Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PONDA FONDA
Some 5,000 people sitting, standing and hanging out
windows heard Miss Jane Fonda, actress and full-time
anti-war activist, speak out. on what is really going on
in Vietnam and UF toward the war effort.
She enlightened students with the information that
grants have been given and work has been done at UF
to develop chromosome-harmful defoliants and other
war products.
Miss Fonda told the large crowd at Graham Pond
Saturday afternoon it is those who provide the money
at this university who determine what races of people
can attend. She referred to Negroes, only 200 and
the American Indians. The crowds response of
whooping brought her own, with a serious expression
Thats not funny.
She asked for support of a Veterans for Peace
movement and introduced one of its organizers. The
blame for My Lai and similar atrocities according to
Miss Fonda, lies with Rusk, Westmoreland, Johnson
and so on, as did the World War II genocide with
Hitler. See more on Miss Fonda, Page 2, and more on
Accent *7l, Page 5.

Ad Amitom.

Vol. 63, No. 68

Alper Upset With Graves' Strategy

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Budget Committee Chairman
Harvey Alper lashed out at
Athletic Director Ray Graves
Friday for not telling the
committee of the recently

Publications Asks
For More Money

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
Student publications may cost
more to UF students next year.
The budget committee was
presented Friday with a
projection of the 1971-72
Student Publications budget
which reveals an increase to
$1.97 in fees per student.
THE CURRENT allocation
per student from the activities
fee of $1.58. The 39 cent
increase will help defray the
ruing cost of business due to
inflation.
!!!! II
11
THE NATIONS leading
scorer, Johnny Neumann
invades Florida Gym tonight
at 7:45 page 16
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 14
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 15
Sports 16
Whats Happening 11
World Wrap-Up 13

TllO
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

ATHLETIC IMPROVEMENTS 'NEFARIOUS

announced improvements to
Florida Field.
Graves told us one thing, and
then decided to spend
$300,000, Alper said. We are
not trying to tell Graves what to
do, just to answer questions.
HE SAID the improvements

THE BUDGET projections
estimated that even if the
Seminole was eliminated, the
budget request would not be
noticably affected.
Student fees make up a small
but important part of income
for The Alligator. But 70 per
cent of the cost of publishing
The Alligator is made up from
advertising revenue.
My king pointed out the
average post per student of each
flditk*} of The Alligator has
decreated with the growth in
size of the paper.
The third Student
The Florida
Quarterly, was described as
gaining momentum by
Director B. G. Myking.
He said the Board of Student
Publications had projected when
the publication started in 1968,
that it would be slow, but at the
present time, the number of
subscriptions was increasing, as
well as sales of the magazine.

tk
I
Jr il
** a A
PHU cope

University of Florida, Gainesville

would not cost the students
anything. That is pure bunk. He
is raising it through an increase
in the cost of tickets for the
freshmen games. This thing, as a
future alumnus, I consider
nefarious.
Two weeks ago, the athletic
director announced a synthetic
turf would be installed at
Florida Field and that lights
powerful enough to permit
telecasting of night Gator
football games would be set up
in time for the next football
season.
During a presentation of the
projected 1971-72 budget of the
Athletic Association made at the
end of fall quarter, Graves said
no great capital improvements
would be made by die Athletic
Association for the 1971-72
year.
DURING HIS presentation,
Graves said the Athletic

TEP Pledges Road Trip
Causes $2,000 Damage

By ItEVE STRANG
Alligator Wira Editor
A fraternity road trip, an
Alachua County Deputy Sheriff
said, could have cost a life and
did an estimated $2,000 damage
Sunday. It is being ironed out,
with the fraternity promising to
pay all damages if the Sheriffs
department agrees not to
prosecute.
Nine pledges from Tau
Epsilon Phi (TEP) fraternity
were questioned early Sunday
by Sheriffs Deputies in
connection with a giant
cable-digger bulldozer found

1:11^3
HARVEY ALPER
... blasts Ray Graves
, >
Association would not ask for an
increase in the allocation of the
students activity fee that goes
for athletics. Graves revealed the
debt of the Athletic Association
still outstanding was $1.7
million for the building of the
athletic dormitory, Yon Hall.
Alper said the budget

idling and dug into the middle of
State Road 121 by Alachua
County Patrol Deputy Ray
Newman.
ACCORDING TO Newman,
Robert Tart of Thrift Oil
Company in Ocala was forced
into a ditch when he almost ran
into a cable digger in the middle
of the road. Tart reported that
he saw some boys disperse as he
came upon the bulldozer. He
then called the Sheriffs office to
report the incident. ~
Newman reported he came
upon the pledges walking in the
center of the road enroute to
investigating Tarts call. He said

\*^ J
\l ImiV

Monday, January 25, 1971

committee had listened in good
faith to the presentation by
Graves but since he did not give
us the facts, I do not trust what
he told us.
He said his next concern, as
chairman of the budget
committee, was whether the
tuition will be increased. 1 am
at a loss for an answer.
If the tuition is increased,
students on this campus are
going to be outraged. Tuition in
the last six years has roughly
doubled at this university. It has
more than doubled for graduate
students, Alper said.
In this state people think
going to college is a luxury,
Alper said. All this state is
doing is taxing the students for
the benefit of the state.

the boys denied seeing a
bulldozer in the road, and then
they went into the Royal Castle
at the 1-75 exit.
Newman said he found the
bulldozer sitting in the center of
the road. The huge plow of the
bulldozer had dug into the
asphalt, and the wheels were
lifted off the ground. The engine
was idling.
NEWMAN ALSO said he
almost ran into the bulldozer
himself because it was pitch
black and fog was setting in. He
said it could have easily caused
(SEE 'DAMAGE/ PAGE 6)



Page 2

!, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25,1971

JANE FONDA:
-./ fcf. -. v ;. < >.
'You Have The Power'

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writar
Arms are being developed on campus and kept hidden from you.
Why isnt this in your hands? implored Jane Fonda from her
rostrum above Graham pond.
Miss Fonda* speaking to an estimated 5,000 students, went on to
condemn the war in Vietnam, black enrollment at UF, and the 2Yi
Hiroshimas that are being dropped on Vietnam each week.
MISS FONDa, presented by Accent *7l, an activist in several
protest movements, spoke primarily on alternatives to the war.
The only way we can win it is by dropping the bomb. And when
that time comes, Miss Fonda continued, it will be too late to
react.
According to the Hollywood acliess, President Richard Nixon came
in on a platform of law and order, just like Adolf Hitler. Are we
going to be good Germans and listen to our leaders?
MISS FONDA implored the surrounding students to rise to the
challenge of ending the war in Vietnam.
There are many people pacified by' the belief that Nixons
Vietnam policy is to end the war ; thats not true. Only the tactics have
changed not the policy.
The American people must make their own peace treaty, she
daimed. The top structure has failed and it is up to the ground
structure to seek a solution.
SHE THEN detailed a nine-point peace treaty authored by the
National Student Association advocating a complete withdrawal of
troops, the end of Thieu, Ky and Khiem South Vietnamese leadership,
a provisional coalition government and a pledge to do anything
necessary, upon ratification, to follow through with the treaty.
You say its not official? Miss Fonda said. Well, that shows your
own lack of respect. This is an honest and just document. By signing it
youll also be pledging to implement it.
According to Miss Fonda, this would include teaching, studying and
getting hold of documents from South Vietnam. She went on to
hurl a barrage of criticism at the Nixon administration, claiming that
the only reason the war is changing and ground combat activity
decreasing is that the Gls have just refused to fight.
THEY THOUGHT they were making progress in Saigon, until the
Tet offensive, Miss Fonda said. The very people they thought were
pacificied had actually aided the National Liberation Front (NLF).
The Gls realized they had been lied to and decided that theyre
just not ready to die; to get blown up. Theyre not John Wayne freaks
like their fathers.
Miss Fonda cited examples of this soldier rebellion. No smart
officer is going to tell any GI to get his hair cut, or take off his beads
or stop smoking pot. Not if he doesnt want to get fragged
(assassinating officers with grenades, boobytraps, etc.).
AN OUTBURST of applause resulted when Miss Fonda told of the
use of rifles for smoking pot. They found away to use their guns.
Miss Fonda claimed that the desertion rate of U.S. soldiers has risen
a great deal since Vietnam. Theyre really Vietnamizing the
Americans. Because of the soldiers refusal to endanger themselves
the brass, through clenced teeth has allowed several concessions.
They included the Paris Peace talks, and the Vietnamization program.
It would be so easy to end the war, she said.
ONCE WE agreed to total withdrawal, and a coalition government
- excluding Thieu, Ky, andKhiem, we could settle the problem.
Miss Fonda accused Nixon of supporting a government that has
publicly admitted it holds 50,000 political prisoners. It is illegal to
advocate peace in South Vietnam.
Miss Fonda went on to condemn the My Lai trials as being the
equivalent of charging Sargeant Shultz, without looking at Hitler.
Why arent they trying Rusk, Laird, MacNamara, Johnson or Nixon,
instead of the scapegoats, Calley and Medina?

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 3261 U. f^
Subscription rate is $10:60 per'year and &.56 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

[about finding a roommate? HI
Alligator 'WANTED ads ore gosd |

§||l
Mr | '.V,
w 1 K
v -1
fHHHI
mi
jgi / 9
Pill'. iS

THE UNIVERSITY,
according to Miss Fonda, is
comp licit in the war effort,
particularly this university.
She said theyre teaching
super-patriotism, white
supremacy and conformism.
The university is attempting to
pacify half this population into a
passive sex role. This brought
on some female applause. She
continued that theyve taught
men to be competitive,
dominant and supremacists, and
in response to some basically
male cheering quickly
added,"and its to your
detriment, men.
The crowd, somewhat
unresponsive, broke into
applause when Miss Fonda, in a
scathing comment, berated
students for wise-cracking about
the Indians plight in America.
Miss Fonda said that the
university is propogating the
false notion that we have a
democracy in America. What
kind of democracy Js itjhe
continued, when more than
half the people-and Senate want
the war to end, discrimination is
continuing, corporation trusts
are prospering and pollution is
all over.

Stud-Ease
Lecture Notes
CEH for PS 212
CHN pv APY 200
CBS CY 202 CY 201
ATG 201 STA 320 MS 102
LOW LOW PRICES!
buy them irt:
1638 W. Univ. Ave.
(next to Spanish Main)
see our classified ad under

THE SUNNY AND warm
pleasant atmosphere seemed a
sharp and ironic contrast to Miss
Fondas claim, On this campus
their are research programs
developing defoliants that will
produce thalidomide babies in
Vietnam. People with the money
with the strings, are determining
your life.
Miss Fonda made a plea for
UF war veterans to participate in
the veteran-sponsored testimony
that will be given in Detroit Jan.
31-Feb. 2, in order to show
that My Lai is happening all the
time, in varying degrees.
She questioned the motives in

4 **
The Fourth International
Animated Film Exhibition
nn ? g an l m t d fMm# -* beet the world hat to offer.
nC^ dW *" unu feature fHm, Charge of the Light Brigade.
Tuesday & Wednesday, January 2B & 27, SO cents.
Union Auditorium 5:30 8:00 10-30
sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitzunlon

M ''
Photos By Phil Copo
the proposed tearing down of
the Flavet apartments, claiming
that a sports arena will replace
the only cheap housing for vets
and married students who want
to attend school.** (The
University Activities Complex
the sports arena was defeated
by students last year. At present,
plans are for a married students
complex, though more
expensive, to eventually replace
the Flavets.)
Miss Fonda, who has been
active in the Indian protest
movement said, I saw Indians
being ripped-off, lied to by the
people that supposedly
supported them. It is because we
live in a country where human
values are not at the center of
things but profit motives
are ... and you have the
power.
Miss Fonda made a final plea
to the American conscience.
Will the American people say
right-on if we finally do get our
men out of Vietnam? Will our
hands be clean, because our men
arent dying? Will the American
conscience be pacified as the
Pentagon presses a button
sometime in the future and just
destroys a nation?



B m| 11 fl| %j| .;v 8 : 4 I U | H I §!>
The UF Board of Student Publications
Urges All Students Who Feel Qualified to
Apply For the Following Positions .
Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Sommer (Term IV) 1971
i ; 7~ r - "' V 7 .--r~= i '.
Managing Editor, Florida Alligator
Terms: Spring (Term III) 1971
Spring & Summer (Terms 111 & IV) 1971
Summer (Term IV) 1971
/
The Board of Student Publications shall choose
the term of office after full deliberation
a >r I
upon applications received.
Previous experience with Student Publications is
desirable but not essential.
You do not have to be a journalism major.
f?.. A
General Instructions
AIL applications are to be picked up and
*mr suP ' i oiom nfmw" ,founiiw;j j tv- uy :s j;....
refurtred between 8 a.ittr pm. to Rm. #330, Reitz Union.
Applicants must return the original plus two
copies of the completed application prior to
4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 19.
*',X.- y
' & r ( _v ...'*
For further information, call Mr. Alan Whiteleather,
392-1680

Monday, January 25.1971, Tha Florida AMgalor,

Page 3



Page 4

. Th*Eisari*Araaiar.

