Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
AAUF: Academic Freedom Sole Issue

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third part of a series
analyzing the investigation of
the American Association of
University Professors into the
state or existence of academic
freedom on the UF campus.)
In the last analysis, faculty
must rebel if they expect to be
taken seriously... Dr.
Marshall B. Jones, an outspoken
and radical believer;
employment terminated
tenure denied.
Why?
THE INVESTIGATING

RaCi
OH

Vol. 63, No. 71

Cars Towed During Fonda Speech

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
While thousands gathered to
hear actress-turned-activist Jane
Fonda at Graham Pond Saturday
Grubb Case
Gets Change
Os Venue
By Alljgator Services
A change of venue was
granted Wednesday for Terry O.
Grubb by Circuit Court Judge
John Crews after his defense
argued pretrial publicity
concerning his case would
prevent Grubb from getting a
fair trial.
Grubb has been accused of
the hanging death of a fellow
inmate, William Baugher, in the
Alachua County jail Sept. 22 of
last year.
CREWS MOVED the case to
Baker County, and delayed the
trial untio March 2, to permit
the defense time to obtain Army
psychiatric records on Grubb.
The prosecution in the case,
as well as the defense, joined in
their criticism of the coverage
given by the Gainesville Sun to
the case.
Herbert Shwartz, attorney for
the 18-year-old inmate, wanted
the trial moved to Dade County
on the grounds his client could
not get a fair trial in north
(SEE 'GRUBB', PAGE 7)

gjjjjppii ANALYSIS 3

committee of the American
Association of University
Professors (AAUP) arrived on
the UF campus on May 5, 1969,
to seek an honest and acceptable
answer to this elusive question.
But the crux of the issue was
beyond the simple act of denial
of tenure. As President Stephen
C.. OConnell had affirmed on
numerous occasions, Tenure is
a privilege; not a right. The

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

UHLFELDER CALLS IT INCONSISTENT 9

afternoon, wreckers were busily
towing away illegally parked
cars.
The action took place as the
result of a tightening of parking
restrictions for special events.
ACCORDING TO University
Police Department Chief Audie
Shuler, 10 cars were towed away
at the owners expense for being
illegally parked:
On the grass
In service areas
Blocking emergency exits
In traffic lanes

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TOM KENNEDY
WHOSE UNION?

Some students have decided that by changing the
name of the Student Union from J. Wayne Reitz,
president of the UF at the time of Marshall Jones'
dismissal and also in favor of the action, to

disapproval of tenure did
happen, on occasion; often with
due cause; hopefully with due
process.
In the case of Dr. Jones, due
process was never protested. The
volatile question which did face
the AAUP investigators was, In
denying Dr. Marshall Jones
tenure, did UF violate the
protection of academic
freedom?

University of Florida, Gainesville

BASICALLY, weve been
rather lax on enforcing the
parking rules, I admit, Shuler
said. As the events get bigger
more people attend, and hazards
increase.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder expressed
dissatisfaction with the
inconsistency in enforcing the
rules.
He said it was unfortunate
that cars were towed away
during the Fonda speech while
strict enforcement of parking
regulations was not upheld

"Marshall Jones Union" will advocate academic
freedom at UF. and also gain a favorable decision
from the AAUP concerning censorship of UF.
W-

JONES PROFESSIONAL
competence as a scholar,
according to the AAUP Winter
Bulletin, was never an issue.
The head of his department,
the Dean of the College of
Medicine and his colleagues in
the college had been satisfied as
to this aspect of his
qualifications.
Although one member of the
Personnel Board, a faculty
member from the College of
Agriculture, had reservations in
this respect, no serious attempt
was ever made by any
administration spokesman to
(SEE 'STUDENTS,' PAGE 4)

during the UF-Mississippi
basketball game Monday night.
ACCORDING TO Shuler
illegally parked cars were not
towed away at Monday nights
basketball game because there
had been no advance publicity in
the Alligator concerning newly
acquired authorized parking
zones.
On the other hand, Shuler
said mention had been made in
the Alligator on parking for
Fondas speech which resulted in
the cars being towed away
Saturday.
In Fridays Alligator a story
entitled Jane Fonda Speaks at

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Thursday, January 28, 1971

Graham on page 2, paragraph
nine said Parking is available in
Hume parking lot.
THIS WAS the extent of
parking coverage.
Uhlfelder said students who
had their cars towed away
Saturday should contact him in
the Student Government offices.
In an effort to alleviate the
parking problem at special
events the UPD announced
Wednesday additional parking
for major Florida Gym
functions, on the UF drill field
located west of the stadium.
SHULER MADE the
announcement following a
meeting with the UF athletic
department which agreed to
open the field for extra parking
during basketball games and
student concerts.
Beginning this weekend the
field will be open an-i cars may
enter from either the ROTC
building entrance or the
northern entrance on University
Avenue.
Parking violations previously
overlooked will now be
enforced Shuler said.
THE DRILL FIELD will be
open for vehicles at least one
hour prior to any function.
People just had nowhere to
park before, were human and
could understand this, so certain
violations were overlooked,
Shuler said.
But now with the new
parking space, in easy walking
distance of the gym well begin
to toughen up on parking
violations surrounding the gym,
he said.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

MAX RAFFERTY:

'Colleges Turning
'
Into Factories

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Writer
and
DONALD LOFTUS
Alligator Corrwpondent
Loss of individualism says
educator-writer Max Rafferty is one of
the big things wrong with this country
today.
As part of UFs Accent7l program,
the former California State Supervisor of
Schools told the audience Tuesday night
the progressive education philosophy
permits a system of downgrading
individual competition and upgrading
groupism.
AS A RESULT, Rafferty contends, the
college student is losing self-identity with
students becoming a number at college
instead of an individual.
This student feeling may be described
as a kind creeping facelessness, he
said. No wonder our colleges are turning
into huge factories.
Rafferty quoted a letter from a
California student at Berkeley, Im

Mankiewkz
To Speak
About Nixon
By VICKIE RICH
Alligator Copy Editor
Accent 7l will present Frank
Mankiewicz, a witty and incisive
speaker, tonight at 7:30 in
University Auditorium.
In line with the Challenge of
Our Dilemma program,
Mankiewicz will speak on
Nixon and Beyond.
MANKIEWICZ CREDITS
todays students as being the
best educated and the most
committed in the nations
history He says it was this
youthful idealism that prompted
him to leave a comfortable law
practice in California and enlist
in the Peace Corp. He then
became administrator for the
Latin American programs.
Later, he became press
secretary to the late Robert F.
Kennedy and accompanied him
during two years in the Senate

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

photographed, inoculated, taped, carded
and filed. I have a parking pass, a library
pass, a lab pass and three or four other
passes.
I SIT IN a lecture class with 700
others and I am No. 327. The professors
lecture is piped in electronically, I never
get to see him.
The multiple choice tests I take are
corrected automatically, graded
automatically and handed back
automatically. I engage in group
activities, group efforts, group recreation
and I presume, in the fulfillness of time,
group therapy.
But I came to college to find myself,
to become a person, instead I have
become a number.
RAFFERTY SAYS this happens
because the educational system has been
allowed to develop this way. Didnt we
permit, and even condone, over the last
30 years or more, an educational way of
thinking in our public schools that
downgrades competition in any form,
that upgrades togetherness for the sake of

X;. -a
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||||||
Ml xjBHF
FRANK MANKIEWICZ
... syndicated columnist
and throughout his presidential
campaign, participating in
numerous rallies, college
meetings and ghetto
confrontations.
Mankiewicz is credited as
todays voice of the
Anti-Establishment. His
column is syndicated in over 250
newspapers and at the present is
a member of the staff at the
University of California at
Berkeley.

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TEPs To Pay Damages
In Cable Digger Incident

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Wira Writer
Tau Epsilon Phi (TEP) fraternity has agreed to
pay the damages made by a cable digger to State
Road 121 early Sunday morning in an incident
allegedly involving nine TEP pledges, and the
Alachua County Sheriffs Department has agreed
not to press charges, according to Sgt. Floyd
Maitland who investigated the incident.
However, Inter fraternity Council is still
investigating what happened. Its judiciary board will
meet Sunday night to decide if TEP broke any IFC
statute or regulation, according to IFC President
Mike Hawley.
THE SHERIFFS DEPARTMENT agreed to not
press charges, Maitland said, because they could not
pin anyone down in the incident.
We want to drop the whole incident, Maitland
said.
The actions of the Sheriffs Department have no
bearing on what the IFC does, Hawley said. If
TEP is found in violation of any IFC statute or
regulation, they will be punished accordingly.

foSjALSnHIRNITURnj
I AND AUCTION I
RETAIL SALES MON-SAT 9 & I
I AUCTION EVERY I
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| 372-3991 I

togetherness, which stresses the
supremacy of the group without regard to
the individual?
People are conditioned that adherence
and acceptance by the group is more
important than the development of the
individuals own abilities, he continued.
Rafferty then pointed out the
progressive education': generation
conditioned to adjust and conform is now
rioting and rebelling on college campuses
from loss of identity.
WHAT WE SEE is the last bubbling of
the yeast before it turns into those
thousands of identical loaves of bread
all baked in the same oven a blind,
senseless protest leading to the death of
individualism.
Rafferty also cited groupism as a
hindrance to racial minorities when they
react only as a member of a group, as a
bee in a hive.
Bees live in a highly specialized
manner. They are cooperative, they
function as a group, everything is for the
good of the hive.

***************
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HAWLEY SAID there would be no attempt to
white wash this incident. He said that even if TEP
was found innocent of the cable digger incident,
road tripping was still against IFC regulations.
Im sure the TEP national office is opposed to
any pledge week activities such as were engaged in,
Hawley said. There will probably be action taken
against the TEP house. IFC has been trying to cut
down on this sort of pledge week activities, he
said.
Jay Stormer, assistant dean for student
development and IFC advisor, said IFC would make
any determination as to group action against TEP,
to chastize them for this little sojourn.
Any action against the nine pledges individually
will be taken by the student conduct board.
TEP President David Simon told The Alligator
Monday that all members of the house are being
questioned to determine the exact events of Sunday
morning. The house as a unit will answer for all its
actions and is currently making inquiries as to the
exact cost and extend of damages sustained by the
road. No cost of damage to the road has been
determined.

THERE IS only one slight
disadvantage to this seemingly fool proof
system, the complete disappearence of
the individual, Rafferty said.
He said if he were a member of a racial
monority in 1971 there are three things
he would do;
As a parent he would work for
education that stressed the importance of
the individual.
e As breadwinner he would upgrade
his potentiality to enlarge his knowledge.
As a voter he would find a political
party that treats him as an individual.
Rafferty asked college students to
recognize your real enemy. It isnt the
Vietnam War or the hydrogen bomb or
even the ecological disasters. Your real
enemy is Mr. Stork. We must shoot down
the stork or he will kill everyone in the
21st century. Never surrender to the
sheer weight of numbers, he warned.
Rafferty said he likes to talk mostly to
college students because we need a
generation which wants to make things
better not to adjust and accept things as
they are.



Senate Supports Monsanto Boycott

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs Student Senate passed a
resolution Tuesday night
supporting a nationwide boycott
of Monsanto products.
According to Environmental
Action Group President Hal
Barcey, Monsanto is one of the
companies which is responsible
for wide scale pollution of

WHATS HAPPENING
By J Godowm

SAVE YOUR ENVIRONMENT Environmental
Action Group meets tonight at 7 in McCarty
Auditorium. Loring Lovell, from Conservation 70s
the state lobby group, will speak.
PARDON THE GOOF Much Ado About
Nothing will be presented on February 6 at 8:15
p.m., rather than January 30 as we reported.
MONEY PEOPLE MEET The Student
Government Activities Fee Advisary Committee will
meet Friday at 3:30 p.m. in Union room 316.

Now Students
Can Review
State Budget
*
By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator Writer
Students now have the
opportunity to review the state
budget and make suggestions.
Rep. Marshall Harris,
chairman of the House
Appropriations Committee, has
approved a plan that allows
students from FSU and UF to
review the budget.
THIS INVOLVEMENT
idea has been instigated in order
that people representing political
philosophies of all types may
have a hand in the legislative
process. Most of the people
usually involved in the state
government represent
philosophies from the middle of
the road and the near right.
The budget bodes will be
opened to review by any
interested students. Also the
budget requests from the various
state departments will be open
for inspection.
The idea of the project is for
students to make constructive
suggestions about where money
should be spent and where it
should come from. It is not
necessary to know anything
about accounting to be able to
participate.
Anyone interested in taking
part may contact Steve
Uhlfelder for information.
CAMPUS CONE
FREE DELIVERY
SUNDAY-THURSDAY
CALL 372-3890

Escambia Bay in West Florida.
THE RESOLUTION says
there have been over 60 major
fish kills this year, each killing
one million fish.
Fish killed, the resolution
continues, have been traced to
industries north of the bay,
using the bay as a dumping
strip.
Barcey said Monsanto had
been singled out because it was

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MUSIC FREAKS An analysis of the music in
James Joyces Ulysses will be presented Friday at
8 p.m. in room 105 B of the Architecture & Fine
Arts Building. Professor Zack R. Bowen of State
University of New York will give the talk and
recordings.
BAHAI FLIC A 30-minute CBS television
documentary film about the Baha'i faith and the
prophet-founder, Bahaullah, And His Name Shall
Be One, will be shown Friday at 7:30 p.m. in
Union room 347. Everyone is invited.

one of the major polluters in
that area.
SENATE PRESIDENT Rick
Horder said a copy of the
resolution will be sent to the
chairman of the board of
Monsanto, to the Florida
Legislature and Vice President
for Student Affairs Lester Hale.
The resolution condemning
Monsanto had an easier time on

the floor of the senate than
other bills.
The senate defeated by a
narrow 26-24 margin a special
request by the Student
Mobilization Committee (SMC)
for $66.41.
SMC MADE the request to
cover a debt the group owes UF.
If this debt is not paid by the
time the Committee on Student
Organizations and Student
Activities meets, the group faces
possible revocation of their
charter.
Discussion of the budgets and
lengthy debates as to their value
highlighted most of the meeting.
The EAG budget was passed
with minor changes; Interhall
budget also passed; and after a
week of being subjected to a
committee review, the Mayors
Council budget was also
approved.
A BILL TO reorganize
Student Governments Executive
Branch also cleared the senate
floor with no changes.
The bill makes it mandatory
for cabinet officers to be full

Thursday, January 28,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

time students during the
duration of their term and
reduces the number of cabinet
positions to five, with a number
of divisions under each one.
Each division is to be headed by
a director.
Another bill, which would
have some effect in the way
future elections are conducted,
was sent back to the judiciary
committee, with the personal
promise from Horder to bring it
back to the floor in two weeks.
The bill in question is a
Maximum Campaign
Expenditure Law, which is
designed to curb excess
expenditures by candidates for
the upper slate of SG.
Horder said the committees
involved in the study of the bill
will try to make the enforcing of
the law more effective.
Watch Your Stop
Every year in the United
States, about 250,000 persons
suffer disabling injuries as a
result of falls on stairs, reports
the National Safety Council.

