Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Report Questions Auditorium Suitability

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Writer
A report has been sent to the Public Functions
Committee by Public Functions Manager Eleanor Roberts
questioning the suitability of University Auditorium for
rock concerts after the one held Saturday night..
ACCORDING TO Bruce Nearson of the Rose
Community Center, Mrs. Roberts told me that
University Auditorium was not suited for this type of

W§k 'jSPifaHk
DAVE SMITH
.. of Service Employes Union

* *
Official Foresees
No Union Friction

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
Willie B. Richardson,
president of the Service
Employes Union Local 626 said
Tuesday he hopes to work
together with Teamster
Representative John McLaughin
to get the workers organized on
the UF campus.
< 1 DONT CARE what union
the workers join, as long as there
is a union on the campus,
Richardson said. The two
unions can work together. We
are here to help one another
with brotherly love.
Richardson pointed out the

Committee On Marijuana
Hopes To Lower Penalty

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
A Student Government move
to recommend to the state
legislature lower penalties for
those convicted of possession of
marijuana was announced
Monday by UF Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder.
A-study committee headed by
Savant President Sue Johnson is
being set up Uhlfelder said, and
is endorsed by Savant, UF
womens service honorary.
THE MARIJUANA study
committees function will be
gathering and correlating
information pertaining to
various aspects of marijuana use
such as physical and

-m Hi
I
JOHN McLAUGHIN
.. of Teamsters

efforts to organize the workers
should not be hampered by the
fact he and McLaughin are
working for two different
unions.
WE WANT both the Service
Employes Union and the
Teamsters to be as one, and all
we are interested in is organizing
the workers, he said.
Richardson said the hopes of
the workers to get a union on
campus have built up, but we
cant do anything until we hear
from Gov. (Reubin) Askew. I
feel they (the workers) have
trust in me, and I love them for
this.

psychological effects. But the
primary emphasis will be on
legal aspects, according to
Uhlfelder.
Were not debating whether
marijuana is good or not, but
whether the penalty fits the
crime, Miss Johnson said.
A psychologist from UF
mental health services has
already expressed interest in
serving on the committee, Miss
Johnson said. 0
UHLFELDER SAYS he is
looking for a highly competent
committee, eight or 10 in
number, and interested students
should contact Miss Johnson at
the SG offices located on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
Hopefully the committee will'

music because of the food and smoking. We have never
had any complaints before at other concerts, and we
cleaned up ihe building afterwards better than it was
before the concert.
Nearson added that, if University Auditorium is no
longer open for rock concerts, this type of entertainment
will be completely eliminated from UF.
We are negotiating now to get big name groups from
California for less than a dollar per student. But if we

The
Florida Alligator

V01.63,N0.59 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, January 12, 1971

ORGANIZERS ARGUE
Unions' Struggle
Sparks Charges
_

By JANET OLES
Alligator Staff Writs*-
The controversy between two national unions
over the representation of non-academic employes
on campus continues with organizer Dave Smith
levying explosive charges against Teamster
Representative John McLaughin.
McLaughins recent return to campus to organize
employes under the Teamsters Union met with
immediate reaction from Business Manager Dave
Smith of the existing Service Employes Union.
SERVICE EMPLOYES is the only chartereu
union on campus, claims Smith. There would be no
confrontation whatsoever only one union with
800 to 1,000 members.
Smith cited the only crucial issue as McLaughins
legal right as only one Teamster organizer to
challenge an established union.
He is attacking a local union, attacking me
personally and I am presuming he is hoping to split
members away from the Service Employes Union,
asserted Smith.
McLAUGHIN, HOWEVER, contends that he laid
the groundwork for the existing union and received
approval, while Smith finds McLaughins hand in
the union formation as being highly exaggerated.
McLaughins personal role in forming the

be set up by the end of the week
and can start work at the
beginning of next week.
It is Uhlfelders intention that
the committee report will be
ready by the end of the quarter
in order to present it to the state
legislature when it convenes in
April.
HE SAID HE has already
talked to legislators from
Alachua and Dade counties who
said they promised there will be
attempted legislative changes
this year.
Uhlfelder said the study
would aid in bringing to light a
more legal and rational
approach to the problem.
People would respect laws
more if they were rational,
Uhlfelder said

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

JUI* Ms! ~, -\~ r
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'/*&; : ?H,f?.o I pi 1 1 fsapyL
1 '* *-, f> * V ,, ? t% 1 t O \'
TERRYWALTERS
o, ' "J' ;
STEVE UHLFELDER
... a legal and rational approach to marijuana

can't use the auditorium the students will have to suffer
for it, Nearson said.
I Ihinlqits very convenient for them to stop us now
with Interfratemity Frolics and our concert coming at the
same time, he said.
According to Mrs. Roberts, Nothing has been decided
yet. All I did was make a report questioning the suitability
of the building.
The Public Functions Committee will meet either
Thursday or Friday to make its decision on the matter.

Service Employes Union is greatly overstated,
Smith said. McLaughin along with a number of
others helped to get the union started, but the
groundwork was done by workers on campus and
by no one individual.
Under McLaughins plan for a Teamsters Union
(Mi campus, all affairs would be run out of Orlando
where the local Teamsters headquarters is situated,
Smith said.
GAINESVILLE NEEDS a local union, Smith
claims. The only effect I can see this having is
splitting and dividing the union so no work can be
done.
Possibly the most fiery issue of the union debate
is McLaughins contention that white workers will
not organize under Smith because of his beliefs and
his feelings that black workers arc not receiving
sufficient benefits either.
This (establishing a new union) is an obvious
attempt, responded Smith, to divide black and
white workers at a time when what is needed is a
feeling of unity. He further charged McLaughin
with using racism and political ideology to cover
up what hes doing which is weakening an existing
union. Hes splitting and dividing workers, stirring
up race hatred and doing his best to destroy union
movement on this campus.



Tha Florida Alltgator, Tuesday, January 12, 1971

Page 2

Earnest Students Can Obtain Jobs

By MARIANNE MACINA
Alligator Writer
i
Are you one of those college
students who has been thinking
about getting a part-time job
after classes?
if you are, and if youve tried
to find a job on the UF campus
or in Gainesville youve probably
come up against a brick wall.
The part-time employment
situation is tight for students
due to the fact that most of the
jobs are filled by the time winter
quarter begins..
ACCORDING TO Ira D.
Turner, director of Financial
Aid, students who are sincerely

IFC Named Best In U.S.

University of Floridas
Interfraternity Council, in
competition with 400 other
divisions throughout the
country, walked away with the
1970 Iron Man Award for the
best overall council in the
nation.
The award was presented at
the annual National

Meditation Course Offered

The Student's International
Meditation Society (SIMS), a
new organization on campus this
quarter, will present an
introductory lecture on the
principles and practice of
transcendental meditation as
taught by Maharishi Mahesh
Yogi Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in
room 349 Reitz Union. Barbi
Lucas, who was trained by the
Maharishi, will be the guest
lecturer.
The purpose of SIMS is to
help every individual expand his
mind, develop his creative
intelligence and make use of his
full potential in studies, career,
and personal life through regular
practice of meditation.
TRANSCENDENTAL

(second time around)
TRYOUTS NOW FOR PLAYS
EUGENE IONESCO ROBERT PINGET
LESSON ARCHITRUC
WED# THURS FRI JAN 13, 14, 15
7PM- 9PM APT 101 TOWER B (EAST)
ACTORS MAKE-UP LIGHTING PEOPLE NEEDED
ALL WELCOME CALL 392-6047
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

interested in finding a job
usually are able to obtain one
through the office of Student
Financial Aid.
There are some 2,000
students working at part-time
jobs on campus, Turner said.
Job seekers call in to our office
about every 20 minutes and
those who really want to work
find jobs. Turner also
commented that at the present,
the financial aid office has
interviews planned for the next
four days. We have about 15
openings for some 200
applicants at the moment. This
is because most of the jobs were
filled Fall Quarter.

Interfraternity Council
conference which was held Dec.
10-14 in San Francisco.
COMPETITION WAS BASED
on status reports submitted to a
judging committee consisting of
the organization and goals of the
IFC.
The Director of the National
Interfratemity Council stated

me d itat ion is a means for
improving the quality of action
by developing full mental
potential and maximum ability.
The practice also produces a
greater success in all actions and
a deeper feeling of fulfillment.
Other benefits that have been
noted are increased energy,
general improvement of health
and relief of tension.
The practice of transcedental
meditation has been gaining
much support in other parts of
the country and some
institutions have even offered
accredited courses in this area.
Currently, UF has
approximately 50 meditators.
Further inquires may be
addressed to SIMS, 1400 Scott

C
BOTH UF departments and
employers around the city
phone in to the financial aid
office when they have job
openings.
. We have found, Turner
stated, that the best job
opportunities for students who
want to work off-campus
part-time are with the food
chains, the stores in, the
Gainesville Mall and in the two
local shopping centers. In fact,
we have 500 students working in
Gainesville this year.
Turner commented that the
student loan situation at UF this
year is the best it has been. We
are continuing to accept

that he was looking primarily for
innovative programs within the
councils and called Floridas
presentation the best ever
submitted.
Service to both the
community and university and
future programs within IFC also
played an integral part in the
judging.

