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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
1 r
j>\\

Vol. 63, No. SO

STUDYING UNIVERSITY SENATE
Committee To Hear Complaints

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The first in a series of hearings
by a committee formed on UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
urging to restructure the
University Senate will be held
Friday.
The purpose of these hearings
will be to hear complaints about
the senate from both students
and faculty. Fridays meeting at
2:30 p.m. in room 230 of the
Conference of Space and

7O Census Opens Door
For New Appointments

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
official certification of the 1970
census showing Florida with a
population of 6,885,702
could open the door to filling
about nine circuit court
judgeships and granting 150 to
200 new liquor licenses by
r Inside 11111 l
The Gator
UF MALE students
are now taking
advantage of a new
draft ruling page 4
Classifieds 14
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 14
Page of Record 12
Sports 17
Tallahassee Report 16
World Wrap-Up 11

- : ; jj P
, PHIL BANNISTER

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Sciences Building will be to hear
only student complaints.
THIS WILL NOT be an open
hearing.
The reason for this is because
the conference room only holds
25 people. There may be an
open hearing later for the
general public.
Interested students will speak
on a regular schedule.
STEVE UHLFELDER, UF
student body president, said,
though it is not conducive for
students to attend, it is critical
we should be there.
One of the suggestions that

outgoing Gov. Claude Kirk.
KIRK, WHO leaves office Jan.
5, is expected to appoint the
new judges with a minimum of
opposition from incoming Gov.
Reubin Askew, based on a state
supreme court ruling in a similar
situation 10 years ago and a
recent advisory opinion saying
he could make the appointments
as soon as the census becomes
official.
THE LIQUOR are
another question and a court
suit may be necessary to decide
the issue.
Officials of the state board of
business regulation have
indicated they intend to go
ahead with the granting of the
licenses as soon as applications
are properly screened, but at
least one legislator, Rep. Sandy
DAlemberte, D-Miami, has
contended it would be

University of Florida, Gainesville

SG has made is to help the
senate reapportion its number of
delegates, according to
Uhlfelder.
Representation is not
balanced, said Uhlfelder.
Twenty-five per cent of the
delegates comes from the
College of Agriculture, while the
College of Arts and Sciences is
not fairly represented.
ANOTHER OF SG
recommendations is to have
25-30 per cent of the senate
made up of students who would
be elected by the student body
from the college they represent.

unconstitutional to distribute
the licenses prior to the 1971
legislature.
ASKEW HAS NOT indicated
whether he will join the dispute.
A section of the new
constitution relied upon by
DAlemberte provides that each
decennial census, for the
purpose of classification based
upon population, shall become
effective on the 30th day after
the final adjournment after the
regular session of the legislature
convening next after
certification of the census.
Spokesmen for Kirks office
and the business regulation
board have contended the
provisions apply only to
legislative reapportionment and
special acts based on population
brackets.

Right now there are no
students with voting privileges in
the senate.
A third suggestion is to have
an elected chairman of the
senate other than the president
of UF.
ALSO A MORE, democratic
process is needed concerning
anything that effects UF
students like the code of
conduct, the firing of Bob

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PHIL BANNISTER
HEAD WORK?
Sometimes art students must feel that they carry the weight of the
world on their heads. With final projects a week away, many canvases
and pieces of wood and metal were carted home to be transformed
into works of art in time for finals. Michaelangelo never had to work
on a deadline, did he?
Christmas Crafts
The second floor of Reitz Union is the scene of rows of tables
covered with handcrafted items of all sorts and sizes. The Christmas
display, lasting Monday and today only, is the result of many talented
individuals and some clubs.
Consisting of leatherwork, candles, wool ponchos, pottery,
paintings and other unique gift items, the display offers quality
merchandise for "people's prices," to quote a sign on the table of the
Candlepeople.
Os the clubs and groups represented, Demian's Leathers, the
Candlepeople and the Kanapaha Homemakers are in the minority of
named groups. Most of the displays are products of individuals or
small teams.
There are tenative plans for another display of this sort to take
place next week. It will be an arts and crafts "display in the woods"
sponsored by the community.
The goods will be available today until 9 p.m.

\* i

Tuesday, December 1, 1970

Canney, and any other changes
in UF policy, according to
Uhlfelder.
Any student interested in
speaking in Friday's hearing
should contact Dr. A.G. Smith,
chairman of the constitution
committee at 392-2052.
For the record, students
should prepare a brief statement
of their views before they go to
speak.

TER



Page 2

Ttw Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Oaoambar 1,1970

OVERPOPULATION:
Have We 'Begot Too Much?

NEW YORK (UPI) Adam
and Eve did their job too well,
some modernists say. Population
experts tell us that the mandate
to them Be fruitful, and
multiply, and replenish the
earth has reached epidemic
proportions.
They point out that large
families may have been
necessary in the beginning,
but today, many, many
begots later, represent
eventual doom.
MORE PERSONS on earth
means more consumption. The
obvious consequences of too
many people getting and
spending are pollution, famine,
depletion of natural resources,
despoiling nature, pestilence,
overcrowding, noise, crime,
social chaos and warfare, say
experts on population control.
If present trends continue,
conservative estimates are that
the world population will double
by the year 2000. In the United
States, George H. Brown,
director of the Census Bureau,
recently announced that due to
a substantial drop in the national
fertility rate the baby bomb
here is being defused.
Brown said that in the 1950 s
American women of
childbearing age averaged 3.45
children, which by the early 60s
dropped to 2.78. At present, he
said its about 2.45.
EVEN WITH THE reduced
rate, however, the nations
population is expected to
increase close to 50 per cent or
to nearly 300 million persons by
.the year 2000, up from 100
million 50 years ago and 200
million last year.
Most demographers agree that
a fertility rate between 2.11 and
2.2 would, without immigration,
achieve zero population growth.
In other words, in order to let
the next generation achieve
population stability, beginning
now couples just starting
families would have to limit
their children to two.
THERE ARE THOSE, however,
who object to this proposal. One
is Dr. Niles Newton, associate
professor of psychology at the
Northwestern University Medical
School in Chicago.
Newton feels there is the
need to individualize, rather
than play a game of
mathematical averages, in regard
to fertility control.
The idea that fyery
should have two
is an insult to the diversity of
feminine personality and
capabilities, he said.
IT OVERLOOKS THE fact
that there are many women who
would be far happier and more

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University, of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator jfeserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will hot be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion. m.i, **
v> ~ . i .1 i

useful to society with no
children at all and that other
women are such gifted mothers
that they should have more than
the usual two.
Many population
organizations, however, argue
that couples who want larger
families still can help stabilize
the population by limiting their
natural children to two and
adopting others.
Zero Population Growth
(ZPG) advocates adoption and
encourages whites to adopt
minority children who not only
have the least chance of finding
a home but who are also more
plentiful than white children.
MR. AND MRS. ANDREW
Mellor, a British couple living in
Mt. Vernon, N.Y., did just that,
adopting two boys of interracial
birth. We already had two
children, but wanted a larger
family, Mrs. Mellor said in an
interview.
But because we felt strongly
about the population problem,
we decided to adopt. Their two
natural children both are girls
and Mrs. Mellor said they also
wanted to balance the family.
Mrs. Mellor, 29, said her
daughters understand that the
two boys are adopted and are
quite happy. We dont push
color, she said, but the girls
know enough' when someone
says something about one of the
boys being so tanned to explain
that their parents were a black
and a white.*
I DEFINITELY encourage
more couples with children to
adopt if they want a larger
family. I feel that its almost a
moral disgrace to have more
than two. Her husband, also
29, is a sales manager for a major
publishing house.
Anne Hargreaves, adoption
coordinator at the Windham
Agency where the Mellors
adopted their children, said the
agency welcomed the Mellors
philosophy on curbing
population but is not pushing it
as a reason to adopt.
We are not pressing this,
Miss Hargreaves said, but
certainly are delighted when a
couple come in and say they
already have two children, but
rather than bring another into
the world, they want to adopt.
The majority of the children at
the Windham Agency are black
or interracial.
|/%|Hir NEW YORK CITY
Service, the only
public adoption service in the
New York State, also has placed
children with couples who want
to expand their families but help
curb the population growth at
the same time.

Its a relatively new idea, and
although we dont emphasize it
in our publicity, its as valid as
many other reasons for wanting
to adopt, said Mrs. Mae Neely,
adoption service coordinator.
In the last year or two we have
had many couples apply for this
reason.
I guess in away we could be
indirectly promoting this idea
because our publicity stresses
that couples who already have
children are still eligible to
adopt. A few years ago, couples
capable of having or who have
natural children could not
adopt. But many agencies have
changed this practice.
MRS. NEELY SAID the
service also has placed many
children with single people.
Although we feel that ideally
every child should have two
parents, we cant always hold
out for the ideal, she said. We
look for a mature single person
who can offer a child a
wholesome life, and have found
many who met the
requirements.
Phylis Doherty, of the Boston
Childrens Association, said the
trend of couples with children to
adopt instead of having more of
their own because of the
population boom is just
beginning in her area.
I think its the ecology thing,
and I think theyre afraid there
are going to be too many people
if they keep producing at the
rate they could produce, she
said.
IN LOS ANGELES, Mrs.
Patricia Likins, wife of a
university engineering professor,
adopted all of her four children,
two of whom are black. When
asked why she and her husband
decided to adopt rather than
have her own, Mrs. Likins said:
I miscarried once and
believed that there might be a
chemical imbalance between my
husband and me. As for
adoption on a whole, I think
that people are realizing that its
immoral to add to the
population problems and have
decided to adopt instead.
In the San Francisco Bay area,
agencies reported that in the last
few years adoption requests have
increased substantially. Many see
the concern for population
control as a factor.
- WE HAVE NOTICED in the
last two or three years an

m Find Peace, joy, and other good
& to give, at the International n
Christmas Bazaar today. J?
& Union Ballroom &
jjg Ham to 9pm &
X sponsored by the J. W. Reitz Union A

increase in couples with children
who have used population
control as a reason for
requesting children, said Miss
Dorothy Murphy of the San
Francisco County Adoption
Agency. She said they have had
couples without children use the
same reason.
Although many of the
population groups support
adoption as a means of helping
to stabilize population, they
point out that adoption is not
their primary concern. /
MOST AGREE THAT the
basic solution would be to make
all means of birth control
including legalized abortion
freely available. Pointing out
that most contraceptives today
still are far from adequate, the
organizations also stress the need
for more research toward
improved contraceptive
technology.
For a long time in many
places the Planned Parenthood
League was the only voluntary

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organization providing
information on population
control. Now many other groups
have been formed, among them
the Population Council,
Population Reference Bureau
and Population Crisis
Committee.
ZPG, WITH ITS main office
in Los Altos, Calif., has
offshoots across the country,
one being STOP (Society
Toward Optimum Population) in
Dallas.
Many conservation groups
such as the Sierra Club and
Friends of the Earth also are
emphasizing population control.
From those groups, solutions
have been proposed as far out as
requiring marketable licenses to
have children and compulsory
sterilization for any parents with
three or more living children.
Rita Hauser, U.S. Representative
to the United Nations Human
Rights Commission, has even
urged the legalization of
homosexual marriages.



UF Student Aid Still Available

By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Writer
I. Douglas Turner, director of
UF Student Financial Aid,
disclosed how students can get
financial aid and what is
available is of critical concern
to students.**
Turner estimates that there is
enough left-over** money to
supply ISO students with funds
for the fall and winter quarters
of next year on deferred
payment loans.
THERE WILL BE some

Davis Named Officer Os Month

A 30-year-old UF police
patrolman from Boyne City,
Mich., has been named the
Officer of the Month.
Officer Edward Davis, a
member of the force for over
four years, received the award

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student employment* available
next year, but no new
scholarships or grants.
This does not mean, as is
commonly thought, that there
are no scholarships available at
all. It simply means the ones for
1971-72 have already been given
out. Scholarships and grants are
usually awarded for a whole
year, rather than a quarter.
The aid fund is, all totaled,
about the same as last year.,
HOWEVER, there is another
resource which should not be
overlooked, said Turner the

for outstanding performance in
the line of duty.
Davis, one of the two
motorcycle patrolman on
campus, served with the United
States Navy from 1962 until
1966.
The monthly honorary award

Federally Insured Bank Loan.
The funds are unlimited since
they are governed by home bank
participation. Turner said these
loans could aid a substantial
number of students for the
winter and spring quarters of
next year.
Recently there has been a
good response from banks
around the state for
participation in the loan
program, said Turner.
APPLICATIONS FOR
Federally Insured Bank Loans
are available in the Financial

is the sixth since the ideas
inauguration last May.
All selections come from an
awards committee made up of
policemen from within the
department.
The committee chairman is
UPD Investigator Melvin Smith.

* JBMi' I
I. DOUGLAS TURNER
... money for 150 more
Aids.Office in Tigert Hall.
Students have to start early to
get their financial affairs in order
for the next year. Deadlines are
usually around the end of
January at the Financial Aids
Office and applications are
processed and awards made in
March.
Students should be reminded
they are already one month late

Tuesday, Daoambar 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

in applying for aid for 1971-72,
said Turner. If theyre
concerned, they need to get
their applications in now.
Turner said the Financial Aids
Office will continue to process
applications as long as there is
money.
Study Rooms
Open Dec. 6
For students needing
somewhere to study for finals
after the library closes, Student
Government has found the
(dace.
Starting Sunday, Dec. 6,
rooms 109, 125 and 127 in
Little Hah and rooms 227, 229
and 230 in the Mechanical
Engineering Building will be"
open from 9 p.m. until 8 a jn.
Because finals are scheduled
in these rooms, they will be
closed during the day.

Page 3



Page 4

i, Tlw Florida AWgator, Tuesday, Dooambar 1,1970

New Draft Rule Affects Students

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students eligible for the draft are taking wide
advantage of a recent Selective Service ruling to allow
registrants to file for reclassification until midnight Dec.
31,197a
THE INSTRUCTIONS issued by Dr. Curtis W. Tarr,
national director of Selective Service, alters previous
policy which stated the application had to be in the hands
of local board personnel prior to a December meeting of
the local board.
Tarr said the new policy was issued because various
boards throughout the country were scheduling their last
meeting of the year at different times.
The instructions should be of particular interest to men
holding numbers high in the 1970 draft lottery. According
to Mrs. Florence Hutson, executive secretary of Local

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"BUT OFFICER ...

