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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'RoDi
v4dl!

Vol. 63, No. 61

REASONS DIFFER AT RAIFORD
Firing Os Art Teacher
Causes Controversy

By TIM SMITH
Alligator Correspondent
A UF law student has
succeeded in disrupting East
Unit of Raiford State Prisons
way of life.
Michael T. Callahan, ILW,
taught the art program at
Raiford under the auspices of
Lake City Junior College. The
program was discontinued Jan.
5.
BILL ROUSE, educational
supervisor at Raiford, called
Callahan Jan. 5 and asked to
meet with him. Rouse told
Callahan that Assistant
Superintendent J. F. Tompkins
had cut out the program.
,Rouse said Superintendent

Transportation Problem:
Solving Now And Later

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first article in a series dealing
with the traffic problem on
campus).
The problem is everywhere: in
front, behind and double-parked
on the side.
Were faced with the
question, Where are we going
to put all the cars? Where are
they all going to go? SG Vice
President Henry Solares.
The Parking and

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ONE OF TWO AUTOMOBILES TOWED FROM UNION
... by University Police Dept. Tuesday night

The
Florida Alligator

D.R. Hassfurder and Tompkins
had given him two reasons to tell
Callahan why he was being fired:
(1) Callahan wont get his hair
cut; (2) he wont quit smuggling
letters in and out of the prison
for the inmates.
Callahan denied the latter
accusation. It was also learned
that if Lake City Jr. College
officials called, Rouse was to tell
them Callahan was released
because of such smuggling
activities.
ACCORDING TO PRISON
officials, the art program was cut
out because inmate paintings
were being sold on the outside.
They claimed this was illegal.
However, Callahan checked
Florida statute, Chap. 945.14

Transportation Committee has
so much to do, it may never stop
working, he continued.
The transportation problem
this year is caused by a
multitude of conditions,
including an increase in students,
faculty and staff, resulting in
more cars, more pedestrians and
more bicycles.
THE PARKING AND
Transportation Committee, the
Physical Planning Division and
SG have undertaken the problem
from two different angles. The
first and immediate need is for a
transportation solution today,

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

(1) which says at the discretion
of prison officials inmates are
allowed to sell hobby crafts in
the prison commissary. Since
this first reaction, prison
officials have reversed their
attitude and now say inmates
can sell their paintings.
To further strengthen this
claim of legality, Callahan
referred to Assistant
Superintendent Tompkins
approval last fall of Jack Murph
the Surf Murphys sale of
paintings in Ft. Lauderdale and
Miami. At times Murphy made
as much as $ 150 per painting.
CALLAHAN, IN A letter to
Dr. James A. Bax, director of
Health and Rehabilitative
Services in Florida, asked how

one that can be implemented
that would provide a temporary
solution to, in UF Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelders
words, the immense problem.
The second objective, and the
prime attempt of the UF
physical Planning Division, is to
provide a future solution as the
situation worsens.
But according to Lee
Burrows, director of Parking and
Traffic, it would be impossible
for his division to think much
into the future. Were just
(SEE 'PROBLEMS/ PAGE 3)

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LAW STUDENT MICHAEL CALLAHAN
... former art teacher at Raiford

Tompkins could talk
approvingly of Murphys sale of
paintings and then deny inmates
at Raiford the same privilege.
There was also dispute over
the furnishing of art supplies to
the inmates. Callahan said that
the prison, through its school
budget, had promised
approximately SSOO.
Out of this expected amount,
the art program received almost
SSO. This consisted of sketch
paper, pencils and other
miscellaneous items. These few
state funded materials were
never used in the sale of any art.
THE ART SUPPLIES that

Traffic Committee
Students Complain

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Student members of the UF
Parking and Transportation
Committee are dissatisfied with
operating procedure.
THE ADMINISTRATION
AND faculty members of the
committee have been
unbelievable about notifying
student members of meetings,
according to committee member
Brad Raffle.
Henry Solares, Student Body
vice president, said student voice
on the committee is still lacking,
but has definitely improved a
great deal. In the beginning we
werent even really considered a
part of the committee, Solares
said.
The Parking and
Transportation Committee is the
recommending body for
transportation changes on
campus. It reports directly to
UF Vice President for
Administrative Affairs William
Elmore, who makes the final

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Thursday January 14, 1971

were most recently used by the
inmates were supplied by
relatives of inmates, by donors
in the Tampa Bay area who were
interested in the program and by
Callahan himself.
Callahan has managed to
display inmate paintings at the
Gainesville Artisans Market.
What money is earned from sale
of these paintings is spent on
more art supplies. Callahan said
it was necessary to do this
because the prison failed to
(SEE 'RAIFORD/ PAGE 6)

decisions, along with UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
COMMITTEE SECRETARY
Lee Burrows, director of parking
and transportation, said, Weve
had some problems this year,
with a change-over in committee
members, which is part of the
reason why the committee has
(SEE TRAFFIC/ PAGE 6)
4
IK.
The Qitor
FATHER MICHAEL
Gannon talks about his
role as a priest, professor,
and human being ...page 2
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies ..'.. 13
Sports 18



Page 2

!, Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

Father Gannon Involved In Life

By JAN 60DOWN
Alligator Writer
From disk jockey to priest,
war correspondent to professor,
Father Michael Gannon's many
roles have taken him far into the
realm of human experience.
Although he insists theres
nothing there when asked to
talk about himself, there is
much, and the priest who likes
to stay in the backround of
things has a hard time
doing it. His involvement with
students and their causes keeps
putting him out front.
CURRENTLY SERVING the
university community in three
ways, Father Gannon is pastor
of the Catholic Parish,
coordinator of the Catholic
Student Center and instructor in
the departments of religion and
history.
I believe my role as priest,
professor and human being; my
mission as being a reconciler and
bridge-builder and when
students ask me to serve them in
some capacity, I try to act, he
explains.
Sometimes, the things I get
into are a bit scary, such as the
events here after the Kent State
killings last spring; sometimes a
bit complex and confused, as the
League of Athletes affair;
sometimes very comforting and
straightforward. But in all three
areas, I believe that a teacher
must get involved if he is to do
any good at all. He must be
willing to walk in the sand of the
arena and not be content to sit
in the bleachers and to simply
pass out grades on how everyone
is doing.
WALK IN THE SAND of the
arena thats just what Father
Gannon has done.
Father Gannon was bom
across from a stable, (Not in a
stable, father? No, he
answers laughingly), on an army
post in Oklahoma. His father
died while he was growing up
and one day his mother, two
younger brothers and he decided
to get into a car and come to
Florida. We decided to stay in
the first place we liked. It so
happened that the first place we
got to that night was St.
Augustine and we never got any
farther.
During the first two years of
high school, he held fourteen
different jobs. With a laugh he
says, Not that I was a drifter,
but I just kept finding some thing
better.
IN HIS JUNIOR YEAR, he
decided to become a

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.
. 1
Patronize Gator Advertisers §
11

INSTRUCTOR, PASTOR, COORDINATOR

7 believe my role as priest, professor and human
being; my mission as being a reconciler and
bridge-builder and when students ask me to serve them
in some capacity, I try to act.
Father Michael Gannon
i i

newspaperman. I got a job with
the St. Augustine Record,
covering sports events. Shortly
after I obtained the position, the
sports editor was drafted and the
publisher asked me to assume his
duties. I covered the games,
helped make up the sports page
and wrote a column.
One could say that I was
advancing rapidly, except on one
point no pay. Once I went
into the publishers office and
asked if it would be possible for
me to be paid, and he said, Son,
what you need is some kind of
experience.
He took a grocery store job
on Saturdays, in order to get
some money and at the end of
the year decided there were
better ways to earn a living. His
next job was with a radio
station.
I OPENED the station in the
morning, playing country and
western music. The name of the
program was Dawn Patrol and
it was from 6 a.m. to 7 ajn.
Then from 7 am. to 9 a.m. I had
the *Caffeine Club, where I
played the popular songs of the
day. From there I went to
school, and then back to the
radio station for a 6:45 pm
broadcast.
Mike Gannon, the journalist,
was bored with school and his
* 4k
mother was worried. He says, I
kept telling her, I havent
learned as much in school as I
have out. I enjoyed the radio
tremendously and as far as I or
anyone else knew, this was my
career for life.
After graduation, he worked
in Columbia, South Carolina, as
a sportscaster for station WIS.
THEN ONE DAY I was
attending a dinner dance at Ft.
Jackson, and in the middle of a
perfectly delightful evening I got
the idea that God wanted me to
be a priest. I laughed out loud at
the idea when it came and tried
to drive it out that night. The
next day it was still there and it
stayed and would not go away.
Three months later 1 went to
see the bishop in St. Augustine
and told him I wanted to enter

the seminary. I thought he
would faint, because he knew
me during my high school
years.
He entered the seminary in St.
Thomas at Hartford,
Connecticut, and completed his
masters in philosophy in
Washington, D.C. From there he
went to St. Louvain in Belgium
and what he describes as four
intellectually stimulating years.
DURING SUMMERS and
vacations he and his buddies
would hop on their motorcycles
and travel all over Europe. We
slept out in orchards, in barns,
along rivers and streams, buying
groceries in country markets. I had
a harmonica and usually one of
the kids would bring a guitar. We
stopped at cases and played folk
songs; the people would sing.
They were beautiful days.
It was at Louvain that Father
Gannon became interested in
history. I became fascinated by
the record of human experience
we call history, and learned how
much mans present owes to the
past. There is no understanding
of the present, except through
history. Everything is a son of
the past.
After his years at Louvain, he
became an ordained priest.
Father Gannon started studies
leading to a PhD. in history at
UF. He served as chaplain of the
Newman Club, a group for
Catholic students, and was the
first priest to work with the
student center.
IN* 1962 he traveled as an aide
with the bishop of this areas
diocese to the Vatican Council
in Rome. When he returned,
Father Gannon started
preparation for the 400th
anniversary of the old Spanish
mission at St. Augustine.
It was then that he began the
research on the history of
Spanish missions that led to his
two bodes, The Cross in the
Sand, and Rebel Bishop.
Invited by Dr. Delton Scudder
to teach in the department of
religion, Father Gannon
returned to UF in 1967. The
Accent Tickets
Accent *7l tickets are now on
sale at the Reitz Union Box
office, 12 to 4:30. They will no
longer be on sale at the Hub.
Iqualityfurniture|
I AND AUCTION I
1 RETAIL SALES MON-SAT 9-5 I
I AUCTION EVERY I
I FRIDAY NITE I
M 441 So. AT WILLISTON CUT-OFF I
| 372-3991

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TOM KENNEDY
FATHER MICHAEL GANNON
... disk jockey, correspondent, priest

following summer he left for
Vietnam.
AMERICA MAGAZINE
asked him to serve as a combat
correspondent to find out the
terror and fear soldiers
experience. So I lived with
them for a month out in the
field from the DMZ to the
Mekong Delta, he tells.
I served with the real
combat men. Most of these men
were the same age as the
students I had been teaching and
I accepted the job because if I
was going to talk about the war,
I wanted to feel the fear and the
agony that these men of that age
group were going through.
So I lived and sweated and
feared along with them. I gave
mass in the jungle clearings, and
gave the last sacraments to 18
year old boys blown apart by
machine gun fire. It was a
sorrowing experience.
That fall Dr. John Mahon of
the history department invited
him to teach Florida history. A
year later the bishop in St.

?, CAMPUS SPEAKER
| SERIES
Curfew" and "Once You Were No
1 >eo P* e are short stories written by
yB Lawrence Dorr. On Thursday, Jan. 14 they
will be read by Douglas Buck in the Union
lounges at 7:30 p.m. The author will be
present for discussion following the readings.
S^Z^ Ce Z ls the P n of Janos
irTS^vjiie 3 Ve f Hungary who now resldes
1 > Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union

Augustine asked if in his spare
time Father Gannon could take
charge of the student center and
turn it into a parish.
HE FOUND THE TIME and
the center and parish grew.
Father Gannon wont take the
credit for it. The success of this
parish is due more to my
associates, Father George
Kirkpatrick and Father John
McCullen rather than to me. I
can say the same thing for the
students, who got the parish off
the ground.
At the center, worship is
centered upon the celebration of
the Last Supper, and our
service to our fellow man is
founded on love, mercy and
peace.
Recently, the center has
opened its doors to a Protestant
revival and to the followers of
Gargamuni Swami and the
religion of Hare Krishna.
Some may raise eyebrows at
this apparent mixing of religious
thought but the motto of the
parish is, Why not?
*T*



PROBLEMS...