Page 3



Page 4

I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28, 1971

Students Father Complained Os Jones

ONE^
question Jones professional
competence as a psychologist.
ONCE THE AAUP general
secretary had authorized the
investigation requested by Jones
and the local association
chapter, an ad hoc committee
made their first visit to the UF
campus.
During their stay they
interviewed UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, President
J. Wayne Reitz, Vice President
Frederick W. Conner, a
representative of the Board of
Regents, two deans, Jones and
12 members of the university
faculty.
There was really only one
serious challenge to Jones
capacity in the classroom that
made by Dean L.E. Grinter of
the Graduate School.
GRINTER WAS troubled
with Jones persistent defense of
a masters thesis he had
supervised. In Grinters view the
thesis was unacceptable, and
Jones persistence in defending
in was evidence of it
susceptibility to emotional
involvement that impaired his
objectivity as a teacher.
The AAUP investigation went
on to say that a disagreement on
the worth of a thesis afforded
no real support for a rejection
by the university of Jones
tenure.
As the investigation
continued, a general
administrative attitude began to
take form. At one point the
Majority Report of the
Academic Freedom and Tenure
Committee made an attempt to
clarify Reitzs position. The
petitioner (Jones) actively and
without adequate basis
confronted "and resisted
university administrative
authority as well as encouraged
others to do so.
THE MAJORITY REPORT
cited Reitzs position as accusing
Jones of using students to his
own advantage without proper
regard for their welfare... and
exercising poor judgement and
lack of restraint by unjustly
interfering with a law
enforcement officer in the
performance of his legal duties.
According to the report Jones
was identified as the charismatic
leader of student activists who
diverted them from the pursuit
of their academic objectives.
The administration painted a
picture of Jones as seducing
students to follow his
example. . in picketing,
confrontations of authority, and
other kinds of disruptive
activities.
IT WAS REPORTED to the
investigating committee at one
point that Jones was
manipulating students for
ulterior purposes i.e., for
gratification of his own need for

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and pleasure in dominating and
controlling people.
It is somewhat interesting, in
characterizing Jones own
reaction to these charges, to
note he read them aloud totally
void of emotion, as if there was
no longer any purpose to get
excited about the charges.
The investigating committee
was emphatic that they could
find no persuasive evidence to
lend these charges any truth.
RATHER, THE REPORT
stated, his involvement with
students, viewed in terms of the
evidence examined, appeared to
have been constructive.
The investigating committee
concluded that Jones
apparently sought to minimize
conflicts between students and
law enforcement officers and
student involvements that
threatened interference with
their academic obligations.
The committee reported that
although Reitz insisted that he
had no objection to Jones
espousing his own social and
political views, he seemed
unwilling to defend Jones right
to influence students when these
views differed from those of the
students parents.
ACADEMIC FREEDOM will
have suffered a profound loss if
the hope for tenure can be put
in jeopardy in this manner,
continued the bulletin.
The AAUP committee then
moved on to the importance of
Jones article, The Role of
Faculty in Student Rebellion,
in the tenure decision.
According to Jones, the articles
basic premise was that, Faculty
should just go and join the
students.
The administration claimed
that the article had surpassed the
normal limits of permissive
conduct. But the 1940
Statement of Principles on
Academic Freedom and Tenure
had declared the faculty
members right to speak or
write as a citizen free from
institutional censorship or
discipline:
THE INVESTIGATING
committee could not reconcile
this with Vice President
Conners statement that, I do
not believe that universities can
consistently or safely condone
such preachment of strife as a
mode of change... which is
contrary to, and potentially
destructive of, the principles on
which true universities must be
organized.
In an interview with
investigating officers, Conner
went on to admit, Some people
want to exercise rights of tenure
before they have acquired
them.
Conners observation,
published in the bulletin, was
viewed by the committee as an
attempt to differentiate between
the academic freedom available
to a tenured member of the
faculty and the freedom

DEAN L.E. GRINTER
... challenge Jones' capacity
available to non-tenured faculty.
CONNER SEEMED TO
contradict this later when he
asserted, that a professor has
precisely the same right to
academic freedom before the
award of tenure as afterward.
Conner continued that
Tenure might be withheld
because a candidate is a
disagreeable person.
The investigation committee
interview with Reitz uncovered
another aspect of the decision
not to grant Jones tenure.
REITZ CONSIDERED the
relationship between Jones and
the graduate student whose
thesis he had defended and to a
twin brother and a sister of the
student, as factors weighing
heavily in his decision.
The graduate student later
committed suicide while a
mental patient in a university
hospital.
Reitz claimed that Jones had
become involved in the
promotion and direction of
students in demonstrations and
confrontations with authority as
ends in themselves. Reitz went
on to detail his knowledge of
Jones relationship to the family
previously memtioned.
AFTER THE GRADUATE
students suicide, Dr. Reitz
visited the father of the three
students.
Jones claimed the purpose of
the constant communication
that ensued between the
administration and the father
was an attempt to get the father
to testify against him.
According to the bulletin, the
father complained bitterly of
what he believed to be the
harmful influence Jones had
exerted on his children after
their arrival on the UF campus.
HIS CHILDREN had become

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J. WAYNE REITZ
... interviewed by committee
involved in activist movements
to speed racial integration in
Florida communities, with Jones
being an adviser of those
involved in the movement.
But ironically, for an issue of
such supposed importance, the
matter never came before the
Personnel Board. Reitz did not
doubt, however, that the other
members of the Board were
aware of this connection.
To add to the confusion and
contradictory nature that
already seemed to characterize a
good deal of the proceedings, a
faculty representative on the
Board later admitted, The
faculty members of the
Personnel Board did not know
anything about a protest by (the
father of the students) with
regard to the influence of Jones
on all of his children.
REITZ WENT ON to add that
although the delivery and
publication of the speech by Dr.
Jones on rebellion were within
his rights as a citizen, by his
action and precept he had
exceeded the boundaries of
permissible conduct.
He also acknowledged that his
adverse opinion of Jones fitness
for retention by the university
was so strong that he could not
have recommended tenure to the
Regents anyway, regardless of
the decision reached by the
board.
According to the AAUP,
Jones article recounted events
and trends he observed as a
participant in what he called the
Gainesville movement.
NOTHING IN THE article,
the report continued, could be
viewed as derogatory of the UF
of its administration. The only
danger, the bulletin continued,
immediately threatening the
university, was that raised by the

WHY FRANK
MANKIEWICZ?
. v" 4'|^^L
BW
v : £\ '. m-,
,;-:-?-w. a y
\% '%S js?sj*;: v; ; ;:> ; :S-v-J^gg^^^^^^^^Kitii|: ; : x:' : l
FOR ACCENT 7lS KEYNOTE ADDRESS
- Director of George McGovern's Presidential Campaign
- Former Press Secy to Robert F. Kennedy
~ Director of Latin American Peace Corps
N D WE SAY MORE?
TONITE UNIV. AUD. 7:30 PM

decision to deny Jones tenure
The report went on to
condemn an often encountered
UF view-poiflt, most aptly
expressed by Conner, that only
tenured faculty had the right to
academic freedom.
The committee was also
unable to realistically accept the
fact that the Personnel Board
could be considered an impartial
and experienced faulty
personnel committee charged
with the duty of recommending
or not recommending tenure.
HALF OF ITS members
were selected by the president,
apparently without consultation
with the University Senate or
any constituted body selected
by the faculty, the report said.
There seemed to be no instance
within anyones memory when
the Personnel Board has been at
odds with the president, it
concluded.
The investigation committee
also condemned the action of
the senates committee on
academic freedom and tenure. It
had concluded that Reitz had
had compelling reasons to
disregard the recommendation
for tenure. They did not,
however, even attempt to
determine for itself or declare
whether these were, in fact,
compelling reasons at all.
As a matter of fact the
investigating committee of the
AAUP, could find no compelling
reason to agree with just about
any conclusions arrived at by
either of the involved presidents,
or groups or both.
DR. REITZ AND the
Personnel Board had relied to a
substantial degree on Jones
advocacy of a general political
theory that neither included
any incitement of particular
action nor stated any intention
by the speaker personally to
violate any valid university
regulation.
In view of this information,
the committee drew the
emphatic conclusion Dr.
Jones has been the victim of a
violation of substantive
academic freedom and First
Amendment rights.
Part IV will deal with the
AAUP Investigation
Committees generally adverse
conclusions regarding academic
freedom and tenure at UF, and
an examination of the case of
Lee Lambom, a former UF
professor fired for refusing to
sign the loyalty oath.



VISTA Obtains Applications

By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Writer
VISTA (Volunteers in Service
to America) has given out a lot
of information to students and
gotten 20 really good
applications, in the two days it
has been recruiting from the
ground floor of Reitz Union,
according to Alan Klein, a
VISTA recruiter.
We were very happy to get
applications from three good
lawyers, Klein said, and the
qualifications of all our
applicants have been really
good.
VISTA, A national corps of
volunteers, men and women,
single and married, of all ages
and backgrounds, was
authorized by Congress in 1964.
About 4,600 volunteers are
living and working in rural

UF Bowling Shoes
Missing In Action

By 808 MILLER
Alligator Writer
Beware! If you happen to be
one of the many people who
possess a pair of UFs bowling
shoes, you may be being
watched.
Patrick Day, the Reitz Union
! "t
f'r
r* #
'* vr.*-.;,:*:,-'..* tfs-n *?*&*-'
recreation supervisor said,
bowling shoes as well as many
other items have been
disappearing from the Union at
an incredible rate. Os the 126
pair recently purchased
approximately 98 remain, with a
drastic shortage in the common
sizes 9-1 OH.
Bowling shoes arent the only
items being pilfered.
We have had speakers from
the Union walls, bowling balls as
well as furniture carried off, not
to mention the miscellaneous
items being removed, Day said.
These shoes cost UF $10.40
a pair and are not meant for
street wear. A person stealing a
pair of these shoes is taking a
foolish chance because they
wear out easily and if caught
they will be turned over to the
Honor Court and prosecuted.
This would mean academic

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WEAVER 15 AND 45 minutes past the hour
TOLBERT 20 AND 50 minutes past the hour
MURPHEE 25 AND 55 minutes past the hour
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Qualifications
'Really Good
poverty areas, urban ghettos, on
Indian reservations, among the
migrants and mentally
handicapped all over the
country.
VISTA is looking for people
who have the ability to
communicate and help others
help themselves, for people,
who, regardless of their major
are socially concerned, Klein
said.
VISTA does the major part of
its recruiting on college
campuses, but also gets
volunteers from technical
schools, various community
organizations and ex-servicemen.
APPLICANTS ARE selected,
Klein said, on the basis of skills

tgm
probation or expulsion from UF
and would remain on the
students permanent record.
This pilfering of UF property
is not only detrimental to the
student involved, but is also
costing every student indirectly.
The color pattern of these
shoes are easily recognized and
Day said he has informers on the
lookout for any of these
pranksters. He has already
caught one person and has
another suspect being watched.
So if you happen to be one of
the persons who possess a pair of
these green and red strike
makers, you may be up the
wrong alley. Spare yourself the
embarrassment and bring them
back.

you may have to offer, your
background and interests.
Theres no set pattern. Every
person has some skills that can
be useful in a community.
VISTA attempts to honor
preferences as to location of
work. After a four-to-six-week
training period, the volunteers
are assigned to a project where
they serve one year.
Students may talk with Klein
and David Onheiber, VISTA
recruiters, today in the Union,
and can see Lynne Edelman,
VISTA campus representative, at
any time for information or
applications.
Her office hours are Monday
and Tuesday afternoons at the
Samson office, room 315 of the
Student Activities Center in the
Union.

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brightens your wardrobe anytime, anywhere
jjjwijafg SHOE SALON
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i

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^ 1 ?: ::: v Hfe" *<
| A ; ,V'\ 's%?{' J/f ' 'SB "',%. f^^STT'fJ^s'i''?*V^,J l jf-%' ,,*'
B. -;|P^
\
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' : ; i;3|l!ttWl
TERRY WALTERS
DAVID ONHEIBER AND JAMES FALCO
... recruiting at UF for VISTA

Thursday, January 28,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

Page 6

Off Campus
Students Can
Air Gripes

New Publication Distributed
To Graham Area Residents

By JANET OLES
Alligator Staff Writer
The Graham Cracker, an
eight page publication with
entertainment in mind was
distributed to all Graham Area
residents Wednesday morning.
Funded by the Graham Area
Council, the newspaper includes
cartoons, columns and news
about activities happening in the
Graham housing area.
ANYTHING GOES, said
Gary Paskal, head of the
publication and copy editor for
the Alligator. The paper will be
uncut and uncensored and
anything submitted will be
printed.
In the future the paper will

Com pus Spoakur
Series
Dr. Peter Lisca will read some
of his own poetry on
Thursday, Jan. 28 at 7:30
pm in the Reitz Union
lounges. Sponsored by J.
Wayne Reitz Union

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Writer
Approximately 50 per cent of UF students live in off-campus
housing. Trying to meet their special needs ard problems, the
Off-Campus Housing Committee is conducting a suivey this quarter.
We want to try to determine on a statistical basis both the
problem areas and the satisfaction areas in off-campus housing, Carl
B. Opp, director for off-campus housing said Monday.
WE WANT to get it done this quarter because the problems
budding in the First quarter have come to a head by now.
* The survey has been difficult to do according to Opp because we
want to make it as statistically sound and reliable as possible. Also, the
cost of the survey is a major problem.
Another set-back for the survey is the students feeling that their
responses wont be kept confidential. But they will be, he said.
OTHER OFF-CAMPUS housing surveys have been conducted in the
past at UF according to Opp. They were never completely analyzed
due to these same problems. However, the past questionnaire did
provide some important information that housing now uses in its
handbook for off-campus housing students.
We found, for example, that if the kitchen is used regularly the
individual food cost drops significantly, Opp said.
Among the many different areas the 7l survey covers are finance,
studying, landlord, and repair problems.
ONE SECTION of the survey asks the student to rate the most
important features he looked for in choosing housing compared to the
most important features of his present housing. It lists such things as:
price, walking distance to campus, swimming pool, quietness, cooking
facilities, air-conditioning, and sound proofing.
The last part of the survey asks free form questions such as Based
on your experience, what suggestions would you make to builders
erecting accomodations for students?
These types of questions were very helpful on past surveys, Opp
said, because students brought up problems that hadnt been
covered.
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING Division also provides a counseling
service for students wanting to go off-campus for the first time or
those students with problems.
The division publishes a handbook providing students with
suggestions, possible problems, and proper procedures in housing.
Some section headings of the handbook read: Picking Your Pad, or
How to Arrange a Rental, Physical Standards and Hints on Heating
and Safety, and Tips on Terminating, or How to Quit Your Quarter
Without Losing Your Shirt.
If students would come in to talk to us and look at the handbook
before taking the step of moving off-campus they would avoid a lot of
problems, Mrs. Denny said.
Located on S.W. 13th Avenue and Museum Rd. the Off-Campus
Housing Division is open daily from 8 a.m. l2 noon and 1-5 p.m.

also include reprints of past
Graham Crackers and old
Alligator articles.
We want to show Graham
residents the wild things that
happened years ago, continued
Paskal, Some of those things
which took {dace make things
happening now look almost
apathetic.
THE PAPER IS distributed

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free of charge and organizers
hope later to solicit
advertisements to alleviate the
cost.
The main purpose of the
Graham Cracker is to pick up
where the Alligator leaves off,
concluded Paskal. People like
to see thier names in the paper
and a small publication give
them what they want.

