113, 121 or 125; W-Z to
Leigh 207, 212 or 240.
CSS 113 MID-TERM
The CSS 113 mid-term
examination will be given
Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 7 p.m. All
students report to Norman Hall
137.
CSS 116 MID-TERM
The CSS 116 mid-term
examination will be given
Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-K report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11;
L-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112
or 114.
ORGANIZATIONS
SUSPENDED
The following student
organizations have been
suspended by the Committee on
Student Organizations and
Social Affairs for failure to
submit, their annual report
and/or officer card:
American Civil Liberties Union
Braziiian-Portugese Club
Dairy Science Club
Gamma Delta
Latin American Club
Pi Tau Sigma
Student Association American
Institute of Architects
Student Mobilization Committee
Tau Beta Sigma
Young Adult Fellowship
Arab Student Club
Chinese Language Club
i -
Gamma Alpha Chi
Lambda lota Tau
Lutheran Student Association
Protestant University Movement
Student Occupational Therapy
Association

Page of Record

Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

Student Peace Union
College of Nursing Council
Zeta Phi Eta
The committee will meet
Monday, Feb. 1, for the purpose
of terminating those student
organizations not meeting the
requirements of submitting an
annual report and/or officer
card.
RESIDENT ADVISER
POSITIONS
Resident adviser positions are
available for the 1971 fall
quarter. Applications and
information may be obtained
from the resident staff in each
area office or from the central
housing office.
These positions are available
to upper-division and graduate
students interested in people.
The position offers an
opportunity for learning and
growth in residence communities
and individual fulfillment
through working with student
interests, needs and concerns.
The pay is approximately
SIOO per month plus furnished
quarters. There also is a waiver
of out-of-state tuition where
applicable.
Applications must be received
on or before March 12,1971.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
Graduate Council on Thursday,
Feb. 4, at 1:30 p.m. in Room
264, Graduate School and
International Studies Building
(GSIS).
EXPECTANT PARENTS'
CLASSES BEGIN
The College of Nursing is
offering another series of
Expectant Parents' classes
beginning Monday, Feb. 1, in
Room M6Ol. Cost if $5 per
couple for the six to eight
Monday sessions lasting from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Interested
persons should call 392-3514 for
registration.
SPEECH SCREENING
All teacher education majors,
regardless of college enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech

screening requirement before
being admitted to the Advanced
Professional Sequence. Students
expecting certification to teach
English are required to take
Speech 201 and do not need to
take the screening test.
Appointments for the test can
be made in Room 124, Norman
Hall.
HOLIDAYS
The holiday schedule for
University employees for the
calendar year 1971 has been
approved. State employees are
entitled to nine paid holidays
each year. This year the holidays
have been arranged so that
employees will enjoy long
weekends.
Friday, Jan 1, New Year's
Day

university calendar

January 29, Friday
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Speaker: David Hoyt, Plaza,
12 Noon
Union Movie, "African Queen",
Union Aud., 7 & 9:45 p.m.
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Speaker: David Hoyt, Union
Ballroom, 8 p.m.
Rose Community Center
Concert, University Aud., 8
p.m.
January 30, Saturday
Rose Community Center
Amplified Music, Plaza, 1
p.m.
Union Movie, "African Queen",
Union Aud., 7 & 9:45 p.m.
SGP: "1776" Play, Florida
Gym, 8:15 p.m.
Union Dance, Union Ballroom,
8:30 p.m.
Basketball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Georgia, away
January 31,Sunday
Rose Community Center
Acoustic Jam, Plaza, 2 p.m.
Faculty Recital, John Kitts
Bassoon, Univ. Aud., 4 p.m.
Union Music, Ballroom, 5 p.m.
Union Movie, "Hallelujah the
Hill", Union Aud., 5:30, 8,
10:30 p.m.
ACCENT 71 Speaker: Joan
Baez, Florida Gym, 8 p.m.
February 1, Monday

' i
The University Calendar willbe
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G-72 Union.

Monday, May 31, Memorial
Day
Monday, July 5,
Independence Day
Monday, Sept. 6, Labor Day
* F r iday, Oct. 22,
Homecoming, half day
Monday, Oct. 25, Veterans
Day
Thursday, Nov. 25,
Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 26, day after
Thanksgiving
Thursday, Dec. 23, Christmas,
half day
Friday, Dec. 24, Christmas
*ln place of the half day for
Homecoming, a different half
day of group activity may be
substituted for employees
working outside Alachua County
at the discretion of the
department chairman.

Beginning Bridge, Union 118, 7
p.m.
February 2, Tuesday
Paint for Fun, Union C-4, 7:30
p.m.
Audubon Wildlife film,
"Migration Mysteries", Union
Aud., 8 p.m.
Music Dept., Elwyn Adams:
violinist, Willard Brask:
pianist, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
February 4, Thursday
Union Movie, "L'Awentura",
Union Aud., 6:30 & 9:30
p.m.
Needlework Class, Union 150 C,
7 p.m.
ACCENT 71 Speaker: Hiram
Ruiz, Univ. Aud., 8 p.m.
February 5, Friday
Union Movie, "Blow Up", Union
Aud., 5:30, 8,10:30 p.m.
BOX OFFICE SALES
Union Play "Much Ado About
Nothing", Students: $1 & $2,
G.P. $1.50
ACCENT 71, Speaker: Joan
Baez, $2.00
"1776" Play, Students $1.75,
$2.50 & $3.00, G.P. $2.50,
$3, $4
Audubon Wildlife Series
Subscriptions

25,



mlaws
by MARTIN E. HABER

(EDITORS NOTE: Questions
concerning the income tax laws
may be directed to Martin Haber
directly at his office at
378-9666.)
An individual taxpayer who
itemizes deductions may deduct
medical expenses he pays for
himself, his spouse and his
dependents. Only amounts
actually paid during the tax year
are deductible.
Medical expenses include any
payment for the diagnosis, cure,
treatment, mitigation or
prevention of disease. Also
included are the expenses for
medical insurance, medicines
and drugs, special aids and
supplies and transportation
expenses primarily for and
essential to medical care.
MEDICAL EXPENSES are
deductible only to the extent
they exceed three per cent of
adjusted gross income. However,
a taxpayer can deduct one half
of medical insurance up to $ 150
Without regard to this limit.
Q). I transferred to UF last year
from California. I am pursuing a
bachelors degree. Can I deduct
the cost of my air fare to Florida
as an educational expense?
A). No educational expenses

Research In Field
Offered This Summer
By CAROL BRADY
Alligator Writer
Educational Expeditions International (EEI) is interested in
students and professors who wish to participate in research work in
the field this summer.
We offer a new experience in education, says Dr. Clarence
Truesdell, president of the recently formed organization. EEI is a
non-profit group which provides the opportunity for groups of
non-specialists to work with a scientist in actual field research.
PROGRAMS ARE offered in archaeology, anthropology,
astronomy, geology, and volcanology. The expeditions travel to
Central and South America, and Africa during June, July, and August.
Each scientist is accompanied by a select group of 25 persons. No
professional qualifications are required for application, and expenses
are kept at cost. The chief scientist himself makes the final selection
from the applicants.
Interested persons c£n obtain more information by contacting EEI,
P.O. Box 127, Belmont, Massachusetts, 02178.

At Lisas House of Bamboo, dining out and genuine
pleasure are one and the same. From the warm welcome
you receive at the door to your last cup of jasmine tea. If
you care to leave the feast with more than just a beautiful
memory, shop from our Chinese delicatessan for an
Oriental delight. Well be waiting for you at
2409 S. W. 13th St. 372-6801

must fall within one of the
following categories to be
deductible:
they maintain or improve
skills required in performing the
duties of your present
employment, trade or business.
they are required by your
employer as a condition of your
employment to maintain your
present status or salary.
In addition, to be deductible,
the expense must not be that
which would be incurred to
meet the minimum educational
requirements in your field.
Even though travel expenses
can qualify as a type of
educational expense, you have
not met the requirements set out
above.
Q). Must I include in my
income the value of a car which
I received as a gift from my
father?
A). No the value of property
received by gift is excluded from
income.
Q). Can I deduct the fee I paid
to an employment agency to
obtain a job?
A). Yes if you itemize
deductions, you may deduct this
expense.