H^WMPAG^NeJJ
attempting to meet the problems
of the present and near-future,
Burrows said.
THIS ATTEMPT took the
form of a shuttle-bus system last
year. Until then, Burrows
said, the UF allowed cars on
most sections of the campus
without the present restrictions.
But this grew into a tremendous
problem.
This year saw the initiation of
shuttle bus passes, and the
six-month decal. The decal,
Burrows said, was an effort to
achieve equality and fairness for
those students who, for some
reason, would only be here six
months.
According to several SG
officials an efficiently operating
bus system would effectively
eliminate a great deal of the
traffic and parking problems. If
we could establish a viable
system of bus transportation and
car-lot bus stations, we might
not need cars on campus at all,
Uhlfelder said.
ID LIKE TO try roping off
the campus entirely, for one
day, to all cars students,
facultys and staffs.
It might show them that they
can get along without their
cars, Uhlfelder said. It would
force them into mass
transportation, walking, bicycles
and eventually into the
realization of the need for car
pools.
Uhlfelder considers the plan
entirely feasible. With the
addition of a bus stop behind the
ROTC lot, and the station
behind Hume, I think we could
try it.
A REGULARLY scheduled
bus from S.W. 16 Ave, according
to Solares, would also eliminate
much of the problem.
On several different levels
Uhlfelders one-day moratorium
on cars has been expanded into
permanent no-car proposals.
Professor Joe Little v of the
Parking and Transportation
Committee has presented a
possible solution that, according
to SG Administrative Assistant
Brad Raffle, would mean a
complete renovation of the
present system.
The proposal would turn a
good deal of Area I, the part of
campus between the
check-points, into a strict
walking and bicycling area.
THIS WOULD mean the
necessity for a much more
effective bus system, Uhlfelder
said. There are still several
imperfections even to the extent
that buses are used today.
Solares warned that things
were likely to worsen in the next
two months, particularly
NEEDLEWORK
Whlf cozier thing could you do
this winter? The class will be
tigght by Mrs. Chs. Buck in
room 118 Reitz Union. Call
372-8037 for information.
Registration is at 7:00 p.m. on
Thursday, January 21. The fee is
$5.00 per person. Sponsored by

because of the new medical
complex.
Construction of Phase 1 of the
complex will begin in two
months and necessitates the
removal of available and
commuter parking lots.
THIS WILL BE our biggest
problem, Burrows said.
Theyll be placing a large fence
around the total west side of the
medical center. The room is
needed not only for the actual
building, but for storage of
machinery and parking space for
construction workers.
Burrows identified several
measures that will be used to
offset the decrease in available
parking spaces.
Well be expanding the lot
surrounding Flavet H into a
44-plus parking lot for registered
medical center commuter
personnel. The construction on
NJS. Drive of a new parking lot,
north of the Horticultural
center, will also begin.
THE CONTINUAL increase
in buildings on
Burrows said, has meant more
cars and less parking spaces.

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Were going to have to move
towards a heavier reliance on
mass transit.
Burrows, secretary of the
Parking and Transportation
Committee, also talked of the
concern with the safety factor.
This has led to various proposals
to reduce the amount of traffic,
including the use of one-way
streets and the elimination of
on-street parking in main
academic areas.
Id personally like to see this
elimination. It would get the
cars off the street, and the
bicyclers off the side-walk,
Burrows said. But where are
you then going to put the car?
ALTHOUGH NOTHING
definite has been recommended
to UF Vice President William
Elmore in charge of
transportation committee
recommendations, the
possibility of increasing the
requirements for faculty and
staff eligibility for the use of
available parking facilities exists.
This could result in a number
of faculty and staff members not

being allowed to park in
academic areas.
Other suggestions include the
staggering of staff so that
everybody wouldnt get out at 5
p.m. But, Burrows said, if we
did this to faculty members it
would really wreck the class
period scheduling.
One solution cited by nearly
all concerned officials was the
increased use of bicycles. This
raises unique problems of its
own.
UHLFELDER SAID, The
pedestrian is in danger; its a
hazard walking on the sidewalk,
today.
Theres such a tremendous
lack of courtesy between the
pedestrian and passing rider. The
increase in bike use is just great.
But it also creates problems.
The UPD has already
threatened a crack-down on
bicyclers. Lt. V.K. Holliman
explained, No students are
allowed to ride bicycles on the
sidewalks. Theyre just too
narrow. Someones going to get
hurt. This had led to a partial
attempt to create bike-ways, and
the immediate transportation
division desire to see bicycle
riders in the street next to the
curb, or on bike-ways.

Thursday, January 14,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

ONE BICYCLE rider made
the candid observation that
when we want to use
advantageous regulations like
traveling with a green light, we
can. When we decide not to,
many of us just run it illegally.
Burrows said, Even if we did
have rules established just for
the bike rider, or decided to
make a serious crack-down on
violators, how would we enforce
it?
Illegal cars on campus was
also sited as a serious problem.
These were divided into two
groups: Those who can not
register vehicles because theyre
freshman or sophomores, and
those who just dont want to
pay $ 10.
Its been estimated,*
Burrows said, that there are
somewhere between 800-1,000
cars in this category off-campus.
Thats fine as long as they dont
bring them on campus during
regulation hours. Sometimes its
cold outside, and theyre just
tempted to ride to class.
Uhlfelder cited the city itself
as a large part of the problem.
The traffic at noon and 5 p.m.
is unbelievable. The citys going
to have to face up to a better
transportation system.
NEXT: The future of parking
at UF.

Page 3



Page 4

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

Sound Circus Offers New Experience

By TERRY VENTO
Aliglnr WRiter
Are you tired of the same old
Friday night routine?
There is a circus in town
that doesnt guarantee it can
solve your problem, but it surely
will try to.
SUPER SOUND CIRCUS, a
new concept in live
entertainment, will be presenting
their first public performance of
their total environment
experience Friday night in the
Union Ballroom from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. Admission is 25 cents.
William Thacker and Bill
Whitman, spokesmen for the
12-member crew, explained the
sound-light extravaganza. Dont
expect a dance. This is not just
underground music and light,
it is a total media show. We use
light concepts never before used
here. Instead of just focusing on
the stage, the lights are on the
6*

FSM To Work
Within Community
By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The idee behind Florida Student Movement (FSM)/* said Lynn
Edefanan, 3ED and president of the organization, is that were
concerned about the issues, and it is impossible for us to exist in the
university and function effectively.
After twice being denied a charter by UF Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale, FSM has decided to not waste our time
piddling in some campus-sponsored organization and to go ahead and
go out into the community and do something effective without
university authoritarian hassels, according to Russ Little, a member
of the group.
THE PROBLEM IS, if youre an effective left-wing organization,
you can't be sanctioned on campus, Little said.
No effective left wing organization has ever existed on this
university campus for a sufficient amount of time, nor will there ever
be under present administrative conditions. FSM is no exception,
Miss Edelman said.
Right now many members of the FSM are involved in projects
outside the university structure. They are working for such groups as
The Eye, an off-campus publication, People of Hogtown and daycare
centers, which all have a common goal, according to Miss Edelman.
THE NAME FSM does not actually apply anymore. Its the people
behind it, the people that make these things work, which is important.
But you have to have a name to be recognized on campus and
everybody tagged labels on us.
We were just there to meet needs and we still are, Miss Edelman
said.
Problems for FSM arose first when attorney William Kunstler spoke
under its sponsorship and then at its ripped-off rally later that week
when buckets were passed for contributions for the Gainesville
Defense Fund.
The title FSM is not important any more, Miss Edelman said,
its the*idea and people that will keep together.
y

people, involving them in the
experience.
Super Sound Circus utilizes
liquids, slides, motion pictures,
strobes, ultra-violets and
polarizers.
IT IS A TRIP, said Whitman.
Included in this show is a
mini-drama involving Count
Dracula and the Phantom of the
Opera. We use professional
makeup techniques to make it
extremely lifelike, said
Thacker.
We also have two dancing
girls, weather balloons
throughout the audience and
continuous movies, making this
a truly total environment show.
How did Super Sound Circus
get its start?
THACKER EXPLAINED that
it started out about three years
ago as a traveling radio show and
progressed to a sophisticated
fraternity party type of
experience, using multi-media.
Not too long ago the group

purchased their own equipment,
and is now working on their
present show, trying to

Literature Reading Tonight

By JACK STROM
Alligator Writer
Tonight at 7:30 p.m., in the
Union Lounge, Professor of
English Douglas Buck will read a
few of Janos Z. Shoemyens
short stories
Shoemyen writes under the
pseudonym Lawrence Don. He
has taken this name from a
character in one of his early
novels.
HIS STORIES deal with
losing and finding faith in God.
He said that his story ideas come
from a reaction to some problem
bothering him.

Below are listed the receipt numbers of books sold in the SG Book Exchange.
Check your receipts. If your number appears here, you will receive a check in the
mail within 2 weeks for the amounts you asked. Unsold books may be picked up
Thursday or Friday Jan. 14 & 15 in Room 306 Union. You may leave unsold
books there until the end of Spring Quarter sale. These 2 days books are being
sold also for those in need of books unavailable elsewhere.
00015 01001 01244 01431
00063 01009 01245 01433
00066 01018 01246 01438
00067 01038 01247 01439
00068 01039 01248 01443
00073 01040 01249 01444
00077 0104a 01250 01448
00118 01053 01251 01449
01000
00136 AMRO 01265 01457
00130 2 01265 0 464
00139 mra 01207 o6
00151 S2S 01275 22
00170 01067 01287 01466
00172 01072 01289 01471
01080 aJSo 01473
22 01089 01203 01474
rnwia 01090 01302 01484
00239 01091 01306 01485
IJrr; 01093 01319 01487
01095 01320 01490
00244 01100 01321 01504
00258 01101 22 01506
00259 llO2 1324 01507
00262 01106 01 329 01508
00280 01106 01 330 01514
00287 01107 01 334 01515
00319 llll 01338 01517
00322 011.16 01341 01518
00324 01118 01344 01519
00357 01119 01345 01523
00364 01124 01357 01527
00365 01126 01360 01539
00366 01129 01361 01545
00371 01134 01362 01546
00780 01135 01365 01549
00784 01138 01366 01550
00791 01145 01369 01553
00795 01155 01370 01555
00802 01158 01371 01556
00805 01159 01373 01558
00807 01162 01377 01563
00813 01167 01380 01669
00816 01170 01381 01571
00820 01175 01384 01577
00822 01176 01385 01578
00830 01177 01386 01579
00832 01178 01387 01580
00840 01179 01389 01584
00890 01183 01391 01585
00904 01184 01392 01605
00905 01189 01393 V 01606
00907 01196 01394 01609
00913 01212 01395 01612
00915 1 215 tgE22
00932 01 216 01399 JSS 37
00949 01220 01401 qg 3B
00951 01223 01405 S 6B
00966 01224 £
00957 01225 oi4 SP 70
00975 01228 mins
00977 01241 01423 ifcl
00962 01242 JJg!
00996 01243 M*
* i 01426 01700

continually incorporate new
ideas into it.
Future possibilities include

In his stories he tries to and came to England in 1948,
explain the transcendent by where he met his wife. There he
using words which appeal to the had his first novel published,
senses. His symbolismis Christian The Open Face of Heaven.
oriented. In 1950 he came to America
Shoemyen has found writing and worked on a newspaper in
financially unprofitable but still Philadelphia. Three years ago he
enjoys it. Some of his short came to the UF.
stories have appeared in the Shoemyen first started writing
Florida Quarterly and two of seriously when he was 21. He
them will be appearing in college has written in Hungarian,
texts. French, German and English. He
SHOEMYEN IS editorial has won the Bowman Ashe
assistant in the Editorial Award.
Department at the Institute of Shoemyen will be at the
Food and Agricultural Sciences. reading and those interested in
He was bom in Budapest, modem literature are invited to
Hungary. He escaped in 1946 attend.

fog and bubble machines, said
Thacker. Were trying to set
you on fire!