"Dead Eye" Phil Bannister, the famous Alligator
photographer, caught this transgressor of the law in
action in front of the Research Library. Obviously
not done in his sin of bicycle riding in restricted

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Board No. 17 for Alachua County, the reason more
students are taking advantage of this opportunity is it
gives a man with a high number the chance to move into a
lower priority group on Jan. 1,1971.
WHAT IT MEANS, Mrs. Hutson said, is that a
student with a 11-S classification, who had a draft number
of say 300, in a year when up to number 195 was chosen,
might find himself with a lesser chance of being picked if
he filed for I-A classification.
In this manner, he would only be picked after all
draftable men bom in 1951 were drafted. Each year after
that, he would move farther down in priority.
Mrs. Hutson said, If he waits until his classification
ends, hell just be put into the pool with all the other men
eligible for that year, using the lottery number given him
when he was 19 years old.
While recognizing young men holding lottery numbers
over their local board high could effectively limit their

areas. The Alligator has blotted his face out of the
picture to protect the uninnocent. All bicycle
people had better beware bicycles have traffic
relies too!

vulnerability to the draft by being classified I-A by the
year end, Tan stated the law allows young men to elect
whether they will apply for a deferment and those young
men granted deferments should be able to drop them if
desired.
THE TYPE OF deferments affected by the
memorandum are high school, college, occupational,
educate! j paternity, and hardship deferments.
The I-Y classification, unacceptable for military service
except in national emergency, is not affected by this new
policy. Men classified I-Y are not able to voluntarily drop
this classification.
Tarr pointed out all deferments were issued for a
limited period of time, generally for one year, and it is the
responsibility of the registrant to submit documentation
for an extension of his deferment.
In the absence of documentation, the new local board
memo instructs local boards to promptly reclassify
registrants into I-A.

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Officials Under Scrutiny
Os New FSRG Foundation

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Big Brother will soon be
watching Florida government
officials.
A newly formed organization
called The Foundation for the
Study of Responsible
Government (FSRG) will
emphasize the fact that
government is the instrument of
all citizens and not just a
privileged few.
THE FOUNDATIONS goal is
to insure honest, responsible
government in the state through
the use of an information system
- the computer.
Unethical and illegal activities
by state officials will be exposed
through use of the computerized
system which will contain
information on 25,000
individuals connected with state
government.
Banks B. Vest Jr., president of
the foundation, said the
organization is concerned with
collusion, favoritism and
corruption among state public
officials.
WE ARE NOT of the
opinion that all public officials
are corrupt, but often many
show a lack of concern for the

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public interest, Vest said.
Vest, a faculty member at
Tallahassee Junior College, said
the primary concern of FSRG is
to correct property taxation
injustices caused by favoritism in
assessments of properties of
some public officials and
business enterprises.
Millions of dollars of tax
revenues are being lost each year
through these practices by local
tax accessors, Vest claimed.
BANKS CITED an example in
Hillsborough County where
there is strong evidence of tax
breaks being given to several
prominent political figures as
well as some major industries.
We intend to continue this
investigation, he said, make
the information public, and take
appropriate action at the proper
time.
The foundation has been
active in litigation concerning
violations of the State Election
Law by candidates for public
office.
AS A RESULT of these
suits, Vest said, we found the
Election Law to be
unenforceable and generally
unworkable due to serious
deficiencies in its provisions.
Vest said FSRG will offer

some alternative proposals to
revise the laws with hopes of
overcoming some of their
present deficiencies.
Vest welcomes all persons in interested
terested interested in the improvement of
government to join FSRG.
Inquiries can be mailed to Vest
at 2325 W. Pensacola St.,
Apartment 138, Tallahassee,
Fla., 32304.

In which the candid connoisseur
about Beer and the drinking of same.
up
a romp the
to a leftover
the
Everybody you
so
cool off, pal. Then cool WM \
off that Bud to your *[ jjj t
hearts content (on fW 1
s no problem,
because a really good | m s£HZP fm
beer like Budweiser f 4gfL j#
is just as good when 0%
you ice it twice. 4 ;. Jfc>"
But I cant resist - ; ".: -
that there is an
easy way to avoid the situation altogether.
Just make sure theres no Bud left over!
Budweiser
KING OF BEERS.
ANHEUSER-BUSCH, INC. ST. LOUIS NEWARK LOS ANGELES TAMPA HOUSTON COLUMBUS JACKSONVILLE MERRIMACK
- - -- --

Gator Getters
Lend Support
What do you call a group of girls who have poise, attractiveness
and care a lot about the university?
Norm Carlson, publicity director for the UF athletic department,
calls them Gator Getters,.
STARTED IN 1969 by Carlson, the group is composed of 23 girls
chosen by a committee composed of two Gator Getters, two coaches
and Carlson at a rush party and interview.
The purpose of the group according to Linda Burr, captain of the
Gator Getters, is to assist the athletic department in recruiting high
school prospects in different sports and to act as hostesses at athletic
department functions..
THE GIRLS sit on the sidelines of the football games lending their
support and high spirits to the team. They sometimes attend away
games, but that is usually the extent of their travel.
Carlson is enthusiastic about their success. They have done a really
good job. Theyve been a big help to us. Theyre cooperative and
gung-ho.

| Make
Great Gifts
ltco'id Sax
OF GAINESVILLE
923 VEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

ad jUi ifU <}afr L
m 1 a, U

Tuesday, December 1,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

l Tha Florida Alligator, Tuasday, Dacambar t, i 970

Tenant Association Plans For Future

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writar
The newly-farmed Tenant
Association, designed to improve
tenant-landlord relations in the
city of Gainesville, will continue
its work into next quarter with a
membership drive and
constitutional convention to be
held January 11,13, and 18.
The bydaws and constitution
will be taken bade to various
apartment complexes and ghetto
areas and subsequently brought
back for a vote by the larger
association assembly according
to Mike Pugh, Student
Government secretary for
legal affairs.
INITIALLY THE city-wide

Senate Approves Building
Os Automated Post Office

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate approved
last week a second reading of a
bill permitting the building of a
fully automated post office on
the UF campus.
The post office had been
waiting about six months for
funds to be approved for its
construction from the Student
Government campus
improvement fund.
HOWEVER, since the post
office was allegedly sent to the

Student Book Sale Held Winter Quarter

A student book exchange will
again be sponsored by UF
Student Government for the
winter quartet.
The sale Will be held Jan. 4-8,
1971, in Room 306 of J.W.
Reitz Union, for the purpose of
eliminating the middleman in
book resale.
SINCE THE students decide
the price to ask, the books are
likely to be sold for more and
bought for less, according to
Carolyn Landey, Director of the
Student Book Exchange.
The student should bring his
bodes that are still available for
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150 3
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
IN IN I AI R

organization was formed as the
result of favorable response to a
survey designed to gain
information on tenant
complaints and the feasibility of
forming such a union.
Those participating in filling
out the questionnaires
distributed by the SG legal

Gainesville Post Office without
authorization from SG, some
senators argued the Post Office
Department should have never
sent it.
The post office bill had
already hit the senate twice in
the past; being defeated once in
the summer quarter, and then
tabled.
The bill was revived again this
quarter, and even though a
number of senators opposed
what they termed a giant stamp
machine the bill passed a first
reading two weeks ago.

resale either during the sale or
on Dec. 8-10 in Room 306, from
14 pjn.
A receipt will be given for
each book received. The receipt
should be kept to reclaim the
book, if unsold, or the money, if
sold.
A CHECK will be mailed to
the student in a self-addressed

f aW* Holiday S Pec/
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Complete Fish Dinner 0 k $ 1 00 f
m toM. Food To Go- Cor Zrvto | 4

Problem areas to be tackled:
dissatisfaction with rent deposits
acquiring nine-month leases for students with
easy subletting arrangements
0 landlords living up to commitments in such areas
as repairs and general maintenance.

affairs committee were residents
of some of the larger Gainesville
apartment complexes and the
area north of the university
station post office, commonly
referred to as the ghetto.
Pugh said the Tenant
Association plans to tackle such
areas as:

During the Tuesday meeting
last week, proponents of the
post office mustered enough
support to pass the bill which gave
$2,500 for construction of a
concrete base and setting up a
direct telephone line to the
Gainesville Post Office to be
used by students who may need
help.
Tuesdays meeting was the.
last meeting of the senate for
this year. The senate will meet
again during the second week of
the Winter quarter.

envelope, provided by the SG
when he brings his book in to be
sold.
Unclaimed books can be
picked up at the end of the sale
or may be left until the end of
the sale in the spring quarter.
Unclaimed books will become
the property of the SG.

Dissatisfaction with rent
deposits.
Acquiring nine-month
leases for students with easy
subletting arrangements.
Landlords living up to
commitments in such areas as
repairs and general maintenance.
ALTHOUGH THE union is
designed to help students, it is
not solely for students. The
tenant union is for anyone who
has rent problems, Pugh said.

ason
PRESENTS
(jM(didQ/
The performance is on Monday, December 7, 1970 at
8:00 p.m. in the Constans Theatre, Reitz Union. A
limited number of student tickets are available for $ 1.50
at the Constans Box Office 12:30 4:30 daily. A
student I.D. card is required for purchase. Sponsored by
J. Wayne Reitz Union in cooperation with the Junior
Welfare League.

Classics From
The
Flicker Days
Featuring
W. C. Fields
in
CIRCUS SUCKER, THE GREAT
MCGONIGLE, THE BARBER
SHOP W.C. FIELDS FILM
FESTIVAL on parking lot next to;
University Lutheran Church, 1826
W. University December 2nd 7:00
PM ya'll come, ya hear! It's free!

On-campus residents presently
have some form 0 f
representation, according to
high and therefore the
association is geared toward
those living off-campus.
Some members of the Tenant
Association are already looking
into the possibility of taking
legal action on rat-infested
dwellings in the ghetto area
which may be violating health
ordinances.
*
Pugh said their action is more
or less on an individual basis
because, they need immediate
help so people will realize whats
happening in Gainesville.
The membership drive will go
into effect after the constitution
and by-laws are adopted.

if



ODK Taps Members;*
Initiate Friday At 5:30

By STEVE STRANG
Assistant Assignments Editor
Twenty-four men were tapped into Omicron
Delta Kappa (ODK), and 15 men were tapped into
University Squires in joint public tapping
ceremonies held Monday at noon on the Plaza of
the Americas.
ODK is a national mens leadership honorary.
University Squires is a freshman and sophomore
mens leadership honorary sponsored by ODK.
THOSE TAPPED into ODK include Bruce M.
Stone, William P. Sokeland, Richard F. OBrien 111,
William B. Wagner, Merriam Gary Clay, David E.
Stein, James T. Bowen, and Larry G. Rodd.
Also tapped were Thomas J.Seybold, Sheldon E.
Finman, William G. Hoover, Jeffrey W. Miller,
James L. Reinman, Steve Zack, Brad Raffle, John C.
Allen, Jr., John F. Cosgrove, Wayne L. Thomas,
Jacob V. Stuart, Robert C. Wattles, Sam Pepper,
John B. Batman, Lowell A. Stanley and Melvyn C.
Libby.
Those tapped into University Squires include
Steven Bames, Mark Barrett, Robert Berrin,
Stephen Colby, William Collins, Rocco Draud,
Robert Alan Estes, Lawrence Freedman and Mark
Karas.
OTHER TAPPEES are Clarence Martin, Robert
McCormick, Paul Rosenthal, Mark Sherry, Thomas

Night Classes In Offing

By LINDA CREESY
Alligator Staff Writer
Progress on the addition of night classes next quarter is at a
standstill according to Gail Merein, Student Government secretary of
academic affairs.
Were still trying to get in touch with everyone involved, Miss
Merein said. So far we havent heard very much.
SOME RESPONSE has been favorable. However, until all responses
are in, nothing definite will be known.
Letters were sent to every dean and department head but only a
few have responded to date.
The possibility of more night classes arose when students requested
the situation be looked into.
Students might be able to earn their degree by attending night
classes alone. Also, more night classes would be of service to students
and student spouses who have to work during the day.
A third reason for offering more night classes is to provide a
students an opportunity to enroll in a course he might not be able to
take during the day due to a schedule conflict.
Sunland Group
Circle K Guest

A group from the Gainesville
Sunland Training Center was the
guest of the Circle K Club and
the UF Athletic Department at
the football game on Saturday
between UF and the University
of Miami.
This was one of several service
projects that Circle K, the
yi rge s t collegiate service
organization;
this year.
CIRCLE K is sponsored by

STUDENT RECITAL
by Applied Music Students in the
Department of Music
Tuesday, December 1
2:30 p.m.
Reitz Union Ballrooni
sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union and the I
University of Florida Department of Music J

Kiwanis Club, and is active in
junior colleges and universities
throughout the state.
This year the Circle K Clubs
in the state have five goals in
common. They include closing
the communication gap and
helping to ease racial tension.
Also, they are trying to decrease
"envifonme nlaf "proWeras, and
educate people about drug use
and abuse.

Stewart, and Ted Wolfe.
Rep. Ralph Turlington, D-Gainesville, and Dr.
Herbert Kaufman, noted opthamologist, were
tapped into ODK honoris causa.
Ralph Glatfelter, ODK president told the tappees
they were chosen as representing the highest quality
in each of the five areas from which ODK taps.
They tap from the areas of scholarship; athletics;
student government, religious and social affairs;
publications; and speech, music drama, and the
other arts.
GLATFELTER ALSO said he had a theory about
honoraries. He said honoraries might be nice to be
in, but unless they do service, they arent
worthwhile.
ODK is a fine organization, he said, not
because people got in, then sat around and did
nothing, but because the people who got into ODK
worked.
ODK and Squires will hold formal initiation
together Friday at 5:30 pjn. at the Baptist Student
Center. The initiation will be followed by a banquet
at the Holiday Inn South.
Rep. Tolbert (Sandy) DAlemberte, (D-Miami)
will speak at the banquet. He will speak on issues
facing us all, according to Glatfelter.
DAlemberte will be introduced by Rep. Kenneth
H. (Buddy) Mac Kay, D-Ocala.

Bfef u
M WSKmi M i # | mm
GAIL MEREIN
... secretary of academic affairs
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Beverly Cheuvront is a senior in journalism from Washington D.C.
Her hobbies include art, hiking and exploring. She is a free-lance
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Bev is a nature nut and thinks women's lib is a good thing.