ATTEND FREE
Youll Increase Your j
Reading Speed I
On The Spot! I
A Limited Time Only! I
#
World Famous Evelyn Wood Youll see why President 9
Reading Dynamics offers you Kennedy invited Evelyn Wood .1
a free glimpse of what it's like to the White House to teach 9
to be able to read and study his advisors and the Joint fi
much faster Chiefs of Staff how to read Jj
faster. 9
Youll actually be taught how Youll hear what the faculty 9
to read and study faster during members of one of America's Ig
the exciting Speed Reading foremost colleges says about I
Lesson. Evelyn Wood, and watch them
read fast'
We want you to decide for your Youll find this Special Free of 9
seif the value of becoming a fer of increased reading speed 9
Speed Reader, Evelyn Wood to be an exciting and unusual 9
style experience.
For a limited time we are offering a I
Special Speed-Reading Lesson to
provide you with a glimpse of what I
its like to be able to read and study 9
substantially faster and youll 9
actually participate in the 9
techniques that will improve your 9
reading and study speed on the 9
spot I

I Free spud mom Lessons! I
Thursday, Friday and Saturday I
I 3:00,5:30 & 8:00 I
I 1125 W. University Avenue I
I 372-1600 I
I SvdftKfMd HEADING DYNAMICS* |
I next to Oonigans I

Friday, January 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
YAMAHA ENDURO 250 1970
Excellent woods bike extras TV
portable b&w Like new Oave
376-7146 After 5 PM (A-st-68-p)
.
Golf clubs complete set including
bag. northwestern aluminum shaft,
cost me $l4O will sell for $65. almost
new call Mike after 5 378-6597
(a-st-70-p)
Diamond solitare with band local
appraisal value with papers for
insurance $705. 78ct. best offer ask
for Vic 8-5 376-8443 (A-st-69-p)

I^Bfl
"NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:50-3:57-6:04

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
4U N
r>
_ £
1 -isl §ll ? I
i ?1 isII 5
-- a t g
Z
~ Q
>
4 U IO -
SI 'JJ to
5 S I J2
§? aa C
§ 8 R Z
< c c
____ __ 3 3
o -
TO
oj2 c
S z m
W H
_
_ /%
-
to O
5 >
IS) m
t

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

FOR SA LE
e*e*e*e*.% e e e e
-* eeeeeeeeeee e e e # e* # .*-"-**
PEAVEY PA system 400 watt peak 4
chan. 2 inputs/can reverb 2 spk
cabinets 2 15" JBLD 130s/cab $825
cash Bill Taylor ac 904 245-2525
Bellevlew, Fla. I will call u
(A-st-71-p)
MARTIN GUITAR D-18 $225 Phone
376-9845 (A-st-68-p)
Books: College English: the first
year, English study guide, CPS 121,
122, CSS study guides 111, 112 call
372-7581 (A-st-69-p)

NOW PLAYINGr J
At: 1:203:30-5:40-7:50
ELLIOTT GOULD
IN A DAVID L. WOLPER Production
"I LOVE MY...
WIFE
A UNIVERSAL PICTi "r TfCHNICOLOR* [R)
e e e e e e'e eeeeeeeeeeee e_ ee_e_e_e eee ee_e e e e
eee*a # e"e*e"e*e*e e*e*e*e*e*e*e*e*e*e*e *e*e*e*e e # e*e e e e *
FOR SALE
100 watt amp garrard turntable two
speakers 12 In. woofers roberts 997
tape recorder with tapes best offer
must sell call 376-6187 after 4pm
(A-st-71-p)
Royal typewriter $35. Two slide
rulers sl3 & $5. One Gramophone
radio/record player SBO. Call Lefty
372- before 5:00 daily.
(A-2t-71-p)
Round front china closet, chase
: 'unge, set 4 & 6 chairs, tea wagon,
round oak table, piano, book case.
Antiques & oddities. 6110 S.W. 13th
St. Closed Sundays. (A-4t-70-p)
Must sell 2 5 speakers enclosed In
walnut cases for just $23; also Gibson
electric guitar will go for only $l5O.
Call Wm. at 376-0406. (A-st-70-p)
Sansui 2000 amp. $225, 2 Sansul 200
speakers SIOO each. All used only 10
hours call 378-0381 after 5:00
(A-st-70-p)
Guitar Martin D2B plush lined
hardshell case new cost S6OO take
best offer over $335 372-5928 Ken
(A-10t-70-p)
1969 Honda CL9O VERY GOOD
includes helmet and car racks S2OO
call Ken 373-3028 (A-st-70-p)
1970 Honda 750 excellent condition
$1295 call 376-6059 after 4:00 pm
(A-st-70-p)
Ampex stereo player recorder plus
speakers S9O call Kyle 392-8720
(A-3t-70-p)
1970 Kawasaki 500 MK 111 Very Fast
Good Condition $750 or make offer
1970 Triumph Bonneville SI,OOO or
make offer 372-4075 (A-3t-70-p)
1968 Honda 305 superhawk runs
perfect, new battery & tires, smaller
tank and seats. $450 Claude
376-1767 (A-3t-70-p)
WEIGHT SET: $lO, BIRD CAGE:
SB, WOOD BOOK CASE: $lO. Call
378-0618 (A-3t-70-p)
Good buy on a 63 Corvalr. Runs like
a dream. S3OO or best offer. Call
373- after 10 pm. (A-4t-70-p)
Add color to yous pad. stained glass
lamps, do It yourself or assembled,
kits complete with precut glass, lead,
solder, wiring, chain 376-2195
(A-st-70-p)
Fender Coronado electric guitar with
case and Heath two channel amp
with reverb $325 call 392-7251
(A-6t-72-p)
SPOTS before your eyes on your
new carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooer now
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
Canon ft ql camera fl:2 lens 4
months old. over $340 new now
$220 phone 372-3977 (A-st-72-p)
1967 Honda 150. Good condition.
Must sell immediatly. Best offer, call
378-3607 after spm. Ask for Steve.
(A-2t-72-p)
Craig model 2404 reel to reel tape
deck. Need bread will bargain yellow
double breasted zoot suit bought at
MGM auction 378-0908 (A-st-72-p)
7 ft. cable spool makes great table
$35. Hl-rlse 2-twln bed/couch combo
complete with cover and bolsters
$35. Call 392-1286 or as. 5 372-0049
(A-lt-72-p)
My own 1970 Honda 750 cc. Gold, In
perfect condition. Only 3400 mi Best
buy around atr#only $llOO. Call
David or Bob at (373-4397)
(A-st-72-p)
Stereo Panasonic 7070 set. includes
radio AM, FM & FM stereo, 8 track
tape plus speakers, for more
Information call 376-8878
(A-st-69-p)

RAPPS
Delivers Fast
373-3377
IVion. Thurs
5:30 p.m. 12:30 a m.
Fri .-Sat
1 2 noon 130a.m.
Sunday
12 noon 12.30 am,
- <-

' "A SONG AND A RAP WITH
a JOAN
BAEZ
JANUARY 31
BPM-FLORIDA GYM
TICKETS $2.00 PER PERSON
ON SALE AT
"f ACROSS FROM MAUL f
NO EARLY I
IWUVM
fjMOasJljl
- m I I |M KZ
t Genevieve thousand Days" [
Special early bird price of 35 cents every night before 6:30 p.m. and ]
Sat & Sun. Madness at Penthouse 2 and Penthouse 3 only. Regular (
Price SI.OO
iiil HEID OVER 6th WEEK
YOU MUST SEE!
The Owl Pussycat
Barbra Streisand fillW frill! AT. ..1:57 3:49
George Segal flllll MIG 5:41 7:39 9:31
SATURDAY NIGHT fg^l
WmMWRwKIWTBStH / Ku nan /
BPM LT/W7, W/ffyyfy'.'A / ' r,m RiaiAiAMlLjilJiJ 1,0 Urn /
WWWPP [atsT /
MWIWaI NEW YORK FILM CRITICS'AWARD
BEST FILM FOR 1970
BEST DIRECTOR
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
"/fyou see nothing
else this year,
you must see
FMERSUPIBXS.
It will not, I think,
JR ever fade from
ih, memory!
fc* "-< i RICHARD sCHts*eL, tyfe
- FEATURE AT: 2:06-3:58 ou
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents a BBS Production
JA^' CH LS N FIVE EASY PIECES ...Karen Black
Bd Susan Anspach Screenplay by Adn.n Joyce Story by Bob Ralelson ana Adrien Jove.
COLOR WC£hS e Producer Bert ScKnexler
v,/* ibSy* Jg: gji^jgrjytes