Blvd., Decatur, Ga. 30030 or to
Barbi Lucas, Rt. 1, Box 340,
Micanopy, Fla. 32667.

SG Furnishing Campus *Bitch Booths

Student Government will set
up bitch booths starting
Wednesday for students to do
just that.
Armed with a list of all SG
projects, senators and cabinet
members will be at the booths in
the Little Hall courtyard and the
Graduate Library colonade from

iwmms
We Want You MW
it
Youre majoring in SWSMJÂ¥WSS And
You want to Experience the Business World
We offer TtQffl
JO
Speakers, Parties, Athletics,Field Trips,Contacts
If you want this AKY wants YOU
Come to the Union Tomorrow, Wednesday,
Jan. 13, 7:30 pm in Room 122-123.
Refreshments.
A Ks. tl Professional Business Fraternity

*
financial aid applications for the
current year and we are halfway
through applications for
7l-72.
If students apply now for
financial aid for next year they
will receive a formal reply by
March. If they wait much longer,

| tarzan Soon
i Back In Action j
85 1
" * ;
x For the past two months, J. Hillis Miller Health Center has j
g: been the home of critically burned actor Steve Hawke. i
g: Hawke, who was playing Tarzan when his stage literally i
g: caught fire, is now recuperating from his injuries. i
g: HAWKE ENTERED .the hospital two months ago with
g: third-degree burns over 70 per cent of his body. The accident i
g: occurred in Rainbow Springs while shooting a torture scene
| with Jane. j
x I was bowing down to the ground when it happened, j
g Hawke said. Some guy was spraying gasoline as they lit a j
g match, and the whole place burst out in flames. I just couldnt j
g get out, and when it was all over, Jane (Kitty Swan) and I were j
g severely burned. j
$: This would have been Hawkes second Tarzan movie. His j
g first, King of the Jungle, marked the 16th man to play the j
g traditional ape-man role. Hawke has also completed aTV movie, j
g Island of the Lost.
g: CHEETA, Tarzans right-hand chimp, was missing from King \
g of the Jungle. They replaced him with a talking parrot, j
g Hawke said. > j
g The accidental fire and resulting hospitalization, has left
g Hawke 50 pounds lighter, and, at present, unable to walk. \
g I hope to be out around the first of February, Hawke said, \
but Ill be disabled for quite a while. Theyre just finishing the j
ij: skin grafts. ;
I went to the UF hospital because, at the time, I couldnt be j
;i;i moved and it was closest and the best. :

t
10:30 am -1 pm. daily. They
will listen to any gripes and
suggestions or answer any
questions. There will also be
pencils and paper for any
written suggestions.
Were setting up these
booths because not enough

they will have a harder time
getting the aid and will probably
have to wait longer for a reply.
According to Turner the
financial aid office has received
1,000 applications for 7l-72
already. We work on a first
come, first serve basis.

L
people come up to SG to make
any suggestions, Craig Hunter,
SG secretary of the interior,
said. Were hoping to get a
response from the students
outside SG.
If the booths get a large
response they will be continued.



Ricci, Profs
To Discuss
Urban Design

Peace Corps
4
Offers New
*r
Program
Do you want to go to Latin
America and at the same time
teach mathematics or science? If
you do, attend the State
University of New York at
Brockport.
Brockport, in conjunction
with the Peace Corps, is
extending a four year program in
which graduates of the program
serve in Latin America. The
students earn college credit
while preparing to teach math or
science.
THE PROGRAM consists of
one academic year flanked by
two summers of fully subsidized
and integrated academic courses
and Peace Corps training.
The Brockport Program is the
only one to grant full academic
credit for Peace Corps Training.
Graduates may receive either an
A.B. or B.S. degree or secondary
school teacher certification.
They also receive an assignment
overseas to a bi-national
educational team. While
overseas, the volunteer may earn
up to 12 hours of graduate
credit.
The Peace Corps office in
Tallahassee said that this is the
only program of its type and
that no plans were being made
to instigate such a program in
Florida.
I josh I
I is not a f

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Win Editor
A panel of 14 professors from eight disciplines
will participate in an Urban Design Dialogue
with Dr. Leonardo Ricci, UF research
professor, beginning Wednesday to discuss urban
problems in the state and, specifically, urban
design for this campus. **
The dialogue will be held bi-monthly on
Wednesdays in Room 105 B of the Architecture
and Fine Arts Complex at 7:30 p.m.
THE PURPOSE of the dialogue will be to
familiarize students and faculty with Riccis
work and to provide feedback concerning
approaches to specific problems, according to
Bill Henry, a graduate assistant who is helping
organize the dialogue.
The feedback will consist of a dialogue
between Ricci and urban experts representing the
social and applied sciences, with the professions
of law, engineering and architecture and with
students and faculty who attend.
A portion of the dialogue will be devoted to
urban design on the UF campus.
HENRY SAID those attending will be
exposed to alternatives different from those
they have been accustomed to in urban design.
They will see a re-organization of this university,
not only in physical organization of the campus,
but of the functional organization as well.

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The dialogue will also be a testing ground for
new ideas in urban design, according to Ricci.
I would like to test the designs we have
developed with the professors in the other
disciplines from both a scientific and urban point
of view, he said.
RICCI ALSO said it is important for students
to attend the dialogue because they are the
users of the university, and they can collaborate
very well (about the feasibility of the urban
designs for UF.)
Panel members will critique proposals made
concerning urban design from the viewpoint of
their different disciplines. Students and other
faculty members will also be able to criticize and
question the proposals during the dialogues.
The dialogues will be held five times for two
hours each time. They will be held on Jan. 13,
Jan. 27, Feb. 4, Feb. 18, and March 3.
The professors participating in the dialogue
include: Mr. Arnold Butt, chairman,
Architecture; Dr. Richard French and Dr. Irving
Goffman, chairman, Economics; Dr. Martin A.
Eisenberg and Dr. Joseph A. Wattleworth,
Engineering; Mr. Joseph Little and Mr. Robert C.
Moffat, Law; Dr. James C. Brown, Philosophy;
Dr. Ernest R. Bartley, Dr. Thomas Henderson
and Dr. Frank Munger, Political Science; Dr.
Stephen T. Margulis and Dr. William C. Mottola,
Psychology; Dr. Felix Bernardo and Dr. Joseph
S. Vandiver, Sociology.

Tuesday, January 12,1971, The Florida Alligator,

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mm.'
Ipf |B|
W- Ml
iv*
BUraBL \ 81 I
LEONARD RICCI
... heads up urban dialogue

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 12,1971

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public
Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union.
Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator Is
the previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous
Wednesday at noon.

CLASS RELOCATIONS FROM
ANDERSON HALL
FROM TO
AND 2 CRB 201
AND 4 CRB 240
AND 5 CRB 340
AND 7 GIS 101
AND 18 GIS 137
AND 20 GIS 190
AND 110 GIS 108
AND 112 L88W144
AND 115 BRY 219
AND 201 BRY 223
AND 203 GIS 109
AND 209 GIS 129
AND 210 MUS 371
AND 211 MUS 210
AND 212 MIL 9
AND 306 GIS 106
AND 307 GIS 128
AND 311 GIS 130
EH 312-DELL
English 312-DELL which meets
Monday from 1-3 p.m. will meet
in Arts and Sciences Bldg, room
125.
EXTRACURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES PARTICIPATION
To hold any elected or
appointed office in any
extracurricular activity, a
student must be free of
disciplinary, scholarship,
academic or admissions
probation. He also must be
classified as a full-time student
enrolled in a minimum of 12
hours.
In exceptional circumstances
a student not eligible to hold an
elected or appointed office may
obtain information on seeking a
waiver by contacting the Office
for Student Development.
LIBRARY HOURS
Library East: Mon.-Sat. 8
a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun., 2-11 p.m.
Library West: Mon.-Sat., 8
a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun., 2-11 p.m.,
P.K.Y. Lib. and Special
Collections, Mon.-Fri., 8:30
a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 8:30 a.m.-12
noon.
Architecture & Fine Arts:
Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; 7-10
p.m. Sat., 8 a.m.-12 noon; Sun.,
6-10 p.m.
Chemistry: Mon.-Fri., 8
a.m.-5 p.m.; 7-10p.m.; Sat., 9
a.m.-12 noon; 1-4 p.m.; Sun.,
2-5 p.m., 7-10 p.m.
Education: Mon.-Fri., 8
a.m.-5 p.m.; Fri., 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun.,
2-10:30 p.m.
Engineering and Physics:

I Try our low cost auto financing lnterest
If is computed each month on the unpaid
H balance and do you ever save when you
I f SI trade or pay aheadl I Call 392-0393 for cost
before signing papers anywhere else.
vV Payroll deduction available for share and '**
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNIOM
||M| _sH^Avgn>^oMt|>jonw^n2thJtf>t__^^otmjS£Oq : w : j_3jOp : g : H>rrm n h Frijly V_y