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TtMsday, Dacamfaar 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Thu Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Dooambar 1,1970

EDITORIAL

Graves Is OK
The Alligator would like to commend Athletic Director
Ray Graves for giving approval to the controversial Florida
League of Athletes.
The FLA was approved last week by the Committee on
Student Organizations and Social Activities. The buck was
then passed to Vice President of Student Affairs Lester Hale
who passed it to President Stephen C. OConnell.
But the big decision belonged to Ray Graves. If Graves
had told President OConnell that he did not approve of the
FLA, OConnell would have killed it right there. But Graves
said okay.
This took a lot of courage.
Ray Graves has been under fire lately for his decisions
regarding the suspension of two tennis players, an athletic
council, a ban on booze at Florida Field, ticket prices, the
Firing of John Parker as assistant track coach, and his stand,
generally speaking, on the role of collegiate athletics.
On many of these occasions, The Alligator has disagreed
vehemently with the athletic director and stated so in
editorials.
Students attacked him. Athletes attacked him. Faculty
attacked him.
We believe we are safe in assuming that Graves has been
under great pressure from alumni groups to stand up to
athletes and students. He has been under pressure from
people within the athletic department to put athletes in
their place, particularly concerning the FLA.
We are delighted that Ray Graves considered both sides
of the argument and saw that it is not the intention of the
FLA to disrupt or destroy athletics on this campus but to
improve the program.
It would be an error to believe that Ray Graves bowed
down to student and athletes' demands. We believe that
Graves recognized the FLA as a worthwhile organization: an
organization which will help to work out problems of the
athletic department from within; an organization which will
surely help recruitment of high school athletes who will be
assured they will not be entering a concentration camp
when they write their names on the dotted line of a
grant-in-aid.
We commend Ray Graves for his foresight today. The
university is fortunate to have him.

Its a long and winding road
back to Gainesville. Especially if
youre humming the Thomas
Wolfe, You Cant Go Home
Again Cultural Shock Absorber
Blues. Its good to sit back
seeing every little nook, cranny,
billboard, and tree again etched
onto your eyeballs from riding
back and forth to and from
wherever home may be.
Hours drag as the car ingests
miles of white line, and once in a
blue moon you have a little time
for reflection on your journey
from real-life Middle America
back to Ivory Tower Land.
BACK TO THE war of
attrition between you and stacks
of volumes. Its finals time and
you find yourself muttering
incoherently, *T gotta get
OUTTA here. Who will endure?
Ideas of men and women
caught within the pages of a
book or little ole you with the
clay feet?
Well, the spirit may be willing
but, for the moment, the flesh is
shot to hell so you have your
doubts.
MIRAMAR, Pembroke
Pines, Jupiter read the words

A Long And Winding Road To Home

on the turnpike ticket. You find
yourself counting Florida decals
on the cars zooming past you,
wondering if you know the
people inside.
Funny, the way people look
like so many other people you
know. Makes you think
everyone was kneaded out of a
cosmic blob of dough, nicely
shaped from cookie cutters, all
variations on a theme.
That kind of destroys my
everybody-is-a-Star theory, but
thats another story.
FLASHBACK TO people you
met this quarter and friends you
rediscovered. There were people
you reached and those you
wanted to reach, but didnt. Oh,
the eye contact was eloquent at
times and the mental telepathy
was electric, but had to watch
yourself to keep from
trespassing on foreign
wavelengths.
Theres such a thing, as
psychological elbow room. But
there good moments too,
when you almost shed your
security blanket of immunity.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

\ [reprisal MISSIQH-NORTHVIETNAM 1
MERCT M15510H-B6T MBSIAITI

Sit back and think pictures of
world-shaking discussions in the
study lounges come to mind
where you compared the relative
merits of Whataburgers over
In-And-Outs finest.
AND THERE were deeper
times when all your dreams and
philosophies hung in the air until
the early hours of the morning.
You learned a new word,
rip-off and heard Abbie
Hoffman and Tom Slade speak
ai me same piace.
Deland. Kissimmee. Yeehaw
Junction.
FLASHBACK TO
Thanksgiving dinner where you
ate for the poor, starving people
in China, and the poor, starving
people in Pakistan, and the poor,
starving people here... oh the
gluttony of it all.
Eating with the dear, but
puzzled ones who call you
daughter and trying to interpret,
but failing miserably, the alien
things that happen on television
screens.
Here was your chance, the
idea of peisou-urpersot contact

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

I Marian Jedrusiak

in a family setting, but you kept
coming up with a sinking feeling
of deja vu.
Could it have been seeing
Joe that did it?
NOT IN CHAPTERS really,
just more or less in heaps and
bundles did you put the sad
things as they happened, or
likewise happy ones.
Coming home to you look
better with short hair dear (I
bought it only happened to
guys) or, at the sight of your
jeans, are you still wearing
those hippie pants?
The car leaves the turnpike.
Youre on 1-75 now, just before
Ocala.
/
YOU TRACE anticipations on
the window, looking out. And
who is not a love seeker when
December comes, said Rod
MclCtien whom you dont
especially like. And you keep
looking for love because there

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

are tin Christmas angels and
Hannukah candles and good
old-fashioned pagan revelry to
whet the appetite.
Theres mysticism in the air.
That and_ Russian roulette
expectations of your final
grades.
Look ahead and you can see
new people to meet and the
chance for the proverbial second
time around.
Past Micanopy to Gainesvilles
three big exits on to familiar
landmarks.
There it is the VA hospital,
thee Towers and the Union.
HOME SAFE.
Nirvana?
Well, almost, or at least a
reasonable facsimile thereof
when you realize the comfort of
fitting into a well-worn niche.
Maybe its a little too easily
worn away from taking the path
of least resistance but, after all,
its where the heart is.



Course Guide
MR. EDITOR:
In COURSE GUIDE 1970 we
are given some appreciation for
encouraging evaluation through
the Presidents Committee on
Teaching Evaluation.
Having served on that
committee, we want to make it
clear that the booklet just
published was done by students
for students and is totally
separate from the efforts now
underway in the various colleges
to provide some systematic
feed-back to instructors on their
teaching.
At no time have we seen or
handled any data used in the
student booklet nor have faculty
participated in the writing of the
booklet.
We believe the most
important purpose of teaching
evaluation is to help faculty
improve their teaching and we

Security at Miami
International Airport leaves a
lot to be desired after touring
the grounds there this past
weekend.
A friend and I went to the
airport to visit someone who
works there, where he gave us
the tour of the works.
THE TOUR consisted of a
baggage compartment of an
Eastern 707, learning how to
start jet engines and a first hand
view of Nationals 747.
If any bad intentions had
entered our minds at the time, a
bomb could have been planted
very easily inside any of the
planes we were on.
Now, if we can do that and
cruise the airport grounds in a
jeep without anyone asking what
we were doing, imagine what a
professional demolition expert
could do.
THE FRIEND we were
visiting at the airport said his
badge would get him out of
trouble if anything arose.
LETTERS POLICY
Lanin mutt:
B* typed, signed,
donoli quoad and not axoaad
300 words.
Not bo signed with a
pseudonym.
§ Hava addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
a s mlthhalfi nnhi 2#
arms win pa wvmnaiQ omy it
writer shows Just cause. The
Mixof reaarvas tna ngni to aon an
letters for space.
Writers may submit longer
assays, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out* columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
. column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to show
samples of his work.

think the systems which the
colleges on our campus are
instituting this year are going to
move us toward constructive use
of student feedback.
CHARLES M. BRIDGES
CORBIN S. CARNELL
JOHN P. OCONNELL
WILLIAM W.PURKEY
Bomb Scare
MR. EDITOR:
Sunday night at 10:35,1 was
suddenly awakened from a well
needed and deserved sleep by
some one who was pounding on
my door and yelling
incoherently.
It seemed it was theYulee
Areas turn as a police made
phenomena called the bomb
scare.
After telling me to dress
warmly because it was cold and
to be out by 11 pm., I closed
die door and went back to sleep.

Something To Think About

The badge can be constructed
by simply typing on a piece of
cardboard your name, the place
you work and putting a recent
picture of yourself on it. Then
cover the card with plastic and
wear it on your shirt pocket.
Guards are located around the
outskirts of the airport, such as
the one near Eastern. We walked
up to his office, a rusty shack
that has an air-conditioner and a
heater, and asked him where we
could find someone.
AFTER HE awoke from his
sleep and we asked our question
again, he replied there were
50,000 people working at the
airport and he didnt know
where we could find him.
At close observation, I found
that the radio was going in the
office and the guard had a
newspaper he was in the process
of reading.
This is security?
IF THE GUARD doesnt
know where a person works,
anyone can walk in with his
homemade ID. card and not be
ni
Lisa srfJ Uiq bib aslbnud
Anyone can buy a jeep, paint
it white, most of the jeeps at the
airport are white, and drive it
past the guard by just waving.
The guards dont stop you,
although a sign says to. Most of
the drivers at the airport just
wave to the guard as they go by.
After what happened in
Jordan this summer, I would
think security would be higher
around 7475. Not true in the
National Airlines terminal in
Miami.
OUR JEEP pulled under the
jumbo jet and we explored the
underside of the ship. -.. We
compared how large the engines

READERS FORUM

Immediately following, RAs
from different floors demanded
I leave my room. If necessary
they said someone would evict
me with force.
I showered and dressed while
listening to a Jethro Tull album
which was the only thing I was
afraid the police would find
because I ripped it off some guy
four rooms down the hall.
Suddenly bells, sirens and
people screaming shattered the
air.
It was 11 p.m. and all was not
well.
I grabbed my books and
wrote a two word note which I
pinned on the door and left.
Outside people were talking in
groups. Nowhere was a
policeman to be found to answer
my questions, which follow:
What right does anyone
have to evict me from my room?
If scares are not suppose to
be planned, how come I was told
25 minutes before the scare to
get ready?
If this really was a
bomb-scare and not a police
search, what happened to the

on the 747 were to 727 s and
7075.
We explored the landing gear
of the giant, and we explored
the insides of the jumbo by
walking up the ramp to the
cockpit and viewing the pilots
seat first hand.
No one approached us.
The entire tour was awesome.

111 ,.V;|r gtfraHnN97' M^^^^mj^^MMHWHlHlwlffllmj^^^^S^'
'
R'eVe &o//* sf/// /iere ore/Tf we? Ze/s be thankful for that.

Alligator Staff

Denise Valiants
Assignment Editor

Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed,ip ,tjip .Flpride .Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer ot the article and not those of the University of Florida.

law the university just passed
leaving it up to each individual
to decide whether or not to
leave the area of a bomb-scare?
Granted in my housing
form there is a little clause
stating that an official from the
university may at any time
search my room. Why cant I be
there? And is this clause or any
of the above constitutional?
What, if any, are my rights
as a UF student? And do they
conflict with my rights as an
American?
Was this scare/raid a
university sanctioned action or
does the city of Gainesville run
the show?
t And if everything Ive
questioned is legal, which 1
doubt, why cant these things
take place at an earlier hour?
I for one need my sleep!
MICHAEL CAHLIN, lUC

MARTY PERLMUTTER

The complexity of the
airport, behind the scenes and
the extra attraction of seeing a
747 made this weekend. But if
we can walk into these places

Craig Hyl
Editorial Assistant

TiMKfey, Daeunbar t, 1970, Th Florida Alligator,

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609 '*'

Right Os Woman
MR. EDITOR:
I want to compliment you for
your understanding editorial on
the right of women to
termination of pregnancy.
Let us hope that the state will
remove all abortion legislation
from the books and allow
women freedom of choice.
Os all the servitudes inflicted
through the centuries none is
worse than compulsory
pregnancy. And none has been
more disruptive of our society
with so many unwanted battered
children growing up to be
violent and criminal.
The greatest right of any baby
is to be bom wanted.
This is one of the aims of
Zero Population Growth.
WINIFRED FRAZER

without anyone caring, what
would happen if someone
wanted to put a bomb in an
aircraft?
It scares me to think about it.

Page 9



Page 10

I Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Dacambar 1,1970

SG Seeks To Fill Office
Os Environment Secretary

ByCARLCRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Hal Barcey, Student
Government secretary for
environmental affairs,
announced Monday that he
resigned his SG position last
Friday.
Baroey, the first cabinet level
officer for environment, said he
was resigning because he
couldnt devote enough time to

Center Os Man
Offers 'Feedback
By ELIZABETH MALTZ
Alligator Writer
Tower of Positive Feedback is the subject for the last program in
the series of involvement sponsored by the Center of Man at Santa Fe
Junior College.
The discussion will be held Thursday night at 8 p.m. in the gym at
the Southeastern Santa Fe Junior College Campus.
DR. CARL CLARKE, an authority on positive feedback will lead
the discussion.
Positive feedback, says Clarke, is the acknowledgement of
qualities, behaviors and attributes which one person respects and
values in another persons personality.
The idea of the program is to bring with you someone you care
about, whether it be a friend, spouse or lover. This person must be
someone with whom you have an on-going, meaningful relationship,
and with whom you would like to develop positive feedback.
The first part of the program will be devoted to enabling each pair
of individuals to engage in positive feedback, after which everyone
just talks.
The discussion will be free and the public is invited.