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

* ##
FOR RENT
One bedroom air cond. apt. sllO per
month. Couplet only, no children, no
pets. Call 372-8737. (B-4t-69-p)
10x50 trailer 85$ Near med center
AC married perfered wooded
GLYWOOD PARK No. 8 378-9018
(B-lt-72-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom apt air cond. heat
water included call 378-4687 $lO5
mo. (B-2t-72-p)
female roommate Mobile City. Own
bdrm, walk in cist $75/mo total call
Judy 376-4616 9am-spm (B-st-72-p)
Need 1 male roomate to share
University Gardens Trace Apt.
Immediate Occupancy $72.50 mo. +
1/2 util. 372-5246 bldg. 712 apt. 306
(B-3t-70-p)
Sublet beautiful two bedroom apt.
furnished, carpeted, dishwasher, cen.
air. tanglewood manor, available Feb.
1 378-8649 or 372-2200. S2OO
(B-3t-70-p)
2 female roommates wanted, own
room In large house, pets welcome.
$55/mo. + 1/3 util, call 376-8736
after 5:30 (B-st-68-p)
Male roomate needed to share
Campus Land apt. rest of Jan. rent
free, S7O per month plus Vz util call
378-2888. (B-st-69-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom air cond apt
slls/mo + utilities, furnished, close
to campus, 1507 NW 4th Ave call
373-1952 after 5:00 pm couples only
(B-2t-71-p)
One bedroom furnished apt. to block
from Tlgert. Central a/c, heat,
carpeted, many extras. $145 a mo.
Spring and Summer qtrs. 372-8271
(B-3t-70-p)
Sublease one bedroom ac apt near
campus available for immediate
occupancy rent 138 dollars plus
utilities call 378-5661 (B-4t-70-p)
WANTED
Female roommate wanted to share 1
bdr. apt. lOlto N.E. 7th St. 37.50
mo. + to utilities, call Jan 372-1532
after 6 p.m. (C-lt-72-p)
1 male roommate needed for La
Bonne Vie apt, immediately or spring
quarter, call Don 378-9536
(C-st-72-p)
Male Roomate to share three
bedroom house near law school no
deposit Feb -free call 373-1296
(C-st-72-p)
Need cheap transportation; bicycle
motor, -etc. In fact. If you have
anything at all Interesting to offer,
give a call. LOVE. 378-3972.
(C-3t-72-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cy 11 nth la between 1 and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
CHEAP One male romate needed
Village Park Apts. TV and stereo All
meals cooked All dishes washed
$45.00 a month call Tom 372-1117
(C-st-69-p)
Roommate wanted female beautiful
new house on lake, own bedroom,
$53.56 mo. Call 373-1372.
(C-3t71-p)
Wanted girl to cook dinner for three
law students. If interested call
378-7082 anytime. (C-3t-70-p)
- .. -irnrnif^BMirrir 11
Female Rommate Wanted Le Bonne
Vie Apts. 52.50 Month For More
Information Call 373-2219
(C-3t-70-p)
Roomate wanted to share apt., 3
blocks from campus with male grad,
A.C., pool, 46/mo, call 376-3733.
(C-st-71-p)
Male rommate, own bedroom in 2
bdrm Apt. $70.00 1/3 utilities.
Frederick Garden Apts. 376-9740,
Charles (C-10t-71-p)

I < t **
£ BEST MUSICAL *>
* MEW YORK DRAMA CRITICS f
CIRCLE AWARD- %
TORY AWARD
i?Jb

THIS SATURDAY NIGHT
JANUARY 30
FLORIDA GYM 8:15 PM
STUDENTS GENERAL PUBLIC
$3.00 $4.00 $3.00 $2.50
$2.25
TICKETS ON /\ECI/ a C
SALE AT: OrrlV-t
A STUDENT GOVERNMENT
L PRQp.irx.nN J

HELP WANTED
Part or full-time sales help needed
$3-5/hr guaranteed to service
established customers set your own
hours call between 7 & 9 pm
378-0421 or 378-0121 ask for Ed.
Car needed (E-st-71-p)
Part time job work own hours at own
convience. For further information
call 378-4091 ask for Ed (E-3t-72-p)
Two law students in desperate need
of a cook 5 days a week excluding
Fri. & Sat. point west apts. call
372-7850 after 8:00 P.M. (E-st-68-p)
IMI

vuMFnam I
r, BBEBT
Wmb'.
HUMPHREY KATHARINE
BO6ART HEPBURN
The riotous story of a river-rat and the spinster
sister of a missionary. Bogart's only Academy
Award film.
Union Auditorium 50 cents
Thursday, January 28 7:00 & 8:46
Friday & Sat. the 29 & 30th... .5:30,8:00,10:30
sponsored by the J.W. R. Union
MMMMMMMaHMUrtHHMMMMaMaMMUHMHHMMMMMMMMMHUBaMMMMMMUMMHMMHUHMMHMMMMMHHHMHMMMHMHI
r Todays |
I more for your money meal I
I moisorrs I
I CRFETERIR I
I r FRIDAY'S FEATURE ~| I
II I 1
1 | PORK CUTLET | jf
% I PARMESAN 1 1
I s i z i
I | i AND 11 I
I 1 YELLOW RICE | g
lo| i 3 I
! 99< j I
I I I
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
I moisons I
CAFETERIA beyond comparison! I
L 2620 N.W. 13th Street m the Gainesville Mall

Friday. January 29,1971, The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS
a
65 VW BUS 12000 miles on engine
opening windows w screens +
curtains homemade camper Interior
good tires S9OO call Roger after 6pm
378-9266 (G-st-68-p)

RAT
is now
Looking HmaU
For Campus Talent
to perform at the RAT
All those interested I
please call
TOM TEDROW
392-7265
or call
392-1618 392-2097

Page 17

( tiftin Clmit g/^^SSSMSUSUiiMimmImaMJ
1 1 IW2 BiggwtONDS*
r i~*Uf ff[ t f-
FffPSEjjPJJ STARTS WEDNESDAY J
FEBRUARY 3RD \
!"'LOVE STORY' IS
i A PHENOMENON!"!
v j -Tim* Magazine
s gffSYYI
* fwSSnmmmxm A
Mi MacOraw* Ryan ONeal TOpP:
A HOWARD 6. MINSKY -ARTHUR HILLER Production J
: John Martey ft Ray Milland ER%gji :
HOWARD 6. MINSKY KSGOti)FN FRANCIS LAI
iaa-agm. J
**
t*r~7MX\ fvnwNram
HiMMI O
J WW
i rTSST If* i
r moms ,/m
: HUMMAS Jijp :
PAYJjMMMM.
bounce
8:20 npra||RivnHnH^H|^K
LADY
sHHKMmHiHHfr
10:15
Nancy was
beautiful...but not
very
Hb
as
w*oai vwAmm mios.seven arts IMP
t ( FLORIDA THEATRE ONLY l
| ALL SEATS sl^s
PH l ALL day-every day