Mon-Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; 7-10
p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m-12 noon; 1-4
p.m.; Sun., 2-5 p.m.; 7-10 p.m.
Health and P.E.: Mon.-Thurs.,
8 a.m.-5 p.m.; 6-10 p.m.; Fri., 8
a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-12
noon; Sun. 7-10 p.m.
Health Center: Mon.-Fri.,
8:30 a.m.-12 midnight; Sat.,
8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 2
p.m.-12 midnight.
Hume: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-11
p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun.,
7-11 p.m.
Journalism and
Communications: Mon.-Thurs.,
8 a.m.-5 p.m.; 7-10 p.m.; Fri., 8
a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-12
noon.
Law: Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m.-11
p.m.; Sun., 8:30 a.m.-11 p.m.
Mead: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-4
o
p.m.
Teaching Resources Center:
Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-12 noon; 1-5
p.m.; 6-10 p.m.; Sun. 2-5 p.m.;
6-10 p.m.
FORD FELLOWSHIPS
Mexican American and Puerto
Rican students are eligible to
apply for a Ford Foundation
Fellowship if they ) have
received a bachelor's degree
during the 10 yea< s ending Sept.,
1971, (?) plan to study for a
Ph.D. in humanities, social
sciences or natural sciences, (3)
plan to enter careers in higher
education and (4) have not
previously engaged in
professional or graduate study.
The fellowship, renewable for
a total of five years, covers
tuition, fees, boqks and supplies
and a monthly stipend of $250
plus dependency allowance.
Deadline for submitting
applications is Jan. 31, 1971.
For application forms and
additional information write:
Doctoral Fellowships for
Mexican American and Puerto
Rican Students, The Ford
Foundation, 340 E. 43 st., New
York, N.Y. 10017.
FIREARMS ON CAMPUS
The possession of firearms on
the University campus is
prohibited except when
specifically authorized by this
memorandum or by the
President of the University.
The University campus" is
defined for purposes of this
policy to include those lands
located in the City of
Gainesville, Fla., occupied by
the University of Florida, and
bounded generally by 13th St.

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publicatio.. of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

on the east, University Ave. on
the north, 34th S*. on the est
and Archer Rd. on the south,
including premises occupied by
fraternities and sororities,
officially recognized by the
University whether located on
the University campus itself or
on the periphery.
The term firearm" is defined
for the purposes of this policy to
include pellet guns and similar
weapons.
Campus residents are
permitted to store firearms in an
area designated by the
University Police at the
University Police Station only.
An area for the maintenance and
cleaning of these firearms will be
provided at this designated
storage facility. When removed
from the storage facility for use,
the weapon must immediately
be taken east on Museum Rd.
until past the campus perimeter.
Return shall be along the same
route. An authorization form
must be acquired from the
University Police for possession
of the firearm while traveling
between the storage facility and
the campus perimeter.
Possession of a firearm anywhere
else on campus is prohibited.
Those presently authorized to
possess guns on the campus are
members of governmental
agencies authorized by law to
possess guns, the University
Police, members of the
University Rifle teams, and the
staff of the Florida State
Museum when the guns are apart
of the museum collection and
are for the exhibit purposes or
used in specimen collection.
ROTC cadets may drill with
unloaded rifles which have the
firing pin removed under the
supervision of the ROTC officers
and cadre. Members of the pfle
teams are authorized to have
possession of their firearms only
when under the supervision of
ROTC cadre personnel on the
firing range or in the ROTC
Armory.
Any student or employee,
including faculty, administration
or staff members, shall be
immediately suspended for
violation of this policy. When
made necessary by University
rules and regulations such
suspension shall be interim in
nature until a proper hearing can
be held by the appropriate
hearing body to determine the
facts and circumstances of the
violation.

stiff personnel
column
IF YOU ARE A STAFF EMPLOYEE AT THE UNIVERSITY AND
HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT THE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
AFFECTING STAFF EMPLOYEES, PLEASE SEND IT TO 'THE
STAFF KEY" ROOM 240 HUB. IT IS REQUESTED THAT
QUESTIONS BE LIMITED TO THOSE OF A GENERAL NATURE
AND NOT INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS. SINCE SPACE
LIMITATIONS WILL NOT PERMIT US TO PUBLISH EVERY
QUESTION AND ANSWER, QUESTIONS WILL BE CHOSEN FOR
PUBLICATION BASED ON EXTENT OF INTEREST AND
TIMELINESS.
RETIREMENT
Q. I changed to the new Florida Retirement System. What is the
difference in the rate my retirement benefit will be figures under this
new plan compared to Plan B of the State Retirement System?
A. Under Plan B, if you started working at the University after July
1, 1963, continued working for 10 years or more and reached age 62
or any age thereafter, your retirement benefit rate would be 1.5%.
Under the new Florida Retirement System with 10 years of service
and retirement at age 62, your rate would 1.6%. If you do not retire
until age 63, it's 1.63%. At age 64,1.65% and age 65, 1.68%.
Q. If I work for the University for 10 years and then resign, may I
still obtain a refund of my retirement contributions?
A. Yes. Regardless of the number of years you have worked for the
State, whether you are under Plan A, Plan B or the new Florida
Retirement System, you may request a refund of your retirement
contributions when you leave state employment.
SICK LEAVE
Q. When does a University employee begin earning sick leave and how
much can he accrue?
A. An employee earns eight hours sick leave per month beginning
with the end of his f irst months employment. There is no limit on the
amount he may accrue. This benefit applies equally to the custodial
worker, the tradesman, the office manager every staff employee
and provides for him and his family 100% income protection should
he be unable to work due to illness.

This policy has been
formulated by a committee of
students and faculty which
studies the removal and control
of guns on campus. Its intent has
been endorsed by the University
Senate with the objective of
maintaining this campus as a safe
community, free of violence for
all its inhabitants and whose
who visit within it borders.
Should it be necessary or
desirable for the use of firearms
by any of the academic
programs of the University, then
permission for such use must be
applied for and gran xl by the
Vice President for Academic
Affairs.
STATE AIRCRAFT
The Division of Motor Pool
Department of General Services,
has assigned a Piper Aztec C and

The University Calendar will be
published weekly listing only
events to open to the University
community. Private meeting
notices will be carried in "What's
Happening" on Mon., Wed., and
Fri. and should be submitted to
the Alligator office, 365 Union
or to Public Functions Office,
G-72 Union.

pilot to the Gainesville area
primarily to serve the University
of Florida.
To avoid losing the plane,
University personnel are
requested that before private
arrangements are made for
in-state- round-trip travel
representative of departments
contact the Office of
Administrative Affairs, 202
Tigert Hall, phone 2-1336, for
information and coordination of
travel arrangements.
The cost for the plane is $74
per hour flying time only, and
will be prorated according to the
number of passengers aboard.
COMMENCEMENT COM.
>
The commencement committee
will meet Friday, Jan. 15, at 2
p.m. in Room 313 Stadium.



Married Students To Get Advisor

By ELLI MOSS
Alligator Writar
Married students at UF will
get a full time advisor to counsel
and advise them within a year or
two, said Assistant Dean of
Student Development Donald
Mott.
Twenty-five per cent of all
students of UF are married: 13
per cent of the undergraduates,
and 54 per cent of the graduate
students are married.
ACCORDING TO Mott, UF
has a sorority advisor for 1,000
people, a fraternity advisor for
2,000 and minority advisor for
350, a foreign student advisor
for 1,000 and there are 4,500
married couples on this campus
with no married student
advisor.
Lacking such an advisor, the
Married Student Advisory
Committee was established a few
months ago.
So far the committee has
planned a married student
orientation program which was
held last Thursday night. The
Black Studies
To Sponsor
Symposium
By TERRY TENENBAUM
Alligator Writar
Educators from the Alachua
County School system will
participate in a symposium
entitled Meeting the Needs of
Todays Children Both Black
and White on Wednesday at 8
a.m. in the Norman Hall
Auditorium. The symposium is
open to the public.
The symposium is being
sponsored by the College of
Educations New Elementary
Program Black Studies
Committee as part of its
continuing program in helping
students and the public to learn
more about black culture and to
become more aware of the
problems in educating todays
youth according to symposium
chairman Dr. Robert Blume, UF
assistant professor of elementary
education.
Speakers in the symposium
representing different grade
levels and interests in the field of
elementary education are:
Sherry Newman, Stephen Foster
Elementary School; Rick Fey,
Melrose Elementary; Tom
Coward, dean of students,
Bucholz Jr.-Sr. High and Doris
Welcome, Idyllwild Elementary.
More information about the
symposium may be obtained by
contacting Blume in room 200,
Norman Hall.
NEEDLEWORK
What cozier thing could you do
this winter? The class will be
taught by Mrs. Chs. Buck in
room 118 Reitz Union. Call
372-8037 for information.
Registration is at 7:00 p.m. on
Thursday, January 21. The fee is
$5.00 per person. Sponsored by

committee is presently working
on a handbook.
PEOPLE ON the committee
include Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Black,
Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Kirsch, Mr.
and Mrs. Jerry Yakatan, Manager
of Married Student Housing Leo
Goff, Associate Dean of Student
Development Phyllis Meek,
Student Development Dean
Frank Adams and Mott.
Some of the topics handled
by the Married Student
Committee include where to go
for financial aid, day care
centers and marital adjustment.
EACH RESIDENT area also
has its own mayor and council
to work out such problems as
maintenance and to put out its
own newspaper.
The orientation program for
married students held last week
in the Reitz Union Ballroom was
initiated by Student
Development to welcome UFs
new couples and answer any
questions they might have.
Addressing the students were
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale, Vice

m r.
association
/ 7 / / i \\VA\ \ \ \ \ \ \ H
plus Comedian
Willie Tyler and Lester
Saturday, January 16
v.., j 3 .
i*
at Florida Gym
v /.l ' Tl*
M** i li
/
Arms />v Tickets on sale at:
TWO *5.50 pl* COVIIDI Record Bar Recordsville
SHOWS: 7:30 & 10:30 pm JWRU Box Office
.i. V
.. \ . ..
i