Student Senate
Approves 71-72
Accent Budget
'i
Voters Under 21 Face
Possible Reregistration

By RICHARD ALEXANDER
Alligator Writer
Certain forms stand to be
changed by the Florida
Legislature so voters under 21
who have registered may have to
re-register, according to Mrs.
Alma Bethea, Alachua County
Elections Supervisor.
The Legislature will have to
determine the qualifications for
those under 21 in light of the
U.S. Supreme Court ruling. The
Supreme Court ruling was that
those between 18 and 21 must
be allowed to vote in all federal
elections. This includes the
presidential and congressional
election. The court also ruled
that residency requirements for
all states must not exceed 30
days for people wishing to vote
in federal elections.
THE 50 YOUTHS who have
registered may have to do so
again in order to fill out the
proper forms, if the Legislature
requires such form changes.
Mrs. Bethea said she is not
going to refuse to register those
who would like to, but that it
would be better to wait until the
Legislature has taken whatever
action is necessary.
Due to the recent ruling
regarding registration procedures
there is little chance of those
under 21 taking part in the up
coming city commission
elections in March.
$4.98 RECORDS
FOR
$3.25
424 NW 13th ST.
HARRISONJEFFIRSONSTARS
MIPNEILVOUNGSUFERtTARJU
dycoLlinsjamcstaylorjoh
NLENNONDEREKATHEDOMIN
OESALLMAHEROTHERSSAVOY
ROWNELTONJOHNEYRDSPOC
OGRANOPUNKGRATEPULDEA
OARLOGUTMRIEPLOCKALKOO
PERSTEPPENWOLFY OUNGBLOO
OSPLEETWOOOMACJOHNMAY A
luamescottonbluesbandi
SAACHAYESSWEETWATERiAMI
SGANGQUICKSILVERCATSTEV
ENSBR EWER ASH IPL.EY

City Commissioner Neil
Butler said that the only way of
allowing 18 to 20 year-olds to
vote in time for the March
elections would be by city
ordinance.
m JOHNSTON
ill PHOTOGRAPHY
Studio Passports
and Applications
4 prints for
5 dollars
"Why Pay More"
Johnston Photography
1915 N.W. 13th St.
Phone 372-2512
YOUpt
We have the
ART
SUPPLIES
SPECIAL
30% OFF
ON PANELS
PADS, CANVAS
CRAFTINT
ACYLICS, ETC.
SAVE NOW
AT
CHESNUTS
DOWNTOWN AT
106 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
372-8421

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writar
Accents 1971-72 budget
received a nod Tuesday from the
Student Senate.
A first reading of the SIB,OOO
budget was approved with little
opposition by the senators. The
actual amount Student
Government will have to shell
out comes to $13,000, with the
other $5,000 coming from ticket
sales and other incomes.
THE BUDGET was increased
$2,000 from last year because
Accent wants to bring more
quality speakers to the campus,
Ed Boze, Accent chairman said.
Boze said the Accent
program, as it is now, gives us a
lot more flexibility in bringing

I All Figures Reducedl7 I
I to New Slimmer N I
I DRESSSIZES^^II
J I M M I y : : : >
I r#ff 372-9372 KI M .. compute 4 month I
Vail or 372-1744 NOW program
_ ........ ... a. "UnlimilVhi.'
I For Your Complimentary Trial Visit & Figure Analysis $*745 I
Jf To tho first
35 to Call
NO crash diets I
A UA strenuous
I RESULTS GUARANTEED, NO exerc ses I
R MPYOU ARK A DRCSS SIZK NO lon g te [ m
r i you can be a sizi io by Fob. 4 Fait to rsctiv ITW memberships
8 14 YOU CAN BE A SIZI 12 BY Feb. 9 th. rult* listed I
I CAN BE A SIZI 14 BY Feb. 9 El.in. W* will
H 20 YOU CAN BE A SIZI 14 BY Feb. 24 gwe you 1
22 YOU CAN BE A SIZI 14 BY Feb. 24 i M AUTUC KDtK
I E4 MANAGEMENT INC, IU/U O WUH IHJ rIfSC
I Elaine Powers figure salon I
I V< MH
I HOURS: 9 AM 9 PM Sat. 9 AM 4 PM I
, MASTER CHARGE ; BANK AMERICARO
111 >. > ... j
h 1240 N.W. 21 st AVE. hbwl

speakers to the campus at
various times in the year.
Accents budget will come
again to the floor next week for
a second reading.
THE ACCENT BUDGET will
also hit the senate a third time,
when the present senate has to
approve the entire budget at the
end of this quarter. The senate
also approved a package of four
amendments to the UF Student
Body Constitution which is to
be placed on the ballot for the
next general election in April.
The amendments will make
the election for the president,
vice president, treasure,
chancellor of the honor court
and traffic court chief justice by
a majority vote.
IF ANY of the offices does

Thursday, Jaiuary 14,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

not get a majority, a run off wiU
be made the following week.
Right now the constitution
provides for only a plurality of
those voting to elect students to
SG posts.
Election week will be rolled
back one week, to the third
Wednesday after the beginning
of the fall and spring quarters, to
leave the fourth Wednesday free
for the run off elections.
ACCORDING TO Senate
President Rick Horder, the
amendments will take effect after
the elections of spring of this
year.
The senate also authorized
SI,OOO to be used by the UF
choirs winter tour, and paid out
another Rathskeller debt.

Page 5



Th Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

Page 6

Sherman To Remain
In School And Office

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida State University Student Body President
Chuck Sherman will remain in school and in office
pending his arraignment in Circuit Court.
The 24-year-old graduate student was arrested
Thanksgiving day for possession of one-half-ounce
of marijuana while in a car parked in the
community of Gulf Breeze located three miles from
Pensacola.
TWO UNIDENTIFIED FSU COEDS with
Sherman at the time of the arrest were not charged.
According to State Att. Curtis Golden of Indian
Harbour Beach, Sherman was released under $ 1,500
bond.
Sherman pleaded not guilty in the Santa Rosa

RAIFORD...

ONeJ
provide adequate funding for the
program.
In his letter of protest to Dr.
Bax, Callahan made it clear that
he had never sold any of the
inmates' paintings either for his
benefit or theirs. He only
delivered their paintings to the
store and helped set up the
display.
During the 15 months

TRAFFIC...

"W
FROM PAGE ONEJ
definitely not met as often this
year as last.
But Burrows said the
committee seemed very
representative of different
interest groups. Weve got
economists, idealists and
realists.
Solares complained that

The world has entered a new stage of history,,
the age of the maturity of man and the
beginning of a world civilization.
The source of this new development was a
Man who was exiled, tortured, banished and
imprisoned for more than 40 years.
He lived during the last century. His name
THE GLORY OF GOD
BahaVllah is the latest in the succession of Divine
Messengers sent by God since the beginning of
man's existence. He is the Promised One
of all religions. His coming ushers in the Age of
Fulfillment mentioned in all the prophecies
of the past. Baha'ullah brings God's Plan
for world peace, world justice and world unity.
FOR INFORMATION:
'PVj7'''F '*C 392-8044
JOttJv or 392-8474
THE NEW WIND A3O minute introductory film
to the Bahai Faith, will be shown Friday, 7:30 in
room 347. JWRU.
* jr. V
mtomzv uoior MvomMis

Callahan taught at Raiford, he
was responsible for two changes
in prison life. He made it
possible for inmates to keep art
supplies in their cells overnight.
Previously they had been
allowed nothing of this nature;
only private possessions. He also
was responsible for obtaining the
privilege for inmates to employ
.the same hair standards as
employes at the prison.
Callahan said these actions on
his part had aggravated prison

students were having problems
being placed on the committees
agenda and being informed of
their appearance time.
They should be meeting
more often, Solares said. It
may be just that theyre too
over-burdened with work, but
they should get down to the
nitty-gritty. Theres a hell of a
lot to do.

Court House Dec. 7
HE WAS THEN bound over to the Circuit Court
where he has not yet been arraigned.
If convicted, Sherman will be expelled from FSU
and cannot be re-admitted to any state university
for one year.
According to Jerry Fowler, FSU dean of judicial
affairs, Shermans past conduct indicated that no
action needed to be taken by the university.
After an administrative meeting following
Shermans arraignment in County Court, it was
decided he be allowed to continue at FSU pending
his arraignment.
I'm under instruction from my lawyer to make
no comment on the case, but I can say my plea will
remain not guilty, Sherman said.
V

officials: I really got under
their skin.
I JOSH I
M will be here m
I Monday 1

I 1971 Seminole I
I portrait photography I
I', v m
I appointments I
I are already filled I
I during the last two days. I
I dont you think you I
I better call now for an I
I appointment? its your I
I last chance. I
I today through January 22 I

I 12-4 pm and 6-10 pm. I
I 1.50 sitting fee I
I Stevens Studios I
I ot boston and maine I

| UF Gripers Rejoice j
: > ( |
: : $
: By JANE CATO j:j
Alligator Writer S
* !
v
: :>
: If you have a gripe about anything on this campus, you now $
: have a chance to be heard. |
: The Presidents Advisory Council, formed last week, will
i; provide a medium for the students expressions of ideas and
: opinions.
INITIATED BY Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder £
: because he felt a need to open lines of communication to the §
:j students, the council will meet every other week. Jj
Brent Walker, secretary of legislative affairs, will preside at :|i
: the first meeting which will be held on Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. in
: room 316 of the Reitz Union.
: Membership on this council is unlimited and at present only
i; 18 people have joined the group. ji;
:j WITH THE EXCEPTION of the first meeting, Uhlfelder will
{ attend the meetings and take into consideration the opinions of iji
i the students.
: The Advisory Council is an exceUent opportunity for
: students who are not interested in actually working for student
: government to communicate their ideas.
Any interested student should fill out an application at the
: SG office in the Union.
: g
SUPER "Jk
SOUND^H
CIRCUSjP^
A sound-light extravaganza call it visual FM Underground, ji
This Friday night in the Union Ballroom from 9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m.|
Admission is 25 cents and a U. of F. Student I.D. Wt
Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union.



Smoked Market Style V r
fIHT "Quantity Rights Reserved"
Cao'n. John's Frozen SugonUghr Shoulder lugof UghT Wsdsm 800 l (tone hi
fj* Cod Fillets.... 2 59 1 Pork Steaks 5* Chick Steaks....^
f Gm'n John's Frozsn "Supor-Right" / 4 Pork Loin :l.cod Western "Supor-iHfhf" Boneless Boot Chuck Mi or
Flounder Filets.69' Pork Ck0|8..::.t69- Swiss Steaks .....W
Cap'n. John's Froson Broadod "Super-Right Stick (wholo or by tho pises) Super-Right Extra Loan Froshly
Perch Portions S I M Liver Sausage..*>39* Ground Beef 3s,*.*! 59
Quick Frozsn Bulk Copslands Slicod Supor-Rlght Froshly faoar 2% LbsJ
J igjfflSSKfo-. Perch Boiled Ham, lol *1 29 Ground Chuck....*79*
i Jl| |i Cap's. John's Fresh Dry Pockod Standard SupOr-Right" Country Trsat Wholo Hog Supor-Right Wsstom Boot Slicod
Ms3|S|s3f Oysters... n o.*1 Pork Sausage 69 Beef Liver 49
Supsr-Right" All Moot Virginia fttrnts OW Fashionsd Country A Supor-Right Cuban Stylo
SM 9 1
Yr Chok.l Jan. foHc.r Mictea. \
msmmS;
30-ox. Loaf Jana faricar Italian Broad or Plain or Soadod J SAVE 30c If,
|HB I MOhMMiani Ass't. rtwvsrs asp SptcMi M With This Coupon Whoa You Buy W :
Rye Bread wnrt*s3=i ib Ttsnrscan l
I A SUMMO Siffitr- 5* it JlJ> s{
Sjyd. Tomatoes 4/g. fifrsiudu Sy
** 1 I Tomato Paste 3-$1 yos^^prninr^^Tw
Bayer*Aspirin.. STH Tomato Sauce PLr.r;r- save 1 5c ty
41 Milk of Magnesia 69c Manwich... ,! p39c j A WESSON OL I
Vanquish 55 59c G fruit. Juice. 39c 3 iSJ .. Es i 1.04 ftr [
llbb r s ** ,ti ll jOh Coupon good through Jan. 20,1971
Colors Soft Spudatl
VflfflHlir ... CO- iSfci CJ. I.fl-H, (10 R.ll Pack 4^
55 37 Rath Tieci* 1 Si o. ./!:. c/0..:.-: d !rJL ssuea i 1 wi.h Thi. coup.n wh.. You *, |
Noodle Soup 6 csl.oo Wdbiin Soap 3 -33 c 1 ZESTA SALTINES |
j VeNeeta... -69 c Kleenex..3^'sl.oo | 31 c c Green Peas 5 Bubble Club 39c
you saw two ways. .. Jf
low, low prices plus Plaid Stamps Btl
ML M Products prohibited by State Law exempt from Plaid Stamp offer. M m r\
BMBpI B

ThuiMtay, January 14,1971, Tha Florida ANgtfar,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