. problems budding
in the first quarter
have come to a head
by now.

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Students Return
For Court Day
By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Writer
Five distinguished former UF students return to campus Friday to
participate in Supreme Court Day at the Holland Law Center.
Chief Justice B.K. Roberts, Justices Richard W. Ervin, David L.
McCain, Vassar B. Carlton and James C. Adkins, Jr., of the Florida
Supreme Court who attended UF, and Justices Hal P. Dekle and
Joseph A. Boyd, Jr. will talk with law students in informal panel
discussions.
PANEL MEMBERS will include the justices and selected members
of the Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar Association, law professors and law
students. The discussions are open and will be held at 1:05 p.m. and 3
p.m. in room 190 of the Law Center.
U.S. District Court Judge William Mcae, Jr. will be moderator of
the first discussion. The topic is the criminal defendants right to
assistance in addition to counsel at public expense.
Chief Justice Roberts is scheduled to moderate the second
discussion as the topic turns to
the need for reform of the
wrongful death act in Florida.
the John Marshall Bar
Association, said Supreme Court L
Day had been planned as an
appreciation day allowing the students and justices to meet in an
informal setting. He said audience participation during the discussions
would be encouraged.
Coordinator of the event, Steve Atkinson, said some law students
with more progressive outlooks hoped to have an opportunity to
discuss several of the courts decisions with the justices. He said the
university setting is a good place to present different views for their
possible adoption by both students and the justices.
A banquet will be held at the Holiday Inn, S.W. 13th Street,
beginning with a reception at 6 p.m. The toastmaster will be Circuit
Judge John C. Crews, Jr.
The main speaker at the banquet will be the Law Schools new
dean, Joseph R. Julin. His topic will be The role of the law school in
the legal process.
Attendance at the banquet is limited to the justices and sponsors of
the event, the Eighth Judicial Bar Association, the College of Law
faculty and the John Marshall Bar Association.

GRUBB...
central Florida because of the
publicity the case has received.
HOWEVER, THE STATE
argued to keep the trial in
Alachua County. After the trial
was moved to the McClenny
Courthouse in Baker County,
Asst. State Attorney Gene
Withworth said that at least the
jury selection should be
attempted in Alachua County.
A grand jury indicted Grubb
in October on a charge of first
degree murder. The same grand
jury also issued a report calling
for the jail reform in Alachua
County.
Baugher, 24, was found
hanging in his cell while awaiting
pre-sentence investigation on a
marijuana possession charge.

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Thursday, January 28,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

Florida Alligator, Thursday, JanuaryJ2B.l97l

Se may find that we learn most of all
from those political and social dissenters
whose differences with us are most
grave; for among the youn'', as among
adults, the sharpest criticism often goes
hand in hand with the deepest idealism
and love of country
Robert F. Kennedy
EDITORIAL
Why Hit Student
For Union Cost?
Union Director W.E. Rion has strange ideas on how the
Reitz Unions $93,800 debt should be relieved.
Rion suggested Tuesday that one way to save $23,500 of
this amount would be to charge Student Publications for
utilities and housekeeping.
What disturbs us the most about Rions proposal, is why
single out student publications? Surely if student
publications is charged, it is conceivable that Student
Government, Blue Key and the remaining student offices will
follow.
It is absurd to be talking about charging student
organizations to pay off the huge debt the union has
incurred when Alumni Services occupies the entire
basement of the union plus a part of the first floor and is
charged nothing. Why shouldnt they be charged for
utilities and housekeeping?
Letting the Education and General Budget pay for the
Alumni Services housekeeping as Rion also has suggested is
not the answer either. Alumni Services should be responsible
for payment, not the state and definitely, not the students.
Rion in his report further stated that another proposition
would be to put a 10 per cent increase on charges to the
users of the union. But he adds this wouldnt oe worth it.
Although it sounds like he is looking out for the interests
of the students, we feel that this statement is merely a
smoke screen. If the Union does start charging student
offices, it is the students who are still the ones going to pay,
simply because student activities are funded by students.
We feel other means are available to raise additional
revenue, as we have pointed out, before having to hit
students again.
Its time the union officials began realizing that the union
exists first for students, and not non-student organizations
such as Alumni Services.
You a victim of the reform movement too, sonny?

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

WELL
50ILFI> 3UGK...
FLUTED COLUMNS £j==3
Really Up Close
L*. I By JOHN PARKER=E==b

I have been told that I am
definitely not with it.
My prose is to prolix as
exPFC Wintergreen might say.
My sentences too long, my
syntax too complex, and I have
a tendency to sprinkle in words
like solopsist and
perspicacious, particularly
when my Funk & Wagnalls stock
is down.
So, like, I have decided that
this column should be where it
is.
I HAVE become hip and am
going to stan giving off nothing
but groovy vibes.
I know this will make a lot of
you up close, particularly the
ones who dont groove to the
with it lingo. But sooner or
later youve got to catch up and
swing.
One of the things Toffler talks
about in his best selling Future
Shock is the amazing rate of
change in our language. Words
are bom, used briefly, and die
unspectacularly, leaving unwary
users looking very unstylish.
TAKE THE word camp, for
instance. For several years,
camp was the epitome of
coolness. Now it once more

Alligator Staff ~
Denise Valiants John Paricer
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Sieve Strang Joan Dalton
Wire Editor Assistant Assignment Editor
' " **' i)- |
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications. c ** *
Editorial, Business. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suit,
third floor, Reitz Union. ons su,t .
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87, 88 or 89.
r { a. .
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of th. .ho
f .he Wiittr of ,h, art*,. and ,h.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Jfcb
\ W/
means a place where boy scouts
go in the summer.
Other words die much quicker
deaths. Toffler lists fab and
gear, two Beatle-inspired
adjectives, that lasted less than
one year.
This is all, Toffler says, the
result of our throw-away
society. Everything is disposable,
even our language.
That is a little sad. Sometimes
we throw out some perfectly
good stuff.
SOME OF my favorite words
are straight from the 19th
century. Balderdash, for one.
Who could come up with a
modem word that conveys all

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

the red tape and folderal? Oops,
theres another one, folderal.
The problem of course, is
staying in style without being a
faddist.
In the public interest, here is a
basic outline for your fall
vocabulary.
Start off with the essentials.
Everyone has the necessary
articles, prepositions, and
pronouns. Build from them. Get
some of the old-liners that are
always in style, like relevent,
unilateral, and avaAt-garde.
THEN GO after some new
stuff, classy, but likely to be
around for awhile. How about a
nice counter-cultural?
And finally, go for one or two
long-shots. The really hip,
where-its-at words that may or
may not last. Splurge, have some
fun, but dont make the mistake
of blowing your whole wad on
them or youll be stuck with a
vocabulary that could be
completely out of date within
six months. Sure, get your self a
ripped-off or a funky or
two. Live a little.
But whatever you do, dont
look in this column for the latest
vogue. I still think a bad trip
means a Greyhound to Ocala.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy. Ann Dupree
Promotion Mamper
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



Day Care:
r
problems, problems
.r '
By TIM STERLING
While Day Care serves low income families, the program may be in
danger of losing out all together.
Gainesville children from low income families have a second home
in Day Care Centers.
Mrs. Thaxton Springfield, Day Care Center Administrator for
Alachua County, said although Day Care serves as a day school for
children of low income, working parents, the five centers in the city
provide them with a second home.
ACCORDING TO Mrs. Springfield, the five include Bell Nursery,
Northeast, Northwest, St. Augustine and Palmer King Day Care
Centers.
Enrollment in these five centers includes primarily Negro children,
although some white children do attend.
Baby Gator Nursery, also funded through Day Care, serves low
income students. Requirements for the nursery have recently been
expanded to permit children of students in off-campus housing as well
as those living on-campus to send their children.
According to Mrs. Springfield, the Day Care program is funded
through the Division of Family Services, a state agency, and parents
pay a small fee which varies according to their income.
THE MONEY goes through the newly-created County Coordinated
Child Care, Inc. (CCCC) and is distributed to numerous Day Care
Centers throughout the county.
The CCCCs is a corporation created to coordinate Day Care
Centers in the county.
Day Care also gets funds from the United Fund which gave SBSOO
to the program for 1971.
Children in the Day Care program receive free food from a program
sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
THE FUTURE of Day Care in Gainesville and the state of Florida
seems uncertain since the program is ultimately affected by what goes
on in Washington.
Day Care does get some federal funds.
There is talk that the Administrations War on Poverty may be cut
soon, and if it is, Mrs. Springfield said, Day Care may suffer, but the
program wont be affected until next year.
At the present time, there are Day Care Centers in Newberry,
Hawthorne and Alachua. Archer, Micanopy, Waldo and High Springs
all want Day Care Centers too.
But as Mrs. Springfield pointed out, there is no money to finance
additional facilities.

Halibut Tells Fishy Tale

By REG CROWDER
Alligator Columnist
With all the interest around
Florida in the sport of fishing, I
decided it was time to interview
a real authority on the subject.
I interviewed a fish.
Fortha Halibut is one of the
best known fish in the Gulf of
Mexico. He was questioned at
his studio north of Cedar Key
where he was teaching a group
of walking catfish how to dance.
Just how is fishing these days?
WELL, IT dropped off for a
while with the cold weather, he
said, but now that its wanned
up we have a nice group of
fishermen moving in.
In fact it looks like well
have a record catch for the May
bait-a-thon preliminaries.
Whats a bait-a-thon?
\ Oh, you know. We get
together and give out prizes for
the best lures caught. There are
contests in the live bait, artificial
bait, and novelty categories.
THAT MUST be interesting.
The novelty category is a lot
of fun. Last year the winder i

Guest Column

' >
a fish who caught a set of false
teeth. It seems this old-timer ran
out of minnows and his wife was
yelling at him...
Imaginative.
It was a rough catch too.
There werent any hooks but the
first dozen guys who saw it
laughed so hard they swam into
the boat and brained
themselves.
Whats the prize?
THATS STILL up in the air.
Last year it was a date with
Flipper. Unfortunately the
winner was a little fellow and
. orric ate fm'\

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And then this old guy asks me where he can buy some acid to smoke.

READERS FORUM I

Hershey
MR. EDITOR:
I was very disappointed with
the column Hershey Defended
in Tuesdays edition. How Mr.
Singer can defend Gen. Hershey
is beyond me, for the fact is
simple. He relished his position
as head of the Selective Service
and thus must be held
accountable.
Mr. Singer writes we live in a
new generation, as does Hershey,
though he truly longed for the
past! And I am not sad as
Hershey seems to be that an
institution which destroys
human lives is (hopefully)
becoming passed. But one
concludes from his speech that
Hershey, aware of Numburg,
still believes in drafting almost

Any new developments in
fishing?
Yes, some good and some
bad. Os course, there are all
these oil spills. One tanker
breaks up and there goes the
neighborhood.
Then there was that rock
festival on the shore this winter.
Somebody spilled a gallon of
LSD in the Gulf. Talk about
flying fish!
PROBABLY THE greatest
long-range threat to fishing is
this urbanization. As humans are
crowded together their quality
of life decreases.
This is endangering our
supply of fishermen for
generations to come.
What can we do?
WE MUST set aside large
areas where humans can live
with clean air and water. If we
let this crowding continue the
animals of the world will be here
alone and all those fascinating
humans will be a thing of the
past.
Its time the animals of the
world got together to protect
this valuable natural asset.

CAPTIONS OUTRAGEOUS

anyone to use as cannon fodder
in Americas bungling overseas
adventures without any second
thought on its morality. A prime
example: his SS replacement,
Curtis Tarr, has expanded CO
status to anyone who can prove
he has come to a logical
conclusion that war and military
service are evil. But Hershey
reiterated in his speech that COs
should still be given for strict
religious reasons only.
A final comment. I attended
Hersheys speech, and submitted
two questions. One was asked,
and it stated: How can you
justify drafting 18-year olds
without a voting franchise, that
is before the recent Supreme
Court ruling? Is it, or is it not a
totalitarian policy? Hershey
replied that totalitarian was a
mighty big word, by golly,
seemingly ruling that question
out of order because I used a
mighty big word. He then
proceeded to hen and haw, and
list most of the moral questions
posed to him, just plain didnt
answer the question. 1.e., he
didnt communicate (though he
believes in communication as
Mr. Singer noted.)
In conclusion, Mr. Singer, a
nice old man with good
intentions does not a saint make.
BRIAN THOMPSON (2UC)
. "\ 'v
Rafferty
EDITOR:
I just finished reading Dr. Max
Raffertys syndicated column in
the Jacksonville newspaper. I
cannot believe some of -his
statements.
For those who arent familiar
with Dr. Raferty, he was former
Superintendent of the California
School System for eight years.
He remains an arch conservative.
In his column he states that
school children should be forced
to stand and salute our flag even
against their will.
We are always reminded of
how Communists brainwash and
virtually force Communism
upon their young. Dr. Rafferty

Thursday, January 28,1971, The Florida Alligator,

was director of the largest school
system in the nation. He had a
great deal of control over our
school age children.
Are we any better than the
Communists?
Think about it!
JEROME BONNETT lUC
Christ Again
MR. EDITOR:
I was so pleased to see a
speaker like Josh McDowell,
who not only saw the problems
but also had the greatest answer
for our individual and
worldwide problems.
This is Jesus Christ, the Son
of God, who let His sinless body
be sacrificed according to the
Jewish traditions and Scripture,
and then rose from the dead to
show He truly was the Son of
God.
No longer does man have to
meditate on his belly button
or chant foolish words for
answers. Jesus came to seek
and save the lost (Luke 19:10)
and was delivered for our
offenses (sins) and was raised
again for our justification.
(Romans 4:25)
For God so loved the world
that he gave his only begotten
Son, that whoever believes in
him should not perish but have
eternal life. For God sent the
Son into the world, not to
condemn the world, but that the
world might be saved through
him. (I John 3:16,17)
Real brotherhood lies in
turning to the person of Jesus
Christ. For by one Spirit we
were all baptized into one body
- Jews or Greeks, slaves or free
- and were made to drink of
one Spirit. (Galatians 12:13)
I hope many people did hear
Josh for I have also found a real
peace of mind and greater love
for others through Jesus now
that I never had before. I wish
everyone would read the Gospel
of John and try Revelation 3:20
He truly is the way, the
truth, and the life. (John 14:6)
REID DAVIS (3ED)

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

Brother Hoyt Finds
True And Living God

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Wire Editor
A man who studied for a
number of years under the great
spiritual masters of the East, and
who was one of the early leaders
in the Haight-Asbury hip
movement in San Francisco, will
speak at UF this weekend about
how he found the true and
living God.
Brother David Hoyt who
studied under Babiji, Lahryi
Mahasia, Paramahansa
Yogananday, Sri Ramnakrishna,
Vivikananda and others, said he
sought for years before finding
that there was just one
mediator between God and man,
the man Christ Jesus.