Twenty-five per cent of
all UF students are
married: 13 per cent of
the undergraduates and
54 per cent of the
graduate students are
married.
Donald Mott
President Harry Sisler Dean
Frank Adams, Superintendent of
Schools Tiny Talbot, Pro-tern
Mayor of Gainesville Neil Butler,
Reverend Fred Castor of the
Lutheran Church, and Director
of Student Health Dr. Wilmer
Coggins.
OTHER SPEAKERS included
Personnel Manager Cliff Eagen,
Director of Financial Aid Glenn
A. Steckel, Mr. Leo Goff, Dean
Phyllis Meek and John Dobson,
moderator.
According to Adams there has
been much research done for
married students but not enough
in the way of services.

Castor enlightened the group
about the religious community
serving UF. He said the Lutheran
Center has a day care center and
there are others available for
students throughout Gainesville.
COGGINS ANNOUNCED
that only full time students can
be helped by Student Health
Services but spouses can get help
from the universitys hospital or
Alachua General Hospital.
According to Coggins a
counseling center for the family
unit is in demand, but not
established here yet.
Coggins also urged married
students to consider one of the
insurance policies provided by
Student Government.
GOFF DISCUSSED the
housing shortage and Dean Meek
discussed such student
development services as
educational assistance and
testing, general help and referral
with academic problems and
tutoring.
Eagen discussed employment
opportunities at UF such as
secretaries, clerks, typists, etc.

Tuesday, January 12,1971, The Florida AlNffrtor,

Steckel mentioned loons,
grants, scholarships, and part
time employment available for
students who need financial aid.
After the orientation
program, a panel of married
students answered questions
from the group and discussed
such topics as how to make
quick money. Some of these
ways include selling blood,
cleaning apartments, and being
in experiments.
A picnic is tentatively planned
for third quarter for the married
students.
SG Draft Cornel
To Rosono Work
Draft counseling for UF
students initiated last fall by
Student Government will resume
its services Monday.
Students should call at
392-166 S for appointments or
other information concerning
the service.

Page 5



Page 6

i. Thm Florida AKgator. Tuesday, January 12,1971

ET he millions who are poor
!37J in the United States tend
to become increasingly
CM invisible . .It takes an
effort of the intellect and
will even to see them.
Michael Harrington
EDITORIALS
We Stepped
We are delighted that someone has finally suggested
another registration plan.
The old one early appointments were granted to
students with the highest grade point averages
discriminated against average** students.
The new plan was suggested by Student Body President
Steve Uhtfeklerwith the Student Senates approval.
Beginning in the fall, early appointments will go to
students who have earned 145 hours or more.
The remainder of the student body will be divided into
three groups. Depending on the quarter, each group will
receive early registration appointments.
The new plan is a step towards equality. It is about time
that step was taken.
im 11 w mi mmmmmmmrn
' V'SHrS* 4*'
A OTHER COLLEGES COMMENT
J > V < f
II I
,4:
r
Youth Advance
Has the U.S. Supreme Court guaranteed us a prompt end
to the war in Indochina?
Has the Supreme Court elected a president?
THESE ARE TWO of the many questions posed by a
recent enfranchisement of an additional 10 million
American voters between the ages of 18 and 21 years.
Although it would be premature now to make any
predictions as to the effect of the panels decision to lower
the voting age will have on the 1972 elections, perhaps we
should at least examine the ramifications.
The 5-4 pre-Christmas decision has sparked extensive
speculation by political analysts and we canilot help but
wonder what effect the changes will have on the 1972
campaigns.
FOR THE YOUTH of this country the move has
invalidated many anti-war arguments (i.e. old enough to
fight and die but not old enough to vote). In contrast,
however, now the youth have at least some power in guiding
their destiny.
The only precedents we can use are cases of
enfranchisement in England and the suffrage movement in
this country earlier this century. Neither greatly altered
voting patterns and although it has been about 50 years
since women began voting, we still havent elected a female
President.
We feel that this decision by the Court is the most
important advance young people received last year. If this
ruling had come three years ago, maybe just maybe
Kent State would not have occurred and the Vietnam war
would have already grinded down.
VICE PRESDIDENT Spiro Agnews rhetoric during the
last campaign might have altered somewhat, and the
frustrations of young Americans would have had an outlet
the ballot box.
Some analysts believe that the Republicans will alter
some of their problems with legislation designed to appeal
to the under-2I voter legislation to clean up the
environment and legislation guaranteeing further civil rights.
The ruling could have its effects on what candidates get
the Democratic presidential nomination. According to a
Dec. 3 Harris Poll Sen. Edmund Muskie, (D-Me.) led
President Nixon 49 percent to 22 percent in the poll to
guage how the men stood with the nations young people.
Another poll shows Muskie running behind Sen. Edward
Kennedy.
TENNESSEE DAILY BEACON

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

i*
University Senate Reform

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of two parts of the
Umasity Senate and the need for
a greater student voice in
campus decision-making.)
By BRUCE ALPER
Alligator Columnist
Who really rules the
University? Not the
administration, not the
President, but the University
Senate. While the President does
have ... veto power over the
actions of committees, faculties,
councils, Student Government,
the University Senate, and the
General Assembly one would
be hard pressed to find an
instance of his overruling the
University Senate on any
particular matter.
The senate has jurisdiction
over all matters pertaining to
university-wide policies and
functions not reserved to the
President and his advisory
councils, and the authority to
legislate concerning such matters
and to make rules and
regulations promoting the
general welfare of university
students, faculty and staff.
THE UNIVERSITY Senate
thus determines the curriculum
and outlines basic policies in a
multitude of areas encompassing
university life. By virtue of its
being the highest legislative
body of the university it is
almost totally supreme.
The University Senate and the
various committees which it
controls are without adequate
checks and balances. There is no
countervailing power of any
consequence in existence to

Sam Pepp Editor InTChief ""'iVlanaging'Editor
-
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
E>
Ken McKinnon Loretta Tennant
News Editor News Editor

in m J
1., m
vjjM
influence the decisions of the
University Senate.
It is inevitable that the
problems faced by students,
their grievances, their needs, the
very sources of their
dissatisfaction all these will
never be fully met as long as this
unacceptable state of affairs
continues. Every student (as well
as every open minded faculty
member) who seeks fairness,
academic justice, reform and a
larger voice in determining the
policies which directly affect his
life has a stake in securing a
restructuring of both the
University Senate and the very
process by which decisions are
arrived at.
SELFISH men wont
relinquish their power or change
because they are primarily
concerned With maintaining
their authority in largely
autonomous circles of dictatorial
influence. Cynical men Wont
give up their power or accept a
greater student voice because
they have no faith in the
intelligence or the integrity of
the young.
While the university should be
a model for the society as a
whole it is in truth the most

1

removed from justice, fairness,
equality or representation and
guarantees of due process.
Although its shortcomings and
inadequacies have been pointed
out time and time again, reform
and change have not come from
the University Senate. Why?
Nothing is allowed to reach
us wnich might weaken our
confidence and lower our
morale. To most of us nothing is
so invisible as an unpleasant
truth. Though it is held before
our eyes, pushed under our
noses, ramed down our throats
- we knoW.it not. This from
Eric Hoffer.
THE PROSPECT OF
antagonizing some of the faculty
and perhaps of even provoking
their ill will cannot excuse us
from continuing to seek the
necessary changes. Reform has
never been brought about by
men fearful of making enemies.
Instead, it has succeeded many a
time because of the potential
friends and followers it was
finally able to harness in its
behalf.
In view of the recalcitrance of
the University Senate are we
correct in assuming that what we
need and what we are going to
get at the University of
Florida is a revolution? Are
confrontation and polarization
between students and faculty,
the latter being the object of our
reform efforts, likely in the
future? Tolerant, moderate, and
restrained students can answer
with a no but the matter is
perhaps a bit more complicated
than this.
My next column will delve
into possible avenues of reform
and the dilemma of moderate
students in seeking to implement
change.