IW hen power leads man
JPJ toward arrogance, poetry
reminds him of his
WJ limitations. When power
narrows the areas of man's
concern, poetry reminds him of the richness and
of his existence. When power corrupts, poetry clean s, for
art establishes the basic human truths which must serve as
the touchstone of our judgement.
John F. Kennedy
EDITORIAL
The Prisons
Are A Crime
Were in a crisis stage in our prisons. Were just running
warehouses, said Dr. James Bax, secretary of the states
Health and Rehabilitative Services, the other day. Our
rehabilitative programs are ceasing to exist. In many cases
theyre pretty brutal warehouses and the results will show
up more in crime when the inmates get out.
The problems were facing now are the result of neglect
in many, many cases and the failure of some of our past
practices.
Prison reform is one of the biggest issues facing the
nation today.
In the past, the cry for prison reform has gone unheeded;
the men who inhabit our prisons have been considered the
dregs of society, not worthy of our pity, our time, our
money, our help.
Fortunately, this attitude is changing little by little.
People are beginning to realize that prisoners are people,
that many of them can be rehabilitated and in some
instances, be taught to become contributing members of
society.
But it is still a slow process. With the exception of the
work of Dr. Tom Murton, who reformed the Arkansas
prison system, there has been more rhetoric than action.
The state of Florida has the opportunity to take some
action. And in doing so, set an example for the rest of the
nation. It is up to Gov. Askew and the 1971 Legislature.
The governor is going to be visited this week by Florida
prison and parole officials with plenty to say and a lot to
ask. They play to inform the governor on the conditions of
state prisons, the problems, and hopefully, some solutions.
The catch, of course, is that they need money. Nearly $35
million more than this fiscal years appropriations, to be
exact.
And later, Dr. Bax says, more funds will be needed.
Approximately $1 million will be needed to implement
the recommendations of hospital consultant Kenneth
Babcock, who says medical staffs in prisons need as many as
96 new positions now.
From $lO to sls million will be needed to construct a
research, teaching and treatment institution for mentally
disturbed offenders.
At least $500,000 will be needed to end the existence of
Floridas nine road prisons and turn them into work-release
centers.
An adequate prison system will cost money. Some of, or
possibly all of the money problems can be worked out by
Gpv. Askew and the legislature.
It will take extensive budgeting. And it will take courage.
Prison reform is still not a popular issue particularly when
it involves the possibility of spending some of Joe
Taxpayers money. And until prison reform becomes a
popular issue, reaching into the wallets of the folks back
home is not going to pick up any political brownie points.
But prison reform has been ignored too long. Too many
times have people we call ourselves civilized turned
our heads. It is time to face the issue. And it has to start
with Gov. Askew.
We urge him to heed the request* of prison officials this
week.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

p I liiiiMyll'i
Sjk t >3b v 1 ? I rl r
lla f m
I \ /
111
Oh say can you seee

PICTURE IN your mind what
would happen if a soldier
stopped to consider questions of
morality every time he was
issued an order to murder
someone.
Why, the whole process of
slaughter might come grinding to
a needless and wasteful halt!
It is a simple matter of
expediency. Either soldiers obey
without question, or everyone
along a chain of command has
the power to veto.
SOMEDAY YOU will all go
out into the real world. How
would you feel if you told an
inferior to do something which
violated natural law and he
refused?
Besides, natural law is a very
tricky thing. It can mean almost
anything you want it to. It is
highly likely that someone can
be found somewhere who can
interpret My Lai within natural
law as being an ecologically
defensible attempt to fertilize
the barren Indochinese
wastelands.

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiants John Parker
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang Joan Dalton
Wire Editor Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of tha University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Busman, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suita
third floor, Reitz Union.
' o'
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
_' 1 f
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the h;.
of the w*- *?f tht article and not th 0i rloHda

Sam Pepper Phyllis Gailub
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Ken McKinnon Loretta Tennant
News Editor News Editor

Case For My Lai

After considerable thought, I
have decided to come out in
favor of the My Lai Massacre.
It was an easy decision to
make. No one likes to think
about wee little tots being
gunned down en masse, even if
there is a possibility that they
are concealing bazookas,
sub-machine guns or other
weapons.

By JOHN PARKER

But I ask you to consider the
problem logically, and I think
you will see that there was really
no other solution.
It is a matter of policy, of
necessity, that soldiers obey all
orders, no matter what the
consequences. This has been an
accepted military doctrine since
the time of the earliest organized
warfare (and who are we to
question the likes of Ghengis
Khan?)
AS FOR those charged with
murder in the incident, why
dont we stop and realize that
these are just good *ol corn-fed
American boys who did what
they have done all their lives,
obeyed their superiors.
And may I once again pose
my suggestion for ending the
Vietnamese affair once and and
for all:
Kill every living thing, raze to
the ground every tree and
building, and then Astro-turf the
whole country.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
C. R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. ST Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
4 . -i.
I V*,.. -r



GUEST COLUMN
A A
>
5: v
BE V
v
V
,v
12 :$
|V ,J.|
I FSM Response 1
By A. R. TODD
This letter is written in response to Dr. Hales decision to deny
recognition to FSM and the letter by exFSMers printed in the
Gator, Tuesday, January 12th. The exFSMers letter has
suggestions which should be thoughtfully considered, however, it does
not answer the charges made by Dr. Hale. I suspect the writers wished
not to dignify the charges by refuting them.
Dr. Hale, in his letter to the Presidential committee, the Committee
on Student Organizations and Social Affairs (SOSA), rests his decision
on three points, which are mentioned in the Alligator, January 4th.
1. He attributes to Mr. Bruce Ellis, the statement: Were going to
break all the rules. In point of fact, no one made this statement, and
Mr. Ellis made no similar statement from the platform during the rally
featuring Mr. William Kunstler on November sth. The only statement
which Dr. Hale could have misquoted was in reference to a rule about
collecting donations a rule which is in such disuse that Dr. Hale did
not refer in his letter to FSM joining other recognized student groups,
including Student Government, in overlooking it. The matter is not as
simple as Dr. Hale implied.
2. In spite of the fact that FSM did not sponsor or lead the mass
entry of Norman Hall following the Counter Culture Ripped Off
Rally, member of FSM, Mr. Ellis, is credited by several present with
encouraging those within the building to leave in order to comply
with University regulations. Dr. Hale shows guile in implying, by
ommission of a matter known to him, that presence of some FSM
members at Norman Hall means support by FSM of the entry, and yet
encouragement of compliance with regulations by a member of FSM
does not indicate responsibility.
3. Without reasonable grounds, Dr. Hale associates FSM, as a
group, with a yippie-type action at the initial SOSA meeting of the
fall term. On this last point he claims that this incident .. indicates
a disregard (by FSM) for a duly constituted committee. The charge
lacks substance as indicated by the time and effort spent by members
of FSM in attempting to gain recognition through a long public
hearing before SOSA and a lengthy rehearing held by Dr. Hale shortly
before the date of his letter. The charge becomes outrageous when it
is Dr. Hale, himself, who shows contempt for SOSA through
overturning its majority decision in favor of recognition of FSM.
From the weakness of Dr. Hales points, each of which was
discussed with SOSA in a public hearing, it seems reasonable to
suspect that considerations used by Dr. Hale in making his decision
may not have been used by SOSA perhaps considerations such as
the response of some legislators, members of the Board of Regents
and newspapers to the speaking engagements of William Kunstler and
Abbie Hoffman on the University campus this past term.
I
If theyre old enough to riot, theyre old enough to nail to
the wall.

* m msmsi in. Hmflnnmawws"
Priviledged Registration

Pro
MR. EDITOR:
Well, the long fight is over. We students, with lousy grade point
averages, have won the right to an equal place in the eyes of the
registrar, and an equal chance at the few openings in the few choice
and necessary courses.
The old system (unique among universities, 1 am told) of assigning
the earlier registration appointments on the basis of grade point
average will /Soon be gone from Gatorland. It was about as effective an
incentive in raising the average grade point as the not-so-long-past
admissions policy of this university towards blacks was in pursuading
them to change their skin color. Rest in Peace.
But can we afford to let the issue fade? Is it necessary for so many
students to be sacrificed? Compare the two appeasements: Just as ol'
Tricky Dick had hoped, the new lottery system for draft selection
quieted down the antiwar-antidraft movement abruptly it takes
quite a conviction to keep screaming your vocal chords out about
peace, love, killing, war, and patriotism when your life is suddenly off
the block. Witness: I have written only 3 antiwar letters since
discovering my birthday to be July 7. And claiming to be a C.O. at
thet. I wonder how concerned I would be if I had been bom 2 days
later?
Dont students deserve at least some voice in what courses they are
offered? We have no right to bum Peabody if we cant all take
Glassblowing next quarter, but when all sections of a course that I
want are closed out, I expect a better response than, Somebodys
Gotta get screwed.
Lets not be deceived by such small concessions. Why must we be
brutalized each quarter? Why does anyone have to be screwed? A
small issue, for small minds only? Possibly. But dont come crying to
me when you are in that last group of one-third to register and want
to take a closed-out course lll be ready to remind you that you will
be registering earlier next quarter.
Mack Tyner HI

EDITOR:
Ken Driggs, the bearded
Sigma Goy, recently wrote his
farewell to the UF audience.
Among other things, he
defended Rae Weimer, Harvey
Alper, and the notorious
Stephen C. O'Connell.
This is rather absurd, since
these political hacks are among
the people Mr. Driggs should
criticize the most. Ken should
have suggested, as I did in 1968,
that President OConnell resign.
He should advocate the
resignation of Weimer, Alper,

Driggs

Hale, Cox, Kibler, and all other
two-bit Yahoos that substitute
corruption for education. He
should NOT praise those who
screw to the proverbial wall
those students who are not
ex-editors of the Seminole.
I guess this is Kens way of
buttering up the kingmakers in
Tigert Hall. Perhaps hell soon
get a job writing speeches for
President O'Connell, like Harvey
Alper. Or answering phone calls
for President O'Connell, like
Jimmey Bailey. Or shining Rae
Wedmer's shoes, or fetching

Thursday, January 14,1971, Tha Florida Aliatar,

Con
MR. EDITOR:
A couple of months ago when
I first heard about your latest
campaign to help equalize the
lives of the poor disgruntled
masses (i.e. seniority
registration), I thought it must
be some juvenile jest on your
part (perhaps a Eller nothing
more). The administration of
this University will never (so I
thought) allow such a ridiculous
scheme to be instituted.
Grade point registration
discriminated against average
students.! INDEED! In what
way is justice and equality
served if we reinforce (through
praise and rewards) just standing
passively by, waiting for your
145 green stamp credits to be
rung up on the registration
machine.
True, grade point averages
may not have status or sex
appeal, but in school, as in life,
the winners of the game have to
play by the rules, and the rules
should be such that the best
players win or, in my opinion at
least, the game the rules et al
are invalid.
I submit that the reasons for
your proposal were not those
stated but were two-fold as
follows. 1. That you and yours
have amassed your 145 hours,
and 2. that you needed some
dew and exciting and relevant
etc., etc., etc., ad nauseum, issue
to keep your names in the public
view. What say (?) *0 mighty
guardians of justice?
BRUCE A. BATEMAN 3AR

Harry Sisler's slippers, or barking
for Hugh Cunningham.
At any rate, chalk one up for
the forces of timidity
obsequiousness. As Jack
Nicholson pointed out in Easy
Rider,*' you can't talk about
freedom*' when you're buying
bought and sold in marketplace.
1 can cope with rednecks, but
Lord protect me from tie-dye
WASP fratmen and Blue Key
token niggers. Let us hope that
some of us do not, as they say,
have a price.
DAVID MILLER

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

TWITS.. Jilt 14 WfO., JAH. SOUPS
fejwf' 3l B'sar I
sr.xm 100-CT. irt c
Aspirin 49
£*?: : fll TIMEC
Mouthwash L 89 II 111 111 Bi m m W V
Grapefruit... 4 s l JHL I box
CHEF BOYAR-OEE WITH MEAT BALLS iSVi-oi. SIOO
Spaghetti J ctNS 1
Quantity Right* Reserved
\ WINN DIXIf STOW*. INC.-COfYtKJHT-I*7l
SUPERBRAND
U Shortening OQ t
Vb 38* limit 6 With $7.50 or I limit On. With $7.50 or More Purcha*. Excluding Cigarette. S|j|,
I I SAVE 40 c can
KRAFT THOIHANO ISIAND SAIAO KUiRAY I) K.H SIOO AnnU J UiC6 . .3 S* Cfli MIXCS ''
Dressing 3 a l 00 Tuna Fish 3 ca 1
SAVE 25c DEL MONTE 17 qq Sousa a e 4 cSi *l Rg Bars 39 Sandwich " 49
* L 17 c Cooking Oil. .. 68* Peanuts .T?. A s l Tomato Paste.. 35 c
Sriuice .3 M M OO Diffs' 39* Facial Tissue.
. mm S HUNTS TOMATO
Towels A 1 mM CATSUP 3 1
' fefejgy SAVE 47 c
S sweetheartUQU.D A-Aft OUSTAfSON'S FRESH HOMOGENIZED
Detergent... 4 *l if
Preserve s ..... 38' MILK
Peanut Butter ** 98 half gallon 59*
w%*RRw nALr wALLvn
SAVE 11c FLOWER CART
save 34 c Mpmn Panty Mose pa>r dkiedarung
MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT I SAVE 25c PEI MONTE CSSWK ftft Bread ... 28*
COFFEE ImU Gold Corn .. .5 a *1 #0 kbssks*
Jr rS~ e- SIOO Rolls 2 39* piA#Tie
aa, OQc H lh 11 Gr. Beans ... 5 *1 OAIION I
f f 1-18. SAVE 25< DEI MONTE WHOLE t StlX 2 0
**" Tomatoes .... 5 a *1 00
CREST Seasoning 1 .;.*r33*
- 53*
s I SvrucT .-75* Dog Food &! 10* cKoc. Pinwheelss9*
. 3AwrST UNIVERSITY A. ~~Y. 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