'New Leadership' Elected By YR

By TOM CORNEL ISON
AMgator Staff Writer
New Leadership" candidates
swept to victory in UF Young
Republican (YR) office elections
Thursday night (Jan. 21) but,
while the winners extolled unity,
rumors of unethical practice
flourished in the ranks of the
defeated.
Linda Zimmerman, 2UC,
earlier the victim of a rock
throwing incident, was elected
YR president over Darrell
McCullough, 3AS. Miss
Zimmerman called for a

Dialogue Changed
For More Efficiency
. a
WRUFs radio show Dialogue will be restructured to provide for
more efficient operation.
Bob Moore is the moderator of Dialogue. Formerly he directed the
show and did all the research work for it himself. Now Dialogue has
added a director, an assistant director, a research staff and a public
relations staff.
Bruce Singer, 2UC, is the director, and Bob Merkle, 3AS, is the
assistant director. Merkle said We are now contacting state and local
officials for speakers and suggestions for topics.
Max Rafferty, an Accent speaker, will be the guest tonight. With
him cm the program, Merkle said, will be two liberal, progressive
educators to balance out the philosophies on the show.

, mmm MTt * \*TLfV-
ordidnt I
I needs volunteers now : I
Mental Health Tutoring Sunland Corner Drug Store I
I Crisis Center Day Care Recreation I
I CM 392-1608 3/5 UtuMv I
MM

membership goal of 1000 at UF.
The YR chapter now has 200
members. Conservative YR's,
many of them members of
Young Americans for Freedom
(YAF), backed Miss Zimmerman
and gave her a 90-59 majority in
the voting.
McCOLLOUGHS DEFEAT
prompted two moderate
candidates, Colleen. Dunbar,
2UC, running for administrative
vice president, and Lin Wellford,
2UC, running for secretary
against the conservative new
leadership, to withdraw. Tim

Baer, 2UC. was barely elected
executive vice president, Rob
Pucket, 3BA, became
administrative vice president,
Jim Cherry, ILW, was picked for
treasurer, Janet Steen, lUC, was
acclaimed secretary, and
Fletcher Gibson, 2UC, Bill Mills,
7AS, and Linda Pedretty, 2UC,
were elected board members. All
the victorious candidates were
affiliated with the new
leadership except for Miss
Pedretty who, prior to her
election as board member had
stated, 1 am tired of taking
sides.
Stewert Hershey, 3LW, a past
YR president and opponent of
the conservative new
leadership said, in reference to
Miss Dunbars withdrawal, 1
think after what this girl has
gone through in the last week,
she should not have to go
through this. Several friends of
Miss Dunbar had been recruited
by her to support moderate
candidates and many were lent
the dues money. Many of these
new members had been
confronted by private detectives
bearing affidavits asking if the
signee had ever received
compensation for a political
vote. Five new. members,
according Ao Miss Dunbar,
would not come back because
they were sick and tired of the
way this club was run.
Miss Welford said of her

withdrawl, Without Colleen we
wouldn't have any authority on
the board. They (the
conservatives) pulled some dirty
stuff today, I have witnesses and
I am bitter. Many of our people
were called and told the meeting
was next week.
OTHER MODERATE
members revealed that they had
been called and told the voting
would not take place for another
week due to an investigation of
the affidavits and the rock
throwing incident in which Miss
Zimmerman barely escaped
serious injury. One Young
Republican, unwilling to
identify himself, said it was well
known he was opposed to the
new leadership, and that he
was called by a person
representing Richard Green and
told there would be no voting at
the meeting, which made
attendance optional rather than
mandatory. Richard Green,
4EG, a YR member associated
with the new leadership,
denied any knowledge of the
phone calls.
Mrs. Roberta Dawson, a
Republican National
Committeewoman from Tampa,
presided over the meeting. I
hope that whatever comes out of
tonight youll get behind the
winner. Mrs. Dawson said, We
got killed in November because
we chose to fight ourselves.
Mrs. Dawson then ruled a

motion by Richard Oberdorfer.
7 AS, calling for an investigation
of the events in the past week
and a postponement of the
voting, out of order because the
State Executive Committee of
the Federation of Young
Republicans had decreed the
meeting was for the sole purpose
of electing officers.
Among the GOP dignitaries in
attendance was David Smith, a
Republican member of the
House of Representatives from
Broward County. Smith
acknowledged satisfaction with
results and blamed the split on
the old, moderate leadership for
failure to adhere to their
charter.
LINDA ZIMMERMAN, the
new YR president, said Sunday
afternoon, We are all back
together. Darrell was appointed
chairman of the political action
committee. Colleen with stay in
the club and keep working.
Tuesday night Miss
Zimmerman plans to call for a
board meeting during which she
will lay out plans for a
membership drive. She also will
begin making plans for guest
speakers on campus.
We must forget about the
past, Miss Zimmerman
continued, the club will
become large and influential in
the future.



Dr. Wright Stresses Self-Awareness

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Writer
With a colorful Mandigo robe
draped over his dark suit, Dr.
Nathan Wright Jr. strolled out
into the audience greeting and
talking to UF students.
Several minutes later he was
on stage as the second speaker
for Accent 71 explaining that
both blacks and whites need to
become self-aware. The way we
become understanding of others
is to know ourselves, Wright
said.
BLACK POWER provides

Raffertys Topic:
Education Today

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Max Rafferty, a lifelong
career teacher and administrator
in California schools, will speak
at 8 p.m. Tuesday in University
Auditorium.
Accent 7l is sponsoring
Raffertys talk on Education
and the Individual.
Until recently Rafferty was
Californias State
Superintendent of Public
Instruction. In 1968 he was
Californias Republican
candidate for U. S. Senator.
A graduate of UCLA,
Rafferty holds an earned
doctorate in education from
USC and honorary doctoral
degrees from Lincoln University
and Brigham Young.
Rafferty is the author of a
nationally-syndicated column
appearing in more than 100
newspapers. In 1962 he wrote a
best-seller on education, Suffer,
Little Children.
Rafferty considers himself a
major educational reformer.
Frank Mankiewicz, a
Cold Cash
During the 1969-70 winter it
cost the Oregon State Highway
Division $7.4 million to remove
snow and sand icy roads.

ARCHITECTS
PLANNERS
CIVIL ENGINEERS
Make your education
count.
Share it
with the other
America.
' ; X
Consider VISTA.
Contact:
/ A rJ-
-4 lj -.Lli
VISTA Rocruitor*
Jan. 25-27
Roitz Union Lobby

blacks with this self-awareness
and a wholesome and worthy
sense of who and what they are.
It is a positive and creative force
which is necessary for the
nations orderly peace and
progress.
Because blacks have been
subjected to a negative
self-identity, they need a new
sense of pride to determine and
shape their own destiny, he
said.
Any human being with any
semblance of self-respect will be

syndicated columnist, will speak
on Nixon and Beyond at 7:30
p.m Thursday in Florida Gym.

I in^Hi
I BBBEBma Model SB6OO FM Stereo Receiver 339.95
I SL72B Automatic Turntable 89.50
I m P' re 888VE Cartridge 59.95
I The SHERWOOD SOUND SYSTEM limited only by your imagination
I I Professional Service Guarantee 1|
| Couch's guaranties that you our customer will receive prompt, courteous, professional £
I dectronici service by our teem off Nationally Recognized CERTIFIED ELECTRONICS £
608 N. MAIN Gainesvilles largest electronics dealer. Ph. 378-1562
' .; r : 7 l ... . - .. r ... .+ r- = , v -- > - -t u_^_

a potential menace if he doesnt
control his own destiny, Wright
said, so black power is needed
to bring about change.
BLACK POWER also asks
whites to become self-aware,
Wright said. He suggested a
white caucus be organized at
UF to help whites become aware
of themselves and the needs of
blacks.
Wright is Professor of Urban
Studies at the State University
of New York and has written
three books just released.
In his book Lets Face
Racism Wright reminds us that
it is fruitless to talk about
whether this person or that
person is a racist because all of
us are conditioned to think in
pathologically pro-white terms.
Stressing the need for
equitable opportunity for
blacks in higher education,
Wright pointed out that in 1969
less than 2 per cent of the
enrollment of public higher
education was black.
After the program, Wright

tm
JHL
'fH. iWfir
HP k
mm R|| mis K
BHR 1
'jiiiIiSBHBIHBBHBBBBBRBPY TT ifly
vw w wr
3
TOM KENNEDY
Dr. NATHAN WRIGHT
... organizing white caucus

met shortly with interested
students to organize a white
caucus on campus. He said

Monday, J&nuary 25, 1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

their goal should be to become
more sensitive to themselves and
the needs of blacks.

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25, 1971

Mechanics Work For Co-op

By TOM NELSON
Alligator Writer
If youre broke and so is your
car, theres still hope. The
Hogtown Mechanics Co-op will
fix your car and accept barter in
return. The Co-op is located
next to the Psycle Shop, 1236
N.W. 3rd Ave.
Although the idea has been
kicking around for the past few

DAMAGE...

J^WMPAGEON^jJ
an accident. Newman
returned to the Royal Castle
where he questioned the pledges.
This time they admitted seeing
the bulldozer, but said it was
already in the road and running
when they found it. The deputy
took down the names of all the
pledges.
My first reaction was to put
the whole bunch in jail, and let
the Dean of Men (sic) come get
them out, Newman said. We
want the boys to leam their
college pranks could cost a life.
HE SAID THE boys gave him
back talk when he first
questioned them before
discovering the bulldozer. But he
discounted their being rude by
saying they were only smart
little boys. There was nothing
wrong with them.
Boys talk like that when they
get in groups, he said.
Newman said after he thought
about it, he decided to try to
find out what happened, and to
be easier on the boys.
TEP PRESIDENT David
Simon met Newman at the
Royal Castle and talked to
Newman. Simon agreed to pay
any and all damage if the
Sheriffs Department wouldnt
prosecute. Simon said

$1 OFF
Clip the
Pizza Inn j~p7
Buck iy
below for a special treat!
/yff PIZZA INN DOUGH NOTE I
(fall / RodoomaNo with thlfi\V I
11 111 . / \purehaao of any II 111 I
AvIVV Wi"thvMT;; | /rfxk Fargo Hit pliaa or j//
g|\\\ /MR Unedium pluaa. I/yjfSk
( ONE
Sorry, offer dot not include cheese pizzas.

months, the Co-op itself began
less than two weeks ago,
according to its manager,
Michael.
WE NOW HAVE about
fifteen freak mechanics, some of
whom like to specialize, said
Michael. We have one guy who
works on Volkswagens and
another, Frank, who works on
motorcycles. Michael, himself,
likes to work on older cars.
The Co-op isnt equipped to

prosecution would ruin; the
boys records, according to
Newman.
Newman estimated the cost of
the damage to be $2,000,
although he said his estimate was
not official. He called that act
vandalism in his report and
said it was a criminal offense,
although not a state
prison-type offense.
None of the nine TEP pledges
would comment on the
incident.
TEP BROTHER Mike Table
said: We want to keep
individuals out of this. We want
to face this as a group. If there is
any financial obligation occurred
as a result of last nights (Sunday
morning) action.
Simon was not available for
comment Sunday evening.
Newman said he will meet
with the Dean of Men (sic) and
the TEP president concerning
the incident today. As of yet no
charges have been filed.
The bulldozer cable digger
belonged to Archie Davis of
Gainesville, who has a contract
with Southern Bell, according to
Newman.

JjViWWLWK'WIWWAWWAV.VAV^
Patronize
Gator
1 Advertisers
S i
,V. .V.NV.V.y.V.V.V.V.V,W.V.V.Vrt.V. ft

do grease jobs or oil changes, but
they can do most minor repairs,
including tune-ups.
When you take your car by
theyll tell you, whether they
can fix it. If they can, they will
charge you for the parts you
need plus a small amount for
labor.
MICHAEL EXPLAINED
Naturally we work a lot
cheaper than straight garages do,

Rooti Toot Whitman!
1 year, unbelievable!!
But lots of fun, the I

m mmm ; gggm , : MMM
JBl
i# pjj IKi
in concert
R,.., i W mb !*4 v ' m m !U: JfcaP " f
JJ'HI 1 Ij. JL iIVS '' I

we dont pay our mechanics as
much. Yesterday, for instance, I
worked a day on a job and only
charged $10.
The barter angle comes in if
you dont have cash. The Co-op
needs tools, feeler gauges, socket
wrenches and so forth. Tools are
worth more to them than
money. Theyll also trade their
talents for food or anything else
valuable.

vnfrfisirr \m
jtwtius
Fraternity Jewelry^
Now order It 6 days a week
Trophy & Plaque Dept.
Expert Engraving
Class rings
Watch repair
Jewelry repair
1802 West University Ave.
Across from Campus

MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-031 5
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-621 1
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

AGRICULTURE
SPECIALISTS
There is a place
in VISTA
for many skills.
There is a need
among the rural poor
to know more about
modern farming.
Make your education
mean something.
Share it.
Contact:
VISTA Recruiter
Jan. 25
Booth Across
From The Hub
10-2 PM



Handwriting On Wall
May Cost The Author

Senate Seeks
Applicants
The Student Senate has seats
vacant in the Colleges of Arts &
Sciences, Education, Business
Administration, off-campus and
Graham-Hume.
Anyone interested in applying
for these seats or for any future
vacancies in other area, should
apply in the senate office, 30S
Reitz Union.
Bags Rise
Use of plastic bags for
packaging of industrial
chemicals, lawn and garden
products and oily and
rough-edged materials is
expected to increase 5 percent
over the 1968 volume of 105
million bags, according to John
P. Sullivan, sales manager for
U.S.I. Chemicals Film Products.