<^ >
specie
ROUND TRIP JET ... O GENEVA. SWITZERLAND VIA O.C. 8 JET WITH COMPLIMENTARY
MEALS AND BEVERAGE SERVICE.
GROUND TRANSFERS TRANSPORTATION FROM AND TO GENEVA, SWITZERLAND VIA DELUXE
TOURING BUSES <2 HOURS OF BEAUTIFUL SCENERY):
EI6NT NIGHTS in the argentiere-chamonix valley. France, argentiere is a
charming alpine village locateo alongside the arve river at
THE BASE OF THE FAMOUS 'GRAND MONTETS' SKI RUNS. THIS AREA IS
FAMOUS FOR THE "MONT BLANC', HIGHEST MOUNTAIN IN EUROPE (15.500 FT.).
HERE SKI IS KING WITH 8 CABLE CARS. 5 GONDOLAS. 3 CHAIRLIFTS. 16 POMAS
ANO 1 COG TRAIN. IN ARGENTIERE. YOU WILL SLEEP AT 3.000 FEET AND
YOU CAN SKI ALL THE WAY UP TO 12,600 FEET. NOVICE. INTERMEDIATE
AND EXPERT SKiERS WILL FIND NUMEROUS TRAILS TO SUIT THEM. FOR
EXAMPLE. tHE WORLD FAMOUS 12 MiLE LONG "VALLES BLANCH RUN" AND
' THE "GUANO MONTETS" WHERE THE RUNS WERE DESIGNED BY WORLO 4
CHAMPION JAMES COUTTET. ON THESE RUNS EMILE ALLAIS WON THE WORLD
CHAMPIONSHIP. YOU WILL FIND 120 INSTRUCTORS. 2 SKATING RINKS. DISCO DISCOTHEQUES.
THEQUES. DISCOTHEQUES. CASINO. CURLING. ETC. THE OLD FASHIONEO MOUNTAIN TOWN OF
CHAMONIX HAS BEEN THE CAPITAL OF ALPINE SPORTS SINCE THE VISIT OF
EMPEROR NAPOLEON 111 IN 1862 CHAMONIX ANO ARGENTIERE ARE LOCATED
ONLY MINUTES FROM BOTH SWITZERLAND ANO ITALY.
*
LONGING enjoy the advantages ano comfort of your opm modern apartment,
ALL WITH BATH. KITCHENETTES AND INDIVIDUAL BEDS. AFTER SKIING
SPLASH IN A HEATED POOL.
LESSONS RENTALS HOURS OF GROUP LESSONS INCLUOEO
RENTALS: METAL SKIS ANO POLES SZ.OO PER OAV.
* SKI LIFTS *IO.OO WORTH OF SKI PASS COUPONS INCLUOEO. OR A COMPLETE 8 AREA
*** TICKET FOR ONE WEEK * OR 523.00.
RACE A GIANT SLALOM RACF FOR THE GROUP WITH A PRESENTATION PARTY
COMPLETE WITH PRIZES AND TROPHIES FOR THE WINNERS.
MINES TWO MULTILINGUAL. GUIDES Witt, meet yoor GROUP in geneva and will
BE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST YQu AT ALL T'MES UNTIL DEPARTURE.
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
Leonard Tanner, Room 310 J.W.R. Union, 392-1618 \

the position.
I AM GOING to be taking
on some new environmental
programs to be announced in
January, Barcey said, and I
havent devoted enough time to
research and I am missing that
part of my satisfaction.
One project Barcey mentioned
he would be working in
conjunction with the
Environmental Action Group

(EAG) is the Model Campus
Plan.
Brad Raffle, administrative
assistant to the student body
President, said anyone who
would like to fill the secretary
position talk to him as he will
probably advise the SG
President on a new
appointment.
RAFFLE SAID, The duties
of the secretary of
environmental affairs will be to
sit in on or sit on committees
that are dealing with the
environmental aspects of the
university.
These committees include
Lake Use and Preservation,
Parking and Transportation,
Space Allotment, Land Use
Planning and others of this
type.
Raffle also said that the
secretary duties include
coordinating with EAG on many
projects and supplying any SG
assistance necessary to EAG in
their efforts, such as manpower
or printing.
Raffle said that anyone
interested in the position should
see him between the hours of
11:30 ajn. to 1:30 p.m., or
from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
The appointment of the new
secretary will be made next
quarter.

wmr H^KME^ V
-,'; Ajf&LS %i' i!f DKmp' i'b'^A^
-' |tl |||f& t ; :?
my
PHIL COPL
CO NSTANS THEATRE
For the first time, the Florida Players will present "An Evening )f
Pantomine (And Other Things)," in the Constans Theatre Dec. 1,2
and 3. The director for the mime skits, J. Michael Gillette, assistant
professor of theatre, said 'There is no particular theme to be followed
for the Evening. It is just designed to give everyone a good time."
Pantomine is acting without words; it involves the use of body control
and gestues, as demonstrated here by Rena Caoney. The evening
promises to be one of fun and entertainment. Student tickets: 25
cents. General public: 75 cents. No reserved seats.

Depart December 18 Q AVQ Return December 27
From Atlanta 7 u/ r\ I W
Y PLUS SIB.OO TAX &
vilfc I <9 JLw JL Service Charge
SIGN UP EARLY SPACE LIMITED
Minimum deposit $50.00, balance due before December 10,This trip is offered by
the University of Florida Student Government limited to students, faculty, and
staff of the University of Florida and to members of their immediate family.
RESPONSIBILITY AND CANCELLATION
Group Travel Associates and cooperating agents act only in the capacity of agents
for the passenger in all matters pertaining to hotel accommodations, sightseeing
tours and transportation whether by railroad, motor bus, motor car, steamship, or
plane, and as such, they shall not be liable for any injury, personal injury, damage,
' o ,, J n f' deiay, or irregularity which may be occasioned either by reason of
any defect m any vehicle, or through the acts or default of any company or
in conveying the passenger, or in carrying out the arrangements of
.^.T* I** 1 ** in nMdion therewith. Airlines concerned are not to
h *' d £2* n *! b l # ? r . omission or event during the time passengers are
HI! b #vent of cancellation, refund will be made in
Graun Tr?fi f writt#n notic# of cancellation is not received by
fn Jitaibi? u by . D J!?*T ber 10,1970, th n rotund will be made only If
be m?dS tab l* ,r ? m th# wait,n ,lrt * this event a refund will
amounf CC f the amo,,nt of sr collected exceeds the
the new S? u s w '" be refun< *ed. The total tour price includes
' v,/70> Fon *"
i PlEAsrpOTnT 1
I Last Name First Name I
| Student Faculty Dstaff QFamlly |
Home Address
ZiP Phone
| Campus Address I
Zip Phono
Male Female QSinglf Married
Age I
Average apartment capacity is four persons (individual beds).
I want to room with: 1. |
There will be a $25.00 per person 2
I "PP'omcntil char,, for twin accommo- |
Vou P *" Instead <[ ~ 1
| Check. Here For Twin. |
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SKI THE ALPS SPECIAL
Price $272 Plus SIB.OO tax
I SKMMLSS* O' deposit the I
ance will be due before December 3, 1970.)
Signature
1 application 1
Mail To I
Group Travel Associates Inc. 1
| 53 W. Jackson Chicago, 111. 60604 I
Enclosed is my check for 4 .....
- Make check payable to
_ Group Travel Associates Inc.
| Applications will ba accaptad and raclpts malld in tn. ordar th.y ar r*calvd. |



: KB'S.
Bel

Middle Eo*t Peace
Could Go Either Way
CAIRO (UPI) President
Anwar Sadat said Monday Egypt
wll not accept another
extension of the Middle East
cease-fire unless a timetable is
worked out for Israeli
withdrawal from occupied Arab
territory.
The middle East News Agency
said Sadat made the statement in
a speech to Egyptian troops
stationed on the Suez Canal.
I will not accept an
:xtension of the ceasefire except
n one case when we have a
ime table for withdrawal, Sadat
aid.
Otherwise I will never agree
to another extension because the
natter will be turned into a
eries of delays and
procrastinations which could go
>n for another 20 years.
Divorce Now Legal
: or Italian People
ROME (UPI) The Chamber
of Deputies rejected the first of
18 proposed amendments to a
historic divorce bill today,
setting the stage for introduction
of divorce in Italy for the first
time in 155 years.
The Christian Democrats, the
dominant party in Italy since
World War II and mditantly
opposed to divorce in any form,
conceded defeat early today.
WE ARE NOW at the end of
a long battle ... in which the
Christian Democrats are
suffering a bitter defeat, floor
leader Giulio Andreotti said.
The first amendment
dealing with the right of judges
to issue divorce decrees for
f the I
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couples marrying in civil
ceremonies was beaten
322-278. It was a 21-vote
victory for divorce advocates.
Pro-divorce forces have a
paper majority of 31 with only
Neo-Fascists, Monarchists and
five independents lining with the
Christian Democrats.
THE SENATE approved the
measure Oct. 9, but amended it
and thus force its return to the
Chamber of Deputies for a final
and decisive vote.
Divorce is an issue which
involved Pope Paul VI, who
strongly condemned it several
times, and caused friction
between partners in five
coalition governments.
It also is an institution which
was outlawed after Napoleon
withdrew from the Italian
peninsula in 1815 after 20 years.
Sucessive efforts to reintroduce

Why doesn't
General Electric sell new ideas
to the cities instead of
new gadgets to the suburbs?

After thirty years or more of
neglect, there's no question our cities
need help.
But what kind of help?
Will another thousand sanitation
men be the answer to dirty streets?
Will doubling the police force
finally bring crime under control?
Can new rent laws force
landlords to provide more low lowincome
income lowincome housing?
All the old, obvious ideas have
been tried. What's needed are new
ideas and new technological
developments.
General Electric has been
working on the problems of cities for
a number of years now. And in that
time we've come up with some
things we think will help.
Garbage
General Electric research has
come up with what is probably the
most revolutionary idea in garbage
disposal in years. Opr scientists are
Working toward a'process by which a
special strain of bacteria converts
garbage into a high-protein food
for cattle.
The process is still something of
a "laboratory trick," but it could be
\n the pilot-plant stage in as little
as three years.

i§|f%.

divorce were beaten and it took
five years to get this measure
this far.
About one million persons
were estimated by experts to be
awaiting passage of the bill so
they can obtain divorces.
TWA Jet Crashes
With Israeli AF Jet
TEL AVIV (UPI) A Trans
World Airlines (TWA) 707 cargo
jet streaking for takeoff at Tel
Avivs Lydda Airport before
dawn Sunday crashed into an
Israeli air force Stratocruiser
being towed on the runway.
Both aircraft exploded in
flames, scattering rubble over
the runway and forcing a
shutdown of the airport for nine
hours.
THE THREE-MAN TWA crew

X\*X-X*X X*X*X*Xv.\^X*Xv/X*X lv.%vX*Xv!JvVv*!'v^Mv^P.v.v.v.x*X\v^^?.&.%^^Ev£v!vX
/X'XXX-x-^BXv'XvX'XvXXvXvX'XX^MXvXivX-

Crime
You might not expect a company
like General Electric to be doing
anything about crime.
But the fact is, GE has been
working with the Syracuse police,
looking for a new approach to the
problem. Our scientists there came
up with a whole new concept in
police organization called "Crime
Control Teams."
In their first year, these teams
were credited with cutting crime
62% in one large, representative
neighborhood of Syracuse. And the
concept has since been adopted by a
number of other cities.
Housing
To meet the critical need for
new low-income housing, General
Electric is participating in the
Department of Housing and Urban
Development's Operation
Breakthrough. r . ...
While GE has no intention of
going into commercial home
building, we do hope to supply the
builder-developer with new products
needed to improve his efficiency.
We now have several design
prototypes of advanced, modular
homes that can be assembled in ar
matter of hours.
These are just a few of the new
ideas General Electric has come up
with to help cities at the same time
that we continue to improve
GENERAL @ ELECTRIC

scrambled to safety, two
suffering minor scratches, but
two Israeli ground workers died
and two others were injured, one
of them seriously, a police
spokesman said.
One of the dead was the
driver of a tractor pulling the
Stratocruiser and the other a
ground crewman whose charred
body was found in the cockpit
of the Israeli transport, the
spokesman said.
The TWA captain, D.
Meyerholz, told newsmen his
four engine jet, its fuel tanks
fully laden for a flight to Europe
with a cargo of Israeli vegetables
and nylon stockings, had just
attained takeoff speed when he
suddenly spotted the lights of
the Stratocruiser looming in the
darkness.
I tried to veer off to the

TuMday, Daownbar 1.1970, The Florida AlHator,

"gadgets" to help people.
We don't think our home
products are at all unnecessary or
frivolous. If they seem that way, it's
because people have forgotten how
much they rely on them. To wash
dishes. To wash clothes. To keep
warm. To keep cool. To entertain.
And on and on.
New ideas for the cities and
new "gadgets" for the home both
have the same end in mind, after all.
To help people live better.
. Why are we running this ad?
We're running this ad, and
others like it, to tell you the things
General Electric is doing to solve
the problems of man and his
environment today.
The problems concern us
because they concern you. We're a
business and you are potential
customers and employees.
But there's another, more
important reason. These problems
will affect the future of this country
and this planet. We have a stake in
that future. As businessmen. And,
simply, as people.
We invite your comments.
Please write to General Electric,
570 texington Ave., New York, N Y.
10022.

right and was heading off the
asphalt but my left wing brushed
the Stratocruiser and then we
felt a tremendous blast, he said.
Pope Gets Greetings
From Australians
SYDNEY (UPI) Pope Paul
VI, fatigued by the whirlwind
pace of his Asia-Pacific tour,
appeared to draw new vigor
Monday from the cheers of
thousands who greeted him in
Australia halfway point on
his mission to lands never before
visited by a Pope.
The 7 3-year-old spiritual
leader of the worlds 600
million Roman Catholics looked
tired and hallow-eyed as he
stepped on to Australian soil for
a two day visit after a long flight
in his special jetliner from
Samoa.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuatday, Oacember 1,1970

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

SPEAKERS ON CAMPUS
Chairman of the Board of
Regents D. Burke Kibier ill
made the following statement at
the meeting in Tallahassee
Friday, Nov. 20:
There has been a considerable
expression of unhappiness by
the public generally and
members of the legislature
specifically, concerning the
appearance on several of our
state university campuses of the
far left radical, Abbie Hoffman.
I can understand this expression
of concern over having people
who openly and specifically
preach violence and revolution.
There is certainly logic to the
position taken by so many that
these types of human beings
have no place on our college
campuses. I hold no brief for the
Abbie Hoffmans and the William
Kuntslers, but I do think that
certain facts concerning this
ought to be put in perspective.
(1) There is no legal way that
these people can be prevented
from speaking on a public
university's campus or any other
public facility. This has been
insured by the Supreme Court's
definition of the first
amendment right of freedom of
speech. (2) Because of the
extreme visibility given these
unsavory individuals by our
media, they have in fact become
notorious celebrities and thereby
have a certain crowd appeal.
Accordingly, when one appears
at any public occasion, curiosity
seekers will be present.
(3) The fact that these
speakers have appeared on
university campuses in no way
indicates an endorsement by the
university of their positions or
beliefs, nor does it indicate that
there are sympathetic followers
of these speakers on that
particular campus.
(4) Above all, a university is a
market place for ideas, even
unpopular and destructive ideas,
and as long as the purveyors of
those ideas behave in a
reasonable manner and restrict
themselves to the expression of
those ideas only, it is my
judgment that they must be
tolerated.
11J 'Â¥ happen to believe that oar'
; a ibiuju. bmi EDtnofrm
system of government s easily
defended in debate against the
likes of the Chicago Seven. It
would be rather chilling if our
only method of combatting this
anarchist marxist ideology was
to repress it. I deplore the
presence of these people on our