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.
V.V.V.*.
AUTOS
a

64 Rambler white S3OO or offer
376-2117 Good transportation
(G-lt-72-p)
65 Ford Falcon low mileage radial
tires exceltant mech. condition great
gas mileage. $450 call Mike after 5
378-6597 816 NW 13th St.
(G-3t-72-p)
1967 Chevelle 396, 350 horse, super
sport, excellant condition. SI2OO
376-7242 (G-lt-72-p)
61 Rambler wagon Good condit.
New seat covers tires, battery, points.
$125 call 376-1974 aft. 5 67 Firebird 326 cu. in. Automatic,
Air, Disc brakes, radio, Power
steering SI6OO 376-0160 (G-st-72-p)
67 MGB 33000 ml. new;
transmission, batteries, muffler, good
condition, will trade, must sell, need
money, below wholesale SIOOO.
378-3972 (G-st-72-p)
1967 Saab $475 firm call 372-1935
after 6 pm (G-3t-72-p)
MG MIDGET MK 11 1966, good
condition w/ radio, heater, wire
wheels. $875 or best offer. Call
378-5889 after 5 (G-3t-72-p)
1967 VW bus rebuilt engine blue and
white good condition SIOOO. Call
378-5756 or 372-8682 (G-st-70-p)
1965 FALCON 3 Speed, Blue with
white convertible top. Looks and
runs good. $650 or best offer. Call
Gary at 378-9752 (G-3t-71-p)
1963 544 volvo engine + trans rebuilt
compleatly 2 months ago, new
clutch, radio, heater, interior great
must sell will take anything over
S3OO call 2-8483 anytime (G-3t-70-p)
65 Austin Healy Sprite, British racing
green, good cond. Must sale for
financial reasons. Call Greg after 5.
376-2048 (G-st-70-p)
1962 Falcon 6 cy. Good mech.
condition. $240 or best offer call
372-6560 After 7pm (G-2t-71-p)
68 CHEVY VAN: 250 engWfe,
43,000 miles. AM-FM stereo. Funky
transportation for $llOO. call
376-1711 between 5 and 7 pm.
(g-3t-71-p)
1966 Mustang Automatic Air New
tires Excellent Condition 1200 or
best offer call 376-8159 5-8 pm
(G-2t-71-p)
X;X:X:X£X:X:X&X!-ivX;X!X:-;-x-x-!-;-:'
PERSONAL
eeeeeeeeeaaer***
e
Coming February 17. THE MAGIC
THEATRE. Entertainment not for
everyone (J-2t-71-p)

FREE

FUCKS

ISON OF
1 DR. JEKYLL
I PLUS
I W.C. FIELDS
I IN
I THE FATAL
I GLASS OF BEER
V at the
I BENCH
i **' BAR
I 730 ON

XvX>-x-X;XwX-I-X&>X:XvXxXxX:Xy
PERSONAL
How ya coming Sweetie? Hope your
B day Is happy! Your fav GDB
(J-lt-72-p)
Clearlng-out-of Gainesville sale, lots
of cheap stuff books, albums,
bowls, etc. in 285-6 Corry Village
(close te Lake Alice) must sell
(J-lt-72-p)
Please helpl Have lost expensive slide
rule not my own. 14 long, orange
leather case. Reward offered. Call
392-8297. Thanks. (J-2t-72-p)
Molly at Mudcrutch from Penn,
where are you? send me your ph. no.
John, the part Injun In the Hawaii
surf shirt. Mobile City lot 388
(J-3t-72-p)
Hey little one! I'm so lonely. Please
come back. I miss you like hell!
Ralsen (J-lt-72-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. ( J-44t-54-D)
Truck on over to Laurent's Books
and Demlans Leathers for your ZAP
Comics and a game of Foosball.
Pepsis still a dime. (J-st-71-p)
Tomasino: Love is having someone
call you teddybear and not laughing;
love Is having someone ask if you had
a good day. T want to say that
everyday. As always your spacy
snoring sweets. (J-lt-72-p)
Precision wneel balancing! All work
guaranteed. Mags a specialty.
$1.50/wheel. Why pay $2.25? Call
Havls 378-2957 (j-st-70-p)
LOST & POUND
FOUND: a purse found near
Mudcrutch farm during the weekend
Call Joyce, 378-9272 (Identify
contents) (l_-3t-70-p)
Found: Brown leather glove near
graham area Friday. Contact Karen at
378-8629 or 392-0571 (L-lt-70-p)
Lost: Black alligator wallet with All
of my ID's; Plaza Theatre Friday
night! Please return to 974 SW 16 Av
by any way possible! (L-3t-72-p)
Lost: Pair of gold wire rim glasses In
black and white case. If found please
call 373-3623. Reward for return
(L-3t-72-p)
Lost*. Navy blue kntt poncho with
gold buttons. High sentimental value!
Reward! Please call 378-0367.
(L-3t-72-p)
Found light meter at Graham pond
during Jane Fonda talk. Claim by
proper identification. 373-2249
(L-70-3t-p)
Found-black male puppy wearing red
leather collar and flea collar in area
of 13th st and 6th ave please please
call 378-3129 NW section (L-st-70-p)
X*X*X*X;X£*XxX;X*X;X;X;X;X'X;:;X'-:vX..
PROFESSIONAL Draft Counseling
Medtc-legal-psychologlc, open Sat. &
Sundays, 3265 Virginia St. No. l,
Miami, 44641583 appointments.
(M-25t-72-p)

MONDAY, FEBRUARY Ist, 1971 atl
Ik* LARGEST SELECTION OF JEANS IN GVILLE HQ
H FEATURING MALE SLACKS W\
HUGE SELECTION OF OUTRAGEOUS KNITS ~ JPn 1
1. \\ L\ BELTS. HATS,TOPS, WORK SHIRTS // // I
I GIGANTIC VARIETY OF COLORED T-SHIRTS /// II I
1 f y) ) OVER 100 FREE PAtRS OF JEANS WILL LEAVE OUR STORE OPENING WEEK- ( \xj( I
I fy/l A FREE PAIR OF JEANS EVERY MONTH FOR A YEAR VV\l
1 y\ / WILL BE GIVEN TO OUR 50th CUSTOMER OPENING DAY. \ \&1
jyrV\ OPEN 10AM 9PM MONDAY THRU SATURDAY /liUt
1249 NW 4 AVE 372-6189 .ZZif jJ 1
_ OFF 13th ST. BEHIND THE NEW MUNTZ STEREO CT >C*)r I

Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29,1971

SERVICES
X:X*X*X-Xt>X X*X-X-X ; X-X-XvX ; X : : ; Sx : : :
Have your motorbike tuned by an
experienced mechanic, extremely low
rates on hondas, suzukis, kawasakis
and yamahas. call John, 392-7026
(M-st-70-p)
Housewives: will do Ironing and
mending for three dollars a week.
Call after 5:30 and before 10 p.m.
372-5269 (M-7t-67-p)
HORSES BOARDED: This areas
finest boarding fact.'ty box stalls
lighted ring miles of trails superb care
convenient to unlv 373-1059
(M-st-72-p)
*
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
8-track cartridges Custom recorded
Two' or more albums on 80 min tapes
$5 Inc tape guaranteed satisfaction
1-day service John 378-5916 nights
(IW5t-70-p)
Graduate school approved typist
extensive experience In legal typing,
short term papers etc. call Barbara at
372- (M-3t-70-p)
Your portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yoursel? in action at school
start at $35 call 378-4842. Harden
(M-10t-70-p)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired-
Auto-Electrlc Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
Stereo tapes 8-track & cassettes Any
2 albums $5 Buy 2 third Vx price.
Free pickup & delivery call Jonathan
373- or leave message
(M-st-70-p)
Typing done; themes, thesis, etc.
Guaranteed accuracy and neatness.
Electric typewriter $.50 per page
Phone 378-7493 good references
(M-10t-69-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest*
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfC)

i iitilrtifWmmiir ft * r *G*ZT
.