i" i* * ASTOR OIL 49'
DA ACT mm m,
Chuck Steak 59 c llvA) I MM A
30c BRAND BEEF BONELESS
Shoulder Roast... 99 c SAVE2r M 1
SAVE 30c W-D BRAND PURE
Ground Beef 3 . $ 1 59
Vl WVI 111 Vwwl !# I 808 WHITE REG. SLICED
SAVE 70c W-0 BRAND PURE
Ground Beef... 10 $ 4 il#%
Beef Steakettes. 2 $ l 5B FI IT 1111 £IRA
SUNNYLAND WHOLE (14-17 LB. AVG.) SAVE 20 C
JA B A W-D BRAND
HAIVIViIA Pure Ground "2[
nMitij/ifii Beef Lamb nil
t 5 3 i,s 9 1>39 u. \3%0
FREEZER QUEEN AU VARIETIES FRESH BOSTON BUTT FRESH FROZEN TURBOT WHITE Breobtone .win
Meat Dinners.. 99 e Pork Roast 59 c Fish Fillets 59 c Parfait Yogurt 3 & 69'
Beef Liver 39 c Pork Steaks ... 69 c Link Sausage ... mt $ 1" Can Biscuits .. 2 -S5 39 e
SWIFT PREMIUM CORNISH FRESH PORK SUPERBRAND MIIOCHEDDAR KRAFT'S PHIIADEIPHIA
Game Hens ..2 1 Spare Ribs l 68 c Daisy Cheese ... lb 79 c Cream Cheese 8x 39 c
FULL QUARTER LOIN SLICED INTO FRENCH FRIED HEAT & SERVE SUPERBRAND CREAMED COTTAGE
Pork Chops 68 e Fish Sticks .S 89 Cheese. ...2 & 69 c Sliced'Cheese.. 99'
GOLDEN BANTAM YELLOW U.S. No. 1 REGULAR
Com 6## otatoes 47
ALL WHITE FLORIDA
wmm l m | *- AA OCOMA CHICKEN, BEEF, TURKEY MEAT
EGGS ]£ dinners
gSL A % Potatoes... .5 a 68 c WST.i *tr *-m
Ul BJ Steakettes... 89 c Rich 4 n$1
A Wl cl amd a tA7 Dinners..- 65 c A h-oz.
Shrimp .... 2 & *2 79 4 I
Bi 5- .. Peas 5 s l
on Bananas 10 c
TREITOP T S T 9| 4CA LARGE STALKS ALLPURPOSE
Apple Juice 39* Fish & Chips... 75 e Celery 17 c Apples 5. 59 e
Orange Juice 2 99 c Cheese Pizza .. >. 99 c Cauliflower... 39 e Oranges 5 >o 49 e
SAVE )Rc STOUFFERS BEEF, TURKEY, CHICKEN CHUN KING CHICKEN OR SHRIAAP __ FRESH BOSTON, 8188 LETTUCE, ENDIVE, ESCAROLE A ROMAINE
Meat Pies..., 2. $ 1 Egg Rolls <=' 75 c Egg Plant 2 -0.29* Salad Greens 2* 29*
HANSCOM GLAZED PECAN, ORANGE CHIFFON FRESH CRISP FRESH U.S. No. I YEUOW
Coconut Lemon <= 79 c Carrots IS 10 c Bell Peppers ..4 - 39 Onions 3 29 c
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVt OPEN ON SUNDAY 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 44V HIGH SPRINGS Uoi N. MAIN ST.

Thursday, January 14,1971, Tha Florida All gator.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Nw area 3 br 2 bath house on corner
lot. central heat and air, patio, very
nice $21,100 can be refinanced or
$5750 for equity 378-0844
(A-st-57-p)
1970 Honda 750 cc 3400 mi. Gold in
excellent condition. Super-fast and
Super-smooth. Only SI3OO. call
373-4397 (David) or (Bob)
(A-st-58-p)
Colliers Encyclopedia, childrens
supplement, yearbooks to date and
bookshelf, save money, my credit,
your trip to library. $? call me
378-6900 (A-st-58-p)
Assembled Dynaco & Elco stereo
components for list price of kit. Full
warranty. Call Dave 376-0716 after
5t30 (a-3t-59-p)
PANASONIC Stereo System $250
new, NOW 4 months old and
ASKING S2OO. Has a Turntable and
AM-FM stereo. 378-7743 (a-3t-59-p)
sears heavy duty reducing machine
make reasonable offer. 378-9256
(A-st-57-p)

The National Shakespeare Company Jv
jjj "Much Ado About Nothing S
\ in the University Auditorium
K on February 6, 1971 Jj
| sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union
'
I NOW AT...2:12 4:04 5:56 7:51 9:46 1
iigkJ The people next door" II
LaSCajSSOkSI
I Roma BPS I
Before Christ. I
I After Fellini CmA MI
I An ALBERTO GRIMALDI Production I
FELLINI SATYRJCON' I
I (English Subtitles) fl
FACES
On almost every critic's 10 Best List (The New York Times, San Franelseo
Examiner, Dallas Times Herald, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Village
Voice to name just a few), this film Is surely one of the few In recent years
to win raves from both Judith Crist and Jonas Mekas. winner of five
awards at the Venice International Film Festival, the film concerns
specifically the lives of Richard and Marla Frost and generally the lives of
us all. Eases Illuminates the little things, the minor abrasions which create a
major abyss within a marriage. The film culminates In a tragic night which
Richard Frost spends with a prostitute while his wife Is at home with a boy
she has picked up at a nightclub. The Guardian called Faces A
land mark...what the cinema Is all about," but this film Is not an easy one.
As Richard Schickel, in Life wrote Infidelity Is only a device to heighten
Cassevete's true subject, the banality of the way too many of us live. Like
the marriage It examines, Faces Is complex, often frustrating and
mercilessly real. Its truths are too Incisive to Ignore and too universal to
miss touching any single member of the audience. The Sunday Express
(London) described this film as "like a kick in the stomach. And I urge
every adult to see it."
Thun., Jan. 14 Fri., Jan. 15 and Sat., Jan. 16
7:00 & 9:45 p.m. 5:00,7:45 & 10:30 pjn.
Union Auditorium .50

FOR SALE
stereo speakers. 2 argos tx-4 3-way
speakers In walnut stain cabinets. 25"
x 14" x 9" both for $75. also study
lamp cost S3O new want sls.
376-6191 (a-st-59-p)
Packard Bell 8-track cartridge deck
for home use. Hardly used. SSO also
vaccuum cleaner sls. Corning Ware
half price. 378-4016(a-st-59-p)
Microscope binocular Graf-Apseo
with B&L optics 2 years old $350
call 372-7607 after 5 or 392-2847
from 8-5 (A-st-57-D)
Llke-new 1969 Gibson electric guitar.
Model es-125t; cost $250.00 new but
must sell for only $165.00 Call
William at 376-0406. (a-st-59-p)
1970 Yamaha 650, high bars,
electronic Ignition, clean, smooth,
fast, 2 helmets $llOO. Jim Smith
378-9129 (a-3t-60-p)
Billiard cues 21 oz adams S2O 19 oz
national tournament sls 19 oz
Willie Hoppe original $25 all
excellent condition. Also TV $5 call
372-7395 (A-st-57-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

FOR SA LE
1970 honda C 1350 excellent condition
$525 call 378-9418 ask for Barry
(A-st-58-p)
1970 KAWASAKI 350. 2500 miles,
excellent condition. In warranty,
bought new car and must sell now.
$550 firm. 378-9270. Steve
(a-st-60-p)
Classical guitar with case. Played very
little, excellent condition. Call Marcia
376-5818. S7Q (a-3t-60-p)
50 ft Ventura for sale, beautiful &
inexpensive home with large lot. see
at no. 91 Plnehurst Park or call
378-7041 after 5 p.m. For March or
June (a-10t-60-p)
35mm SLR camera & leather case
lenses will Interchange, bought In
Japan 8 mos ago $l4O now SIOO
with tripod, call Gary after 6
373-1467 (a-3t-60-p)
New Moon mobile home. 1970
44x12 model 2 br front-rear. Ideal
for 2 students. Mid-June occupancy.
See by appointment. Call 378-4775
(a-st-60-p)
I Drafted. One month-old 3-speed bike
| with light, chain lock $45 Phone
I 376-5852 (a-3t-60-p)
| PLEXIGLASS! half retail price.
I Assorted colors and size sheets, call
1 372-7318 after 6:00 p.m. (a-3t-60-p)
I Yamaha 12 string guitar plus case
SIOO also De Armond cl Ip-on elect
[ pick-up for flat top guitar S3O see at
I 251-c Flavet phone 378-5782
j (a-3t-60-p)
FROM wall to wall, no soil at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. electric
upholstery shampoos also available
Lowry Furniture Co. (a-ts-c)
Bicycle... If you get tired of
peddling It has a small motor goes 8
mph and 400 miles to gallon. Asking
S6O will take best offer, Alan
378-8378 (a-lt-61-p)
New 4 track stereo cassette car tape
player-recorder plus used 8 track
player both for $95 call 376-0642
after 6 p.m. (a-3t-61-p)
70 Kawasaki 350 Big Horn The
Beautiful woods & enduro machine
Fast light & dependable Bored out to
approx 36 H P Call 378-1061
(a-2t-61-p)
Stereo: Fisher 65 watt amp., 2 Fisher
speakers, and Dual 1215 turntable
with base, cover & cart. All new
save $125 only $375. 378-9192.
(a-3t-61-p)
1967 VW needs body work, breaks.
Engine excellent condtion S6OO or
best offer phone 373-3890
(a-lt-61-p)
West Point long full dress coat Grey
Average size Unused S3O 378-9272
Ask for Robin (a-2t-61-p)
VX;X:X::;X;X;:;:;X;:;X;X:X:X:X;X:::::::::X ; X ; ;
EOF? RENT
Female roommate needed
Immedlatedly. The Place. Prlvat
bedroom, townhouse, S7B a month
includes utilities. Please call
378-0622. (B-4t-58-p)
Roommate needed Immediately.
Landmark apt. $47.50 rent + utilities
call Carlos br Larry at 378-9834 or
come by apt. 88 (b-3t-59-p)
20' Trailer ex. cond. completely self
contained, on shady lot 376-8690
perfect for student (b-3t-59-p)
FOR RENT 1 BR turn. Apt. with
Studio, SBS per mo. Micanopy
Center of Modern Art. Bldg. Phone
378-2401 Preferred Properties,
Realtors. (b-3t-60-p)
sublet small apartment, one block
from campus. $95 a month, utilities
Included, available Immediately, call
373-2623, between 10 am & 6 pm.
(b-3t-60-p)
Female roommate wanted. Move
Imm. Village Park Apts, call
376-9829 anytime. (b-3t-60-p)

EOF? RENT
x-xvx-x-x-x-x-x-x-x'x-x-x-x-xx'x-x-:*
THE PLACE, opening now for one
roommate, sublease until August,
$82.50 per month, utilities included
in rent, call 378-9270. quick.
(b-st-60-p)
NICE two bedroom apt to sublease
till June 1117 NW Ist Place apt 7 call
376-7465 $ 125/mo + utilities
(b-lt-61-p)
XwxWxxW^^^
WANTED
:x-x::-x ; x ; x-x ; x;x-X ; x-: : x ; x ; : ; : ; : ; : ; x : : ; x ; :
Roommate wanted. Luxury living at
a reasonable > price Point West. apt.
378-9947 500-8 S.W. 34 St. Bill or
Joe (c-st-55-p)
roomate to share 4 brm. house have
own room 42.50 mo. plus utilities
3117 N.W. 6 St. (c-3t-59-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cyllnthla between 1 and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
2 female roommates wanted for
spacious home with fireplace, lib
acres, pets allowed, call 378-0415
(C-st-58-p)
Female roommate to share apt. one
block from campus near The Place,
$45 mo. 373-3864 (c-4t-57-p)
WANTEDI U.F. Student Telephone
Directory for 1970-71. Will pay
SIO.OO. Write R.L. Hill, P.O. Box
77346, Atlanta, Ga. (c-3t-60-p)
2 WARM CHICKS NEED
FRIGIDAIRE. If selling a
refrigerator, call 392-8536 or
392-8531. (c-st-60-p)
HELP! vegatarlan freak needs a place
to live, wants own room, In town or
out of. call 378-0719 (c-3t-60-p)
One studious male to share apt at
Williamsburg. Immediate occupancy.
S7O/mo. Come by after 6 p.m. apt
126 (c-2t-61-p)
m n
Male Roommate Needed Landmark
Apts 47. 50 Per Month 4 man apt.
dishwasher, Sauna, health club incld.
call 378-1811 (c-3t-60-p)