By JOHN PARKER
Alligator Columnist
Time.
You remember, like a circle in
a spiral, a wheel within a wheel.
A tunnel that you follow to a
tunnel of its own.
MEANWHILE
OZYMANDIAS crumbles while
the sands stretch away. And
away.
A net, said Kant, upon which
to hand the ribbon of our lives,
is time. But Kant had droopy
socks. So it goes.
Billy Pilgram came unstuck in
time, scampered from one end
of the net to the other. From
cold frozen gut-aching prisoner
of war camp to the

FSM Reply
MR. EDITOR:
Hale has denied FSM its
charter.
The news media have called
this denial a tactical error on the
part of the administration. They
predict a confrontation with an
aroused student body.
Now listen closely to what I
have to say.
There will be no
confrontation. The student body
will not react that way. Listen
while I explain why.
First let me explain why FSM
does not need the universitys
charter.
The reason is that we can
work better off-campus. In fact,
everything thats happening in
Gainesville is happening without

Some ThoughtSAboirt Time

pragmatically attractive arms of
his overweight myopic wife
whose daddy set Billy up in a
lucrative optomotrist business)
in 1965. Unstuck, visiting
moments like relatives at
Christmas. Like death in Our
Town.
Time, said Dunbar angrily.
Yesterday you were stepping out
of high school with your lungs
full of clean air and the closest
you had been to paradise was an
unhooked brassiere. So you do
things to make time go slow.
Like shooting skeet (especially if
you dont LIKE shooting skeet).
WHY? SPUTTERED
Clevinger, who didnt quite
understand why Dunbar could
be so simple-minded. But for all

campus sanction; for examples,
the Food Feasts and the Eye.
And there is a simple reason for
that: to be sanctioned by the
university, an organization must
not make anything happen.
The people who are making
something happen in Gainesville
are not students in the usual
sense. They are just people living
in Gainesville who happen to be
going to school. But nevertheless
they are all essentially
off-campus agitators.
Students are people going to
school here who do not live in
Gainesville. They live in Fort
Lauderdale, Miami, Jacksonville.
Or at least they come from there
- but they probably dont live
there, either.
People who live in a place
want to change it so theyll be
happy living there. Like moving
into an unfurnished apartment
with your own stuff and
re-painting it. A lot of people
dont even know they dont like
always living in someone elses

READERS FORUM

V
f ** I
his intelligence, Clevinger
couldnt answer stupid old
Dunbars unanswerable
response:
What else is there?
Indeed, what else is there? A
friend asked, coming down from

apartment already furnished; a
slot all ready for someone to
plug himself into. They dont
connect the fact that they dont
feel so good about themselves
with the passive way they live in
their places; but the connection
still holds. Those people make
good students. But not such
good people. Not so good for
themselves.
The people making things
happen in Gainesville live in
Gainesville. Theyre trying to
make it their own place with
their own things to do and ways
to do them. No campus campussanctioned
sanctioned campussanctioned organization has ever
been encouraged to do that.
And none has ever done it.
When things have happened
around here, it has always been
started by people who live here
and therefore care how things go
down here.
The students are not going to
confront the administration.
Theyre not going to make
something happen. Students
never do. Its always

By REG CROWDER
Alligator Columnist
Arturo di Broom is the
enfant terrible of street
sweepers.
He bullies. He orders. He rants
He raves.
Evert his friends call him
volatile and unpredictable. He is,
in short, a man who allows
himself to have enemies.
DI BROOM is good and he
knows it. Now going into his late
60s (he claims no one really
masters the broomhandle in less
than 40 and often 50 years), he
has his pick of the streets of the
world.
Oh I suppose I could be a
millionaire if I wanted to go
back into that rat race," he said
softly. Zurich, Berlin, New
York, Rio. They have all mac;
standing offers.
. Di Broom sighed. He nibbled
thoughtfully from a tray of
imported cheeses and sipped
from a brandy sniffer filled with
Chianti and Fresca.
HE LOOKED across the wall,
covered with assorted brooms,
mops, and brushes. Engraved

'Time Sweeps On

Christmas vacation. I just
noticed my parents getting
older, he said. And I cant
remember what I did three days
ago or last year or five years ago.
And my parents are getting older
~nd older and Im starting to
wonder what in the hell is going
on.
SO SLEEP. Sleep the Great
Sleep of Jake the Pragmatic,
Jake the wise, who, being the
governors advisor, knew better
than to fight such things.
Try to fight it and you come
unstuck in time like Billy
Pilgram. Or maybe unstuck like
Benjy, slobbering from the
tragedy of years ago to the
tragedy of yesterday to the
tragedy of now, all sound and

off-campus agitators. Yeah:
boo! Let that blow your mind.
But dont quote me out of
context, because Ive told you
now what that means.
And let it soak in why it is I
can tell you what the students
are or are not going to do. Think
about it.
And if you want to get in on
whats happening, Ive told you
how to do it. You start living
here. You join the off-campus
agitation...
Love, and All Power to the People,
Ex-FSMers
Anderson Fire
Mr. Editor:
Would you be good enough to
print the following statement in
the Alligator:
On behalf of the English
Department and Comprehensive

% t
plates commemorated the
famous impliments.
Autographed photos of the
greatest names in street
sweeping. In the place of honor
a tiny whisk broom with the
message, To my son Arturo, on
his fifth birthday. The streets of
the world can be yours.
On the mantle Di Broom's
memoirs, Time sweeps on.
I don't know myself. 1 am
different each month, each
minute. 1 amaze myself, he
says. How different I can be

Tuesday, January 12,1971, The Ron da Algator,

English Department
departments that suffered the
greatest loss in the recent
Anderson Hall fire we wish to
express our deep appreciation to
the administration, the
maintenance crews, the Police
Department and the Gainesville
Fire Department for the
splendid manner in which
everyone contributed to making
our loss more bearable. We wish
to commend the student body
for their mature conduct and
especially the assistance that
students rendered in helping us
to protect our property and our
records.
As a result of all this splendid
cooperation we shall be able to
continue our work in an orderly
manner with the least possible
inconvenience to all.
Sincerely,
Alton C. Morris,
Chairman, Department of English
James R. Hodges,
Chairman, Comprehensive English

minute to minute! I explode one
minute and kiss the next. I was
born that way.
NOW IN semi-retirement in
Micanopy, he rarely sweeps
streets anymore.
Dont get the idea I'm out of
shape, he warns.
Di Broom has settled into a
vigorous daily regime. He
sweeps his carport and halfway
down the driveway sometimes
going as far as the bird bath for
endurance. Some students are
allowed to watch this.
FOR PRECISION he sweeps
his stone patio and barbecue
grill. But this is a private thing.
Alone.
The movements are so
beautiful, he said. I get very
emotional.
On current events, Di Broom
takes a conservative view.
It is harder today, but a
determined young man can still
become a street sweeper. For
others who dont have it, there
are many other roads to
greatness. Even a concert
violinist can be great, in his own
way.

fury, signifying nothing.
The answer of course,
according to Caldwell (who
always knows such things) is
simply not to think about it.
BECAUSE THERE ARE
those of us who can come
unstuck and fly forward to
death and look back on their
lives like a 1948 musi-tragedy,
and evaluate each maudlin scene,
each with its own stars and bit
players.
So dont think about it.
Because the now of now will
soon be the now of back then,
and then it will be the now of
way back then, and as soon as I
write this, the now of now has
passed. And I have died.
Don't think about it.

Page 7



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average $2.40 each Inc. cartridge.
Quality. For details John 378-5916
nights. (A-st-55-p)
70 Kawasaki 350 Big Horn The
Beautiful woods & enduro machine
Fast light dependable Bored out to
approx 36 H P Call 378-1061
(A-2t-58-p)
Colliers Encyclopedia, childrens
supplement, yearbooks to date and
bookshelf, save money, my credit,
your trip to library. $? call me
378-6900 (A-st-58-p)
Stereo component set-60 watt
Kenwood amp, Sony tape deck & 2
speakers see at No. 4 Frederick
Garden Apts, or call 373-3671
(A-3t-57-p)
TENNIS ANYONEI new and used
rackets 4 sale $5 to S4O also
RACKETS RESTRUNGI LESSONS
call 808 378-7841 (A-3t-57-p)

Page 8

I, The Florid* Alligator, Tuesday, January 12,1971

FOR SALE
1968 Triumph 250, 3000 miles,
excellent condition, new gaskets,
SSOO. 710 NW 14th Ave. Gainesville
(A-6t-55-p)
1968 HONDA cl-90 Less than 4,000.
miles Excellent condition $l6O see at
the CYCLE WORKS 1220 S. Main
St. (A-3t-58-p)
Microscope binocular Graf-Apsco
with B&L optics 2 years old $350
call 372-7607 after 5 or 392-2847
from 8-5 (A-st-57-D)
Sony 230 w Tape Recorder. Like
new, S2OO. Bell & H. movie camera,
S2OO new, asking SSO. 378-7872
(A-st-58-p)
Hollywood set of Ludwigs with
Rogers Dynasonic snare with cases
excellent condition 373-3894 after 6
(A-4t-56-p)
Billiard cues 21 oz adams S2O 19 oz
national tournament sls 19 oz
Willie Hoppe original $25 all
excellent condition. Also TV $5 call
372- (A-st-57-p)
Schwinn 5 speed bike $49 peddle or
ride Solex bicycle with motor S6O
Framus electric quitar and magnavox
amp both for SSO call Alan 378-8378
(A-3t-57-p)
1970 Honda 750 cc 3400 ml. Gold in
excellent condition. Super-fast and
Super-smooth. Only SI3OO. call
373- (David) or (Bob)
(A-st-58-p)
From wall to wall, no soli at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. electric
upholstery shampoos also available
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
1968 Honda 125, very good
condition. Must see to appreciate.
$325 call 373-2771 (a-2t-59-p)
stereo speakers. 2 argos tx-4 3-way
speakers In walnut stain cabinets. 25
x 14 x 9*. both for $75. also study
larftp cost S3O new want sls.
376-6191 (a-st-59-p)
Packard Bell 8-track cartridge deck
for home use. Hardly used. SSO also
vaccuum cleaner sls. Corning Ware
half price. 378-4016(a-st-59-p)