/CLon Volkswagen X
jno P Repairs X |
Month s Sperw/ for V. W. Drivers V
Lube, oil change, clean air & oil filter, and Just clip OUt\
dutch and brake adjustment all for $3.95 ac j_ \
w Normal cost 511.50 a savings of $7.55 present It at \ i || Sebastians 535 S.W. 4th Ave. andVj I
take advantage of this special 3
\ / PHONE r
\37S-938iy |
llalleluj£tlt
the Mills

directed by Adolf as Mekas
Expressing an uninhibited kindling to light the screen
love for cinema, with wild cinematic jokes and
HALLELUJAH THE HILLS zany stunts in spirited visions
parodies practically every and nostalgic reminiscences,
film style from Griffith to Unencumbered by plot, the
Godard. Two rivals unite in film rides free and billows
friendship as they try to into infectious gaiety and
forget their lost love, Vera, riotous fun.
who has tired of their
courtship and marries
another. The far-fetched i I
story is merely another \ f
January
5:30, 8:00 &. 10:30
A Selection From The
Union's Classic Film Series



Regents To Delay
Choice Os President
ORLANDO (UPI) The
Board of Regents probably will
delay for another month the
selection of a president for
the University of South Florida,
board member Dr. Louis Murray
said Wednesday.
Murray is vice president of the
board and one of three members
on the selection committee.
The committee hasnt made
up its mind? Murray said, it
isnt ready to recommend
anyone to the board.
Regents member Elizabeth
Kovachevich of St. Petersburg
had earlier expressed doubt a
president would be named at
Mondays meeting here.
The Regents had been
expected to name the president at
their Jan. 18 meeting in Tampa
but said then it would not do so
until Mondays meeting.
Murray said the selection now
will probably be made March 1
at a meeting in St. Petersburg.
Dr. Harris Dean has been
serving as acting president at
USF since last July when Dr.
John S. Allen retired.
Dean had been prominently
mentioned for the top post but
withdrew himself from
consideration at the Jan. 18
meeting.
Reported to be the leading
contenders for the post are Dr.
Cecil Mackey, FSU executive
vice president, and Dr. Harry
Sisler, UF vice president of
academic affairs.
Ownr Subpoenaed
For Mail Bag Fraud
NEW YORK (UPI) The
owner of a Woodstock, N.Y.,
leather shop was presented with
a federal subpoena Wednesday
because he was selling replicas of
U.S. mailbags.
Bob Glazer, 27, who runs the
Hapiglop Shop, was selling pony
express mailbags with U.S.
Mail written on the canvas
front at the national boutique
show in New York.
Glazer said a U.S. postal
inspector gave him the subpoena
at his booth Wednesday* the last
day of the three-day show. The
subpoena, alleging illegal
possession, manufacturing and
distributing items with
I 11R EL LI I
RADIAL TIRES
I For American, European I

Godding & Clark
2ND AVF. & 2ND ST. SE
378 2 31 I

UPI:

government markings and false
representation, ordered Glazer
to appear before a grand jury
Feb. 3.
A lot of people wanted to
buy these things, Glazer said.
I sold quite a few at the last
show last spring.
The bags sell for $45 each.
Kent State Report
Destruction Ordered
CLEVELAND (UPI) A
federal judge Thursday ordered
destruction of a special state
grand jury report on the killing
of four Kent State University
students because it would
prejudice the 25 persons
indicted and prevent a fair trial.
U.S. Distnct Judge William K.
Thomas said although the grand

[ STBK SHfIKC
Student Special
| (With The Coupon) I
I e 9 u^ar Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15C Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90$ Pi s tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
i 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville |
mm mam mam mam mam mm mam mmm mam mmm mam m mama mam mma

| b Jv JH jH m H H H
H Hill I
L A A Marantz complete home entertainment component
system factory packaged for you for only $349.00. You save
k J MIHIHI $124.00 on the price of the components that make up the
1H fabulous Marantz Model 28 AM/FM Stereo Receiver/Com Receiver/Com|
| Receiver/Com| 4 pact! The Marantz Model 28 System includes a Marantz N
2|flli|lllilfl 1 \ Model 26 AM/FM Stereo Receiver worth $219.00, two M
Marantz Imperial IV Speaker Systems worth $l3B, the wM
. J famous Garrard SL-558 Record Changer with Shure Car*
tridge worth $79.45, and a^handsome walnut grained base
J; I BPrSjji worth $25.50 and a smoke plastic dust cover worth $12.95. Li
A total of $473.00, factory packaged for you for only W%
j s34 p|ju {124 011 HI H
H tomPLETE mnnnn H
a STEREO SVSTEIR! M
H MARANTZ ... The company with $ U
M the 3 year guarantee... parts and $K Ml

Tallahassee Report

jury violated its oath of secrecy
he would not halt prosecution of
those indicted because the
indictments were separate and
self sufficient from'the body of
the report into the shooting
deaths of the students last May 4
by Ohio National Guardsmen.
The American Civil Liberties
Union ACLU, which filed the
suit challenging the report and is
defending several of those
indicted, said it doubted
whether a fair trial was now
possible.
The only alternative of the
courts will be either to dismiss
all of the charges or proceed
with something less than a fair
trial, said Benson Wolman,
head of the Ohio chapter of the
ACLU.
State Attorney General
William J. Brown said he would

not know what steps to take
until he had seen the order.
As soon as I get a copy I will
sit down and evaluate it then we
can go further, Brown said.
Thomas also said the grand
jury issued a written report that
it was not instructed to issue and
used words connoting guilt
throughout.
Smoking Should Be
Banned, WHO Says
GENEVA (UPI) Smoking
should be banned in public
places, the executive board of
the World Health Organization
WHO said Thursday.
Smoking should be an
activity limited to consenting
adults in private, a statement
said.

GOT A SICK LITTLE FOREIGN
CAR ON YOUR
We've got the parts so you can
make it better, or you can bring
W it to us and we'll fix it for you.
YATES AUTO PARTS

Friday, January 29,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

USAF Ground Troops
To Withdraw By 1972
SAIGON (UPI) U.S.
military sources said Thursday
the United States hopes to
withdraw all combat Air Force
units from Vietnam by the end
of 1972. The U.S. command said
elite Green Beret troops had
begun packing their gear for a
pullout of Special Forces units
within a month.
The withdrawal plans were
revealed as new fighting flared in
Cambodia and American
military officials announced a
sharp increase in U.S. battle
deaths last week to 50, up from
37 the week before and the
highest total in more than two
months.

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

TRY TO IMPROVE 4-2 RECORD
_ '-d
UF Wrestlers Vie In 4-Team Match

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Spofts Editor
UFs wrestlers kick off a four
weekend stand of quadrangular
matches when they play host to
Southeastern Conference foe
Alabama, Florida A&M
University and Broward Junior
College today at Florida Gym.
The Gators meet Broward and
Alabama takes on FAMU at
3:30 p.m. to begin the activities.
At 5:30, UF wrestles FAMU and
Alabama matches Broward. In
the final events at 8, UF tangles
with Alabama and Broward
squares off with FAMU.
THE SHOW will be the first
quadrangular match ever held at
Florida Gym, according to coach
Keith Tennant. It will start the
Gators on a rigorous schedule,

Tennis Team Takes Challenge
With Many Freshman Faces

By Alligator Sarvicos
The UF tennis team faces a
real challenge this year, in
producing a team of the same
calibre it had in the past if the
upcoming schedule means
anything.
And with the graduation of
four seniors, tennis coach Bill
Potter will be tested even more
in the effort to produce a
winning team.
THE GATOR netters, who
open their 27-match schedule
Feb. 20 against the University of
South Florida, finished fourth in
the SEC last year.
This year the Gators must
face perennially tough FSU,
Miami, which is always among
the top three in the country,
Michigan, last years Big Ten
champ and SEC rivals Tennessee
and Georgia.
The team will feature many
new faces, Potter said, with
the possibility of as many as
four freshmen moving into the
top six spots.
LEADING THIS group is
Tony Pospisil, a junior college
transfer from Toronto. Pospisil
was last years National Junior
College Champion, and is
expected to lead the way as the
no. 1 man for the Gators.
He possesses a great
all-around game, and could push
for the SEC singles
championship, Potter said.
1 SAVE
WITH CONFIj)ENCE
DATSUN f'
GOODING & CLARK
2ND Ave. & 2ND ST. SE

v.vtv.v \v*v ,v rr }

I
CHRIS CORDER
... may go three
which has the Gators in
upcoming quadrangular matches
in Atlanta, Auburn, and
Tuscaloosa.

