***
by Rofflar
, MAKES LONG HAIR 1
LOOK GREAT! I
New Roffier Styles for all hair lengths, all age groups
B Whether you're a student, a young executive, a
businessman even 13 years old and under
Roffier has developed styling systems for every
young man who prefers long hair. Neck length,
shoulder length, Just as long as you like. The
p(easT off,#r AVANTELOOK ,or ,on ha,r W,M
Univenity Plaza
Men* Barber ft Style Shop
Specialist* in hair ttraightning 4
1620 W. University Ave. 373-1196

McLaughin and Megil agreed
that the Reuben Askew
administration will facilitate
organizing workers on campus.
In the past unionizing efforts
have been opposed by former
Gov. Claude Kirk, even though
the new Florida constitution
recognizes the right of state
employes to collective
bargaining.



Askew Makes His Final Preparations J

. it.. ;
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Hours before he became
Floridas 37th governor this morning, Democrat
Reubin Askew moved into the mansion, selected his
final little cabinet adivsor and announced he was
calling a special session of the legislature on Jan. 27 to
tackle insurance rate problems.
Displaying a take charge side that surprised even
some of his close associates, the attorney from the
Florida Pandle also disclosed he would ask the supreme
court to rule on constitutionality of a proposed
corporate income tax.
SINCE ASKEW pre-signed the oath and actually
assumes the powers of governor at a stroke after
midnight, the official oath-taking ceremony at noon is
a mere formality. >

.... il
nv W rn \
: I wjp
>: sll 1
. iM ....... 'S :
: Igily pn
. |
x
j: GOV. REUBIN ASKEW AND WIFE
|
v ... hare for homecoming activities in November
s

> m m m m m m W - - - -- - - - -- -- -- --
I STUDENTS open a I
tfj -- .... ~ f
FREE PERSONAL CHECKING ACCOUNT I
I MAINTAIN A MINIMUM BALANCE OF $99 AND WRITE ALL THE CHECKS YOU NEED WITHOUT A SERVICE CHARGE I
I WE INVITE YOU TO ENJOY THE FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE I
I AND PERSONAL SERVICE OFFERED BY GAINESVILLES I
* BB|
I LARGEST AND OLDEST BANK. I
sB; - * .v r £ > v; ; > t jjjj
I I
. wpHIRIIHIIHHI
I 104 N. MAIN STREET PHONE 378-3341 i I
/ -*
**- \ .?
I Tomorrow's ideas Today member fdic I
|.\ >
r ic4
f|! * >t . ~ ... .-.' ..... ' ,j_.

CHILES TO ATTEND INAUGURAL

Askew was cheered at word late Monday that his
master of ceremonies and close personal friend, U.S.
Sen.-elect Lawton Chiles, had gotten permission from
his doctor to fly up for the ceremony. Chiles recently
underwent emergency surgery.
Chances of a sunny inauguration were called pretty
slim by the weather bureau with a cold front
expected to move through the capital late Tuesday
morning, dropping temperatures from the mid 60's
around noon toward the low 30s Tuesday
night.
Askews final appointment of inner circle advisors
prior to becoming governor went to ex-Mayor Louis
Ritter of Jacksonville who becomes secretary of
professional and occupational regulation at $20,000 a

Wl
GATORS MARCH FOR GOVERNOR
__- i

The UF student body will be well represented in
Tallahassee today during inauguration ceremonies
for Governor-elect Reubin Askew.
The 240-member Gator Band will perform in a
pre-inaugural concert at 10:30 ajn. on the Capitol
lawn with bonds from FSU and Florida A & M. The
Marching Gators also will participate in the 2 p.m.

Tuesday, January 5,1971, The Florida Alligator,

year.
Succeeding John Cashin, who held the post under
Kirk, Ritter is a graduate of UF with a degree in public
administration. He also served two years as special
assistant to R. Sargent Shriver in the Office of
Economic Opportunity. Ritter, who was on the city
council 14 years and mayor in 1965-67 was defeated
by Mayor Hans Tanzler and has been operating a
consulting firm in Jacksonville.
Askews announcement of a special session did not
come as a surprise since he had discussed it with
legislative leaders and the press. But his limiting the
original announcement to insurance, leaving the tax
reform phase up in the air represented a slight change
in original plans.

parade.
About 160 students from the various military ]
units on campus also are among inaugural j
participants. j
The Gator Band has played for the inauguration :
of every Florida governor since 1921 with the :
exception of 1967.

Page 3



lb Tha ftoridi AlSgtor, Tuawtey, January 5,1971

Page 4

Changes Felt In Traffic Court

By RANDY BELLOWS
AMpAar Staff Writer
A dramatic change occurred
in the Student Traffic Court
following publication of police
complaints and compiled
statistics that had charged the
court with unwarranted and
excessive leniency.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder also had a conference
with Kathy Spellman, chief
justice of the Student Traffic
Court. According to Uhlfelder,
the meeting concerned her
office efficiency* and
maintaining student control of
the universitys traffic court.
THE GRAPHED data deals
with the change in Student
Traffic Court action since the
early December conference and
story^
The Alligator also found in
the two court sessions and
written appeal results analyzed,
convictions in the fall Student
Traffic Court had risen 25 per
cent (from 64 per cent to 90 per
cent) compared to a summer
Traffic Court conviction rate of
82 per cent.
She seems to have come
more in line with justice,
Officer J.G. Padgett said. The

OfITIHWO *|j
Unions Topic Os Dialogue |
1
John McLaughin, UF student who began £
organizational efforts among cooks in fraternity
houses and Dave Smith, business agent for the j£
Service Employes Union, will appear tonight at 11 g:
on WRUFs Dialogue. £
The show is an open phone forum and calls are g:
welcomed to talk to the guests live and on the air. g;
Phone numbers are 392-0772 and 392-0773.


TAKE IT ROMA LEADING FLORIDA EDITOR
"In hiring interns and reporters. The Miami
Herald always considers people with
experience. Students working on a
permanent basis on a publication like the
Alligator are acquainted with the problems
and procedures of publishing a newspaper.
When I interview, seniors especially, I can IMS
never understand how a journalism student
can graduate without ever writing outside ||||W
the classroom."
The Florida Alligator
now has
GENERAL ASSIGNMENT
All interested students should attend a
special staff meeting:
WdiHtdav January 6
Room 365 7:00 P.m. GEORGE BEEBE
J. Wayne Reitz Union Miami Herald
Senior Managing Editor

results are more believable; more'
acceptable. The dispositions
were ridiculous before, he
continued.
AFTER DEC. 3 Student
Traffic Court results jumped
from 19 to 65 per cent of those
found guilty, assessed both fines
and points/ There was also
approximately a SO per cent
increase of those found guilty
assessed at least some penalty.
This fell in line, for the first
time, with summer Traffic Court
results.
Officer E.B. Gladin said, The
Alligator story was what we
needed. 1 think (Miss Spellman)
was in the dark before; she may
not have realized what was going
on and what the proper
procedure was. Its been
tremendously better since then.
Gladin said that judging on
the most recent court results it
looks like a fires been put
under her.
UHLFELDER SAID he gave
Miss Spellman a warning, and
told her that things werent
perfectly satisfactory.
Kathy felt she was being
fair, Uhlfelder said. I told her
she should do what she thought
was right; but that there must be

'MORE IN LINE OFFICER SAYS

rrzrr percentage of traffic violators
' FOUND GUItTY, BUT ASSESSED NEITHER
9056 " FINE nor points
m 70%
70%-- iiilii!
eo%- lliiiil
50% - iiilii
o* - 27% ::pi;||f§b~
ao%- iiilii liilii
2* " iPPPP&i PIPPPi M Before p
10% - P*, P PPPPP P Dec. 3 ill
m Dec. 3 :: : : : :: mMMtm
0% -
FaUQuimr Summer Quarter Fall Quarter
(Chief Justice (Chief Justice Chief Justice
| Ktthy SHlnan) John Row> Kthy Spellman
STUDENT TRAFFIC COURT ACTION
... before and after police complaints

some reason for the difference.
Uhlfelder said he hesitated to
interfere with the autonomous
judicial body. The executive
branch of Student Government
is not in the position to go to
the Honor Court, for example,
and tell them that there havent
been enough convictions.
ANY CHANGE in the
court would ultimately lie with
the Student Senate, Uhlfelder
said.
According to the student
body president, their discussion
also dealt with her office hours.
'She hasnt been around
enough, Uhlfelder said. I
asked her to have more regular
office hours.
Uhlfelder said it wasnt his
position to change the will of
the student body.
They elected Kathy. But Ill
be watching to see what
happens. If it combs down to a
matter of whether or not traffic
court stays with the students
because of a lade of operation

efficiency, Ill do whatever I can,
if necessary, to bring about a
change of personnel.
The consensus of police
officers who have attended
traffic court, since Dec. 3 is that

* I
\ RUSH FORUM :
: TONIGHT :
: :
* 7:00 P.M., :
*
* 7. #
* University Auditorium
*
*

+
*
I All rushees and interested
*
* students are urged to attend.
*
* Important information will be
* given concerning the pew
* rush system.
*
*
*.
I Rush Sign-up Today

*
1-5 p.m. Panhellenic office,
*
* 3rd floor Union
*
*
*
3-5 p.m. Graham,

*
* Broward, J

Jennings I
*
*
*
* if you cant sign-up during '*
* any of these times you can still
* sign-up at the Forum tonights
*
*

things have gotten quite a bit
better.
It will be easier to go to
municipal court from now on,
Student Traffic Court Clerk Nell
Parker said. '



Cabinet Members
Start On Promises

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Three new* members of the
Florida Cabinet, all from Miami,
take office today and plan to lose
no time in getting to work on
some of their campaign
promises.
The electionof Richard Stone
as secretary of state, Robert
Shevin as attorney general and
Tom OMalley as insurance
commissioner theoretically give
South Florida a majority on the
Cabinet. They join incumbent
Comptroller Fred 0. Dickinson
of Palm Beach, Education
Commissioner Floyd Christian
and Agriculture Commissioner
Doyle Conner, the Cabinets
only member from rural north
Florida.
OMALLEY APPEARS TO be
in the hottest spot as the three
new faces begin their four-year
terms with the Cabinet. During
his bitter primary and general
election campaigns, OMalley
pledged to work for repeal of
the California Plan of
automobile insurance
rate-making and implementation
of a no fault concept of auto
insurance.
The California plan OMalley
wants to scrap allows
underwriters to raise their
liability rates without prior
permission from the insurance
commissioner. The
commissioner is thus allowed
only to order reduction of rates
he finds excessive.
The no fault idea of insurance
coverage would allow motorists
to insure themselves against loss
from accidents, regardless of
who is found at fault in a wreck.
Under the present system,
OMalley says, too much of the
insurance dollar goes into
attorney fees for court battles
over who is to blame for
accidents.
OMALLEY IS scheduled to
make his first formal pitch for
the no fault insurance system
Thursday at a meeting of the
Senates Special Insurance
Committee. But he expects some
delay in fighting the California
plan.
OMalley said he would like to
introduce repeal legislation
during the special legislative
session planned late this month
by Gov.-elect Reubin Askew.
I doubt if well be able to do
much more prior to the regular
session in April. OMalley said.
Unfortunately, we havent had
the opportunity to do much
prior to taking office.
STONE WILL succeed
Secretary of State Tom Adams,
who becomes lieutenant
governor and temporary head of
the State Commerce
Department.
Stone said one of his first jobs
will be organizing a meeting of
local election supervisors to set
up uniform procedures for
registering 18-year-olds in
national elections, as ordered
wnvusiTr
JiWtltiS
Fraternity Jewelry
Now order It 6 day* a week
Trophy & Plaque Dept.
Expert Engraving
a Class rings
e Watch repair
a Jewelry repair
£O2 West University Ave.
Acres* from Campus
2 block* from Hub 373-1025

recently by the U.S. Supreme
Court, and improving the
readability and understand understandability
ability understandability of voting machines to
avoid confusion on election day.
Stone also said that at the
first meeting of the new Cabinet
Jan. 12, 1 want to get off the
defense and onto the offense in
environmental problems.
Shevin plans to streamline
procedures in the attorney
generals office so that advisory
opinions requested by
government agencies can be
available within seven days. He
also said he plans to pay special
attention to prosecuting
polluters and to hiring legal
specialists in the consumer
protection field.
Shevin, who has pledged not
to seek re-election four years
hence if the states crime rate
does not decline, also said he
wants to coordinate law
enforcement and narcotics
control programs, study means
of speeding up trials and make
the State Department of Law
Enforcement more aggressive.

Computers!
Sales, Systems Support, Engineers, Programmersall get involved at RCA.