JML < STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
"I RECOMMEND 1776
WITHOUT RESERVATION!
CIlw Barnes, N.Y. Timet
Americas
'fiv Award Winning
Musical
Jan. 30, 8:15 pm Tick,m now on
sale at
Florida Gym
Presented by Student Government Productions

FOR sale
Assembled Dynaco 8 Elco stereo
components for list price of kit. Full
warranty. Call Dave 376-0716 after
5:30 (a-3t-59-p)
PANASONIC Stereo System $250
new, NOW 4 months old and
ASKING S2OO. Has a Turntable and
AM-FM stereo. 378-7743 (a-3t-59-p)
67 VW bus mechanically perfect
stereo tape SIOOO.OO call
372- (a-3t-59-p)
Llke-new 1969 Gibson electric guitar.
Model es-125t; cost $250.00 new but
must sell for only $165.00 Call
William at 376-0406. (a-st-59-p)
FOR REBTT
v.ww.v.%w.v.v.%%%v*v.v.v.w>.w.v.
Roommate needed Immediately.
Landmark apt. $47.50 rent + utilities
call Carlos or Larry at 378-9834 or
come by apt. 88 (b-3t-59-p)
20 Trailer ex. cond. completely self
contained, on shady lot 376-8690
perfect for student (b-3t-59-p)
1 male roommate wanted for La
Bonne Vie apt. 346. call Mark at
373- or come by. also selling 7
reel tapes new at wholesale prices
(b-2t-59-p)
2 bedroom apartment need 1
person to share 373-4283,
376-0635 Butler Garden
Apartments (B-st-56-p)
" J
Need female roommate for lamancha
apt. own bedroom air cond. and
heated $75 a month Including
utilities nice people please call
378-9448 (B-st-56-p)
One two bedroom apt to sublease at
gatortown 309 SW 16th Ave. Call
378-9408 anytime (B-st-56-p)
1 female roommate; Landmark apt.
174; rent $47.50. Call 376-2184.
(B-st-55-p)

FOR FT EBIT
Female roommate needed
I mmedlatedly. The Place. Prlvat
bedroom, townhouse, S7B a month
Includes utilities. Please call
378-0622. (B-4t-58-p)
Newly decorated rooms for girls.
Across from campus on W.
University. Cooking privileges and
lounge. S7O. per month 373-2580
(b-lt-59-p)
WANTED
Roommate wanted. Luxury living at
a reasonable price Point West. apt.
378-9947 500-8 S.W. 34 St. Bill or
Joe (c-st-55-p)
roomate to share 4 brm. house have
own room 42.50 mo. plus utilities
3117 N.W. 6 St. (c-3t-59-p)
GOOD DEAL ON ROOM summit
house large room for two must rent
now, CHEAP! 1 cal! Doug 376-2048
save money great roommates
(C-2t-58-p)
ONE studious male to share trailer,
will have private room. $55/mo. + W
utilities. CALL 376-7206 after 6 PM
(C-3t-58-p)
need 1 or 2 chicks to cook and clean:
own room $20./mo utilities Included
call 376-3638 Joe or Jeff (C-3t-58-p)
ROOMMATE wanted to share apt
with 3 girls at Williamsburg Please
call 378-3733. (C-3t-57-p)
HOUSE entering school In Mar.
family of 4, prefer to assume low
Interest mort. & buy equity. Send
details to C.R. Edewaard 120-5
Summit Dr. Minot AFB, ND 58701
(C-st-55-p)
l>
Male to share one bedrm apartment
Has bedrm, llvingrm, kitchen 8i bath
1216 SW 2nd Ave. Come by or call
376-2084 (C-st-55-p)
female roommate $53.75 la bonne
vie Immediate occupancy share
bedroom private bath, call
373-2923 or come by apt. 338
(C-st-55-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
trailer, own bedroom, close to
campus. Call 378-1856 after 5:30
pm. (C-st-56-p)
Listeners wanted will pay $2.00 for 1
hour session must be native English
speaker and have normal hearing,
please call cylinthla between I and 4
pm for appointment 392-2049
(C-20t-56-p)
1 female roommate needed to share 2
bedroom apt at university gardens
S4O a month + utilities call 378-2250
after 6 pm (C-4t-57-p)
2 female roommates wanted for
spacious home with fireplace, lVz
acres, pets allowed, call 378-0415
(C-st-58-p)
Female roommate to share apt. one
block from campus near The Place,
$45 mo. 373-3864 (c-4t-57-p)
liMI NOW!
I 2:12 4:04*5:56 1
7:51 9:46
I Barbra I
\ The Owl
Jarithe Pnyrat \
pUPBiCj NOW!
Xhas A HANG UP X
/AT...1:52 3:47
\ people KW
V ssl-Biy



jnMMKrp|ni||
HA
/ 4
*' i
Lp99pnt|V97^A^
I SHOWS 1 So- /r)W
1 5:30 -7:30
*ont of th *§jf f M^Pl
Funnist Comedies
of the Year!
ypa/y
1? |ns
ST
laWllffiM 3 DAYS
I at w iwwniiT4ve^^
I FANNY HILL I
I 2:50.5:50 :S0 I
jg, Sweden Is most famous A
jg. women together for the T
first time I
\ FANNY HILL ;
and
* M INGA /
FLORIDA THEATRE JnLY
75c Ms * age *l7
1.55 age 17 ever
AW Pay Bverv Day
INGA 1:30 4:30 7:30
10:2S
HURRY 3 DAYS LEFT!
AT: 1:32 3:37 5:42 9:52
GET WITH THE
CATS WHO KHOW
WHERE ITS AT!
WAIT DISNEY
PRODUCTIONS'
A PURR-FECTLY
WONDERFUL NEW
CARTOON FEATURE
TECHNICOLOR* <&>
LAST TIMES TODAY I
2:24 4:53 7:22 0:51
JOHN WAYNE
A Howard Hawks Production
RIO LOBO
Technicolor* [G|g*>

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED
CAMP PINEWOOD ln The Blue
Ridge Mountains' Hendersonville, N.
Carolina. Co-ed Camp For Boys &
Girls. Students interested in summer
employment as Cabin Counselors,
Activity Instructors, Kitchen Aides
and Groundskeepers, should write for
general information and Staff
Applications. .Now!. .Only
clean-cut young people need apply.
Camping dates: June 22 to Aug. 17.
Reply to winter address: Camp
Pinewood, 1801 Cleveland Rd. Miami
Beach, Fla. 33141 (E-6t-54-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
378-6900 ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years, also
guitar repair service! (E-st-58-p)
Need reliable, experienced person to
care for Infant weekdays In my
home. 376-9865. (E-st-57-p)
Need extra spending money? Have
four hours a week to spare? Sell
Floridas yearbook on a commission
basis, call Jan evenings 373-3817
(e-3t-59-p)
Student Wanted Male or Female to
learn Engraving University Jewelers
Apply In Person 1802 W. University
Ave. (e-4t-59-p)
Part or full-time sales help needed
$3-5 an hour, guaranteed to service
established customers, call between 7
& 9 pm 378-0421 or 378-0121 ask
for Ed (E-st-57-p)
AUTOS
Good transportation 62 Pontiac Runs
well good tires plus 2 spares Recent
tuneup and new battery. Call Jim
after 5:30 376-0549 (G-st-55-p)
MUST SELL 65 Ply Fury 111, new
polyglass tires, factory air, radio,
heater. Will Deal. Call Anytime
372-5809 or 373-4213 (G-6t-57-p)
1967 Camaro 327 4 spd ac radio
heater wide ovals best offer over
1095 call 376-2310 (G-st-56-p)
1965 Dodge Polara stawgn 9-pass.
v-8, sac. alr-cond. & heater, power
brakes & steering, roof rack, trailer
hitch owner going overseas. SBSO.
376-0237 (G-st-56-p)
1965 Mustang must sell 2nd
car-6cyl, automatic, good cond,
maroon exL, white int., radio, heater,
low mileage, $550 cash. 378-9273
after 5 p.m. (g-st-59-p)
1969 Ford 2-dr hardtop, 302-VB,
f/air, power steering, radio, low
mileage, bal warranty, one owner,
financing to arrange, call 376-4981.
(G-st-58-p)
Mercury Cougar 67 V-8 stick shift
3-speed transmission, radio, good
tires, excellent condition $1,395
376-4640 (G-st-58 p)
a
MGA 1600 1960 new top wire
wheels paint excellent must sell
372-2340 (G-3t-58-p)
1966 MGB roadster wire wheel radial
tires, fold down top and more, runs
well asking 900$ phone 373-1043 ask
for Greg (G-st-58-p)