The other newcomers
expected to see action are
freshmen Rusty Addie, Ray
Heidema, Ricky Knight and
Mike McCaffery. They will be
provided balance and leadership
from veterans' Buddy Miles,
Bruce Bartlett and Kenn Terry.
MILES, A sophomore from
Jackson,' was the number one
junior player and the number
three mens player in Mississippi.
Bartlett, a history major from
Metairie, La., was ranked 24th in
CAMPUS CONE
FREE DELIVERY
SUNDAY-THURSDAY
CALL 372-3890

SAVE ilOOae NOW I
mBBBBBmHHB ShHhhhHhHb [ f y u are a discriminating stereo listener and you must have the m
i^*llllll best, you can now have Marantz at an impressively big savings It is it
.£&- J&&L & * Syst emfeaturing the **"> mS
Jf. odel 22 120 Wa ft AM / pM Stereo Receiver and two Marantz Imperial
>< three-way speaker systems. Here is what STEREO REVIEW said about I
the Marantz Model 22 in the August, 1970 issue:
BMHBB .,: Only a few f the most expensive amplifiers can compare with
it in distortion and response characteristics.
W ; its frequency response, separation, and distortion have 1
not been surpassed by anything in our experience.
lj yj ew J these facts, the price of the Marantz Model 22 would
seem to be moderate indeed.
printed specifications are impressive for a receiver but not
11 nearly as impressive as the figures we measured.
U iViaR" -JM " the and audio sections of the Marantz Model 22 decisively
# set it apart from other receivers, .. decisively
Receive* W,d ?t ,requency ,ange ,hat we have et measured I
MODEL TWENTY-TWO t e B |lOQ-OO- 0 '" 15 ,inest the Marantz Modal & I
THE FIDELITY SHOP

TOM DERFfOUGH
... 158-pound class
Tennant said Alabama should
be the favored team in todays
matches, Alabama is one of the
better teams in the SEC, he

the nation as a high school
performer. He was runner-up in
the Southern Junior Davis Cup
Championships in high school.
m
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
.4222 N W 13th ST.

MARTY PERLMUJTER
Executive Sports Editor

said. LSU captured the
conference title last year, and
Alabama beat them last week,
18-16. They both have about the
same teams they had last year.
The Crimson Tide has two
standouts in sophomores John
Hanna and Jim Kraph, who are
heavyweights. Hanna is
undefeated in his collegiate
career.
KRAPHS ONLY loss at
Alabama came at the hands of
Hanna, when they met last year
in the Georgia Tech Invitational.
Kraph is the defending SEC
heavyweight champ.
FAMU finished second in last
years Florida Collegiate
championship, just edging out
host UF. I expect them to be a
little weaker this year, Tennant
said.
UF, 4-2 in dual meets this
season, defeated Broward several
weeks ago.
Tennant will be weighing in
two wrestlers for each division,
hoping to give some of his
second teamers a chance to
wrestle.
GATOR WRESTLERS
include Steve Gaines, John
Read, 118; Jack Marshall, Steve
Salzman, 126; Dave Rothman,

I KINGS CURB COUPON |
% WtflkifF I Hamburger Platter &

% iFoodHostf sl-10 value w/coupon
v§ j| v Check for Kings Royal Treats w
>§ I; |T B '9 *avings everyday Both locations

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

Page 20

CHUCK KELLERI
Sports Editor

Bill Read, 134; John Barres,
John Nappy, 142; Bob Penna,
Chet Sanders, 150; Jeff
Shaffner, Tom Derrough, 158;
Mike Shewmaker, Fran
Brzezinski, 167; Chris Corder,
Dean Tibbetts, 177 and Don
Zorich, 190.
We dont have anybody for
the heavyweight class, Tennant
said. But if it makes a
difference in whether we win or
lose well enter a lighter man.
If no wrestler is entered in a
class, the match is forfeited.
WE HAVE one 190 pounder
and no heavyweight, Tennant
said. If we dont win by the
177-pound class, we might as
well pack our bags and go
home.
Tennant said some of the
Gators might have to wrestle
three times maybe Zorich and
Corder. But it just depends on
how things are going.
Sanders with a sprained ankle,
is expected to be the only UF
wrestler slowed with an injury.
I havent been really happy
with this weeks practice,
Tennant said. We havent
worked as hard as we could.



Barker Doesnt Mind Pressure

By GREG MACK
Alligator Correspondent
The UF Rugby Club was
trailing Nassau in the Bahamas
Invitational Tournament when
they tied the score on a
perfectly executed play covering
55 yards.
No time remained.
A DARK-HAIRED, wiry,
31-year old Australian who had
once been told by his mother to
leave or quit rugby, was called
upon to kick the game winning
conversion.
From 15 yards out Tony
Barker split the uprights to pave
the way for the Gators
consequent sweep of the
tournament.
I wasnt worried a bit, he
later remarked. Its much easier
to make a kick under pressure
than when it doesnt mean a
bloody thing.
COACH BARKER came, to
UF two years ago in pursuit of
his post-doctoral work in
physics. Not having any friends
in Gainesville, he decided to
become involved somehow in
athletics. From his childhood
and college days in south
Australia he gained experience
playing tennis, squash, cricket
and rugby.
Upon viewing his first
American football scrimmage
Tony thought he might like to
give the kicking game a bit of a
try. He visited Athletic
Director Ray Graves but was
disappointed to learn he was
ineligible for varsity sports
because of his post-doctoral
status.
Soon thereafter Phil Whyatt
contacted me about playing in a
match for the Cricket Club at
FSU. While in Tallahassee the
two Aussies happened to see a
football game on television and
began reminiscing about their
beloved sport of rugby.
The Florida Rugby Club was
bom.
INTRAMURAL OFFICIALS
were at first skeptical of
sponsoring a completely foreign,
contact sport such as rugby.
However, after a great deal of
encouragement, two slightly
pregnant footballs were
obtained. An ad was placed in
The Alligator asking for
interested ruggers no
experience necessary, but the
club gradually dissolved.
The following September, the
club was reorganized and in its
very first game, defeated the
University of Georgia. Florida
soon joined the Southeastern
Rugby Union and finished its
first full season with a 7-7-1
record. Since that time the game
has spread throughout the state
with Miami, Florida State, and
the University of South Florida
all following the Gators
example.
Barker feels this years club is
stronger and more spirited than
ever before.
THERES STILL too much
BUSH VW
Specializing In
Service And Repairs
On
VOLKSWAGEN
1311 N.W. sth Ave.
376-4261

talking by players while on the
field, observes Barker. In
Australia the captains of each
team are the only ones allowed
to speak to the referee, and they
must be careful of their
language. If a player commits an
error no one speaks a word
because they know he is
suffering enough. If a rugger
does well he is congratulated.
This type of conduct is foreign
to American sports where
protests and fights are more
often the rule rather than the
exception.
This is not to say that rugby
doesnt have its share of hard
knocks. While playing college
ball, Tony suffered three
cracked ribs, a lacerated tongue
requiring six stitches and a
severe leg injury in which his
thigh bone was nearly smashed.
Only the last injury forced him to
miss a game.
* Barkers credentials for
playing rugby are impressive. He
played five years' for the
University of Adelaide and in his

*
\ TOWN COLLAR SHIRT
| CLEARANCE
v regularly 10.00
> SALE! 6.86
These are all long sleeve shirts by a famous
New Haven t shirtmaker! Make your selections
from a wide variety of stripes and patterns in
assorted colors. Incomplete size range. Use your
convenient Maas Brothers Credit Card!
The 409 Shop
/mum Stof/ieM
GAINESVILLE MALL
C
rr ~/v

senior year was elected to the
Souths All-State squad, an
all-star team chosen from about
50 teams. He also received pne
of the most valued All-State
awards, The Best and Fairest, an
honor bestowed because of his
playing ability and
sportsmanship.
BARKERS NAIVETE of
American ways has more than
once created embarassing
situations for him. He vividly
remembers the time when he
and some new found friends
visited a girls dorm. After
talking with the girls in the
lobby for some time, the group
of guys decided it was time to
leave. Tony remarked politely to
the girls that he would possibly
drop by in the future to knock
you up, an Aussie phrase
meaning to pay one a call.
After the guys picked
themselves off the floor, they
were able to explain to Tony the
error of his ways.
Coach Barkers education in
America was furthered one more
iota.