. jftuOJ-P L GETTING STARTED!
DESIGN AND PAINT I
* Instructor, Paul Burdick
WJQg
Register Tuesday, January 19 I
at 7:30 p.m. in raani C 4
A $9.09 charge par perm I
f \ *Ponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union I
I Bl BB
NAMED DESIRE
ipj j ji i uni g| jj Tai BB b H
I mght before 6:30 p. m. and Sat! & Sun. Mitincu
I STS 2 ** Penthouse 3 only. Regular Price I
r v.
WANTED
female roommate for upstairs La
Bonne Vie Apt. to share large bedrm.
and private bath winter and spring,
for more info, please call 373-2219
(c-3t-60-p)
female roommate wanted at
University Gardens Trace for winter
and spring quarters one bedbroom.
call 373-3941 (c-3t-60-p)
Wanted bass guitarist for Chicago Jazz
oriented type group call after 5 pm
ask for Tim or Charlie 378-9497
(c-2t-60-p)
Female roomate needed at La Bonne
Vie Apts. 51 a month + Vs utilities
call 378-9844 ask for Diane
(c-lt-61-p)
One female roommate needed now
for 174 Landmark. $47.50/month.
Stereo. Color T.V.. Call 376-2184
(C-st-60-p)
Wanted 1 female roommate In
Landmark no. 59 Immediate
occupancy, rent $47.50 + utilities.
Please call 378-0016 (c-3t-60-p)
Seasons
Best Musical
N. Y. DRAMA CRITICS' CIRCLE AWARD AWARDTONY
TONY AWARDTONY AWARD
PCll]
The delightful song-and.
dance version of him the
Declaration of
Independence came to be.
Jan. 30
8:15 PM Tickets now on sale
Fla. Gym tJWRU o*Offk>a
Presented by Student
Government Productions



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.wjwwnnwmwsmx wSKWSmf
WANTED
1 female roomate Immediately, Jan.
rent free. French Quarter no. 13, call
373-3895 anytime. (c-st-60-p)
Need male roomate for apartment at
The Place own bedroom, reasonable
rates with all the modern
conveniences. Call 378-4481
(c-2t-61-p)
HELP Male grad, student needs
room. Walk to campus; approx.
S4O/mo. Please call 376-8059
evenings, (c-lt-61-p)
2 Girls want 1 or 2 others to share
155/mo expenses on 3 bedroom
house 2001 N.E. 15 TERR
(c-2t-61-p)
Two starving guys need cook(s).
Details at Interview, spec: color solid,
no stripes or dots, ht. 4' 0" to 6 8,
wt. 50 to 250. Call the butler at
372-3403 8 am to 8 am (c-st-61-p)
Got a 5-string Banjo for Christmas
and need lessons Call Bill at
392-7511 In the afternoon
(c-lt-61-p)
Need companion for disabled veteran
age 24. Will consider young man or
couple. Students may apply. Call
392-3413 A.M. / 372-0127 after 3:00
(c-st-61-p)
1 Female Roomate Wanted Share one
bedroom, duplex apartment. Call
Andrea 378-1795 (c-3t-60-p)
FREE FOODI 3 male students need
co-ed to cook meals Sun-Thurs.,
FREE MEALS, call 378-9813
(c-3t-60-p)
wanted: 1 female roommate for
Landmark Apt. contact Gretchen at
no. 373-1387 or come by apt. no. 23
Jan. rent paid (c-st-600p)
COINS Buy and Sell all old or scarce
coins. Cash for your coins all Silver
Gold and Type coins. Sell coins
reasonable Tom 392-7444
(c-10t-60-p)
NEED IMMEDIATELY. One or two
roomates for Gatortown apt. 211.
Call 392-8259 or 392-8260.
(c-3t-60-p)
HELP WANTED
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
378-6900 ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years, also
guitar repair service I (E-st-58-p)
Need reliable, experienced person to
care for Infant weekdays In my
home. 376-9865. (E-st-57-p)
Need extra spending money? Have
four hours a week to spare? Sell
Florida's yearbook on a commission
basis, call Jan evenings 373-3817
(e-3t-59-p)
CAMP PINEWOOO ln The Blue
RMlge Mountains Hendersonville, N,
Carolina. Co-ed Camp For Boys It
Girls. Students interested In summer
employment as Cabin Counselors,
Activity Instructors, Kitchen Aides
and Groundskeepers, should write for
general Information and Staff
Applications. .Now!. .Only
clean-cut young people need apply.
Camping dates: June 22 to Aug. 17.
Reply to winter address: Camp
Pinewood, 1801 Cleveland Rd. Miami
Beach, Fla. 33141 (E-6t-54-p)

Todays ]
more for your money meal I
moisons
CAFETERIA I
{THURSDAY'S I
I PORK CUTLET PARMESAN! I
* WITH oo>! ~ I
| I SPAGHETTI 77y I | I
| I FRIDAYS FEATURE I I
& I Morrison's famous A A I 2
* 5 | ROAST TURKEYO 1 C I 3
WITH x |
! MASHED POTATOES.
{ DRESSING. GRAVY.
[and cranberrysauce J
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
mORRISOIVS
CfIFETERIft ..beyond comparison! I
L 2620 NJN. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Page 13

T** Rorida Ai lip tor, Wednesday, January 14,1§71

HELP WANTED
xXvX;XyX:X-x-x-xxx-x-;-:x-x-x-x-Xv
Student Wanted Male or Female to
learn Engraving University Jewelers
Apply In Person 1802 W. University
Ave. (e-4t-59-p)
Part or full-time sales help needed
$3-5 an hour, guaranteed to service
established customers, call between 7
4 9 pm 378-0421 or 378-0121 ask
for Ed (£-st-57-p)
:*Wi*:X-X!^x-:rXv:r::::: : :::x:::x::: : ::: : :::x
AUTOS
MUST SELL 65 Ply Fury 111, new
polyglass tires, factory air, radio,
heater. Will Deal. Call Anytime
372-5809 or 373-4213 (G-6t-57-p)
1965 Mustang must sell 2nd
car-6cyl, automatic, good cond,
maroon ext., white Int., radio, heater,
low mileage, $550 cash. 378-9273
after 5 p.m. (g-st-59-p)
1969 Ford 2-dr hardtop, 302-VB,
f/alr, power steering, radio, low
mileage, bal warranty, one owner,
financing to arrange, call 376-4981.
(G-st-58-p)
1966 MGB roadster wire wheel radial
tires, fold down top and more, runs
well asking 900$ phone 373-1043 ask
for Greg (G-st-58-p)
1967 Camaro 327 4 spd ac radio
heater wide ovals best offer over
1095 call 376-2317 (g-st-50-p)
1966 Olds 442, radio and heater,
4-speed, $895 or will trade for cycle
plus cash. Call 373-2132 ask for Mark
(g-st-60-p)
67 Austin Healy Sprite with am-fm
radio, motor and brakes In top shape
SIOOO call 378-1900 or see In front
of Corry Village (g-st-60-p)
67 VW Bus mechanically perfect
stereo tape SIOOO.OO or best offer
call 372-2172 (g-3t-59-p)
Must sell 1962 Dodge Lancer. Needs
moderate work. S2OO or best offer.
Call 376-7925 after 5:00 pm
(g-3t-60-p)
64 English Ford, good tires, rebuilt
motor, new battery, rear brakes, dlff.
good transportation phone 372-0764
after 5 PM (g-st-60-p)
Mercury Cougar 67 V-8 stick shift
3-speed transmission, radio, good
tires, excellent condition $1,395
376-4640 (G-st-58-p)
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE 1967
low mileage SIOOO or best offer call
392-0560 or 392-0528 (g-2t-61-p)
TRIUMPH SPITFIRE 1965. Red
with white top 4 tonneau. SSOO. call
376-6354 after 9 p.m. (g-st-61-p)
Alfa Romeo 1961 Glulletta spyder
convertible good cond. new paint,
reconditioned engine S6OO call
378-8960 (g-3t-61-p)
BMW 1600 1968 very good condition
SI3OO 40.000 miles call 392-0560 or
392-0528 (g-3t-61-p)
:tX:XvX:XvX^
PERSONAL
Want to be a leading woman? return
your Mortar Board application by
Friday. Jan. 151 (J-st-58-p)

PERSONAL
X-X;X;X;X;:;X;X;X;X;X;XxX;:£X;;;>!*XXy
Student travel, trips, charters,
Europe, Orient, around the world.
Write S.T.O.P. 2150 C Shat tuck,
Berkely Calif. 94704 or see travel
agent. (J-10t-58-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
378-6900 ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years, also,
guitar repair service) (j-st-58-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
Gator carpet cleaners will clean 2
rooms and a hall for $19.95. How
about 1 room for $9.95? Phone
373-3841 for details. (J-st-57-p)
Chico, Thankyou, You make all the
difference In the world! *1 LOVE
YOU Snake (j-2t-60-p)
Trudge daily to the well no longer
Rebekah. Let a Christian Isaac know
your wharabouts. write him at
3425-202 S.W. 2 Ave. Gaines.
(|-2t-61-p)
ride to SPIRIT concert Frl. Jan.
15th. Tallahassee 8:00 p.m. return
Sat. contact James 1103 S.W. 4th
Ave. share expenses (J-lt-61-p)
LOST & FOUND
Lost! 4 mo. some Beagle pup, female,
tan with black and white masked
face, lost east of norman hall, call
373-3061 Reward for my best friend
(l-4t-60-p)
Found near University Press a pair of
glasses In case. Pick up at the Press.
(l-3t-59-nc)
SERVICES
Painting, lowest rates In town, first
class, experienced, licensed. Free
estimates, call John Hickey 372-4427
eves. (m-3t-59-p)
HURRY 3 DAYS LEFT?
AT: 1:32 3:37 5:48 9:52
SET WITH THE
CATS WHO KHOW
WHERE ITS AT!
mfjM
WALT DISNEY
PRODUCTIONS
A PURR-FECTLY
WONDERFUL NEW
CARTOON FEATURE
TECHNICOLOR
2:24-4:53 7:42 -*:sl
it
JOHN WAYNE
A Howard Hawks Production
RIO LOBO
Techncotof*

SERV ICES
Certified Instrument flight Instructor
will give you dual Instruction in his
retractable gear Mooney at very
reasonable rates. 378-9296.
(M-st-57-p)
Alternators generators starters
Metrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric service, till s. Main
378-7330. Now! BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
have your motorbike tuned by an
experienced mechanic, extremely low
rates on hondas, suzukls, kawasakls
and yamahas. call John 392-7026
(m-4t-60-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at and grad of Bklyn
College, N.Y. Term papers, theses,
dissertations. 50 cents and up. v
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft. 6
(M-st-58-p)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)

HMH3I 1
I w s w, w. life s. V */1 a
iaijiaeVtJdrll
SHOWS J UUUK6UUI
4-io 1 Blasting Week/ j
6:45
9:25 J Jbnri- |
! iSSI I
3rd j
SHOWS OHf K! OUS S
1:30 |
3:30 I 1
7-M ONE 0F THE BEST
9:30 1 ;J r AMER,CAN FILMS OF*
ilSn' the yeari-)m.m v
; H WNBU
m MDoma ;
2 nwMGas
*- COLOR j
m *" m m m m m m m m an an m
JjE \
"FANNY j TOMORROW! tpflt j
"Inga" MELINA mehcouri v|H| 2
! H ARDY KRUGER 111
| JAMES MASON W j
I Sometimes it is y l
* who hide the deepest fears. 1
! PMPI >BOB CAROL
TED A ALICE' 1
fer
\f f- STARTING GATE!"'
T w Y'\ Bob Salmaggi, WINS I
L&A |
u* oemeuTcns mc
f FLORIDA THEATRE ONLY >-- -
ALL SEATS $1.26
AH Svnr Oey

SERVICES
JTlffllfflllttM
8 Track stereo tapes Any 2 albums
on l tape 84 One day service Call
373-3611 Ask for Jonathan or leave
message (m-st-58-p)
WE LOVE ,ANIMALS. Loving care
and attention for your pet while you
leave town, private home with fenced
yard. 376-8569 (m-st-60-p)
Steve Is back In town with fast
professional and Inexpensive service
for your HONDA see him at the
CYCLE WORKS 1220 S. Main open
2 until 8 p.m. (M-st-58-p)
Typing done; themes, thesis, etc.
Guaranteed accuracy and neatness.
Electric typewriter $.50 per page
Phone 378-7493 anytime. Good refs.
(m-st-60-p)
FREE CHILD CARE alternative to
strict authoritarian nurseries share
parental responsibility In rotating
child pool for details call Connie
376-0881 (m-2t-60-p)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber 6 Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)