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HOYT WILL BE at UF Friday
on the Plaza from noon until 4
p.m. and at 8 pan. in the
Ballroom of the Reitz Union.
Saturday he will speak at the
Catholic Student Center at 9
a.m. and will speak at street
parties at sth Avenue at 11 a.m.,
Kennedy Homes at 1 p.m., and
at Gardenia Gardens at 3 p.m.
Saturday night he will speak at
the Catholic Student Center.
Sunday Hoyt will speak at
area churches, and at the St.
Augustine Catholic chapel at 8
p.m.
HOYT SAID HE began
searching for God while in
prison for six and a half years

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I

Bridge More Than Wood

By TERRY VENTO
Alligator Writer
If only wood could speak ...
Stained by ink and scarred by
knives, the little bridge west of
the Reitz Union on the UF
campus has become this areas
mecca of beauty of all kinds.
ITS SERENITY and foliage
invites intruders in the forms of
both curious wildlife and
humanity.
A nearby trickling stream,
subjected to everything from hot
feet to skipping rocks, is a
part-time wishing well. It boasts
a wealth of secret hopes in the
form of the scattered pennies
sunken in its floor.
Students stroll on the bridge
cm a lazy afternoon, dash on its
path on the way to class or just
visit it briefly on the way to
nowhere in particular.
PARENTS WITH their little
ones delight in unhurried visits,
for no book could teach such a
lesson of beauty as well as this
bridge -a page from Mother
Natures scrapbook.
Amateur painters equipped
with water colors and
imagination find the simple
beauty of the area worth
replication.

for smuggling narcotics. After
being paroled he went to San
Francisco where he became
involved in the first love-ins and
be-ins. During the Summer of
Love (1967) he lived with free
love and flower power. But that
wasnt any good, he said.
Sure, flowers and love and
we could help people physically
a little, but the inner lives of the
hundreds were being destroyed.
Sure, do your own things
sounded groovy and good, but
the effects were horrible, he
said.
Hoyt tried Krishna
Consciousness for awhile and
became involved with the
Temple in Haight. Then one

In weather of all kinds, people
find their way to the bridge. But
the sunny days seem most
popular, as blankets with
studying couples spot the area,
frisbee games abound and food
is enjoyed on the neighboring
picnic tables.
ALTHOUGH THE bridge
does tell a story of beauty,
perhaps its most precious tales
are hidden in the inscriptions,
initials and poetry that are
etched on its wooden sides.
Tony our love was desire
based upon impossibility
8.R.
Sometimes the plight of
another would issue consolation
from one who knows the hurt of
loss.
NEVER HAVE I known so
great a love to last so short a
time.
Never has anyone explained
the flight of love. But, my
friend, at least you have held it
for one sweet moment.
Indeed it was a sweet
moment! And the love we

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Sure, flowers and love and we could
help people physically a little, but the
inner lives of the hundreds were being
destroyed. Sure, do your own things
sounded groovy and good, but the efffcts
were horrible.
Brother David Hoyt

night Hoyt saw Christ in a
vision.
WOW! IT WAS at that
moment I got the largest shock
of my life. I had always believed
that Jesus was the greatest guru
or Avatar of the Ages, but now I
realized that He must have been
more. 1 prayed and asked God to
show me the Truth at any cost.
Then I found in that Bible that
Jesus Christ the True Light of
the world, was setting me free.

shared I will never forget.
BETWEEN THE numerous
pairs of initials in hearts, is even
found an occasional SAE and
Remember Josh.
Is there really so much
significance in this little bridge?
It has been said that beauty is
found in the eyes of the
beholder. Judging from the
multitude of inscriptions these
beholders have left behind, it
does have meaning and even
memories to many.
THE PAINFUL problem of
freedom vs. love is displayed on
its wood in faded blue ink ...
Only lonely men know
freedom.
Love, as lovely as it is, still
ensnares.
Is it better then,
to be on the outside, in the
dark and free,
or caged contentedly,
but still looking out behind
the bars?
This little bridge would have a
lot to say ... if only wood could
speak.



Prince Finds Photography Exciting

By CONNIE DANIEL
Alligator Writer
Doug Prince, instructor of
photography in the school of
fine arts, calls himself an
amateur photographer, but
anyone who takes a good look at
his exhibit at the annual faculty
art show may wonder about
that.
Prince, whos 28, explains it
by saying hes still in the
exploratory stage. He says
theres a great deal of freedom
in being an amateur I hope I
never leave that stage.
IN THIS YEARS exhibit he
has two types of photography, a
dimensional type, and prints.
One print, Self Portrait, is
the result of six months work.
Prince said he had the idea of
himself floating in a stream. He
had a picture of a UF stream,
and another his wife took of him
floating in a stream at a nearby
camp.
Combining the two he got the
effect of a drowning man.

Draft Counseling
Needs Helpers
By TODD PRICE
Alligator Writer
r
: V ['
.... "i
- ' 4
If we get one guy out then its worth it.
This is the basic premise behind the Student Government (SG)
sponsored draft counseling program. Well counsel anybody, but UF
students primarily apply, stated Director Mark Waldman. Those
counseled include over 200 people during the Fall Quarter and about
25 per week thus far this quarter. Though UF students get priority,
anyone may request an appointment.
ITS NOT our business to persuade, Waldman stated. He also said
the counselors dont give advice but present alternatives, addresses,
and when a counselee needs help to write his beliefs for conscientious
objector status, to help them articulate what they feel.
The most frustrating problem, according to Waldman, is that most
of the time they (those counseled) dont have the slightest idea what
theyre going to do. The student, though having gone to college for
four years, has rarely, on his own, tried to really look into his problem
for alternatives.
' i. .
THERE ARE three active volunteers with another in training who
work in shifts averaging three hours per person with hours scheduled
to suit the counselor. Office hours are Monday from 2-5 p.m., 7-10
p.m. and Tuesday from 7-10 p.m.
More counselors are needed. Training length averages four weeks
but depends on the individuals past experience. There is no pay.
Though the program is succeeding, there is still a lack of counselors.
Anyone interested in being counseled or in becoming a counselor
should call the SG secretary at 392-1665.

The National Shakespeare Co.
A wAk "Much Ado About Nothing''
jSwiapDJ February 6, 1971 in the
University Auditorium at
PfffSSE%Hj|| 8:15 p.m Student tickets are
SI.OO and $2.00. General
admission is $2.50 or $3.50.
\/\y Purchase tickets at the
XILX Constans Theatre from noon noon-4:30
-4:30 noon-4:30 p.m. on weekdays.
Sponsored ky J.* Wayne Rein
Union.
: >_ Ll^A

LATER he added a landscape
with house, stream, and rocks
(taken in Iowa). The effect was
good, but he got tired of this
and decided to put something in
the sky.
First he tried birds, but finally
settled for a moon he
photographed in Athens, Ga.
The final touch was a rainstorm
over the Atlantic. The result
Self Portrait -a manipulation
of five images.
Prince, who graduated from
the University of lowa with a
MA in photography, has been
doing a lot of experimenting
with dimensional photography
for more than two years.
HE WAS INSPIRED by a very
early form of photography
called ambro-type (I 860). This
was like a print on glass with
black paper behind it, giving a
two-dimensional effect. What
Prince uses now is lithofilm,
frequently used in graphic arts.
Prince has inserted various
lithofilms (pictures on plastic) in
plexiglass rectangles. The result
has the effect of a 3-D movie,
impressive in the way the theme
of each block stands out. He has
four on exhibit now.

FREEDOM AS AN AMATEUR

Prince says photography has
an exciting future. He said in the
past art looked upon
photography as a subversive
element in the finer arts. But
thats changed now. Its a
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popular medium in art almost
a fad.
Prince has had several exhibits
prior to the art faculty show,
including the University of lowa,
Nihon University, Tokyo,

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I DOUBLEDAY

Thursday, January 28,1971, flu Florida Alligator,

Oregon State University, and
others. Hes also had several of
his works published in
photography magazines, and has
won awards twice at the annual
Winter Park Art Festival.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

MIAMI (UPI) Cloyce Bradley Cook was the runaway
son of a South Carolina preacher. He was barely 17,
blond, clean-cut, very polite, and adrift with only a few
dollars in this city of expensive hotels and palm-studded
beadies.
Cloyces dad, he said, was too strict. His mom had been
nagging him. The family had argued about some of the
bad company** Cloyce had been keeping lately.
SO CLOYCE packed a bag during the night, boarded a
bus in Piedmont, S.C., and headed southward nearly three
weeks ago. His money didnt last long in this winter
tourist mecca. He got hungry and homesick. Then it
turned cold and Cloyce had no (dace to deep.
On Jan. 17, he came across a car belonging to Mrs.
Josephine Fuschetti. She left the keys in the ignition.
Cloyce climbed behind the wheel, cranked the engine and
decided to head for home.
He got halfway up the Florida coast before a policeman
spotted the stolen car in Titusville and arrested Cloyce. He
was returned to Dade County last Friday and brought
before committing Magistrate James Rainwater along with
30 other prisoners.

World Wrap-Up

Rate Hike Approved
For Long Pittance
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
Florida Public Service
Commission approved increases
in intrastate long distance
telephone rates Monday that will
add from five to IS cents to the
cost of each three minute call.
The increases, which the
commission said will make long
distance telephone users pay
their own way for the first time,
go into effect at 12:01 a.m.
Friday.
All IS companies operating in
Florida were authorized to boost
their long distance rates, but two
companies recently granted rate
hikes were ordered to post bond
to protect their customers in
case the additional boost pushes
their earnings above accepted
levels.
The increase will amount to
five to 10 cents for each
three-minute station-to-station
call and five to IS cents for
person-to-person calls.
Army Roducos Its
Countor-lntolligonco
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Sensitive to charges that it has
been spying on civilians, the
Army appears to have reduced
its counter-intelligence activity
and ordered a purge of some
of the 7 million counter counterintelligence
intelligence counterintelligence files it maintains at
Ft. Holabird, Md.
This came to light Tuesday
with the disclosure by Capitol
Hill sources of a letter sent by
Mtj. Gen. Kenneth G. Wickham,
the Armys Adjutant General, to

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When A Clean Cut Kid Goes To Jail...

all major domestic commands.
The letter spells out
situations warranting collection
of counter-intelligence
information on civilians and
explicitly declares: individuals
and organizations do not
become of concern to the
Department of the Army solely
because they oppose government
charges.
Action will be taken, the
letter says, to purge all files of
information the storage of which
is not authorized by this letter.
Wickham's letter is dated Dec.
15, 1970, and follows charges
that soldiers in Illinois kept
surveillance on the activities of
Sen. Adlai E. Stevenson 111, Rep.
Abner D. Mikva, and former
Illinois Gov. Otto Kener, all
liberal Democrats.
Conspirators Rights
Violated, NCC Says
e
LOUISVILLE,. Ky. (UPI)
The National Council of
Churches Tuesday said a federal
grand jury violated the rights
of co-conspirators named with
the Rev. Philip Berrigan in an
alleged plot to kidnap one of
President Nixons advisers.
The Councils general board
unanimously adopted a
statement expressing concern
over successive violations of the
right of accused persons to be
presumed innocent until

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RAINWATER, a small claims judge and former U.S.
Border Patrol chief, was impressed by the youths
clean-cut appearance and extreme politeness.
Son, you dont look like the kind of boy who should
be in jail, Rainwater said.
Im a runaway, sir, Goyce replied. Rainwater had no
choice. He sent Cloyce to the county jail, but with this
request:
Son, when you go back to jail, theyll give you a
phone call. You call your dad. Tell him to call me, either
here at the office or at home tonight. Will you do that?
YES, SIR, Cloyce said. 11l do that.
Cloyce kept his word, and Friday night Rev. Calvin
Cook, frantic with worry since Cloyce ran away, called
the judge from Piedmont and told him were driving
down there right away.
Cloyce, with no past record, scored low on a jail
classification test and through what officials now say was
an error in common sense was placed in cell 6BIR. It is
an 18 by 36-foot steel cage with two toilets, a tiny
shower, a dozen bunks and a crust of rust and filth.
Cloyce had 19 cellmates. They ranged in age from 42 to
18. They were in jail for crimes ranging from murder to

adjudged guilty under due
process of law.
The board acted after Rep.
William R. Anderson, D-Tenn.,
appealed to the Council last
Sunday on behalf of Roman
Catholic priest Philip Berrigan
and his brother, Daniel, also a
priest.
Philip Berrigan and five other
persons were indicted by a
federal grand jury in Harrisburg,
Pa., on charges of plotting to
kidnap presidential adviser
Henry A. Kissinger and blow up
the heating systems of
government buildings in
Washington.
Veterans To Conduct
U.S. War Crime Trials
NEW YORK (UPI) A group
of Vietnam war veterans says the
Mai Lai massacre is not an
isolated incident and that in 10
years of war hundreds of war
crimes have been committed.
Jan Crumb, president of
Vietnam Veterans Against the
War said that more than 100
Vietnam veterans would testify
Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 and 2 in
Detroit concerning actions they
had seen and in which they had
participated in the war zone.
Crumb said the purpose of the
three days of testimony called
the winter soldier investigation
- was to examine fully the
American policy of genocide
in Vietnam.

peddling dope. There were 13 whites and seven blacks,
including convicted armed robbers Johnnie Lee Jones, 20,
and Melvin Shelton, 19.
CLOYCE*S BOND was SSOO -about SI,OOO less than
normal in such cases but that was still more than Cook
had.
The public defenders office stepped in and got Mrs.
Fuschetti to agree to drop charges if the Cooks would pay
her the SSO it cost to get her car back from Titusville.
The Cooks gratefully agreed. That was Monday evening.
The Cooks, Mrs. Fuschetti, the public defender and Judge
Rainwater were to meet Tuesday morning, sign the
necessary papers and get Cloyce out of jail.
At 3:15 am Tuesday, guards were summoned to cell
6BIR. Cloyce was lying on the concrete floor near the
two toilets. There was a braided rope around his neck and
a knotted towel over his mouth.
CLOYCE Bradley Cook, the 17-year-old runaway son
of a South Carolina preacher, had become the second
victim of a jailhouse murder here in the past 12 months.
Johnnie Lee Jones and Melvin Shelton were charged
with the killing.