We believe in tots of
interface-people work out
their problems together.
We call it total systems
architecture.
In our Computer Sales and
Systems Program you
receive ten weeks of formal
training that provides you
with a broad knowledge of
the field of your choice
I if
wmmNmm Its
I
HrnT
w
/, Ij I IffaS J£§pA
>:. :..*{ 9. Spfffet jjm, / gfe,.
I :
1
H v I
Pilau w
JBIIP, :
Y M K; Y * i>- / :
MB fl|j
ny i I /

.m:;:;:- jak
ASSOCIATION COMING NEXT WEEK

Inter-Fraternity Council will present the
Association in concert with Willie Tyler and Lester
Saturday, Jan. 16 in the Florida Gym. Showtimes
are 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. and admission is $5.50 per
couple. Tickets are on sale at the Record Bar,
Recordsville and the Reitz Union Box Office. The
Association includes, from left to right, Brian Cole,

Sales or Systems.
Engineers can choose a
Rotational Program for a
broad overview of the
company or direct
, assignment to the area of
your skill.
Other benefits are that we
are not a narrow specialized
corporation. We are
technologically diverse,
m '" wRObtH /vj
1
\
WKm j
BB| WmMc/,s' &'Y f m
If ///Ifl
tip j
" f
mB
v:xv> f

Tuesday. January

Ted Bluechel, Jim Yester, Larry Ramos, Jules
Alexander, Terry Kirkman and Riduurd Thompson.
The group made its debut in November, 1965
Pasadena and a few months later sold nearly t
million copies of their first record, "Along
Mary."

human and highly
concerned with the future.
Also we are a total
communications company
that includes defense and
commercial electronic
systems, electronic
components, and solid state
devices of the most
advanced kind.
If you are majoring in
Computer Science,
Electronic or Mechanical
Engineering, or have a
strong interest, regardless
of your major, in Computer
Sales and Systems, we
I would like to talk to you.
Contact your College
Placement Director, or write
directly to RCA College
Relations, Dept. E, Cherry
Hill, Camden, New Jersey
08101. We are an equal
opportunity employer.
/. r V.
On Campus Interviews
January 21,22,1971
ItGJI
* /
'
SgflD*/ J >
V W v-m_ w

Page 5



I. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 8, T 971

Page 6

Folksinger Bucks
Army About Hair
Length Regulations
-

No More Pep Pills Available
From Leading British Drug Firm

LONDON (UPI) A leading
British drug firm announced
Sunday it is halting production
of amphetamines commonly
known as pep pills and
Basketball Tickets
Now Available
Students may pick up tickets
for all home basketball games
during the week of Jan. 4 at
Gate 13, East stand from 1 p.m.
to 5 p jn.
After this week all remaining
tickets will be made available to
students and general public on
the day of the game on a first
come-first served basis. Students
may pick up thier tickets at Gate
13 beginning at 5 pjn. through
half-time as long as tickets are
available.
Special Half Price
Rate for Faculty
and Students
Please send me the Monitor for
1 year 115 9 mos. $11.25
6 inos. $7.50
lam Q faculty student
Check/money order enclosed
Bill me later
Name
Address
City State Tip
the
Christian Science
Monitor,
Box 129. Aatoi* Station
Boston. Massachusetts 02123
J

withdrawing its entire stock
from the market.
There is a growing weight of
evidence that the use of
amphetamines has undesirable
social side effects, the
managing director of Nicholas
Laboratories, Stewart Kipling,
said.
The latest official British
statistics show there are about
500,000 persons in the country
using amphetamines, many of
them youngsters of grade school
age.
The Nicholas announcement
said all druggists now in

BUY ONE]
- BURMTO
HttL
'' ....... i
QQOQGGBI
826 W. UNIVERSITY
10:30 AM TO 12:00 PM
7 DAYS A WEEK

BOISE, Idaho (UPI) A folk-singing National
Guardsman, who was ordered to active duty for
wearing a wig to drills, received wide support
Sunday for his legal fight against induction.
Offers of money and legal advice poured into the
Boise home of 26-year-old John Baugh after he was
given a 10-day reprieve by Idaho Attorney General
George Bennett. Baugh was earlier ordered to report
Monday for active duty.
BENNETT SAID HE called Sixth Army
headquarters in San. Francisco and asked for the
extension because he wanted to give Baugh every
chance to present evidence that might have been
overlooked.
.Baugh, scheduled to be discharged Feb. 16, had
served in the guard 5Vi years and wore a trimmed
wig to inspections for about a year. At tirst it was
approved, but the decision was later reversed,
upheld again and then reversed for a final time,
which puts Baugh in his present predicament.
Baugh claims his shoulder-length hair is necessary
for folksinging. A hearing date will be set by the
Army which will settle whether Guardsmen can
wear wigs to drills and pass inspection.
GUARDSMEN IN some states are allowed to
wear wigs to cover longer natural hair.
For Baugh, the father of one child, the decision
will either give him' discharge papers orders to
Ft. Lewis, Wash., and a trip to the western Pacific,
possibly Vietnam.

possession of company
amphetamines had been
requested to destroy them.
Exactly how many pills were
involved was not disclosed.
There still is a very real need
for amphetamines, Kipling said,
but only under strict
supervision.
More than 15 years ago the
World Health Organization
warned amphetamine abuse
could lead to mental disorders
and hallucinations. At that time
the drug was used mostly as a
treatment against obesity.

\
= Z-=S!I vermansDOWNTOWN ==^
SILVERMANS
; YEAR-END
I SALE 1
I NOW IN J
| PROGRESS j
I FINE APPAREL
g FOR 3
MEN AND WOMEN
SUBSTANTIALLY
REDUCEDI
SILVERMANS. 22sw.univ.ave.
, SILVERMAN'S DOWNTOWN -
}.
IT DOES
6010 OIN
4 SECONDS
FLAT
When most car dealers take you for a
test drive, they Ve out to impress you
with how fast their cars go* But when
you take a test drive in a Volvo, youll
also be unpressed at how fast you
can stop*
nowhere
'
'. % % a : ~C
VOLVO, INC,, I*7o
Harf red Auto Imports
Your New Volvo Dealer
508 E University Ave. Ph 372-4373



CHANGES ...

r'
future with the night game
capabilities.
OTHER UNIVERSITIES
around the country have asked
their alumni to buy a square
foot of the carpet in order for
that university to finance the
playing surface. The charge for
each alumnus range from $5 to
ilQfQT_thft small portion of
turf.
The action on renovating
Floridas athletic program was

AFT: UF Compelled
To Pay Fired Teacher

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writar
The UF American Federation
of Teachers (AFT) announced
Monday the UFadministration
was forced to pay fired
education instructor Robert
Canney an additional months
salary.
Canney, a UF graduate
student and former graduate
assistant, was fired last
November following his
conviction in St. Petersburg for
resisting arrest with violence at
an anti-war demonstration last
April. The conviction is being
appealed.
CANNEY WAS fired,
according to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, in the
best interests of the university.
AFT President Kenneth Megill
said Monday that the AFT
retained Gainesville lawyer
Richard Wilson in November in
an attempt to win Canneys
reinstatement.
It also announced at that time
that the national AFT had
agreed to give financial support
for the legal challenge to
Canneys dismissal.
MEGILL SAID Wilson had
written two letters to OConnell,
stressing there was a breach of
contract.
There is no legal action for
reinstatement, Megill said,
which proves the contracts
people have are very very bad
contracts.
The contracts are written on
the side of the administration
and this shows the need for
collective bargaining.
Wilson was informed in late
November that Canney would be
paid through the end of the
quarter, but announcement of
the action was delayed until
Canney received his final check
at the end of the quarter
December), Megill said.
Their Bag Now
The Texas legislature has
given landlords a tool to cope
with persons who skip out on
their rent. Under recent
legislation, the landlords can get
a lein on all baggage and other
property found within the
dwelling.

frowned upon by student body
president Stove Uhi f elder
Monday.
The only good thing about
the bad news (the lighting and
the artificial surface) is that
money wont come from the
students, Uhlfelder said. Im
glad the money is coming from
other sources than the student.
GRAVES NOTED other
capital improvements for Florida
which would help the recruiting
program in the future. Those on
the list included new seating at
the stadium, a renovated press

Canney could not be reached
for comment but, according to
Megill, will return to do work on
his masters thesis fids quarter.

January clearance sale
Men's Shirts ||| ladies Jt
ZXXSZSXr jumpsuits A pantsuits <^gg?
NOW 9" to 5" P i = jHl 25.00 to 50.00 Value. jggj
INUW A TO 3 NOW 1Q99 so 2999
Sweaters Dresses
SMW V-neck & Cardigans 1800^4800v *'
W s,m,l,xi JHf NOW 9" to 29
1 NOW 50-75% OFF
Mens Slacks m
12.00 to 24.00 Values 1 Sweaters
Unfinished bottoms 1 Zjy
Waist sizes 28,29,30,31 ONLY f 16.00 Value XA
NOW 1" to 5" NOW 8"
e|B ..
ouble P lB Vest Suits
Is & Sports Coats 38.00 Value
ironwool Corduroy NOW 21 /^/jigM
C.P.O. Shirts 9.00 to 24.00 Values
Kay Cases Fringe Vests rag. 14.00 NOW 8.99
" Purses reg. 16.00 to 21.00 NOW 899 to 10.90
Â¥0 lf*
1620 W*st University Ave.
. ... :

box at Florida Field, lights for
the track and the baseball field,
an indoor natatorium,
resurfacing of the tennis courts
and the track, and golf course
improvements.
*
This is an initial step as part
of a plan to bring Floridas
athletic facilities up to the level
of the top institutions against
which we recruit and compete,
Graves said.
A new scoreboard and stands
are now being constructed on
the south side of Florida Field in
the facelifting of the Gator
home field.

Musical Tryouts Scheduled

Tryouts for the first Florida Players production
pjn. in the Constans Theatre.
Ride Besoyans musical comedy Little Mary
Sunshine is the selection and requires dancers,
singers and actors.
TRYOUTS ARE open to all UF students. Scripts
are available in room 363 of the Arts and Sciences
Building.

r
f>
tfe'
1..
. =-* r
NEW SOUTH END ZONE SEATS
... already being constructed ~

Tuesday, January 5,1971, Tha Ronda Alligator,

Students interested in working in technical areas
of production should attend a meeting at 7 pjh.
Jan. 12 in the Constans Theatre.
Also on campus today, the Panhellenic Forum
will meet in the Union Auditorium at 7 p.m. and
the Chess Club will meet in Room 150 of the
Union, also at 7 pjn.

Page 7



Page 8

1, Ttw Florida Alligator, Tuesday, January 5,1971

EDITORIAL
While Mice Away
The Cats Played
While visions of sugar plums danced in the heads of UF
students during the past several weeks, those elves up in
Tigert Hall were up to all kinds of mischief.
No sooner had the last edition of the fall Alligator gone
to press; no sooner had classes ended and exams begun,
when controversial things began happening.
First, in Tigert Hall. While you were eating your
Christmas pudding, President Stephen C. O'Connell and
Lester Hale, the vice president for student affairs, were
putting the blocks to the Florida Student Movement (FSM).
A committee for student organization had recommended
approval to the FSM as a recognized campus organization.
Hale, presumably after consulting with O'Connell, did not
give his approval to the organization.
We have to admire the vice president's timing. No
students around to raise hell about it. The Alligator not
publishing. Beautiful timing.
Second, on the last day of classes the University Senate
passed the new conduct code, with sections some people
called the strictest in UF history. These controversial
sections were rewritten and revised by President OConnell
and UF attorney Tom Biggs.
Again, you will note the timing. No reportage. Nobody to
raise hell except the enraged senators who charged the
conduct code was railroaded through by O'Connell.
Third, the Athletic Association was busy, too. It started
plans to renovate Florida Field: artificial turf, new
scoreboard, improved lighting system. The athletic
department has been under the gun for months for its
financial policies, among other things. It is interesting that it
laid its most controversial plans when school was not in
session.
As we pointed out in the last Alligator of the fall quarter,
postponing controversial decisions until the heat is off
does not remedy any situation. Tigert Hall and the athletic
department postponed their decisions until the Alligator
ceased to publish and/or students were gone for vacation.
But students are back and we are publishing again, and
the same problems exist. If the Administration believes it
has avoided trouble with its what they don't know, wont
hurt them attitude, it may be mistaken.
We know.
If theyre old enough to vote theyre old enough to fight

The Sam Pepper Phyllis Gallub
Florida Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
ait a. Jeff Klinkenberg
Alligator Associate Editor SP/
The future is not a Ken McKinflpil Loretta Tennant
gift: it is an achievement News News Editor
( j V
1971. Right On Schedule

By JOHN PARKER
Alligator Columnist
The New Years Column is
dose to perfunctory for the
descriminating columnist.
It generally contains some
homey ditties, describing the
columnists reluctant surrender
to typical holiday fare of
boozing, bowls and boring
in-laws.
THEN HE may give you a
capuslated version of the past
year. A gloomy picture, to be
sure.
Then perhaps, as a capper
(and to show that he is, after all,
a pretty hearty fellow and all
that) he may point out a few
happy items and claim that these
may represent some glimmer of
hope for the coming year.
Add a few Hail Mary's, a
solemn benediction, and youve
got yourself a real rip-snorting
New Years column.
BUT, ALAS, faithful reader,
you knew you could trust me
not to regale you with the trite
formulas of yesteryear. Right?
Wrong. It is not a
conscientious disdain* for the
hackneyed that keeps me from
treading on that well-trod earth.

Alligator* .Staff
Daniw Valiants 'Sbim pirttir
' i*m I MIMS SUa'XSJK.x.
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Slave Strang
Wire Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the aiwnir..
Km Board of Student Publications. immp.n, of
/>
Editorial, Butinsas. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suit*
third floor, Reitz Union. \
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those off the University of Florida.

1
'V
v f
it is a simple lack of
competence.
I don't know how to assess
last year any more than I know
how to predict next year. I offer
only a few quick conclusions
which I offer for you to weave
into any kind of hair-shirt you
like.
% Vietnam goes on. The
fighting is not active, there are
not as many men there as
before, but we are still very
much in that war and our
economy is still being drained
into the swamps of Indochina.
Since the heat has been off the
White House on the Vietnam
issue, Id say well be there for a
long, long time. Richard Nixon
does not do much that he is not
forced to do.

