Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
jHp f W \t k
JHM| r p >. J
H ii KT'Ah
* mff i 11 tgmw mmk a -" I IB I I
Hi si v >'£H I Hi
Hfciy V /iffii -\1 > sajk H Zik* SSggSi,
* Ay "*
P W > *^aH|
$S Knf m TmTmwfrr -' j w^ Est
fe %a, --*3ggM§|g&, ..
Si. *w.:i;\v.'SSfS!Rf* w S'HBK?SaMHwMw?ig^y>>"?y'''x
Uh hjPK
EHBft-ftHHP' \mw I* hHHHHRF EHHP" t?#^ -^ ; #.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY /-'

Ko/. 63, No. 46

OCONNELL TO DECIDE
New Athletic League
Seeking Recognition

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator News Editor
The League of Florida
Athletes, formerly the Union of
Florida Athletes, will get word
from UF President Stephen C,
OConnells office today on
whether or not they will be
recognized as a campus
organization.
After a Wednesday night
meeting, held to approve its
constitution and elect temporary
officers, the League's faculty
adviser, Father Michael Gannon,
a Gainesville ecumenical
clergyman, was told Thursday
night, at a meeting of the
Committee on Student
Organizations and Social Affairs
(SOSA), that he would first have
to get acceptance from UF
Athletic Director Ray Graves
before the charter could be sent
to the presidents office.
GRAVES, in a surprise move,
approved the charter Saturday.
Under university rules the
charter could not be granted
jBSH!*
The Gator
SIGMA PHI Epsilon
is suing Kappa
Alpha over a land
disagreement page 2
Academics 4
Campus Crier 10
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 12
Sports 18
WhatS Happening 6
World Wrap-Up 16

University of Florida, Gainesville

before Graves approved it, even
though O'Connell makes the
final decision on its approval
after receiving the
recommendation of Vice
President for Student Affairs,
Lester Hale.
Norm Carlson, UF sports
information director and an
assistant athletic director, said
Saturday that Graves approved
the charter out of good faith.
FIRST WE HAD to know
for sure that the group (League
of Athletes) was trying to help
athletics at the university,
Carlson said. With Carlos
(Alvarez, an all-American split
end as its chairman, it looks like
that is what they are trying to
do.
Alvarez was elected
temporary chairman at the
League's Wednesday night
meeting. Fred Abbott, an
offensive tackle for the Gators,
was elected temporary secretary
for the League and Louis
Heuser, a polevaulter on the

Regents: No Sports De-Emphasis

By CHRIS LANE
Alligrtor Staff Writer
A special Board of Regents committee reported Friday the
proposals made by UF Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder and
Chuck Sherman, president of the FSU student body on the
restructuring and de-emphasizing of collegiate sports are deemed
inadvisable.
The committee, held a public hearing Oct. 29 to evaluate both sides
of the athletic controversy.
THE COMMITTEE concluded that information presented at the
hearing does not justify any further investigation of intercollegiate

Monday, November 23, 1970

track team, was elected its vice
chairman.
It is reported that Graves and
his constituents were leery of
the Leagues motives because
they had not seen its
constitution.
GANNON SAID he took a
copy of the constitution to
(SEE 'LEAGUE'PAGE 2)

Radicals Rights Protected

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligrtor Staff Writer
The Board of Regents will not
prevent radical speakers from
visiting Florida campuses
because there is no legal way to
prevent them from coming.
D. Burke Kibler HI, chairman
of the regents, told the regents
during a Friday meeting in
Tallahassee the Supreme Court's
definition of the first

I *£ J wjri f' 1 V '>- f-f -.5^
m J
i*£ p vgl'
jfl
u.
' -Bk \j
h'C /
H*'-Kr H*'-Kr...£.,-;>^^^24';;?.rfi;''r;:..Br
...£.,-;>^^^24';;?.rfi;''r;:..Br H*'-Kr...£.,-;>^^^24';;?.rfi;''r;:..Br Jj*
: M^y*
H ; Kgppr afe- ^4.
- m
''WBMBs ~W* .~JR J*B
l^ w .-j^B
& QSP- .1 =-. ,!, a
ij- Spit
H& I9w -'- v
'b v Iv< i&S:
b£ -' 3b : . W-

I
I f
#
The Temptations (top left) played to an overflow crowd at Florida
Gym in two shows Saturday night. Father Michael Gannon (top right)
and the Catholic Student Center followed that crazy happening with
what turned in to be an all-faith midnight Mass in the Plaza of the
Americas (see related story, page 2). The lead singers for RGF and
Fayr (above, left and right, respectively) did a bump and grind on the
Reitz Union Mall Saturday afternoon to prepare UF students for a
wild weekend.

amendment right of freedom of
speech in the United States
Constitution insures radical
speakers of the right to speak on
the Florida campuses.
BUT THE Regents chairman
also attacked the choice of
speakers in the campuses.
Our students need more
reasonable balance in the
ideologies of campus speakers to
gat all points of view, Kibler
said.

athletics within the state university system.
Additionally, the proposed restructuring or de-emphasis of the
various programs is deemed inadvisable.
The committee claimed the parimutuel betting funds committed to
the support of intercollegiate athletics do not represent a drain on
the resources available for the development of the academic programs.
In fact, an analysis of the UF intercollegiate athletic budget
revealed that the intercollegiate athletic program contributed to,
rather than took from, other operations of the university.
SHERMAN TOLD the committee that athletics are given too much
(SEE 'REGENTS' PAGE 3) i

WILD WEEKEND

|HBPS *r
~* lf |T^^' :
Ihttjta2r *p .Jl
flOK^^w

He noted it did not matter
how distasteful radical speakers
are to citizens of the state of
Florida; there was nothing the
regents could do to keep them
out.
THE STATEMENT comes in
the heels of a visit to the FSU
and UF campuses by Chicago
7 defendant Abbie Hoffman
and a visit by their counselor,
(SEE 'RADICALS'PAGE 14)



Page 2

!, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 23,1970

By ELIZABETH MALTZ
Alligator Writer
A disagreement over land on
Fraternity Row has\led to a
court case between the Sigma
Phi Epsilon and
fraternities.
The complaint was filed by
the Florida Alpha Alumni Corp.
of Sigma Phi Epsilon against the
Kappa Alpha Association of
Florida, Inc. on May 1,1970.
IN THE COMPLAINT which
is on file in the Court of Record
of Circuit Court, it alleged
the defendant purchased a site
of land on Fraternity Row
which had been designated in
1956 to be for the purpose of
public and fraternity recreation.
The land in question, lies
between plots 5 and 6. Sigma

Plaza Thanksgiving Mass
Celebrates God As Light

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
Nearly 3,000 UF students and Gainesville citizens
gathered in the Plaza of the Americas at midnight
Saturday to thank God for light.
The Thanksgiving midnight mass, organized by
the Catholic Student Center, proclaimed that God
is light.
A MULTI-MEDIA presentation asked and
answered the question, in this world of darkness,
where can we find the light?
Various readings, including Bible verses and
references to current issues, were complemented by
a series of slides projected on a large screen. Taped
music, beginning with the theme from 2001,
formed an audial backdrop.
The slides and readings, which were composed,
arranged and produced by seminarians from St.
Johns Seminary of Boynton Beach, advised
listeners to look for the light in happy, loving, sad
and hopeful j^apes.
AS NEARLY 3,000 tiny flames broke the

LEAGUE ..
PAGE ONE^j
Graves on the day following the
Leagued presentation, to the
SOSA.
I wanted them to have one
on file Gannon said.
Gannon said that, if the
charter is approved by
O'Connell, the League would
not make any definite plans
until football season is over.
AS SOON AS the season is
Over we will invite more athletes
to join the league in promotion
of athletics at UF, Gannon
said.
Presently, the league has a
membership of some 60 athletes,
mostly trackmen.
When the charter is approved,
the league will reportedly work
with Graves in determining
off-the-fidd activities for all UF
athletes.

ALUMNI. NOT FRAT HOST/UTY
Sig Ep/ KA Disagree Over Land

Phi Epsilon (Sig Ep) occupies lot
5 and Delta Chi is on lot 6. The
property which Kappa Alpha
(KA) bought is bisected by a
deep ravine and creek.
The intent to use this land as
a park and not as a building site
is evidenced by the fact the land
bears no plot number on the
master plan of the campus in
1948 and in 1958.
UF HAS PERMITTED and
encouraged the use of the area
for recreation and beautification
and has prohibited any use other
than these.
When Sig Ep moved to
Fraternity Row it was an
unpopular move. The area
where the Row is located was
isolated and underdeveloped.
As an inducement to them UF
made a verbal agreement the

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered- as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

** .. o mm _j SLs y Wr a p tender strands of spaqhetti
Tonight & every Monday, v* '> ow-courmy me.t a uce around
our Italian spaghetti V T,' or V ndmammamia ,halreal
dinner wily 99 cents /s' jp^T4VtT 9h Smmmt
1 T 1,./.. 1 1606 NWl3* St
Gainanill*

darkness, Father Michael V. Gannon of the Catholic
Student Center encouraged everyone to light your
candle and take it with you into the world.
The passing of the peace was begun as Father
Gannon asked all to shake the hand of those next
to them, adding that if a close relationship existed
between neighbors, other expressions of love would
be acceptable..
Father Ed Coles and Father George Kirkpatrick
were co-celebrants, and hundreds filed through the
crowd and up the stage to receive communion.
FATHER KIRKPATRICK said, we are very
pleased with the large numbers and enthusiastic
participation.
Two folk groups who regularly sing for Sunday
masses combined to supply music and song for the
mass. Printed song sheets were distributed and read
by candlelight.
Christie Chalmers, one of the UF students
attending the mass, described it as, Fantastic! I
liked the unity and joy which filled the hearts of the
kids there. It did a good job of sharing the love of
Christ.

y.v.v.
The university is not
legally bound to keep the
lot vacant, but I think it
is morally responsible.
\
Howard McKinney :
W.W.*
portion of land situated between
lots 5 and 6 would be kept in its
natural state and not be
developed as a building site for
any purpose.
RELYING ON THIS promise,
Sig Ep entered into a lease with
the State Board of Education
and from 1956 until the present
have, along with other
fraternities, improved and
beautified the area by planting
and maintaining grass,

shrubbery, and stepping stones
and by building a bridge over the
creek.
Sig Ep alleges UF recognized
the area as a park by informing
the fraternities who were not
living on the Row all lots were
spoken for and none were
available.
Nevertheless, on June 28,
1969, the Kappa Alpha
Association of Florida, Inc.
bought the land from the
Trustees of the Internal
Improvement Trust Fund. The
number of the plot became
SA.
SIG EP ASKED the court to
rule the deed between the
Trustees and KA as void. They
also asked the Trustees be
injoined from selling the site in
the future and a permanent
injunction be issued to prevent
the property from being used as
a building site.
The Board of County
Commissioners of Alachua
County, Fla. issued a resolution
stating: We are aware of the
fact the Trustees of the Internal
Improvement Fund are
contemplating conveying to the
Kappa Alpha Association of
Fla., Inc. lot SA on Fraternity
Row and whereas the property
will be used for fraternity
housing.
Be it resolved that we do not

fek
o* c dM
Dominos Pizza
376-2487 Htt DtUVttY 376-2487

propose to devote lot SA on
Fraternity Row for outdoor
recreational purposes and that
the Trustees are to proceed
accordingly.
THE COURT RULED i n
favor of KA and an appeal has
been filed by Sig Ep.
At the present time the KAs
live in an old apartment building
at 18 NW 17 Ave., off University
Ave. near the University Station
Post Office.
They have lived there since
their old house was tom down
three years ago.
Conditions have improved
since last year; the downstairs
area has been air-conditioned
and the house has been
repainted.
BUT, ACCORDING to
Charles Gregg, president of KA,
they are still in need of a new
house.
There is no hostility between
the two fraternities. It has been
the alumni that have been
harassing us, Gregg said, not
the local chapter.
Mike Hawley, Sig Ep
president said, We have never
held anything against the KAs
and I dont mind them building
on the lot. There are no ill
relations between us.



J F
HK" _^§|§i|^^B
jjs
> v

U|
-sS
WPPP'I'IPWI p Jf
BHB
JOHN PAUL JONES
... student should leave

REGENTS .
f FROM PAGE ONeJ
stress and importance on todays
college campus.
It is evident that those who
have been closely associated
with intercollegiate athletics are
keenly aware of intangible values
to be derived from these
programs while those of us not
in such proximity may not
realize such gains.
IN THIS TIME of unrest and
uncertainty, the existence of
intercollegiate athletic programs
on our university
campuses ... is of inestimable
value, read the committees
report.
The report disclosed this
may be the most inopportune
time in which to consider
de-emphasis of intercollegiate
athletics.
The problems confronting
young people of all ages suggests
the need for more involvement
in all types of athletic activities.
There is no reason to believe
that restructuring intercollegiate
programs will foster this
involvement.
To the contrary, the report
concluded, these programs
promote interest and provide
motivation for an untold
number of young people.
I Advertise! j
5 Its Good- B^jsiness^jl

Farmer Studies JM Rights

By BECKY LLOYD
- Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville City Manager Harold Farmer has
completed his study of an incident involving the
coverage of news by a UF journalism student. The
study has been presented to the City Commission.
Richard Glenn, 4JM, was filming a junior high
school football game at Citizens Field for a class
assignment. During halftime, Glenn attempted to
photograph a city policeman arresting two youths
who had scaled a wall to get into the game.
AN OFFICER shoved the camera into my face,
Glenn said. Glenn complained to Gainesville Police
Chief W. D. Joiner about the treatment he had
received.
The Gainesville City Commission, after hearing
statements from Glenn and Gainesville Press
Association President Don Reid, voted to have the
incident investigated by Farmer.
Glenn said the study stated that the previous
police investigation was adequate. According to
Glenn, Farmer said he would do the same as the
Police Chief W. D. Joiner had done, except that he
would have complained to UF about Glenns
conduct.