We intend to tell America
that, yes, we killed and often
tortured prisoners; yes, we
destroyed villages and even parts
of cities and entire towns, for no
discernible purpose ; yes, we used
weapons and munitions and even
gas, banned by international
law; yes, we forcibly removed
entire populations, Crumb said.
Reporter Spots U.S.
Troops In Cambodia
NEW YORK (UPI)
American troops, dressed in
civilian clothes but wearing
combat boots and carrying
weapons, were found at the
bombed out Phnom Penh airfield
in Cambodia, CBS News
reported Tuesday night.
Correspondent Don Webster,
in a tape broadcast on the CBS
evening news, said newsmen
were barred from one side of the
airfield but by a fluke the
CBS crew did get there.

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And on arrival ... we found
a unit of American troops on the
ground here in Cambodia,
carrying weapons, pistols,
wearing combat boots, but
otherwise wearing civilian
clothes in an apparent attempt
to hide their identity, Webster
said.
He said the soldiers would not
say what their unit was but one
GI said they were led by a
Colonel McKinley and pointed
out a man in a white sports shirt.
The man in the white sports
shirt, according to Webster, was
very upset by our presence and
wouldnt come within one
hundred feet of us much less
answer our questions. Webster
said the men came in in
unmarked helicopters.
Webster said unmarked
American-made helicopters have
been spotted flying around
Cambodia and at the airport,
there were eight unmarked
helicopters in the wreckage in
addition to the ones the UJS.
gave Cambodia.



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EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! FLORIDA GRADE A" FRESH (POLY BAG) I TENDER SLICED I
Whole FRYERS 29$ e e F r
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF FULL-CUT I I
ROUNDSTEAK 98< I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! PALM RIVER FLAVORFUL I EXTRA VALUE BUY! I
Skinless FRANKS_.^39t
I BACON I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! SAVE 22 canto ON DETERGENT EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! SAVE 50 cento ON X 1
TIDE "XK 65< FAB DETERGENT 1 99< I AQ+ I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! SAVE 4 canto ON RED PACK EVERYDAY LOWPRICEI SAVE 12 eentaON WHOLE SUN I 1-LB. PKG. M
CAN TOMATOES 13 ORANGE JUICE s?&l2t| I
GFRUIT JUICE 39{ EVAP. MILK TALL CAN 13<| EXTRA VALUE BUYS! I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! SAVE 5 canto ON CAMPBELL'S EVERYDAY LOWPRICEI SAVE 10 canto ON OUR PRIDE
TOMATO SOUP "Mo< ICE MILK <£S.49t| I Your Choice .. Sunshine Brandi
EXTRA VALUE BUY! -SAVE 39 canto ON PET NON-DAIRY EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 10 canto ON OUR PRIDE I
COFFEE CREAMER J£ z 39< ICE CREAM 59<| #GREEN BEANS WITH PORK I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE So ON RED GATE EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! MORTON ASSORTED FROZEN TURNIP GREENS WITH PORK I
KIDNEY BEANS -3 12< MEAT POT PIES 8-OZ. SIZE 19<| TURNIP GREENS WITH ROOTS I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! SAVE 3 CENTS ON OUR PRIDE EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI INTERSTATE FROZEN POTATOES I # GREENS WITH PORK I
FRESH BREAD 15< FRENCH FRIES 19( I #NORTHERN beans with pork I
EXTRA VALUE BUY! OUR PRIDE THRIFTY DINNER EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 20 canto ON CREAM-WHITE I
FRESH ROLLS 15< SHORTENING S 59 EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 20 canto ON COFFEE EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 10 cants ON KRAFT
MAXWELL HOUSE 69< MAYONNAISE 59 EVERYDAY LOWPRICEI-SAVE 7 cants ON SELF-RISING EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! EARLY GARDEN SWEET I
TRIANGLE FLOUR 37< DEL MONTE PEAS S, 25< I sov. u P To /< Illy I
£ j B
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI I I
everyday lowpricei kaMamtommmmtototomtotomM
/%IJ Miluf/iiitAA FRESH HOMOGENIZED GRADE "A I EXTRA VALUE BUYI I
wW rrHIWOUKBv I ; large farm golden ripe I
BEERS- 89{ bananas
SAVE 30< AT BIG STARI HALF-GALLON CARTON 59<
THJESUPERMARKJEIjrH^mLLSJIJLjKM^S!

3736 NEWBERRY ROAD

Thursday, January 28,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

>. ' .Jr
PRICIS GOOD THUR., JAN. 28 thru SUN., JAN. 31
SM rnnA Quantity Rights Reserved
WINN-WXIC STORES, INC. COPYtIGMT-tV7I MO.TON
y i T WIMW SAY£ Pumpkin Pies 5 88
DIXIE DARUNG PRESTIGE
Bread mgSm thrifty maid 20*
Twin Rolls. .2 59 c |fSg| VI I[h A D JB B>
Pecan Buns 7 ~~39 c I'SHI JIIWIA
I**l \ 1 -,irsl Limit lof your choice with $7.50 or more purchase excluding cigarettes mm HHHB M
SAVE 10c. .. DIXIE DARLING KJ \| SAVE 18c... DIXIE CRYSTALS POUND
Fruit Buns ... 39 c SUGAR 5 49 c 5 BAG
rMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, '*'**> *>
10c OFF . SAVE 30c ALL grinos QUICK or REGULAR DUNCAN HINES LAYER |
CHEER # ASTOR If QUAKER H CAKE
DETERGENT# COFFEE ffl OATS |fp MIXES j
limit I of your choice with $7.50 or more f! U*lt 1 with $7.50 or more purchase < limit 2 with $7.50 or m?re purchase
purchase excluding cigarettes. M | excluding cigarettes. exclud.ng cgoreHes. SAVE
BLUE, WHITE § CAI/E MHBI ... A^B
OR COLD WATER MM/M j iAVt CAVF 35 c
arrow 34c JAVI x i
i ^ p t 18-*. Mm\ 1 8 1/2-o x.
Lm v I pkgs.
p r lB ||| s
' mmmmmmm < wmmmmmmhm?
" Hl-C FRUIT PILLSBURY PANCAKE (5c OFF) PIPER TRASH CAN VOS HAIR
Drinks 3 a s l Mix .... at 25 C Liners .. 3as s l Spray... 88 c
VAN CAMPS W/Beant CRACKIN'GOOD ROYAL HONEY KELLOGG'S CORN MY-T FINE
Chili .. 3 a s l Grahams $ 1 00 Flakes *. 21 c Pudding 2 a. $ 1 00
BBY SAUER- CRACKIN'GOOD ASSORTED FAMILY FAVORITES 50 PLUMROSE DEVILED HAM SWEETHEART FABRIC
Kraut. 3 a S I OO Cookies 3 a S I OO Spread 3 a s l Softener ss 78 c
FRISKIES DOG DELMONTE GREEN LANCE COCKTAIL GLENN FARAAS STEMS 4 PIECES
Food .. 7-v S I OO Peas ... 4a S I OO Peanuts 4a $ l Mushrooms 4
ni'l 1
Jf DEL MONTE SLICED or HALVES CHOCOLATE DRINK / < T^N ,, *BCX IVORY 1
| Yellow ClingM NESTLES M LIQUID M SUNSHINE
I PEACHES P QUIK DETERGENT 1 BUHER
limit 2 with $7.50 or more purchase
K cans' F | ? CAN M (Qtr 0 ..) B^B^j^
1 B*w B : M " B
B M Bomt B
INSTANT COFFEE MB stOKELY TOMATO EL THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING
NESCAFE § CATSUP 5-1 KRAFT 3 I
MIPEROSE ARMOUE ARSONS EEGUIAE OE CLEAR FRITO LAY
Sweetner ....*£ 69* Beans & Chili.. Ammonia ss. 27* Potato Chips ... S£ 33*
WMIVIONIhM ARMOUR .ARSONS IEMON EEJEO IAV CHEETOS BAKED
Granulated ~ 89* Potted Meat... 29* Ammonia *Sr 31* Cheese Puffs .. %' 39*
emVCBOCKfR FUDGE MAGGI KEEBLER ZESTA KLEENEX REGULAR 4 DESIGN
Brownie Mix... ss 59* Chicken Cubes 39* Sa I tines £s 41* Paper Towels. 4 's£ *l
DELMONTE SLICED ALPOCHOP SUNSHINEKMSPV lOOFT. ...SAVE )2c
Pineapple .... 3 a 89* Horsemeat... 2 Sir 57* Crackers .... v 'is 43 e Glad Wrap... 3 . I
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open ON SUNDAY 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.
o f,

i. The Flortde Alligetor, Thuradey, January 28,1871



omjhk PRICES GOOD TRUE, JAN. 28 thru SUN., JAR 31
SAVE 34 c
SUPERBRAND MILD DAISY STYLE
W-p BRAND USDA CHOICE E-Z CARVE OVEN-READY |H 1 CHEESE # %J T
JHk HHi J SINGLY WRAPPED SLICED
DID Dfl AVT Hi Cheese Food -7
mil# I Pirn. Cheese 69 c
Delmonico I CHUCK 4$ FRYER
I STEAKS m
: 5.,, ... %
W-D BRAND GROUND HANDI-PAK STEW FRESH PORK SPARE TAUMADGE FARMS COUNTRY SMOKED WHOLE or HALF PIIISBURY BUTTERMILK
Meat... 89 c Ribs .... 69 c Hams . 99 c Biscuits 4 ss-4 5 C
TENDER SLICED BEEF SUNNYLAND PURE PORK BREAKFAST LINK FRENCH FRIED HEAT A SERVE FISH COPELAND RANGER SMOKED SUB (Half or Whol*)
Liver ... 39 c Sausage $ 1" Sticks ... 89 c Bacon .. 39 c
FRESH HALF or WHOLE PORK BREADED BEEF FRESH FROZEN TURBOT WHITE FISH COPEUND All MEAT
Hams . 59 c Fritters 79 c Fillets... . 59 c Franks .. 49 c
FUU QUARTER IOIN SLICED PORK OSCAR MAYER All MEAT PILLSBURY SWEETMILK TARNOW CHIPPED SMOKED BEEF, HAM orCORNED
Chops .. . 69 c Wieners -7 Biscuits 4 45 c Beef .. 3 S I OO
g|§Bhh G rr BBF B Hormnienized)
TOMATOES j j BANANAS j |
u.s.h..twnmt AO. MkL fBTNCH FRIED .. SAVE 11- Afll
POTATOES 10 .gy C& POTATOES 5s DO?
HARVEST FRESH SAVE lie... TASTE O' SEA URGE MORTON 3-Couno Chic. A Dump., Chic., Turkey B**f
Annies sit 49 c Ofrtons ...... 3 29 c Fish Sticks ..... o. 68 c Dinners ....... *£ 58 c
/ 'rH C3 WASHINGTON STATE RED or GOLDEN SAVE 18c.., MORTON SAVE 10c BIRDSEYE INTERNATIONAL HAWAIIAN A PARISIAN
Cdbbaae * 10 c Apples 10 89*= Pound Cake .. 2- *l Veg. Dinners .2 . 88 c
w BOSTON or 8188 LETTUCE ENDIVE, ESCAROIE or ROMAINE SAVE I 8e... MORTON GERMAN SAVE 10c BIRDSEYE International Mexican, Bavarian A Japan.*.
Potatoes 4 59 c Salad Greens 2 . 29 c Cnoc. Cake .. 2 *l Veg. Dinners .2 * 88 c
Carrots 2 <= 23 c Margarine 45 c Pecan Twist 58 c Sausage Pizza.. 68 c
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY Aaj WGN SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.