Inflation goes on. We
always thought that you
couldn't have inflation and
unemployment at the same time.
Oops. Back to the graphs.
Meanwhile, Congress and the
President are showing no signs of
putting the real stoppers on
inflation; namely wage and price
controls and ending the war.
Pollution, yech. Too much
has been said already.. Just go
out and try to find some river to
drink from. It is going to take
money to do something about it.
Money that is now buying
bullets and bombs.
The general mood of the
country is still pretty sick.
Hardhatism abounds. We are a
country of gimmee and after
the gimmee's get theirs, the
only thing they can do is worry
about someone taking it from
them. We call that conservatism.
WELL, NOW dam it, Ive
gone and been cynical again.
And I was going to try to to be
all sweet and giggly this year.
At any rate, there are
indications that, contrary to
popular belief, 1971 will go on
pretty much as scheduled.
And that, one supposes, is
something, isn't it?

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392*1681,
82, 83 or 84
C.R. "Randy" Coleman
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy Ann Dupree
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 3924609



Tolerance Is A Must

By BRUCE ALPER
Alligator Columnist
President Stephen C.
OConnell wrote some months
ago ... that human
judgments... are fallible and
that the real basis of freedom
comes from a willingness by the
individual to doubt enough the
infallibility of his own opinions
and actions to recognize that
those of others may be valid.
These Words are magnificently
simple and yet so lucid and
significant that their very
greatness may be lost in a
moment of superficial reflection.
President OConnell has in fact
stated that every man has the
right to his convictions but must
grant that same liberty to others
and not merely ridicule,
condemn or verbally abuse those
who differ with his own views.
BARRINGTON Moore, Jr. in
his essay Tollerance and the
Scientific Outlook cautions us
that self-restraint and a
dedication to the pursuit of
truth M ... leads neither to
flaccid acceptance of the world
as it is, watery toleration of
every doctrine because there
might be some contribution
somewhere, nor to the fanatical
single-mindedness of the
doctrinaire, willing that a
thousand may perish in order

%*:%%*i*s*:*!*!A*:*;%*:
T) T7 1 A r\UD C FAD TTA /T
yiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisiiliMllllil READERS FORUM

Blackmail
MR. EDITOR:
When the student oiganized
plan for the evaluation of
teachers was first initiated at UF
last year, I interpreted the
movement as an honest desire on
the part of all parties concerned
to improve the communications
between faculty and student.
Educators would supposedly
be informed of their abilities and
their deficiencies.
It now seems as if *this
evaluation program has turned
into legal blackmail.
I am refering specifically to
the situation of two full
professors in the College of
Business Administration.
Last year, before ODK
initiated its evaluation scheme,
the Dean of Bus. Ad. prepared
and distributed forms for the
evaluation of all the educators in
his college.
The two professors in
question received very excellent
ratings. However, Having
provided time out of their
teaching schedule for this
evaluation many of the
professors in the College of Bus.
Ad. did not participate in the


*
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double ewd and not mooed
300 words.
0 Not be signed wHti e pseudonym.
0 Hove addressee end telephone numbers of writers.
Nlfnvl will 09 niuuipu oniy it wnw )M
eause. The editor reserves the rirfit to edit ell letters far
Writers mey submit longer columns or letters
to' bo sunsldswil for uoe as Speaking Out" columns.
Any writer interested b nibmhtbig a regeter column Is
wfcad to eonteet die editor and be prepared to show
C
tni|MSi or nn wont.

S>
<*
j
we must know ... when to be
tolerant and when tolerance
becomes intellectual cowardice
and evasion.
Os course none of us can ever
hope to have all our fellows see
the world as we do even though
we readily extend a tolerant
attitude toward their views,
however different from our own
they may be.
EVERY IDEA or belief, even
those considered revolutionary,
unpatriotic, and ridiculous,
deserves to be analyzed and
examined. Yet, this does not
mean that such beliefs and ideas
mist be accepted.
Some of todays liberals are
too narrow-minded in outlook
to be called liberals. A liberal
often goes too far in acceding

ODK evaluation program.
I am sure many students will
remember that a list was
published in the Alligator giving
flagrant notice that the
professional educators had not
seen fit to submit to the lofty
requests of ODK.
This was the first instance of
the blackmail I referred to
earlier.
The obvious inferrence was
that these men were afraid to
submit their abilities to the
public scrutiny of the
evaluation. There were articles
and debates that followed the
published list that attempted to
dear the air but the damage was
done.
Now, after a period of months
ODK is distributing its teacher
evaluation manual.
In this supposedly
enlightening student bible are
ratings and discussions of the
various abilities of the faculty.
In some instances these
ratings are not based on a
representative sample of the
students of the College of Bus.
Ad., but rather on the obviously
biased statements of an extreme
few, perhaps as few as only one
student.
This letter is Obviously an
emotional response to what I

the demand's of certain
groups, giving them more than
their due under the rules of
justice. A moderate realizes that
he must constantly strive for
justice but to give each more
than he deserves is to infringe
upon the rights of others and is
thus injustice.
Liberal rhetoric can be as
full of nauseating hypocrisy as
any others. Even so, it is a
disastrous error to junk the
whole of liberalism, says Mr.
Moore. This in essence is
tolerance, for it recognizes that
while a particular way of
thinking may contain a
multitude of errors it can still
possess some very salient points.
AS PRESIDENT OConnell
has counseled us, we can
practice tolerance only if we
show our fellow man ... good
manners, common decency,
courtesy, mutual trust and
respect.
Many of us become
ideological extremists because
we cannot admit that our
positions are intolerant and full
of contempt for the views of
others. Yet, the dUemna of
deciding just what the truth is
does not mean we can ever
abandon tolerance and
moderation as the principles by
which we must live if we are to
live together at all.

consider a situation insulting to
the professional integrity of the
faculty concerned.
I recommend that if ODK
really desires to provide students
with realistic appraisals of the
educator that it publish the
results of the College of Bus. Ad.
evaluation, which the professors
did participate in and which
waxed on a much larger sample
of students.
I recognize that the ODK
effort has many useful puiposes.
However, the usefulness of the
evaluation program has been
greatly impaired by the lack of
concern extended to various
members of the faculty.
The faculty, as well as we the
students, must have the right of
dissent, freedom of choice, and
the knowledge that they cannot
be blackmailed or intimidated.
CLIFFORD L. GIONET, 7BA
Athletics
MR. EDITOR-
For the past month or more, I
have listened to a great deal of
talk concerning the
de-emphasizing of athletics at
the University of Florida. After
discussing this subject with
several people, I find only a
small percentage are in favor of
even limiting the athletic
program.
Most of us are particularly
proud of the fact that we have a
good football team (even if
we*ie not in the same class as
Auburn this year.)
As I understand from reading
The Alligator, we pay
approximately S3.SO per quarter
for our athletic program. I used
to feel that was a fair amount to

x nL, kSr
J# 1J f /ft # 1 ~ x J
nr
Jr rM jJB
A
Sure, I remember you now dont tell me, Ill get it
in a minute ...

pay; however, in recent weeks
Ive decided that it is really a bit
too small. '
Therefore, I would like to
propose that we de-emphasize
Student Government and put
the savings toward the Athletic
Association and a new athletics
complex such as LSU has
done!
To support this, I submit that
Mr. Uhlfelder and his staff are
self-admittedly ineffective and
do not represent the majority of,
the students.
Secondly, I would like to
refer to Mr. Shermans remarks
in the November 20,1970, issue
of The Alligator regarding the
reduction of the funds of
athletics to the financing of
athletic needs and a place to
play.
This, statement could be
re-applied to Student
Government.
Let's restrict the funds to
Student Government needs and
office space and eliminate Mr.
Uhlfelder's scholarship and
expense account.
We needn't stop here there
are also some very qualified
appointees on scholarship. By
qualified" I mean to say based
on the amount of contributions
to Mr. Uhlfelders campaign
fund last spring.
I would like to admit at this
time that periiaps my feelings
toward athletics are a little
biased since 1 have always
wanted to participate in varsity
athletics. Unfortunately, 1 never
could make the big time."
Perhaps if a few people would
admit this to themselves, we
the usually silent majority

Tuesday, January 5,1971, Tha Florida AKiyrtu,

wouldn't have to put up with so
many old old foot-in-the foot-in-themouth"
mouth" foot-in-themouth" routines.
RICK HAGER, 4EG
Joy In Christ
MR. EDITOR:
While re-reading the Alligator
of November 23, I was very
excited when I came across the
letter written by Reid Davis, 3
ED.
He had written:
. .History has shown that
people have tried to settle their
differences through forceful hate
and revolution, which seems to
be growing in this country. But
this can only lead to more hate.
From Jesus I have learned
that love is the best solution to
any problem. As Romans 12:21
of the Bible states, Do not be
overcome by evil, but overcome
evil with good.' Also, 'above all
these things, put on love, which
binds everything together in
perfect harmony.* (Coioseians
3:14)
You are so right, Raid, and
your letter in the Alligator could
not have been more timely.
I truly admire you for writing
the letter, for Romans 1:16
states, I am not ashamed of the
gospel of Christ, for it is the
power of God unto salvation to
everyone that beheveth."
All of you readers who have
not experienced the joy and
peace through having Christ in
your hearts, repent now, and l
fully guarantee that you shall
not be disappointed!
ROBIN LAIMINGER, lUC

Page 9



Page 10

,Ihe Ftarkh AHl|ptor, Twwfcy, January 6,15T71

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
information Services, Building H. Ail
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

NEW STUDENT
CONDUCT CODE
I. Introduction. As members of
the academic community,
students enjoy the rights and
prMhp that accrue to such
membership, including, but not
limited to, academic freedom
and participation in the
decision-making processes of the
University. Additionally,
students are subject to the
obligations and duties which
accompany this membership and
are responsible for compliance
with the requirements of law
and with all regulations of the
University.
In order to have effective
campus governance by students,
faculty and staff, it is
encumbent upon members of
the campus community to
notify the appropriate judicial
body or official of violation of
these regulations, to encourage
all to comply with them, and
assist in their enforcement by
testifying as witnesses when
called upon to do so.
All conduct regulations of the
University shall be printed in a
form or forms which make them
available to all students and shall
be applicable only upon
publication in the Alligator, the
Student Handbook, or other
reasonable means ~6f
notification.
11. University Authority. Under
the authority of the Board of
Regents (Florida Statutes, Sec.
240.001, 240.042, and
240.045), the President has been
delegated the responsibility for
establishing and enforcing
regulations governing student
life (Board of Regents Operating
Manual Section 2, paragraphs
7.2 and 7.3).
The regulations are designed
to enable the University to
protect itself and its members
against the conduct of those
who by their actions impair or
infringe on the rights of others
or interfere with the orderly
operation of the University.
Discipline may be imposed for
offenses against the Code
occurring at any of the following
locations or activities:
1. University campus;
2. University owned or
controlled property;
3. Property or other housing
units assigned for responsibility
to the University, including, but
not limited to, fraternity and
sorority property;
4. Activities sponsored by the
University wherever they may
occur;
5. Activities officially
approved by the University
which are conducted by
University chartered
organizations wherever they may
occur;
6. Activities occurring
off-campus as provided in
paragraph VI/
111. Rules of Procedure. The
primary judicial bodies
authorized by the President and
charged with the administration
and enforcement of this Code

shall formulate and furnish to
students charged with an
offense, rules of procedure
which shall insure basic
procedural fairness. Basic
procedural fairness shall be
afforded to any student charged
with an offense; this shall
include, but not be limited to:
1. The right to be notified in
writing of the charges against
him with sufficient particularity
and in sufficient time to insure
the opportunity to prepare for
the hearing;
2. The right to a prompt
hearing before an appropriate
official, committee, or court;
3. The right to know the
nature and source of evidence
which will be used against him;
4. The right to present
evidence in his own behalf;
5. The right of freedom
against earn p u I e-o-ry
self-incrimination ;
6. The right to appear with
an advisor at the hearing.
Suspension Pending
Hearing. Certain situations under
Board of Regents Policy, this
Code, the University
Demonstration on Policy and
the University Policy on
Possession and Use of Firearms
on Campus call for immediate
suspension in the event of
violation of said policies. If a
student is suspended under such
policies without hearing, he
shall, upon request, be entitled
to a preliminary hearing at the
earliest practical time from the
demand for same; such hearing
shall be solely to determine if
the suspending official acted
within the scope of his authority
and that there is probable cause
to believe that the student has
violated a University policy. The
hearing board shall be appointed
by the President, and shall
report its determinations to the
President for whatever action he
deems appropriate. This
presidential action shall be
interim until the Student
Conduct committee hear the
matter and make
recommendations to the
President.
V. Violations of the Code of
Conduct. A. The Committee
on Student Conduct may
recommend to the President
expulsion or any lesser penalty
for the following offenses:
1. Furnishing false
information to the University
with intent to deceive.
2. Forgery, alteration, misuse
of University documents,
records, or identification cards
(including but not limited to
indentification cards used for
admission to or issued by the
Rathskeller or the University of
Florida Athletic Association).
3. Destruction, damage or
misuse of public property,
including library materials, or of
private property on campus by
. intentional acts or acts
committed with reckless
disregard of possible harm to
aid public or private property.
4. Actions or statements