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campuses, but nevertheless, I
respect the right of students and
faculty to hear these people if
they so desire, provided, of
course, that these people behave
themselves while on our
campuses.
I am not unmindful of the
view that is held by many, that
it is a sign of weakness to allow
these people to speak. I must
disagree with such a view, as I
think it would be a sign of
infinite weakness to resort to
repression as our defense against
this skum. I also recognize that
these purveyors of hate and
venom would like to incite riot
and revolt on campuses, and that
many of them preach for the
destruction of our institutions
and our very government itself.
We hopefully are prepared for
such measures. I do think that
some legislation strengthening
the trespass laws of the state
might be helpful in order to
allow us to remove undesirable
non-students from our
campuses. There is some doubt
as to whether these uninvited
people can be removed at this
time unless they are actually
breaking the law.
I would encourage all student
groups that bring in speakers, to
see that there is a reasonable
balance between opposing and
conflicting ideologies.
It is my judgement that our
college presidents have handled
these unpleasant situations in a
prudent and appropriate
manner, and they have my full
and complete support. I would
hope that they have the support
of the general public which they
so genuinely deserve.
REGENTS APPROVE NEW
POLICIES
The following policies were
approved by the Board of
Regents at its Nov. 20 meeting
in Tallahassee:
GRADUATE ADMISSION
POLICY
The policy described below
applies to students who seek
admission as first time or
transfer graduate students to a
master's or doctoral degree
program. The policy contains
minimal systemwide
c pequlrements.-tmiyet sffles Thay
fdfl 6W ll( more 1 tractive
Pf.f.t r r r y r
admission policies if they so
desire.
In order to be admitted, a
first time graduate student or a
graduate student transferring
from a graduate program at
another university must have a

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

bachelor's degree or equivalent
from an accredited university
and must meet at least one of
the following criteria:
(1. He shall have earned a "B"
average or better in all work
attempted while registered as an
upper division student working
for a baccalaureate degree.
(2. He shall have a total
Quantitative-Verbal Graduate
Record Examination score of
1,000 or higher or an equivalent
score on an equivalent measure
approved by the Board of
Regents.
Exceptions
Not more than 10 per cent of
the total headcount enrollment
in graduate degree programs may
be admitted as exceptions to the
above criteria. Students
admitted as exceptions need not
meet either of the criteria listed
above bout should meet other
criteria devised by the
university, such as excellent
letters of recommendation from
trusted colleagues or satisfactory
performance in a specified
number of graduate courses
taken as a post-bachelor student
or practical professional
experience in the discipline for a
specified period of time.
Special Post-Bachelor's
Non-Degree Students
Students with bachelor's
degree or equivalent who do not
meet the systemwide criteria and
who wish to enroll in courses
but not degree programs at the
post-bachelor's level may enroll
under the classification of
special post-bachelor non-degree
students. Student credit hours
generated by students so
classified will count as upper
division credit hours for
budgetary purposes. Universities
wishing to admit special
post-bachelor non-degree
students to graduate degree
programs after the student has
satisfactorily completed a
specified number of credits may
do so provided that the number
so admitted are included as part
of the 10 per cent exceptions.
REVISED POLICY ON
POLITICAL ACTIVITY
The revision extends to Career
Service Employees in the State
seek election to and hold publicl
office under certain conditions.
The revision is proposed under
authority of Chapter 70-277
which authorized such activity
subject to approval of the
agency head and the Division of
Personnel and Retirement. The

current' Board policy permits
State University System
employees other than ones
filling a Career Service position
to seek election to and hold
public office.
Revised Policy:
3.20 Political Activity
A. Employees
1. Any employee under the
jurisdiction of the Board of
Regents may seek election to
and hold public office upon the
recommendation of The
president(s) and approval of the
Board of Regents under the
following conditions:
(a) Such activity shall not
interfere with his normal duties
and responsibilities as outlined
in the Board of Regents' policy
on outside employment;
(b) Prior to seeking election
to and holding such public
office, the employee must
establish that there is no conflict
of interest between this activity
and the responsibility of the
individual to the university or

university calendar

Tuesday, Dec. 1
Student Recital, Union
Ballroom, 2:30 p.m.
Delta Chi meeting. Union 150 A,
7 p.m.
Sigma Nu Christmas Carols,
University Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Stamp Club meeting, Doyle
Conner Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi meeting, Union
362,7:30 p.m,
Bridge Club meeting, Union C & >
D, 7:30 p.m.
UF Dames meeting, 530 W.
Univ. Ave. 7:30 p.m.
Basketball, University of Florida
vs Sanford, Fla. Gym, 7:45
p.m.
Florida Players, Mime
Productions, Constans
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Young Republicans meeting,
. Union 361,8 p.m.
Arte Musica, MSB Aud., 8:30
p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 2
Beta Gamma Sigma Initiation,
Union 362,6:30 p.m.
Rathskeller Movie, W.C. Fields,
7:30
h UHh C.flMiny!f!A. V... r\ D;
Relations -meeting,.. Union
362,7:30 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
meeting, Union 118, 7:30
p.m.
Ffofida Players, Mime
Productions, Constans
Theatre, 8 p.m.

All listing of public events to be
printed in the Winter Quarterly
Calendar must reach tne"Public
Functions Office by Friday
December 4. They should be
addressed to Mrs. Patti Allan,
Calendar Secretary, Public
Functions, G-72, Reitz Union.
The Quarterly Calendar
includes movies, speakers,
concerts, dances, plays,
conferences, short courses,
exhibits and other campus
events open to the University
Community.

universities concerned and to the
State of Florida;
(c) The candidacy shall be
approved in advance and prior to
the announcement for public
office.
2. Where an employee elects
to run for and hold public office
and such action is judged by the
president(s) to interfere with
the full discharge of his regular.
duties, then the employee must
obtain leave of absence or
submit his resignation.
3. All Career Service
employees who have the
appropriate approval from the
President and the Board must
also have the approval of the
Director, Division of Personnel
and Retirement of the
Department of Administration.
(Career Service employees are
subject to provisions of Chapter
110 of the Florida Statutes.)
4. All employees shall adhere
to the provisions and spirit of
Section 104.31, Florida
Statutes.

Christmas Concert, University
Aud. 8:15 p.m.
Christmas on Campus, Tree
Lighting, Univ. Aud. Lawn,
10:15 p.m. President's
Christmas Message, Univ.
Aud., 10:45 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 3
Women's Glee Club Christmas
Concert, Union Stair Case,
12:30 p.m.
Phi Kappa Phi Initiation &
Banquet, Union A, 233, 234,
6:30 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi meeting, Union
122,7 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
meeting, Union 357, 8 p.m.
Law Dames Bridge, Union 150
D, 8 p.m.
Florida Players, Mime
Productions, Constans
Theatre, 8 p.m.
Senior Recital, Lynn Tyner,
Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
BOX OFFICE SALES
Asolo's production of
Candida" Students $1.50,
No General Public, Dec. 7th
Showing
Asolo's production of
General Public
lull. 2)n
SB.OO includes r a r champagne
Reception, Dec. Bth Showing
"The Nutcracker Suite",
Gainesville Civic Ballet
St udents SI.OO, G.P. $2.00
Florida UJ
Pantomine", G.P. $.75
Students $.25



Census Shows Decades Gain

WASHINGTON (UPI) After
becking snd double checking,
he Census Bureau reported
Monday the 1970 U.S.
jopulation was 204,765,770 -a
, a in of 25 million over 1960
vhich will require the
reshuffling of congressional seats
n 14 states.
The decades gain of
25,442,595 Americans was
recond only to the 28 million
gained in 1950-60. But on a
Percentage basis, the 13.3 per
:e nt increase was the second
owest since the 7.3 per cent
zain of 9 million in 1930-40.
the final figures
reported to President Nixon
nq re 4.5 million more than
those contained in a preliminary
count Sept. 1 when the Census
Jureau predicted that the final
count would be increased by 4
to 5 million after all military
men, transients and rechecks had
)een counted.
Preliminary counts raised a
chorus of complaints across the

Calleys Trial Resumes

FT. BENNING, Ga. The
murder court martial of Army
.t. William L. Calley Jr. resumes
Tuesday following a six-day
holiday interruption.
Calley, 27, is on trial for his
life, charged with the murder of
at least 102 South Vietnamese
civilians at My Lai. The Army
charges the former platoon
leader led his men through the
tiny hamlet and Calley either
killed the villagers or ordered
them shot.
L THE PROSECUTION spent
the first six days of testimony
parading 21 witnesses to the
stand. Testimony has shown
there were two distinct groups
of bodies, the small of from 10
to 20 bodies located at the
intersection of two trails south
of My Lai. Witnesses also said
they saw a second and larger
group of dead civilians
perhaps more than 100 or as few
as 30 in an irrigation ditch
east of the village.

629 Americans Die
In Holiday Traffic
By United Press International t
Final figures Monday showed 629 Americans died in traffic
iccidents during the four-day Thanksgiving holiday, a figure well
>elow preholiday estimates of the death toll by tiie National Safety
Council.
The council had predicted 670 to 770 persons would be killed on
lighways during the peak travel period that extended from 6 p.m.
ocal time Wednesday to midnight Sunday.
THE LOWER holiday period death toll is in line with a year-long
rend of fewer highway deaths even though there are 3.8 million
nore cars on the road and 3 million more licensed drivers, a safety
council spokesman said.
He said a combination of factors, including safer cars built to meet
he standards of new federal laws, better trained drivers, more miles of
afety-engineered highways and more awareness of the problems of
Irinking and driving, contributed to the safer highway record.
About 1,000 fewer persons will die in highway accidents this year
han 1969, the council predicted a 2 per cent drop.
THANKSGIVING, 1970, was the safest Thanksgiving holiday
ecorded since the council began keeping figures for the period three
rears ago.
National Safety Council figures showed 696 persons died last year
nd 764 were killed in automobile accidents during the 1968
'tanftftivingjicgiQid*,, V* X'>>. v. .v.w.v

country that some communities
had been under-counted. But
Commerce Secretary Maurice
Stans said Monday that a
recheck in 500 communities
involving about 30 million
persons showed that the final
tally was accurate to 0.05 per
cent or five persons out of
every 10,000.
The population gain,
combined with population
shifts, meant that five states will
gain representation in the House
of Representatives, while nine
others will lose representation.
CALIFORNIA, the biggest
gainer in population, will add five
House seats. Florida will get
three more and Arizona,
Colorado and Texas will gain
one each.
New York and Pennsylvania
will lose two each, and Alabama,
lowa, North Dakota, Ohio,
Tennessee, West Virginia and
Wisconsin will lose one apiece. It
will be up to state legislatures to
make the adjustments in time

The government abruptly
interrupted its case a day before
the scheduled Thanksgiving
holiday was to begin, giving rise
to speculation it might be saving
key testimony until after the
break.
The court martial, before six
Army officers in a cramped
courtroom, reconvenes at 1 p.m.
Tuesday.
NO WITNESS has put Calley
at either site where the alleged
massacres took place. Only one
has said he saw the chunky,
red-faced officer at My Lai on
March 16,1968.
The attorney for a possible
key witness says Paul D. Meadlo,
20, of West Terre Haute, Ind.,
has been subpoenaed but will
not testify unless he is granted
immunity from prosecution.
Attorney John A. Kesler said
Meadlo has been called to testify
this week, probably Thursday.
Kesler and Meadlo will fly to Ft.
Benning for the trial..
MEADLO, WHO WAS a

for the new apportionment to
apply to the 93rd Congress
which convenes in January,
1973. If a legislature refuses to
redistrict, it is assumed the
federal courts would under the
Supreme Courts one-man
one-vote ruling.
Technically, Congress could
increase the size of the House,
now comprised of 435
representatives, and thus prevent
states from losing representation
under the new reapportionment
formula. But the size of the
House has remained the same
since it was increased from 386
to 435 in 1910 and there have
been no proposals to increase it
again.
The President is required by
law to submit the Census Bureau
report to Congress during the
first week of its regular 1971
session. Congress then has 15
days to act, and if it takes no
action to change the number of
House seats, the existing
apportionment formula would

member of Calleys platoon, was
named by Capt. Aubrey M.
Daniel, the chief prosecutor in
the court martial, as having shot
and killed a number of civilians
at Calleys direction.
Meanwhile, the defense
seemed eager to prove the
evidence of apparently
indiscriminate killings by
American Gls.
Under a ruling by Col. Reid
W. Kennedy, the military trial
judge, who said he would allow
latitude in cross-examination in
order to bring out everything
that happened at My Lai on the
day of the alleged massacre, the
defense exacted recollections of
civilians killed by helicopter
gunships, and at least two
individuals killed by Army
captains.

SWING
AROUND
TO
Budgat
Rent a Cap
OF GAINESVILLE
CALL
376-1245
FOR
Free pickup and
delivery anywhere
- im n hii t H off
in Alachua County
GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE
ONE WAY SPECIAL
15 *OO FLAT RATE
Includes Air conditioning
A free pickup and delivery.
24 Hours Maximum
Budget
RentaOap
WE RENT
BETTER CARS
, FOR LESS!
i in uni ii I i p 1 -i

be applied to the new
population total.
With a four million
population gain, California
became the nations most
populous state with 20,098363.
New York, gaining from
16,782304 to 18,287329 drope
With a four million
population gain, California
became the nations most
populous state with 20,098,863.
New York, gaining from
16,782304 to 18,287329
dropped back to second place.