A SOUND MOVE.
v T-
MRS P
MODEL 172SW-111 THE TAPE new LP speed l% IPS Stereo I
RECORDER COMPONENT SYSTEM Headphone jack Flawless stereo
IN WALNUT FURNITURE FM recording 4 track Stereo and
2 wide range Acoustic Suspension Monaural Record and Play 2 Pro Prospeakers
speakers Prospeakers in genuine walnut cabi- fessional VU meters
netry 18,000 cycle wide range STOO 95
audio 4 speed option with the R*9 299.95 IZZ
Professional Service Guarantee
Couch's guarantees that you our customer will receive prompt, courteous, proses proses.
. proses. sional electronics service by our team of Nationally Recognized CERTIFIED ELEC- tj^
A TRONICSTECHNICIANS. ) \
A COUCH'S ,NC
608 N. main "Serving Gator Country Since 1933" Ph. 3784562
~ - : ;; " ' v.* ~

FARMER SAID the investigation consisted of
interviews of 16 witnesses, and its purpose was to
determine if the previous investigation was
adequate.
Glenn said he was disappointed in the study,
since it didnt present any new facts. Farmer has
refused to let me see the testimony of the
witnesses, Glenn said. He will go back to the City
Commission and ask to see the testimony. I am
thinking about asking Farmer to complain to UF,
Glenn said.
The controversy revolves around the right of the
student journalist to report the news. Joiner said,
The policy toward the news media is what it
should be.
THEY HAVE the right to report any public
gathering as long as they dont interfere with the
duties of a policeman.
Glenn feels that the incident was an attempt to
tell a newsman that he cant film something.
John Paul Jones, dean of the College of
Journalism, said that when a student newsman is
covering a regular story and an additional news
event spontaneously occurs, the student should
leave if trouble arises.

Monday/Novatnber 23,1970, Thr Florida Alligator,

I ; SlB
BF^n
L
WILLIAM JOINER
... just don't interfere

Page 3



Page 4

> Mondav,Wfiwirt > i 23,1970

By BRUGH PETTRY
ABp*ar Writer
The Department of
Agricultural Economics has
received a $46,807 grant from
the U. S. Department of the
Interior Office of Water
Resources Research, according
to Dr. K. R. Tefertifler,
chairman of Agricultural
EooooraiGS.
These federal funds,
combined with $102,069 from
state sauces, wfll be used to
complete the second phase of a
three-year study designed to
develop an optimal water
allocation model for the
Kissimmee River Basin.
THE FIRST PHASE of the
study, just completed, was also
financed in part by the Office of
Water Resources Research.
The goal of the study is
eventually to develop a model
large enough to include the
entire water management system
operated by the Flood Control
District.
According to Tefertiller, the
primary objective of the study
wfll be to determine how surface
water which can be controlled
by the Flood Control District
should be allocated among
alternate uses.
ALTERNATE USES include
flood prevention and supplying
water for industrial, municipal,
agricultural, and recreational
uses.
The value to society of each
of these possible uses of water
wfll be the primary factor in
determining the optimal
allocation of the water.
The results of this project
should provide guidelines for
obtaining more optimal use of
the available water supply and
may lead to an operating policy
that would provide additional
water during the periods when
critical water shortages occur.
THE STUDY is being directed
by Dr. John E. Reynolds and Dr.
J. Richard Conner, of the
Agricultural Economics
Department.
Dr. William H. Morgan,
director of the Water Resources
Research Center, coordinates
activities between the Flood
Control District, the Dept, of of
of

Performance is the pleasure
II -'***' ***** '**"'*' ** * JHk( \
tmV i / ilk
great sports car feel, great sports
PlAif Q/\fV jammed with the good things of driving like front disc
O' brakes, radial tires, a new 58 hp engine with overhead valves,
dash-mounted tachometer, 4-speed synchromeshed stick shift,
OpiUvl bucket seats. The driver's car-all there because it's a Fiat!
ommwd $2389.60 anna
Harfred Auto Imports
Your NEW Fiat Dealer
506 E. University Ave. Ph 372-4373

Agricultural Economics, and the
Dept, of Interior.
* *
The appointment of Dr. Peter
A. Cerutti, eminent biochemist,
as professor and chairman of the
UF Department of Biochemistry
was announced Friday by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
CURRENTLY AT Princeton,
Cerutti will assume the
biochemistry chairmanship at
UF in January with a joint
appointment in the College of
Medicine and the College of
Arts and Sciences.
Bom in Switzerland, Cerutti
earned his M.D. and Ph.D.
degrees from the University of
Zurich.
His work at UF will be to
develop the biochemistry
department in order to serve as
an important link between the
biological sciences and the
chemical and physical sciences,
according the College of
Medicine Dean Emanuel Suter.
CERUTTI CAME to this
country in 1964 as a research
associate for the National
Institutes of Health.
He is a member of the Swiss
Medical Association, the Swiss
Chemical Society, the American
Chemical Society, and the
American Society of Biological
Chemists, among others. He is
also a trustee of the
American-Swiss Foundation for
Scientific Exchange, Inc.
* *
Five-hundred dollar cash
awards were given to four UF
College of Law students at
Fridays weekly luncheon
meeting of the John Marshall
Bar Association.
THE RECIPIENTS were Dan
Gallagher, junior from Orlando;
Edward Hales Jr., senior from
St. Augustine; Stephen Rees,
junior from Sarasota and
Robert Woolfoik, junior from
West Palm Beach.
Jim Quincey representative
of the award sponsor, the Young
Lawyers section of the Florida
Bar Association announced the
winners. The awards are based
on academic standing and
financial need.
* *
Dr. Emmett L. Williams has
been named associate dean and

ACADEMIC NEWS

Dr. Marvin R. McMillin
appointed assistant dean for
undergraduate studies in the
College of Education by
OConnell.
BOTH APPOINTMENTS are
effective this month. According
to College of Education Dean
Bert L. Sharp, the upgrading of
titles is intended to reflect more
accurately the duties Williams
and McMillin already are
performing.
Williams has served as
assistant dean since January,
1969. Now in his sixth year as a
member of the UF faculty,
Williams is widely known as
director of UFs Middle School
Institute.
His specialties are in the field
of English language arts and
general curriculum theory.
Before coming to UF, he was
curriculum coordinator for Nova
School, an experimental,
advanced concept school in Fort
Lauderdale.
WILLIAMS earned his
bachelors, masters and Ph.D.
degrees at Peabody College in
Nashville, Tennessee, where he
served as assistant to the
president before coming to UF
as an associate professor in the
Department of Secondary
Education.
McMillins new responsibilities
will include the development
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
*
For information call
CASSELS
IN THE AIR
378-2646

and implementation of a variety
of programs for undergraduate
students in education. Since
joining the UF faculty in 1970,
he has served as coordinator of
undergraduate programs.
McMillin received his masters
degree in counseling from
Indiana State University and his
Ed.D. in student personnel

LUMS DAILY SPECIALS!
Good Mon, thru Wed.
Lum's features
Famous Beer on draff
Schlitz, Budweiser, Ballantine
Michelob
Featured Sandwich plus 16 oz. Schooner
| SI.OO I
- Lum's Famous
e Sub
e Pastrami and French Fries
e Ham and French Fries

A NEW KIND OF
CHRISTMAS GIFT
~ I
PERSONALIZED GIFT CHECKS FOR
Christmas Births Easter
Graduation Mother's Day
Father's Day Special Occasions
Bar Mitzvahs Birthdays
Weddings Wedding Anniversaries i
OFFERED BY
OF GAINESVILLE
MEMBER FDIC
_1717 NW 13 ST 378-2346

services from UF in 1965. His
specialty is counseling and
guidance.
Before returning to the UF,
he served as director of
counseling at Rose Polytechnic
Institute, Terre Haute, Indiana;
and as director of the Student
Counseling Center at Indiana
State Univeisity.



ZPG Sponsors
Family Planning
Speech Tonight
1
Family Planning and
Today's Social Problem
topic tonight at 8 in the
Arts and Fine Arts
Auditorium.

IFC Elects
New Officers
Elections for the 1971
Interfratemity Council (IFC)
officers were held Tuesday
night.
The new officers are: Mike
Hawley, Sigma Phi Epsilon
president; Jim Wilkerson, Theta
Chi executive vice president;
Frank Omato, Lambda Chi
Alpha administrative vice
president; Bob Westbrook, Pi
Kappa Alpha secretary; and
Bradley Sheare, Delta Sigma Phi
treasurer.
Family Special
For Miami Sat.
Art Wroble, Student
Government secretary of
athletics, announced Thursday
there will be a family special
for the Miami-UF game next
week.
Married students having
spouse tickets will be able to
buy tickets for their children at
$1 apiece. The parents of the
students can buy tickets at the
regular price of $7, and the
entire family will be guaranteed
adjacent seats.
Tickets will be available from
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday at Florida Field.
The Legend of the
Portugese Rooster
There is an old legend In the
Barcelos region of Portugal, about
an innocent man who was
condemned to be hanged.
Spectators came from the whole
region to watch the execution
many bringing lunches of whole
roasted chickens. When the victim
protested his innocence on the
scaffold, the executioner
promised to set him free if one of ?
these chickens would come to
life.
Then, according to this folk
tale, a roasted cock began to
crow. The prisoner got his
freedom, and Portuguese homes
gained a new mascot: the
brilliantly-painted ceramic
"rooster of happiness.
Buy a friend a "Portugese rooster
of happiness" at the Union's
International Christmas Bazaar
for only 25 cents. November 30
and December i in the Union
ballroom, i 1 a.m. to 9 p.m.

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Zero Population Growth (ZPG) will be
sponsoring Dr. Paul Burgess, director of a
new UF $7 million family planning
project for the state, in a program
scheduled for tonight in the Arts and
Fine Arts Auditorium.
The program, to begin at 8 p.m., will
feature a lecture by Burgess entitled
Family Planning and Todays Social
Problem.
AFTER THE SPEECH, there will be a
question period, and Burgess will discuss
the new $7 million project.
Dr. Seymour Block, UF professor of
chemical engineering, said Thursday
Burgess will be the director of a statewide
family planning project, for which the UF
has received a $7 million grant.
The grant is for actual field work for
the whole state for the next five years,

If General Electric
can build an electric tractor,
why can't they build an
electric car?

General Electric is marketing a
14-horsepower rechargeable electric
tractor capable of speeds up to 7
miles an hour.
We think it's a remarkable
innovation. But an electric car it's not.
As a garden tractor for home
use, Elec-Trak'can take advantage of
characteristics that would be distinct
disadvantages in an electric car.
The availability of fuel is no
problem for Elec-Trak. It's designed
for limited use near electrified
structures, making overnight
recharging possible.
The heavy weight of the
battery, which would slow down a
car, means greater applied traction
for Elec-Trak.
Because Elec-Trak must travel
at slow speeds to do its jobs, there
are no aerodynamic energy losses to
take into consideration.

Block said, and a million has already
been acquired this year to begin.
BURGESS WILL HANDLE the
non-medical aspects of the grant.
Burgess was bom, raised and received
the bulk of his education in Ireland. A
Ford Foundation Mid-Career Fellow, he
has his M.S. in public health and is a
doctor of theology.
He also attended the Vatican School
for Diplomats.
AS A ROMAN CATHOLIC priest,
Burgess was one of five who handled
English correspondence for Pope John
XXIII.
For seven years Burgess served in
Africa as the First Secretary to the
Vatican Embassy in Liberia. He left the
church for several reasons and is now
married and has three children.
Burgess comes to the UF after serving
in the Carolina Population Center.

Still, one might expect Elec-Trak
to be the forerunner of a pollution pollutionfree
free pollutionfree automobile. Perhaps it is. But
there are many crucial problems left
to be solved.
The most important one, of
course, is the development of a
substantially better electric battery.
Any car built today would be severely
limited in range and performance,
and probably prohibitively expensive.
General Electric is making
progress on new batteries, but there's
a long way yet to go.
We've experimented with zinc zincair
air zincair batteries. Sodium-sulfur batteries.
Silver-zinc batteries. Lithium Lithiumhalogen
halogen Lithiumhalogen batteries. And others. There
are problems with all of them.
Problems of life-span, cost,
practicality.
Despite the problems, General
Electric scientists and engineers are
working foHhe breakthrough that
will make electric cars possible.
Maybe the breakthrough is
closer than we think. But we'll
ELECTRIC

Monday, Movamtow 23, >970, Tba Florid* Alligator, I

continue to work and leave the
predictions to someone else.
Why are we running this ad?
We're running this ad, and
others like it, to tell you the things
General Electric is doing to solve
the problems of man and his
environment today.
The problems concern us
because they concern you. We're a
business and you are potential
customers and employees.
But there's another, more
important reason. These problems
will affect the future of this country
and this planet. We have a stake in
that future. As businessmen. And,
simply, as people.
We invite your comments.
Please write to General Electric,
570 Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y.
10022.