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

which by design or consequence
amount to intimidation or
hazing.
5. Continued attendance at,
after warning to disperse by an
official of the University, or
participation in, a raid on a
University living unit.
,6. Disorderly conduct; or,
disrupting the orderly operation
of the University as defined in
Section 2, paragraph 3.18 of the
Board of Regents Operating
Manual and the Demonstration
Policy of the University.
7. Failure to comply with a
University regulation or rule.
8. Repeated violations of
Housing, Interhall, and Area
Council; regulations when the
student has been found guilty by
the Hall or Area Conduct Board
of a previous related violation.
9. Violation of any municipal
ordinance, law of the State of
Florida or law of the United
States.
10. Violation of conduct
probation.
11. Unauthorized use or
taking of public or private
property.
12. Possession of a firearm on
the University campus except as
specifically authorized by
University policy on the
Possession and Use of Firearms
on the University Campus.
13. Actions or conduct which
hinder or obstruct or otherwise
interfere with the
implementation or enforcement
of the Student Conduct Code.
14. Failure to appear before
the Student Conduct Committee
or the Coordinator for Student
Conduct and to testify as a
witness when reasonably
notified to do so by the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct. Nothing in this
subsection shall be construed to
compel self-incrimination.
B. The Honor Court may expel
a student or impose any lesser
penalty for violations of the
Honor Code as defined by the
Student Body Constitution, and
other offenses against the
Student Body defined by proper
enactments of Student
Government, with jurisdiction
assigned to the Honor Court,
and approved by the President
of the University.
C. Hall and Area Conduct
Boards may impose such penalty
as set forth by the University
Housing Committee for the
following: Violation of Housing,
Interhall, and Area Council
regulations.
D. Traffic Court may impose
authorized penalties for the
following: Violation of
University traffic, parking and.
registration regulations.
E. Such other judicial bodies
as may be established and rested
with jurisdiction by appropriate
authority.
VI. Off-Campus Conduct. When
a student violates Section V-A-9
of this Code of Conduct by an
offense committed off the
campus and which is not
associated with a
university-connected activity.

the disciplinary authority of the
University will not be used
merely to duplicate the penalty
awarded for such an act under
applicable ordinances and laws.
The University will take
disciplinary action against a
student for such an off-campus
offense only when it is required
by law to do so or when the
nature of the offense is such that
in the judgment of the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct:
1. The continued presence of
the student on campus is likely
to create interference with the
educational process and the
orderly operation of the
University; or
2. The continued presence of
the student on campus is likely
to endanger the health, safety or
welfare of the members of the
University community or their
property or that of the
University; or
3. The offense committed by
the student is of such a serious,
heinous or repulsive nature, as to
adversely affect the student's
suitability as a member of the
academic community.
If the Coordinator for
Student Conduct determines
that the offense affects the
University as stated above, then
the Committee on Student
Conduct shall hold a prompt
hearing.
in considering matters
referred to it under this section
of the Student Conduct Code,
the Committee on Student
Conduct shall consider whether
the offense is of such nature as
set out in 1, 2 or 3 above, if it,
in fact, was committed by the
student, in addition to its
consideration of whether or not
the student committed the
offense and its recommendations
for penalty.
The action of the Committee
on Student Conduct shall be
made without regard to actions,
pending or completed, by any
off-campus official or body.
VII. Postponement of Hearing
Due to Pending or Possible
Criminal or Civil Charges, if the
student charged with a violation
of the Student Conduct Code,
regardless of which primary
judicial body may hear the
matter, wishes to have the
hearing postponed because there
is pending or possible civil or
criminal litigation which he feels
might be prejudiced by the
findings of the hearing, such
postponement may be granted
provided the student requests it
and agrees to accept conduct
probation -or suspension,
depending upon the gravity of
the offense. Such probation or
suspension will be determined
and activated by the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct and will remain in force
until such time as the student
requests a hearing before the
appropriate primary judicial
body, and the hearing is held.
The student shall be informed
whether he would be placed on

probation or essM
suspended prior to his making a
decision to postpone the
hearing.
VIII. Student Waiver of Right
to Hearing, in the event a
student charged with an offense,
under Section V-Aabove, wishes
to waive in writing his right to a
hearing by the appropriate
official or hearing body and the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct wishes to accept
jurisdiction, the Coordinator for
Student Conduct may make a
determination of facts and, if
the student is found guilty of
the offense, make a
recommendation of penalty.
IX. Summary Hearing. When a
student is accused of a violation
of Section V of this Code which,
in the opinion of the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct, if proven, would not
warrant a penalty in excess of
two quarters probation, then the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct may require such
hearing to be held before the
Chairman of the Committee on
Student Conduct or his
designated representative.
The hearing shall be held in'
accordance with Section 111 of
this Code.
X. Conflict of Jurisdiction. In
the event that the offense
charged is within the jurisdiction
of more than one primary
judicial body, the Coordinator
for Student Conduct shall
determine which primary
judicial body shall hear the
charge.
XI. Penalties. A student
adjudged guilty of violations
under Section V above, may
receive, except where specific
penalities are provided for, any
or ail of the following penalties:
1. Reprimand Formal
rebuke and official recognition
of misconduct as charged by the
University.
2. Conduct Probation A
student on conduct probation is
deemed not to be in good
standing with the University;
conditions may be imposed at
the time the student is placed on
conduct probation. If the
student is found in violation of
the probation by subsequent
violation of this Code prior to
the completion v. of the
probationary period, he will be
either suspended or expelled
from the University. The
duration of the probation period
and conditions imposed will be
in direct proportion of the
degree of seriousness attached to
the misconduct.
3. Suspension The duration
of the period of suspension shall
be in direct proportion to the
degree of seriousness attached to
the misconduct. A suspension
may be imposed for an
indefinite period of time or for a
given period.
4. Expulsion A student
shall be deprived of his
opportunity to continue as a
member of the University
community.
5. Payment of Damages ln
addition to the penalities
described above, a student may
be required to pay compensation
for damage to the university
property provided, however,
that such compensation sHall be
limited to the actual cost of
repair or replacement of such
property.



1 World -HP* Wrap-Up |
j^y^X*XX\vXvXXX*IvXvXvXvXX XvXv! X XI*ySx I*XI I yx >**-* .*.''*Xv!^^BvX.vX vv 'X !vXv!v!v!vXv!v!*Xv!
# i mmmmmm mmm "**************************+*** m*^m AH

tgypnon President
Warns Os New War
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat warned his people today
of the possibility of a new war
with Israel should the Middle
East peace talks break down
again.
As he did, the Egyptian and
Israeli envoys flew to New York
for talks with U.N. mediator
Gunnar V. Jarring.
Jordan, also a party to the
peace talks, was in the midst of a
crisis involving Palestinian
guerrillas and there was some
confusion as to who would
represent Jordan in New York.
The guerrillas oppose both the
current cease-fire and the talks.
The cease-fire does not
involve the Syrian or Lebanon
fronts and the Beirut newspaper
Al-Anwar said Israeli tank
gunners attacked a south
Lebanon village Sunday,
damaging at least 15 houses. The
report said Israeli tanks hit the
village of Shebaa for five hours
and killed a number of people.
There was no official
confirmation of the attack.
Israel still was having trouble
in the Gaza Strip and a military
spokesman in Tel Aviv said
Israeli troops killed an Arab
gherrilla near a Gaza refugee
camp today after he hurled a
grenade at an Israeli patrol.
Another grenade was hurled at
an Israeli civilian vehicle.
The Egyptian president
already has begun a worldwide
diplomatic offensive to explain
Egypts position in the peace
talks. Today, Sadat journeyed to
the town of Tanta, 56 miles

MALONES
I Book and Supply
I SAVE also
I On New & Used *Uof F Glasses & Mugs I
TEXTBOOKS U of F Sweatshirts
I For All Courses p ens I
|| See us first for oil Briefcases |
your school needs. Art Supplies
I Desk Lamps I
I if. of F. Jewelry Book Ends I
I ? U. of F. T Shirts Checks Cashed
I Stuffed Animals. Clocks I
I Pocket Books Stamps I
I Free Customer Parking Located At Rear Os Our Store |
I 1712 West University Ave. Phone 372-0368^^j

north of Cairo, to explain his
policies to the Egyptian people.
Manson Trial 'Political
Defense Lawyer Says
LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Charles Manson is undergoing a
political trial in the Tate
murder case and should no more
be charged with nurder than
Gov. George Wallace or John
Birch Society head Robert
Welch, a defense lawyer argued
today.
Irving Kanarek resumed final
arguments for the defense in the
six-and-one-half-month-old trial
by telling the jury Manson was
being charged with the slayings
because his philosophies were
antagonistic to most of
American society today.
This is a political trial in
which Mr. Manson is brought
here because he is a symbol of
one of the confrontations that is
going on in this country today.
Gas Explosion Rips
Mall On Miami Beach
MIAMI BEACH(UPI) A gas
explosion shattered a block of
businesses just off the
tourist-packed Lincoln Road
shopping mall Monday, spraying
the street with broken glass and
debris and killing at least one
person.
Miami Beach police spokesman
Pete Corso said that in addition
to the one unidentified dead
woman, four policemen and 60
civilians were injured, and of the
injured 5 were admitted to Mt.
Sinai Hospital.

Police brought in earthmoving
equipment to search for any
more persons who might have
been trapped in the rubble of
Mannys Restaurant, the Circle
Blueprint Co. and the Friendship
Gift House.
Corso said the explosion was
centered in the blueprint shop.
It happened almost instantly
after its manager, Hal Boday,
called the gas company to report
a heavy odor of gas.
The explosion happened on
Meridian Avenue in the block
between Lincoln Road, where
hundreds of shoppers were
strolling on a balmy afternoon,
and Lincoln Lane.
McCormack Prayed
Not To Be President
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Retiring Speaker John W.
McCormack, D-Mass., said
Monday President Franklin D.
Roosevelt had a love of
mankind and President Harry
S. Truman the strongest sense
of intuition of any man I have
ever seen.
McCormack was interviewed
on NBC-TVS Today Show. On
another television program
during the weekend, he said that
when he was next in line for the
presidency he prayed nightly
that the good Lord would spare
President Johnson.
The interviewer asked
McCormack what had given him
the most satisfaction during his
time in Congress.
He told of a woman who
came to him during his years as
majority leader after he had
done her a favor. He said he got
embarrassed when she became
profuse in her thanks and called

him a great and good
congressman.
If I had to choose between
being either great or good, I had
rather be good, he said.
Agnew: Editorial Bias
Modivates My Critics
WASHINGTON (UPI) Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew said
Sunday editorial bias in favor of
liberals was partly responsible
for criticism that he had been a
divisive force in politics.
Agnew said some of the things
he has been called are much

/ University City Photo Supply \
1021 W. University Ave.
Across from University City Bank
Featuring a complete line of
cameras, film, and accessories Cl-Lil-l il
for the professional and /flrf/i M
amateur photographers 111 /1E V
Click Camera Store
6rtMsvM Mali J

Tuesday, January 5,1971, The Florida Alligator,

worse than the utterances Ive
made, but that he saw no
editorials spout into being in
his support.
Agnew was interviewed by
conservative columnist William
F. Buckley Jr. on Buckleys
television program, Firing
Line.
Asked why he has been
accused of being divisive, Agnew
said, I suppose Im the
foremost articulator of the
destruction of liberal dogma at
the moment and there are very
few people on the public scene ~
who attack the sacrosanct
institutions.

Page 11



Tht Florida Alligator, Timday, January 6,1971

Page 12

" J-_ ' 4 _- i
Campus; Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
BUY YOUR BOOKS FOR LESS
-SG BOOK EXCHANGE
" , .'r \
V T. > '
- _*
Student Governments Quarterly Book Exchange
4. ;
Is Selling Used Books For Lower Prices. Come And
Browse Our Shelves
' -. .
Room 306 Os The Reitz Union
N :/.
January 4 8 From 1 P.M. 5 P.M.
EAG Seeking Environmentalists
The Environmental Action Group is seeking interested people to work in various projects aimed at
saving the environment. Please work with us this quarter. Call 392-1635 or see us at 323 J.W.R.U.
' v ... 4 w v
. i,
Help Improve Florida Politics?
The United Students for Action (U.S.A.) is actually doing something about The Stagnant Condition of
Florida Politics. We are forming a lobby group to present and reflect student views to our legislatures
in Tallahassee. Call us at 392-1665 and find out how you can help us. Thanks.
* 0
Student Basketball Ticket Information
Students may pick up tickets for all home games from Jan. 4 Jan. 8 at Gate 13, East Stand from j
p.m. 5 p.m. After this tickets will go to students and the general public on a first come-first serve
basis on the day of games.
' * v.f
Math Dept. Offers Non-Credit Course
'r
A non-credit course in Programmed Trigonometry will begin Jan. 13-7:39-9:00 P.M. Mondays and
Wednesdays in 110 Anderson Hall.
Replacement Seats Open For Senate
The Student Senate has seats vacant in Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, Journalism, and
Law. If interested, please apply in the Student Senate Office, 305 J.W.R.U.
' 9
Student Government Presidents Advisory Council
*. 1 * /
Student Govt, is initiating a student advisory council. We are seeking members from all phases of
campus life in order to add diversity to SG. Please call 392-1665 for an appointment. /
Florida Players "Tryouts I
... *'
Tryouts for Fla. Player's big winter production of "Little Mary Sunshine" will be held Tues. & Wed.,
Jan. 5,6,7 p.m. at the Constant Theatre.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON 5 00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS
BRUCE SCHWACK (R.G.8.)
fii DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