TONY BARKER KICKING CONVERSION
... had run in with campus coeds a few seasons back

Friday, January 29,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29,1971

GREETINGS:

By Alligator Services
UFs All-America defensive
end Jack Youngblood was
picked in the first round of
Thursdays National Football
Player Draft by the Los Angeles
Rams.
The 6-foot4, 250-pound
senior was the 20th collegiate
player to go in the first round,
and was the Rams second
first-round choice.
I AM honored to be
drafted, Youngblood said. Its
more than I could ever hope
for.
Youngblood was called at the
Gainesville Sun newspaper wire
room at 12:15 p.m. and
informed by the Rams of his
drafting. Rams coach Tom
Prothro, a scout and the teams
publicity director talked to him
during the conversation.
Im glad to be going to a
team where they need young
talent, Youngblood said.
LOCAL ATTORNEY Bill
ONeal will handle Youngbloods
negotiations.
UF linebacker Mike Kelley,
another draft hopeful, had not
been drafted by late Thursday
afternoon.
Youngblood planned to leave
Gainesville last night with Gator
teammates Tommy Durrance,
Kelley, John Silman, Randy
Warbritton, Andy Cheney and
Bob Harrell for a vacation at
Beach Mountain, N.C.
Coach John Mazur took the
last offer for the Boston
Patriots first round draft choice
in the National Football League
draft at about ,1 a.m. EST today
and then decided to go for
Heisman Trophy winner Jim
Plunkett.
THAT LAST offer was a
mighty tempting one, Mazur
said at the teams draft
headquarters. Were hopeful
Plunkett will do for us what Joe
Namath did for the Jets, he
said. They both have the same
mold.
General manager George
Sauer said, I rate Plunkett
every bit as good as probably
better than Namath at this
same stage.
The Pats got the first pick in
todays NFL draft by virtue of
the teams 2-12 mark during the
1970 season. Club officials, who
gathered at the teams regular
season training camp at Curry
College in this Boston suburb,
said more than 20 NFL teams
made a pitch for the first round
choice.
THE NEW YORK

GIASS IS out iDsntiS^
CARS TRUCKS BUSES
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO INSUEAHQ CLAIMS
BMBIIW UTAUATWW* WW BTUUTM t MCE IB A IMBT
376-2558 I
E MO AH>Wt> CAtl IIWMCt-MMBI
sis N.W. sr bast siei ajci. eamr, pa bok m MMsvau

Youngblood Picked 20th In Draft

selected John Riggins, a
6-foot-2, 225-pound fullback
from Kansas. Riggins, a slashing
inside runner, was 16th in the
nation in rushing with 1,131
yards in 11 games, an average of
102.8 yards per game.
Riggins scored 14 touchdowns
and had 84 points for Kansas.
The Atlanta Falcons chose
Joe Profit, a 6-0, 206-pound
speedster from Northeastern
Louisiana.
The Pittsburgh Steelers
picking eighth, took Frank
Lewis, a lightning quick pass
receiver from Grambling. Lewis
a 6-1, 196 pounder averaged
over 16 yards per cany as a
running back in his junior year.
He made the complete transition
to wide receiver as a senior and
proved to be Gramblings major
offensive threat.
The Green Bay Packers, using
their choice obtained from
Denver when they traded
quarterback Don Horn, selected
John Brockington, the
All-America running back from
Ohio State. Brockington 6-1,
220 pounds ranked 10th in the
nation in rushing with a 115.7
yard average per game. He
carried 240 times for 1,041
yards and 15 TDs to tie for
sixth in the nation in scoring last
season
LOS ANGELES, using its first
round pick obtained from
Washington in a multi-player
trade, went for linebacker Isiah
Robertson, a 6-3, 225-pounder
from Southern University.
Robertson, billed as the black
Dick Butkus is rated as one of
the most aggressive linebackers
in the nation.
Joe Moore, a running back
from Missouri was selected by
the Chicago Bears. Moore, 6-1,
205, finished third in the nation
in rushing as a junior but sat out
most of his senior year with a
shoulder separation.
DENVER, USING its choice
obtained from Green Bay,
selected Marv Montgomery, a
6-6, 270-pound offensive tackle
from Southern California.
Montgomery was one of the big
cogs in the Trojan running
attack this season.
San Diego, picking 13th,
named Leon Bums, the muscular
running back from Long Beach
State. Bums, 6-2, 200 the
National College Division
rushing champ in 1969, gained
1,033 yards last season, more
than 600 less than his junior
total.
He scored 20 touchdowns and
120 points in leading his school
to a 9-2 record.

11
-wfr' lefc
ammmtt* *? * mm m
****4mM
JACK YOUNGBLOOD
... first round
CLEVELAND CHOSE
defensive back Clarence Scott of
Kansas State. Scott, a 6-1,
180-pounder, is expected to fill
the Browns dire need at
comerback.
George Allen, who came to
the Redskins earlier this month
after being fired by the Rams,
said: I think this is just a
tremendous trade for us. The
future is now. We want to win in
1971 and were now a
considerably stronger team.
He added he thought the
trade would upgrade the
Redskins as a potential
contender by as much as 25 per
cent.
ALLEN SAID Talbert was the
key to the trade in his opinion.
He said he considered the
young defensive tackle the
equivalent of a number one draft
choice for the Redskins.
Hes a great young player,
* **************
Guns Guns Guns
Inventory over 500. Buy
Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies. Harry
Beckwith, gun dealer,
Micanopy. 466-3340
I?
I SON OF
1 DR. JEKYLL
{ PLUS
I W.C. FIELDS
I IN
I THE FATAL
I GLASS OF BEER
| BUSH 1
1 BAR j
| 7:30 ON I

Allen said. He knows our
system. Hes a fine leader and
will set the pace.
HE TERMED Talbert one of
the 10 top linemen in the NFC
and noted he had sacked
opposing quarterbacks 16 times
last season. (
Allen also pointed out that
there were few outstanding
defensive linemen available in
this years draft and added The
worst thing for a team is to be
always building.
Allen said obtaining the three
starting Los Angeles linebackers
strengthened the Redskins where
it was most needed. The three
will give solid experience to back
up Washingtons younger
linebackers, Chris Hamburger
and Harold McClinton.
VERNON HOLLAND, a 6-6,
260-pound offensive tackle from
Tennessee State was taken by
the Cincinnati Bengals. Holland
distinguished himself against
big-time competition in a
number of post season all-star
games and is considered one of
the better prospects.
The Kansas City Chiefs
drafted Elmo Wright, Houstons
record-shattering pass receiver.
Wright, a speedy 6-0,
195-pounder who set an NCAA
record for career TD receptions
at 34 last season, caught 47
passes for 874 yards and nine
TDs.
The St. Louis Cardinals
selected Norm Thompson, a 6-1,
173-pound defensive back from
Utah. Thompson, who starred in
post season competition,

