Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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On any given day in the Plaza of the Americas
you can see people digging on the sunshine, or the
pine needles, or the dogs playing, or just other
people. But when a speaker the likes of Abbie
Hoffman comes to UF f s miniature Central Park,

Pafid.
vAffi Amman.

Vol. 63, No. 44

SENATORS WANT NEW SYSTEM
Registration Attacked

By CARLOS LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
The present UF registration
system has come under attack
from the Student Senate.
A resolution passed by the
senate Tuesday night calls the
present registration system
discriminatory and asks
registration officials to
establish a more equitable
plan.
THE RESOLUTION suggests
a random selection system be
adopted, in order to give all
students an equal chance at
having a good registration date.
Under the present system, a
student's grade point average is
used as a criterion for giving a
registration date. Those with a
high average get an early
registration date, and those with
a lower average are awarded later
dates.
Senators argued that the
present system allows those
students with a higher average to
get the best classes while those
students with a lower average

GUEST COLUMNIST Robert
Scholes, an associate professor
of speech at UF, relates his
feelings about Israel .. .page 9
Classifieds 20
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies 20
Sports 26

TO EACH HIS OWN

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

find some classes closed and the
selection of teachers limited.
TUESDAYS SESSION also
saw the passing of a first reading
for the construction of a base in
which to put a completely
automated post office for the
UF campus.
The automated post office,
given to UF free by the United
States Post Office Department,
has been ready for installation
for some time.
It seems the automated post
office was sent without
authorization of Student
Government, and senators
objected to releasing the $2,500
from the Campus Improvement
Fund needed to construct the
base for the post office and a
direct telephone line to the
Gainesville Post Office.
IF THE BILL passes a second
reading next Tuesday, the go
ahead will be given for
construction of the walkup post
office in North-South Drive,
across the street from the
Graham Area dormitories.
According to Henry Solares,
student body vice president,
some parking spaces will be
provided for students using the
post office.
He said FSU and the
University of South Florida have
similar facilities for their
students and have had success
with the project.
SOLARES POINTED out the
location was chosen because
about 10,000 students walk
through there every day, and it
is just outside the restricted
campus zone, permitting

students 'Yip" it up in high fashion. Alligator
photographers Phil Bannister and Phil Cope
captured the man with the star spangled glasses and
two wine-loving souls at the Plaza Tuesday.

University of Florida, Gainesville

students with cars to drive to the
post office and park.
In other senate action, the
charter for the Black Student
Union and the Black Sisters for
Progress were passed.
Also approved by the senate
was the Resident Advisers
fraternity, Alpha Omega.
The senate will meet again
next Tuesday in room 349 of
the Reitz Union at 7:30 pjn.

FSM Seeks Recognition

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alfcptor Staff Writar
The controversial Florida Student Movement
(FSM) will try again to get official UF recognition.
This will be the second time FSM will try to get
official recognition; in last week's meeting of the
Committee on Student Organizations, the group was
accused of disrupting the proceeding, and chartering
was postponed until today's meeting.
UNLIKE LAST WEEKS meeting, today's
meeting will be held in a larger room.
Some FSM members protested last week because
they said they were told the meetings were open to
anyone. Upon arriving at the meeting, they found
the meeting room too small to accomodate the
approximately 30 FSM members who had wished to
attend.
The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. in room 349
of the Reitz Union. This room holds more than 100
persons.

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PROPOSED LOCATION FOR POST OFFICE
... 10,000 students walk there every day

THE FSM IS ALSO awaiting approval from
Student Government.
Their charter was rejected by the Student Senate
last week because certain provisions, such as
membership, were not acceptable to the senate. The
charter presented by FSM to the senate contends
that all UF students are members of the
organization.
Also awaiting recognition by the committee is the
UF League of Athletes.
THE LEAGUE, formed by a group of UF athletes
who are not satisfied with conditions in athletics,
changed its name from the Union of Florida
Athletes in order tojrcevent any confusion about its
intentions.
The League claims they represent UF athletes,
who are not represented by a committee formed by
athletic director Ray Graves.
A third group coming up for recognition is the
Black Sisters for Progress. This organization has
already received recognition from the Student
Senate during Tuesdays meeting.