GATOR CXiASSIFIEDS

GERT'S a gay girl raady for a whirl
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooer now
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfc)

1122 W. 373-1061
WHOLESALE f -RCT/kilTI
MAkt HANDCRArrao J6
S Te/ L u£aT £ l£R SjfcDs
s Ey l
I Be V Pj
A
Wednesday January 6
: the RATHSKELLER presents
IKING KDNGi
* alio
J CHAPTER ONE OF "THE PERILS OF PAULINE
:SS ££ ADMISSION 25<:
* 10:45
* You don't hawo to be 21 to make it at the RAT!
PRESENTED BY SGP
******* *****
I Take a Break |
I I
-enjoy I
| The Florida Alligator |

Tuesday, January S, 1971, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
Landmark available for Immediate
sublet | or 2 male roommates 2 bdr.
47.50 + util. Jim Darby 373*3049 or
378-7693 (B-3t-54-p)
WANTED
Male to share l bdrm. apt. to begin
now or winter trm. $57.50 + %
utilities 1216 SW 2 Ave. Apt. 22 has:
1 bdrm. Itvrm. kltch. A bath Stop by
or call 376-2084 (C-4t-50-p)
FEMALE Roommate needed for
Landmark Apt. 50 for Winter Qtr.
AC TV $47.50 + utilities Call
376-7693 after 5:30 P.M. (C-6t-48-p)
2 female roommates wanted to share
Landmark apt with Junior. 47.50
mo. Jan-June 373-1598 Marian or
Janie (C-3t-51-p)
SSSSSSSSfSS
HELP WANTED
SSftSf&i
We have a part-time opening for a
mature and ambitious Junior, senior
or grad student who Is Interested In
obtaining practical Training In the
field of finance. Insurance and
marketing. There Is opportunity for
reasonably high earnings. For a
personal and conftdental Interview
appointment call 373-3589
(E-lt-54-p)

HELP WANTED
PT X-ray Tech, needed by Alachua
Qen. Hosp., on-call, day nursery for
pre-schoolers while you work. Call
372-4321 X 365. (E-10t-45-p)
CAMP PINEWOOO ln The Blue
Ridge Mountains Hendersonville, N.
Carolina. Co-ed Camp For Boys A
Girls. Students interested In summer
employment as Cabin Counselors,
Activity Instructors, Kitchen Aides
and Groundskeepers, should write for
general Information and Staff
Applications. .Howl. .Only
clean-cut young people need apply.
Camping dates: June 22 to Aug. 17.
Reply to winter address: Camp
Plnewood, 1801 Cleveland Rd. Miami
Beach, Fla. 33141 (E-6t-S4-p)
AUTOS
1968 flat 850 Spider convertible.
21,000 miles. Radio. New paint. Call
Alachua 462-1245 or 462-2687.
(G-Bt-47-p)
PERSONAL
-f
Computer Dating meet your Ideal
date. Special Introductory price. Now
serving leading colleges and
universities throughout the US.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702
(J-23t-44-p)
SINGLE STUDENTSI Meet more
members of the opposite sex at U.F.
All dates In Gainesville. Free details
write: Nationwide Dating Service,
P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-15t-41-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst...
.. .102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039
for appointment. (J-44t-54-p)
J. Carol, Happy New Yearl This
quarter well surprise them all, each
In our own way. Love, M. Ernest.
(J-lt-54-p)
QUIMINSON RIMINSON KNOWS
LLOYD TROWELSON, do you? Call
this week I 392-7349 room 249
Fletcher S (J-lt-54-p)
Rooti-toot-toot, Im a ... Whitman.
Make a new years resolution to
study, for everyone elses sake,
PLEASE! PLEASEI (J-lt-54-p)
SERVICES
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to LU4jVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (M-tfc)
No time for typing? Call me anytime
Barbara 378-4069 $.50 per page
electric carbon ribbon. Paper not
supplied. (M-2t-52*p)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto-Electric Service, 1111 S. Main
378-7330. Nowl BankAmerlcard and
Master Charge. (M-tfc)

I
f
1
HH
;.:aH[|
J ""

the rxk. jui.Muu (dm
SiiPlii 1 is a British made
film featuring stars of the rock and jazz world
from both sides of the Atlantic jamming in a
converted factory. Captured on film are Buddy
Miles and Steven Stills, Buddy Guy. Jack Bruce,

January 5 & 6th 5:30,8:00,10:30 Union Auditorium SI.OO pon*orod by tn
J.W.H. Union
BKmK&Kmmmmmmmmmm^mmmmmmmmmarnmlmmmmmmimmt^mm^mm^t^mmmmmmmmmAmmmmmmmmHmmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Page 13

I its m
jvw- w
Strasa
The Owl
jallto
taycat
AT... 2:12 o
4:04 5:56
I 'SCROOGE: I

Todays
more for your money meal
a.moisons
__CfIFETERIP
P TUESDAY'S FEATURE "j
golden fried chicken I
I ALL YOU CAN EAT I
!j 99 5 WEDNESDAY'S I i
* FEATURE I |
a J SAVORY BEEF STEW J
! 79{ i
i j
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
Lmoisows
CRFETERIR ..beyond comparison! j
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Eric Clapton, and Roland Kirk jamming the
blues together; Colosseum and the Modern Jazz 1
Quartet and Led Zeppelin all playing separately
and in various combinations ending in a jam
with Clapton. Guy, Stills, Jack Bruce, Duster
Bennett, Buddy Miles, and Dallas Taylor.

NOW PLAYING!
AT: 1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15t9:20
PURR-FECTLY
WONDERFUL j
WAIT
MlMk*sS*
tsasmCtss
NEW CARTOON FEATURE J
TECHNICOLOR
1970 Walt Disney Productions
NOW PLAYING!
AT:2:244:53-7:22&9:51
|Auy liiffMlF
JUWn fWWnCiin
A Howard Hawks Roducbon
tholobo m
Tetihnccta*



I, TVw Florida Alliprtor, Tuesday, January 5,1971

Page 14

SEX IN 1970
= : r 2 gr
.... .. -. ....... x
" __ ... Hr. . ''
Depends On Where You Do It
. TvSi. I

By DICK WEST
UPI Writ*r
While everyone is busy
reviewing and evaluating the
year that was, let us not forget
the role that sex played in 1970.
For an analysis of the year's
sexual impact, I have obtained
an exclusive interview with Dr.
Goliath McPrude, author of the
best-selling book "More Than
You Ever Wanted to Know
About Sex and Are Sorry Now
That You Asked."
Q. From a sexual standpoint,
Dr. McPrude, was 1970 a good
year or a bad year?
A. That depends on what
part of the country you live in.
It was a good year south of Lake
Erie, west of the Pecos River and
in Pocatello,Tdaho. Elsewhere, it
was nothing much to write home
about.
Q. What determines whether
a year is sexy or not?
A. Climate has a lot to do
with it, and also the amount of
nitrogen in the soil. Generally
speaking, the best years are the
years in which you have an
easterly wind prevailing.

Soviets Invited To Attend
Trial Os Angela Davis

NEW YORK (UP!) The State
Department has invited Soviet
experts to sit in at the trial of
black militant Angela Davis in
California on charges of
kidnaping and murder,
Newsweek magazine reported
Sunday.
In the lead item of the Jan. 11
Periscope section, Newsweek
said Washington officials hope
Russia will reciprocate by
admitting U.S. observers to the
trials of alleged Jewish
skyjackers and intellectual
dissenters.
WITH PRESIDENT
Nixon's blessing, a letter is on

| recordsvillel
| WELCOMES |
| YOU BACK I
j with A DEAL ON j
I GEORGE HAMt&PN j
j TRIPLE ALBUM I
SB.BB I
JANUARY 5,6, 7, j
RECORDSVILLE
g GAINESVILLE MALL |

Q. What are some of the
factors that kept 1970 from
being a great sex year?
A. The General Motors
strike, for one thing. Other
adverse forces included the
failure of Congress to enact a

its way from the State
Department to Pyotr Kapitsa,
Russia's top physicist, inviting
him and other Russian scientists
and legal experts to observe the
California murder trial of black
revolutionary Angela Davis, the
magazine said.
It was not clear why the
invitation was addressed to
Kapitsa.
MISS DAVIS, an avowed
Communist who formerly taught
philosophy at the University of
California in Los Angeles, is
charged with purchasing guns
used in a shootout at the Marin
county courthouse in San

- -A. .
*
meaningful gun control law and
the trouble in Cambodia.
Q. Did 1970 produce any
major trends or portents that
might influence the future
course of sex in this country?
A. The only significant
development was the Senate
vote to deny additional funds
for the supersonic transport. Sex
cannot thrive in America
without a flourishing aviation
industry.
Q. Did the bankruptcy of the
Penn Central Railroad have any
notable effect on the nation's
sex life?
A. It is of course, axiomatic
that sex becomes haphazard if
the trains don't run on time.
Look at what happened in Italy
in the 19305. I would say,
however, that sex in the United
States is flexible enough to
survive the Penn Central,
provided a prolonged rail strike
can be avoided.
Q. What were the
implications, sex-wise, of moves
to restrict imports of shoes and
textiles?
A. It is always difficult to

Rafael, Calif., in which a judge
and three others were killed.
Under California law, Miss
Davis could be sentenced to
death if she is found guilty.
Beetle Bingt
White fringed beetles are
destructive to more than 200
varieties of plants.

Gresham's 16 th Drugs, Inc.
1605 SW 13th St. 376-2568
.. 1 ' /
Prescriptions
Cosmetics Gifts
. Jewelr^* u Toys Cards 3
Open Weekdays 8:30 AM to 10PM
>/ Sunday IPM to 10PM
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS

convince the Americans that
their sexual well-being hinges on
Britain's entry into the
European Common Market and
other aspects of international
trade. But if new trade barriers

Datsun
gives you
someming
exxtra.
> *
pern ysrcr*i\ //
/|| -Jps\ /#/ IH m
Price of this Datsun 4-Door includes:
Independent rear Fully reclining bucket
suspension seats
Whitewall tires Safety front disc brakes
Tinted glass & Nylon carpeting
DATSUNS
decid&^^^

are raised, there undoubtedly
will be a sexual decline.
Q. How about sex and our
Middle East policy?
A. The less said about that,
the better.
' V,



Tollahassee Report

Sherman Up For Trial
On Marijuana Charge
MILTON, Fla. (UPI) Santa
Rosa County Judge M. M.
Gibson has bound Florida State
University student body
president Chuck Sherman over
to circuit court for trial on a
charge of possession of
marijuana.
First Circuit Court Judge
Woodrow M. Melvin was
assigned the case Thursday
following Gibsons ruling. No
date has yet been set for the
trial.
Sherman, 25, a third year
graduate student in political
science was arrested
Thanksgiving evening in the
small resort community of Gulf
Breeze near Pensacola and
charged with possession of
one-half ounce of marijuana.
Adults Selling Drugs
To Get 10 Years
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Attorney General Earl Faircloth
Monday ruled adults who plead
guilty or nolo contendre to
selling drugs to minors must be
adjudged guilty and sentenced to
not less than 10 years
imprisonment.
Faircloth, in an opinion
released during his last day in
office, said the law resolutely
forbids the placing of the
defendant on probation, and
therefore probation may not

Uncle Sam Pays Phone Bill

GREENSBORO, N.C. (UP!)
Pretty Rita Ann Galyeans
telephone number is in all of the
new 1040 federal income tax
manuals much to the chagrin
of the Internal Revenue Service.
Rita, a 17-year-old high
school student, is having a ball.
Or she was, until the IRS moved
in to rectify its mistaken listing
of her number for its regional
office at Greensboro.
Ive been getting calls from
everywhere, Rita said. Ive
been getting more than a
hundred a day.
The calls started Tuesday.
They came from such distant
points as Chicago, Key West,
Fla., New York and Fort Wayne,
Ind. To-Ritas bewilderment all
of the callers wanted
information regarding federal
income taxes.
Finally, a representative of
the IRS visited Rita and
explained that her telephone
number inadvertently was
printed on the income tax
Manuals out of Washington and
distributed nationally.
He said her number has been
listed on every income tax
booklet 1040 in the United
Staes more than one million
of them.
Rita, a brown-haired,
dark-eyed junior at Smith High
School, said she was anxious to
return to class Monday after the
holiday break to tell her friends
of her newly-found prominence
in the hearts of taxpayers.
Besides the publicity, Rita is

lawfully be granted.
The court must sentence him
to serve at least ten years in the
state prison in order to comply
with said statutory provisions,**
Faircloth said.
The ruling was requested by
Okaloosa County Circuit Court
Judge Charles A. Wade of
Crestview in a letter last month.
*
Bill To Repeal All
Property Exemptions
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
proposed bill to repeal all
exemptions granted by special or
local acts to property taxation
will be discussed by the Senate
subcommittee on ad valorem
taxation at a public hearing Jan.
18 in Orlando.
The bill, which was prefiled
by the Senate Ways and Means
Committee, is almost identical
to a bill which passed the House
but died on the Senate calendar
during the 1970 session.
Approval Expected
For Canoe Trails
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Floridas conservation-conscious
Cabinet is expected to approve a
plan January 19th to dedicate
nine scenic rivers flowing over
350 miles as Wilderness Canoe
Trails.*
The canoe trail program
would put Florida on a par with
the Famous Boundary Waters

reaping something every other
teen-ager would dream about about
- about her telephone bill paid
for a full year, compliments of
Uncle Sam for all the
inconvenience he has caused her.