B 1
.Ji
RH m
'
SEYMOUR BLOCK
... chemical engineering professor

Page 5



Page 6

l, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 23,1970

Frat Problems Discussed At Retreat

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Periodic clinics for pledge
masters, concerning pledge
programs and rush activities, was
one of the items that came up
for discussion, criticism, and
consensus at this week-ends
Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC)
retreat, at the Hilton Inn in
Orlando.
The retreat is an annual event
held by the IFC to give UF
Greeks the opportunity to get to
know each others leaders.
ACCORDING TO Bruce
Boudreau, retreat chairman, the
event was attended mainly by
fraternity presidents, pledge
masters, and other fraternity
officers.
Mike Hembree, director of the
financial forum, said, We tried
to get the problems of each
house out in the open. We
attempted to seek the best
solution for these problems, by
using the experience of each
fraternitys methods.
Boudreau said he felt
everyone was pretty well
pleased by the retreat.
USUALLY OUR forums
became general bull sessions

WHAT'S HAPPEING

APPRECIATING THE
LEGISLATURE: Florida
Cicerones will have a meeting
today at 7:30 p.m. in the Reitz
Union. Information on
scheduled Legislator
Appreciation Week will be
discussed. All old members who
wish to remain active should
plan toattend.
ITS BULLWINKLE: A free
Bull winkle film festival is being
sponsored by the Union Nov. 28
at 6, 8 and 10 p.m. in the Union
auditorium.

Dont Miss mmrnm
Arby's mm
THREE for TWO H
Special
Monday-Wednesday
Nov.
Buy 2 DGLiCiOUS
ays RoasT bbgf
sanDwieHes anD J
Gerone

BmIB H,, / "^B.
>** wyi Just South of the Underpass

BRUCE BOUDREAU
... IFC retreat chairman
where we just compare notes on
each houses activities, he said.
The Friday night guest
speaker was State Sen. William
Gunter, a UF graduate, and
former fraternity man. Gunter
talked about the fraternity
system in general, and problems
at UF, but spent a great deal of
time detailing plans and possible
upcoming legislation for a
uni-cameral legislature.
He then accepted questions
from the floor, one of which
delt with the Ad Valorium on

BUSINESS PROBLEMS: The
Business Administration Student
Advisory Council office is
located in 218 Bryan Hall.
Student representatives are
prepared to give help and
tutoring in business.
THE BIG SHOT: The last day of
tryouts for the Gainesville Little
Theatres next production will
be held today at the little
theatre on NW 16th Bhrd. at
7:30.
NIGHT FLYING: Arnold Air

fraternity property taxes.
Legislation may be brought
around a second time during this
years session, to make
off-campus houses pay a
property tax.
THIS WAS OPPOSED last
year by members of the IFC
who traveled to Tallahassee to
speak out against it. For some
houses this might mean a large
increase in rent.
Gunter said he felt there must
be a more equitable solution to
raising money than to throw
part of this burden onto
organizations of college men.
He stated the pros and cons
of the issue, and then looked at
it from the fraternal angle,
Hembree said.
THERE WAS ALSO a forum
on rush rules. According to
Hembree the rules wont be
changing too much.
The general tendency,
Hembree said, is to usually let
the houses run rush as they
want, as long as they conply
with university regulations.
The financial forum lasted for
approximately an hour and a
half, and topics ranged from
fraternity economy, to present
outstanding debts.

Society, an Air Force ROTC
honorary, and Angel Flight are
sponsoring a Thanksgiving food
and clothing drive for
disadvantaged families in
Alachua County. All members of
the organizations are asked to
meet at the ROTC building
tonight at 7:15 p.m. to collect
food and clothing in the
Gainesville area.
(NOTE: Notices for Whats
Happening must be turned in
TWO days in advance of
publication date.)

Eighty-five persons attended
the retreat.
They all have the common
interests and mutual problems
Only At
Kiser's Office Equipment
SBS Executive Swivel Chair
Gray, used, but clean
$2950
S6O Side chair with arms to
match, used but clean
519 50
Special Special
(Only 10 of each type)
604 N. MAIN

GATOR SHOP
LEVI'S
CORDS
Long, lean Levi's jeans in a care carefree
free carefree corduroy that always look
great. Pick your favorite fashion
colors: olive, sand, cocoa, cool BHHH
blue. 27-36. $ 98
GATOR SHOP Bn
1710 W. University Ave.
|Bonk-Americord Master Charge

that face all fraternities,
Hembree said. The elimination
of the petty jealousies and
rivalries is essential to the
fraternities future survival.
Indian River
Grapefruit & Orange
Available Nov. 16 Dec.
4 $3.50 per 40 lb. Carton
Citrus Club 1177
McCarty
392-1996



'-. t
%
-.*.* >S I
-. V
* <
r*. , **
8 .' 1 \ :
ANNOUNCMG
A CITY
WITHIN
A CITY

j {
I
Gardens... destined to become a sophisticated $26 million
residential, shopping, hotel, and business complex by 1973. One
thing Bivens Gardens wont be, though, is a concrete canyon.
We know what the chaos of unplanned development could do
to a beautiful lakeside site like ours. Thats why Bivens Gardens
will be different. We planned it that way. It will bean exciting
place to be. A place to breathe and enjoy the trees. A respite
from the maze of neon and the leafless forest of utility poles. A
place with everything for those who want and can afford the
finest. Like magnificent lakefront condominium residences.
Twin tower high rise condominium apartments for those who
want to see forever on a clear day. The changing panorama from
a revolving restaurant and cocktail lounge atop a sixteen story
convention hotel. A prestige office tower thats close to every everything
thing everything in Gainesville, but nothing will come close to it. And the
kind of shopping you wont have to leave town for. With all this
to look forward to, what could be a bolder statement of our
faith in the future of the University City?
I *\
BIVENS GARDENS
it
SO MUCH MORE THAN CAINESVTLLE EVER EXPECTED!
-
1 <. ./-V -A,
. ****** ** -

Monday, Noaambar 23> 1970, Tha Florida iUOpiar,

Page 7



'/The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 23,1970

Page 8

EDITORIAL
It's Worth It
For Convenience

Tuesday night the Student Senate will have the
opportunity to save your pocketchange and your feet.
Thats the night for the second reading on the bill about
the proposed on-campus automated post office.
A similar bill was turned down in the past, and another
tabled.
Now there is a new senate, and we urge them to vote in
favor of the bill.
An on-campus post office would be a service to the
students, as well as faculty and staff. It would provide a
place where stamps can be purchased at post office prices,
at a convenient location.
The proposed site (on North-South Drive, across the
street from Graham Area) was chosen, according to Student
Body Vice President Henry Solares, because approximately
10,000 students pass there every day.
Many of these students are unable to get to the post
office, even though it is only a few blocks from campus.
And when one is in Norman Hall and has a very
important letter which must be mailed immediately, that
few blocks can seem an awfully long way away.
The hangup appears to be releasing $2,500 from the
Campus Improvement Fund to construct the base for the
post office and a direct telephone line to the Gainesville
Post Office.
We think it is commendable that the senators are
carefully considering fund allocations.
But senators, consider your feet.

Who Shall Protect Us From The Protectors ?

It was way back in
September, 1968, the article
appeared in a national magazine.
Journalist Nat Hentoff
chronicled *- how the
establishment's artillery of
suppression harassment,
reprisal, physical force is
deployed against those who
would exercise their
constitutional right to activist
disagreement.
Even then Mr. Hentoff could
write from personal experience.
The superintendent of the
building in which he had an
office spoke to him in the
elevator.
LISTEN, he said very
softly, *T shouldn't be telling
you this, they told me not to,
but a couple of F.B J. guys were
asking about you yesterday."
What did they want to know?
Oh, do you just work here or
do you live here, too? Where do
you go in the summer? Who
comes to see you?
Mr. HentofTs crime: Writing
and speaking against the
Vietnam war, signing a petition
in support of conscientious
objectors to the draft, being on
the board of directors of the
New York Civil Liberties Union.
MR. HENTOFF ended up on
a blacklist of the House
Internal Security Committee a
few weeks ago.
He was one of 64 people
identified in the HISC report as
members, or participants in the
activities, of Communist
organizations, militant, radical,
or extreme groups,
self-proclaimed revolutionaries,

or who provided public support
to such groups and
organizations, and had been the
recipient of specified sums as
speakers fees or honoraria for
engagements on campuses.
Never mind that none of
those things are illegal under
either state or federal laws. It
sounds impressive, anyway.
THE AMERICAN Civil
Liberties Union asked for a
federal court injunction to stop
publication of the list.
ACLU attorney Lawrence
Speiser called the HISC list a
Blacklist.
He said it has no legitimate
legislative purpose other than
to harass universities, the people
on the list and infringe on free
speech.
U.S. District Judge Gerhard
A. Gesell agreed.
He granted an injuction to
stop official publication of the
list.
HISC CHAIRMAN Rep.
Richard Ichord immediately
released the list to the news
media and it is expected to be
printed this week in the
Congressional Record.
So much for law and order.
Were it not for the frightening
specter of the old HISC It
used to be called the House
Committee on Un-American
Activities during the age that
now bears the name of Sen.
Joseph McCarthy the list
would be downright funny!
ASIDE FROM the star
radicals" included, the

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

So you can see by the example of these fine young men that the charges of marijuana
use in our Armed Services is absolutely groundless and probably a sham by some dirty
commie rat If*

committee has decided that
among those who should not be
granted their Constitutional
rights to freedom of expression
are attorney William Kunstler,
poet-playright Le Roi Jones,
comedian Dick Gregory, boxer
Muhammad Ali, Dr. Benjamin
Spock and Nobel Prizewinning
chemist Linus Pauling.
Mr. Hentoff who is 4S and
too old to ever have been a
member of the SDS and says he
hasnt joined any similar groups,
is joined by a special category of
militants.
The Ichord committee
managed to work into the list
the names of people supporting
the abolition of HISC. They
indude: Rev. C. T. Vivian and
Rev. Wyatt T. Walker, who were
leaders of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference; Robert
Sollen, who is not specifically
identified; John Ciardi, poetry
editor of The Saturday
Review, John C. Bennett,
former president of the Union
Theological Seminary and
Nathan Hare, an instructor at
Howard University.

Alligator Staff
D*.V.lim. Craig Hyt
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Stave Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
PuMMwd by students of the University of Florida under the
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial. Business. Advertising offices in Student Publications Suit,
thud floor, Reitz Union. bu,t *'
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the RMfa Alligator are thow of
of th. write, of ,h mk* JZSSHgXgSZ

Sam Pepper Phyllis Gallub
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Ken McKinnon Loretta Tennant
News Editor News Editor

THOSE NAMES, which were
in the original list, may be
dropped from the list going into
the Congressional Record,
because they tend to undermine
the HISC appeal of Judge
Gesells order.
(It might be noted that
Bennett and Dr. Martin Luther
King who was associated with
Vivian and Walker through
SCLC sent a letter to Congress in
the spring of 1968 expressing
their fear of a return to
McCarthyism.)
All said, HISC trying to spare
us from radicals raises the
proverbial question of who shall
protect us from our protectors.
Just what fruits are to be
borne of the new HISC remains
to be seen.
SOME YEARS ago
Congressman John Culver of
lowa summed it up, while
arguing against strengthening the

BEG CROWDER

Subversive Activities Control
Board.
To grant such a frightening
power (to establish a public
black list of organizations
deemed Communist or
Communist infiltrated) to a
bureaucrat, to five men, or
indeed to (any) Government
official... is most dangerous
and irresponsible, said Culver,
because it may only serve to
stifle dissent it may only serve
to kill expression of
controversial views in this
nation.
To the extent that it denies
the political vitality and vigor of
our own free institutions, then it
clearly aids and abets the
Communist movement.
Perhaps Mr. Ichord and his
associates on the House Internal
Security Committee should add
themselves to the already
distinguished list.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices. Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. ST Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A.Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609



Chile And Allende
MR. EDITOR:
I enjoyed reading the article
by Ken Driggs on Chile, and
along with him, think the recent
election of Allendale in Chile is a
significant occurance in Latin
American politics.
However, there were a few
errors in Mr. Driggs article that
should be pointed out.
Chiles democratic system is
not actually 120 years old but
rather 137 years old, dating
from the Constitution of 1833
although there was a short lapse
in democratic mle in 1925 when
Congress was dissolved and a
military junta took power.
A new constitution was
written and the democratic
system has remained stable since
1925.
Allende did not lose the
1958 election by a smaller
margin than he won this past
one. In 1958, Allende lost by
2.71 per cent, while he won this
past election by only 1.32 per
cent.
Allende, upon losing, did
not support Alessandri in 1958.
Nor did Alessandri support
Allende this year.
What Alessandri did this year
was to tell members of his own
party in Congress not to vote for
him (many did any way, because
they had no chance of winning.
there may be a vast world of
differences between the
Communist and Socialist parties
is not so vast.
At one time, the Communist
party was said to follow the line
of Moscow, while the Socialist
party favored the more
revolutionary doctrine of
Peking.
Chile, of course, under the
Christian Democrat, has
followed a socialist line, with
considerable influence exerted
by the government in agriculture
and industry.
The return of a Popular Front
government to poser (they were
in power once before in 1938)
will move Chile still further to
the left.
Undoubtedly, this
government will move quickly to
establish relations politically and
economically with other socialist
countries.
We may not like it, but the
move is a shrewd and necessary
one for Chile.
One of the principle points
mad- by Mr. Driggs, namely that
die American copper companies
have exploited the principal
LETTERS POLICY
LfttmimM:
B typed, signed,
double 300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Hove addresses end
telephone numbers of writers.
Names wiil be withheld only if
writer shows Just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit ail
letters for spaoe.
Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested In submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to show
samples of his wOrk.