ACCENT 71
Presents
JANE FONDA
in
BARBARELLA
Tuesday Jan. 12 Union Auditorium
7:00 & 9:30 pm. 50 cants
SpMngsU.ot

Tuesday, January 12,1971, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
Seniors: Positions available In
financial sales and investment
counselling. Unlimited income
potential. Century Planning Corp.
will be on campus Jan. 20. Sign up at
Placement Center for interview.
(J-st-56-p)
Need to sublet apt. one male,
poolside. Williamsburg 52.50/mo. call
378-8407. (J-st-56-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
Gator carpet cleaners will clean 2
rooms and a hall for $19.95. How
about 1 room for $9.95? Phone
373-3841 for details. (J-st-57-p)
Student travel, trips, charters,
Europe, Orient, around the world.
Write S.T.O.P. 2150 C Shattuck,
Berkely Calif. 94704 or see travel
agent. (J-10t-58-p)
Want to be a leading woman? return
your Mortar Board application by
Friday, Jan. 151 (J-st-58-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
378-6900 ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here for 3 years, also
guitar repair service! (J-st-58-p)
LOST <&, FOUND
Lost Woman's Elgin watch in
Anderson area. Call Betsy at
372- or 372-3435. (L-2t-58-p)
Lost In Williamson Hall woman's gold
Bulova watch. Small belt type band.
If found PLEASE call 392-0509 or
378-7140 (L-2t-58-p)
Found-a pair of men's brown rimmed
glasses In the parking lot behind Well
hall. Call Jackie at 373-3402 or at
392-1681. (L-3t-58-p)
Found near University Press a pair of
glasses In case. Pick up at the Press.
(l-3t-59-nc)
SERVICES
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 111 l S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmericard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)
HORSES BOARDED Alachua
countys most complete facility
Lighted ring trails box stalls tack
room convenient to University ph
373- (M-st-56-p)

Certified Instrument flight Instructor
will give you dual Instruction In his
retractable gear Mooney at very
reasonable rates. 378-9256.
(M-st-57-p)
8-track Tape Cartridges Save 60%
your albums custom recorded,
average $2.40 each Inc cartridge.
Quality. For details John 378-5916
nights (M-5t*55-p) j

SERVICES
i-i-x-r-XvXv:-:*:*:-:-:-:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.::::;.;:;.:.;.;.
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)
Student Employment in Yellowstone
and all U.S. National Parks. Booklet
tells where, how to apply. Send
$2.00 Arnold Agency 206 E. Main,
Rexburg, Idaho 83440. Moneyback
guarantee. (M-st-56-p)
Dei-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at and grad of Bklyn
College, N.Y. Term papers, theses,
dissertations. 50 cents and up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft. 6
(M-st-58-p)

IDaily entree special 52$ u P |
IDaily pastry special 19$ I
I Featuring color T.V. & Jukebox on free play I
W PEERLESSLY POITMYED M PMNPIY OF COLOR
ORLT V'
B Wednesday Night
At The RAT
Cary Grant and
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
star in the all alltime
time alltime classic .
"GUNGA DIN"
Show Times... 7:15,9:15
and 10:55
Tickets Only 25<
\ Todays ]
I more for your money meal 1
moisons I
I __CfiFETERIfi I
I T TUESDAY'S FEATURE "| I
I (GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I I
I ALL YOU CAN EAT I
\\ 99c!!
i I WEDNESDAY'S I §
I | I FEATURE I % I
I ~ | SAVORY BEEF STEW j s I
j 79C|
I LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons
I CfiFETERIR .beyond comparison! 1
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Page 9

SERV ICES
8-track Tape Cartridges Save 60%
your albums custom recorded,
average $2.40 each inc cartridge.
Quality. For details John 378-5916
nights (M-st-55-p)
Steve is back in town with fast
professional and inexpensive service
for your HONDA see him at the
CYCLE WORKS 1220 S. Main open
2 until 8 p.m. (M-st-58-p)
Painting, lowest rates In town, first
class, experienced, licensed. Free
estimates, call John Hickey 372-4427
eves. (m-3t-59-p)
INCOME TAX returns prepared 35
N. Main St. 378-9666 or 378-6127
Haber & Budd Accountants
(m-46t-57-p)



Page 10

I, The Florid* Alligstor, Tuesday, January 12,1971

Definite Steps Token
For IFC Presentations

By MORGAN ROOD
Alligator Writer
i
The Association are coming to
Florida Gym Saturday.
What exactly is the procedure
Inter-Fraternity Council must go
through to bring Frolics to this
campus?
Several factors must be
considered by I.F.C, before a
concert is set. First is cost.
F rank Amato, administrative
vice-president of 1.F.C., said the
Association cost about SII,OOO.
Three Dog Night, another group
I, F. C. is looking at, cost
$15,000. Credence Clearwater
Revival, for example, goes for
about $25,000.
ALL THE REVENUE from
tickets is not profit. I.F.C. must
pay transportation, plants and
grounds, maintenance, gym
rental, security, power, ushers,
spot light men, and all
advertising. This runs into the
thousands of dollars. If the
concert is outside, I.F.C. must
get rain insurance or they will
risk taking a heavy loss as they
did on the Rascals concert two
years ago.
Secondly, I.F.C. must
consider the availability of
groups. Miles Wilkin, producer
of I.F.C. Frolics, said, There
are only about eight agents for
all the mljor groups. We call all
eight and find out who is
available.
Last year Wilkin and Amato
had to go to Houston to sign
Janis Joplin when Jose
Feliciano, who was originally
signed for Frolics, cancelled out.
Our selection is limited by
two-thirds because most groups
are reluctant to play two shows,
as is necessary in Florida Gym,
Wilkins said.
We are also handicapped by
the fact that we have no real
choice of dates, Wilkin added.
The University tells us what
dates we can use.
I.F.C. TRIES to capitalize on
groups making tours around the
state, but many travel during the
break or on finals week. Dione
Warwick, for example, will tour
the state soon, but the only date
UF could get her would be four
days after Spring classes began.
There would be no time to
advertise for a possible Warwick
show.
Thirdly, I.F.C. tries to
consider the desirability of
groups coming to the UF. We
try to get as popular groups as
we can afford, Wilkin said.
Even so, I.F.C. hopes to make
$4,500 to $5,000 off the
Association concert.
When asked about the
possibilities of another stadium
show such as last years Super
Show, Amato said, As far as
I.F.C. is concerned, any show we
give the students will be in the
stands.
Ray Graves and Doug
Dickey are in Houston
Congo Census
A total of 21,637,976 people,
including 932,402 foreigners,
live in the Congo, an area as big
as the eastern half of the United
States, according to the latest
official census.

*<
d wikt. iblb ***
B Bp f l
Wjt
WKL V
wF w&m
THE ASSOCIATION
... costing IFC about SII,OOO

attending an NCAA meeting and
could not be reached for
comment, but Gene Ellenson,
executive assistant athletic
director, said Even with the
proposed synthetic turf on
Florida Field, the idea of an
audience on the field is still
repugnant. Glass would still be a
problem.

TheB
that attracts
the birds:
THE MGB 71
The look girls look for. The MGB 71 has it... that road roadhungry
hungry roadhungry 100k...10w, lean, and manly. With mag-style
wheels, radial-ply tires, new recessed grille. Even a
leather-covered steering wheel.
And when it comes to action, the MGB 71 puts out
with 1798 c.c. twin-carb engine, 4-speed synchro synchromeshed
meshed synchromeshed gearbox, rack-and-pinion steering and track tracktested
tested tracktested suspension.
So come on down to our showroom and test drive
Americas largest-selling imported sports car. The
MGB 71. Its the closest youll ever get to a bird cage
on wheels.
Harfred Auto Imports nMNI
Your New MG Dealer
506 E. University Ave. Ph. 372-4373

Fm sure before they allow
students to bring wine bottles
and glass on the field again, they
are going to think twice about it,
no matter what kind of surface
we have on the field, Ellenson
said. However, I wont say
there wouldnt be another show,
any request will be honored and
taken to the board.