)sho?x
208 W. UmX Ave.
Diagonally Across From Silverman's
Open til 9 P.M. Friday
JUST ARRIVED!
CORDUROY FLARES
CORDUROY FLARES
CORDUROY FLARES
NEW COLORS!
NEW WEAVES!
IQ 00 £ 12

canoe area that each summer
draws thousands of
outdoorsmen to Ely, Minn.
The canoe trail program is the
brainstorm of Lonnie Ryder and
Fernando Redo, planners with
the State Division of Recreation
and Parks.
The beautiful part of this
program, and the reason we
expect quick approval by the
Cabinet, is that it wont require
any additional funds, said
Recio. Florida already has five
established canoe trails four of
them, including the 90-mile
Wilderness Waterway trail, in
the Everglades National Park.
There will be 14 canoe trails
about evenly distributed
throughout the state if the
Cabinet okays the nine
additional rivers.
Askew Calls Special
Session For Jan. 27
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
DAI |Kf% A flroiir AVtn/MinAA^l
VJUT7 iN-cuum Asitew announced
Monday that he is calling a
special session of the legislature
Jan. 27 to deal with rising
insurance rates.
Askew simultaneously
disclosed that he would ask the
State Supreme Court, as soon as
he becomes governor at one
minute after midnight today, for
an advisory opinion on whether
the legislature can enact a
corporate income tax by simple
statute or must have it approved
by the people as an amendment

She said the telephone
company would fix it so that
future calls would go to a special
operator who would ask the
caller whom he was trying to
reach Uncle Sam or Rita.

to the state constitution.
The governor decided on this
course after lengthy discussions
with legislative leaders, and a
plea from Insurance
Commissioner-elect Thomas
OMalley to have the legislature
consider emergency insurance

jDStf-Fax Bowliag League Meetiig
(if *fl January 5, 6:30 pm
Room 348 Rtitz Union
All interested parties please attend
For More Information contact
Reitz Union Gamas Area
I
GREAT SAVINGS ON
QUALITY APPAREL
DRESS SHIRTS 2 s o. sS I
SPORT COATS reduced I
UP TO OFF I
REG. PRICE I
SLACKSand JEANS 2 FOR sioH
CONVENTIONAL AND FLARES I
ALL WEATHER JACKETS
SELECTED GROUP I
SUITS VALUES TO $95.00 I
SWEATERS REDUCED 20% I
JACKETS AND COATS 1/3"|
A £ IB
MANY OTHER
ITEMS
REDUCED
ALL SALES FINAL-NO REFUNDS-NO EXCHANGES |

leiueyl, 1971, The Rortde Afrfpepr, i

law reforms immediately.
If the State Supreme Court
advises him that the constitution
must be amended to permit a
corporate income tax, Askew
said, he will expand the Jan. 27
special session to include tax
reform as well.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligrtor, Tuasday, January 5,1971

By Alligator Sarvioas
Tension and turmoil of
society were reflected at UF
throughout 1970.
Controversy in areas from
academics to athletics served as
a backdrop for recognition of
quality, growth and
development in education,
research and service.
Student enrollment soared
above 22,000, taxing facilities
and personnel limited by
inadequate funding. Although
student population increased by
almost 1,500, corresponding
adjustments in new employees
were insufficient, combined with
more than $lB million sliced
from the Universitys 1970-71
budget request.
PLANS TO construct a
University Activities Center,
including a spacious sports
arena, performing arts theatre,
natatorium and other facilities,
were put in limbo when students
defeated a proposed $6 per
quarter increase in their activity
fee to help fund the complex.
All was not gloomy on the
building horizon, however.
Funding of Project I, the first
phase of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Centers expansion
program, was assured with the
award of $19.7 million by the
National Institutes of Health and
subsequent matching of $12.5
million in state funds.
And two new swimming pools
- the first to be built on the
campus in 42 years were
added in residence hall areas.
FOR THE FOURTH time in
six years and an
unprecedented third straight
year the College of Journalism
and Communications placed first
in the William Randolph Hearst
Foundation national writing
contest. Florida won in 1964-65,
placed sixth and third the next
two years, and has dominated
the competition since 1967. A
Florida student, Raul Ramirez
of West Palm Beach, captured
the Hearst individual award to
give UF a dean sweep of annual
honors.
Announcements were made
during the year of appointment
of the first distinguished visiting
professors, a program
co-sponsored by various
academic units and the Alumni
Association.
Retired UJS. Supreme Court
Justice Tom Clark will be in the
College of Law and former
Undersecretary of State for
International Affairs Willard L.
Thorp in the College of Business
Administration during the 1971
winter quarter.
STUDENTS EMPHASIZED
their commitment to things they
consider relevant with their
ACCENT *7O program on
Tomorrow in Perspective. The
week-long February event
brought an array of national
figures to the campus for
speeches treating various phases
of the environment.
Divergent views -o-n
conservation, pollution, city
planning and the state- of the
nation were covered by Arthur
Godrey, Jeanne Dixon, Mayor
Sam Yorty of Los Angeles, Mqj.
Gen. FJP. Koisch of the Army
Corps of Engineers, Dr. Rene
Dubos, news commentator
David Brinkley and others.
Controversy throughout the

1970: Quite A Year At UF

year centered more on speakers
than on their topics with such
dissimilar personalities as Abbie
Hoffman, Margaret Mead,
William Kunstler, Gen. Chappie
James, Ralph Abernathy and
UJS. Rep. Carl Albert among
those giving talks.
THE NATIONAL ISSUE of
campus unrest was most evident
at UF in May when protests
against the death of four
students at Kent State and the
war in Southeast Asia were
reflected in a series of
emotion-charged events.
Student Government
sponsored a May 6 memorial
program on the Plaza of the
Americas with the UF
administration joining in
declaring a day of mourning for
those who had lost their lives.
This occasion, for all on campus
to have an opportunity in
concert to express their sorrow
publicly, splintered into efforts
by individual factions to
promote disruptive action.
The Student Senate called for
a three-day strike. One group
invaded an empty classroom
May 7 and expressed the
intention of remaining
indefinitely but vacated the
building after being warned of
the threat of arrest.
BECAUSE OF the high state
of emotion and a feeling that the
safety of students would best be
served by having the smallest
number possible remain on
campus, President Stephen C.
OConnell cancelled "evening
progress tests May 7 and classes
scheduled Friday, May 8. The
campus was fully operational the
following Monday.
Following the interruption of
activities, UF officials prepared
to analyze student demands to
disarm campus police and
eliminate ROTC. By June action
was taken on a committee report
to study removal and control of
guns on the campus. The
possession and use of firearms
now are prohibited except when
specifically authorized. ROTC
remained on a voluntary basis.
Athletics were the center of
debate, beginning with
circumstances surrounding the
hiring of Doug Dickey as head
football coach. Dickey replaced
Ray Graves after Florida
defeated Dickeys Tennessee
team in the 1969 Gator Bowl to
cap a 9-1-1 season.
THE YEAR WAS also the
first in which students were
required to purchase tickets to
home football games. Further
furor was stirred by a strict
enforcement of the
long-standing policy prohibiting

CAMPUS TOURNAMENTS
6 1970 1971
BILLIARDS,
BOWLING, BRIDGE, CHESS, and JBBiff
TABLE TENNIS ~
Individual trophies for each event ~
persons in each
event will be eligible for
intercollegiate competition to be
hosted by the University of Florida in H
February, 1971.
tiTTff REGISTER:
liIREITZ UNION GAMES AREA
yMW JANUARY 4-18 t2:OONOON |p
ONLY FULL TIME UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE
SEITZ UNION GAME AREA

possession and consumption of
alcoholic beverages at Florida
Field. A new container ban
prohibited ticket-holders from
bringing liquid containers of any
kind into the stadium.
Later in the season increased
bomb threats throughout the
nation, in Florida and at UF
caused a public announcement
of policy pertaining to such
threats and security measures
being taken at Florida Field.
Although bomb threats were
prevalent throughout the year,
the only semblance of such
violence occurred when a
fire-type bomb exploded with
little damage in the ROTC
Building in early September,
during the break between the
summer and fall quarters.
Other athletic-related
controversies included the use of
Florida Field for a Student
Government-sponsored Super
Show which caused the field to
resemble a large garbage dump
following a rain-drenched
performance of popular rock
groups; rules and regulations
governing the ownership
disposition and sharing of
proceeds from the product
Gatorade, now resting with a
federal court to resolve differing
views; the formation of the
Florida League of Athletes
following some discontent of
certain team members with dress
regulations imposed by the
coaching staff, and a Board of
Regents study of the role of
athletics on state university
campuses.
UNION ORGANIZATION
was evidenced in several areas
with the formation of an
American Federation of
Teachers chapter and organizing
activity among non-academic
employees.
An audit review on
employment policies was
conducted on the campus by a
team from the Office for Civil
Rights of the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
It noted that positive steps had
been taken in the direction of
Equal Opportunity Employment
and listed adverse findings to aid t
in eliminating remaining
deficiencies.
During the year UF began an
extensive self-study of all
departments, colleges and service
units. To identify its missions
and necessary resources, UF
joined with other state
institutions in launching a
planning, programming and
budgeting system.
PLANNING FOR the states
first college of Veterinary
Medicine, authorized by the

1965 Legislature and partially
funded by the 1969 Legislature,
established that the resident
instruction programs of the new
college will be associated with
and under the general direction
of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center. Research and extension
efforts will be coordinated by
the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.
During the year there was a
TONKSHT

AN EXCLUSIVE SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS! y*2KsjC^.
"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING"
YOUR NFW COLLFGF RING IS INSURED JJSr
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST .
* LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT, ROBBERY,
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE.
* LOSS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING.
* ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE. ':^Eg
REGISTERED CERTIFICATE WITH EVERY RING 1 *1:
HATCHERS JEWELERS '%jsl
2 EAST UNIV. AVE. 376 6892
im w. r J 57 3
A r WHOLTOAUE f WCTAiuTI
VV handcraf-tbo
S \ sSods
fry C"
Sebastians Sbop Volkswagen Repairs I
Welcome Back Students
We do expert VW Repair
Watch for our Specials
Sebastians Sbep
535 $W 4th Ave. Phone 376-9381
m VfIIHIVIIM u
[ mown:
whmm *** * brwali M
I Wo're glad to sm ail of you back! 1

re-examina ti on b f
administrators, faculty and
students of the University
College (UC) and the
organization of general
education on the campus.
Several plans submitted to the
Curriculum Committee were the
subject of vigorous discussion.
Action on the colleges future is
scheduled by the University
Senate Jan. 21.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins



The
Florida
Alligator

'3O PER CENT WONT WIN GAMES BARTLETT
Cagers Plagued By Poor Shooting

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett stressed his teams poor
shooting as the main reason his
team is mired in a below .500

' : wir

v:';; -S
M? : v&js B|k
,_< jmm T<>
v*
....... -Jf
j.;.
'v, 'S /
TOM KENNEDY
GARY WADDELL STRUGGLES TO KEEP POSSESSION
... Gator center (in white) fights with two Auburn defenders for ball

sV l^ v 'The independent Greeks
S Omega Alpha chapter, newly
organized colony, welcomes
U of F men and cordially
invites you to visit our I
x&ms&zm) temporaryhme temporaryhme'%
'% temporaryhme'% si
i brotlierhood with the opacity to grow and
change-which offers the individual the
B opportunity to express and develop his own
M. M % talents while he plays a decisive role in the
MURPHNEE AM*
I
.UNNERSITY AVENUE
|l| in^r-iitrwNw
wi w m
I' ... I *"* £
' II f
M. W. Ist AVE.
tpKQ
If. : r. f
*. .-I'.|
PHONE: 373-2775 1728 N.W. IST AVE.