Thursday, January 28,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



FOR SA LE
I-:-:::-::::-::-:-:-:*::-:-:-::-:-:-:::-::-:-:*::-::-:--
English Bulldog Puppies AKC reg.
Championship Bloodlines. Males and
Females available call 378-9808
(A-st-67-p)
1970 Bonneville 650 Triumph New
pistons 5800 miles Asking SI3OO.
Will trade for car call 373-2596 after
spm (A-st-67-p)
YAMAHA ENDURO 250 1970
Excellent woods bike extras TV
portable b&w Like new Oave
376-7146 After 5 PM (A-st-68-p)
MARTIN GUITAR D-18 $225 Phone
376-9845 (A-st-68-p)
Single hose 2-stage regulator scuba
pro MKlll used once still In box
brand new will sacrifice 208 NW 14
St. rear apartment. (A-3t-69-p)
Stereo Panasonic 7070 set. Includes
radio AM, FM & FM stereo, 8 track
tape plus speakers, for more
Information call 376-8878
(A-st-69-p)
Diamond solltare with band local
appraisal value with papers for
insurance $705. 78ct. best offer ask
for Vic 8-5 376-8443 (A-st-69-p)
Books: College English: the first
year, English study guide, CPS 121,
122, CSS study guides 111, 112 call
372-7581 (A-st-9-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS I
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes |
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark. §
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of |
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more j
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add 5.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for I
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds. I
Deadline -3.00 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDft BY PHONE I
W K) | I
i £ I
v> I
J r T] O) 3" 5
SSsstiss
Bo§ w s $ s f n
tnCQJ Q) CL J a>
" £ 5
z
Q I
W W IO
_j- & s- & s- §
8 & -? §
- 9 i JD
§?a a c
| BS' Z
£ ~ | §
o ~
% n > *Q z I
? -H o c >
-< o o
ISI I
5S h
A
X > I
I
I

ifc

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Golf clubs complete set Including
bag. northwestern aluminum shaft,
cost me $l4O will sell for $65. almost
new call Mike after 5 378-6597
(a-st-70-p)
Round front china closet, chase
lounge, set 4 & 6 chairs, tea wagon,
round oak table, piano, book case.
Antiques & oddities. 6110 S.W. 13th
St. Closed Sundays. (A-4t-70-p)
Ampex stereo player recorder plus
speakers S9O call Kyle 392-8720
(A-3t-70-p)
1970 Kawasaki 500 MK 111 Very Fast
Good Condition $750 or make offer
1970 Triumph Bonneville SI,OOO or
make offer 372-4075 (A-3t-70-p)
1968 Honda 305 superhawk runs
perfect, new battery & tires, smaller
tank and seats. $450 Claude
376-1767 (A-3t-70-p)
WEIGHT SET: $lO, BIRD CAGE:
SB, WOOD BOOK CASE: $lO. Call
378-0618 (A-3t-70-p)
Good buy on a 63 Corvalr. Runs like
a dream. S3OO or best offer. Call
373-1162 after 10 pm. (A-4t-70-p)
Add color to you( pad. stained glass
lamps, do it yourself or assembled,
kits complete with precut glass, lead,
solder, wiring, chain 376-2195
(A-st-70-p)

Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

FOR SA LE
Must sell 2 5 speakers enclosed in
walnut cases for just $23; also Gibson
electric guitar will go for only $l5O.
Call Wm. at 376-0406. (A-st-70-p)
Sansui 2000 amp. $225, 2 Sansul 200
speakers SIOO each. All used only 10
hours call 378-0381 after 5:00
(A-st-70-p)
Guitar Martin D2B plush lined
hardshell case new cost S6OO take
best offer over $335 372-5928 Ken
(A-10t-70-p)
1969 Honda CL9O VERY GOOD
includes helmet and car racks S2OO
call Ken 373-3028 (A-st-70-p)
1970 Honda 750 excellent condition
$1295 call 376-6059 after 4:00 pm
(A-st-70-p)
BLACK LIGHTS Only 3 left cant
buy anymore from manufacturer for
this price. After these, prices must go
up to S2O. Call 392-9197 (A-2t-70-p)
Roomate wanted female beautiful
new house on lake own bedroom
$53.56 mo call 373-1372 (A-3t-71-p)
How bout a really nice 3/4 bed? Its
like new good spring and good
mattress originally S7O now Its
yours for only 378-6158 (A-lt-71-p)
Royal typewriter $35. Two slide
rulers sl3 & $5. One Gramophone
radio/record player SBO. Call Lefty
372-6474 before 5:00 daily.
(A-2t-71-p)
Gerts a gay girl ready for a whirl
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shamppoer sl.
Electric upholstery shampoos also
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-62-c)
PEAVEY PA system 400 watt peak 4
chan. 2 Inputs/can reverb 2 spk
cabinets 2 15 JBLD 130s/cab $825
cash Bill Taylor ac 904 245-2525
Bellevlew, Fla. I will call u
(A-st-71-p)
Scuba diving equip, including tank,
regulator, wet suit, fins, mask, weight
belt and snorkle asking S2OO or best
offer call 372-3750 June leave no.
(A-lt-71-p)
100 watt amp garrard turntable two
speakers 12 In. woofers roberts 997
tape recorder with tapes best offer
must sell call 376-6187 after 4pm
(A-st-71-p)
FOR RENT
%V.V.VAVAV.V.V.V.%V.V.V.V.V.V. .V.V
2 female roommates wanted, own
room in large house, pets welcome.
$55/mo. + 1/3 util, call 376-8736
after 5:30 (B-st-68-p)
Male Roomy Wanted share 2 Bdr.
apt. 3128 N.W. 21 St. $32.50/mo.
available now. call 376-8384 or
378-6886 after 5 p.m. (b-st-67-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom apt. No. 102
olympla close to university furnished
- air & heat walk in closets nice place
1100 SW Bth Ave. call 378-7429
(B-st-67-p)
Need 1 male roomate to share
University Gardens Trace Apt.
Immediate Occupancy $72.50 mo. +
V 2 util. 372-5246 bldg. 712 apt. 306
(B-3t-70-p)
Sublet beautiful two bedroom apt.
furnished, carpeted, dishwasher, cen.
air. tanglewood manor, available Feb.
1 378-8649 or 372-2200. S2OO
(B-3t-70-p)

p *******
ACROSS FROM MAll ||||
I BOR^M^ERS"!
PENTHOUSE 2 I I
Days
vklltKM !*! -mI lH *JH*LII C.illx t*Kl |HHV *!
H mchi lvl.r t* m |* tu, .*ml 'ui 'latirtco* M BH
Jf Uhl f\niloHM *MI\ vv>*nl.a IVkv
MM *> * V IK

for rent
One bedroom air cond. apt. sllO per
month. Couples only, no children, no
pets. Call 372-8737. (B-4t-69-p)

I ORGANIZATION I
PRESIDENTS
I 1971 SEMINOLE PICTURE SCHEDULES : I
I ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1971 I
I PRESIDENTS OF: I
I DELTA THETA PHI I
I ORDER OF THE COIF I
I PHI ALPHA DELTA I
I PHI DELTA DELTA I
I PHI DELTA PHI I
I UF LAW REVIEW I
I PRESIDENTS OF THE PRECEEDING I
I ORGANIZATIONS I
I WILL MEET IN FRONT OF THE I
I AT 2:45 P.M. TO HAVE THEIR PICTURES I
I TAKEN FOR THE 1971 SEMINOLE I
I ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 29,1971 I
I PRESIDENTS OF: I
I PHI SIGMA
I FLA. ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB
I ALPHA CHI SIGMA
I SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON
I GAMMA THETA UPSILON
I PHI ALPHA THETA
I CHINESE LANGUAGE SOCIETY
I PI MU EPSILON
I SIGMA PI SIGMA
I PI SIGMA ALPHA
I ALPHA KAPPA DELTA
I DELTA SIGMA RHO
I SIGMA ALPHA ETA
I PRESIDENTS OF THE PRECEEDING
I ORGANIZATIONS WILL MEET IN FRONT
I OF PEABODY HALL AT 3:15 P.M.
I TO HAVE THEIR PICTURES TAKEN
| FOR THE 1971 SEMINOLE
I ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 29,1971
I PRESIDENTS OF:
I ASSN. FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
I KAPPA DELTA PI
I PI LAMBA THETA
I STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL
I CHILDREN
I STUDENT FLA. EDUCATIONAL ASSN.
H
I PRESIDENTS OF THE PRECEEDING
I ORGANIZATIONS
I WILL MEET IN FRONT OF NORMAN HALL
I AT 3:45 P.M. TO HAVE THEIR PICTURES
I TAKEN FOR THE 1971 SEMINOLE.

FOR RENT
Sublease one bedroom ac apt near
campus available for Immediate
occupancy rent 138 dollars plus
utilities call 378-5661 (B-4t-70-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
One bedroom furnished apt. to block
from Tlgert. Central a/c, heat,
carpeted, many extras. $145 a mo.
Spring and Summer qtrs. 372-8271
(B-3t-70-p)

in concert
BAEZ
8:00 p.m. I
person I
JWRUBOXOFFICE PRESENTED BY SGP |

Seasons
Best Musical
N. Y. DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD AWARDTONY
TONY AWARDTONY AWARD
ppe J 1* i
lne delightful song-and song-anddance
dance song-anddance version of how the
Declaration of
Independence came to be.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 30
Florido Gym 8:15 PM
STUDENTS GENERAL PUBLIC
$3.00 $4.00 Tickets on Sale at:
$2.25 $3.00 J.W.R.U. BOX OFFICE
$1.75 $2.50
'Y '*-*' '
A Student Government Production
jnrfWMf
UUEBM
K-y
HUMPHREY KATHARINE
BOGART HEPBURN
The riotous story of b river-rat and the spinster
sister of a missionary. Bogart's only Academy
Award film.
Union Auditorium 50 cents
1
Thursday, January 28... .7:00 & 9:45
Friday & Sat. the 29 & 30th... 5:30,9:00,10:30
eponeoiad by the J.W. R. Union

FOH RENT
Sublet 1 bedroom air cond apt
slls/mo + utilities, furnished, close
to campus, 1507 NW 4th Ave call
373-1952 after 5:00 pm couples only
(B-2t-71-p)

Thursday, January 28.1971, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
eee e e -e e e e e e
Male roomate needed to share
Campus Land apt. rest of Jan. rent
free, S7O per month plus to util call
378-2888. (B-st-69-p)
WANTED
Listeners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cyllnthla between 1 and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
CHEAP One male romate needed
Village Park Apts. TV and stereo All
meals cooked All dishes washed
$45.00 a month call Tom 372-1117
(C-5t*69-p)
Female Rommate Wanted Le Bonne
Vie Apts. 52.50 Month For More
Information Call 373-2219
(C-3t-70-p)
Dead or wrecked 62 Opel sedan 1700
series must have title will pay up to
$15.00 or please free (C-lt-71-p)
Roomate wanted to share apt., 3
blocks from campus with male grad,
A.C., pool, 46/mo, call 376-3733.
(C-st-71-p)
Male rommate, own bedroom In 2
bdrm Apt. $70.00 + 1/3 utilities.
Frederick Garden Apts. 376-9740,
Charles (C-10t-71-p)
Wanted girl to cook dinner for three
law students. If Interested call
378-7Q82 anytime. (C-3t-70-p)
yr y VVW N T -1 17! yy
WORK STUDY. summer jobs
man-woman 40 hr week day camp
counselor $65-SBO per week 5 days
Call John Liles 372-5621 also swim
instructors (E-3t-69-p)
Part or full-time sales help needed
$3-5/hr guaranteed to service
established customers set your own
hours call between 7 & 9 pm
378-0421 or 378-0121 ask for Ed.
Car needed (E-st-71-p)
Two law students In desperate need
of a cook 5 days a week excluding
Fri. & Sat. point west apts. call
372-7850 after 8:00 P.M. (E-st-68-p)
AUTOS
1967 Flat 124 sedan. Good
dependable transportation. S4OO.
Call 376-5633 after 4. (G-St-67-p)
1970 Volkswagen excellent mech.
condition SIBOO or best offer call
378-7247 evenings (G-4t-69-p)
65 VW BUS 12000 miles on engine
opening windows w screens
curtains homemade camper Interior
good tires S9OO call Roger after 6pm
378-9266 (G-st-68-p)
65 Austin Healy Sprite, British racing
green, good cond. Must sale for
financial reasons. Call Greg after 5.
376-2048 (G-st-70-p)
1963 544 volvo engine + trans rebuilt
compleatly 2 months ago, new
clutch, radio, heater, Interior great
must sell will take anything over
S3OO call 2-8483 anytime (G-3t-70-p)
68 CHEVY VAN: 250 engine,
43,000 miles. AM-FM stereo. Funky
transportation for $llOO. call
376-1711 between 5 and 7 pm.
(g-3t-71-p)
1962 Falcon 6 cy. Good mech.
condition. $240 or best offer call
372-6560 After 7pm (G-2t-71-p)
1966 Mustang Automatic Air New
tires Excellent Condition 1200 or
best offer call 376-8159 5-8 pm
(G-2t-71-p)

Page 17

AUTOS
a**
1965 FALCON 3 Speed, Blue with
white convertible top. Looks and
runs good. $650 or best offer. Call
Gary at 378-9752 (G-3t-71-p)

till
the Hills
directed by Ado Has Mekas
Expressing an uninhibited kindling to light the screen
love for cinema, with wild cinematic jokes and
HALLELUJAH THE HILLS zany stunts in spirited visions
parodies practically every and nostalgic reminiscences,
film style from Griffith to Unencumbered by plot, the
Godard. Two rivals unite in film rides free and billows
friendship as they try to into infectious gaiety and
forget their lost love, Vera, riotous fun.
who has tired of their
courtship and marries
another. The far-fetched
story is merely another
Sunday, \f
January 31
5:30, 8:00 &. 10:30 p.m.
Union Aud.
A Selection From The
Union's Classic Film Series
Haiu33 | ]****** T^ftf2 Begirt BONDS*
S. is JAMES :
"r i Connery id bond ?
DAYS
THUNDERBAuHHMiHiIwH^IOOKnffIH*
3:30 7:45 HR SIIIMI ll< 1 Jil Hi IMIJu Ma
LIVE TWICE %ll l9lVl[nSl
1 30-5 0:00
: Tjmmur pahawsmh* l
* Mt **************MMMMMM
RnWJKV I* eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee a
r tm* |9r,'A
: HURRY! HURRY!
SHOWS : LAST FEW /j||k|
: .. days! Mm v 1 :
S 3 : Funny, real :
£* : and touching! JjPJSL
; COLOR SU finmcas
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
WflsWlaM*********** eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
_ Starts 0+ m
: Tomorrow :
straw < fllMnf
AND
"STUDENT e iaITO*
nurses" j Nancy was beautiful... I
but not very pretty! t
[FLORIDA THEATRE ONLY* V *****
ALL SEATS $1.25
ALL DAYEVERY DAY

AUTOS
1967 VW bus rebuilt angina blue and
whita good condition SIOOO. Call
378-5756 or 372-8682 (G-st-70-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

''XvlvX^x-rXwIvXtXvI&XvXvXyXvX ''XvlvX^x-rXwIvXtXvI&XvXvXyXvXPERSONA
PERSONA ''XvlvX^x-rXwIvXtXvI&XvXvXyXvXPERSONA L
Mostly GERMAN SHEPHERD, year
old, rabies vaccinated, free to good
home. 373*2184 (J-4t-68*p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
Pack your Knapsack for adventure 30
day Bicycle-Camping tour of England
Price Includes: round trip alt fare
rental of 10 speed bike, 2 man tent,
stove, and a very together itenerary
and more Call 376-7985 (J-10t-62-p)
Happy 19 Lynn! or is It 7? or 12?
have a good, no matter how many it
Is! Tad (J-lt-71-p)
To one of the Best Initiation classes
to KROP up In a long time!
Congratulations new Phi Mu Sisters!
We love you!!! (J-lt-71-p)
BIOCHEMICAL WARFARE. If you
are interested in digging Into what
goes on here, meet at 4 pm, Thursday
on the north lawn of union
(J-2t-70*p)
The Copy Center next to College Inn
binders and label holders as specified
by grad school. Xerox copies 4 cents
3 cents our quality and service
guaranteed, open Sundays by
appointment 1718 W Unlv 8 am 9
pm. Parking In rear at Malones
Bookstore. The Copy Center
376-9334 (J-st-67-p)
Little Girl Just think, today you
are a whole seven years old! gblng
and gboing and keep playing! Love
santa claus (J-lt-71-p)
Precision wheel balancing I All work
guaranteed. Mags a specialty.
$1.50/wheel. Why pay $2.25? Call
Havls 378-2957 (J-st-70-p)
Phi Sigma Sigma Sisters, Pledgings
Swell, What the hell; We want our
pins! Phi Slg Love, The Pledges.
(J-lt-71-p)
Truck on over to Laurent's Books
and Demlans Leathers for your ZAP
Comics and a game of Foosball.
Pepsis still a dime. (J-st-71-p)
ill!
|l|
If|||i| HHi HI
'/?! a C -,V- v 'V-V; 'sj VV f i j
M I
' v Vv '( t
1 rum* I
***. m
I Bfe. J||

Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

.VA%v. , .w.v.VAVAV.v.v.y. , .v.y.v.v.
PERSONAL
Coming February 17. THE MAGIC
THEATRE. Entertainment not for
everyone (J-2t-71-p)
LOST St FOUND
FOUND: a purse found near
Mudcrutch farm during the weekend
Call Joyce, 378-9272 (Identify
contents) (L-3t-70-p)
Found: Brown leather glove near
graham area Friday. Contact Karen at
378-8629 or 392-0571 (L-lt-70-p)
Found light meter at Graham pond
during Jane Fonda talk. Claim by
proper Identification. 373-2249
(L-70-3t-p)
Motorcycle helmet, silver, lost In
walker 213, please please return It
cannot afford another, call laura at
372-1987 2nd one In two months
(L-2t-70-p)
Found-black male puppy wearing red
leather collar and flea collar In area
of 13th st and 6th ave please please
call 378-3129 NW section (L-st-70-p)
Lost: QUASI MO TO of big built,
answers sometimes to Freddl
dangerous when In heat but
otherwise gentle. Reward!! call Alan
378-8378 (L-lt-71-p)
X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-XvX-X-X-X-X-X
SERVICES
X:X%!X*X"X*XvX*X*X\*X*X*X\*:;X-X;X-X X:X%!X*X"X*XvX*X*X\*X*X*X\*:;X-X;X-X---INCOME
--INCOME X:X%!X*X"X*XvX*X*X\*X*X*X\*:;X-X;X-X---INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
The Copy Center next to College Inn.
Binders and label holders as specified
by grad school. Xerox copies 4 cents
3 cents our quality and service
guaranteed, open Sundays by
appointment 1718 W Unlv
Bam-9p.m. parking in rear at Malones
Bookstore: The Copy Center
376-9334 (M-st-67-p)
Housewives: will do Ironing and
mending for three dollars a week.
Call after 5:30 and before 10 p.m.
372-5269 (M-7t-67-p)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Mam
378-7330. Nowl BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
. '*
8-track cartridges Custom recorded
Two or more albums on 80 min tapes
$5 Inc tape guaranteed satisfaction
1-day service John 378-5916 nights
(M-st-70-p)
Graduate school approved typist
extensive experience In legal typing,
short term papers etc. call Barbara at
372-0869 (M-3t-70-p)
Vour portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yourself In action at school
start at $35 call 378-4842. Harden
(M-10t-70-p)
Stereo tapes 8-track & cassettes Any
2 albums $5 Buy 2 third V 2 price.
Free pickup & delivery call Jonathan
3 7 3-3611 or leave message
(M-st-70-p)

MONDAY, FEBRUARY Ist, 1971 afl
Ikl LARGEST SELECTION OF JEANS IN G'VIUE iffll
H FEATURING MALE SLACKS J@P|
WA HUGE SELECTION OF OUTRAGEOUS KNITS fjS) 1
\\ H BELTS. HATS, TOPS, WORK SHIRTS //I // 1
; | &l GIGANTIC VARIETY OF COLORED T-SHIRTS /((\[\ 1
f y Hover 100 free pairs of jeans will leave our store opening week- (vxH f
lyyj A FREE PAIR OF JEANS EVERY MONTH FOR A YEAR VV\ 1
p/ / WILL BE GIVEN TO OUR 50lh CUSTOMER OPENING DAY. \ ]A|
jrvsi OPEN 10AM 9PM MONDAY THRU SATURDAY /A//WI
1249 NW 4th AVE 378-6189 J) I
OFF 13th ST. BEHIND THE NEW MUNTZ STEREO T /fi

yXrXtXtXwXxX;^
SERVICES
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)
Typing done; themes, thesis, etc.
Guaranteed accuracy and neatness.
Electric typewriter $.50 per page
Phone 378-7493 good references
(M-lOt-69-p)
Your portrait painted realistically.
Modern and historical themes or
record yourself In action at school
start at $35 call 378-4824. Harden
(M-10t-70-p)
MMM
/ The Owl @J
Lx aid tie I
Is: f
9:31
I a "jack i
I NICHOLSON I
55 five l
1970 EHSSI
PIECES I
I 2:06 3;SB 5:50 7:4SJMSj

i

H lii a H H H I ft | |
IN A DAVID L. WOLPER Production j J
"i love my... mmemSasM
Wife MMwMimwM
A UNIVERSAL PICTI>F TECHNICOLOR* (g)

\ Todays ]
I more for your money meal I
,moisons
I CAFETERIA I
I [THURSDAYS FEATURE"! I
I I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND jl I
| MACARONI _ |
£ | ALL YOU CAN gQA j p
I I EATI V| =5
I I i FRIDAY S FEATURE I 1 I
I | I PORK CUTLET PARMESAN I 5 I
I and I
YELLOW 00 A
I 99{| I
I LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison! j
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall



m:*oT 5o riinwiac >doio\ 'I
i J-. < Western Beef (Bene in) Grade A* Fla. or Ga. Freih Leg or Breast Super-Right Rib Half
Hggfflgg|Sf CHUCK STEAKS .... 59- FRYER QUARTERS... 39 PORK LOINS 49
W ftITIW SWISS STEAKS.... 89 FRYER BREASTS .rn. 49 PORK LOINS .59
W-tlgglm (ROUND CHUCK.... 79 BOX-O-CHICKEN 7! ~29 BOSTON BIIHS.'.. 49
Oscar Mayer All Meat or Pure U.SO.A. Grade "A" Quick Frozen (18 to 22 Lb. Avg.) Super-Right" Shoulder
MPVfH BEEF FRANKS.... St 79 YOUNG TURKEYS... 39 PORK STEAKS 59
imT*m BAKED HAM.... 559 PERCH FILLETS ...Kts9 SMOKED BACON 3 St-T
Quick Frozen Copelands All Meat
GROUPER FILLET... 79 WHITING FILLETS .St 59 SLICED BOLOGNA.£S9
i & ii H | m i/ en z d 14 na (fWAt.w^ nwccS rD ,t^ u spedaii rifeiFSn ry~v^\r\ig^P^
MILK g- 1 APPLE PIES.... l;Hg jt IMllflP
Sunnyfield Plain or Solfrising m. Jone Parker Cracked Wheat, Whole Wheat or Sandwich I
FLOUR n 39* ffljj*S2r mKt BRtAD 3 79 ¥CJ\I CI M
BUY ONE GET ONE BP.-ffJ SWfffIOLLS ITTsW % W LCo T?P
FREE tMSrnSM IT COCKTAIL '<£ BLENDED PEAS
aniii.mTM- E3E53| HALVES or SLICED Y.C. PEACHES it
PIXIE ICE CREAM I f*C| CDV large 1R( iSsM CUT, WHOLE or FRENCH GREEN BEANS V*
CAKimAfirucc I stalk lir BW SEASONED GREEN BEANS £
SANDWICHES I WzSk CATSUP St
""" 6Q ( I WrOnCIGS nPL f A / lie H STEWED TOMATOES
07 I J J M PINEAPPLE SLICES 2Z \
1 A DDI EC OC wmm. WHOLE or SLICED BEETS ,Lb Glass
BEER 89* | APPLES Z3 f $-100
1 RUSSET BAKING IK) RIPE E|||P|i # 1 IVI I WW
Angel Soft POTATOES 10 it, 45c TOMATOES w 19c I i em anlii
TOWELS .4-=sr s r a I I WP* oray
COLA #o Carton * Bottles 59*
Plaid Stamp GtMftSflft,, 1
Pfaid Stamp pssts.

Thu rutoy, January 28,1871, Tha Florida AKifator, I

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28,1971

, ; j ~~~ ~n
ISpEfl IS*9| HPSjppj
i GREEN ijf qTX TH r # J
1 %j*4j|F r WHP
H jfcv
| *99* Cnt sausa *' sure * afK ***
WED. NOON, FEB. 2, 1971 V | cereals let you fix a meal in a minute, too.
1
r
jflL
Cu&UfdaM j£(HUL Plica*,! r fl Its n + j^Vjftl^
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! All-Purp... Shortening PlMl l/Uil Wllffc Fj| /, IgflNM
Crisco -75 c d c A lAy mmMmm H
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Assorted Colors facial Tissue DOOfieS Farm Apple WlflO 4/5 89(
SCOtt ,.. 31 Lancers Vin Rosen-wti s $3.59
Ice Milk ST 49* Lambrusco ..mport, 4/5 $1.39 ~._ * *
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Paradise Rrand Strawberry
Preserves Y 59* *£*
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Assarted Plovers X OIIftCHOCS 00000000
Toastem Pop-ups .. ** 33*
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI Coffee Creamer D'jUllOll PfittVC pkg. of CA(
Coffee-Mate '?;:' T3* *.JL " *
York Addlac a ,. ee (
Mueller's Lasagne r 39* MTTTWWtVBM w."" ieS *** * -33
IViIiVOAY LOW PRICE! Pieces, Quaker State 41 om mm A Adi c '**'
Mushrooms *;: 29* warrots ... f3c
IviwrOAT tOMf PWCII t|R rjjp tana
Tomato Sauce ?. 25* k. 19 Orange Juice
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Serdo
r rapes ruit Juice ... \ 6 r 38*
'is w*mmas^



CSB CSS i^lf^SsSSfSl^S^^
*" m£tf W. rM i rfl U 9
v :" S- : .'
Fm Om Paiiij PcptT. (W Oia Pefifateum PaT. OUi.l>A\lsl I RU^IQf
Kraft's Individually-Wrapped Tasty German-Style ([ FW' r_ 7
Sliced American .. WT 69' Sliced Bologna .... ".£ 49' 'f Ji gaimesville mall
Alp, Brand Imported Delicious Cooked \ | ff i Topped with Cream Cheese Icing
Big-Eye Swiss X: 42 c Corned Beef ..... T'S9 < ti I Lg*k i Carrot Bar Cake
Cottage Cheese ... VJS 67' Baked Beans ST39' j7
Margarine.. M9' Potato Salad '"39' \ Coffee Cake
Sweet or Buttermilk Always A Family Favorite AQ C
Ballard's Biscuits .. V" 10' Bar-B-Cued Fryers . 69'
Sour Cream ... 42 Sandwiches 59'
Roman Brand Frozen Whole Frozen
>aJ IuSI / Meat Ravioli 67 c Strawberries . fV.!' 47 c
Eat the basic 4 foods every day. Aunt Jemima Frozen Original Ore-lda Frozen Shoestring
Sara Lee Frozen Pecan Birds Eye Frozen Japanese Style
Birds Eye Frozen Assorted Puddings Deerfield Frozen Golden
/ Cool n Creamy... '" 69' Cut Corn f s 59
...ular or G.i
S.afood Tr.at, Quick-,ri.n V. *.l in.
Trout Fillets ir 99 Intensive-Care ... 69*
Seafood Treat, Delicious Florida Cooked Nothing Better or Pastor,
Crawfish Z r *1 3 Bayer Aspirin .... ,o £ 79
MHRHRRA fIMIRSIA
VMlriHr VBHHHV
S mSPECTEp E WESTERN BtWH 0(l/t CWjl Qcptl
Sirloin Steaks '.' $ 1 09 \ Peanuts X7s'
Imperial R0a5t...... *.'99* Smarties Candy.. X'37'
Eitglish-Cut Roast... ffl" \^l||Hp7
Beef Short Ribs £'s9* OJl^Qlwff>^liaJ :^UMAe,
TiT TDT
§mi r U oil A m
|m ijv> WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVIIIE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALI
2 %rA*mTi W. U.i.-ity *..~. ot 34th W 1014 N. Main 51,. 2430 N.W. 13H. SM.V BBRlg.
-

Thursday, January 28.1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 28, 1971

Youngblood Looks To Busy Morning

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Editor
Jack Youngblood, the Gators
standout defensive end, is going
to be busy later this morning.

;: W X .'A*: MP's. m. M >
r mL iritV SEf iyib>.
W Jjfc kiip- m
W ij&
*g aa
..utiSWW.J. !
' w \ < /.'V'* 5? <'
JACK YOUNGBLOOD KEEPS HANGING ON
... against Tennessee and quarterback Bobby Scott
fN MURPHREE AREA
Frisbee Meet Set
Kappa Alpha fraternity had its foosball tournament, and Murphree
area has its Frisbee contest.
The contest, open to any Frisbee enthusiast, is set for Saturday,
Feb. 6, in conjunction with the opening and housewarming of the new
Murphree area Commons Building.
FIVE FRISBEE events will be held in the courtyard next to the
Commons building and surrounded by Sledd, Fletcher and Thomas
Halls. Frisbee hopefuls may compete in distance, style, boomerang
throwing, relay and lagging off a wall on a 50-yard course.
All style Frisbees may be used, according to tournament assistant
director Bruce Stone, who is a Murphree resident adviser.
There is an entry fee of 25 cents for each event entered. The events
winner takes the entire pot. Entries should be directed to Stone at
392-7298.
ITS NOT concrete now yet, Stone said, But we might have some
other contests, maybe ping-pong.
A handful of RAs are running the contest, which was the brainchild
of Ed Bodine.
This is the first Frisbee contest that Ive been familiar with,
Stone said.
Tampa Hires Payne

By Alligator Services
University of Tampa football
coach Bill Fulcher, formerly
UFs offensive line coach, hired
Gator graduate assistant Jim
Payne to handle his offensive
line, Tampa officials said
Wednesday.
Payne has been a graduate
assistant at UF for the last two
years, working with freshman
and B teams and scouting for the
recruiting program. He received
his masters in physical education
last December.