natural resource of Chile, is
unfortunatley probably true.
John Gerassi, in his book,
The Great Fear in I-atm
American estimates that had
Chile nationalized its copper in
1928, it would be $3 billion
richer today. Had they done so
in 1950, they would be richer by
more than $2 billion.
These estimates may be
inaccurate, but the important
thing for U.S. copper companies
and U.S. foreign policy makers,
is that the Chileans also are
aware of these estimates; and
while 30 per cent of the
population live in subhuman
conditions, they will not forget.
Although underdeveloped,
Chile is a magnificently civilized
country.
In a non-violent, democratic
election, they have chosen (from
our point of view) a radical
government.
What happens in Chile now,
however, will probably not
depend as much on the
government of power as on a
party out of power, the
Christian Democratic Party.
They are the party of the
center now, and whether or not
they join forces with the Popular
Front will undoubtedly be the
determing factor in Chile during
the next six years.
CLIFF J. KIRCHMER, 7 EG
OMalleys Concept
MR. EDITOR:
Re: Article, Barbaric
Concept, written by John
OMalley in the November 16
Readers Forum.
Mr. OMalley stated, no
doubt that having children is an
inconvenience and in some cases
a real hardship for women. But
in all cases it is a lot more
important that a hardship for
the children involved it is a
matter of life and death.
I was somewhat puzzled by
this remark. Mr. OMalley, did
you mean that the hardship of
childbearing should be endured
with the welfare of the unborn
child in mind?
This welfare of the child is the
precise reason for my support of
abortion.
If the child is unwanted and
considered a burden by the
mother, dont you believe that
this child's life, unless he is a
blessed exception, will be along
road of continuous hardships?
Personally, I would rather die
in heaven than live in hell.
CAROLINE WILLIAMS, lUC
Wofs Truck
t
MR. EDITOR:
Since Wols Mobile Nest and
Brotherhood Truck was
immortalized on the front page
of Nov. 17th*s Alligator, I felt
that the general public should be
informed that not all reactions
to it are so favorable.
Last Friday (the 13th) while
the owner was navigating the
N.W. section of town, one of the
locals took a shot at the truck
with his rifle and completely
destroyed the right rear-view

READERS FORUM

minor. (Real funny that guy
deserves a medal, or at least a
ticket to see JOE. He might
really dig it.)
The incident was duly
reported to the Gainesville
Police Department who wrote it
up as a vehicle report (and made
it sound as though the truck ran
into the bullet) and then the
matter was dropped for lack of
witnesses.
It is pretty sad when ones
safety is threatened because of a
statement of ones beliefs.
As one of the signs on the
right-hand side of the truck (the
side, incidentally, which was
shot at) says: You have not
converted a man because you
have silenced him.
PAMELA PRIEM
Grog Jones
MR. EDITOR:
I have nothing but pity for
the unfortunate Greg Jones.
He, poor light of perfect
reason and paragon of the most
advanced of tastes, is immured
in this pest-hole of
chain-theatres where one sees
neither cockroaches on ones
feet or upon the silver screen.
Can noone be prevailed upon
to at least temporarily revoke
the euthanasia statutes to put
this poor wretch into that
Valhalla of reviewers where the
people are naked, hope is dead,
and nobody laughs?
There is no spectacle of
greater tragedy than an aesthete
being vocally miserable because
other peoples tastes do not
slavishly become congruent with
his own at the instant his bulls
are promulgated.
Mr. Jones wallows in his own
misery at incredible length and
sententiousness.
Did it ever occur to him that
some folk like drivel because it
does not compel them to think?
Thinking and the vulgar
monotony of survival demand
simple if somewhat slack-jawed
pleasures to anaesthetize the raw
nerves daily re-dissected on the
stage of the world.
Would he deny a lot of rather
unfortunate and tasteless
populace this simple pleasure in
order to wander a merry hour in
some artistic garden of fungus?
I suspect he would.
A modest proposal: Let a few

M i i W*

rational, cynical persons get
together a sum of money and
send Mr. Jones to New York, or
some other metropolitan area
and allow him to glut himself on
all of the things he misses so
poignantly and publicly. But
only when he acknowledges that
de gustibus non disputandum
est.
C.Y. WELLES
Discovery
MR. EDITOR:
Rev. Abernathys and Abbie
Hoffmans speeches both
brought back frustrating
memories of last years student
strikes which I got involved in so
much that 1 planned to drop out
of college over the summer and
even considered moving to a
commune in California.
It was then that I discovered
that Jesus Christ was real and
accepted Him as my personal
Lord and Savior.
Everyday since has given me
much meaning. Before as a
radical, I was out to try to
save the world; now I know I
can save people through Jesus.
History has shown that people
have tried to settle their
differences through forceful hate
and revolution, which seems to
be growing in this country.
Butthis can only lead to more
hate.
From Jesus I have learned
that love is the best solution to
any problem. As Romans 12:21
of the Bible states, Do not be
overcome by evil, but overcome
evil with good.
Also, above all these things
put on love, which binds
everything together in perfect
harmony. (Colossians 3:14)
REID DAVIS, 3ED
Instant Replay
MR. EDITOR:
Since most of my fellow
students missed the dialogue
with Dr. Sisler concerning the
reassignment of Bob Canney, I
feel it would be worthwhile to
have an instant replay.
Dr. Sisler was asked why

Monday, Mobar 23.1970, Tha florida Alligator,

Canney was reassigned. He
stated that Canney was a
convicted felon and that it was
in the best interest of the
University of Florida to reassign
him.
When asked what the best
interests of the university were,
Dr. Sisler said that it was in part
a concern for the reputation of
UF and partly consideration for
the interests of the
administration, faculty, students
and the university community.
When asked if the contracts of
students, graduate assistants and
faculty members required that a
convicted felon be suspended,
reassigned or fired, Dr. Sisder
said no.
Dr. Sisler stated that Pres.
OConnell, Dean Sharp and he
had made the decision to
reassign Canney.
He was then asked why the
faculty and students had not
participated in the decision since
it was made partly in their
behalf.
Dr. Sisler said that there were
many university committees in
which students could participate
but that students did not seem
to be interested in participating.
When asked the names of the
students and the committee
which considered Canneys case,
Dr. Sisler stated that no
committee had done so.
Finally, when asked what
students and faculty could do to
obtain reconsideration of
Canneys reassignment, Dr. Sisler
said that the decision stood and
was final.
What I don't understand is
why the administration is so
hell-bent on removing Canney.
Yes, he has been convicted of
a felony.
However, our system of
justice allows a felon to appeal
his conviction and even provides
for his release during the appeal
via a bond system.
If the courts had enough faith
in Canney to release him on
bond, why can't the
administration have enough faith
in our judicial system to wait
until Canneys conviction has
been upheld or reversed?
Well, Pres. O'Connell, Dean
Sharp and Dr. Sisler, why can't
you wait until Canney has
exhausted all your beloved
channels of appeal before you
shaft him???
FREDERICK REPLOGLE, 4FY

Page 9



Page 10

I, Tlm Florid* Alligator, Monday, Novambar 23,1970

Campus! Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Unite For Action
The United Student Action Committee (Campus Lobby Organization) will meetonTues., Nov. 24 at
8:00 p.m. in Rm. 150-B of the Reitz Union. If you are interested in action, come.
Budget Deadlines Approach
Any chartered Student Government organization wishing to sub mit a budget request for the 1971-72
' school year should be advised that the hearings will be held next quarter. All budgets must be
submitted to John Dodson no later than Dec. 1.
Gallup, Harris, And Now Pulse
Project Pulse, the campus polling project is now underway. Any organization on campus interested in
conducting a poll concerning any aspect of campus life can use this service. The parties should contact
Harry Rose at 376-9533 for details.
Attention Married Students
Student Govt, has been successful in securing a "Family Day" for the Miami game. All students
holding SPOUSE COUPONS will be able to purchase tickets for their children at SI.OO each and for
their parents at $7.00 each. All tickets will be for regular reserved seats in the student section.
Windows for the Miami game will be open at Gate 13 on Mon. and Tues. of this week from 10:00 a.m.
to 8:00 p.m.
Blue Shield Back At The Campus
Blue Cross-Blue Shield Insurance Identification Cards may be picked up Nov. 30th and Dec. 1, from
the Student Service Booth across from the Hub.
Florida Players In An Evening Os One-Acts
Nov. 22, 23, and 24 the Florida Players will present an evening of one act plays. Four plays will be
presented each evening beginning at 8:00 p.m. Join the fun and merriment at Constans Theatre.
Tickets are only 25 cents.
S. G. Tutoring Continues
The Student Govt. Tutoring program is still in operation. Any student wishing to be tutored or offer
his services as a tutor should call 392-1665 and obtain the necessary information.
Mr. Boekhoff-We Found Your I.D.
Henry Boekhoff's picture I.D. was found at Gate 13 last week. He can pick it up by contacting Art
Wroble in the Student Govt, offices.
Campus Crier Congratulates Fundraisers
Thanks go out to the fraternities and sororities that participated in the Homecoming United Fund
Drive. Special recognition goes out to TEP, AEPi, in the fraternity division and DPhiE in the sorority
division; these groups jointly collected over one thousand dollars.
Bulletin Space Available
4r-
Any student may use bulletin board space. You need only apply for it on the 3rd floor of the Union.
Does Student Government Work?
Many questions are being asked now about the true nature of Student Govt. Does it work for the
students. The answer is an emphatic yes. Here is how it is working for you:
If you are a student who spends money the Student Govt. Discount Program soon to go into effect
will probably save you a lot of dollars each quarter. If you are a student who is concerned about the
community the Student Govt. Food and Clothing Drive will give you a chance to help many migrant
families have a happier Thanksgiving.
If you are a student living in an apartment complex the Student Govt Tenants' Union will help you
work out problems with your landlord such as no heat, or collecting your annual rent deposit.
These programs are proof that Student Govt, is working to help you. But it's a two-way street. Are you
willing to get involved?
Volunteers Needed For ODK.
ODK Course and Teacher Evaluation needs your help to evaluate courses for next quarter. If you're
willing to participate, come to the Student Activities desk on the third floor at the Union anytime and
let us know.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE ?
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON 5 00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS
BRUCE SCHWACK
Dl RECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



llffll Blue Shield I.D. Card |jl|
may be picked up in the ii|i
li 11111 across from the Hub |||l|
Tuesday, November 24 11111
Monday, November 30 81111
mm\ Tuesday, December 1,1970 Pppl

Monday, November 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
1970 MOBILE HOME 12 X 54 Near
new Special $360. Others 964*5606
Starke 378*8490. (A*st*4s*p)

HR NOW AT ...
I'M*. N>ltl|l>S*4 a VI
j"'''" P 2:00 3:52 5:44 7:39 9:36
"DARKER
THAR AMBER
I 2:23 4:45 7:12 9:40
"BEST SINCE 7 ZV T ZZZ^WOg
Joitph l l;,nt Prutxlt An A.co Imbtsty f,!m A St'gt bltormin P'oOuO'O"
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline *3OO pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
n for sale (con-cut...) STUDENT_# PHONE
for rent D 1 dav
wanted 2 da Y s ADDRESS
q help wanted Q 3 days ( 10% discount)
D autos 4 days (*lO% discount) gjy STATE iZIR
Q personal n 5 days and over
O lost-found (*20% discount)
services WORDING
I'll I I I I. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I
2l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
al I I I I I M I I I M I I M I I I I I I ITTrr
4l I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FOR SALE
Big sounding stereo for a low, low
price. Craig cassette stereo tape deck.
Call Bob at 392*9972 (A-st*42*p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 23,1970

FOR SALE
Building your own color organ?
Control one kilowatt per channel for
less than $2 with a triac from TAU
Inc. 717 NW Ist St. 376*0624
(A-5t*43-p)
63 Mercury 390 rebuilt engine a/c
power aut trans, very clean, excellent
mechanically, new tires, belts tune
up. 378*3326 after 4:30 wk. day.
(A*st*43*p)
Quality Tape Cartridge Recording
accumulate 4 tapes and sth Is Free
2) of your albums $6 inc cartridge
averages to only $2.40 per album.
Figure the savings! 378-5916 4*B pm
(A*st*4l*p)
Sacrifice sale Raleigh 3 speed Eng.
racer and 1 month old Yamaha
guitar. Both in absolutely perfect
condition. 378-0313.
BASSET HOUNDS beautiful
tri-colored, AKCreg., bred for
temperament, 8 weeks old, wormed,
shots, males, females 378-7829 or
392*0872 (A-st-45-p)
Nikkormat FTN with 50mm f/1.4
normal lens and case Excellent Cond.
$225 call 378*9968 after 5 P.M.
(A-st-44-p)
Irregulars & seednds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcaser 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t*31-p)
MENS TIES FOR SALE. Beat the
Christmas rush buy a tie. Some at
3/SIO.OO others $4.50 or $5.00 each.
Call Bob 378-4730 night. (A-st-46-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Bub Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Electric upholstery shampoos
also available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfc)
65 Honda 337 New carb. Engine
recently rebuilt tool-kit, helmet
Included tight machine S4OO or best
offer. Call 376-4895. (A-st-46-p)
Tame Baby Ferrets, coons monkeys
bobcats ocelots skunks parrots hawks
snakes lizards turtles for sale trade or
buy kongo pet 475-2546 (local)
(A-tfc)
131
wm
IMS
HHI
From the Experimental Film Series
Good Times
Wonderful Times
produced A directed
by Lionel Rogosln
Mans inhumanity to man is a
dominant theme in this satirical
portrayal of insulated bourgeois
life. Documentary footage of the
horrors of war are contrasted with
idle and reactionary cocktail
party chatter; the two worlds
exist side by side, never
intersecting. Rogosin succeeds in
creating a bitterly ironic portrait
of our era.
Cinema verite and improvise!ional
techniques combine to reinforce
each other and produce a
multi-level attack on the
uncommitted and the
warmongers. With its social,
political and humanistic
emphases, the film offers
provocative insights into the
apathy and brutality which
perpetuate the desolation of war.
7:00 & 9:30
Union Auditorium
50 cents
Monday, November 23
sponsored by the J.W.R. Union
BKB