Thursday, November 19, 1970



!, Hi RmA Alligator, Thursday, November 19,1970

Page 2

Rubella Prevention Swings Into Action

By JEAMNE HUTTO
AMgaftor Writer
The rubella prevention
campaign, initiated in an
attempt to prevent an
anticipated rubella epidemic in
the coining spring, is well
underlay with the
immunizatiofk of over 1800
9 H
VOLUNTEERS
... give Rabdta vaccination

Accent Presents Prison Program On Plaza

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent *7l will present Day
in Prison today from noon to 2
p.m. in the Plaza of the
Americas.
The discussion will be led by
moderator Ron Sachs, who
investigated die Alachua County
Jail murder for The Alligator.

Attacks On St. Pete Police
Continue; Car Firebombed

ST. PETERSBURG (UPI) A
St. Petersburg police cruiser was
destroyed early Wednesday
when a firebomb was tossed
inside it as it was parked outside
an officer's home.
Nearby a note was found tied
to a rock and it read:
THIS IS THE start of the
revolution. Fire and death to the
pigs.
The note, signed Mongoose
also read you may think the
incident yesterday has been
forgotten."
Police Chief Harold Smith
said the reference to yesterday
apparently concerned a city
council action offering S2OO
reward for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of
persons who ambushed and beat
two police officers, John B.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is th official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. the
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next

children in schools and nurseries
this week.
The purpose of the campaign
is to stop the spread of rubella
from child to mother, especially
when the youngsters mother is
expecting another child.
RUBELLA, MORE
COMMONLY KNOWN as
three-day measles or German
measles, is extremely dangerous
to the unborn baby, usually
causing deformities and mental
retardation and too often death
in the way of natural abortion
and stillbirths.
The goal of the Stop Rubella
Campaign is to immunize more
than 18,000 school children ages
one to ten, against the deadly
disease. Only an estimated one
out of four babies whose
mothers have contracted the
disease are born normal,
according to Mary Young,
executive secretary of the North
Central Florida Chapter of the
March of Dimes.
During the epidemic of 1964,
only about 15 per cent of the
pregnant women were
susceptible to rubella, but even
so, approximately 30,000 babies
were bom withbirth defects such
as blindness, deafness, mental
retardation and other
deformities.
ANOTHER 20,000 INFANTS
were born dead or were

DAVID BACHMAN, Deputy
Director for Inmate Treatment
for the State of Florida, will give
the financial and administrative
side to the prison problems.
John H. Ricardo, a former
inmate of Raiford prison, will
speak about a typical day in
prison and the problems he has
had with the parole board.
Ricardo spent six and one half

Horton and George A. Gatchel,
early Sunday.
OFFICER WILLIAM T.
Detterline said he heard a noise
about 2:15 ajn. and looked out
and saw the police car on fire.
The car is one belonging to the
K-9 dog patrol and the officers
take them home when off duty.
The Junta of Militant
Organization (J0M0), a black
militant group, announced this
morning it was offering a
counter reward of S2OO for
information leading to the arrest
and conviction of any members
of the colonial administration
of the occupying army for
actions against the black
colony.
Horton and Gatchel were
attacked by 10 or 12 Negro
men after they stopped a car
being driven recklessly on the,
citys south side.