SUPER
SOUND^H
M CIRCUSI^H
...
A sound-light extravaganza call it visual FM Underground. B
This Friday night in the Union Ballroom from 9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m.fl
Admission is 25 cents and a U. of F. Student I.D. JH
Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union.
|2445 SJU3^^^|HH
SIRLOIN FIT
1 i* L where you get a break MS
on steak and
everything else
It is better to deserve without receiving
M than to receive without deserving I
LIKE TO GET WHERE
YOU R£ GOING?
WANT TO DO IT
WITHOUT LEAVING AN
ARM AT THE BANK
AND A LEG AT THE
GAS STATION ON THE
WAY?
\kXv / M
Honda
SALES AND SERVICE
HAS THE SOLUTION
TO YOUR PROBLEM
818 W UNIVERSITY AVE 376-2637



- The.
Florida
Alligator

UF Road Jinx Remains

: : '' I
[ I fik.
M
r
fetattaPl
l ;m v
' * >,
\... J B \II
V
TONY MILLER
... bags 26 points

IN CYO TRACK MEET
Relay Team, Hurley Shine

By JOHN MATTHEWS
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs two-mile relay team won
its event with the years best
collegiate time and Gator pole
vaulter Scott Hurley defeated
world record holder Bob Seagren
in Saturdays Catholic Youth
Organization National Indoor
Trade Meet at the University of
Maryland.
The Florida Track Clubs
(FTC) Ron Jourdan also won his
event, jumping 7 feet in the club
division high jump.
RELAY TEAM MEMBERS
Dennis Bruce, Frank Betts,
Bemie Vaughn, and Eamonn
OKeefe combined efforts for a
time of 7:33, described by UF
track coach Jimmy Carnes as a
pretty fast time.
This means theyll receive
invitations to all the major
meets, said Cames, including
the upcoming largest indoor
meet in the country at the
Astrodome.
It was the third straight win
for Hurley. Scott is the leading
collegiate vaulter in the country
right now, Carnes said.
HURLEY, WHO had jumped
over 16 feet in competition only
Jujitsu Meeting
Set For Tonight
The UF Jujitsu Club will hold
its First meeting of the quarter
tonight at 7. Instruction and
equipment is provided free of
charge.
808 STACY
MILLER-BROWN
4222 N W 13th ST.

*x^B*, ,; jflr 'ijii 1

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Alligator Executive Sports Editor,
KNOXVILLE, Tenn UF lost its 11th straight road game,
dating bade to last season, in an 85-75 defeat at the hands of the
Tennessee Volunteers Monday night at Stokley Center.
A phenomenal 66 per cent shooting from the field helped the Vols,
now 10-2, capture a nine-point lead at the half, 41-32. The Gators,
who dropped their ninth game in 13 contests, were 50 per cent from
both field and foul line in the first half.
LEADING THE Vols in the early stages were forward Don Johnson
and guard Mike Edwards. Johnsons consistent scoring from the
comers, hitting his first five shots, and Edwards shooting from the
top of the key kept Florida from keying on any one player^
Sophomore Gator wing Tony Miller, after hitting 17 points in the
first half, went on to lead UF scorers with a personal varsity high of
26 points.
Post Gary Waddell also had his best production of the year, finishing
with 23 points.
Jimmy England was high man for the Vols with 23 points, followed
by Johnsons 19 and Edwards 18.

once before this year, now has
three consecutive 16-foot plus
efforts to his credit, and
victories in all three meets he has
entered this year.
Cames called Hurley the
most promising young vaulter in
the country right now.
Hurley, who holds the SEC
record at 16-feet-7 attended the
U.S. Olympic Training School at
Duke this past summer.

ROBBIES is
BACK!
Meals & J^^jandwiches
TV & BILLI ARD^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
I f On The Gold Coast I
FORWARD LOOK
by Roffler
1 MAKES LONG HAIR
LOOK GREATI
New Roffler Styles for all hair lengths, all age groups
S Whether youre a student, a young executive a
businessman even 13 years old and undei
Roffler has developed styling systems for every
young man who prefers long hair. Neck length,
shoulder length, just as long as you like. The
new Roffler AVANTELOOK for long hair will
Mens Barber & Style Slop
Specialists in Hair straightnlng
1620 W. University Ave. Phone 373-1106

HE OUT JUMPED two
members of last years U.S.
national squad, as well as
Seagren at the Saturday meet.
FTCs John Parker finished
sixth in the mile run with a time
of 4:08. Parker was leading with
less than a quarter of a mile left,
but faded in the last part of the
race won by John Mason, of the
Pacific Coast Club, who had a
4:01 time.

1970 CADILLAC, Sedan de Vill* $5895
Four door hardtop, Sauterne Gold with beige vinyl top
and matching interior. Air conditioned, full power, factory
warranty.
1969 CADILLAC Fleetwood $5195
Unexcelled luxury, cost SB,OOO new. Full power and all
comfort options.
1969 OLDSMOBILE, Delta Custom $3195
Four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior. AM/FM
radio, air conditioned, full power, including power door
locks.
1966 BUICK Electro 225 from $1595
Four door sedans choice of 2 nice cars. Full power, air
conditioned. Very clean.
1967 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass . $1895
White Vinyl over Turq. AC, EW, ES R&H. PS&PB
1968 OLDSMOBILE, Delta $2395
88" four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior.
Radio, heater, automatic transmission, power steering and
brakes, air conditioned. Electric seats.
1968 FORD, Fairlane 500 $1695
Four door sedan, dark green with white vinyl interior,
radio, heater, automatic transmission, air conditioned,
power steering.
1968 OLDSMOBILE, Delmont -...........52095
Air conditioned sedan with electric seat, automatic
transmission, power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
1967 OLDSMOBILE, Toronado $2295
Two door coupe. Gold. Front wheel drive, air conditioned,
full power.
1967 OLDSMOBILE, "98 $2295
Luxury sedan. White vinyl over maroon. Full power, air
conditioned, electric windows and seats, cruise control,
remote trunk lock, tilt wheel. Power door locks.
1967 PONTIAC, Grand Prix $1995
Blue with matching vinyl interior, two door hardtop,
electric windows, tilt wheel, bucket seats, stereo tape
player, remote trunk release. Air conditioned.
1967 OLDSMOBILE, Cutlass $1895
Two door hardtop. Automatic transmission, air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, electric
windows. Gold.
1967 CHEVROLET, Caprice ..$1795
Two door hardtop with automatic transmission, air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
Yellow. Very clean.
1970 CADILLAC Coupe de Ville ..$5995
2 dr H.T. White Vinyl over Lt Green, Air Condition, Full
Power. Factory Warranty. 15000 mi.
1968 CADILLAC Coupe de Ville $3895
2 dr HT, Gold with Beige vinyl interior. Air Cond. Full
Power, Less 20,000 Miles Local ower.
196*6 FORD FALCON Falcon $895 I
Two Door sedan six cylinder, automatic, radio, heater.
1968 FORD Custom 500 $1695
#
Air Cond, Power Steering R&H White.
1966 MERCURY Monterey $1095
Four door hardtop, white over red. Power steering, power
brakes, radio, heater, air conditioned. Runs good!
1966 VOLKSWAGEN $995
"Bug" green with radio and heater.
BRASINGTON
Cadillac-Oldsmobile, Inc.
2001 NW 13th Street 378-5301

Tuatday, January 12,1971,Tha Florida AMigrtor,

Page 11



Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 12,1971

Page 12

league Bowling Reprieved
* *6

By BRITT CRITTENDON
Alligator Sports Correspondent
The five leading teams in the
- Orange League all drew
temporary reprieves in the draw
of bowling last Thursday. None
of the top teams will be pitted
against each other in the first
round.
They will, however, be against
teams lower down on the ladder
who will savor the opportunity
to knock off the league
pacesetters.
SIGMA CHI will face 14th
place Sig Ep. Sigma Nu must
face seventh place Pi Lam, a
traditional bowling powerhouse.

I* HI - -. IH
A KEEPSAKE KEEPSAKEYOUR
YOUR KEEPSAKEYOUR PORTRAIT IN THE
I 1971 SEMINOLE
1 Hi A IH
111 STEVENS STUDIOS OF |
I BOSTON AND MAINE WILL I
I BE SHOOTING PORTRAITS IN I
I J.W.R.U. 346 DURING JANUARY 11-22, I
I FROM 12-4 PM AND 0-lOPM. f l/I I
| I SITTING FEE OF $1.50 AND THE ||
I SEMINOLE MAY ALSO BE PURCHASED. If 111 I
I APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE II
/ Ml
I BY CALLING 392-0550. I
111 11
I HI IH
STEVENS STUDIOS I
I I and tlie I
I 1971 SEMINOLE |

Third place SAE will play last
years bowling champs, the TEPs
who are now in 13 th place in the
league. ATO will bowl the eighth
place Phi Taus, and Fiji meets
the 15 th place Lambda Chi
Alphas.
Other matchups include the
AEPi at the Delta Chis, the Pikes
at the Betas, and the Phi Delts at
the Pi Kappa Phis.
IN THE Blue League, number
one Delta Tau Delta has drawn a
bye to play the winner of the
SAM vs. AGR matchup. In the
same bracket, second place Chi
Phi has won a bye to play third
place Theta Chi in the
quarterfinals in a meeting that

will have disheartening effects
on the loser.
Other games include Phi
Psi at DU, and Delta
Sigma Phi at Kappa Alpha.
All independent students are
reminded that Wednesday is the
last day to sign up for tennis.
All dorm students must sign
up for volleyball by Thursday.
All registrations may be made at
the Intramural Office, room 229
of Florida Gym before 5 p.m. on
the day designated.
The volleyball manager has
made an urgent request for more
officials. Officials are paid $1.50
per game. If interested stop by
the intramural Office or call
392-0581.

hl
I p * - f v 'H/? ~
RUGBY ROUGHNESS
Gator Rugby, with its own brand of roughness, can be seen this
Saturday at 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on Norman Field. UF's B-team
meets the University of South Florida in the first game, while the
A-team takes on the Atlanta Rugby Club.