FOR SALE
1954 Rigid Frame Triumph 650 cc.
Good chopper material. Call
378-8281 or stop by 235 NW 3rd
Ave. ask for John. $450. (A-21-46-P)
Extraordinary & Unusual clothes.
Bells, shirts etc. guy or chicks original
handmade & guaranteed. Call
376-5798. Honda Scrambler 90
$l2O. (A-3t-46-p)
Citrus Club Fruit Sale give a box
for Xmas or Thanksgiving 40 lb. box
grapefruit $3.50 oranges or mixed
$4. 392-1996 or drop by Rm. 1177
McC. Hal. (A-st-46-p)
Alrstream 17 foot clean, completely
self contained. Sleeps four
$2,495.00. See at 2910 N.E. 15th St.
Call 372-2946 or 378-9240 for
appointment. (A-lt-46-p)
KENWOOD TK 140. Worth over
S3OO. Need Cash! Asking S2OO.
Excellent Condition. Save over SIOO
by calling 378-5707. (A-3t-46-p)
ROBERTS 770 X Tape recorder
last week $375 now $275 or best
offer. Rem. 44 Mag. bolt action rifle
K-4 scope rifle bag $l5O Call
378-8676 Doug Altman
(A-4t-46-p)
FOR RENT
3SSS9SSSSGB&
Sublet immediately male roommate
private bedroom $75 per mon. utls.
inc. La Mancha Call 373-2149 after 5
p.m. (B-3t-44-p)
Need 4 people to sublet La Mancha
apt. $75 per mo. private bedroom
utilities included. Occupy starting
winter quarter. Call 378-3615
(B-3t-44-p)
Sublet 1 bdrm frnshd apt sllO
month 1404 SW 10th Terrace
376-9612 bonus included!
(B-3t-44-p)
Married couple needed to sublet 1
BR apt available in Dec. Good
location, AC. Call 378-3526 after
7:30 pm. (B-3t-44-p)
Quiet, spacious one bdrm furn apt,
ideal for couple or 2 roommates,
available Dec. 15. Call 378-0279 after
7 (B-st-42-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom furn. apt.,
AC/heat, pool. Avail. Dec. 15.
Couples only, no pets. Call 372-0736
between 4 PM & 11 PM. (B-st-45-p)
Beer Tavern with Built in Bar-B-Q
Pit. Rent or lease. Phone 376-6793
anytime. (B-st-45-p)
Sublet female 1 bdrm. frnshd. apt.
U. Grdns. 72.50 + V 2 utls. Bus to
campus. Call Linda 373-3941.
(B-3t-46-p)
ROOMS for single male students for
winter and spring quarter. One block
from campus. $45/mo. Call Dave or
Rick, 373-3924 after 7 PM
(B-st-46-p)
PLACE PENTHOUSE for winter
quarter on. $75 per month includes
utilities. Call 372-9972 or come to
Apt. 328 Place. (B-3t-46-p)

r 1
Todays 1
more for your money meal I
mORRISOVTS
CAFETERIA |
] 1
MONDAYS FEATURE j I
, BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
_ j WITH HASH
5 BROWN 7A j 8
o j potatoes / I
l | TUESDAY'S FEATURE j l I
a I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I =
| ALL YOU CAN EAT
I 99*1 I
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER: 4:30 til 8 FREE PARKING 1
moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison! i
2620 N.W. 13th Street In the Gainesville Mall jJ

WANTED
Female roommate wanted for French
Quarter apt. $51.25/mo. Available as
soon as desired. Call 373-3539
Needed 1 female roommate
immediately. French Quarter.
December rent paid. 378-3989 after
3 PM. (C-5t45-p)
Wanted one female roommate for
winter and spring quarters. La Bonne
Vie. Call 378-4121. $48.75 a month.
(C-2t-45-p)
Come again I Listeners wanted Will
pay $2.00 for one hour session. Must
be native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Susan
between 8 and 5 for appointment.
392-2049. (C-Bt-44-p)
LANDMARK APT. 40 Need one
liberal roommate (male) for the rest
of the year. 2 bdr. 47.50/mo. call
378-9638 or 378-8411 (C-4t-44-p)
Female roommate wanted for winter
quarter Landmark apts 47.50 mo +
utilities Call 373-3364 Apt. 51
(C-3t-44-p)
Three roommates for Jan. Have your
own room for 60.00 or share a room
for 40.00 monthly. Call Wayne at
378-8293 University Gardens Apt.
(C-st-44-p)
Sublet female roommate for winter,
spring term 2 bdrm, furnished apt.
Share room with 1 other. Close to
campus Call Denise 373-2980
(C-st-44-p)
Female roommate to share modern 1
bdrm apt. next to Camelot. no
deposit. $65/mo. + ¥2 util, option to
leave or keep for self In Jan. Call
378-9774 (C-st-42-p)
Roommate wanted for The Place;
lease thru June. Call 373-3777 for
details. (C-2t-46-p)
HELP* WANTED
PT X-ray Tech, needed by Alachua
Gen. Hosp., on-call, day nursery for
pre-schoolers while you work. Call
372-4321 x 365. (E-10t-45-p)
Waitresses Flagler Inn contact Mr.
Radditz 1250 W. University Avenue.
(E-35-46-P)
AUTOS
.1
VW *66 sedan, tires & battery under
guaranty, radio, inspection sticker,
tag, 70,000 careful ml. with VW
servicing every 3000, dependable
transportation, $644 firm, 376-0036
Dr. Mayer (G-3t-44-p)
1966 VW Karmann Ghia convertible
good condition SBSO 372-3964 after
6 (G-st-44-p)
66 Corvair, 4spd trans, 140 HP, well
maintained. Needs paint, otherwise
excellent. Call Roy, 378-4998 aft.
evening. (G-st-44-p)
69 Charger, high perf RT, 440, 4 spd.
red, black top, chrome reversed
wheels H big tires great condition.
Call 392-6198 or 373-3981 after 5,
wkend. (G-2t-45-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
68 OLDS 442 like new, auto, trans.,
A/C, heater, radio, tape. Must leave
U.S?, $1995, Call K.C. 376-1877
(G-st-43-p)
Ford Galaxle Fastback. Air,
power*earing, radio, heater, stereo,
low mileage, new tires, $1,850. Call
376-6176. (G-st-45-p)
Must Sellll 1964 Olds Holiday 88.
Full power, factory air, tuned last
week ... great shape. BEST OFFER!
378-5430 evenings. (G-3t-46-p)
63 BLUE STUDEBAKER,
Mechanically perfect, new paint,
reliable transport, $350 cash or best
offer, 378-1217. (Q-3t-46-p)
PE FT SONA L
Hate to cook? Too poor for an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 376-9473 (J-22t-30-p)
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever,
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Elect rologist ....
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)
HIGHER EDUCATION;
SECONDARY EDUCATION;
SOCIAL-ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT. Directories of
Positions. New, innovative approach.
Inexpensive. Effective. Write:
Intercept/Soclocom, Harvard Square
P. 0., Box 317, Cambridge, Mass.
02138. Call: (6 17)
868-4150.(J-4t-45-p)
Girls call 2-9038. Call soon. Call now.
Thank you! (j-2t-45-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS! Meet more
members of the opposite sex at U.F.
All dates In Gainesville. Free details
write: Nationwide Dating Service,
P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-15t-41-p)
Seminole sales staff meeting Tuesday,
November 24, 8:00 p.m. Important
call Jan If unable to come
(J-4t-44-nc)
ROC discount records specializing In
progressive rock $4.19 albums
reduced to $3.25 located at 424 N.W.
13th St. 12 to 9 pm (J-st-44-p)
COMPUTER DATING Meet your
ideal date. Special introductory price.
Now serving leading colleges and
universities throughout the U.S.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702
(J-23t-44-p)
Eye Reading As Hobby No Charge
Singles or Group 378-8490 Or
376-6217 Leave Phone number
(J-st-44-p)
373-2771 Dave Depew will listen.
The Student Senate may be able to
help with your problems. Let me
hear your views. (J-st-42-p)
COOK FOR US EAT FREE! Four
guys seek coed to prepare homestyle
dinners, 6-7 days a week. We wash
dishes. Call 378-7479 (J-st-43-p)
Free cat to anyone who Hves off
campus. Lovable, box-trained, acts
like a dog. Call 392-7872 or
392-7862. (J-2t-46-p)
CHARLIE J.: J. ANNEX: Youre the
greatest! Have a happy T. Day! A
southern belle. (J-2t-46-p)

IAT 2:10 -4:36 -7:00 9:25 || AT 3:00 5:10 7:20 9:30 I
I II I
I AMKEMCHOLSHIM I H LEE I
*£". I 11MARVXNI
I CATCH- I I ] MONTE
I 22 I WALSH
MVM a vyUatam
BlMiniNiMii HVMtfttUMM ifiTMMtCAffiFIIMKH I fivl ifvSicni
LaanwwaitwT. hubmmt. mwiYPfBMB| co STARR '^
WNUPiHms .wTMSKH;JiVRn! I JACK PALANCE
QRSOMIVBIES **i fflwriwen| jeannE MOREAU
ntNtaiI*PMHVISKIII* I panaviSiON*oxd TECHNiCOiOt*

Monday, November 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
BRAT: Nine months down two
years and ten months to go! NEAT! I
love you more each day. me
(J-lt-46-p)
Do you sculpt? Batik? Paint?
Whittle? Make something nobody
else does? The Reitz Union Is having
a Christmas Sale of International gifts
and original crafts. We want It to be
an open sale of Interesting items so
everyone Is Invited to sell their
creations. No fees, registration or
Insurance. No businesses either. Nov.
30 and Dec. 1 Union Ballroom 11 to
9. Questions? Call 392-1655
(J-st-36-p)
JERRY K. where are you? Call Bill
Nelson at 373-4230. Also 6 7 new
tapes for sale at wholesale price
(Scotch). Call any time. (J-lt-46-p)
Tutoring for Spanish courses. Will
tutor any required basic courses.
Spanish native. For appointment call
Vic 378-4574. (J-st-46-p)
SKI two students need two more
to share apt In Stowe, Vt. from Dec.
12-21. Good rates. Ride available.
Call 372-2419 or 378-0659.
(J-2t-46-p)
The Space Corps wants you! Space
people unite to bring peace & love
throughout the universe. Pax, Space
Queen T and spacey cadets M & A.
(J-2t-46-p)
Please put back the bike YOU stole
11/19 between 8:30 & 11 in front of
the Journalism Bldg, (locked)
THATS PRETTY LOW! (J-lt-46-p)
LOST <& FOUND
LOST diamond ring around Med.
Center. Please call 376-3537 or
372-6676. It is my engagement ring!!
(L-2t-45-p)
Found outside of Matherly Hall a
soft front to a Konlca camera case.
Can be picked up at Lost & Found In
JW Reitz Union. (L-3t-45-p)
LOST pair of heavy rim glasses in a
brown case. The frames are
redlsh-brown in color. Please call Dan
at 378-8580 If found. (L-st-44-p)
Lost one brown wallet In or near
Walker Aud. Need my IDs If found
please call 392-8232. Thank you.
(L-3t-46-p)
LOST Black double-fold wallet In or
near Chemistry or Music Buildings.
Return all ID's to Box 30-0593
Mur-L or call 392-7123 please!
(L-25-46-P)
1 GATOR |
V e*e
V O
I i
ADS I
I SELL! 1
11

m * e
* *.***********
LOST <& FOUND
-x-x-x-x-XvXxXxXxXxi
LOST: Tues. nite In Arbys: brown
wallet with all the usual goodies like
drivers license, etc. My phone
number Is 373-4246. Reward
(L-2t-46-p)
SERVICES
:*:*:*:
Planning on flying home for the
holidays? Save 25% and still get, a
reserved seat with an Eastern Youth
Card. Only $3. Call your Eastern
Campus Rep. at 378-9792, evenings.
(M-st-44-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Americard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Del-Ray Typing Service former
secretary at & grad of Bklyn. College,
NY. Term papers, theses,
dissertations 50 cents & up.
373-1984, 9-5, 373-1429 aft. 6
(M-st-41-p)
Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
4c Sell Trade Repair.
4 Reloading supplies. Custom
* reloading. Harry Beckwith,
X gun dealer, Micanopy. "r
* 466-3340.
0 /
jlpifl
Hi c 5 Wee? I
You Mutt Be 18 Yeart of
| Age to Enter & Prove it! |

K '*s%£* '*// ' -'A % IriSP y *\>
1 lilil Jfti g| m. J& Jgftfa 4BH&0& fife £ & J? 7 #-B B ~
-Xji||j|j* : JnSr
8 Rnl r**- iR Hbk sft ; #'JA wKw'SflKflK^9^^sK&' :: s ; '> K#l| sIKVJ
jsgj& not wtfy often) cm? the
I ly^r
i I* s&' W
I However
1
K';;-' '>. * ' si >4 vL 1 a.,
W S \ -. #..r
*;'(, when thtlfv' ;; .;' : v';
I - : 7
Ptfe? / 7\ : *|BBKIg: .WHap 1 '*
p#/ v i v 3CTBBMIMBMI v 5
I
K
I
p f Cr *&
A magazine of the art*. Poetry. Stories. Photography. Drawing*.
V *| ; X/, k
I SALIH HEBE* Ro-Mo Camera Mdcttt Bookstore Union Guest Desk
I Sub. Circus Hub

Page 13

SERVICES
Were wired for sight at the smaller
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Aye.
across from Greyhound Bus Station.
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Fly direct Jax Intnl $7.50 per
person. Service direct to your airline.
Schedule for Nov. 25 or Dec. 10.
Other days too. 392*8349, 392*8353.
(M-25-46-P)
LAST 2 DAYS
1 1:30
fTt > ft J 3 5:30
7:30-9:30
TOT AL
* SHOCK
# # OUnnmty In Tlie Hitchcock e
e TraWttnn.
# COLOR ICPI t e*
ee e r

| /OH
l4dt}ki*'M O 1 I LAST 4 DAYS! I J
} THE MAGNANIMOUS EXPERIENCE jf
* OF COLOR AND SOUND
44MMMM4MM MMM MMMM* ssss

SttdBHBOQIH
PtHTHOUT"^^tNT^USI
fcritysHerecsTgl
pEjffljE^e.
e # Yeall
.* Till it Worts *afW If
MMpoaaemHpwnnMM
Adultsl.so
Child .50 -
ALL DAY eee**



Page 14

I, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 23,1970

UF Hosts Fact-Finding Senators

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligrtor Staff Writer
A group of state senators who
comprise the Ways and Means
Committee visited UF Friday on
a fact-finding trip, according to
Rae O. Weimer, special assistant
to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
The senators met with UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and heard presentations by eight
UF faculty members on
problems in their areas. The
senators were given a pitch for
more help, more money and
improved classification of
present personnel.
Fred Connor, UF vice
president of academic affairs,
stressed the idea UF is a high
level university due to emphasis
on graduate programs. He said it
is a very expensive program, but
of great value to the state and
the nation.
SALARIES are normally

RADICALS ...

|*FROM PAGE OWE^j
attorney William Kunstler.
Kibler said the speeches made
at the campuses in no way
indicate an endorsement by the
universities of the speakers
position, or that there is a large
following for radical ideologies
on the campuses.
I deplore the presence of
these people on our campuses,
(Hoffman and Kunstler) but,
nevertheless, I respect the right
of students and faculty to hear
these people if they so desire,
provided, of course, that these
people behave themselves while
on our campuses.
HOWEVER, the Lakeland
lawyer said he will seek help
from the Florida Legislature, in
the form of a trespassing act, to
keep undesirable elements from
coming to the university
campuses.