LAWYERS
are needed to help
Americans who can't
afford legal fees ...
j or medicine
or decent housing
or schooling
or adequate food ...
VISTA, America,
needs law students
who care.
Contact:
VISTA Recruiters
Jan. 25-27
Reitz Union Lobby

By JANET OLES
Alligator Staff Writer
Students who enjoy scribbling
graffiti on buildings, bathroom
walls and traffic signs are subject
to prosecution under Floridas
defacing of state property
provision, if caught.
9
Recently the new Graduate
International Studies building
and numerous stop signs on
campus have been the target for
various stop the war messages, if
caught, the violaters can be fined

M [I
A Marantz complete home entertainment component
r 1 system factory packaged for you for only $349.00. You save
$124.00 the components make up the
IHIHfIHHHHI fabulous Marantz Model 28 AM/FM Stereo Receiver/Com Receiver/Comr
r Receiver/Comr % pact! The Marantz Model 28 System includes a Marantz
LJ Model 26 AM/FM Stereo Receiver worth $219.00, two
Marantz Imperial IV Speaker Systems worth $l3B, the PP
kJ famous Garrard SL-558 Record Changer with Shure Car Carr
r Carr tridge worth $79.45, and a handsome walnut grained base PB
| | worth $25.50 and a smoke plastic dust cover worth $12.95.
9 1 A total of $473.00, factory packaged for you for only PP
hi uSSraRH $349.00:
4 tmmJUBU save 1124 on n a
a lompiETE mnnnniz R
R STEREO SVSTEHI! H
H MARANTZ .. The company $ H
ri the 3 year guarantee ... parts and Ml &l M
M 319 N.W. 13th ST. mon.. S at.,oam.*3opm PHONE 378-2331 M

$52 or imprisoned for three
months.
CAMPUS POLICE feel that
merely writing on desk tops
would probably not be
considered defacing property in
court but if a person was caught
maliciously cutting into a table
top he could be prosecuted.
No cases have been reported
recently but in the past students
have been arrested on similar
charges. One such incident
occurred two years ago when
students from Florida State
University burned a message into
Florida Field saying Beat

Monday, Jimmy2B,l97l, Th* Florida Hipm,

,||
Florida**. Charges were levied
and the violaters were
prosecuted.
Painting or otherwise altering
the general appearance of
university property is considered
a misdemeanor but police are
handicapped in enforcing the
provision because violaters are
hard to catch.
It*s difficult to catch
students in the act of writing on
signs or buildings,** explained
one campus policeman. "The
defacing is evident, but the
writer usually is not.**

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Monday,January 25,1971

1 ou can fool some of the people all of the
time, and all of the people some of the
time, but cannot fool all the people all the
- Abraham Lincoln
EDITORIAL
/>
Widening War,
Widening Gap
As we have pointed out in numerous editorials since
school began in the fall, President Nixon says one thing,
then does another.
Take the war in Southeast Asia. We understand that the
President is trying to end the war there. At least we assume
so. But it also becomes painfully obvious that one cannot
accept what the President says at face value and retain any
self-respect.
For example, he continues to put his foot in his mouth
when he talks about Cambodia.
Last spring, as we all know, the President, with a lot of
fanfare, announced that he had sent troops into Cambodia
to wipe out a few commie sanctuaries. Most of us were a
little apprehensive about it, but at least the President said,
All Americans of all kinds, including advisers, will be out
of Cambodia by the end of June.
On May 18, he said, We shall avoid a wider war. We
believed him.
On June 3 only 27 days left until we get out of
Cambodia President Nixon announced that the only
remaining American air activity in Cambodia after July 1
will be air missions to interdict the movement of enemy
troops and material.
Something went wrong. On June 30, we were still in
Cambodia. The President announced The guidelines of our
policy in Cambodia. He made five points, among them:
There will be no U.S. advisers ... and There will be no
U.S. air or logistics support.
The next day President Nixon disclosed that I can say
now that we have no plans to send more American ground
forces into Cambodia. We have no plans to send any advisers
into Cambodia. We have plans only to maintain the rather
limited diplomatic establishment that we have in Phnom
Penh.
Somebody was fibbing.
It was recently learned that U.S. helicopter gunships are
being used for Cambodian ground troops as fire support.
They are also being used to reinforce Cambodian and South
Vietnamese ground troops.
At least one U.S. soldier has been photographed on the
ground in Cambodia.
But according to Defense Secretary Melvin Laird, there is
nothing to be concerned about. He insists there has been no
change in our Cambodian policy.
As The Miami Herald has pointed out, the war in
Cambodia is not the only thing widening. The credibility
gap in Washington resembles the Grand Canyon.
,

The
Florida^
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

|f= 3= FLUTED ~ Ej=! 3
Academic Folderol
I I - By JOHN PARKER^E====3

The American Association of
University Professors (AAUP)
report that the University of
Florida lacked academic
freedom has about the same
impact as a late bulletin
reporting snow in Philadelphia.
Freedom, of course, is in the
eye of the beholder. There can
be no doubt that in the eye of
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, and or even
Stephen C. OConnell this school
is probably more free of
academics than any in the
country. And getting more so
each year.
The only problem, J. Wayne,
wherever you are, and Stephen
C., is that some of us have
differing definitions of academic
freedom than others.
You see, some of us take it
quite seriously that you saw fit
to deny tenure to Marshall Jones
because he thought integration
was meant for Ocala as well as
Selma, or because he wrote some
very civil disobedience things in
an academic journal. Some of us
are just twisted enough to
interpret your actions as an
attempt to keep the man from
speaking his mind.
Sure, it was probably all a big
misunderstanding. But, as I say,
there are people around who
misinterpret such things.
The Canney affair is another
one of those. You see, in the
state of Florida, even an

Alligator Staff
Om*m Valiant* John Parker
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Stove Strang Joan Dalton
Wire Editor Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of tha University of Florida unitor tha ausoicat of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite
third floor, fleitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

ys& 1 1
attorney can practice law if he
has been convicted of a felony,
so long as he has an appeal
pending. So to remove a teacher
from a classroom on the grounds
that he has been convicted,,
without any kind of further
investigation, smells a little like
telling the fellow to shut up.
And when good ol Lavon
Gentry was arrested for taping
up anti-war posters a couple of
years ago, it seemed to some
people that it was the content of
the posters and not the physical
act that was being objected to.
Like I say, it was probably all
just a big misunderstanding, but
still, there are those of us around
who have a tendency to misread
the prevailing wind.
President OConnell, Dr. Hale,
and other wielders of Big Sticks

Phyllts-GalJub
Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

' v ?Tf

in and around Tigert, let me
depart from my usual gentle
ways and be brutally frank for a
few paragraphs.
You people dont give a damn
about academic freedom.
Further, you dont give a
damn about having a great
university.
And the reason you dont, is
that you dont understand the*
meaning of either. To you, a
great university is a matter of
more, bigger buildings, better
trained technicians, and a 10-0
football team.
You dont realize that every
time you try to repress someone
for having unpopular beliefs,
however well-rationalized your
actions are, you are violating
academic freedom.
But please, Dont listen to me.
Dont listen to the Marshall
Joness, the Lavon Gentrys, the
Bob Canneys.
But if you want to listen to
SOMETHING and are very very
stffl and quiet, and wind is just
just right, you might be able to
hear something very interesting:
:j*w
The faint tinkle of far away
laughter.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. 5. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



By BRUCE ALPER
Alligator Columnist
Hello there. Are you the one
who got the shaft last week or
has been screwed by a professor
or maybe the Committee on
Student Petitions of the College
of Arts and Sciences? Maybe
you feel just plain unhappy and
disgusted. Maybe youre
completely bored with this
course and think the professor is
the worst lecturer you have ever
been stuck with.
If you havent been screwed
or gotten the shaft you may not
care. But who knows
tomorrow you may be the next
victim of academic and
administrative intrangience and
of educational alientation.
Thats my term for boredom and
disinterest in the classroom as
well as for tyrannical faculty and
administrators men who often
dont give a damn about student
rights and needs.
I HAVE always tried to be
fair to people. Thats why I have
at times praised President
OConnell and the great strides
we have made under him while
also pointing to some of the
serious shortcomings we are
faced with. While I have
criticized Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder I have
also applauded some of his bold
efforts.
I have strongly condemned all
extremists and violence as a
means to implement change. So
remember this administrators,
deans, chairman, and faculty
if I cant trust you, nobody can.

READERS FROUM

Frats
EDITOR:
In theory, the Fraternity
System at this university
represents brotherhood in its
fullest form. In practice,
however, the greeks on our
campus are a manifestation of
brotherhood in its most empty
form. The latter form, as
exhibited by the fraternities, is
brotherhood directed exclusively
towards the organizations
themselves. In this void form of
brotherhood, those within the
framework of the fraternal
organization afford
consideration, while those
without are unimportant. This,
course, would be an invalid
charge, if not shown true in
practice.
On Jan. 20, various
fraternities participated in a
bowling tournament at the Reitz
Union Lanes, sponsored by the
Intramurals Department. This
drew crowds of greeks to watch
their respective teams compete.
At the same time, the Reitz
Union was sponsoring a
campus-wide tournament in
Billiards, Table Tennis, and
various other competitive indoor
sports. The fact that both of
these tournaments were taking
place at the same time, under

The Eternal Shaft

lb I J
ill*.
IT HAS often been said that
our university seeks to become a
great institution. Just what is
this illusive greatness we aspire
to? How do we measure it and
when will it become a reality?
Do we measure greatness in
terms of high faculty salaries or
big name academicians? Do
shiny new buildings mean we are
great?
If we use these things as
guides we will be sorely
disappointed and fail to ever
achieve the true measure of
greatness.
Greatness means an ability to
junction on a. scale so conceived
that each student really counts.
It means caring about students
their needs, problems, and views.
Greatness means a willingness to
achieve something better.
Greatness means a
democratization of the
university and the very processes
by which decisions are arrived
at.
WHILE MANY professors are

the same roof, suggest a conflict
of interests. Billiards, like
bowling (or any other
competitive sport), requires
extreme concentration on the
part of the participant. If the
surroundings around the
competition are overly noisy, it
is next to impossible for one to
concentrate on the endeavor at
hand; such was the case in the
Games Area on Jan. 20.
The fraternities cheering
sections allowed their teams to
bowl in silence, but between
frames (units of bowling), and
particularly between games, the
cheering greeks sounded like the
followers of Der Fuhrer ... very
loud! As a result of this noise,
the participants in the Billiards
tournament had to wait (even
though they had set time limits
to their games), until the
atmosphere was conducive to
concentration. As a participant
in the Carom Billiards
tournament, I complained to the
management about the noise,
and the fraternities were asked
to keep the noise level down,
and have consideration for the
other people in the area. The
fraternities ignored this request;
and in one instance, told the
manager W the area where to get
off.
Thus, the fraternities, by
their actions on January 20,
openly and directly expressed
the fact that they only care
about themselves. If this is,
indeed, the case, then the greeks
ought to formulate a new

pretty knowledgeable in their
chosen fields they are noticeably
lacking in any real awareness of
the true meaning of education.
Therefore, shouldnt we give
students a larger voice in
determining just what their
education should include?
We are not just students who
are going to leave here in a few
years. In essence, we are the
University of Florida.
Change, progress, and reform
we must have. Anyone who sets
himself up as our adversary is
not just unjustifiably
conservative and parochial in
outlook but is actually an enemy
of tomorrow for tomorrow
will see the things we seek made
reality.
HAVENT ENOUGH people
gotten the shaft? Hasnt the
faculty and its power cliques
screwed enough students so that
we refuse to tolerate any further
repetition of this? Havent
enough professors and lower
echelon administrators played
god with our lives long enough?
Is this any way to run a
university?
One might almost say that the
symbol of some of UFs
faculty-administrative power
groups is a finger raised at
students in the classic symbol of
contempt.
We all know what a university
is. Thats where the professor
gets tenure and the students get
screwed.
If anything, a university
involves human relations. Isnt it
about time we begin to
humanize such relations?

theory, which coincides with
their actions.
JOELJENETT
3AS
Tell Josh
EDITOR:
Last night at approximately
11:00 I was standing in the
darkness of my bathroom
brushing my teeth. Suddenly a
glaring white light filled the little
room. Naturally I presumed
that one of my roommates had
flicked on the light switch. I
looked about and discovered I
was alone. The realization hit me
that I had been chosen as the
object of a divine message. This
fact did not particularly startle
me sihcel had been preparing all
my life for such an occasion.
Thats why I always brush my
teeth in the dark. I want to face
HIM with a clean mouth.
The swirling bright light
assumed a physical form, one
that resembled a very wispy
W.C. Fields. Tears streaming
down my cheeks. I joyfully
kneeled before this messenger of
the Lord. Silently the spirit
drifted to my side and placed a
ghostly hand on my shoulder. It
spoke but one command,
f TELL JOSH IVE CHANGED
MY MIND. I looked up. My
friendly phantom was gone.
CHARLES W. RILEY 4 AS