Records Make
Great Gifts
ecord "Sax
OF GAINESVILLE
J 23 *e s t UNIVERSITY AVENUE

Helo. Im Johnny Cash.
I want to tel you about
the sound of the Hohner
harmonica.
Its a sound thats as much a
P art America as the lonesome
wail of a freight train in the night.
A sound that was first heard
back in the 1850s when Hohner
harmonicas soothed restless
mountain men. homesick sailors
and weary plantation workers.
During the Civil War,
sound was Johnny Reb playing
Dixie at Shiloh and Lookout Mountain. While across the lines
Union soldiers played John Browns Body.
Cowboys broke the prairie stillness with Hohners. Railroad
men kept them in their overalls as the great iron beast pushed west.
Wichita, Pocatello, Sacramento.
The sound went with boatmen up from New Orleans.
Lumberjacks in Coos Bay. Miners in Cripple Creek. Farmers in
Dyess, the little town in Arkansas where I grew up.
I remember hearing it back then. Good times or bad, the
humble harmonica has been in Americas hip pocket as we grew up.
I And its still there today.
Because its a sound thats simple and
true. Happy and sad. A reflection of life,
past and present.
Its not surprising that today Hohners fit
so naturally with any kind of music. Blues,
Folk and Rock. In fact, Hohner makes over
160 different kinds of harmonicas, from an
inch and a half to two feet long. Popular
models come in all different keys. Theres even
a neck holder so you can play harmonica and guitar at the same
time. Me? I use the good old Marine Band for songs like
Orange Blossom Special. It gives me just the sound I want.
Pure and honest.
You can get the same sound I do by getting a Hohner
harmonica today. At your campus bookstore
M. Hohner, Inc., Hicksville, N.Y. 11802
> * v A

Tuedfy.Pecpaibcr l1S70, T* Flflrt* AH***,

I THE BAND
IN CONCERT
JACKSONVILLE
CIVIC AUDITORIUM
FRI. DEC. 11-8:30 PM
IBANKAMERICARD
MASTER CHARGE
PRICES
3.50-4.50-5.50 I
Tickets now on Sale Jax Civic
Auditorium Hemming Park
Ticket Office and Coliseum
Reservations Accepted
Phone Auditorium 354-2041
Ticket ordere accepted by mail.
Send check or M.O. to Civic
' Auditorium and enclose self
addressed stamped envelope.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Olins Mobile Home Sales, Starke
Fla., Rt. 100 West has 1971 Skylines.
1 and 2 bedrooms furnished for
53195 set up and delivered. Bank
financing. (A-30t-47-p)

2:10-4:35-7:00-9:25 I
ANXEMCHOtSFUM 1
AUUM I:
MiMustaeuiatmetew. I
jaam m . emwi. nine
RATED R"

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -MO pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* M M
I lI 1| 1| £
8|1! & 3 I £
Z Z Z a o
_ z
Q
_ >
w W IO
- § v
N * 3-S S < |
oo> p
Si J j so
z < a* ss
§ aa C
5 8 8 2
Q A St
TO
1 Q > 3 z
_ s 5 m
K V, V . 1
, f£._ eV
SSjjSPPfI T* ...,
_ >
~ S i >
_ 2 f
___ N m
1 ~

FOR SALE
#* e e
e "*e*e*e*#*e*e*e*e*e*e*e*e*#*e # e*e*e*e*e*e"e*e*e e
Citrus Club Fruit Sale give a box
for Xmas or Thanksgiving 40 lb. box
grapefruit $3.50 oranges or mixed
$4. 392-1996 or drop by Rm. 1177
McC. Hal. (A-st-46-p)

3:10-5:20-7:30-9:40 I
ouiL&sJ
W I
ibill

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, December 1,1970

FOR SA LE
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy kongo pet 475-2546
(local) (A-ts-c)
Mobile Home, 12 x 57, 1968 Park
Avenue, 2 bedroom, air cond., very
reasonable, call 378-8523 (A-4t-50-l)
Quality 8-Track Tape Cartridge
recording. Figure the great savings
accumulate 4 tapes & sth is FREE
(2) of your albums $6 inc cartridge
averages to only $2.40 per album.
Why pay more? 378-5916 John 4-8
pm (A-st-49-p)
Silvertone stereo tape recorder.
$50.00 or best offer. Call Kirby
373-1748 (A-3t-50-p)
KEEP carpet cleaning problems small
use Blue Lustre wall to wall. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Electric
upholstery shampoos also available.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
For sale New half size refrigerator
Call 392-8484 (A-4t-50-p)
1970 honda cl-350 Scrambler show
room condition S6OO call Barry
378-9418 (A-4t-50-p)
PEACE TAGS Replica of Gl dog
tags, but show only peace sign, $1
set. J. Makula, P.O. Box 7347,
Tampa, FI. 33603. (A-st-49-p)
MENS TIES FOR SALE. Beat the
Christmas rush buy a tie. Some at
3/SIO.OO others $4.50 or $5.00 each.
Call Bob 378-4730 night. (A-st-46-p)
65 Honda 337 New carb. Engine
recently rebuilt tool-kit, helmet
included tight machine S4OO or best
offer. Call 376-4895. (A-st-46-p)
For Sale: 1-speed girls bike. 1-speed
s3O; Guitar s3O; Radio ss.
Call 373-2581 after 6 PM.
(A-st-47-p)
._nn
5 AT THE RAT
f WEDS. NIGHT S
7:30 pm o c>
2 9:00 pm 2
5 10:30 pm ADMISSION i
2 presented by SGP 2

I BICYCLE
| PARTS and
I FOR All! MAKES |
I I
j 1236 NW 3rd Rw J 72-03801

FOR SALE
XvX-XvX-:*:.:^^
STEREO SPEAKERS matched set
Electro Voice high performance
12-inch speakers. Call Oave,
378-7479 for details.
Triumph 650 custom. A flawless
machine. Last week in Gville 5,000
miles on engine. All aluminum,
chrome, very fast, 2 helmets.
378-7872. SI,OOO. (A-st-49-p)
Stereo 70 watt solid state Eico Amp,
matching FM In perfect condition,
both for $l5O. 373-3890. (A-3t-49-p)
Electronics Hobbyists . FREE bag
of parameters to all who stop by.
Technical Assistance Unlimited. 717
N.W. First St. (A-st-49-p)
Packard Bell Home Entertainment
set. Garrard record changer B&W TV,
AM/FM stereo receiver, walnut
cabinet. Excellent condition. $175,
372-5483. (A-3t-49-p)
1968 HONDA 305 Scrambler set up
for enduros, plastic fenders, 322 cc,
400-19 knobby, also have the lights
and all parts for street use including
chrome fenders, extra sprokets, and
misc. parts, $400.00 376-1824.
(A-2t-49-p)
18000 BTU Fedders air conditioner 2
yrs old, excellent condition, $l5O.
CALL 373-2602 or see at 304-1
Diamond Village (A-4t-48-p)
Mamiya C 33, only TLR with
interchangeable lenses, porrofinder,
grip, lens shade, 120 & 220 backs,
over $350. Hardly used $l5O.
378-3767, Bill (A-3t-48-p)
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcases 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
Typewriter. Used Smith Corona
electric portable. SSO. Very good
condition. Call 372-7287. (A-4t-48-p)
y:;X:^X;:wXX;X;X;X;X;X;>X;X;>>>y;X;:v
FOR RENT
3 girls needed to sublet apt. at Univ.
Gardens. $47.50 ea. Starts Jan. 1
June. Call 378-6183. (B-4t-47-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom furn. api.,
AC/heat, pool. Avail. Dec. 15.
Couples only, no pets. Call 372-0736
between 4 PM & 11 PM. (B-st-45-p)
ROOMS for single male students for
winter and spring quarter. One block
from campus. $45/mo. Call Dave or
Rick, 373-3924 after 7 PM
(B-st-46-p)
2 bedroom furnished apt. central air
and heat, quiet neighborhood.
Available in Dec. $155/mo. call
378-3104 anytime.(B-st-47-p)
Live in the lap of luxury! One
roommate needed for The Place for
Jan. 1. Call 372-5942. (B-st-47-p)
Sublet apt. Dec. College Terrace Apt.
across street from campus. Call
378-7434. (B-2t-49-p)
NEW
and used
Furniture, Appliances
and Miscelleanous Items.
QUALITY FURNITURE
AUCTION
441 at the Williston Cut-off
372-3991

for hebjtt
Sublet 3 bdrm. turn, house. Jan-June;
A/C, /z blk from campus; $165 per
mo.; Call 373-2104 after 5:30 PM.
(B-4t-48-p)
Sublet Hawaiian Village 2 bedroom
flat. AC, pool and dishwasher. $220 a
month. Call 378-1217 anytime.
(B-st-48-p)
MUST SUBLET Bedroom for 2,
private bathroom, air cond.,
dishwasher, pool, tennis ct., Will take
LOSS. Jim or Tom 373-2384.
(B-2t-48-p)
Sublet 1 BR apt Winter-Spring
Quarter 2 blocks from campus very
reasonable Call Gail at 378-9712
After 5:30 P.M. (B-3t-50-p)
NEED AN APARTMENT? Beautiful
2 bedroom townhouse. Call
378-2219 (B-4t-50-p)
1 bedroom duplex apt. 120/mo
furnished close to med center quiet
location sublet after dec. 15 call
372-0674, 1916 SW 14 Tr.
(B-4t-50-p)
WANTED
24 year old returning student needs a
place to live beginning winter
quarter. Sociology major Write me
and describe what youve got, costs,
etc. Alan Fried, 1241 Normandy
Drive, Miami Beach, Florida 33141
(C-4t-50-p)
Female roommate needed beginning
winter quarter 2 bedroom apt. one
(1) block from Tlgert $45. month +
utilities call 373-3134 (C-4t-50-p)
S4B/mo. to live in Village Park Apts.
We need a female roommate for
winter and spring quarters. Call
376-9829. (C-4t-49-p)
Roomates for house 10 blocks
behind Norman. Own room for
$35/mo. + V 4 utilities. Call 373-1748
(C-4t-50-p)
1 or 2 female roomates, 2 bedroom,
2 bath. Now thru June. $46.25 +
utilities Call Polly 372-1854
(evenings) (C-st-49-p)
Male to share 1 bdrm. apt. to begin
now or winter trm. $57.50 + V 2
utilities 1216 SW 2 Ave. Apt. 22 Has:
1 bdrm. livrm. kitch. & bath Stop by
MF 5-6:15, Sun. 1-3 (C-3t-50-p)
Female Roommate Wanted for next
quarter only. Roomy, carpeted apt.
close to campus. S9O for the quarter.
Have own room. 1324 SW 13
376-4003 (C-3t-50-p)
One bedroom, furnished apt for
married couple, from January til
June. Around sllO-$125 monthly.
392-7622 (C-4t-50-p)
Male roommate needed for winter
and spring quarters $46.25/mo.
Gatortown apts. Available Dec. 10
call 378-3867 (C-2t-50-p)
Female roommate to share four,
bedroom apartment close to campus.
Call Sue. 373-3766. (C-4t-50-p)
ROOMMATES for 3 bedroom house
IV2 blocks from campus. Persons
should have some furniture. Call
Bruce 378-8855 pets considered
(C-2t-50-p)
Do you need a home? We need you!
Call Cindy 378-6592. $47.50 mo.
Landmark. Female. (C-st-47-p)
Roommate needed immed. Fredrick
Garden Apts. $42.50 mo. heated
pool, air cond. Call 376-0803.
(C-st-47-p)
I need a place to stay for the winter
quarter. Graduate In March. Call
Doug. Ph. 372-6002 (-3t-48-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for
Landmark Apt. 50 for Winter Qtr.
AC, TV, $47.50 + utilities. Call
376-7693 after 5:30 PM. (C-6t-48-p)
Need 1 room In house close to
campus. Will pay around 50/mo.



-
gator CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
. ..*! I # I # l*******?*** ,, # *** ** ,##- **
wanted two roommates girls French
barter Apts. 59. Call Susie orCat hi
17 3-4 282 or Janice Or Shelly
73-3197. (C-st-49-p) J
-emale roommate to sublet 2 br. apt.
Winter & Spring qtr. Air-cond.. pool
ius to campus. $39 '/ util. Call Pat
578-9430. (C-3t-49-p)
emale roommate needed for
andmark Apt. 95 Winter and Spring
quarters. $47.50 per mo. Call
378-4404. (C-2t-49-p)
1 or 2 male roommates to sublet La
Vlancha Apt. 36. $75/mo. inc.
jtnities & private bedroom. Dec. rent
free. Call 378-6716 or stop by office.
C-st-4 7-n)
Male roommate wanted for winter
juarter for new 2 bedroom trailer,
jwn room, SBO/mo. + V? utilities. Call
378-0733 after 5 PM. (C-st-49-p)
~ome again! Listeners wanted Will
,ay $2.00 for one hour session. Must
3C native English speaking and have
lormal hearing. Please call Susan
jetween 8 and 5 for appointment.
392-2049. (C-Bt-44-p)
emale roommate needed
mmediately. Landmark 97. $47.50
icated AC pool sauna dishwasher,
ivc m luxury. Call Joy only. After
>:00 372-8252. (C-3t-49-p)
Male roommate to share 1 br. apt.
eye, pool, three bloc from campus.
t 46 mo. Prefer Law or grad student.
;all 378-0733 between 5 and 7.
C-st-49-p)
help wanted
: O L U M B I A RECORDS
ROMOTIONS MGR. $75 per mo.
Ir. BUS or JOUR major this is a
antastic job for the right person. Call
Steve at 373-2687. (E-2t-49-p)
HELP WANTED: Bookkeeper
Jright, ambitious person wanted for
apidly growing construction
lompany. Send resume to P.O. Box
112, Gainesville. (E-st-49-p)
HOMEWORKERS. Address
invelopes. Send stamped envelope &
>5 cents to GWL Enterprises. 640
-obb St., Athens, Ga. 30601.
E-4t-49-p)
How hiring team leaders for new
16-bed Nursing Unit at Alachua
General Hospital. Salary based on
iducation and experienced. Call
172-4321-227. (E-6t-49-p)
'T X-ray Tech, needed by Alachua
Sen. Hosp., on-call, day nursery for
>re-schoolers while you work. Call
172-4321 x 365. (E-10t-45-p)

AUTOS
** *# # *" # *%****,* % - # * # # # # # # # *,
970 BMW 2002 Automatic with sun
oof. One owner, low mileage,
-xcellent condition. $2950. Call
172-0268. (G-st-47-p)
Ilf*
Spendable transportation. $l5O or
fe^o Call Chuck 468-1203 after
> (G-3t-48-p)
l? 6 rv 8 Fiat ~ 850 s P* ? 1,000 miles. Radio. New Paint. Call
G-Bt-47-p)
NOW
IMMI I I 1:43 3:42
| 5:41 7:45
. Jal i l 1 I
Anthony Quinn
pa
_ Barbra 31
Streisand kS
Montandi
PnAClerf
y OU Can See §

TuMday, Decamtor 1,1970, Th. Florid. Alligator.