As it is now, we cant
remove uninvited people (from

H you buy a Volvo 145,
mechanics won't always
be fixing your wagon.
,JL Mill-
Volvo*s reputation for holding up wasnt earned by breaking
down: 9 out of every 10 Volvos registered here in the last
eleven years are still on the road. We cant guarantee every
Volvo will last that long, but we can tell you this: Buy
a Volvo 145 and youll have more than a wagon you can get
a lot of stuff into. Youll have a wagon you can get a lot of
years out of.
harfred auto imports
506 E. University
Your New Volvo
Dealer in Gainesville

higher on the average at UF than
at other state institutions,
Connor said. This is justified due
to the number of professional
schools.
High ability is expensive,
Connor said. UF grants 23
masters degrees in 76 subjects.
Dr. Harold Hanson, dean of
the graduate school, pointed out
graduate programs are necessary
to the state. Students become
creators of knowledge instead of
consumers of knowledge.
UF GRANTED more Ph.D.s
than any other school in the
southeast in the last 10 years,
Hanson said. UF graduate
students are the best in the state.
There are 22 nationally ranked
departments with three being at
the top, Hanson said.
The problems of budget
approval in the business
department were presented to
the committee by Vice President
of Business Affairs William

the campuses) unless they break
the law, Kibler said.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said Sunday any
legislation they (Regents) try to
pass (to keep speakers off the
Florida campuses) would be
unconstitutional.
Uhlfelder said the Regents
were trying to create an issue
over speakers on the campuses,
yet were not solving the
problems faced by the
universities in Florida.
Millions Os Puffs
South Koreans smoked
21,510,750,000 (b) cigarettes
during the first half of 1970,
bringing 31,470,119,000 (b)
won ($104.9 million) in revenue
for the government, the
Monopoly Office reports. Each
smoker consumed 14 cigarettes a
day on the average. The number
of smokers was placed at
8,110,000, or about 35 per cent
of the population.

Elmore. If possible, he said he
would like to see a streamlining
of budget approval.
Director of Personnel Robert
Button reviewed the statewide
pay and classification plan for
the past three years. Action that
used to be taken at UF now has
to be done in Tallahassee,
Button said. This causes delays.
WALTER MATHERLY, from
the physical planning
department, related the
procedure UF goes through to
develop building and planning
procedures. He also pointed out
s9l million will be needed to
meet the building space
requirements for the projected
1976 enrollment. This would
cover new construction,
renovation, and replacement of
old buildings.
Dean of Engineering Robert
Uhrig presented a report on the
GENESYS program. He wants
the program expanded in the
state, and stated it serves
THE
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
4< Xerox 3<
Thesis & Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376-9334 8 am-9 pm

P "I
f\i i i
i i i
, \i: i : i
'-' : i
i\\ i / j
\* i } ;
CUT ON DOTTED LINE \ \ I It It
v \ V / >
vz \ ; $ /
/ / /
( \ IWe thought ( I J
v I wed give you /
\ \ | busy bug owners a hand./
\ \ } YOU NEED IT! DID YOU KNOW THAT THE f
I t / AVERAGE HAND HAS A SURFACE AREA /
% \ OF 24 SO. IN.? THE AVERAGE MINI-AUTO /
% W HAS A SURFACE AREA OF 900,759,327.092 /
% SQUARE INCHES. IT TAKES 857,329,456,948.01 DROPS OF/
\ OF WATER, PLUS 910 CANS OF ELBOW GREASE. AND /
* 3,600,000,000.00 MICROSECONDS OF TIME JUST TO /
1 WASH A LITTLE BUG! /
\ 0R /
\ WE WILL DO IT FOR A FILL UP (8 GAL. /
MINIMUM) OF OUR GREAT PHILLIPS 66 J
x GASOLINE AT NORMAL PUMP PRICES. /
\ IF YOUR BUG ISN'T THIRSTY BUT /
NEEDS A BATH, WE'LL DO IT /
FOR JUST A BUCK! ||^
GAS N*SAVE CAR WASH
616 N.W. 13th St.
IPSST! m CAM HANDLE BtG CARS TOO!
mm i m < in i

industry in the areas where it is
located.
Agriculture is the biggest
business in Florida, John Sites,
from the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS)
Experimental Station said. The
IFAS at UF strengthens and
promotes agriculture, according
to Sites.
Cedi N. Smith, chairman of
the faculty committee on
salaries and fringe benefits, said
in order to attract and maintain

$1 OFF
Clip the
Pizza Inn Til
Buck
below for a special treat!
PIZZA INN DOUGH NOTE" I
[fj\[ / \ Redeemable with thlf
|1 111 r /- \purcha*a of any II |II I
JLV*W fiMTTMI-' /-rA llarge size pizza or 2/7
/Vm lmedium pizzas.
(Oil ONE PIZZA INN BUCK ijCul
... '

/a
faculties of very high quality,
the salaries must be equivalent
to those at universities of
comparable quality.
Committeemen visiting UF
included Sen. J. H. Williams,
Ocala; Sen. Lee Weissenborn,
Miami; Sen. Dick Fincher,
Miami; Sen. John R. Boxson,
Gulf Breeze; Sen. Allan Trask,
Ft. Meade, and Herman Meyers,
from Department of Educations
budget and planning
department.



A&S Drops Required Honors Seminar

By MARIAN JEDRUStAK
k Alligator Staff Writar
Thanks to a change in honors
requirements in the College of
Arts and Sciences, students

Tolbert To Honor
Black Employes

By MARCIA GREEN
Alligator Writar
Black employes at UF will be
honored during the Christmas
season by Tolbert Area students.
The idea was initiated by
Clarence Martin, South Hall
resident and student senator.
Black employes have never
been honored for their fine and
hard work in dorms, servomats,
and the general school area,
Martin said.
BLACK STUDENTS at
Tolbert have decided to honor
these employes in appreciation
for their services.
During the Christmas season
the students plan to give
Christmas cards to the employes.
Christmas gifts will be given
according to the availability of
funds.
Martin is placing a resolution
before the Student Senate
introducing a plan to honor
black employes on campus.
Martin will make an official
statement explaining the
planned activities later this
week.
Final arrangements, as of yet,
have not been made. They
should be ready later this week,
Martin said.
Hail, Columbia
Columbia University New
York was chartered in 1754 as
Kings College.
SWING
AROUND
TO
Budgafe
Rent a Gar
OF GAINESVILLE
CALL
376-1245
FOR
Froo pickup and
dalivary onywhaw
in Alachua County
GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE
ONE WAY SPECIAL
15.00 FLAT RATE
ImHMm Air eowdltlnwlng
BffMpMoip and dwivary.
24 Hours Maximum
Budget
WE RENT
BETTER CARS
L FOR LESSI

enrolled in the college will no
longer be required to take a
senior seminar in order to
receive high honors.
The change comes as the result
of a recommendation passed

HPMMBojjjc.
M VW
-y & jrnmm,
-< Hr
BBT JL
'j '
CLARENCE MARTIN
< ... initiated idea
honwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBCRSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 All DAY
WEEKENDS $3 All DAY
For information call
JL, 376-0080
o teoNwoou
Ni 39th A V(NU( 601 f £ '*
l

M M M M a CLIP A SAVE ______________ CLIP A SAVE
NOW OPEN MONDAYS
FREE DELIVERY IN HEATED
Gift OS OVENS PHONE 376^1322
iF SPUTA MIDNIGHT
W ITALIAN CUISINE 2204 SW 13th ST. U.S. South 441
PIZZA PASTA
CHEESE 1.25 1.75 SPAGHETTI
PEPPERRONI 1.45 1.95 Meatballs 1.60
SAUSAGE 1* 45 1.95 Meat Sauce 1.50
MEATBALLS 1*45 1.95 Mushrooms 1.80
SALAMI 1-45 1-95 _ _ Italian Sausage 1.80
GARLIC 1.35 1,85 SIDE ORDERS Clam Sauce 1.80
fiRFFNPEPPER 1*35 1.85 F?AVIOLI
SHRIMP 1.60 2.10 MINESTRONE SOUP .35 Meatballs 1.90
ANTHOVY 1.60 2.10 ITALIAN TOSSED SALAD .40 Meat Sauce I .80
MISHROOM l60 2.10 GARLIC BREAD .25 Mushrooms 2.00
COMBINATION I- 75 2.55 BAKED POTATO .40 HOME MADE BAKED LASAGNA 2,55
(ANY TWO) VEAL PARMIGIANA AND
deluxe 1.95 2.85 SPAGHETTI 2.55
VEAL AND EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA
HERO SANDWICHES CHICKEN CACCIATORE 2.55
nCCCCDT AND SPAGHETTI
GINOS MONSTER 2 FOOT LONG UCd3CK I BAKED MANICOTTI 2.55
Loaded with Ham, Salami, Cheese, nHFFSE CAKE W
Pick less. Onions, Tomatoes, Peppers, p,a,n 55 cherry 75 A ABOVE ORDERS INCLUDE GARLIC BREAD
Ital lan 01 Is and Seasonings ECLAIRS*
1.75 one half .95 CHOC. BAVARIAN PIE J W
GERMAN CHOC. CAKE .40 J A /
VANILLA,CHOC.CHIP, 1 Yf
ITALIAN MEATBALL SUB choc. ICE CREAM .25 ] f A
Meatballs and Meatsauce .85 8 A W
ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND A \ W M
PEPPERS SUB /Y ? AM
Spicy italian sausage, n I Kl I/' C ..A
green meatsauce 1/K IINIV 3
roast ROOTBEER
? ~ T ~ *- k * |

Nov. 12 by the College
Assembly, composed of Arts &
Sciences faculty members and
10 students.
THE RECOMMENDATION
on college honors was a joint
effort by the Arts & Sciences
Undergraduate Committee,
Curriculum Committee, and the
Student Advisory Council.
Revisions in the honors
program have resulted in three
categories in which academic
achievement may be recognized
in the college:
Departmental honors in
which a student may be
recommended by his major
department. Requirements for
departmental honors work will
be set by each department and
the department will be required
to print them explicitly in the
catalog.

NewSwjftie ;
VW WAS
Roikswagenl 1N S£ EMB£R SAIES
K BEATEN? J in CANADA
I SWIFTIE, DATSUNI j
the numvMY IS ALMOST A ITS HAPPENING
ol a mcwTap PHENOMENON. NOW AT.
OF A NEW CAR |T happens IN SOME Godding & Clark
WITH SUPERIOR PLACES BEFORE "where even
DESIGN TECHNOLOGY OTHERS. BUT ONCE
AND SUPERIOR a '\ oX
PEOPLE WBtiaklr ,rom the univer,it v
PERFORMANCE FIND OUT on 2nd Ave. 378-2311
l open Sunday 2-5

Baccalaureate College
honors to all students who earn
a grade point average of 3.3 or
higher in upper division work.
Baccalaureate high honors
to all students who earn a grade
point average of 3.5 or higher in
upper division work and who
complete either a departmental
honors program or at least eight
hours of interdisciplinary high
honors seminars.
REASONS FOR the change in
honors policy have been cited as
limitation on the number of
students participating due to the
size of the meeting room and the
fact previously selection of
students for the seminar was at
the discretion of the seminar
committee.
I have been told that there
are about 150 students in the
College of Arts & Sciences with

Monday, Novambar 23,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

grade point averages of 3.5 or
higher, yet only about 18 would
be able to graduate with high
honors, said David Chafin,
chairman of the Student
Advisory Council.
According to Dr. Ernest Cox,
assistant dean of the College of
Arts & Sciences, the new
program will affect students
graduating in December.
Florida Quarterly
HERENOW!
at bookstores.