GOT A SICK LITTLE FOREIGN
. CAR ON YOUR
We've got the parts so you can
make it better, or you can bring
W it to us and we'll fix it for you.
YATES AUTO PARTS 372-8536 |

Hell be standing by an
Associated Press wire machine at
a local newspaper, and be
available for a phone call from
his Yon Hall dorm room.
Youngblood isnt a journalism

PRIOR TO going to Florida,
Payne was head coach and
athletic director at Pensacola
Catholic for three years and was
an assistant coach at a Dallas,
Texas school.
Payne was a tri-captain of the
1962 Southern Mississippi team
where he was an offensive guard
and defensive tackle.
Fulchers choice was the first
exchange from his former
Florida colleagues, after taking
over the Spartan vacancy left by
Fran Curci, who went to Miami.

NFL HOLDS DRAFT TODAY

major or doesnt work with the
phone company. Hes just a
top-notch football player who
should go early in todays 1971
National Football League Player
draft, which will involve 442
collegiate players.
AND ITS THE word from
one of the 26 NFL teams that
Youngblood will be waiting for.
Id like to stay in the
South, the 6-fooM, 250-pound
senior said. But you really
dont have too much choice.
You have to go where you are
picked.
Youngblood, an All-American
this year, is expected to be
drafted in the first round, being
considered one of the best
defensive ends in the nation.
BUT THE Monticello native
said he may switch positions
when he hits the pros. I hope
to become a linebacker, he
said. A lot of the teams have

n^77inrHH|
SIRLOIN PIT H
where you get a break
on steak and
everyth else
fjj Some women blush when they are kissed; some call for the Sip
9 police, some swear; some bite. But the worst are those who |B
|gg[ laugh. mm

-opr ------
M ./ > V-
W' f B
3 'Wggm f>J| J 0
s "L
MIKE KELLEY
... has a chance
talked about moving me there.
Youngblood played
linebacker at Monticello High,
which won the state class B
championship in his senior year.
His stock value in the pro
ranks probably jumped a few
points after the recent Mobile

Senior Bowl in which
Youngblood was named the
Souths outstanding lineman.
THE MAIN purpose for
games like the Senior Bowl is for
the pro coaches to look at you
under pro conditions,
Youngblood said. Your
performance can drop you a
couple of rounds in the draft or
raise you a couple.
Mike Kelley, a UF linebacker,
made a strong showing in the
recent Hula Bowl in Hawaii, and
is considered the only other
graduating Gator senior who will
be drafted today.
Youngblood also mentioned
the -monetary aspect of the
Senior Bowl -a $ 1,250 check as
a loser on the South squad.
Playing for money gives you a
little different incentive, he
said. But you go out for the
same thing to play for the
team and to win.
EVEN WITH his healthy size,
Youngblood has shown good
pursuit in his Florida defensive
career. He runs the 40-yard dash
in 4.8
Pro linemen must be able to
pursue with speed and
quickness, Youngblood said.
Speed comes with maturity.
If Youngblood doesnt take
advantage of his pro chance, he
intends to return to UF and get
a degree in business. And when
he wont be playing football or
studying, he may be making
marriage plans for Diane Young,
who he intends to marry
sometime between June and
December.
Many teams have approached
Youngblood, but he said they
havent said anything definite
about his draft status. Theyve
already asked where Ill be
Thursday, Youngblood said.
And theyve asked my phone
number.
They have the number and
Youngblood will be waiting.
The shoe with 3 stripes
r
Models for knocking
around or varsity use.
Casual, jogging, handball,
basketball, baseball
soccer & football.
Demand the best
Demand "Adidas"
Florida
retail alas room
302 N.W. 6th St
Across from the
pnraenger train station
Master Charge
Accepted



Killian Selected Golf Team Captain

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Wednesday was a beautiful
day for Mike Killian both
temperature wise and personal
wise as he was voted the team
captain for the 1971 golf team.
Being named captain is the
greatest thing that has happened
to me, Killian said from his
Mount Vernon apartment. That
and being able to play for
Florida are the two biggest
thrills of my life.
KILLIAN, A standout golfer
from St. Petersburg lost just one
time in high school match play,
that to Jim Barber, now at
Florida State University.
We had a series of 10 season
matches in the year and he beat
me one. We also met in the
district meets, but I was
fortunate to come out on top,
Killian said.
The junior had a lot of
pressure to sign with UF when

Baseball Team Faces 41 Game Slate

By Alligator Services
UFs baseball team will open a
41-game schedule Thursday,
March 4, when they face Florida
Southern at Lakeland. The
schedule includes perennial
powers, Miami, North Carolina,
Auburn and FSU.
Head coach Dave Fuller, Dean
of Southern Baseball Coaches, is
optimistic as he enters his 24th
year of Gator baseball. Although
he suffered several big losses in
personnel, he has seasoned
replacements for most of them.
FULLER LOST three first
rate pitchers in Glen Pickren,
Wayne Rogers and Rod Macon.

'Cfo^hjffri v- .'/'''' | J
s y % '&/ $P* -', %
£
*.#&& ?s& >;.?£: Wfytmuxs.
WILL HARMON SLIDES BACK TO FIRST
... senior should be starting in left this year

SAVE.
WITHCONFjDENCE
MTSCN
GODDING & CLARK
2ND Ave. & 2ND ST. SE
378-2311

'ONE OF MY GREATEST THRILLS

he was still in high school.
A LOT OF my friends
wanted me to come here as did
my folks, but I wanted to go
away, Killian said. Even former
UF golfer Bob Murphy put in a
commercial line for Florida.
I played a couple of rounds
with Murphy in St. Pete and
while out on the course, he gave
me some good points about the
university, he said.
But Gatorland was not for
Killian, at least not right after
high school.
I WAS OFFERED two
scholarships, one to Florida and
the other to Houston. Because
Houston is a bit farther away
than Gainesville, I went out
there, Killian recalled.
But in Houston, you werent
allowed to do anything but play
golf. No social life, no other
sports and what got me was no
classes.
The coaches there just
wanted you on the golf course.

Also gone is the sure-fielding
double-play combination of
Leon Bloodworth and Tommy
Blankenship. Several other
players who were being counted

Remember!
"
f 3 for 2 Hamburger Special
Buy 2 at regular 3rd one FREEI
Tueeday-Wednesday-Thursday 5-9 p.m.

IM
\" -
MIKE KILLIAN
... golf captain
They didnt care whether you
had classes or not, you were just
on the course and thats all that
mattered, Killian said.
I REALIZED then that I
wasnt in college just to play
golf, although that was a big part
of it. I had to get an education

on have withdrawn from school.
The Gators could start a full
team from last years roster but
have a number of new faces who
will push former team members
for positions.
Should last years squad
prevail, it would be Gainesville
junior Tommy Dulaney at first,
Madison, (Wis.) native, John
Flad, a junior or Quincy
sophomore Glen Hurst at
second, Pompano Beach junior
Dennis Banks at shortstop and
Gainesville junior Rick
Scarborough at thud.
Melbourne senior Will Harman
would be in left, Sarasota
sophomore Nick De Virgilis in

as well, and Houston didnt offer
me that.
Then in the spring of 1969,
Killian realized one of his thrills
as he signed a scholarship to UF.
The program here is what I
want, Killian said. If I dont
make it in golf, then at least I
will have an education to fall
back on.
GOLFERS ALL hope for that
chance to play with the touring
professionals at one time in their
life and Killian is no freak.
I have had a touch of the life
as I have played with some of
the former UF golfers in St.
Pete. Gary Koch and I played a
round with Frank Beard as two
of 15 junior golfers who had the
chance, Killian said.
Other golfers on the tour
Killian has played at least nine
holes with include Dan Sikes,
Dave Regan and Doug Sanders.
SANDERS WAS busy with
his business propositions when I
went nine holes with him. Sikes

center, Miami senior Tony
Dobies in right, and Gainesville
senior Len Fuller catching.
PITCHERS WOULD be
Madison (Wis.) native Tom
Seybold, Gainesville senior Larry
Sheffield, Orlandosenior David
Thomas, Cocoa sophomore Bob
Kowalski, Roslyn, (N.Y.)
sophomore Walt Gardiner and
Orlando sophomore Allan
McCall.
Other veterans who will figure
in the plans are Lgrry Kieszek,
catcher, Ft. Walton Beach
junior; Steve Lewis, first,
Wellsvflle (N.Y.); Tom Ratliff,
outfield, St. Petersburg
sophomore; Jim Steele, oift field,
Gainesville sophomore; and Bob
Carpenter, outfield, Melbourne
sophomore.
The Gators had their most
successful fall league ever under
the direction of assistant coach
PA. Lee. The league produced

For College Men
Qp IT
Platoon Leaders Class
Freshmen and sophomores
attend two six-week summer sessions at Officer
Candidates School, Quantico, Virginia Juniors
take one extended session in summer before senior
year Commissioning on day of college graduation
Ground officers then attend six months of advanced
leadership training at The Basic School, Quantico
Aviation officers report directly to flight school
Officer Candidate Class
After college graduation,
candidates attend Officer Candidates School,
Quantico, Virginia Upon commissioning, aviation
officers begin jet or helicopter training Ground
officers report to The Basic School, Quantico, for six
months advanced training.
Ask A Marine
REITZ UNION/900-300/1-4 FEB

Thursday, January 28,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

I played in Jacksonville. Regan
was the only player to offer me
advice since most of them had
enough problems with their own
game.
As for the multi-million dollar
golf circuit, Killian said he
would like to get in on some of
the cash.
The public relations major
currently has two goals he is
shooting for in the next couple
of years.
WINNING THE SEC meet
this year is my first goal.
Winning that and or the NCAA
is not impossible this year,
Killian said. The Gators are
ranked number one in the SEC
and also third in the country
behind Houston and Wake
Forest.
My long range goal is to be
able to do something for the
school after I graduate.
I feel that I will owe them
something for putting me
through college," Killian said.
VV v
Mi. \
HB Mil
DAVE FULLER
... lows DP. combo
several newcomers who served
notice they will have to be
considered for starting positions.
Most of the pitchers are
freshmen but have shown they
have 4he ability and competitive
make-up to pitch varsity ball this
year.
Coach Fuller feels UF will be
as good or better thanlast year,
and will play a key role in the
race for the Southeastern
Conference Championship.

Page 23



Page 24

, Tha Florida Alligator, Thuraday, January 28,1971

IN NEW YORK, OHIO MEETS

Trackmen Face Busy Weekend

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
Itll be a busy weekend for the UF track team with the prestigious
Millrose Games in New York, and a dual meet with Ohio State in
Columbus on the agenda.
This is the big one, track coach Jimmy Carnes said of the
57-year-old Millrose Games held in Madison Square Garden. Its
usually a sellout with about 18,000 attending.
POLE VAULTER Scott Hurley, half miler Eamonn OKeeffe, the
two mile relay team of Jack Stewart, Frank Betts, and Benny Vaughn,
will represent the Gators in the meet.
Jack Bachelor, Ron Jourdon and Frank Shorter of the Florida
Track Club will also appear in the games.
Then on Saturday, the entire Gator squad will take on Ohio State
in Columbus in the Gators first team meet since the Senior Bowl
Meet.
Theyre tough in the sprints and the hurdles in particular, Carnes
said of Ohio State. Itll be a tough meet.
THE GATORS might be handicapped by the tight schedule in order

Independent League Waiting For 4th Team

By BRITT CRITTENTON
Alligator Correspondent
The P.K. Revival, the Free Radicals and Bisons I have
all moved into the semifinals of Independent tennis. The
winner of Newell Entomology Society Ginos will also
be in the semis.
Bisons I destroyed the Wesley Foundation 3-0. William
Mendenhall, Philedient, Skip Lees, and Dave Johnson
didnt lose one game of their match to Jeff Bungard, Ed
Jones, Dick Derrough and George Lutz.
THE FREE RAW CALS gained their berth with Charles
McCormick, Bruno Zeegers, Norm White, and Kiyo

AND THREE EXCITING GO-GO DANCERS
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k f FREE BEER FOOSBALL
| | 9:30-10:30 TOURNAMENT
A CASE OF BEER
12:00-12:30 to the winner
gjk ALSO ON THURSDAY NIGHTS
MINI-SKIRT CONTEST
$lO FOR EVERY CONTESTANT
IF
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JIMMY CARNES
... stronger this year

Fusimori leading the way over Georgia Seagle I.
The P.K. Revival had the most trouble capturing its
quarterfinal game'. Nick Garcia beat Alvin Satin 4-2, 4-0
for Revival. Orlando Moreno came back for the Bisons
with a 3-5, 4-2, 4-0 win over Dennis Warmke. In the
rubber match Lyman Ott and Jim McClave easily won the
first set for Bisons, 4-0. Tim Henderson and Warren Sarle
rebounded, however, to capture the last two sets 4-1,4-0
and the match to give Revival the win.
Regular starters for Ginos include John and Charlie
King, Vince or Scooter Gallagher and Todd Rainsberger.
Newell stars include Jim Richeson, Federico Aguilar, Gary
Dunlap and Dave Carlson.
INDEPENDENTS are reminded to begin signing for

to get to Columbus from New York in time.
If they miss one connection, they won t make it, Carnes said.
And their missing the meet will make it tougher to win.
Getting to the track on time proved to be a problem last week, as
OKeeffe, Hurley, and the relay team arrived about 15 minutes before
their scheduled events in the Philadelphia Track Classic.
WETIE LEAVING Thursday for New York this time, Carnes
said. The boys are really up for this meet.
The Gators will face top flight competition in New York as the
relay team will run against perennial track power Villanova, winners
last week at Philadelphia, conference rival Tennessee, and a tough
Manhatten team.
Additionally, Hurley, who didnt jump over 16 feet for the first
time this season at Philadelphia, faces both Bob Seagren and John
Pennel, two of the countrys best vaulters.
THE DUAL meet with Ohio State should see the UF stronger than
last year, when State beat the Gators for the first time in six years.
Were stronger in events they concentrate on this year, said
Carnes, plus weve been practicing for events like the low hurdles
which we dont even run in the SEC.

bowling. The deadline is Thursday, Feb. 4, at 5 p.m.
In dorm volleyball, bracket winners in Murphree area
include Thomas H, Thomas F, Thomas D, Fletcher K, and
Murphree D.
In Hume area Bristol and Yeaton are undefeated.
McLachlan is running away with the Graham area
championship. On East Campus, Jennings 4 & 5 lead their
respective brackets with four wins in as many tries. The
Tolbert tournament has just gotten under way but already
Tolbert 3 is in last place with two losses.
Dorm sections should now sign for tennis. Deadline is
Monday Feb. 8, at 5 p.m. All signups can be made in
person or by phone at the Intramural Office, room 229
Fla. Gym, 392-0581.