miscarried. The expectant
mothers who were not
susceptible to the disease had
already contracted the disease
during childhood, in most cases.
PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
FROM the age of one and school
age children up to age ten who
did not receive the rubella
vaccine in school can receive
their immunizations at these
locations this Saturday and
Sunday.
In Gainesville Saturday:
J.M. Fields Plaza Westgate
Manor Mobile Home 10:30
a.m. 5:30 a.m. 6th Street
Winn Dixie Carefree Camper
Mobile Home 11:30 a.m.
5:30 pjn. Gainesville Shopping
Center Carefree Camper
Mobile Home Unit ll a.m.
5:30 p.m. T.B. McPherson
Recreation Center 12 noon
6 p.m. Bartley Temple
Methodist Church 12 noon -6
p.m.
Around Gainesville
Sunday: At the regular Public
Health Clinic l2 noon 4
p.m. in Newberry, High Springs,
Hawthorne, Alachua and at 12
noon 2 p.m. in Archer.
Micanopy Town Hall 4 p.m.
5 p.m. Waldo Mobile Unit
at City Park -12 noon 2 p.m.
Monteocha Community
Center 2:30 3:30 pan.
Copeland Mobile Unit at

years at Raiford for breaking
and entering and will give
reasons why he feels 70 per cent
of people who leave jails come
back, according to Ralph Nobo,
vice general chairman of Accent
*7l. He also narrated the movie,
Yesterdays Man which has
been shown on television.

The FLORIDA QUARTERLY will not
help you pass a physical science prog,
lower the curve of a history midterm,
make you immortal (alas).
The FLORIDA QUARTERLY will not
(at least not very often) cure the
j common cold, supply a well balanced
meal, give you fresher breath.
However ...
| The Florida Quarterly can be a part of you on a quiet
Sunday afternoon, or a gentle companion the
I y black bag of college is all around you, or a friendly
gift for a special friend.
florida quarterly
I A magazine of the arts. Poetry. Stories,
j Photography. Drawings.
I & &T .< njjs
ON SALE HERE: Ro-Mo Camera Mikes Bookstore Union Guest Desk I
I Click Camera Fla. Bookstore Design Shop
I Sub. Circus Hub

STOP RUBELLA

Community Store 4 p.m. 5
p.m. Arredonda Arredonda
Mobile Unit at St. Peters
Church 2:30 3:00 p.m.
Arredonda Trailer Park 3
3:30 p.m.
The sponsors for the Stop

UF PSYCHOLOGIST Dr.
William C. Mottola, will talk
about social isolation and the
psychological problems involved
in being in prisons.
Were having the Day in
Prison to inform students about
the problems and changes
confronting the prison system

Rubella Campaign are the
Alachua County Medical
Society, the Gainesville Junior
Womans Club, the North
Central Chapter of the March of
Dimes and the County Health
Department.

today, Nobo said.
The question and answer
period will be the best time for
students to express their
opinions to administrative
officials in Tallahassee through
Bachman and to show there is
interest among UF students
concerning changes in prisons.



Bad Roomie May Move You

ByCARLCRAWFORD
AMifator Staff Writer
Alright, so your roomie
climbs the walls and screams
Wambasi war cries at three in the
morning and the guys in the hall
are forming a Hitler youth group
and you want to move off
campus because youre getting
funny in the head. Can you
move off campus?
Maybe, just maybe.
JOE BALL, Administrative
Assistant to the Director of
Housing, said a student must
have an extreme problem before
housing releases him from his
four term contract.
Students must have a severe
problem for release, said Ball,
such as a severe financial need
or a severe emotional problem.
We do, however, consider
each student on an individual
basis.
MANY FRESHMEN and
sophomores try to get off
campus, but they dont
understand that the contract
they signed is for a full four
quarters, and they cant move
off campus till their junior
year.
The reason for the four
quarter contract, according to
Ball, is the repayment of bonds
purchased by the public to pay
for the construction of
dormatories.
The residence hall program is
self supporting, said Ball; we
receive no state funds for the
construction.
OUR GOAL IS to provide
good student housing and service
at a reasonable rate and get the
people their money back.