*w- * rs lit// '*'
"Cong, hell. Captain thats our own men
GUEST COLUMN
Gay Lib Here

By JULIUS JOHNSON
There exists a need to bring
the quest for sexual
identification out of the public
washrooms and into the much
more acceptable arena of the
academic setting. There also
exists the need to share the
experiential facts gathered from
living The Gay Experience with
that part of the academic
community and most
especially the Board of Regents
and other lame duck orders
that still consider homo- and
bisexuality sexual deviations
from hetrosexuality rather than
competing possibilities of
defining ones self.
But more fundamental is the
need for the formation of some
organization that can offer
confrontation to the existing
and developing myths of life in a
gay subculture; an organization
that will have the courage and
manpower to remove many of
the fears practioners of The
Gay Experience have of the
societal community and of
themselves; an organization that
can decrease the need for living
incognito.
SUCH ARE to be the
purposes of University of
Floridas charter of The Gay
Liberation Front (GLF), if ever
allowed to complete applications
for admission as a recognized
campus organization. Causes and
cures per se are not to be
included among the extensive
list of priorities. The primal
concern of any gay liberation
movement should be growth
through personal understanding
and expansion. The means and
techniques for such a growth
process are readily available via
sensitivity and encounter groups,
social activities, rap sessions and
forums for legal anA
psychological advice.
The GLF will attempt to
provide an atmosphere structure
to limit the degree of societal
stress and repressive forces
encountered in the development

Momfay/Jatory 25,171 # The Florida AMdrtor,

and exploration of ones
possibilities, regardless of nature
or content. The only definite
attempts to be made in curing
the causes of the homosexuals
emotional problems and
significant handicaps will be the
extermination of the
mythological stereotypes, images
and opinions held, reinforced
and perpetuated by a
fact-deprived community.
IT WOULD be fool-hearted to
say or imply that the
homosexual community has
nothing to be fearful of. It has.
All the fears are not immediately
recognizable but among these
that are are: a.) attempts to
maintain an unblemished public
image, the perimeter of which is
outlined and defined by either
the community setting or by
ones self; b) the ability (or
inability) to overcome the
feeling nurtured and
reinforced by society that all
(or any) homosexuals are
queer and inferior; c)
reliability of recent Harris Poll
which quotes 63% of U.S.
population as regarding
homosexuals as harmful to
society; d) possible decrease (or
increase) in the terrible anguish
and enormous psychological
fears aroused by presence of
homosexuals or any discussion
of the Virtues of homosexuality
in a social setting; and e)
parental and peer tolerance.
Consequent to these fears
homosexuality and its gay
experience have become The
love that dare not speak its
name.
The closets and dark of night
have long known the secrets and
virtues of homosexuality, but if
homosexuals and the other
varieties of sex-types in the gay
movement lack the courage to
proclaim publicly the triumphs
of their own way of life, why
should the rest of the world be
expected to come across any
change in attitude?

Page 9



Page 10

>, Tht Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25,1971

By BRUCE KUEHN
Alligator vvrvwr
Love is the title of the
course.
Lots of sharing, touching and
caring is involved. Learning steps
in becoming a loving person and
reading relevant books on love is
a part of it. A small
even-numbered group of both
sexes are paired off.
THESE ARE SOME of the
aspects of one of the courses
offered by the Florida
Experimental College (FEC).
Through reading books on
love and trying out new
concepts within the group, the
course members hope to practice
these concepts of love in their
lives. Methods used from the
human potential movement

FBK Speakers Bureau
Seeks Interested Students

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Students with relatively good
speaking ability are wanted by
Florida Blue Key Speakers

The Rat A Place To Date
By DAVE ZIEGLER
Alligator Writer
Through the work of Student Government Productions (SGP) the
Rathskeller is becoming an appealing place to take a date on
weekends.
During.the week SGP sponsors W.C. Fields, and Marx Brother films
at the Rat. SGP is trying to bring movies to the Rat Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday of each week this quarter and at present bands are
being booked for the weekends when no other activities are planned.
Accent 7l, in connection with SGP is bringing Joan Baez to
campus on Jan. 31. On Jan. 30 a New York theatrical group will be
presenting the play, 1776 in the UF Gymnasium. This production
won the Tony Award for being the best musical last year.
Andrew Smith, SGP ticket manager said, We are trying to make
the entertainment on this campus more diversified. We are going to
have different types of entertainment for different types of students.
In February the program starts with the National Ballet. Delanie
and Bonnie and Friends will appear in concert along with Pacific Gas
and Electric on Feb. 20. Malcom Fraeger, a concert pianist, will
perform at the University Auditorium, Feb. 28.

I lIRELLI I
RADIAL TIRES
I For American, European I

LOVE

involving sensitivity will be used.
After this, whatever happens
depends upon the group.
Love is only one of the
courses offered by FEC. The
central function of the college is

Bureau to travel around the state
and rap about UF as it really
is according to Ernest Georgi,
co-chairman of the Florida Blue
Key Speakers Bureau.
Students should pick up

HEALTH SPECIALISTS
b
There are lots of
unhealthy
people in this country
and setts of peof ipeople,
too.
Most of the time
they're the same people.
If this arrangement
intrigues you,
consider VISTA.
Contact:
VISTA- Recruiters
Jan. 25-27
Reitz Union Lobby

And Other Courses

# The Comic Book
o Altornotivo Liffo Stylos
o Tho Communal Movomont
o Bicycling
# Yoga And Meditation
# Sensitivity Group
o Sex
e Magic 123
e The Beatles

to generate an idea and let those
involved in a particular course
respond. After a course is
introduced the group is free to
shape the idea of the course in
their own way.

applications in the Florida Blue
Key room 312 at the Reitz
Union.
TOPICS WILL BE set up in
advance on Jan. 29 at a meeting
with prospective speakers.
After a screening at least 30
people will be picked, coached
and trained in the art of
speaking, Georgi said.
The screening session will
consist of a five minutes speech
and a 10 minute question and
answer period.
THE INTERVIEWS with the
speakers will take place Feb. 4
and 5.
The speakers will be free to
say whatever they want, said
Dave Shull, director of the
Speakers Bureau, though some
public relations material should
be included because they will be
speaking to ex-alumnus that do
send us (the university) money.
The speakers will be speaking
at civic clubs, junior colleges and
probably high schools, according
to Georgi.
The speakers will not be paid
and will be on tour around the
end of March and the first three
weeks in April. Shull said.

8*
BIRTHDAY
ii'% '
LOW EVERY DAY PRICES
REDUCED EVEN MORE!
FREE GIFTS
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Mustang
MOBILE HOMESwoV
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378-1346

NO ATTEMPT is made by the
leader of the group to make the
course evolve in a certain
direction.
The Florida Experimental
College is actually a nebulous

1^ I
[Daily entree special 52{ u P |
IDaily pastry special 19( I
I Featuring color T.V. & Jukebox on free play

The University Religious Association
which sponsors:
Bridge Over Troubled Waters
Religion In Life Week
World University Service
Christmas on Campus
invites you to attend an Orientation Meeting
4:00 pm Tuesday Jan. 26,1971
| IB IB 11 Room 302 Reitz Union

LADIES JANUARY
I I.
*Â¥ Brands - iJfoi) m, rr
Dresses 1 occ
Jumpers Q li Aj ANO
Skirts '3 more
Sweaters V
Blouses
Pantsuits JfolftWWltg
Jumpsuits i
Hooded Coats <^W
Lingerie .Vt;cr*> ew/ customer is fjorneone spo mI
University Plaza
1620 W. Univ. Ave.
American Express. Bank > CVjrge. C
organization. At the beginning
of each quarter, students get
together and create courses that
interest them or pursue then thenhobbies.
hobbies. thenhobbies.
Titles of the other courses
offered this quarter are: The
Comic Book, Alternative Life
Styles-The Communal
Movement, A Study in Vedic
Literature, Starting a Co-op and
Keeping It Going, Bicycling,
Yoga and Meditation, Sensitivity
Group, Religion as Resistance,
Science Fiction, Expressive
Movement, Draft Counseling,
Guitar, Sex, War Machine,
American Radical Writings in the
60s, Revolutionary Strategy,
Magic 123, The Beatles,
Photography, Needlework and
Spring Health Kick.
Interested students may call
378-0034 for information.



Personality Conference Topic:
Guidance In Age Os Dissent

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Wrhar
The theme for the 11th
national Personality
Conferences sponsored by the
College of Education and the
Division of Continuing
Education, was Counseling in the
Age of Dissent.
The conference is designed,
Mr. Wilmer T. Coram,
co-ordinator of the conference
and head of special programs in
the division of continuing
education said, for the
psychologist, psychiatrists,
people in public schools like
guidance counselors, and anyone
acting in counseling people. This
conference is for pros handling
hang-ups.
THIS IS the 11th straight year
that UF has sponsored this
effort, according to Coram. It
was started by Dr. Abe Maslow,
a leading psychologist.UF is the
only institution in the country

HAPPENING
mmmmmmmmmmmm-mmmm i i By
SMILE PLEASE: Florida Players meet tonight at 10:15 in Constans
Theatre. Seminole pictures will be taken.
IF YOU LIKE CHESS THEN: Try Gator Go, the Oriental board game
Tuesday 7:30 p.m. in Union 150A and 1508. Very easy to learn, very
simple rules.
BIG MOUTHS WELCOME: Florida Blue Key Speakers Bureau is
seeking men and women students interested in speaking before civic
clubs and junior colleges. The purpose of this program is to tell people
outside the university community what is really happening.
Applications can be obtained in the Blue Key office, third floor, Reitz
Union, through Jan. 27.
MORE SMILES: Organizations presidents, other than greeks, will
have their pictures taken this week for the 71 Seminole. Each
organization will be represented only by the president or a
representative of its choosing. The time and place for the pictures will
be in the Alligator Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Watch for it.
A REAL LIVE POET: Dr. Peter Lisca will read his poetry Thursday at
7:30 p.m. in the Union lounges.
MEDITATE:. The Students International Meditation Society lecture
will be presented Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the Union room 346.
CELEBRATE: Indias Republic Day is being celebrated by the India
Club Jan. 30 at the Baptist Student Center at 2 p.m. There will be
films and snacks join in the celebration!
MAKE ONE THING PERFECTLY CLEAR: Environmental Action
Group invites you to write a letter to President Nixon, thanking him
for halting the Cross-Florida Barge Canal. Stop by the EAG office,
third floor Union, so paper and pens.
U-M-M-M GOOD: A Study in Vedic Literature continues tonight at
the Catholic Student Center Library at 7.~lncluded in the lecture will
be instructions on how to prepare dahl, (Eaik Indian Vegetarian
Food), and chapter three of the Bhagavad Gita.
MORE FREE FOOD: Free East Indian Vegetarian Love Feast at noon
today. Come and enjoy these exotic delicacies at Krishna House, 1915
N.W. 2nd Ave.
Gainesville Course Beginning Monday. Jan. 25
SELF HYPNOSIS
LECTURE AND DEMONSTRATION
RCE January 25, 8:00 PM Holiday Inn South
LEARN WHY SELF HYPNOSIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL
AND EFFECTIVE TOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELF SELFIMPROVEMENT.
IMPROVEMENT. SELFIMPROVEMENT.
WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROCHURE
INSTITUTE OF APP4I HYPNOSIS
5445 MARINER STREET, TAMPA, PH. 872-0698

that conducts this type of
thing, Coram said.
The conference is composed
of' leading specialists in their
field from across the country
that speak to other
professionals. The program
officially commenced Wednesday
at 8 p.m. when Dr. Edward
Shovenir, a Ph.D. and executive
vice president of Evergreen State
College, talked about Crust
Over a Volcano.
Friday, there were four
speakers starting al 9 a.m. with
Dr. Hani Van De Riet, a member
of UF psychology department,
whose topic was The Rage of
Women.
AT 11 A. M., Dr. Sidney M.
Jourard, Ph.D., Professor of
Psychology at UF, spoke on
Humanistic Posture in the Age
of Dissent.
Dr. E. Arthur Larson, M.D.,
deputy director for hospital and
institutions with the department

of health and rehabilitation in
Florida spoke at 1:30 p.m.
concerning Youth and Drugs,
and Much Much More. The
Counselee is Black and the
Counselor is White was Dr.
Robert L. Williams topic.
Williams is from Washington
University and black.
THE CONFERENCE ENDED
Saturday at 9 a.m. after Dr.
Richard Keith McGee, associate
professor of clinical psychology
at UF speaks on Suicide To
Be or Not To Be. McGee is also
director of the center of crisis
intervention research in
Gainesville.
Each of the topics, according
to Coram, has something to do
Guns Guns Guns
Inventory over 500. Buy
Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies. Harry
Beckwith, gun dealer,
Micanopy. 466-3340

****!s
X presented by
i plus i
[ DINNER SPECIAL I
r ft . r* $*
I 1/4 FRIED CHICKEN I
| MASHED POTATOES, Y
f GRAVY, GREEN BEANS ONtY Y
I DINNER SPECIAL GOOD 4:30 to 7 PM 4

with the main theme of the
conference.
It will help them become
more aware of the problems of
dissent, and what prompts
it .Many of its causes have not
surfaced yet because of lack of
interpersonal communication
between people, Coram said.

if KINGS CURB COUPON I
vl 1430 svv 13th Street
Ik miflM/^r/ am^ur 9 r Plotter g>
j ! 1 Check for Kings Royal Treats gP
JS i WT B,fl Mv,n ** everyday Both locations gP

Monday, January 26,1971, The Florida Alligator.