Page 14

1, The Flarids Aligator, Thursdgy, Jgnugry 14,1971

A R K E T **!* Individually-Wrapped
i Delicious Dairi-Freth
if, rownoroow SsZ'"-
A*bxe.&to*uw EJP ELJL^^^^BM I £ J m dlS *p vv
You'll find all your "old friends on jggal Breakfast Club Regular
Pub.,x shelves... the names you MargOTm
know and trust.... radifiona. foods _ _ _V _ lutt.rn.ilk er Sweet
SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSPECTED WESTERN BEEF SALE!
Sirloin Steaks It' s l'
Imperial Roast "' 99*
English-Cut Roast... 1" *l
Premium Proten PRICES EFFECTIVE
Daal Chur# Dike p t V 5f c wed. noon, jan. 13 thru
BCT HQIT KIDS ,b wed. noon, jan. 29,1971
1
fIQySS3SXEttMuQEE9|P|
MHTIjtLIQJ
, o > l *k
SeaW Qejfc FumOaiWmOept.
Halibut Steak .£* 99* Boones Farm Apple Wine 89< Ban Qia fiy Fwi Pffi-
Donald Deck Presea Plerida Orange Cent.
wy w. n~u. , M< *v Orange Juice.... .T 29*
"* Snrimp ' w Grand Vin (Imported) Wines Banquet Assarted Presen
Meat Pot Pies ..... o pk t *1
White, Red and Pink s 99{ Ore Ide Presen
Tater Tots 7 45*
r\ n I I iirds lyn Presen witk Brawn Sugar Olasa

j|KHDByL\ Grapefruit -y Broccoli Spears ...
1 SMSPr with new, nwut Stauffer's Fresen
r jgSS^yTomatoes r. 23* Corn Souffle' 'iT 47*
' i; 35-
W%to Eggplant ........ "IS* Merten's Prase.
Broccoli 33* Honey Buns .£ 29 e
Peppers or Cukes -9* Cinnamon R 0115... S67*



rTri T1 |f J r
, \ , r * : ' \
UiOia Cfl^o^.
Chopped Ham ... 4:159' Smarties Candy.. %tr 37' BHH^HB
Potato Salad 4139' Hershey-ettes .... IT 67^^PrPffffj^|
Cole Slaw 4", 39' Candy Drops '4T 37
Sliced Old Fashion or a, ~. . ~, 1 s**s ** 4HB. ? WPs
Polish Loaf pld 59 c Buttermints V£' 31 c
Tasty A W ftl
Baked Beans aaa a a pound 39' a V MM M O J^H
Always Family Cuban
Sandwiches .59' UitOux fWwi ftdt.
Always A Family Favorite,
Bar-B-Q Fryers .... C 79' Purified Water .... !:" 57' located in oainesvillemall
Fried Chicken DusTpan, ...36' OO^^O^H
ST *1 4 K£. *2 S 5 *2* Cereal Bowls ...19' isjamousjoints delicious
6 kb Garnished with Butter Strewsel,
FI Deliciously Tendor Apple
£ dau M EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Paradise Brand Strawberry Regularly 54c per dozen,
2-lb. A c Assorted Danish Bakery
Preserves 59 Large Cookies
Dog Food e e e e e e e e e 1 3* 16 OZ dozen 39*
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! wi in A kin DCDCI Regularly 89c, 8-inch, Filled with
Pf temf Ilf /Ur AINU rtr 31 Pineapple, Cherry or Blueberry
c,SALE Creamy Cheese Pie
Whole Apricots -** |i V save 2o< on each spk. - *
PrTTjjT^^^^^m
Maxwell House. .i:69 c
ImC I CIIWBW b#, Br m ini EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! Heuseheld Bleach
srr~-r~ ... u < 1 rsHlXj] Penny-Saver... s2s*
vreen reas . *9 j
EVERYDAY LOW PRKEI Jean es Arc Red ml mm , a a
Kidney Beans .. "18* KdC Chunk Tuna 29
a*** EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! White Hawse
C0cktai1'........ ~ 28* Apple Juice .... '-29*
tGIO kWl3
Thursday, January 14,1971, Tha Florida Aliptor,

Page 15



Page 16

I, Tht Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14,1971

No Censorship
For Georgia
Abortion Ad

i all II l
WW^ii|gg

Chicago Toachers
Strike For Pay Hike
CHICAGO (UPI) Teachers
went on strike Tuesday in the
Chicago school system, the
nation's second largest, closing
the city's 533 public schools and
giving 577,000 pupils an
unscheduled holiday.
Mayor Richard J. Daley,
moving quickly to end the
deadlock between the
20,000-member Chicago
Teachers Union (CTU) and the
boarji of education, invited
negotiators to bargain in his
office.
Teachers carrying picket signs
marched around grade and high
schools and the board of
education offices in the
downtown Loop district.
The union's 385 member
house of representatives voted
Monday night to reject the
board's last contract offer, made
earlier in the day.
Ftwtr Draft Dodgers
Flee To Canada
TORONTO (UPI) The flow
of American draft dodgers and
military deserters to Canada has
dropped sharply, partly because
its hard for a young man to get
a job in Canada these days and
because young Americans prefer
to stay home and fight the
system."
The number of young
Americans seeking refuge in
Canada is now only about
onethird the number four
months ago, according to the
Toronto Antidraft Program.
The drop became clear when
the usual Christmas rush failed
to materialize this year, Naomi
Wall, one of the program's
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

ATLANTA (UPI) The. State Board of Regents and editors
of the University of Georgia student newspaper held a
conversation of understanding Tuesday, but the Regents took
no censorship action against the Red and Black for publishing
abortion and contraceptive advertisements.
The boards Committee on Education had been asked by
Regent Roy Harris of Augusta to meet with the editors after the
controversial ads first appeared in October. Harris labeled them
filth.
The advertisement concerning male contraceptives read,
What do you intend to get your girl for Christmas? Pregnant?
Speaking for the board, Education committee Chairman
James A. Dunlap of Gainesville said, We dont doubt you fully
intend to serve the reader. But Dunlap told the students they
should keep public opinion in mind when deciding what to
publish. <
He also said it was his personal opinion the editors should
consider questions raised in the General Assembly when
appropriations for the university are being considered.
Student editor Steve Stewart told the Regents the editors,
when judging the suitability of ads or stories, first consider
does it meet reader requirements.
After the meeting, Stewart said, Im glad there was no
censorship. I felt the Regents were responsible men and just

counsellors, said Wednesday.
There was always an increase
in the number of exiles during
the Christmas holidays of
previous years, she said.
College students facing the
draft have the opportunity to
flee to Canada during their
Christmas vacation from school,
and many military men are on
leave visiting their families at
that time.
The number of new draft
dodgers and deserters visiting the
program's offices has dropped
from about 25 a day in October
to about 8 per day now, she
said, confirming a growing belief
that they no longer view Canada
as the land of hope.
Stone Practices
Government In Sun
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Secretary of State Richard
Stone, governments leading
advocate of government in the
Sunshine" let his actions speak
louder than words today.
Stone called in the capitol
work force and had nine heavy
oak doors removed from his
offices, conference room and
offices of top aides.
The former Miami senator,
who sponsored legislation
banning secret meetings of
public bodies, removed one of
the doors himself.
1 said we would operate with
an open door and without any
closed conferences or secret
meetings and I mean it," he said.
Anyone waiting to see me
can look in and see who I am
talking to, he said. Thats the
way it ought to be.

ROBBIES
BACKi,^
Meals &
TV & BILLIARDi^H
1718 W University Ave.
I 'On The Gold Coast I

Manual Published
For Revolutionaries
NEW YORK (UPI) A
reputable publishing firm said
Wednesday it has published a
manual for revolutionaries
containing instructions ranging
from sabotaging telephones and
destruction of bridges to
mayhem and murder.
Lyle Stuart Inc. said The
Anarchist Cookbook" has come
out in a sl2 hardcover edition
and a $5.95 paperback edition
which will be made available to
university bookshops. The
books author is William Powell,
a student at Windham College,
Putnam, Vt.
According to Powells
forward, he sees his bode as a
useful handbook for the Silent
Msg only when the fascists in
power decide on final
repression of the people."
Peter M. Bergman, head of a
publishing house subsidiary and
author of the book's preface,
said he thinks the book's chief
interest will be for the square
guy who wants to know what is
going on.
There is no political merit in
publishing this book," Bergman
said. It is not a call for action.
For the real hippy and yippy,
especially for the rebellious
student, it hardly contains
anything basic that he does not
already know.
The book instructs in
surveillance, explosives, lethal
gases, wiretapping, electronic
jamming, use of guns and knives,
garroting, and boobytrapping.
It is profusely illustrated with
photographs and diagrams. A

wanted to. ta?k. He pointed out that Tuesdays ResL and. .;
Black carried an abortion ad, but said, I guess we cant ignore
public opinion.
Advertising Editor Jo Ann Rock said the students would,
review their selection policy.
Dunlap told the students during the meeting he felt the
organization that bought the contraceptive ad was an outfit
my instincts tell me is someone making a fast buck. I feel you
are being used.
But Stewart said the ad came from the National Advertising
Agency and had been checked with the Better Business Bureau.
The board also heard several university student body
presidents, including Quinn Hudson of Georgia State in Atlanta,
call for the Regents support in backing a responsible sexual
behavior and health education program on all the State
University System campuses.
We need your help and moral support, Hudson said. The
program he outlined called for approval of The Loving Book,
a manual on birth control for college students he said has been
approved by several clergymen and Planned Parenthood.
Chancellor Dr. George Simpson generally approved the
program but said each university would have to work out
specifics. He said the program had no real basic problem.

lengthy section on drugs gives
formulas for making LSD and
cooking with marijuana and
harshish.
Calley Obeyed Orders
Trial Witness Says
FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI)
A witness testified Tuesday that
Ist Lt. William L. Calleys task
force commander called for
action against the village of My
Lai because Americans were
losing too many men there to
the Viet Cong.
Somethings going to have to
be done about that damn
village, David B. Hein, 23, of
Janesville, Wis., quoted the task
force commander, Lt. Col.
Frank Barker, as saying about a

GOT A SICK LITTLE FOREIGN
CAR ON YOUR
PBT We've got the parts so you can
m make it better, or you can bring
it to us and well fix it for you.
YATES AUTO PARTS 372*636 |
by Roffhr
MAKES LONG HAIR
LOOK GREAT!
Nw Roffter Styles for all hair lengths, all age groups
B Whether you're a student, a young executive, a
businessmen even 13 years oM and under
Roffter has developed styling systems for every
young man who prefers long heir. Neck length,
shoulder length. Just as long as you like. The
AVANTELOOK for long hair will
University Plaza
Men s Barber & Style Shop
Specialists In Mtr itrwightning
1620 W. University Ave. Pbone 373-1106

week before the alleged massacre
at My Lai.
Calley is charged with
premeditated murder of 102
Vietnamese civilians on March
16, 1968, the day his platoon
made a sweep through the village
to clear out the enemy.
The name of the deceased
Barker also cropped up Tuesday
at the My Lai court-martial of
Sgt. Charles E. Hutto at Ft.
McPherson in Atlanta.
A witness testifying for
Hutto, who is charged with
attempt to commit murder and
assault, said Barker observed the
My Lai sweep from a helicopter
and expressed satisfaction with
the way it was carried out.
Barker was killed about three
months after My Lai in a
helicopter crash.



UTCn mwrewni mnv SAIUnUAY --
H^^B7S^* W, I,U W '' ~ ~j£l B 3736 NEWBERRY ROAD
Price* affaetfva tliru Tuas., Jan. IS, 1871.
CHANGE TO BIG STAR...
AND KEEP THE CHANGE!
SAVINGS UNUMITED! /j^^|
I How often have you seen a marked-down price in a food wf
HI store and then read the fine print about "limit of one with jBBF
I a $5.00 purchase?" This won't happen to you at Big Star in xHCc, a
I Gainesville. Buy all you want. The low price is good on Isrv
I 0116 r a dozenl Spend a few dollars or a few cents... no \p
minimum purchase required)

HITCH YOUR SAVINGS TO A STAR!
EXTRA VALUE BUYI U-S.OA.: CHOICE BEEF
CHUCK ROAST 48<
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI FLORIDA GRADE "A" FRESH (POLY BAG)
Whole FRYERS 29<
EXTRA VALUE BUYI US.D.A.: CHOICE BEEF RIB.
Steak or Roast 98<

EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 22 omfto ON DETERGENT
TIDE "XK SS^:6st
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 4 canto ON RED PACK
CAN TOMATOES 303 CAN 13*
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 6 cento ON ORCHARD CHARM
GFRUIT JUICE . 39<
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 6 canto ON CAMPBELL*
TOMATO SOUP Si UX
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 5 canto ON RED GATE
KIDNEY BEANS £l2
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 7 canto ON OUR PRIDE WHITE
FRESH BREAD SS 19<
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 8 CENTS OfFOUR PRIDE 100%
WHEAT BREAD St 25<
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 20 canto ON COFFEE
MAXWELL HOUSE JS69<
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 26 canto ON
WESSON OIL ; 88{
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 14 CENTS ON OVEN-KRISP
FRESH SALTINES Hi 19<
r
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI
OLD MILWAUKEE TAB-TOP CAN
SAVE 30< AT BIG STAR!