UK-UF Film At Rat Toai|lrt
Movies of the UF-Kentucky football game will be shown at 9:15
p.m. tonight at the Rathskeller. Admission is free and beer will be
served for those over 21.
JJ r&spgal: % KT
Christmas Bazaar |
Jfi Unique gifts from around the world, as well as ?S
m handicrafts from artists of Gainesville and the
$ University. n.l jg
n Union Ballroom Q
11 am to 9 pm 5
Hi sponsored by the J. Wayne Reitz Union n
' Advertise
its good business
* . -tu
. % .... n v , t. ;,

For these reasons, Ball
explained, housing uses tight
fiscal measures, one of them
being the four quarter contract.
We must handle each
problem individually, though,
Ball said, because we balance
fiscal and humanitarian
measures.
THERE ARE TWO steps a
student should follow if he feels
he needs a housing release. The
first step is to talk to the dorm
Resident Administrator.
The administrator might
have a quick and ready solution
such as a room transfer, or he
would talk to the roommates,
Ball said.
If the problem isnt solved on
this level, the student should
then go to the housing offices, at
the base of Towers.
WELL FIRST FIND out the
facts, Ball said.
There is no cut and dry step
at this point. If the student
claims severe financial need,
well investigate this. If its an
emotional problem, well refer
the student to the mental health
service, and act on their
recommendations.
Ball stated that the mental
health service had carried their
burden and had done a
tremendous job in this respect.
THERE IS NO paper work
involved in breaking a contract,
but housing requires a letter
from the student stating his case
for the record.
Some of the most frequent
requests for breaking a contract
come from people wanting to
move into their fraternity or
sorority house when a space is
made available.

One of the strangest problems
that Ball can remember is a
student who had a zoo.
PETS CANT BE allowed in
the halls, and one student had a
whole menagerie of pets he
wanted to maintain, but we
couldnt let him out of the
contract.
When and if a student breaks
a housing contract, any money
returned depends on the
individual case. Sometimes the
student has to pay for the entire
year.
Students who insist on their
right to live off campus have to
pay the full contract for a year
to move off, Ball said.
THE STUDENTS parents are
notified if housing investigates a
financial problem. When an
emotional problem exists, it is
left to the students discretion
whether or not his parents are
notified.
The peak time for request to
break contracts, Ball said,
came about the time I sent a
letter out reminding students
their fall quarter rent was due.
Release requests from now
on to the end of the year is an

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unusual exception and we will
only release those severe cases.
So far this year, Ball reported,
'there have been six releases.
Most problems have been
handled by other means.

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offer good only this
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Thursday, November 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

SPK?

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Novambar 19,1970

Page 4

SUICIDE AUTHORITY EXPLAINS
'There Is A Quality Os Existence

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
A noted authority in the area
of suicidology said Tuesday the
reason suicide prevention centers
are in operation today is because
people are concerned with the
quality of life and not just with
the continuance of it.
There is something better
than existence, said Dr. Jerome
A. Motto, associate professor of
psychiatry at the University of
California. There is a quality of
existence.
MOTTO, SPEAKING at the
first annual meeting of the
Gainesville Suicide and Crisis
Intervention Service, Inc.
(SCIS), said a suicide center is
much like a human being.
Like a person, a suicide
center has a life of its own, he
told the audience of ISO SCIS
members. When the center is
fiist bom it has to be nurtured
in order to survive.
Like a person, the center has
a goal in mind to make some
type of contribution to a society
it grows up in, he said.
THE SUICIDE center,
established in December 1969, is
operated by a majority of
volunteers under a small
administrating staff. About 50

UF Student Lawyers Rap
To Uninformed Poor

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Law in this country is supposed to be the
equivalent of justice but justice in the United
States is often applied, to the poor people
especially, in a discriminatory manner.
There are a lot of things that poor people dont
know and would like to know about die law,
Lance Stezzer, a UF freshman in law said.
RAP WITH THE LAWYERS is a program
sponsored by the Law Students Civil Rights
Research Council (LSCRRC) and the Black Student
Union (BSU). Tonight at 8:30 in the Mt. Carmel
Baptist Church, located at 429 N. W. 4th Street, will
hopefully be the first in a long series of Rap with
the Lawyers sessions.
The program essentially will be for everyone.
Admission is free and the idea behind it is to help
people understand their rights, according to Stezzer.

j Orange & Blue I
I Basketball Game j
j Friday night, Nov-20, 1970 j
I Florida Gym I
Florida Students $.75 j
Other Students SI.OO j
General Public $1.50 j
Proceeds Go To Student Loans j

m
DR. JEROME MOTTO
... 'center has contribution'
per cent of the volunteers are
UF students.
Motto said a situation where a
person is hurting very badly
and may be near suicide can
only be solved by an individual.
Only the individual can
respond to such a situation and
handle it in some meaningful
way, he explained.