WHAT
ARE OUR
RIGHTS?
Can we claim them without
violence?
Jim Spencer, a Christian
Science practitioner, says we
can. And he proposes a radical
method of doing it. It's based
on an understanding of God as
divine Love, the undertying
source of human rights.
After his talk, he'll answer
questions.
Monday, January 25
Reitz Union Aud. 8:00
Sponsored by
Christian Science Oraaniratinn

Page 11



Page 12

t.Th* ftorfcb Alligator, Monday, JintitrV 25/I*7l

r
Campus Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
v -
Finance Manuals Have Arrived
Finance manuals should be picked up from the Secretary of Finance this week by all student
organization business managers. The manuals may be picked up in the third floor of the Reitz
Union in the Student Gov't Office.
- .... \ i
Theological Students Harken!
Dean Neil Ho use wright of the Vanderbilt University Divinity School will be in Room 356 of
the J. Wayne Reitz Union on Monday, January 25th from 3 to 5 p.m. to meet with students
who are considering theological study at either the graduate or professional level.
.. v
Flicks At The Rat
Mon. 7:15,9:00,10:45 Laurel & Hardy ... Chump At Oxford and ...
Spook Spectacular
Bride of
Beep Beep
Dracula
Copperfield with W.C.
Creature of the Black Lagoon
Tryouts
Florida Players will hold tryouts for the second production of the winter quarter: "Five
Finger Exercise" in Little Hall, room 101 Wednesday and Thursday, January 27 and 28;
from 7:00 to 10:30. Scripts are available in ASB 363.
r
* \
Trig. Help Sessions
The Mathematics Department is running a programmed trigonometry course Monday and
Wednesday evenings, 7:30 to 9 p.m. in Weil 328, through March 106 h. You may start at any
time you feel you need help in trigonometry.
s-
Supreme Court Day
The Supreme Court of the State of Florida will be the guests of JOHN MARSHALL BAR
ASSOCIATION this Friday, Jan. 29. The Justices will arrive at the Law School at 12:00 for a
Brown Baggers luncheon, which will be followed by an informal panel discussion for the
balance of the afternoon.
TUES., JAN 26 THURS., JAN 28 SUN., JAN 31
jjf | Bf
Hx Rafferty Frank Manltfewanicz Joan Bain
*.hr if-,'.' ' .s"f to
ACCENT 71 Symposium Continues
ACCENT 71 presents three more renowned speakers to the U of F campus this week. Dr.
Max Rafferty, noted educator and nationally syndicated columnist will speak in the University
Auditorium on Tues. Jan. 26. Frank Mankiewenicz, internationally syndicated columnist and
former press secretary to Robert F. Kennedy, will be the keynote speaker Jan. 28 in the Fla.
Gymnasium. World renowned folksinger and anti-war activist Joan Baez will sing and speak on
Sun. Jan. 31, in the Fla. Gymnasium.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON 5 00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS
/ ROBERTHARRIS
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
- STUDENT GOVERNMENT



1 World m

Truman's Condition
Callod 'Fair Sunday
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (UPI)
Former President Harry S
Trumans condition was listed as
fair Sunday and doctors
indicated he may be developing
complications.
Truman, 86, is suffering from
inflamation of the large
intestine.
Dr. Wallace H. Graham,
Trumans personal physician,
issued the following statement:
The results of the tests
available at present, lack of
appetite and a restless night are
sufficient cause to redefine the
former President's condition as
fair.
Truman's condition had been
listed as good since shortly
after he was hospitalized early
last Thursday with severe
stomach pains. Graham said the
colitis was related to the former
Presidents gastric illness two
years ago.
EOF Soaks Injunction
Supporting Halt Ordor
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Environmental Defense Fund
(EDF) will seek a permanent
injunction against the Florida
Barge Canal so President Nixon's
halt order cannot be revoked, a
spokesman said Wednesday.
There is certainly no
likelihood that President Nixon
will change his mind, Edward
Lee Rogers, EDF general
counsel, told UPI. But Congress
has not de-authorized the
project. As a man once said,
money can wait.
ROGERS, of New York, said
he heard from a reliable
authority the President's order
halting further construction was
influenced by the EDF victory
in federal district court here.
Judge Barrington Parker
ordered a temporary injunction
halting further work on the
Cross-Florida Canal on technical
grounds, and called for hearings
that might lead to a permanent
injunction.
Nixon Tuesday permanently
halted all work on the $165
million project, already
one-third completed, on the
recommendation of his council
on environmental quality.
THE PRESIDENT did not

BUSINESS MAJOR ?
MBA ?
You can make a
difference
in the economy
of poor Americans,
in the quality of their
lives.
You can help
shape the future
of your country.
Consider VISTA.
VISTA Rocruitor
Jan. 25
Booth Across
From Tho Hub
10-2 PM

make any reference to it the
court action of course, so I think
maybe I should, Rogers said in
a telephone interview.
We consider that the
Presidents order to be an
admission of error on the part of
the administration. We consider
it to be an agreement with the
merit of our complaint.
Prospocts For Tax
Amondmont 'Good'
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
major job of governmental
reorganization is done but in
the face of a $250 million
money crunch, there are still
dollar savings that ought to be
squeezed from consolidating and
eliminating unnecessary or
duplicating functions.
So said House Speaker
Richard Pettigrew, D-Miami, as
the Wednesday date approaches
for convening a special session of
the legislature.
Prospects are good that the
legislature will adopt a
constitutional amendment that
would, if approved by the
people at a special election
beforehand, let the legislature in
April impose corporate income
tax and fix the rate.
It wont be easy to get the

a |
jV/ -m- ~ ,3SH^^Sai^J-:c <
yOM v# Ufa

constitutional change through
the legislature, particularly by
the huge two-thirds vote
necessary for a constitutional
amendment, to say nothing of
the even bigger vote needed to
submit it to the people at an
election in April instead of
waiting for the next regular
election more than a year away.
But Gov. Reubin Askew has
two things going for him in
pushing the tax. First, he was
overwhelmingly elected just two
months ago on a platform that
promised a corporate income
tax. And the right atmosphere
has been created through
projections of the governors
staff, the legislature, Republican
and Democrats, of an
anticipated gap between needs
and income that could reach
$250 million.
Soviots Suggost UN
Loavo Now York City
MOSCOW (UPI) The
Soviets suggested Sunday the
United Nations should consider
pulling out of New York, a city
that ... has become a center of
organized crime and
gangsterism.
The suggestion, carried in the
Communist newspaper Pravda,

was part of the continuing
Soviet campaign of retaliation
against harassment of Soviets in
the United States. The campaign
has included intimidation of
American residents of
Moscow. Tomas
Kolesnichenko, Pravdas New
York correspondent, suggested
U.S. authorities intentionally
encouraged attacks on Soviet
and Arab missions to the United
Nations.
Indeed, what else can
explain the fact that American
authorities have not taken
effective measures to cut short
and prevent hostile hooligan
actions, he asked.
Now, as the question of
construction of new United
Nations buildings in New York is
being discussed, it is
necessary... to give serious
thought to the question of
whether the United Nations can
count on normal functioning in
that city, Kolesnichenko said.
More than (Mice, many
delegates of the United Nations
raised the question of the
feasibility of the further locating
of the U. N. headquarters in
New York, a city that ... has
become a center of organized
crime and gangsterism.
The Soviets repeatedly have
insisted that the United States

' Monday, January,2s.lo7l. Tha Florida AlUtatar,

connived in attacks on Soviet
diplomats by militant "Jewish
groups in the United States.
The Russians retaliated by
damaging American cars and
accosting U.S. diplomats,
businessmen and journalists
working in Moscow.
Eldridgo Can Snoak
Into U.S.Mrs. Cloavor
LONDON (UPI) The wife
of fugitive Eldridge Cleaver said
in an interview published here
Sunday that the Black Panther
minister of information could
easily sneak back into the
United States.
The United States is a very
large country bounded on three
sides by water, Kathleen
Cleaver said in the brief
telephone interview from Algiers
with the Sunday Times of
London.
It has many mountain ranges
and the Bay (sic) of Mexico,
she said. Anyone who wants to
enter the United States can do
so.
Cleaver said in a CBS
television interview taped in
Algiers last year that he would
sneak back into the United
States to help blacks take our
freedom.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for s,a>e.
I rwttfr
Small refrigerator S7O big fan $7 hot
plate $6 aquariums $3.50 e $7 call
call 378-7650 anytime (A-2t-67-p)
1970 Bonneville 650 Triumph New
pistons 5800 miles Asking SI3OO.
Will trade for car call 373-2596 after
spm (A-st-67-p)
6O FALCON economical good tires
only needs battery $l5O or best offer
Colleen 372-7485 1968 Gilera motorcycle 5600 miles
124 cc. S2OO or best offer. Call
376-9473 Gene Makela best time
5:30 or leave number anytime.
(A-3t-67-p)
Save over SIOO on Sony 230 w tape
recorder. Baby due soon, must sell.
Has jacks for tuner, phono, has
mikes, new p/r head 378-7872
(A-3t-67-p)
Suzuki 500 cc cherrybomb call
372-2197 practically anytime
(A-2t-67-p)
English Bulldog Puppies AKC reg.
Championship Bloodlines. Males and
Females available call 378-9808
(A-st-67-p)
50 ft Ventura for sale, beautiful &
inexpensive home with large lot. see
at no. 91 Pinehurst Park or call
after 5 p.m. For March or
June (a-10t-60-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -3.00 pun. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
W M
n
£
CO
T) QJ IT < -* h
5%!! fIS 5
s?§* s j 5 | n
C Q 3 Q) Q fD w
a 5
O QQ DO q
>
. _____ & CO ro
Q. Q_ Q. Q. Q. 5 ia
.. 0) 0) 03 Q> QJ 2 AO
*"< < < < < w
lyj w> (/i S
- l . o £
s a j _* § o
1 TO
8 S a o. C
§ 8 8 Z
<
3 3
-
TO
i o > 3 z
m 5 m
CO 2
(O -H
wmmmmm mmmmmmm
*
3
n -DO
z m
M m

jFOR SA LE
62' Falcon 4-door 6 cyl stick shift 25
miles to gal radio heater good mech
cond $295 411 NE Blvd Apt No. 3
come by any time see and save.
(A-st-66-p)
Junk sale: flute S9O uke $5 tape deck
S4O tin & wood boxes ivory foreign
dolls Ips 50 cents books & more junk
come & browse 1022V2 NW 4 Ave
(A-3t-66-p)
Colliers encyclopedia, childrens
supplement, yearbooks, and
bookshelf. Save: money, my credit,
your trip to the library all only $75
378-6900 (A-st-64-p)
Yamaha SOctf 1966 like new
condition/tixcetlent transportation or
first bike. Runs all week on a gallon
of gas. Tool kit. $125. Call 373-4270
(A-st-64-p)
Casette auto stereo tape deck
player-recorder. Brand new will
SELL (make offer) OR TRADE for
used elec typewriter. 376-1997
(A-st-64-p)
Used SPORTS EQUIPT. mens golf
clubs, bag & cart, bowling ball & bag,
women's bowling ball, bag & shoes
call 372-1316 after six (A-st-64-p)
EKO 12-strlng guitar Includes electric
pickup S2OO value for $l5O includes
casen call 392-8819 after spm
(A-st-65-p)

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25,1971

FOR SALE
70 Honda 350SL 1000 miles
excellent condition $750 call
373-1680 (A-3t-66-p)
Beautiful lmported Brazilian
Guitars $35 and up. Gainesville
Discount Music 107 N. Main Street
372-8130 (A-3t-66-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Electric upholstery
shampooers also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
BICYCLE Schwinn Varsity Girls
10-speed. Excellent Cond. S6O Call
Bob 392-7417 or see at Fletcher
M room 183. (A-2t-68-p)
Sylvanla Stereo record player, BSR
mini-changer, 40 watts amplifier, air
suspension speakers, S7O, call
378-0052 (A-lt-68-p)
12 string guitar EKO excellent cond
case incl Lee 376-8958 SIOO
(A-3t-68-p)
1970 Volkswagen excellent mech
condition SIBOO or best offer call
378-7247 evenings (A-g-68-p)
26 gal aquarium fluor. hood, gravel,
new sls filter, stand and approx. 30
fish. Just add water. $65 or best offer
378-5032 (A-3t-68-p)