. .v. 1 .;...
BE-' lit ; fIH Isl >BB. S Mim s flrafl Vfll a agr ft
t a
- |B , JBjV

season, three wins and six loses.
Our shooting has been very
poor in the last four games,
Bartlett said on the eve of
Mondays game with Vanderbilt
at Florida Gym. We have been
shooting near 30 per cent and

that wont defeat the kind of
team we will be playing the next
couple of weeks.
During the Christmas
vacation, the Gators lost to LSU
87-77 in Baton Rouge, defeated
Northwestern 88-73 here, lost to
Fordham 72-65 here, and
suffered two loses in the Gator
Bowl Classic in Jacksonville
69- to Georgia Tech, and
70- to Bradley. Last week,
Florida defeated Auburn 66-60
at Florida Gym.
WE HAVE played good at
times and in one game had only
five turnovers, Bartlett said,
but our shooting really has
been below what it should be.
Beginning with the Houston
game, a 61-60 loss here, Bartlett
reviews the past seven games.
HOUSTON We controlled
the tempo of the game but
during the second half, we shot
only 29 per cent.
LSU The layoff hurt us as
we played a poor first half, being
down by 20 points. But the boys
came back in the second half
and closed to within three
points. The last two minutes
proved to be decisive as we
couldn't put the ball in.
NORTHWESTERN Our
best game to date. We put
everything together and won by
15.
FORDHAM Within 48
hours of the previous game, our
team just didnt look the same.
GEORGIA TECH This
was the opening round of the
Gator Bowl Classic and we let
Techs press bother us. Our
mistakes hurt us but we were

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Tuesday, January 5,1971, The Florida Alligator,

i
still in the game with five
minutes remaining. You cant
win a game scoring only two
points in five minutes.
BRADLEY Their press
didnt effect us. We had a
one-point lead with 50 seconds
left in the game, but again our
shooting hurt us. We played well
enough to win, but...
AUBURN We showed
constant improvement here, but
again our shooting percentage
was only 32 per cent.
Bartlett didnt pinpoint any
one player on the Gators that
has been a standout this season.
We have had good players
sometimes, but not often
enough.
It seemed at the beginning of

If All C.P.O. Shirts
Values to $17.00
Solids and Plaids
NOW 9.95
Winter Jackets
Pea Coats
Navy Valve
NOW 1/3 OFF
Mens Flares
Solids A Plaids
m m NOW 25% OFF
jj B Florida imprinted sweaters
B B S-M-L-XK
M BB Navy A Brown $6.95 Value
NOW 5.25
National Brand
Long Siam Dross Shirts
Values to SB.OO Solids & Stripes 595
Short Shove Shirts- )ne Group I
Values to 6.00 S-M-L Button-down Collars
2.99 ea. or 2/$5
GATOS SHOP HRI
1710 W. University Ave. pall hiL^||
Bardc-Americarc^^

CHUCK KELLER
Sports Editor

* 0
the year, our team was looking
for away to lose a game, but
now it seems to be that they are
looking for away to win,*
Bartlett said.
* REBOUNDING, A part of the
game which plagued the Gators
earlier this season, is now
becoming a strong part of the
team.
We were getting hurt on the
boards in the first couple of
games/* Bartlett said, But now
either we win on the boards or
we are within one rebound of
the other team.**
The Gators have three away
games in a row and face seven
games in 11 days within the next

Page 17



i. The Florida AMigator, Tuatday, January 5,1971

Page 18

Trackmen Shine In Holiday Meets

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Cormpondant
*- -i
Christmas was not a restful
holiday season for UF track
athletes.
A small but potent contingent
won the unofficial, team title at
the indoor Northeast Louisiana
Invitational Dec. 12 in Monroe,
La. And a larger group won the
Mobile Senior Bowl meet a week
later.
OUTSTANDING IN the pole

' llfi:
Rf JB B bhrmEEE^^
bXJk_ A
, , V&-V vyw-. T Bp sfe .!,,nn. smai
TOM KENNEDY
RON JOURDAN CLEARS BAR IN RECENT MEET
... FTC's high jumper has cleared seven feet over 25 times
Millers Last Second Shot
Defeats Vanderbilt, 84-82

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Exacutiva Sports Editor
Sophomore point guard Tony
Miller sank a 15-foot shot in the
last two seconds of the third
overtime period Monday night
to hand the Southeastern
Conference leading Vanderbilt
Commodores an 84-82 defeat to
the Gators.
Miller, who had missed game
winning shots in regulation play
and the first overtime period,
took a pass from Jerry Hoover,
circled to the right of the key
and hit the game winning basket
TONY MILLER
... hits winning shot
§fU
CAMPUS REP
808 STACY
378-5222
MILLER-BROWN
422^JIWJ3h^T ;>

vault competition, UFs Scott
Hurley set a school and meet
record with a 16-foot, 6-inch
effort which is the leading mark
in the nation in the early indoor
season.
Florida Track Clubs (FTC)
Ron Jourdan, who has jumped
seven feet or higher over 25
times in his career, cleared 6
feet, 10 inches to win that event.
He had three good tries at 7 feet
but clipped the bar with his trail
leg.

as the final seconds ticked away.
THE LAW of averages was with
us, Miller said in the wild
locker room following the
Gators fourth victory in 10
outings. The screen was set up
good with blocks by (Dan) Boe
and (Jerry) Hoover.
When the shot left my hand,
1 knew it had a good chance to
go in, Miller said. The first
shot (the last one of regulation
play) felt good, but it didn't
fall. The shot went in the
basket, circled it, and popped
out.
In the second overtime,
Vanderbilt came from behind to
tie the score at 80-80 after
Florida ripped off eight straight

FRANKS SUB BASE I
2003 SW 13th St I
announces I
FREE DELIVERS
cat, 372-7644 5 I
We deliver to all campus I
locations and off-campus I
within a 2-miie radius. I
Op en: I
11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sun-Thurs I
11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Fri-Sat I

John Parker, running for FTC,
easily won the mile in a meet
record time of 4:05.2, a personal
best and also a nation-leading
mark at the present. Parker ran
evenly paced quarters to leave
the field 40 yards
behind.
PERHAPS THE most thrilling
event of the meet, however, was
the two-mile relay which saw
slow legs by Jack Stewart and
Ken Bumsed made up by a
brilliant 1:52.9 by Benny

points in the first two minutes.
Hoovers last second desperation
shot hit the backboard and went
astray.
A TURNOUT of 3,613 wafched
the tallest player ever to play in
the SEC, 7-foot 4-inch Steve
Turner, who scored only two
points in his brief play.
Gary Waddell was high man
for the Gators with 20 points
with Miller next at 19. Other
Gators in double figures were
Hoover with 10, Earl Findley
12, Tom Purvis 13, and Hal
Kelley with 10.
Rudy Thacker and Rod
Freeman were high for Vandy
with 16 each.

Vaughn, and an edge-of-the-seat
come from behind 1:51 by
irishman Eamonn OKeeffe to
give UF a five yard victory in
7:46.
Roger Carson set a school
record in the semi-finals of the
60 yard dash, running a 6.1,
while Ron Coleman long-jumped
22 feet, 9 inches.
O'Keeffe, feeling the effects
of his brilliant anchor leg on the
two-mile relay, picked up a
second place in the open 880 in
1:56. Jack Stewart recorded the
same tine in placing second in
the B section of the 880
during the afternoon.
MIKE LARRISON threw a
personal best 50 feet, 6VI inches
in the shot, while teammate Jim
Nelson placed third with a
52-foot, IVa inch shot. Chuck
Duff placed third in the high
jump behind Jourdan with a
6-foot, 8-inch effort.
A week later the two-mile

Cant Find That Book?
W e ve Got it.
rT I The Americans
I I I By DAVID FROST
L I Popular TV personality
Tm. 'W^' I and author of The English,
V Vll 1 David Frost gives equal
I *X)LVjI I time to Americans in his
I I new b ok wh,ch offers an
1 aJM 1 amusing and controversial
jk I cross-section of what is
I best and worst in the
I U.S.A. With gentle satire,
1* I Frost questions every
aspect of American life.
looks moko on idool lotting gilt.
Our s#l#ction it tho most comploto
in Goinutvilio.
Pip# Shop 4
IIV C v Bookstore
AJM. ftoSPJM.
116 South#ott First Streot Mon.-st.
gSt Rn TheB
that attracts
the birds:
THE MGB 71
The look girls look for. The MGB 71 Ijas it.. .that road roadhungry
hungry roadhungry 100k...10w, lean, and manly. With mag-style
§jj gr Wheels, radial-ply tires, new recessed grille. Even a
*§ W leather-covered steering wheel.
if
wmm ~o<-
And when it comes to action, the MGB 71 puts out
with 1798 c.c. twin-carb engine, 4-speed synchro synchromeshed
meshed synchromeshed gearbox, rack-and-pinion steering and track tracktested
tested tracktested suspension.
-
So come on down to our showroom and test drive
America's largest-selling imported sports car. The
MGB 71. It's the closest youll ever get to a bird cage
on wheels.
Harfred Auto Imports
Your New MG Dealer MhptL

relay shifted personnel andcame
up with a 7:42, nearly lading
the field with Bruce and recks
joining Vaughn and OKeefe.
THE MILE relay, running
nearly even splits, won in 3:20
with Bill Rennis, David Haines,
Benny Hicks and Jerry Fannin.
Jack Steward placed second in
the 600-yard dash in 1:12.2 and
Chuck Duff again jumped 6 feet,
8 inches for second place.
OKeefe also won the
1,000-yard dash in 2:11.2 with
Vaughn second in 2:12.
Shotputters Nelson and
Larrison continued improving as
they threw 52-feet, IVi inches
and 51% respectively. Scott
Hurley again broke the 16-foot
barrier to win the pole vault
with 16%.
Ron Coleman placed second
in the long jump with 23-feet
9-inches, Grover Howard picking
up 4th with 22-feet 8-inches.



HATFIELD UNITED WITH DICKEY
Vo Is Aide Joins Gators
As Defensive Back Coach

By KEN MCKINNON
Alligator Nam Editor
UF head football coach Doug
Dickey announced Monday that
Ken Hatfield, a wide receiver
coach from Tennessee, will
replace former defensive
backfield coach Don Brown.
Hatfield, a 27-year-old native
of Helena, Ark., was hired by
Dickey at Tennessee in the
spring of 1968 as an assistant to
then-freshman coach at UT Bob
Davis. He moved to his wide
receiver position when Dickey
came to Florida in January in
1969 and youthful Bill Battle
took over the reins at Tennessee.
DICKEY WAS a coach at
Arkansas under Frank Broyles at
the time Hatfield was playing
there between the years
1962-1964. The Razorbacks
played in the 1962 Sugar Bowl,
losing Jo Mississippi, and in the
1964 Cotton Bowl, defeating
Nebraska, while Hatfield was
playing there.
Hatfield made second team
All-America as a defensive back
at Arkansas, twice being named
to the Southwest Conference
academic team and to the
academic All-America team his
senior year.
Married to Sandra Wright of
Kennett, Mo., Hatfield coached
at Helena, Ark. High School in
DOUG DICKEY
... announces new coach

ART and OFFICE
I jL SUPPLIES I
I r H COMPLETE ART AND I
I ENGI J EERING SUPPLIES I
I BRING THIS COUPON I s99 I
I IN FOR A 207. \ I
SSS2L CHESNUTS
| GOOD TILL JAW. 10tfc, 1971 | DOWNTOWN AT 106 W. UNIV |

KEN HATFIELD
I IT MAAIiMa nn n
t ui receiver codcn
1965 before joining the Army.
His active duty consisted of a
three year apprenticeship under
Paul EHetzel at West Point.
DICKEY, UPON hiring

$1 OFF
Clip the jyj
Pizza Inn < \j t J
"Buck"
below for a special treat!
/yU PIZZA INN DOUGH I
[ffil ' \sNNflilMi with thl/i\\
11-111 / \purehM of any II 1 11 |
JLV*\\ eHSffil-: /Ca or yj
1 Plaza Inm Xi f rs* Ftai Inn
Dollar par famHy \ /j7*-4§2l' **
QNE PIZZA INN BUCK 1 sl\\

t
Hatfield to the coaching position
at Tennessee in 1968,
remembers Hatfield as an
intelligent, alert member of the
Razorback secondary and an
important member of the teams
defense.
Brown will now work with
the offensive lineman,
specifically the tight ends, and
will take on some football
administrative work under
Dickey.
With the appointment of
Hatfield, only one position
within Dickey's staff remains
open, that of the head freshman
coaching job, vacated by Jimmy
left his UF job as linebacker
coach to take over as defensive
coordinator at Virginia Tech.
Speculation is that the
freshman position will be filled
from within Dickey's staff.

1970 CADILLAC, Sedan do Villa $5895
Four door hardtop, Sauteme Gold with beige vinyl top
and matching interior. Air conditioned, full power, factory
warranty.
1969 CADILLAC Fleotwood $5195
Unexcelled luxury, cost SB,OOO new. Full power and all
comfort options.
1969 OLDSMOBILE, Delta Custom $3195
Four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior. AM/FM
radio, air conditioned, full power, including power door
locks.
1968 CADILLAC, Sedan de Ville $3795
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, full power. White with
blue interior.
1966 BUICK Electro 225 ... from $1595
Four door sedans choice of 2 nice cars. Full power, air
conditioned. Very clean.
1967 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass $1895
White Vinyl over Turq. AC, EW, ES R&H. PS&PB
1968 OLDSMOBILE, Delta $2395
"88" four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior.
Radio, heater, automatic transmission, power steering and
brakes, air conditioned. Electric seats.
1968 FORD, Fairlane 500.................51695
Four door sedan, dark green with white vinyl interior,
radio, heater, automatic transmission, air conditioned,
power steering.
1968 OLDSMOBILE, D01m0nt......................52095
Air conditioned sedan with electric seat, automatic
transmission, power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
1967 OLDSMOBILE, Toronado $2295
Two door coupe. Gold. Front wheel drive, air conditioned,
full power.
1967 OLDSMOBILE, "98 $2295
Luxury sedan. White vinyl over maroon. Full power, air
conditioned, electric windows and seats, cruise control,
remote trunk lock, tilt wheel. Power door locks.
1967 PONTIAC, Grand Prix ..........$1995
Blue with matching vinyl interior, two door hardtop,
electric windows, tilt wheel, bucket seats, stereo tape
player, remote trunk release. Air conditioned.
1967 OLDSMOBILE, Cutlass $1895
Two door hardtop. Automatic transmission, air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, electric
windows. Gold.
1967 CHEVROLET, Capric5... MW ...............51795
Two door hardtop with automatic transmission, air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
Yellow. Very clean.
1970 CADILLAC Coupo da Vi11a.... $5995
2 dr H.T. White Vinyl over Lt Green, Air Condition, Full
Power. Factory Warranty. 15000 mi.
1968 CADILLACCoupa da Villa $3895
2 dr HT, Gold with Beige vinyl interior. Air Cond. Full
Power, Less 20,000 Miles Local ower.
1967 FORD Galaxia 500...... $1695
Gold W/Black Vinyl interior, Air Condition, Power
Steering, Power Brakes. Radio, Heater, X Clean 44,000
Miles
1968 FORD Custom 500 $1695
Air Cond, Power Steering R&H White.
1966 MERCUAY itoonterey $1095
Four door hardtop, white over red. Power (tearing, power
brakes, radio, heater, air conditioned. Runt goodl
1966 VOLKSWAGEN $995