Drive an MGB 7l
Ji i
And test drive
yourself.
Find out if youve got what it takes to take advantage
of the MGBs track-proven features. Like rack-and-pin rack-and-pinion
ion rack-and-pinion steering. Four-speed, all synchromesh gearbox.
Competition-bred suspension. Powerful front disc
brakes for behind-the-'ine stops.
And dont be surprised if people turn to look when
you're driving down the street. Theyre just admiring
those mag-style wheels, radial-ply tires, new recessed
grille and a dozen other features that give the MGB '7l
the 'now' look.
So come on down today. Just ask for the MGB 71. The
sports car thats got jt,.if you do.
Harfred Auto Imports (Mm)
Your New MG Dealer
506 E. University Ave. Ph. 372-4373

intercepted seven passes last
.
season.
RALPH THOMPSON, a 6-1,
185-pound wide receiver from
West Texas State was drafted by
the New York Giants.
Thompson is expected to give
the Giants the speedy threat
they lost with the trading of
Homer Jones last season.
The Oakland Raiders, drafting
19th, took Jack Tatum, the
two-time All-American defensive
back from Ohio State. Tatum,
6-0, 208, can play any of five
positions cornerback, safety,
running back, linebacker or tight
end in the pros and is considered
one of the most mobile and
versatile athletes in college
football.
Baltimore, using the pick
awarded by Commissioner Pete
Rozelle from Miami for luring
away, coach Don Shula, took
Don McCauley, the 6-0, 195
North Carolina tailback who set
a single season rushing record
last year with 1,720 yards.
McCauley, who broke O.J.
Simpsons single season mark,
finished second in the nation
behind Ed Marinaro of Cornell
in rushing and scored 19 TDs.
Leo Hayden, Ohio States 6-2,
215-pound running back was
drafted by the Minnesota
Vikings.
The Dallas Cowboys selected
Tody Smith, Southern
Californias 6-5, 260-pound
defensive tackle.
Baltimore completed the first
round by taking Leonard Lunlap, a
6-2, 280-pound defensive bade
from North Texas State.



UF Looking To End
Road Jinx In Georgia

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Two in a row is the goal
Saturday night in Athens, Ga.
for the Gators when they take
on the University of Georgia in a
Southeastern Conference
encounter.
Game time is 8 p.m. It will be
broadcast back to Gainesville on
radio station WRUF at 7:55.
PRESENTLY, COACH
Tommy Bartlett couldnt be
more excited as his team is
coming off its finest
performance of the year, a
106-86 conquest of Mississippi
Monday night.
But, like Bartlett has said
before, in basketball, unlike
football, you dont have a week
to rest on your laurels.
ANOTHER STANDOUT,, in
the revamping of the Gators in
the Ole Miss game, was Tom
Purvis, who finished with 18
points and 17 rebounds. It was
his best over-all game of the
year.
As for the Bulldogs, Ronnie
Hogue leads in scoring average
with 14 points a game. Cauthen
Westbrook is next with 13.9,
and Lanny Taylor is the other
Bulldog in double figures with
11.3.

Swimmers Host
North Carolina
The undefeated UF swim team, winners of r\lne straight meets this
year, faces an unknown quantity in Saturday opponent North
Carolina.
We dont know much about them, said Gator assistant coach
Eddie Reese. We dont even know their record.
Although North Carolina has been an Atlantic Coast Conference
swimming power in recent years, Were not going to worry about
getting up for them, Reese said. We feel were a little stronger than
they are.
In fact, team members arent even going to be swimming in their
regular events.
* ft
Were trying to prevent them from getting stale, trying to break
the monotony. Its hard to go 100 per cent in your best event all the
time.
The meet begins at 2 p jn. at the Gator pool.
- This Weekend
IMg* FRANKS 2-FOOT
x OfV
PERISCOPE SUB!
Contains Italian ham, Italian cheese,
salami, turkey, Frank's special dressing
Call 372-7644 for free delivery after 5
OPEN Mon-Thurs-11-11
2003 SW. 13 St Fri&Sat 11-1
Sun 12-11

Georgia is not a running ball
club like Mississippi, Bartlett
said Thursday. When they are
forced to run, like against Ole
Miss last Saturday, they can. But
that is not its strategy.
BASICALLY, THEY play a
slow down game like we do,
Bartlett said.
Geprgia basketball coach Ken
Rosemond last week moved
sophomore guard Gino
Gianfrancesco to the starting
team and has been rewarded
with a 23-point outburst against
Auburn, 25 points against Ole
Miss and 15 against Mississippi
State last Monday.
During these three games,
Gianfrancesco has made 23 of
35 shots from the floor for a
sizzling 65.7 percent. On the
free throw line, he has an 85 per
cent mark on 17 of 20.
Leading the Gators with a
15.5 point average is sophomore
Tony Miller.
The past four games have seen
Miller in double figures, hitting
28 against Mississippi for his best
point total of the year. During
that stretch, the offense has
been keying around Miller, who
has been hitting close to 50 per
cent of his shots.

EARL FINDLEY is currently
second on the Gators in scoring
average. He moved up from third
with his 2 3-point production
against Mississippi.
GEORGIA IS 3-11 overall on
the season, but two of those
victories were against SEC foes.
Florida brings its dime store
record, 5-10 and 3-5 in the SEC
into the game.
If we can keep shooting like
we did Monday night, we can
end that road loss that plagues
us, Bartlett said.
THE
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
4< Xerox 3(
Thesis & Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376*9334 8 am -9 pm

FINAL
CLEARANCE

SHOE RACK SALE
Italian Imports and
Hand Sewn Loafers
Values to $24.95
$099
W Pair
Downtown Only
Mens Sweaters
Entire Stock
1/2 Price

Use BankAmericard or Master Charge
£tas *n rag
1 3 It. University \ve. and Gainesville mall
Free Parking on First Federal Lot
\

FlGrti I ftf mM jALJ P
111 Ji ll IHU \ J!
I r -j
f||p S *' ; .j|jjj|
jf h9hhH
* jg^kwbF w v
IHMliteS
PHIL BANNISTER
TONY MILLER (ON HIS BACK) IN OLE MISS GAME
... sophomore leading Gators with 15.5 average
I I STARKE? FLORIDA j
* SOONER OR LATER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER"
1- HOURS I
1 WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
I SATURDAY BAM IPM I
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT!

CASUAL SLACKS
Large Group Perma Press,
Wash 'n Wear
Famous Name
Reduced S C 00
Values to $13.00
SEASONAL SALE
Continues on
SPORT COATS
and SUITS
A Good Selection Left!

Friday, January 29,1971, Tha Florida AIK gator.

Page 23



Page 24

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 29, 1971

BONANZA SIRLOIN FIT
'THERE IS ONLY ONE'; 4 W
BAMIfKmR 2445 S.W. 13 ST.
BONANZA Jake Out 378-0946 H§\ (j4§|>
"Congratulates the i 1 .<'*&£**
Player of the Week Ployer Os The Week X=/
r IU/CI Ul llic TT eeiS. # Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks,
a I chicken, fish, and our famous V4lb.
Bonanzaburger lOO% beef, French
Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets .89
I Our steaks are served with a steaminq-hot, buttery I
baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green
Steak Sandwich -1-19
f.
Bunkhouse Special Vz lb. 100% chopped j
beef -1.39
Rib Eye 6 oz., tender cut steak
Steak Sandwich *1.19
Sirloin Strip ll oz., savory, hearty meat,
Top Hand a 15 oz. T-bone for a huge,
rugged appetite 2.99
PLUS OTHERS
Earl Findley
| | f This week's player of the week goes to Earl ]|
| I J Findley, UF's wing who broke a four game slump
\ f and scored 23 points against the University of THI?
| | f Mississippi Monday night. ££
\ C It was his block of a Johnny Neumann shot in > STORE
the first half which coach Tommy Bartlett cited as FOR
iH one turning point in the 106-86 victory for the
I Gators. STUDENTS H
0 The 23 point performance was not tops for the
| Gators Monday night as Tony Miller, runner-up in
V the voting this week, closed with 28 points. Tom I
Purvis, who had his best game of the season, was |
* third.
|

Dominol Pizza I ~
Call 376-2487 9 12 IMAGINE
Our superb cheese pizza IIVinUIHLa
H| 12 small pizza $1.40 mha
14 medium pizza $1.90
| DELUXE PIZZA Pepperoni, mushrooms, ham, KS CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE
pepper, onion add $1.20
I The Domino People
i are Pizza People, Period. i isl .... located in the Hub
' 1710 S. W. 13th ST. wB