SUBURBIA N.W. 13th Ph. 372-9523
Drive-In Theatre Aeross from Mall
CLINTEASTWOOD^^^
mm
NO EARLY
BIRD PRICE
mbbb
PENTHOUSEZITE^THOUSESr
2001 A SPACE I Anne Os The
OPYSSEY | Thousand Days
special early bird price of 35 cents
very night before 6:30 p.m. and
Sat. & Sun. Matinees at Penthouse
2 and Penthouse 3 only. Regular
Price SI.OO

; ATj ; -1 Qsn nn n n nn mmiiniinn n?h 18
W | 2SS X? ? r i wvax*

FOR SA LIE
12x60 taylor. front & rear bedroom,
study, IV2 baths, fully panelled, small
down payment. 20A Archer Road
village or call 378-1061 after five
(A-st-68-p)
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy Kongo Pet 475-2546
(local) (A-16t-55-p)
CHEVY FANS! 2-600cfm holley
carbs $25 ea. 301 shortblk. forged
pistons bal. & clean. Erson roller cam
& kit Lunati cam SSO Tunnel ram
sllO many other hlperf parts all new
call 392-9488 for details & specs.
(A-2t-68-p)
YAMAHA ENDURO 250 1970
Excellent woods bike extras TV
portable b&w Like new Dave
376-7146 After 5 PM (A-st-68-p)
FANTASTIC DEAL!! 1969 Akal
tape recorder. New cost $950 will sell
for S4OO, includes $l5O worth of
tapes. 376-9507 after 5:00
(A-3t-68-p)
1969 YAMAHA 250, DS6C
Street-scrambler, excellent condition,
with 2 helmets, book rack, & helmet
lock, all for SSOO. Call Tom at
378-6424 (A-3t-68-p)
MARTIN GUITAR D-18 $225 Phone
376-9845 (A-st-68-p)
Bus 65 VW excellent mechanically,
all seats, double bed, ice box, morel
S9OO 378-5094 (A-2t-68-p)
BARGAIN two year old zenith 23
B/W T.V. just got a colored set will
sacrifice for $75 or best offer call Jim
376-0549 after 5 PM (A-2t-68-p)
FOH RENT
Room for Rent Kitchen and bath
room facilities $45 per month I am
seeking liberal-minded university
student Ph. 376-4895 Please enquire
(B-3t-68-p)
Female Roommate needed for spring
qtr. one block from campus $55 + V 2
utilities call 378-5898 (B-st-64-p)
Male Roomy Wanted share 2 Bdr.
apt. 3128 N.W. 21 St. $32.50/mo.
available now. call 376-8384 or
378-6886 after 5 p.m. (b-st-67-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom apt. No. 102
olympia close to university furnished
- air & heat walk in closets nice place
1100 SW Bth Ave. call 378-7429
(B-st-67-p)

FOR RENT
Need 1 male roommate to sublet at
Tanglewood* S7O per mo + Vz utl.
Call auer 3 pm 372-7182 Apt 62
great place to live and quiet, too.
(B-2t-6 7-p)
Female roommate wanted: $42.50 a
month plus utilities, two bedroom
apt. village park call Michele
378-0622 anytime. (B-2t-67-p)
1 bedroom furnished trailer, close to
university. Rent for Feb and March,
$45 month plus utilities. Call Chris at
392-7346 (B-lt-68-p)
2 female roommates wanted, own
room in large house, pets welcome.
$55/mo. + 1/3 util, call 376-8736
after 5:30 (B-st-68-p)
WANTED
Female roomate(s) needed at U.G.T.
apts. cost is $47.50 per month plus >4
of utilities. This month rent is paid
and you can move in now. 378-4614
(C-2t-67-p)
Female wanted to live in large NW
area house, private room, babysit for
small child In exchange when needed
378-0844 after 6. (C-3t-67-p)
Used Sheet Music Wanted Gainesville
Discount Music 107 N. Main Street
372- (C-3t-66-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cyllnthla between 1 and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
COINS Buy and Sell all old or scarce
coins. Cash for your coins all Silver
Gold and Type coins. Sell coins
reasonable Tom .392-7444
{c-10t-60-p)
Need to sublet apt. one male,
poolside. Williamsburg 52.50/mo. call
373- Jan. rent free. (C-st-64-p)
Female roommate wanted
immediately 3 bedroom Williamsburg
apt $45 month also subletlng entire
apt spring quarter call 378-0518 apt
No. 14 (C-4t-65-p)
WA i~fc
$95.00 weekly possible addressing
mail for firms Details send stamped
self-addressed envelope to Blaber Box
125 53 El Paso, Texas 79912
(E-st-66-p)
Help wanted-drlver and passenger van
to work nlghts-call campus cone
372-3890 (E-4t-62-p)
Two law students In desperate need
of a cook 5 days a week excluding
Fri. & Sat. point west apts. call
372-7850 after 8:00 P.M. (E-st-68-p)
Homeworkers Envelope addressers
& mailers. Send stamped envelope &
25 cents to GWL Enterprises 640
Cobb St. Athens, Ga. 30601
(E-2t-65-p)
AUTOS
1965 Corvette Stingray. 327 cu In
350 HP, 4-speed. One-owner 48,000
miles. White with Maroon Interior
Need S2OOO. Call 376-6191.
(G-st-64-p)
196 7 Fiat 124 sedan. Good
dependable transportation. S6OO.
Call 376-5633 after 4. (G-st-67-p)
INOONIMJNDHM
U ADMITTED I
I DONT JUST I
11/ut>iere|



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
Alfa Romeo 1961 Glulietta spyder
convertible good cond. new paint,
recond. engine $450 call 378-8960
(G-3t-66-p)
68 VW bug, good tires, new battery,
recently reworked engine, typical
reliable VW transportation, will trade
for good bus. SI2OO, 373-3842
(G-st-65-p)
1968 Volvo 142 S, 4 Speed, New
Tires, Low Mileage, Green, Good
Condition, SI6OO. Must Sell, Wife
Pregnant. 378-0507 (G-4t-66-p)
1964 MGB, 4 Speed, Wire Wheels,
Green, $575. Must Sell, Wife
Pregnant. Call 378-0507 after 5.
(G-3t-66-p)
VW CAMPER 1969 Pop Top sleeps
five, exceptional condition, must sell
S2BOO 392-6108 392-6063 leave
message (G-st-66-p)
1963 Chevy wagon, power steering,
air cond, lots of room, good cond,
6-cylinder, call Sue, 2-7678 after 5
wkdays (G-st-66-p)
65 VW BUS 12000 miles on engine
opening windows w screens +
curtains homemade camper Interior
good tires S9OO call Roger after 6pm
378-9266 (G-st-68-p)

RAPPS
Delivers Fast
373-3377
Mon.-Thurs.
5:30 p.m. 12:30 a.m.
Fri.-Sat.
1 2 noon 1:30 a.m.
Sunday
12 noon 12:30 a.m.

SWfl%
ENDS THUR.
I TheOwll
I and the I
I Passjfcatl
1 AT... 1 :S7 3:49 ,1
5:41 7:36 9:31 [r]|
AT MM [p]
I StHl:Sl7>#l
d

SHOWING TONKSMI
UURa l HARDY A
Spook Spoctaculore jrC /
"Bride of Frankenstein"
"Beep Beep"
"DRACULA"
HOW 7:15,9:00 4C> pef | ....
TIMES: ,0-4 *3V P**on y so*.

Monday. January 26,1971, The Florida Alligator,

I ot ,he RAT!

AUTOS
..........................
1961 Volvo 4dr radio htr 4sp stick
new tires locking gas leather buckets
good mileage Inspect & commuter
or b st Mor 9*n 378-6696
(G-lt-68-p)
PE FI SONA L
Student travel, trips, charters,
Europe, Orient, around the world.
Write S.T.O.P. 2150 C Shattuck,
Berkely Calif. 94704 or see travel
agent. (J-10t-58-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
NEED SOME NEW HAIR? Must
Sacrifice! Long Genuine Muskrat
coat for guy or girl SSO or best offer
call 373-3181 anytime (J-st-66-p)
Joe thank-you for another wonderful
weekend, they get better and better.
I love you and I like you. Drive safely
Sunshine (J-lt-68-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
378-6900 ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years. Also
guitar repair service! (J-st-64-p)
Mostly GERMAN SHEPHERD, year
old, rabies vaccinated, free to good
home. 373-2184 (J-4t-68-p)
CONGRATULATIONS New ALPHA
CHI Pledges! Were All Proud of You.
The Ax's (J-lt-68-p)
263-92-5159: Would you believe two
yrs. As of the 24th? Rotsa Ruck.
Grits. (J-lt-68-p)
Union popular film selection
committee meets Wednesday In room
331 of the Union at 7:30 (J-3t-68-p)
Anyone interested in working with
programs such as bridge-over bridge-over-troubled-waters
-troubled-waters bridge-over-troubled-waters contact the religion
dept, for further Information
392-1625 (J-3t-66-c)
The Copy Center next to College Inn
binders and label holders as specified
by grad school. Xerox copies 4 cents
3 cents our quality and service
guaranteed, open Sundays by
appointment 1718 W Unlv 8 am 9
pm. Parking in rear at Malones
Bookstore. The Copy Center
376-9334 (J-st-67-p)
PLEXIGLASSI Half-Price! Assorted
colors + thickness In 4x sheets or
smaller. Call 372-7318 after 5:00.
Also will make items. (J-st-64-p)
Pack your Knapsack for adventure 30
day Bicycle-Camping tour of England
Price Includes: round trip air fare
rental of 10 speed bike, 2 man tent,
stove, and a very together Itenerary
and more Cali 376-7985 (J-10t-62-p)
Express yourself Join FBK
Speakers Bureau and speak
throughout the state. Apply Rm 312
JWRU Jan. 18 Jan. 27 In Aft.
(J-7t-63-p)
I.;.;.;.:.;.::;-;.:.:.;-:.;.:;:-:-:-:.:-;-:-:-:-;-:-;.::;-:.:::::-:-;-::;
LOST S l found
Found: blue 1970 class ring from
Miami H. S. t Initials R.M.T. call
392-2060 or come to desk In lobby
of Computing Center. (L-3t-67-nc)
Lost: Womans silver 1.0. bracelet.
Has no monetary value but much
sentimental value! If found please
call 392-9468. $5.00 reward I
(L-3t-66-p)

Page 15

SERVICES
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
do you want freedom with
responsibility for your child?
378-3241 for babysitting 3134 NE
12 Street (M-4t-67-p)
Made to order In African print now
for now Dashlkis to fit anyone $5.
Includes cloth of your choice
378-0597 Sylvia also any sewing
(M-lt-68-p)
FREE CHILD CARE alternative to
strict authoritarian nurseries share
parental responsibility In rotating
child pool for details call Connie at
376-0881 (M-st-66-p)
Housewives: will do Ironing and
mending for three dollars a week.
Call after 5:30 and before 10 p.m.
372-5269 (M-7t-67-p)
The Copy Center next to College Inn.
Binders and label holders as specified
by grad school. Xerox copies 4 cents
3 cents our quality and service
guaranteed, open Sundays by
appointment 1718 W Unlv
Bam-9p.m. parking in rear at Malones
Bookstore. The Copy Center
376-9334 (M-st-67-p)

B- |
Patronize
;
j Gator Advertisers;
L ?
nsnrsw sr\ "i
ONLY 10 DAYS
UNTIL LOVE STORY! S
jll&ng
| LIVE TWICE -1:30 6:45 j
| THUNDERBALL 3:30 7:46 |
OM3SI2J i
Skinny. I f LOVERS AND
J OTHEITSmSNGERS J
7 n 7r* 1
NURSES I*3o 4:257:20 4 I
lovers atoaSiooilS DAYS
! (x) i
1 namngiMLi w l
ilMKEpai
imnaUM fjln i
S stwauGcEa S
2 Lovers*!*
FLORIDA THEATRE ONLY
ALL SEATS SI .25
l.ihMvimvtf.J

Answers To Crossword Puzzlo
iK- : laffiiiiaaiiiiia

Todays
more for your money meal
amoisons
CRFETERIfi
J 1
MONDAYS FEATURE ]
CHUCK WAGON STEAK
_ and hash 4* 4*
> I BROWN HyA Ip
" POTATOES I
|I | 1
Z I TUESDAYS FEATURE | s
5 I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN | s
| ALL YOU CAN EAT |
I 99<
LIiaBIMBIBaBIBBiJ
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8 FREE PARKING 1
Lmoisons
CRFETERIfi .. beyond comparison! I
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

| the time has come, |
and the |
Florida |
to" t^SS
Alligator 1
is now i



PB 16, Tha FlorwS Alligator, Friday, January 22,1971

The
Florida
Alligator

Gators Host Nations Top Scorer

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Stopping the nations leading
scorer will be one task Gator
basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett must do tonight in
Florida Gym as the Gators host
the University of Mississippi and
Johnny Neumann.
Neumann is raving revues
from opposing scouts and
players in this his sophomore
year as he is being tabbed
another Pete Maravich, LSUs
ex-super scorer.
THROUGH SUNDAY,
Neumann was averaging over 42
points per game, despite his
below average 38-point
production against Georgia
Saturday. So far this season, the
sophomore whiz has compiled a
60-point output against Baylor
and over 50 in three other
games.
If the Gators concentrate on
Neumann more than the rest of
the Ole Miss team, they will still
be in jeopardy of losing their
fifth game in a row and eleventh
of the season.