Tuaaday, January 5,1971. Tha Florida Alligator. I

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida AMigator, Tuesday, January 5,1971

it takes TWO hands
to handle a
WHOPPER
- 8 Hiimhi i i S i
JE*. t l,
Mrr ttiL---*- Sul ifriiiifu //.r yuM
JE fl / | |
H§|lg S
"V- J.|
- i ?|pP' ro £
'% N ?4V
fflH B|||BBBBMBpBf jjg v >*'
*- : 4 ' : '
'^^BwaKP^Br WmaFi" : V w *WUjy
v ij ,mw m
H J9 4# REp*. RKg3 B
r R TT A y V ||R B
i "W vs -''aPp
- .life-> ; *ijS|||||pi~
The Two-Fisted BurgerAt
Burger King
(try one yourself and see!)
.
Add OUR Golden French Fries, I
f -^.1r^:.r.;."537
And Delicious Drinks To Jyg
The WHOPPER, And You .* :
Have A Meal To Satisfy
Any Hungry Gator.
Visit The
M I "' K : P ; ft; g! S , ...:*
fjjjgfc Home Os The WHOPPER
KING
8 N. W. I6th Ave. MmiltK^HiHflir"



Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'Piifii
vAff

Vol. 63, No. 54

McLaughin returns
l. W
2 Labor Unions May Confront At UF

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
A confrontation between two
powerful national unions may be
shaping up in the UF campus
this quarter.
John McLaughin, the UF
student who started to organize
cooks at fraternity and sorority
houses last spring, is back on
campus, this time as a
representative from the
Teamsters union to organize
nonacademic employes.
McLAUGHIN, who was

Hale Denies FSM Charter

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Official recognition has been
denied by UF Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale, to
the controversial Florida
Student Movement (FSM).
In a letter dated Dec. 8 of last
year, Hale informed Dr. Frank
Maturo, chairman of the
Committee on Student
Organization and Social Affairs
(SOSA) that the group (FSM)
is not yet ready for recognition
as a university student
organization.
THE DECISION was made by
Hale, even though the

Night Football,
Rug Seen In 71

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Night football and an artificial
playing surface for Florida Field
may become a reality in time for
the 1971 season.
In a December monthly
meeting of the Board of
Directors of the UF Athletic
Association (AA), Florida
Athletic Director Ray Graves
I: '' Inside
POLICE COMPLAINTS
and story cause
changes in Student
Traffic Court page 4
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 12
Page of Record -1
Sports *7
Tallahassee Report 13
World Wrap-Up 11

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

graduated from UF last spring,
worked with the Teamsters in
Atlanta for six months, helping
to organize Georgia textile
workers, until he convinced
union officials for the need to
organize nonacademic personnel
here. International Union local
626 already is working on
campus and is affiliated with the
AFL-CIO.
McLaughin said he was
particularly concerned with
what he called the radical
politics of Business Manager
Dave Smith of the Service

committee gave a favorable
recommendation. Minutes of the
SOSA meeting on Nov. 19 reveal
that only three members of the
committee voted against
recognition of FSM.
Hale stated that after careful
review of the minutes, the
minority report and other
material available to me I have
concluded that the stated
purposes of FSM, if carried out
entirely within policies and
regulations of this university, are
in keeping with the guidelines
within which organizations may
receive university recognition.
However, the of
Bruce Ellis (an FSM m^rnber)

announced a list of priorities the
AA needs for the future years. In
that list was the renovation of
.the lighting system and a
synthetic surface.
GRAVES SAID the money
for these innovations for the
university will come from the
proceeds of two home freshman
football games which will be
sold with the varsity tickets.
(Season ticket prices for the six
game home schedule for 1971 is
$42 plus the $4 price for the v
two freshman games, which will
give Graves the money needed
for the renovations.)
The artificial surface,
probably called Dougs Rug
South, because the Dougs Rug
North is at Neyland Stadium in
Knoxville, Tenn., will be bought
with that extra $4 the
association will be getting from
ticket sales.
A fringe benefit will be the
opportunity of regional or
national television dates in the
*.h tfr ' v -1.
(SEE 'CHANGES/ PAGE 7)

University of Florida, Gainesville

Employes Union (name of the
local chapter of the Service
Employes International Union).
MANY OF the white
maintenance workers at UF,
McLaughin said, would not join
the union because of Smiths
political background. And if we
dont want this thing to turn
into an all black union, we will
have to get white people into the
union.
McLaughin. also pointed out
that Smith has no license from
the state of Florida to organize
workers on campus, and he said

who had the event on the Plaza
(of the Americas) Nov. 5, on
behalf of the FSM, in
announcing that they were
going to break all the rules did
not give evidence of FSMs
willingness to abide by
university regulations and
policies.
THE LETTER also charges
the intrusion in Norman Hall by
FSM members was in violation of
UF demonstration policy, even
though it did not reach the point
of officially being declared to be
disruptive.
The letter further stated the
disruption of the SOSA meeting
last quarter by FSM members
even though many present were
(SEE 'FSM/ PAGE 2)

I sa
I i
m
OLD, YES, BUT DEPARTING
: 1' :: : '-' h i ;
Florida Field's outdated south end zofte scoreboard (above) and
hardly-used lights (right) will be replaced before next year's football
season. Also under capital* improvements for the UF Athletic
Association are new seats to replace the delap id ated bleachers in the
south end zone and a new synthetic carpet for John Reaves and Co. to
run on. Photos by Tom Kennedy.

this might endanger the legal
position of the Service Employes
Union.
He also indicated that the
AFL-CIO affiliate has not been
registered in Tallahassee, as
required by Florida statutes.
RADICAL POLITICS could
be used as an issue and I could
blow this thing up, McLaughin
said. I have background
material and other information I
obtained from the House
Internal Security Committee (on
Smiths activities).
But this is not going to be a
Red-baiting issue, he added,
and that is not the way to
organize workers.
It was reported in the Tampa
Tribune last week that a
Gainesville police undercover
agent, Bradshaw M. Mallard, told
the House Internal Security
Committee in Washington D.C.
in June of 1969, that Smith had
threatened his life.
THE INCIDENT occurred
during a spring, 1969, rally in
the Plaza of the Americas, when
Mik Klonsky then national
secretary of the Students for a
Democratic Society spoke to
UF students.
Mallard said he was in plain
clothes, taking pictures and
notes of the rally whSn allegedly
Smith and a UF coed
approached him and demanded
the camera.
Mallard said he refused. He
made a threat upon my life. He
(Smith) said that they would

\ S

Tuesday, January 5,1971

JOHN McLAUGHIN
.. returns to unionize
take the camera and I told him
someone would die doing it.
MALLARD CLAIMED that
Smith and the coed then told
him: we will get you. There is
no doubt about that.
He said no attempt was made
by the pair to take the camera
away from him and that no
arrests were made in the plaza
after the incident.
When contacted Sunday,
Smith said: as long as I have
been in this university there have
been about 10 Dave Smiths.
THREATENING A persons
life is a felony, if there is any
truth in this (accusation by
Mallard), why have I not been
(SEE 'UNIONS/ PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alfptor, Tuesday, January 8,1871

UNIONS...

|||fOM PAGE O.J
arrested. I considered a lawsuit
but I found out you cannot sue
for testimony given in the floor
of Congress
Smith calls the charges
ridiculous because Mallard
could not back it up.
He said McLaughins using
this incident was a cheap trick.
The Teamsters are not doing
good nationally.
SMITH SAID that local
chapters of other AFL-CIO
unions were wrong in not
supporting the Service Employes
Union, and only now have they
said anything about organizing
the workers on campus.
Building unions (in
Gainesville) sat on their asses
and never tried to organize the
workers in this university. Where
were they in March, the
Teamsters were not interested,
Smith said.
He said the reason the
FSM...
FTrompage j|
presumed not FSM members,
indicated a disregard for a duly
constituted committee.
The lette- recommends that
it appears to be in the best
interest of the university and the
future of FSM and other
organizations, to hold this
application (for recognition) in
abeyance until the group is able
to show how it has reorganized
itself to provide stability and
officer responsibility as stated
by your (Maturos) committee.
HALE SAID FSM may
resubmit their application to the
SOSA committee but no earlier
than the beginning of the spring
term.
Atilla Ilkson, FSM vice
president, said Monday that no
substantial charges of
misbehavior were brought out

Askew To Appoint Regent

By JANET OLES
Alligator Writer
Although Gov. Claude Kirk
has nominated outgoing
Secretary of Community Affairs
James G. Richardson for the
Board of Regents, speculation
has it that he will not be taking
office.
Gov.-elect Reubin Askew
expressed his desire to appoint
the regent himself and feels sure
the Cabinet and Senate will
confirm his appointment.
I certainly respect Mr.
Richardson, but advised the

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June. July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The' Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

building unions in the city were
not trying to organize the
workers was because we filed a
complaint (against local building
trade unions) on the
international level.
McLAUGHIN AND Dr.
Kenneth Megill, speaking for the
Service Employes Union,
appeared Sunday evening in
WRUFs Voices and Views.
Megill, a controversial UF
philosophy instructor, is
president of the American
Federations of Teachers local
1880, which represents more
than 100 UF professors. The
AFT is affiliated with the
AFL-CIO, and its local chapter
has been working with the
Service Employes Union to
organize nonacademic workers
on campus.
MEGILL SAID that any
union has the right to be here
until there is a collective
bargaining agreement, and
eventually the choice of which
union is going to represent the
"f-**
by the vice president for student
affairs.
He said that in the incident
mentioned by Hale, in which
FSM members entered Norman
Hall, no classes were disrupted,
and that Executive Vice
President Harry Sisler had said at
the time the actions of the group
were not disruptive.
ILKSON INDICATED the
charges against FSM brought out
in the letter were satisfactorily
answered during the last meeting
of SOSA; at least, -he said to
satisfy a majority of committee
members.
Ilkson lashed out against the
administration, saying they are
trying to push out the only
left-wing organization on
campus which is trying to
establish itself in the university
community.
Lynn Edelman, president of
the group, said the real issue in
denying recognition to FSM was

governor I intended to make my
own appointment, said Askew
upon learning of Kirks action.
Regents must be confirmed
by at least three of the six
members of the State Cabinet as
well as the Senate, and Askew
has a commitment from the
Cabinet not to act on any
eleventh-hour appointments by
Kirk.
Askew told Kirk his
intentions more than a week
ago, but Kirk decided to pick an
appointee anyway which would
be hard for Askew to turn
down.

workers is not one for me to
make, not one for anyone
wandering into town and saying
they are going to represent the
people.
The choice is going tojbe
made by the workers of this
campus, Megill added.
I didnt *wander into town,
McLaughin retorted. I have
been a student here for four
years and I am a student at this
time.
(McLaughin is registered as a
part-time student this quarter at
UF).
I DID the groundwork
personally (to organize
nonacademic workers). I used as
a basic support the maids and
the janitors in the Murphree area
who helped me do a tremendous
amount of legwork.
At the time I left (UF) I was
told by Mr. Cox (Val Cox,
representative for the Service
Employes International Union
with offices in Atlanta), the
the administration denying free
speech to the group. She claimed
the denial was a political game
played by politicians.
Ilkson said the group had not
met since the decision, but they
were going to have a meeting
this week.
ANOTHER FSM member said
the failure of the administration
to recognize the organization
had delayed, but not canceled
their drive to get campus
recognition.
Hale added in his letter he had
recommended to SOSAs
secretary, assistant director of
the Reitz Union, Bill Cross, that
no more temporary recognition
of organizations be given by the
committee until it has
developed guidelines within
which such groups could meet
for the sole purpose of
formulating their organization,
electing officers, draw up its
constitution, etc.

One candidate which has been
cited as the possible
Askew-appointee is Jack
McGriff, insurance agent and
former faculty member at UF.
McGriff, from Alachua
County, indicated interest in the
Regents position and was active
in the Askew campaign of this
fall.
The vacancy on the board
that supervises the state
university systems occurred Jan.
1, when the term of Henry
Kramer from Jacksonville
expired.
tonight

mm mtt hhik
|H|
IV wSm
v BiSil
* .*J>-V
'HMK- Bjjgg
JtBBBK *.. 1
y |'|U
J£f 'BFo
DAVE SMITH, LEFT
... said incident was a cheap trick

thing was off the ground.
WHEN McLAUGHIN
graduated from UF last spring he
took a job with the Teamsters in
Atlanta. After six months, the
Teamsters decided to send him
down with full support,
McLaughin said. He will start
organizing the workers when he
gets his license from the state in
the near future.
In the WRUF interview, both

""~~""~~""^^mammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmaammmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmKmmmmmmmmammmmm
Winter Bowling
Leagues Are
Organizing Now!
Mixed and mixed doubles leagues are forming for
Monday thru Thursday nights at 6:30 or 9:00 p.m.
x?
. .. V C.
b
Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES AREA and fill
out an application. Deadline for signup is Jan. 11,
1971.
r :. '.. '; '<-
Reitz Union Games Area