AUTOS
61 MGA 1500 cv., "classic brand
new paint, wire wheels good
condition, must sell $450. call Dh
376-1739 (G-2t-50-p)
VOLVO great transportation SSOO
Bob 378-7479 (G-2t-50-p)
BMW, 1966 1800 TI, Air. am-fm,
polyglas, like new engine. Must sell
now! For only $1095. Call Ron at
372-6740 (G-4t-50-p)
Volvo sedan 1961. Good running
condition. $250 376-8855 after 5-00
(G-4t-50-p)
PERSONAL
HI Diamond Village Vote for Richard
Sapp 305-4 for Treasurer on Dec 2d
phone 378-6436 (J-2t-50-p)
Whoever ripped off my MGA
tonneau cover: It takes cojones to
bring it back. 378-6898 (J-3t-50-p)
263-92-5159: Broken promises
should be mended. Grits (J-lt-50-p)
Share expenses on two month driving
trip thru Central America. Over 21 &
mature. Pref. with military
experience. For more info. Call Bill
at 378-9577 (J-4t-50-p)
Tutoring for Spanish courses. Will
tutor any required basic courses.
Spanish native. For appointment call
Vic 378-4574. (J-st-46-p)
FREE KITTENS for Xmas also,
MATH TUTORING catch up now
for finals grad student call
378-3746 Mikki. (J-3t-49-p)
Christmas is coming. Finals are too:
Let the PHI SIGS make It sweeter for
you. (J-st-49-p)
Stop! Read this! Two lucky lasses
needed to make an apt. a home: over
looking a vast green pasture.
Beautiful! Call 373-3230
Williamsburg. (J-3t-49-p)
Wanted. Scientific American old
issues 1968 & 1969. Will pay. Please
phone 378-9140 after 5 p.m.
weekdays or Sat. & Sun. (J-2t-49-p)
Its a coop. Its a craftsmans outlet.
It's original. It's non-profit. It's
something Gainesville has needed. Its
downtown. Its The Gainesville
Artisans Market. 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open 10-9 Mon-Sat and 1-7 on
Sunday. (J-3t-48-p)
The Rolling Stone, Crawdaddy,
Ramports, East Village Other, Tarot
Cards and Books now at Demians
Leathers/Laurents Books. (J-6t-48-p)
3 ays
wuTnHiiA *7 If
~ Shows 9
US:£5 Os OF
NACaiBHIOV
V THECAE?
ffi^TtCWIJCOLO^V
I IkHi Ckrnif Awijfl H
ISP
Shows K | NOO F
3:30 A WESTERN
5:30 HE'S SORT
g:3O COWBOY.
I Frank Sinatra
| George Kennedy in
V Igp) COLOR J
L 3 ST 1
SHOWsUQJpfTPfI
i : 3 O
3:20
15 I McKenzie I
day L, BREAK" 1

PERSONAL
Good deal on beautiful engagement
wedding ring set. Cost $250.00
when new, sold to best offer. Call
Sue Barnett at 3 73-4250 after 5:00.
(J-st-47-p)
Does the student senate reflect the
views of students? Put the senate to
the test call 372-1820 12 PM 8
AM. Mack Tyner can help you issue
your challenge. Frustrations are too
big and numerous these days to try
to hold them. Share a gripe today!
(J-st-47-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS! Meet more
members of the opposite sex at U.F.
All dates in Gainesville. Free details
write: Nationwide Dating Service,
P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-15t-41-p)
Hate to cook? Too poor for an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 376-9473 (J-22t-30-p)
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)
COMPUTER DATING Meet your
ideal date. Special introductory price.
Now serving leading colleges and
universities throughout the U.S.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702
(J-23t-44-p)

wWg / EfIUMHH f]
'wwm' 1 f
'm Wl MM ; ;1 J i
u m 1 w K iwi
* *N.
'flu.
imM, PjJ***. sl&urx****
5420 Northwest 13th Street / Tel 3TI-2137 j
1.. . W e W

Page 15

LOST <& FOUND
Light blue wallet missing from
Mallory Hall. Reward no questions
asked. Only want IDs and pics. Call
392-9132. Please!!! (L-2t-49-p)
LOST brown leather shoulder purse
at Temptations show. Call 378-4647.
Reward. (L-4t-48-p)
'#'#**'**%''#*#********%************'*****
t 0 m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
000m0m0000 0-0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SERVICES
Typing done; themes, thesis, etc.
Guaranteed accuracy and neatness.
Electric typewriter. $.50 per page.
Phone 378-7493 anytime. Good
references. (M-st-47-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Americard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office in town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.
across from Greyhound Bus Station.
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at & grad of Bklyn College,
NY. Term papers, theses,
dissertations. 50 cents & up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft. 6.
(M-st-49-p)

ijjjjjwM]
l AT THE RAT S
| WEDS. NIGHT l
7:30 pm 0 -.
l 9:oopm J
f 10:30 pm ADMISSION 3
presented by SGP



Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Oacambar 1,1970

Vktims Os Crime
To Got Compensation
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
- Rep. George Firestone
prefiled a bill Monday which
would provide compensation for
the forgotten person in the
crime cycle the victim while
another proposal would create
an insurance regulating
commission.
Firestone, D-Miami, said his
bill, and a companion measure
introduced in the Senate by Sen.
Gerald Lewis, D-Miami, would
provide for compensation of
SIO,OOO to each of the victims

UPI: 7 \ Tallahassee Report

*i --- )_.,> - ; : : ; - ',' "
-VaHmr^ I Bfe. '" " r : -.-.. '!?*'~.i '!?*'~.i---9
--9 '!?*'~.i---9
J v.-? *2*-.-*' (3>-'E*-i's -*%- i? .^- v : '~ r '** lf^w^M toi^BHHHHEC. . _. J S' ) 75*7 Oes i? '-tj' ; ; v.,'- Vr' Vif '.- £'
8 K
| H | I 1.-i"
.-i" i

If Kooky Kat had the muscle to make a couple
of KIH speakers work, he'd roar instead of meow.
The simple fact is that even a fair compact music
~tsystemcould produde a whole lot of music if it had
KIH speakers.
Now, we're not suggesting you
with someone elses so-so system. We make our own
complete stereo systems and theyre really special.
They all feature excellent solid state electronics
and come with either an FM stereo or an AM/FM
sto'eo radio. They're very nice looking and easy to
use. And best of all, they have great KLH speakers.
We admit they're not very flashy. There are no
dazzling lights. Or fancy doohickeys.

dependents.
CLAIMS UNDER the
proposal would be filed with a
three-member compensation
commission which would hear
claims and decide the amount of
compensation for persons killed
or injured during the
commission of a crime.
I intend to push for the
passage of this legislation
because while crime is on the
rise in Florida nothing is being
done to aid the forgotten person
in the crime cycle the victim,
Firestone said.
Rep. Carl Singleton, as a
Miami Democrat, prefiled a bill

U HIGH
uQm FIDELITY
CENTER

How to beat the system.

We figure the speakers are where the sound
comes from so that's where we put most of our effort.
Beatles on a compact
like a singing group in ins
s ins teach onsn animal act. And the Philharmonic sounds
as if all the musicians showed up.
We think you'll find all our music systems sound
quite different from the ones youre used to hearing.
Visit your local KLH dealer for a demonstration.
And tell him Kooky sent you.
Or write to KLH, 30 Cross Street, Cambridge,
Mass. 02139, for more information and a complete
catalog on KLH compact music systems.

which would put the regulation
of the Florida insurance industry
under the control of a
six-member commission
appointed by the governor and
confirmed by the Senate. Three
members of the commission
would be selected from the
ranks of the industry while the
general public would be
represented by the remaining
three members.
An executive director
bearing the title of insurance
commissioner would be
appointed by the commission to
run the insurance department.

He would be subject to removal
only upon conviction in court of
malfeasance, maisfeasance or
nonfeasance.
Incoming state treasurer
Thomas OMalley, who will also
serve as insurance commissioner,
has opposed the separation of
the insurance department from
the treasurers office.
Askew And Family
Pose For Pictures
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
-Gov.-elect Reubin Askew

FOR YOUR / ROOSEVELT MALL
rr TCKjiKif* / JACKSONVILLE 388 8539
919 UNIVERSITY AVE.
fLtAiUKt / GAINESVILLE 378 9805

This is the KLH Model 24 FM Stereo/ Phonograph.
The suggested retail price is $319.95 (slightly higher
with sawfifiJliflt otnU 213iJ9
. *
-Jbr jra^H
RI IH
KLH RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
A trademark ol KLH Research and Development Corporation >1

posed for his official
inauguration photographs
Monday after returning from a
weekend governors orientation
conference in North Carolina.
Aid George Sheldon said
Askew and his wife and
children posed for a family
portrait in their Pensacola home
before the governor-elect flew to
Tallahassee. Later in the day, he
posed for an individual
photograph.
. i ..
Both pictures will appear in
the inaugural program for the
Jan. 5 ceremonies.



The
Florida
Alligator

Bob Favreau Snaps 3 State Records

Special to th Alligator
Bob Favreau broke three state
weightlifting records this past
weekend enroute to a come
from behind second place finish
Jin the AAU State Powerlifting
Championships in Tampa.
Favreaus first record came on
a 410 pound squat, which he
later broke on a third attempt of
420 pounds. As if that wasnt
enough, Favreau then shattered
the state deadlift record with a
clutch 515 pound lift.
A NEW AMERICAN record
; for Favreau (565 pounds for a
jlightweight) would have been

Eigma Nu
ictorious,
low In Finals
j
By HARVEY SPOONER
Alligator Correspondent
Sigma Nu, led by A1
Jimonsen, moved into the finals
)f Orange League football by
idging the Pi Kappa Phis, 26-20
(n a game that was close all the
/ay, the score was tied at 13-13
t the half despite the fact the
'Jus doubled the Pi Kaps first
iown production notching six.
The Nus continued to outgain
the Pi Kaps in the second half
but managed to score one more
fD to capture the game.
IN THE OTHER semi-final
lame, the Pi Lams took a 27-6
lalftime lead and then held on
or a 27-25 win over ATO but
he game will have to be played
>ver due to a protest.
It seems one Pi Lam
touchdown was called when the
|eceiver had his body in the end
tone but the ball was declared
hot to have been in the end
tone. This was an improper call
|nd due to the closeness of the
Contest the game will be
Replayed.
In the Blue League Delta Tau
pelta and Alpha Gamma Rho
fwait a faceoff for the
championship.
! THE B.F. BOMBERS will face
Jhe Clique in the independent
the Snowflakes meet
pc Ribetters, Ginos Shifthawks
jj*y the Bjg Red and
1* 1020 tangles
TWgpen Experience in the
quarterfinals.
' In Doan buketbdl, North I
icored a 45-23 victory over Staff
f Tolbert Area. North; w as led
fy the rebounding of Dave Conn
jith 11 and the scoring of
Ted Sahreson with 27
feints.
But the North effort was not
enough to keep South II from
Chiming the Tolbert Area
championship. Jennings IV has
won the East title while
yearns Staff section has also
qwn declared a winner. Sledd
Jeets Thomas to decide the
Murphree championship and
yistol, Farrah, and Yocum still
K *;.

' *'.'/.* Vjiil^ ,,>^iik^ ( '.'lva^/XlalaLv 1 .t^lA^^'i*V

UF WEIOHTLIFTER FINISHES SECOND IN TAMPA

*s3* Jl
v PS) SSCM
iso ffiK
PHIL COPE
WEIGHTLIFTER 808 FAVREAU IN PRACTICE
... he recently broke three state records, but lost


\ llWIi f v I
WftffiyA .
'. \
Rat makes it young
dF iiMwf^Th
=>> -
.jkv
Makes the fun of driving easy to afford y un 9 budgets.
The 850 Sport Spider and Sport Coupe are so easy to awn they're almost
"beginner's cars" for the sport enthusiast. Yet each one is fully equipped with real sport JH|
car details like a dash-mounted tachometer, direct reading fuel, temperature
and oil gauges, front-wheel disc brakes, radial-ply tires, contoured bucket A|| iM h
seats and a sure-stroking four-forward speed synchromeshed stick shift. ¥jfl
The Spider is an authentic Bertone body. Tells you right away why a jjSKBM
Spider seats only two)
The Coupe has a rear seat for really close friends and the same sporting
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At your dealer now, fully equipped, K M] jE
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jriwHKflkKflLi How does Fiat do it for th# Price?

DELAND DODGE SALES CORP.
1205 North Blvd.
Deland, Fla.
904-734-7800
. i- A f 9 T 1 .-

needed for the UF weightlifter
to overcome Bob Pereda in the
meet.
Juan Echavarria finished third
in the competition to give
Florida a second and third place
finish in the lightweight class.
Echavarria also came from
behind to capture the bronze
medal. His 490 pound deadlift
moved him from seventh place
to third in the championship.
Mr. Teenage Florida, Dennis
Wood, used strong bench presses
and squats to secure third place
for him in the light-heavyweight
class. Woods steady lifting

HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS, INC.
506 E. University Ave.
Gainsville, Fla.
904-372-4373 v .w.wv.v v, < <
*4*3- 4 ttttttttM : : V e 44
. #,... * v^y.*'

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Tuwday, Decambor 1,1970, Th* Florida Alligator,

PHIL PETTIJOHN
Sports Editor ;

enabled Florida to capture third
place in the team competition.
808 PEREDA, from Tampa
Weightlifting Club, took honors
with 1205 pounds lifted.
Favreau was second with 1160,
25 pounds better than the old
record before Pereda won, while
Echavarria finished with 1070
pounds.
Florida will be represented
this weekend at the 1970 Dixie
Weightlifting Tournament in
Atlanta as Wayne Pomeroy and
Favreau travel to the meet Dec.
5.

OCALA SPORT MOTORS
522 S. E. Ist Ave.
Ocala, Fla.
904-622,6*17.,... v>.

Page 17



Page 18

I, Ttw Florida ANigator, Tuesday, December t, 1970

U I
- ... v-:||M
H ;*p jK|
CLIFF COX
SH§sp!<;7-.-
TONY MILLER
gj j|k
-omHH|[|hH|k :
gg rpagffig K,
ffl M^Mt *il I
Si.' Jh
mk>. - mt
H&. >,
S| ' w| 5' #
V I ,',' r> (t .-. Hjt j,
GARY WADDELL
BK A.-- y 3m 1 HH
HtoaE f '
IB Jr% ; i:
M -
>mmm rS% jgigk 'W&£
'****' 4
Jp JBgf^
n *w gn
m Wk JH^i#
r !&,
m 4RMH
Wf life
TOM PURVIS
- K
*" wfe
*W
JERRY HOOVER
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
,J/AyAViV//V.V/.V*iV.WV
T 5 orwns ..... 5 /mns

*" '*"' .- f f "**, :;. ;" %*f ,; --. *' ts M J, 'f: V;, .... -.._ : ,U- a-J f-.as v- & J*di Si.
Gators Open Basketball Year
With Fast Sam ford Tonight

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Writer
The Samford University
Bulldogs invade Florida Gym
tonight at 8:15 to open the
Gators 1970-71 basketball
season which coach Tommy
Bartlett hopes will be better
than last years effort.
Because of tonights earlier
senior football banquet, the
game has been moved to 8:15
from the normal tipoff time of
7:45. The freshman Gators, who
meet Orlando Junior College,
begin their season at 6:15,
instead of 5:30.
THE NEW starting times will
be in effect for only this night of
basketball.
Bartlett, with a strong second
unit, plans to start 6 foot 6
junior Cliff Cox at left wing, 6-1
sophomore Tony Miller at right
wing, 6-10 sophomore Gary
Waddell at low post, 6-5 senior
Tom Purvis at high post and
5-11 junior Jerry Hoover at
point guard.
With this comb ination
Bartlett will work for
improvement over last years
9-17 season, the first losing slate
of his coaching career.
WE SEEM to be as ready as a
coach could want, Bartlett said
Monday. Weve had enough
practice and its now time to
start playing.
Mark Thompson is the only
Gator, on the otherwise healthy
team, who will miss the game.
ROD-REEL & GUN SHOP
WE FIX-TRADE-SELL
cM/nxxxKowM Hcr < ate.
- in
ARCHERY-FISHING-HUNTING
| 378-16961
1223 E, UNIVERSITY AVE.