Sigma Chi Hits Gridiron
Against Fired-Up Sunland

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Editor
Junior Bob Miller was in a
touchy situation last Saturday
because he was hoping that his
UF fraternity football team
would get beat.
Sigma Chi came out to
No Bowl Bid
Brings UFCash
For not playing in any
post-season football games this
past year, the Gators will receive
$12,309.20 from the Gator
Bowl Association.
Under Southeastern
Conference rules, all SEC teams
will receive a percentage of the
gate and television receipts from
bowl games if one SEC team is
involved.

THE
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
4( Xerox 3<
Thesis & Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376-9334 8 am -9 pm

JK. JBMh
WL H V at W

JSjfe
Jj
JOHNNY NEUMANN
... 42 plus average
Mississippi is currently ranked
second to Jacksonville
University for the highest
scoring average per game this
season with a 100.5 average.
BEHIND NEUMANN in
scoring is Danny Gunn, a
6-foot-2 guard and David
Rhodes, a 6-foot guard. Gunn
and Rhodes are the only other
Rebel scorers in double figures.
Rhodes is averaging 16.3 with

Gainesvilles Sunland Training
Center for the retarded and
played the centers rag tag
football team, which happened
to be coached by Miller.
SUNLAND WON, 27-24, but
the fraternity wasnt too upset
over Millers infidelity.
The brothers have always
asked me questions about things
out there, said Miller, who has
been working as a Sunland
recreation assistant for five
months. And they have
expressed a desire in visiting.
Miller planned the game,
working with about 20 Sunland
youths, who were really willing
to leam.
Some of them knew a little
about football mostly what
they had learned on TV, Miller
said. We just went over the
basics.
Sunland also has teams in
softball and basketball.

I I STARKE 0 1 FLORIDA I
"SOOXER OR LATER YOUR FAVORITE DEALER"
1- HOURS -1
1 WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
I SATURDAY BAM IPM
PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT*

NEUMANN ON DISPLAY TONIGHT

KAL. jKii
flB ,y Wm /
iMa
jH k 9k jj
La m
gr Hlnu>' .. A,; H
TOM PURVIS
... in double figures
Gunn close behind at 12.8.
Against Georgia, Neumann
scored 38, followed by Rhodes
with 16 and Gunn with 14.
Old Miss is currently shooting
48.8 per cent from the field and
74.9 per cent from the line as
compared to Floridas .403 and
.685 figures.
Another Rebel, center Jim
Farr, is second in the
Southeastern Conference in

I really appreciated the
interest Sigma Chi took,
recreation director Ron
McMillian said. I further invite
any group of guys or
organization to come out and
play our teams.
Miller warned that other
challenging teams should beware
of the Sunland crew. The kids
took the game serious, he said.
They were out for blood.
They were really fired up. If
they didnt like a call by the
referee they really jumped on
them.
..More than 40 Sigma Chis
came out to match talents.
It was a fun thing for the
fraternity, and it was a fun thing
for the kids, who really dig
anybody taking an active
interest in them, Miller said.
Hopefully, the next team that
plays Sunland wont be Sigma
Chi just for Millers sake.

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Page 16

shooting percentage with 56.9
on 33 of 58 shots.
THE GATORS will try to end
their losing streak which
includes three games on the road
and a disappointing 72-58 loss to
Mississippi State in their last
outing.
Balanced scoring will be UFs
strong point with four players in
double figures on the year.
Sophomore guard Tony Miller
leads the team with a 15-point
average. His best effort has been
a 26-point production against
Tennessee.
Post Gary Waddell is next
with an 11.4 with Earl Findley
only .1 point behind at 11.3.
The other Gator in double Agues
is Tom Purvis with an 11-point
average.
ON THE BOARDS, Findley
and Waddell pace the Gators
with 109 and 104 rebounds,
respectively. Farr leads Ole Miss
with 9.0 rebounds a game with
Neumann second and Gunn
third.
Immediately preceding the
Neumann showcase, the baby
Gator basketball team will meet
the University of South Florida
at 5:30 p.m. The freshmen have
won four of ten this season and
stand 2-3 in the SEC.
Don Close is the top scorer
for the frosh with a 14.2
average. Doug Brown, 13.7,
Steve Williams, 12.7 and John
Sarto, 11.9 are the other
freshmen in double figures.
If last years appearance of

BUY ONE
TBSfflM
an m
_ H H H^BIH
WITH rn p -A,
is FRFF a<^5 u
AD HILL... 27,28,1971
ONLY

826 W. UNIVERSITY
10:30 AM TO 12:00 PM

The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25,1971

CHUCK KELLER
Sports Editor

Pete Maravich in Florida Gym is
any indication of how
Gainesville fans turnout for a
high scorer, a capacity crowd of
5,100 is likely for the 7:45
tip-off.
As in all Gator basketball
games, radio station WRUF and
Otis Boggs will call the
play-by-play beginning at 7:40
p.m.

The Citroen.
Its so different
it will take
courage to buy it
After you get to
know it, it will take
courage to buy
anything else.
CITROEN^
EDS MEHARI
CITROEN SALES & SERVICE
4308 N.W. 13th Street
We Know The Value of CARS
You Know The Value
of SERVICE



Koch Comes ToUF
With Credentials
By MARK ROSNER
Alligator Sports Writer
Gary Koch is an ambitious young Gator golfer who is considered by
his coach as the finest young player to come into the college ranks in
many years.
He has a very consistent game and putts especially well, UF head
golf coach Buster Bishop said of Koch. He also has an excellent
attitude toward the game.
KOCH, A FRESHMAN from Temple Terrace, already has several
junior titles under his belt. He is the current Junior National Amateur
Champion and has won the Florida Junior Championship, the Orange
Bowl International Junior Championship in 1969, the Babe Zaharias
National Junior Championship and the Florida Open.
This year Koch has the third best team stroke average.
In his eleven years of playing golf, Koch has played on many
courses. He praised Arnold Palmers Bay Hill course in Orlando and
the Doral in Miami as the most challenging courses he has played on.
Koch chose UF over twenty other schools because of its location
and academic standing.
I WANTED to be able to play all-year-round at a school that
emphasizes education, Koch said.
As for future plans, Koch wants to finish school and then perhaps
chase the riches of the pro tour.
Although nothing is very definite, I have given thought to
becoming a pro golfer, Koch said.
HAVING PLAYED with both Arnold Palmer and Frank Beard, an
ex-Gator golfer, he respects them tremendously.
It was a great thrill to play with them and I consider them to be
two of the finest pros, Koch said.
Koch played at King High School where he led the golf team to the
state championships two years in a row. He placed third individually
in the 1970 State High School Championships.
I think we have a good team this year, and I think we will finish
high in the NCAA tournament in June, Koch predicted, and I think
we will finish high in the SEC.
Freshmen Absorb
Homecoming Loss

UFs freshman basketball
team made an indirect
homecoming game a success for
ex-Gator Mike Leatherwoods
Indian River College, as it lost
81-76, Saturday night at Fort
Pierce.
Leatherwood, a former UF
point guard and last year a
freshman Gator coach, is in his
first year of coaching at Indian
River.
THE LOSS brought the
Gators record to 4-6.
Don Close paced the UF
freshmen with 29 points, while
6-foot-10 Doug Brown followed
with 19. Malcolm Meeks, 12,
and John Sarto, 12, were the

| 2445 SJIM3^^H^H
| gMm
P#| m 111 MJ& 111 M SMSe
SSUBFIT 1
L where you get a break M
on steak and
everything else teg*
History is something that never happened, written by a man l||
who wasnt there.

CLOSE

only other Gator players in
double figures.
The Gator freshmen next
square off with the University of
South Florida, tonight at 5:30
before the UF varsity and Ole
Miss game.

v?II xi&b£32l
tgjH
BROWN

UIV
fl|
m in
EAMONN O'KEEFFE
nchowd

-- Wwi
RON JOURDAN
... dears 6-8

MM^
181
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

| THE BIGGEST MUSICAL HITI
H IN YEARS I
|| BEST MUSICAL 1
II NEW YORK DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE AWAROO96B-69 I
|S TONY AWARD* 1968-69
#iii i I i 1
il ; ' -gw f 1

Villanova Beats
Gator Relay Team

The Villanova two-mile relay
team nipped the UF squad at the
wire to capture the event in
Saturdays Philadelphia Track
Classic.
After falling a little behind in
the first two legs with Dennis
Bruce and Frank Betts, the
Gators caught leading Villanova
with Benny Vaughn.
UFs Eamonn OKeeffee
battled Vfllanovas supreme
miler Marty Liquori in the last
leg but was edged out. UF
finished at 7:38.5 behind
Villanovas 7:38.1.
THE OTHER Gator
representatives didnt fare as
well. Scott Hurley with a
15-foot-6 effort ended up in
fifth place in the pole vault.
OKeeffe placed fourth in the
1000-yard run and Florida Track
Clubs Ron Jourdan high jumped
6-feet-8 for fourth place.
The performances were a
climax to a very troublesome
day for the Gator entourage.

OIASSIS out BUSIH^
CARS TRUCKS BUSES
SUCIAL ATTENTION TO IHSUBAHg CLAIMS
IBBIAtI EBTMUTItH* HMB BTIMAWI HB A BMW
I 376-2558 I
MDAnnioaiiww-isai
iaa M.W. IT.. BAST MM AX4. MMT, f A MR 414

Monday, January 25,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

They had trouble with the
car going over to Jacksonville to
catch their plane, track coach
Jimmy Carnes said. They
missed their flight and had to get
another one. They didnt get
there until 6 oclock and the
i meet started at 6.
COACH RAY BENSON
accompanied the group.
Carnes said he believed the
late appearance affected the
Gators, because they didnt have
enough time to prepare after the
trip.
But Im not making
excuses, Carnes said. They
were going against the best in
the nation.
THE TWO-MILE relay team,
OKeefe, Hurley, Jourdan and
FTCs two-miler Jack Bacheler
will compete next for the Gators
in Fridays Millrose Games in
New York.
Weve been working and
pointing to the Millrose Games,
Carnes said.

Page 17



Page 18

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25,1971

24 Hours Of Daytona

Field Os 60 Entered In 24-Hours

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Correspondent
A pair of Porsche 917 K
models, fresh from a one-two
finish in Argentina a few weeks
ago, will be among the field of
some 60 cars in the tenth annual
24-Hours of Daytona, Jan.
30-31.
The John Wyre team,
sponsored by Gulf Oil, is one of
the most respected organizations
in endurance racing. Wyres cars
captured seven out of ten events
last season and clinched the
World Manufacturers
Championship for the Porsche
factory. In a four-year history,
the blue-and-orange cars have
won 15 races, at least one at
each major circuit, and two
championships.
JO SIFFERT, a Swiss Grand
Prix driver, will rejoin the team
again this year as head driver. He
has taken 10 major endurance
races in the last three years,
more than any other active
driver. Siffeits co-driver, Derek
Bell of England, a former Ferrari
driver, combined to win the first
race of the season in Argentina.
Mexican Pedro Rodriguez,
winner of last years 24-Hours
and also 63s and '64s events.

4
J|i#'
" H^y~ |i'j|i|j^^^^^^MMg : ~ ; ~'Mr^r^, i B HI BMBBlMwwilffi HBHM BBB&Hwaesffi#'
B '*
I
r.. lr ; llAmir DamAa Th. North Amficn FUOn, W.Fmi3l2U Supff-V. will b. Md. Th. m.ln t .ill fh*h
reiiaii versus rorsene durin *. ? 4 * w *^"^ ,> * >***" ** **o*, fro <*
Villlli 1 viwv viifviiv Daytona. Just prior to tha start Saturday, a Kennedy Sunday.