BBBbhb ABB M ' JBBBI
mH Jim BUM'' Jj§ttjfH Jm B B Bym JHE Jb JhLk H B am B B B H
Isl B| B IVp Bk in 11 BB flB Bi fl 88811 B BB fl fl fl fl fl fl flB fli fl fl fl
p |BBI m fl fl In fl I flgfl 188 fl fl fl k 0 0

EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 30 CENTS ON INSTANT
NESCAFE SESF sp9
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 60 canto ON
FAB DETERGENT*99c
BIG CAN MAKES %-GALLONI WHOLE SUN FROZEN
ORANGE JUICE 16-OZ. CAN 33<
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE -SAVE 3 nto ON FARM CHARM
CANNED MILK c 13
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 10 canto ON OUR PRIDE
ICE MILK CARTON 49$
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 10 canto ON OUR PRIDE
ICE CREAM CARTON 59$
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI MORTON ASSORTED FROZEN
MEAT POT PIES B EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI INTERSTATE FROZEN POTATOES
FRENCH FRIES % 19{
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 20 canto ON CREAM-WHITE
SHORTENING as 59<
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI HEINZ ASSTD. STRAINED
BABY FOODS % 7<
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI
*>
FRESH HOMOGENIZED GRADE "A
Ml LK-$1.09
HALF-GALLON CARTON

Thurtday, January 14,1971, The Florida Alligator, I


I EXTRA VALUE BUYI I
1 FROSTY MORN SMOKED PORK 1
I PICNICS I
I 38< |
I EXTRA VALUE BUY! 1
I KELLEY'S SLICED BREAKFAST I
I BACON I
I 1-LB. PKG. I
k|
f
i| EXTRA VALUE BUYSI I
> I Your Choice . Sunshine Brandi
r
J *GREEN BEANS WITH PORK I
s I TURNIP GREENS WITH PORK I
I *TURNIP GREENS WITH ROOTS I
I cCOLLARD GREENS WITH PORK I
I BEANS WITH PORK I
I PORK AND BEANS I
r| YOUR CHOICE! 4AI I
I NO. 300 CAN HIP |
I Sav# Up To 7< IUV I
I EXTRA VALUE BUY! I
I LARGE FARM GOLDEN NINE f
I BANANAS I
I 9< |

Page 17



The
.Florida
Alligator

FACE MISSISSIPPI STATE TONIGHT
;' t :
Gators Looking To End Losing Streak

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Florida will be out to snap a
three game losing streak tonight
in Florida Gym when they face
Mississippi State in Southeastern
Conference game.
Following losses to Alabama,
Kentucky and Tennessee on the
road, Florida will try for its
third SEC victory of the year
against a hustling Bulldog team.
THEY DONT possess the
talent which Kentucky and
Tennessee have, Gator coach
Tommy Bartlett said, but they
gave both teams a run for their
life.
They had Kentucky down
by 13 points at one time and
seven at the half before losing
and they did defeat Tennessee
by two points last week,
Bartlett said.
I consider Kentucky and
Tennessee the best teams in the
conference now and Mississippi

Rugby Teams First Match
Saturday At Norman Field

Special To The Alligator
The UF Rugby Team gets
bade into full swing Saturday at
Norman Field when they face
challengers from the University
of South Florida beginning at 2
p.m. with a second game
scheduled for 3:30 pjn.
The B-team from Florida will
partidpate in the third meeting
of the 1970-71 season, as
Florida won the two previous
meetings, once at Tampa.
In the 3:30 game, the Gator
A-team will meet the Atlanta
Rugby Club.
ATLANTA IS considered to
be one of the strongest teams in
the Southeastern Conference
and has the most experience in
meets. This particular club was
formed 15 years ago.
Presently, the Gators field
one of the best teams it has had
in the short history of the dub.
Since the beginning of the
quarter, the ruggers have had
from 35 to 40 players attending.
Several players from last
years highly successful (8-1)
team who were unable to play
during the last quarter, have
returned to the team.
PLAYER-COACH Phil Wyatt
believes his team is improving
constantly, although it will be
difficult to improve much on
last quarters 8-1 record. The
Gators only loss last quarter
came in a close away game with
the University of South
Carolina.
Wyatt expressed a great deal
of confidence that his Gators
will be ready to handle both
teams Saturday afternoon.
To lead the cheers, the varsity
cheerleaders will be on hand

- - - r-r-

msm msmm
m msmm |
HHI Wt Wm
TONY MILLER
... had 26 in Tennessee
State played right along with
them, he said.
BARTLETT BELIEVED that
Jack Bouldin, Randy Hodges,
Donnie Black and Malcolm
Wesson would give the Gators
the most trouble.
Bouldin, a 5-foot 11-inch

bringing color into the game
with their cheers.
RUGBY MISCELLANEOUS
- During practice last week,
center Fitz Miller, scrum-half
Rick Meatyard, center Kevin
Soden and wing Tom Hestor
have received praise for their
fine work from coach
Wyatt.. Bade from last years
team are Mark McKevers, Tom
Herriot and John
Ebersole... Steve Fuller has
joined the Gators and will be a
player-coach next to Wyatt.

HIINAMZfI
SIRLDIK PIT
where you get a break M
on steak and
j- t i w { Wiyffiifm
Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to
B become their own. I

guard averaged 15.7 points per
game last year, Hodges, 6-3 with
a 13 point average and Black,
6-foot guard, all are returning
from last year. Wesson stands
6-5 and was the second leading
scorer for the Bulldog freshman
team last year.
Bartlett will start the same
five he has gone with the past
couple of games with Tony
Miller and Gary Waddell leading
the way.
MILLER FINISHED with 26
points in Tennessees shoot-out
while Waddell had 23. Earl
Findley was also in double
figures in Tennessee adding 12.
Mississippi State was picked
the worst team in the SEC
before the season started but
have surprised rivals in the
league with their style of play
this year.
Those not being able to make
the game at 8 p.m., radio station
WRUF will broadcast the game
beginning at 7:55.

Fuller has had about 15 years of
playing experience and will be a
great asset in both his playing
and coaching abilities, Wyatt
said.
Rugby Club
Winter and Spring
Feb. 6-Pensacola
20-U. of Miami
27-U. of Ga. (Athena)
2 8-Atlanta (Atlanta)
Mar. 6-NC State
27 & 28-Second Annual Gator Rugby
Invitational Tournament
Apr. 10-S. Carolina
May 2 & 3-Gold Coast (Miami)

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator. Thuiaday, January 14.1971

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CHUCK KELLER
Sports Editor



Sw i m Fins Co I d 1
\
But Show Goes On
Despite cold temperatures this winter quarter, the UF Swim Fins, a
synchronized female club, are busy preparing for their annual spring
show.
The group meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the University Pool
WE HAVE 25 girls in the club now, faculty advisor Miss Dorothy
Shields said. But we would like to have 30 or so, because it would
make it easier for production time.
Membership is open to any interested UF girl, with or without
experience.
You just have to know how to swim just be an average
swimmer, Miss Shields said. Well teach the rest youll need to
know.
THE SPRING production is the highlight of the years activity.
Costumes and choreography are developed by the members.
Other shows are performed during the year for special convention
requests, homecoming and Alumni Association gatherings. Last year
the Swim Fins performed for the Florida League of Municipalities in
Daytona Beach and a recreational conference.
The year before they appeared on the Mike Douglas television show
at Cypress Gardens.
Our main purpose is to entertain for the UF community, Miss
Shields said. The other is just a sideline.
The club is supported by intramural funds.

Carnes Introduces
t
7l UF Track Team

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
They love to run in the sun,
said UF track coach Jimmy
Carnes. The weather is a big
factor in our recruiting.
The state sportswriters
touring the Gator track facilities
Tuesday were probably
convinced.
The temperature was a balmy
70: attractive coeds stood
around the track and Blood,
Sweat and Tears was playing on
the Public Address system.
Quite a recruiting gambit,
especially if the prospect is from
snow covered New York or
Pennsylvania.
THE TUESDAY tour was
designed so Carnes could show
off his 1971 squad, a group that
currently includes the leading
collegiate pole vaulter in junior
Scott Hurley, an All-American
half miler in junior Edmann
OKeeffee, and one of the top
two mile relay teams in the
country.
Carnes is proud of his current
squad, and of the way they
have developed into one of the
top collegiate squads in the
country.
Weve been in the top 10 or
12 teams in the country the last
few years, Carnes said, and
weve got the countrys best
schedule.
CARNES IS aiming for the
top with the Gators, looking
for athletes who can win a

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national title for Florida.
In the attempt, Carnes has
looked as far as Dublin, Ireland,
and as near as his own campus.
Half miler OKeeffee is the
Irishman, and admittedly hadnt
heard too much about UF
before coming here.
BUT HIS PREP coach in
Ireland wrote a friend of Carnes
about the promising young
runner, and Carnes signed him to
a scholarship.
Bingo the Gators had their
first Irish All-American. At the
other extreme, Nat Jenkins was
discovered in a campus physical
education class after he ran a
10.5 100-yard dash in tennis
shoes and with a stand up start.
CARNES SAYS the
Jacksonville freshman who had
trouble in high school basketball
with his elbow hitting the rim
might just develop into an
outstanding collegiate high
jumper.
Although Carnes is aiming
toward a national title in a few
years, he hasnt been able to
break Tennessees stranglehold
on the SEC championship.
But he says the Vols, who
have won six straight titles since
1964, can be taken this year
although theyre better than
ever.
HE ADDS however, that the
league has become so much
better balanced that LSU,
Alabama and Kentucky all have*
a shot at it.

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FIVE OF THE UF SWIM FINS WHO PARTICIPATED AT CYPRESS GARDENS
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Thursday, January 14,1971, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, January 14, 1971

Gators Had Queen Os Spades On Road

If the game was hearts, the
Florida Gators started this past
weekend off with the queen of
spades and rounded up the other
hearts in the deck except one
before the round was over.
But in actuality the game was
basketball and the Gators were
going to Lexington, Kentucky to
face the Wildcats and then on
Sunday, would travel to
Knoxville, Tenn. to play the
Volunteers.
DONT FORGET these games
were on the road, and that is not
the Gators bag. UF has won
only one game on the road in
the past two years.
Against Kentucky in
Memorial Colisium, the Gators
had problems containing Tom
Parker, Larry Steele, Mike
Casey, Tom Payne and just
about the rest of the team.
Parker, Steele and Casey all
were hitting from Cincinnati and
were going to the boards if their
shots happened to miss, which
was not often.
WHEN KENTUCKY coach
Adolph Rupp decided to rest his
first team with 10 minutes
remaining in the game, two of
his reserves hit for double
figures. Jim Andrews was the
most impressive with his tip-ins
and shooting from around the
key.
We had to contain the tempo
JIMMY ENGLAND
... leader of shoot-out
FSU Proxy
Takes Ban
Off Recruiting
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Restrictions which kept Florida
State University basketball
coach Hugh Durham from
recruiting for one year, have
been lifted.
FSU president Stanley
Marshall placed the restrictions
on Durham after the school was
put on NCAA probation on
charges of violations in
)asketball recruitment.
Although restrictions are off
the coach immediately, the
NCAA probation will continue
through this season.
Marshall said he is lifting the
one-year restriction because
during the year Durham and
others associated with the
basketball program had observed
the letter and spirit of the
NCAA regulations and those of
the university.

LOSING STREAK AWAY CONTINUES

MARTY
PERLMUTTER
of the game in order for us to
win, Gator head coach Tommy
Bartlett said. We were doing it
all right for the first 10 minutes
of the game. But we missed a
couple of shots and committed
three turnovers and the game
was finished for all practicle
purposes.
Bartlett was one of the few
coaches that had beaten Rupp
the same number of times as the
Baron had defeated his rival (the
series was tied at four wins
before the game).
Sunday, the Blue Goose took
the Gators and the rest of the
entourage that made the trip to
artificial Knoxville.
IN JUST ABOUT every aspect
of the Volunteer athletic
program, Tartan surfaces come
into play. The football stadium
has the rug, the track is artificial
and the basketball court is also
made by Monsanto. I was
beginning to wonder whether
the swimming pool was also
Tartan.
When the Gators arrived in
Big Orange Country, they had
99 points with the queen sitting
VOLS BIG THREE
,
MIKE EDWARDS
... accomplice in 61.4%

Atmosphere? You'll find it just as appealing as the Maadarin Chinese
cuisine at Lisa's House of Bamboo. Were not sure whether our dragon will
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youll find our service superb. If dining out is not your preference, shop
from our Chinese dellicatessan. Whatever the case, well be expecting
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in their hand (hearts is played to
100 and the player that reaches
that mark first, loses).
The Gators had the losing
streak going full steam when
they entered Stokely Center for
the game. Plus the Tartan
surface, a jinx for the football
team this year, and the history
of Vol-Gator games in Tennessee
were against Florida.
The record book shows that
Florida last defeated the Volsin
Tennessee in 1963.
The first minutes of play
demonstrated to the fans that
this years version was going to
be a shoot-out.
JIMMY ENGLAND, Dick
Johnston and Mike Edwards
were hitting from farther out
than Casey and Steele was for
Kentucky as the Vols rolled up a
phenominal 61.4 per cent
shooting from the field.
It seems that everytime we
shoot good enough to win, the
other team comes up with
something abnormal like 61 per
cent, Bartlett said. The Gators
finished with 54 per cent from
the field, their best percentage
of the year.
Freshmen for the Gators came
out a bit better, splitting their
games with Kentucky and
Tennessee.
D.O U G BROWN was high
for the Baby Gators both games
scoring 23 against Kentucky in a
I g Br*
DICK JOHNSTON
... hit from outside

winning cause and 17 in
Tennessee despite heckling from
a group of students behind the
Gator bench.
The Gators still have a chance

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for a .500 season, but they have
to win on the road. With the
season half over, and only five
games left on the road, it looks
like Florida has an advantage.