Page 15



Page 16

. Th# Florida Alligator, Monday, ttdmmbar 23,1970

.^^V. *.\ .v.|...j.v^^^^^^^^^|.; !-?-?-!!-!!-!v-.-;-.-!->!*!-I!-!!!-!v!-!!-!!)*!!^^K!^^^fcl^^^!!!!!!!?!!!!!!!!^?V.!?-!I!!!!!!!-.*.I..^^WIv^^K*. , .vVV-.v-:-l-.-

Cyclone Survivors
March On Capital
DACCA Starving survivors
of the cyclone and tidal waves
that devastated coastal areas of
East Pakistan marched on the
capital of Dacca Sunday in
search of food, water and shelter
after despairing of help ever
coming to them.
A trickle of relief supplies has
found its way into hands of
survivors in some of the more
accessible of the afflicted areas
but, 10 days after the disaster
struck, tons of relief materials
were still sitting at Dacca
Airport and in four Red Cross
warehouses.
A relief commission official
explained why one shipment
from Britain of outboard
motors, inflatable rubber rafts
and boat oars that arrived
Saturday failed to move
southward.
We loaded this shipment on
lorries last night but the Red
Cross people didnt show up to
take delivery so we unloaded the
shipment, and we are still
waiting for the Red Cross, he
said.
i
Israel To Talk When
Conditions Right
MIDEAST Israels
negotiators will return to the
U.S.-supervised Middle East
peace talks only when it
considers conditions are right,
the Israeli cabinet said Sunday.
It said one major condition is an
agreement to strengthen and
extend the Suez Canal cease-fire.
The situation in the Middle
East also was a major topic of
discussion in Cairo where the
new Council of Ministers was
holding its first working session
since being sworn in last Friday
by President Anwar Sadat.
A leading Egyptian official, at
the same time, said that Egypt,
Libya and Sudan will maintain
their separate entity in their
proposed federation but will
have a unified army.
]
' IncidentsOccur With
Nuclaar Warheads
WASHINGTON Senate
investigators said Sunday there
had been unspecified
incidents involving the
security of some of the 7,000
U.S. nuclear warheads stationed
overseas in NATO countries.

HpEROSA
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

In a heavily censored
transcript of hearings conducted
by the Senate Foreign Relations
subcommittee on national
commitments, Chairman Stuart
Symington, D-Mo., and a staff
investigator strongly implied
that the incidents were related
to the 1967 military coup in
Greece.
We r put these weapons all
over the world and, in my
opinion at least in some places
we do not guard them
properly, Symington said.
And that is based on actual
experience plus letters of protest
I received.
Congress May Cut
Troops In Europe
WASHINGTON The Nixon
Administration sharply opposed
Sunday a mounting
congressional effort to cut U.S.
troop strength in Europe. But
Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield said he may press the
issue to a vote in the Senate next
year.
In testimony from U.S.
military officers and a lengthy
letter by Secretary of State
William P. Rogers, all released by
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee Sunday in a 300-page
transcript, the administration
warned that a reduction of
forces could drive Europe into
the arms of Moscow, wreck the
Atlantic alliance, undermine
East-West negotiations and
increase the risk of a nuclear
exchange without saving much
money, and perhaps increasing
costs.
Mansfield rejected the
arguments and told newsmen he
was serious about calling up
his long-dormant resolution next
year urging a substantial
reduction in the 250,000-man
U.S. army in Europe.
St. Louis Teachers
Strike Settled
EAST ST. LOUIS, 111. The
longest teachers strike in
American history was settled
during the weekend with East
St. Louis teachers gaining
virtually nothing.
The agreement to end the
12-week old strike against East
St. Louis School District granted
no pay increases or back pay.
However, teachers who resigned
during the strike were reinstated
on a two-year probationary
basis. But they lost their

seniority and tenure they held
before, and an average of $1,700
in wages.
Nixon Pledges Help
In Election Reform
WASHINGTON Senate
Republican leader Hugh Scott
released a letter from President
Nixon Sunday promising
administration help in drafting
election reforms that would
substitute for a bill vetoed by
Nixon limiting campaign
spending on radio and television.
On the eve of a Democratic
attempt to override the veto in
the Senate, Scott released a

MILLER E3I
BROWN
4222 N.W. 13th
' ST.
808 STACY .lUC
378-5222 |
CAMPUS REP

We aim
to cheese.
I Ml ft
SiiBMMI W
MON., TUES., AND WEDS. ONLY
Burger Chefs
Double Cheeseburger
2 Special
Double Cheeseburgers Forvvt
"Burger Chef right up th* street I
goes all out at 715 N W 13th Sf 1 11^1
to please the Student / f

Dear Hugh letter in which
Nixon said elections reforms
were needed but that the vetoed
bill had many shortcomings
including the fact that it limited
campaign spending in only one
area.
Air Force Jet
Crashes In Laos
SAIGON A U. S. Air Force
FlO5 jet fighter-bomber,
carrying special equipment to
locate and attack antiaicraft
missile sites, crashed in
northern Laos Saturday but both
crewmen were rescued, military
spokesmen said Sunday.
The crash, attributed to

GLASSIS 0(/A Bus\Hi^
CARS TRUCKS BUSES
SKOAL ATTBinON TO IMSUMMCE OHMS
IBIAtI WSTAUATION WH WBAIStIHWW I MUTT
I 376-2558 I
m AWWH CAU. MBtBPICI JPMBI
mikw.Whlastwsb ajca.owabwyiuj

causes other than enemy
action, occurred during the
28%-hour period that UJS.
warplanes were bombing North
Vietnam in retaliation for
Communist firing on U.S.
reconnaissance planes over the
country.
U.S. spokesmen declined to
answer any questions about the
raids over North Vietnam,
saying that there would be no
further comment beyond
Defense Secretary Melvin R.
Lairds announcement Saturday
in Washington that the planes
carried out strikes below the
19th parallel in North Vietnam
in response to attacks on
American planes.



Marshall Students Find
Adjustment Difficult

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. (UPI)
_ There is much more living to
be done and we need one
another.
SO SPOKE Mike Gant,
student body president at
Marshall University where
students were still numbed by
the shocking air tragedy which
killed 75 persons, including
virtually all of the schools
football team and coaching staff.
The actual cause of the Nov.
15 plane crash probably wont
be known for months, but the
effects on the campus were
immediate.
Dr. Donald Demon, acting
president of the university,
summed up the feelings of the
8,500 students.
ITS GOING to be tough
around here for a long time, he
said. In a few short moments,
the only thing that counted was
37 young men, Marshalls
traveling football squad.
Now they were dead, along
with their coaches, the men who
believed in them, and their most
loyal supporters, men who
suffered through a 27-game
winless streak, an NCAA
suspension, and expulsion from
the mid-America conference.
Students struggled to return
to normal routine when classes
resumed last Wednesday, but it
was virtually impossible. No one
was untouched.
THERE WERE too many
reminders around them. A single
wreath outside the football
offices at Gullickson Hall,
hundreds of telegrams posted on
the bulletin board at old
main... a bulletin board that
just a few days before the
tragedy had announced a
football pep rally... the black
armbands ... ribbons and the
wreaths on fraternity and
sorority houses and dormitories.
For some, the sense of loss is
closer to home. Sue Ellen Cook
of Man, W.Va., was waiting at

the <,
cpo classic JL )
outer shirt
Gangway ... when you set sail in /
our tall, trim outer shirt! Rigged \\
for action with a custom-shaped
body of rough-and-ready wool ...
comes in hardy seafarer checks
and classic plaids. Anywhere
you turn the "ayes and eyes
This Week Only
reg. $17.00 NOW $ 9.99
Pnfoerstig jziifyop |
1620 W. University University Plaza

Tri-state Airport for kicking
specialist Marcello Lajterman.
They were to have been married
Sunday.
Cathy Gibbs of Huntington
remembers the good times. Os
talking to head Coach Rick
Tolley about the Wichita State
plane crash, when he remarked
to her he was glad the team
would only fly once. She thinks

Khruschev Memoirs
Critical Os Stalin

NEW YORK (UPI)
Describing Josef Stalin as
savage, brutish and not
quite right in the head, former
Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev says in his
controversial memoirs that if the
Soviet dictator were alive today
he would vote that Stalin be
brought to trial and punished for
his crimes.
IN AN EXCERPT from the
forthcoming book Khrushchev
Remembers, published Sunday
in Life magazine, the former
Soviet ruler also says he owed his
own life to Stalins second wife,
Nadezhda Sergeyevna Alliluyeva,
who praised him to Stalin before
her suicide in 1932. He calls this
his lucky lottery ticket.
The excerpt, entitled Life
with Stalin, was the first of
four to be serialized from the
reminiscenses which Khrushchev
has called a fabrication but
the magazine asserts is an
authentic record of Nikita
Khrushchevs words. The full
text will be published next
month by Little, Brown and Co.
Both Life and Little, Brown
have refused to disclose how the
material reached the West.
KHRUSHCHEV, who was
deposed in 1964, and is reported

of Jack Rapsy stopping everyone
in sight to tell them his broken
collar bone had healed and he
would play against Kent State.
MANY STUDENTS just cant
talk about it any more. No
words, they said, could express
the hollow feeling inside them.
Yet, classes go on at Marshall,
and a new team will be put
together, somehow, some way.

to be seriously ill at present with
a heart ailment in the Kremlin
Hospital, mentioned his present
circumstances only in the
opening paragraph. I now live
like a hermit on the outskirts of
Moscow. I communicate only
with those who guard me from
others and who guard others
from me, he says. Writing in
earthy language and anecdotal
style, Khrushchev traces his
relationship with Stalin from
their first meeting in 1925 when
Khrushchev was Very impressed
by him and heartened by the
democratic spirit he displayed
to Stalins last years as a lonely,
fearful, sometimes drunken
tyrant. Stalins rule, he says,
damaged the fabric of our
Soviet society.
There are some people who
think that we have Stalin to
thank for all our progress, who
quake before Stalins dirty
underdrawers, who stand at
attention and salute them,
Khrushchev says.
In everything about Stalins
personality there was something
admirable and correct, as well as
something savage. Nevertheless if
he were alive today I would vote
that he should be brought to
trial and punished for his
crimes, Khrushchev says.

BBi^^gn^an
USED^^?^fl^ APO
1970 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville .$6295
4 door hardtop, full power. Blue with leather interior.
Stereo radio, cruise control, power door locks.
1969 CADILLAC Fleetwood $5295
Unexcelled luxury cost SB,OOO when new. Full power
and all the comfort options.
1969 MUSTANG Mach 1..., $2895
Fastback coupe. VB, power steering, power front disc
brakes, air conditioned. Automatic transmission. GT
Equipment.
1968 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville $4195
Four door hardtop. Black vinyl top over turquoise. Air
conditioned, full power, cruise control, leather interior
with bucket seats.
1968 FORD Fairlane 500 $1795
Four door sedan, dark green with white vinyl interior, I
radio, heater, automatic transmission, air conditioned,
power steering.
1968 OLDSMOBILE Delta ..,..$2495
"88" four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior.
Radio, heater, automatic transmission, power steering and
brakes, air conditioned. Electric seats.
1968 OLDSMOBILE Delmont.. $2495
Air conditioned sedan with electric seat, automatic
transmission, power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
1967 OLDSMOBILE Delmont $2095
Four door hardtop. Gold. 425 VB, radio, heater, automatic
transmission, power steering and brakes. Clean. Local I
owner.
1967 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass $1995
Two door hardtop. Automatic transmission, air I
conditioned, power steering, power brakes, electric
windows. Gold.
CHEVROLET Impala... $1495 I
2 door hardtop, automatic transmission, power steering I
power brakes, radio and heater.
1966 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville. $2295
Four door hardtop. White vinyl over blue with beige
interior. Full power including air conditioning, tilt
telescoping wheel, cruise control, power door locks,
twilight sentinel.
1966 FORD FALCON $995
Two door sedan, white, six cylinder, three speed column I
shift, radio, heater.
1966 COMET Capri ...$13951
Two door hardtop, white with blue interior. Radio, heater, I
automatic transmission, air conditioned, power steering.
289 V 8
1966 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass Supreme......sl49s|
Four door hardtop, blue with matching blue interior. Air I
conditioned, automatic transmission, power steering, I
radio, heater.
1966 CHEVROLET Nova ~,,....51095
4 door sedan, 6 cylinder, automatic transmission, radio, I
heater
1966 CHEVROLET Malibu- ..$995
Convertible, air conditioned, automatic transmission, I
radio, heater, power steering.
1965 BUICK RIVIERA ....$1595
Two door hardtop, white with blue interior. Automatic I
transmission, air conditioned plus full power equipment. I
1965 FORD Country Squire $995
Station wagon, gold witn beige interior. New I
reconditioned V 8 engine, automatic transmission, air I
conditioned, power steering, power brakes. Very clean car. I
1965 BMW $595
Four door sedan. Yellow. Excellent second car,l
economical to operate.
1965 OLDSMOBILE Dynamic "88.....51195
Four door hardtop, automatic transmission, air I
. conditioned, power steering, power brakes, tilt wheel,!
radio, heater. Turquoise with matching interior.
1964 CADILLAC Sedan de Ville. $1195
Four door hardtop. Light green. Air conditioned plus full I
power. Extra clean car.
1964 OLDSMOBILE Dynamic "88.... $995
Three seat station wagon, air conditioned, automatic!
transmission, power steering, power brakes. Very clean.
1969 ~ ~..41695
Automatic stick shift White.
BRASINGTON
Cad iliac -O Id smob lie, .Inc. I
2001 NW 13th Stft 378-5301 |

Monday, November 33,1970. Tha Florida Alligatoc,.