SUPER-VEE TO PRECEDE RACE SATURDAY

Mr \Mk jgglp Wm
IHUr- JT *ls f V mm
%'?' } tuk Jjm
; *' -\ * 7 V*' *.' ?*. *-\
* 5 ,^^>^r.-\.V ;. *£V-/£*
PIT STOPS CAN MAKE OR BREAK A RACE FOR A TEAM
... any confusion can turn a stop into a disaster

will be looking for his fourth
victory at Daytona. Jackie Oliver
of England will join Rodriguez

in the number two car. Oliver
drove in the 24-Hours two years
ago and was leading the race

when his car was wrecked by his
co-driver.
In addition to the Wyre can,

the Martini and Rossi Racing
Team has also entered two of
the powerful 917 K Porsches. Vic
Elford, a veteran of three
seasons of long-distance racing,
will head the list of drivers
scheduled to handle the cars.
DR. HELMUT MARKO of
Finland will be Elfords
co-driver, while Gijs van Lennep
of Holland and Leo Kinnunen of
Finland, who was Rodriguez
co-driver when he won last year,
will drive the other.
Opposition to the Porsche
strong-hold will come in the way
of six Ferrari 5125, the most
formidable one being entered by
Roger Penske of Trans-Am fame.
American Mark Donohue and
Englishman David Hobbs will
drive the Sunoco-Ferrari. During
testing recently at Daytona, the
team unofficially broke the
track record by five seconds.
THE TWO remaining Ferrari
512 s are both private entries.
One is to be driven by Michael
Parkes of England, a retired
Grand Prix driver and Ferrari
test engineer, and Jo Bonnier,
the Swiss president of the Grand
Prix Drivers Association who
drove a Lola-Chevy at Daytona
two years ago. The other will be
(SEE DAYTONA' PAGE 19)



Who's Who In Heavyweight Class

By WILLIAM GLASSMAN
Alligator Boxing Corrwpondent
Boxing fans are now looking
forward to the fight of the
century March 8, between
Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier
for the heavyweight
championship of the world.
Both men say that after the Fight
they will retire.
What is to become of the
heavyweight division if they do
hang up their gloves?
Looking at the World Boxing
Association ratings for the
period ending Dec. 1, 1970, we
can now do a little speculating.
Rated the top challenger is
Oscar Bonavena. The bull from
Argentina is a man that can take
a punch and deliver one as well.
Bonavenas only experience on
the canvas was with Ali standing
above him. He has to be rated a
top prospect for the vacant title,
if Frazier and Ali do retire.
No. two in the ratings is Jerry
Quarry. He has a good punch
and the desire to fight. It is hard
to remember the last person
Quarry beat of any worth.
GEORGE FOREMAN is next
on the list of title hopefuls. The
present Olympic -heavyweight
champion is big, powerful, and is
unbeaten. He has been in against
some good men and never has he
been in trouble.
No. four is Jimmy Ellis. Since
losing to Joe Frazier last year
Ellis has not decided what he
wants to do in fighting. He has
defeated such notables as
Quarry, Floyd Patterson and
Leotis Martin. Should Ellis
decide that boxing is for him,
the heavyweight division has
another to recon with.
Mac Foster is next, and I still
cant figure it out. Maybe its
because he is an ex-marine, or
maybe his 20 or so straight wins
against nobodies made an
impression on someone in the
WBA. When he did Fight
someone of repute, Jerry
Quarry, he lost.
GEORGE CHUVALO is rated
sixth. The Canadian is another
who has lost to everybody there
is to lose too. Last year when he
battled Jerry Quarry, it was the
fight of men who always lose
and stay in the top 10. Chuvalo
was victorious only when Quarry
said he did not hear the count a
perfect ending for two losers.
A1 Jones of Goulds, Fla. is
seventh.
Eighth on the Ist is European
heavyweight champion Henry

HEY, TEACH
If education
is your bag.
and if you're
willing to learn
something you may
have never known
about yourself
talk to us about
the wonderful things
VISTA has to offer.
Contact:
VISTA Recruiter
Jan 25
Booth Across
From The Hub
10-2 PM

Cooper. Cooper, 36 years old, is
still slugging it out on the
continent. He is a good boxer,
but has a problem, he bleeds too
much. It is very simple; you hit
him and he gushes all over you,
the ring, and the fans too.

I dWW
n sra

SAVE...
WITH CONFIDENCE
DATSUN
GODDING & CLARK
2ND Ave. & 2ND ST. SE
378-2311

i nraiuMtiT! Est
I FREE DELIVERY IN HEATED j
; GtfiO S OVENS PHONE 376-1322
7Z -TLtL 5 MUR MIDNIGHT
W ITALIAN CUISINE 2204 sw 13th ST. u.s. south 44i
I PIZZA PASTA I
I CHEESE 1.25 1.75 SPAGHETTI |
1 PEPPERRONI 1.45 1.95 Meatballs 1.60
I SAUSAGE 1.45 1,95 Meat Sauce 1.50 |
1 MEATBALLS 1.45 1.95 _, _ ___ ___ sl ? l : oom ? *
I salami 1.45 ;.95 SIDE ORDERS 'r]*l'Z,lT a9e 1o 1
pari IP I 35 I 85 Clam Sauce 1.80
I GREENPEPPER 1!35 1.85 M "ESTRONE SOUP -35 RAVIOLI |
60 2 10 ITALIAN TOSSED SALAD .40 Meatballs 1.90
I ANCHOVY K6O 2*. 10 GARLIC BREAO .25 Meat Sauce 1.80
MUSHROOM 160 2.10 BAKED POTATO .40 Mushrooms 2.00
I COMBINATION 1.75 2.55 HOME MADE BAKED LASAGNA 2.55 I
1 (ANY TWO) VEAL PARMIGIANA AND
I DELUXE -1.95 2.85 SPAGHETTI 2.55
1 > VEAL AND EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA
I HERO SANDWICHES DESSERT SSSZUa. 1:5
I r- CHEESE CAKE W AND SPAGHETTI I
1 GINOS MONSTER 2 FOOT LONG p| a f n 55 Charry j 5 m BAKED MANICOTTI 2.55
Loaded with Ham, Salami, Cheese, ECLAIRS ;45 I
Pickless, Onions, Tomatoes, Peppers, choc. BAVARIAN PIE W ABOVE ORDERS INCLUDE
Italian Oils and Seasonings GERMAN CHOC. CAKE .40 f GARLIC BREAD
, UJS, onp haLL.. .95 VANILLA,CHOC.CHIP, S i
| ITALIAN MEATBALL SUB CHOC.. ICE CREAM .25" 1 Atfl fA 1
Meatbal Is and Meatsauce .85 1 J F I
ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND 1 .\ T I 1
PEPPERS SUB A Am | I
Spicy ital lan sausage, _ A :
green peppers and meatsauce -.95 DRINKS
roast beef
Foot long, COKE,ORANGE,SPRITE, f
roast tomatoes, ROOTBEER
mayonaise >-IO ICED TEA, COFFEE, MILK .20 I

IN COOPERS last Fight he
regained the European
heavyweight championship,
defeating Jose Manuel Urtain of
Spain. The right lasted eight
rounds, and when it was over the
fighters were something to

bush vw
Specializing In
Service And Repairs
.On
, VOLKSWAGEN
1311 N.W. sth Ave.
376-4261

behold. Both men looked like
butchers knifes had done them
in.
Ninth is Greg Peralta of
Argentina, a journeyman Fighter
who went the distance with
George Foreman. About six or
seven years ago he fought for the
lightheavyweight championship
and lost to Willie Pastrono.
Last, you have someone called

Daytona ...

driven by two Belgium drivers,
Taf Gesselin and Hughes de
Fierlant.
Friday, preceding the
24-Hours, a Formula Vee event,
The Brundage International
Race, will be held. In addition, a
Super Vee race is set for noon,
Saturday, Jan. 30. The Super
Vees are powered by 1600 cc
Porsche-Volkswagon engines and
are expected to attain speeds up
to 160 miles per hour as they
run over the 3.81-mile road
circuit.
Starting time for the 24-Hours
is 3 p.m. The race will end
Sunday, just 23 minutes prior to
the scheduled launch of Apollo

STAK* SHftKC
' Student Special
| (With The Coupon) I
I Our Regular 93t Sleakburger i
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90< lus tax |<
i Steak n Shake 1
1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville |

Monday, January 25,1971, The Florida Alligator,

Jose Luis Garcia of Caracas.
THERE ARE a few others
like, Boone Kirkman, Patterson,
and Jeff Meritt.
Kirkman is a good fighter, but
has a habit of getting knocked
out in the second round.
Patterson is old, and is now
fighting the likes of Levi Forte.
Meritt is young, strong, and
may well fight Kirkman, my
dream fight.

14. The lift-off will be visible
from the grandstands if the sky
is clear.
\ £
S : :":y
PEDRO RODRIQUEZ
... going for 4th win

Page 19



Page 20

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, January 25,1971

- Domino s Pizza
fm #. FREE DELIVERY \u v-viSl
mf e W /K\ BM Call 376-2487 /Tl
\w Our superb cheese pizza /
> V 14 medium pizza $1.90
I/TTa > j\ Ssv^ |9h9891 16 large pizza $2.40 "Vs; /£ f[Ti
ijyAV rMHH|| DELUXE PIZZA Pepperoni, mushrooms, ham, green ly. Vjs y j
are Pizza Period.
|tig| PJJ ZZLES I J /|m|
rr > ~5~ 1
17 [ yffi 11 1
8853 8M55
58 s7 58 HISS I
80 Vltl B2 S 3 Bj^^Bil
55 66 67 66 SO
HOURS ---P p-* p|^ M HOURS
s:oopm-l:00am Sun-Thur i P ~~M ii V" I s:oopm-l:00am Sun-Thur
s:oopm2:ooam Fri & Sat j]l JP ZjPi!! Jm I s:oopm-2:ooam Fri & Sat
DOMINOS wh HP" F~ - I DOMINOS
nre WT hot bpvios
IPSPB S HprS 122
HP" H I JBM
I 127 Bis ~ ~ I
FREE Peminoll
Crossword By Thomas W. Setter I
m. m bb bb I Kp' W
CAMPUS I lift
CTlIf I BB ACROSS DOWN I ||B
7 Town In 50 Recoiled. shipwreck. abbrevla- 2 Expectation 2 f 61 extreV'e*' 94 Verse"* I Bv^
%*> Pw M,y "K"-
DELIVERY ir s Sr* -Br isST as.-" s. -sr
23 In same 55 Ballerlnae 82 Silk thread. 104 Japaneee # e Mart*".*' 67GeoE"cl'l Im sfede. IMB
place. ekirt. 84 Novel. volcano. ,7 ..LV division.
* wm mm 24 Hopeleas 56 Internation- 85 Revoke, as 106 Snuggled. / wgnt 36 Wreathes. 68 German soa. 107 A felony.
372-1655 alhihway. -legacy. 107 Potter-. 8 d Clark 37 Hom th#
2SJolaonsong 57 Norwegian 86 Byron, for clay. J a,i?l!r e r * Maeters. 71 Kline. Madisons K,.
hit. county. one. 108100 centavos. ~ 38 Kitchen tool. 73 Gibe. maiden -ii'
If ii 27 Big name 58 Rowe. 87 Artery. 109 Contraction. 10 Comparative 39 Abide. 74 Football name. -
J/ /a|34o in golf. 59 Beet eeller 88 Blackthorn. 110Compre- ending. 40 Italian teams 110 Wooden S Infi
W 29 Dam. author. 89 Enoch -. hend. 11 Compen- hamlet. 76 Hatch' *>- I K
30 Printing 60 Glaet- 90 Wait on a 111 More ated 41 Horne. 77 Ogle 111 Svelte.
1 2Put in order. 42 Military I W?
T\f r" A /N 31 Meditate. 91 Protuber- 112 Loosen. 13 Type of commands. 78 Eliot 2 I
IJ I / / A 33 Lantern 61 Mountain in aneeaona 116 Ones newest security 43 Lament. ,t.* r Cter- m h I
rI/,/,Ai7 feast: Japan. Antarctica. plant. clothe.. 44 Biblical coin. I* t r* ~Ber Vil I
* < <4. Aky 34 Shaveling.. 62 on (ex- 92 Former 120 Part of 14 Interlock. 45 Flintlike Ti. 1 I cJHHHKi jSR~
35 Dallied aggerate). N.Y.C. Ea.ter week 15 Part of rock. 2Cautious. 3"
amorously. 64 Between: notable. 123 Fiber plants. speech: 48 lago, for one. 83 Present is scrutinized. 1
36 Delivery fee. Fr. 95 Catapult of 124 Western abbr. 49 French hoime of I BT.
HAnnli Mri J n g l_ R ;| 40 Machine 65Much:comb. early. Indian. 16 Disregarded honeysuckle La Gloconda.
UOUgn moae rresn Uaily part. form. warfare. 125 Sheepllke. completely. 50 Rustic 84Aviator. 117 Diminutive: I\ K,
* 43 Equine 66 Hollywood 96 Common 126 Ansa. 17 Everest, for 53 Classified. 86 Bell tone. euff.
animal. suffix. 127 Parsonage. one. 54 Plavthino 88 Preserved. 118 Absence of.
44 Tatter. 68 hole 97 Cleaved. 128 Curses. 18 Collection 89 Old French 119 Fish line I -th
" 14" 17" 45 dAzur. (drill). 98 More 129 Nominated. offsets 55 Ringworm. coin. ... i ork |. ?
~ 46 Container. 70 Pried. private. 130 Cleaned the iornnvrtto 57 Penalties. 90 Cut off. 121 Eggs
47 Similarity. 72 Miss Claire. 99 Dye. Judaism. 59 Bold. 92 Wretched- 122 Nassers I
CHEESE 91.00 $1.90 ness.
orben rsrrs .ss ... Answer On Pag* 15 IK
PEPPERONI I -sBS
ITAUAN SAUSAGE 1.30 2.90 I M Wm
GROUND BEEP 1.30 2.90 I j^K
ANCHOVY 1.30 2.30 2.90
MUSHROOM 1.30 2.30 2.90 ALL ITEMS Buy yours at the
COMBINATION OP DINNERS m jhub r&M\
ANY THREE 1.60 SANDWICHES Hi yS5e7 V/jB
COMBINATION OP MADE FROM i (4>m\
EVERYTHING 1.90 BREAD
CHANELO'S j ?hl coV 1
372-1655 PIZZA PALACE 372-1546
___j 608 NW 13th St