. I sums pit
wh*re you get a break M
on steak and
L everything else
"Bachelors, like detergents, work fast and leave no rings."
. a k.*. > *x- *I aif

The sophomore wing is
recovering from an ankle injury
and will not be ready for action
until January.
To offset the quick,
fast-breaking Samford squad
from Birmingham, Ala., Bartlett
will probably substitute freely
from a depth-rich bench.
A LOT of our success this
year is going to depend how our
second unit performs, Bartlett
said.
-Junior Jeff Miller and
sophomore Hal Kelley play
behind Cox, while senior Ed
Lukco will spell Tony Miller.
Senior Earl Findley and senior
Robert Agee back up Purvis.
Waddell, a red-shirt last year
with a back injury, will be
relieved by either junior Dan
Boe or Agee..
SAMFORD IS r trying to
become a major college
basketball team, Bartlett said.
And theyve got the players to
do it.
Coach Van Washers Bulldogs,
who will be also opening their
season, roared to a 16-9 slate last
year, averaging 91.1 points a
game. Four starters from that
team 6-6 forward Sherman
Hogan, 64 guard Randy Long,
64 forward Otha Mitchell and
6-9 center Rod Behrens will
be back to run their respected
fast break.
Hogan, Long and Mitchell all
averaged at least 16 points a
game.
THEY ARE a run, jump,
RED PM aA
NIGHT (V
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

shoot fast-break type of
team, Bartlett said.
Bartlett said he would be
relying on ball control, strong
rebounding and substitution to
meet the fast break, a type of
play which the Gators may
intermittently pull this season.
Were going to have to do a
better job on defense and
rebounding than we did last
year, Bartlett said.
SAMFORDS TEAM is an

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AND SALES
Student's Friend"
Specializing in tune ups General
Auto Repeir and Corvairs.
Free Estimates AN Work Guaranteed
1031 So. Main St. Ph. 378-8532
[Central Charge] [Bank American!] [MatterCharge]
YOU CANT REALLY
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UNTIL YOUVE DRIVEN
A MERCEDES.
The 164 is exactly what Volvo intended intendeda
a intendeda more expansive, faster and more plush Volvo
which, at over SIOOO less, offers luxury sedan
buyers an attractive alternative to a Mercedes.**
Car & Driver
The interior rivals the luxury of the more moreexpensive
expensive moreexpensive Mercedes and has several features
that go beyond the Federal safety standards.**
Philadelphia Inquirer
This is the first power steering weve
encountered that is as good as Mercedesits
about time somebody challenged them.**
Road & Track
You have a clear choice between this sedan
and a Mercedes 2 50. The Volvo will perform
as well and is a great deal less complex to service.**
World Car Guide
To test-drive a Mercedes, you can see the
Yellow Pages for the dealer nearest you.
Then come to us and appreciate the difference.
.j
Harfred Auto Imports
Your New Volvo Dealer
506 E. University Ave. Ph 3724373
v.v.v.v

unknown thing. We havent
played them before, and we
havent scouted them this year.
Tickets are available in the
gym lobby to non-UF students
for $1 and to adults for $2.
UF students, with a validated
fee card and 1.D., may pick up
free tickets at gate 13 in the
stadium from 1 p Jn. 'to
half-time. Tickets for the first
six home games will be
distributed at gate 13, 1 p.m.-5
p.m. through Dec. 4.



lASKETBAH, season opens tonight
vr*
Jacksonville In Running
For South Cage Honors

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Frank McGuire
ias the material at South
:arolina to make a solid bid for
he NCAA basketball
ihampionship this winter.
But his Gamecocks will
>robably receive strong
ihallenges from Jacksonville
Fla.) University and Kentucky
or Southern honors and will
lave to get through that pesky,
ipset-minded Atlaatic Coast
inference tournament to get
nto the NCAA playoffs.
THE GAMECOCKS appeared
leaded in that direction a year
igo after they won all 14 of
heir regular season ACC games.
Jut upstart N.C. State staged a
lowdown in the tournament
inals to upset South Carolina,
12-39, and it was wait until 7l
or McGuire and his troops.
McGuire has four starters
ncluding John Roche back from
ast seasons 25-3 team and a
lot-shot sophomore named
Cevin Joyce who averaged 25.3
,s a freshman and who is
xpected to step right into that
one open berth.
It will be hard for us to post
nore victories than last year and
r ou dont go 14-0 in Atlantic
'oast competition every year,
aid McGuire. But we will have
i strong team that will be
capable of going all the way.
IF SOUTH CAROLINA can
vin the ACC and the NCAA
iast, the Gamecocks can expect
o face either Jacksonville or
Centucky in the NCAA
emi-finals.
The Jacksonville Dolphins,
who lost to perennial champion
UCLA in the NCAA finals after
winning 27 of 28 games, have
7-foot-2 Pembrook Burrows
returning.
With that sort of board
strength and the speed expected
from a couple of widely
acclaimed junior college recruits,
the Dolphins figure to make it to
the Mideast regional without too
much trouble.
There theyll probably meet
Kentucky which lost all-America
Dan Issel and all-conference
Mike Pratt but which has Mike
. asey back, after a years layoff
because of an automobile
accident, and 6-foot-ll
sophomore Jim Andrews who
iveraged 28.4 points per game
with last years frosh.
ANDREWS IS faiingi,pretty
big hole sinjje Issf§o%ge|.33.9
last season while leading
Kentucky to a 25-1 regular
season mark.
Dixie basketball is going to
uve to survive this winter
without Pistol Pete Maravich,
die LSU sensation who packed
honwood
I Golf Club
I STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
I TH II MONTHS FOR 525 TAX
1 SPECIAL RATE
I WEEKDAYS S 2 All DAY
| WEEKENDS $3 All DAY
I £ f' '"formation coll
I 376-0080
I V teoMwoo p
U Ni 19th AVINUf ClSt*
S * 4 ? ** k .

Southern gyms for three years
by being the most prolific scorer
in collegiate basketball history.
The Pistol is still playing for a
Southern team, but as a pro with
the Atlanta Hawks.
However, Ole Miss thinks it
may have a new Pistol in Johnny
Neuman, a 6-foot-6 sophomore
from Memphis, Tenn., who
averaged 38.4 as a freshman.
And LSU is replacing Maravich
with Gary Simpson, a 6-foot-l
sophomore from Granite City,
111., who had a freshman average
of 34.6.
Breaking the South down by
conferences;.
SOUTH CAROLINA is the
odds-on favorite in the ACC
with Duke, led by 6-foot-10
Randy Denton, expected to be
the leading contender. North
Carolina lost Charlie Scott and
two other starters and N.C.
State, the surprise ACC champ,
has gaps to fill.
If Casey regains his
1968-69 form and Andrews lives
up to promise, Kentucky shoudl
hand Adolph Rupp his 26th
Southeastern Conference title in
39 seasons.
Tennessee, led by
second-team all-SEC guard
Jimmy England and bolstered by
sophomore Mike Edwards who
shot at a 30.9 clip with the frosh,
and Auburn, featuring Johnny
Mengelt, the lone returning
all-SEC first teamer, rate as the
Wildcats chief contenders.
DAVIDSON AND West
Virginia long dominated the
Southern Conference. But West
Virginia turned independent a
couple of years ago and this
doesnt look like Davidsons
year.
The Wildcats lost three
starters from last years
championship team and leading
scorer Bryan Adrian (20.2

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Italien Basketball Shoes
$10 A UP
GATOS SHOP HK
Acrow from Murphroo Arm
Bnk-Am*rlc*rd Mlltmlwrj*
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average) had knee surgery a
week ago and wont be ready
until later in the season.
If Davidson loses control, the
Southern Conference should" be
a wide-open dogfight since there
doesnt appear to be anyone else
standing by to take over.
There are three independents
in the South worth watching this"
winter Jacksonville, Florida
State and Georgia Tech.
JACKSONVILLE LOST only
to Florida State during regular
season- play, and revenged that
later, and Florida State lost only
two other games besides the
rematch with Jacksonville.
Gilmore turned down pro
offers and Burrows declined to
be red-shirted as the two big
men figured this was the year
the Dolphins could go all the
way- and show ex-coach Joe
Williams he switched to Furman
one year too soon.
Although Florida State lost
Dave Cowens, one of the
nations best rebounders, two
other starters and two top
reserves, coach Hugh Durham
said the Seminoles, 23-3 last
year, are going to have a good
basketball team.
GEORGIA TECH got a bid to
the NIT with a 16-9 record last
season for one reason Rich
Yunkus. The 6 foot 10 Yunkus,
who averaged 30.1 last season, is
bigger and better than ever as a
senior and thus the Yellow
Jackets must be considered again.
LSU also went to the NIT last
year but isnt expected to return
without Pistol Pete.
A lot of people expect us to
roll over and play dead now that
Pete is gone, said Press
Maravich, the LSU coach and
Petes pop. I dont think that
will be quite the case.

USEpHnteSSBcARsi
1968 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville $3995
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, full power. White with
blue interior
1969 MUSTANG Mach I $2895
Fastback coupe. VB, power steering, power front disc
brakes, air conditioned. Automatic transmission. GT
Equipment.
1968 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville $4195
Four door hardtop. Black vinyl top over turquoise. Air
conditioned, full power, cruise control, leather interior
with bucket seats.
1968 OLDSMOBILE Delta ..,.....$2495
"88" four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior.
Radio, heater, automatic transmission, power steering and
brakes, air conditioned. Electric seats.
1968 OLDSMOBILE Delmont.. $2495
Air conditioned sedan with electric seat, automatic
transmission, power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
1967 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass $1995
Two door hardtop. Automatic transmission, air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, electric
windows. Gold.
CHEVROLET Impala $1495
2 door hardtop, automatic transmission, power steering
power brakes, radio and heater.
1966 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville $2295
Four door hardtop. White vinyl over blue with beige
interior. Full power including air conditioning, tilt
telescoping wheel, cruise control, power door locks,
twilight sentinel.
1966 FORD FALCON $995
Two door sedan, white, six cylinder, three speed column
shift, radio, heater.
1966 COMET Capri .....$1395
Two door hardtop, white with blue interior. Radio, heater,
automatic transmission, air conditioned, power steering.
289 VB.
1966 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass Supreme $1495
Four door hardtop, blue with matching blue interior. Air
conditioned, automatic transmission, power steering,
radio, heater.
1966 CHEVROLET Nova ....$1095
4 door sedan, 6 cylinder, automatic transmission, radio,
heater.
1965 CHEVROLET Malibu-. $995
Convertible, air conditioned, automatic transmission,
radio, heater, power steering.
1965 BUICK RIVIERA $1595
Two door hardtop, white with blue interior. Automatic
transmission, air conditioned plus full power equipment.
1964 CADILLAC Sedan de Vi11e....~...~Fr0m $1095
Four door hardtop. Air conditioned plus full power. Extra
clean car. 3 to choose from
(965 BMW. $595
Four door sedan. Yellow. Excellent second car,
pcoriamical to on6rate. I
1965 OLDSMOBILE Dynamic "88 $1195
Four door hardtop, automatic transmission, air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, tilt wheel,
radio, heater. Turquoise with matching interior.
1966 VOLKSWAGEN.. $995
"Bug" green with radio and heater
1964 OLDSMOBILE Dynamic "88.... $995
Three seat station wagon, air conditioned, automatic
transmission, power steering, power brakes. Very clean.
Cadillac-Oldsmobile.lnc. j

Tuesday, December 1,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 19



I, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, December 1,1970

Page 20

Ruggers
Triumph
Overseas
By FRED JOY
Alligator Sports Writer
Not only did the Florida Rugby
Club enjoy two days of tropical
warmth this past weekend, but
they brought home a victory
plaque as proof of their athletic
heroics.
On Friday after Thanksgiving,
the Rugby Club loaded its team
and made tracks for the
Bahamas, where they were
scheduled to play a
single-elimination tournament
with three other teams from
Nassau. Having to play with a
minimum of 15 players and once
again facing more experienced
opponents, the Gator ruggers
racked up two more victories on
the season.
THE RUGBY CLUB played
its first match on Saturday
against the Nassau Rugby Club,
whom UF had upset earlier in
the year 26-0. However, it took
a last ditch effort in the closing
moments of the game to give the
Gator ruggers all-9 victory.
At halftime of the Nassau
game the Gators were trailing
6-0. The UF club then began to
put things together and tied the
score with an 80-yard run by
Fitz Miller and a penalty kick by
Tony Barker.
Yet, Nassau scored another
try making the score 9-6. With
time running out, Tom Braswell
picked up a loose ball on
Nassaus 20-yard line and
initiated a string of laterals
which resulted in Paul
Faulkners score 80 yards later.
Barkers extra point kick was
good in the one second that was
left, and the UF Rugby Club
celebrated its first of two wins.
THE GATORS ruggers then
took on the Baillou Rugby Club,
which had defeated the Nassau
Bucaneers 9-6 the day before, in
a Sunday morning contest. Even
though Baillou had players from
New Zealand, Ireland, and
England, the UF ruggers
overpowered them 24-5
Fitz Miller, John Young, Paul
Faulkner, Kevin Soden, and
Greg Mack all scored tries
(worth three points) for the
Gators. Tony Barker kicked two
extra points (worth two points)
and Paul Faulkner kicked one.
The two victories brought
UFs rugby record to 5-1, with
two more games to go this
quarter. The Gator ruggers will
play the University of South
Florida Saturday at 4 p.m. on
Norman Field, and Vanderbilt
Dec. 12 at the same time and
place.
Peterson Wins
Gold Medal
The Florida Fencers Barbara
Peterson won the womens foil
gold medal in a fencing
tournament at FSU last
weekend.
Miss Peterson was the only
member of th UF fencers to
place in the meet against
Stetson, St. Petersburg Junior
College and Florida Memorial
.University. .4- *-

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