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

ORANGE AND BLUE BASKETBALL GAME
Varsity Runs Past Frosh-Subs, 114-67

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Writer
Six players scored in double
figures to lead the UF varsity
basketball squad to a lopsided
114-67 win over a combined
freshman-sub team Friday night
at Florida Gym in the annual
Orange and Blue scrimmage.
They (freshmen and varsity
subs) just had a slow start, and

MStiJi i"l -
Jr B| w
q ''''. l Wtf H
wBS *' WOf ; : Hgfe*
||F Py
TOM KENNEDY
TOM PURVIS (32) PULLS DOWN STRAY REBOUND
... one of 5 varsity rebounds against froth-subs

__
- ,2. =^'*-n J j _'.**&" V V M M V j~, r- w Wm _. > > tu ?t| f '*2'f> >'
Bf i j
K Mkk ;
Jjsfic amL
\ \ M
I f. 1 U V'' vBHBF jHBI n i wW 7kM mjk &, Ta*.
Bbk ; j : i
1
'MifeMr Sr
m \M ilf'iffllTJF nIK
>£& ~' S %; ;-J HBk I^H
B.-. wb ' p||*g| retal
j£&- ** * kS PBMK .<;;. '"-f*w?;v ssC£ji^JtaadTMj.v <'*
M ''P|l|pffife^ ,^^pP** Ws fl
I V w
JB mJIBHP^BBBBi^WWBMSBIBHMMWHHHHBWH^Wi^BHHII^BBBHBB^^
~ ? i ||yk it p ,' r< a W is i
BL TwBB ** ' "' : '- > -->>-' ,! n|
3$!P*V 'W* n : Ag?
B :'W #; ; : .vp'
PHIL BANNISTER
DAVID HITCHCOCK (IN WHITE) GOES HIGH TO BLOCK A KICK
i ... Ted Strains (30) tries to keep Hitchcock from punter

. ,V. r?*rs. m y* vr r v. .* ~ , ".V7.v.'.*-' , ..'. ~ i ',i mv .". ... / v. V'.\'. v. u
fiATOR SPORTS

the varsity got on top early and
kept pouring it on, assistant
coach Dick Davis said.
ALMOST $3,000 from the
2,000 in attendance was raised
from ticket sales for the Gator
Loan Fund. With each dollar
matched by the federal
governments National Defense
Loan Fund, the scrimmage
provided almost $30,000 for the
UF fund.

Cliff Cox led the varsity team
with 18 points, followed by
Gary Waddell, 16, Earl Findley,
15, Hal Kelley and Tom Purvis,
12, and Tony Miller, 11.
When you play as many boys
as we did its hard to single out
individual players, Davis said.
But we thought Cox played
real well along with Waddell.
COX, LEFT wing, also topped
the game with 10 rebounds, just
one more than the individual
efforts of Waddell, Findley and
Dan Boe.
The varsity didnt play
defense as well or shoot as well
in the second half, Davis said.
After the first five minutes the
varsity had jumped to a 20-2
lead with the help of sharp
shooting.
The varsity Gators hit 45 field
goals in 98 attempts.
WE ALSO did a real good
job in rebounding (55-23),
Davis said. We were down last
year in rebounding, after leading
the conference in rebounding for
three years in a row before
then.
REBOUNDING DEFECTS
were evident in last years 9-17
seaons record.
The boys are working real
hard for the upcoming season,
Davis said. Attitude is good,
and we have more than five or
six boys that can play.
Last year the Gators were
bothered by inexperience and
injuries that trimmed the few
experienced players available.
WERE STILL young,
Davis reminded. But Weve
improved, but so have the other
conference teams.
Out of the present starting
team of Jerry Hoover, point;
Purvis, high post; Waddell, low
post; Tony Miller, right wing,
and Cox, Purvis is the only
senior. All the rest are juniors
except Miller, who is a promising
sophomore.

MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor

Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 23,1970

Tony Duva, second-team
point behind Hoover, saw
limited action Friday, after
coaches said he would be absent
with a sore leg.
WING JEFF Miller, who
injured his elbow in Thursdays
practice, left the game in the
second period with a sprained
ankle.
Sophomore wing Mark
Thompson missed the game with
an injury that tore ligaments in

|9HH|HM9r : ; H%g JHBf
Hg§&
Hi||gfl
TOM KENNEDY
EARL FINDLEY (42) STRETCHES TO BLOCK SHOT
... Scooter Hudson just clears interference
BabyGatorsomp
56-8 Over FSU

It was the biggest romp of the
year for Florida football. The
biggest one sided victory for the
Gators that is.
Friday afternoon before an
estimated 6,000 people, the
freshman Baby Gators ran at will
to defeat Florida States
freshmen 56-8 at Florida Field.
RUNNING BACK Leonard
Lucas, back from an injury that
sidelined him for the Louisiana
State game last week, rushed for
181 yards on 18carries including
a 63 yard jaunt for a touchdown
that opened the scoring.
c
Lucas also ran for
touchdowns of 6 and 2-yards
while playing his final game of
the year.
Quarterback Chan Gailey

PHIL PETTI JOHN
Sports Editor

his ankle several weeks ago.
Hes still moving very slow
and is limping badly, Davis
said.
Davis said Thompson, who
just got off crutches and out of
the cast, wont play for some
time until he starts responding
to therapy.
The Gators open their season
Dec. 1 against Samford at
Florida Gym.

completed six of nine passes for
94 yards and also accumulated
72 yards on the ground on 11
carries in his first half
performance. Back-up
quarterback David Pope played
fhelast part of the second
quarter and most of the last half.
THE BABY GATOR offensive
line, which no doubt will help
the varsity Gators next year,
were opening holes for Lucas
and Vince Kendrick, who rushed
for 88 yards. Gary Padgett,
Trippe Whitaker, Mark King, Joe
Sheppard and Kris Anderson all
will grade out well in the game.
The Baby Gators finished the
year with three victories against
two defeats while the Baby
Seminoles finished with one
triumph in four starts.



Pi Lambda Phi A Winner
27-12 In Nose Bowl

(EDITORS NOTE: Elizabeth
Maltz asked to do a girls eye
view of the annual Nose Bowl
game pitting Pi Lambda Phi and
the Tau Epsilon Phis pledges.
Here is her account of the game
which saw among other things,
five interceptions.)
By ELIZABETH MALTZ
Alligator Writer
At the annual Pi Lambda Phi
versus Tau Epsilon Phi Nosebowl
game Sunday the Pi Lams
defeated the TEPs 27-12.
Pi Lam opened the scoring on
a pass from fullback Jimmy
McPhearson to Randy Fried,
making the score 7-0.
WITH ONE AND a half

Benjamin All-State
With sth Place Finish

A disappointing third place
finish in the triangular meet at
Florida State University this
weekend closed out the 1970
cross country for the Gators on
a losing note.
Leading the team was Roy
Benjamin, finishing fifth and
making the All-State Cross
Country team (the top seven
finishers make the team).
THE TEAM was practicing
hard all week and had only one
day of rest before the meet,
Coach Roy Benson said. We are
looking towards the track season
(tryouts are Nov. 30 and Dec. 1)
and most of the runners are
working towards making that
cut.
Finishing behind Benjamin
was Ron Nabors, Jim McQueen,

jKr**
o*
Dominos Pizza
1376-2407 FOB DaiVERY 376-2487

minutes left to play in the first
half TEP Dan Budasoff scored a
touchdown on a deflected pass.
TEP failed to make the point
after touchdown and the score
remained 7-6.
Scott Lyons, Pi Lam center,
caught a 30 yard pass enabling
Fried to score and rusher Evan
Byer to score the point after. At
this point the Pi Lams were
leading 14-6.
In the second half TEP Neil
Einhorn and Pi Lam McPhearson
made interceptions.
FRIED SCORED another
touchdown for the Pi Lams and
the score became 20-6.
Pi Lams last touchdown was
scored by Louie Lippman, with
the point after by McPhearson.
TEP Dick Kamfey scored the

Dave Heitkamp, Billy Hicks, Bob
Burr and Dave Harrison.
Ken Misner, FSUs top
runner, captured his third
straight individual championship
covering the four-mile circuit
around the FSU course, in a
record 19:51. The time was the
first ever recorded under 20
minutes on the layout.
We knew that FSU would be
tough in the meet and that
South Florida would also be
hard to beat if we worked hard
during practice, Benson said.
But we are looking towards
those tryouts the end of this
month.
FSU was first with 21 points
followed by South Floridas 47
and Floridas 52.

final touchdown resulting in a
final score of 27-12.
OUTSTANDING PLAYERS
were Pi Lams Randy Fried and
Jimmy McPhearson, and TEPs
Bobby Shenkman, Dick Kamfey
and John Bursky.
This was the fifth consecutive
victory of a Pi Lam pledge class
over a TEP pledge class.
Sportsmanship was at an all
time low as was evidenced by
flaring tempers, name calling,
and a short fist fight on the
field.
jtiilS!#Ba.
iMPiiP
MB
ALACrtilillSilNlTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

I LAST DAYS
I I Phase I Grand Opening Membership |
I ACT NOW AND SAVE!
I MEMBERS WILL BE ENROLLED FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY AT
I THE LOWEST RATES EVER OFFERED BY ANY HEALTH
I SPA ANYTIME ANYWHERE
I MEET NANCY
WOMENS PHYSICAL
DIRECTOR
STUDENT SPECIAL
For a limited time only, we
are offering student
m memberships at a very large
discount. Special is good for
nancy IS ONE of our highly qualified the first 45 to call or come in
I STAFF MEMBERS READY TO WORK WITH YOU Qn |
I ON YOUR INDIVIDUAL PROGRAM OF EXERCISE y
1 & WEIGHT CONTROL. Call now
I 378-2441
I OUR FACILITIES INCLUDE:
MODERN EXERCISE MACHINES ULTRAVIOLET SUN LAMPS
HOT WHIRLPOOL BATHS SWISS FACIAL MACHINES
* MASSEUR & MASSEUSE EUCALYPTUS INHALATION ROOMS
BEAUTY SALON JOGGERS, BICYCLES. ROLLERS
FINNISH HOT ROCK SAUNAS PROFESSIONAL WEIGHTS
I COME BY TODAY FOR A TOUR
I OF OUR RE AUTIFUL FACILITIES
S STEVE SPURRIER HEALTH CLUB
FOR "The All-American Club" FOR
MEN 207 N.W. 23rd Btvd., Gainwrill., Florida WOMEN

FACE TAMPA TONIGHT i
' a
j Wrestlers Begin |
As football season slowly comes to an end, so begins S
wrestling. |
$: The UF wrestling team takes to the mats tonight against the
University of Tampa at 7:30 p.m. in the fifth meeting of the |
teams. Florida leads 4-0. &
g COACH KEITH TENNANT has named Steve Gaines to §
wrestle in the 118 pound division and Jack Marshall in the 126
division. :£
| Other starting members of the team include Johathan Barres,
| 142 division, Chet Sanders, 150, Mike Shumaker, 158, Bob £
Penna, 167, and Chris Corder, 177.
ij-j Tennant has appointed transfer student Sanders and Jeff |
Shaffner as co-captains for the meet. Shaffner is out with an
>: ankle injury. He also sat out last year with a knee injury. :£
$: The meet is the first of 15 for the Gators this year. Following :!
the Tampa meet, the team will travel to the Georgia Tech
|:j: Invitational in Atlanta Dec. 4th and sth before they take on the :jij
$: University of Georgia on the 18th of December.
[ SHflic~l
' Student Special
| (With The Coupon) I
I Our Regular 93< Stealcburger i
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90d plus tax |
I Steak n Shake 1
| 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville |

Monday, November 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,!

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 23,1970

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
) THERE IS ONLY ONE A
RAHVIVPiV 2445 S.W. 13 ST. J
BONaHZa Jake Out 378-0946Hs\ gffto
"Congratulates the i I
Player of *he Week Player Os The Week X-/
# Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks,
chicken, fish, and our famous Vtlb.
rr\KA PI ETC v3; V | 3£EE3|| SS£3 Bonanzaburger IOO% beef, French
\hJ w 1 e meE I Ink Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets .89
TAKE-OUT I Our steaks are served with a steaming-hot, buttery
|i a baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green
menu
Steak Sandwich 1.19
r Bunkhouse Special lb. 100% chopped
-139
! Steak Sandwich
Top Hand
rugged appetite Z9O
OPEN PM
\ \u\V V* f\ Nw : :{&9SP^'''' : ''' : sjff|jWflfflMHHl^HMMPfflHM|
J / \ This week's player of the week goes to freshman
\ a \ Leonard Lucas for his play in Friday's Baby Gator JaHPII >s
ItflAHl \ 4 56-8 triumph over the freshmen of Florida State
PMI§ \ \ University. HH^^^HHB9
\ j Lucas carried the ball 18 times for 181 yards
H \( and three touchdowns in the freshmen's final game
'- IjH
Lucas, from Daytona Beach, Fla. opened the
I W scoring for the Gators by romping 63 yards early
the first quarter. He also added runs of two and six -- ;Jk
yards for his three scores.
INDIVIDUAL EFFORT
m .ci
JJ MON. FRI. Teems must work together to win. But when
I M 4% WW% I W% J ft-ft it comes down to the wire, it comes down to
V W 0 m M MJg q.j the individual. You heve to do your job, and do
IIUIIIIIIU O iILLu 9-12 i-rr.r^xs
students all have their jobs to do and for it to
work all must do their part well. Let us help
mrr I |% irn \# -f you do your job, come to "Your on Campus
UtLIVtK Y ___ Store" for your school supplies.
m 1 am- BF
M Call 376-2487 CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE
H 1710 S. W. 13 th HBJ 5|3 ,he H b