It tells what to do if a policeman came to your
door, what rights you have, and bail-bonding
procedures. It will also clear up the difficulty in
buying insurance. Most poor people either buy too
much or the wrong kind.
TOWARDS THE END of the program, we will
invite questions from the audience in an effort to
get feedback and in an attempt to find out which
pressing legal issues the people in the Gainesville
community would like to hear discussed in the
future, Stezzer said.
The program is based on the ideas and work of
Hazel Land, a UF law student, Stezzer, and Mr.
Robert J. Guttman, a constitutional law professor
and faculty advisor of the LSCRRC.
Before the question and answer period at the end,
there will be speakers from the UF College of Law.
Fletcher Baldwin; a UF constitutional law
professor, Peter Ward; a visiting remedies professor
at UF; Guttman and others will speak about
understanding the law and peoples rights.

Motto added the volunteer is
often able to respond better to
such a situation than, say, a
clinical psychiatrist. He said
this was because the volunteer
specializes in only one area of
suicide prevention while the
clinical psychiatrist must know
all areas.
GENERALLY, volunteers at
the SCIS center answer the
crisis or hot lines phones
staffed 24 hours a day to aid
people in a crisis.
In this sense, the volunteer is
really the professional, Motto
said.
SCIS officers for 1970-71
were elected during a brief
business meeting which followed
a banquet meal in the ballroom
of the Reitz Union. Motto spoke
after the meeting.
A SLATE OF officers,
presented to the membership by
a nominating committee, was
elected by acclamation when
nobody chose to oppose the
proposed ballot.
Elected were: Raymond D.
Zopp, president; Anne S. Ross,
vice-president; Marie W.
Swinford, secretary; and James
T. Hennessey, treasurer.
Hennessey is assistant to the UF
vice-president of student affairs.
Zopp praised the volunteer in

his acceptance speech.
I FEEL THAT it is
particularly appropriate that the
voice that answers the crisis
phone is that of a volunteer
functioning as a trained clinical
associate, he said.
I find this people
voluntarily helping people in a
crisis to be a particularly
meaningful type of service.
The Sybil Mackey Volunteer
of the Year Award, given to the
clinical associate who has made
the most outstanding

ORIENTAL TEA-HOUSE ATMOSPHERE
OPEN 5-9 PM DAILY
Step through the beaded curtain. Inhale the aromas of joy.
Mandarin egg rolls cooking gently. Bamboo House shrimp simmering
in the pot. Would we tempt the palate if we could not satisfy the
appetite? Indulge yourself. At Lisas House of Bamboo.
- '
For our Western friends in a hurry
Phone ahead for take outs I
2409 SW 13th St. 372-6801 FREE PARKING I
IS. NEW /
AND CATERS ESPECIALLY TO //
STUDENT APPETITES AND BUDGETS. TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF THIS INTRODUCTORY
COFFEE or COKE and DOUGHNUT
rsssi
1 FREE £
\ COFFEE or COKE and DOUGHNUT 5
SyJjWII^EPERPER^N--EXPIRES NOV. 26. 70
#########>
p
WERE OPEN 24 HOURS
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
FORMERLY MARION'S COFFEE HOUSE

contributions during the year,
was presented to Mrs. Joe
Brasington.
Mrs. Mackey was the first
volunteer to actively participate
in a lifesaving rescue, validating
that critical situations can be
effectively handled by the
center.
Outgoing SCIS officers are;
Leveda Brown, president;
Edward L. Jennings,
vice-president; Joyce B. Rowe,
secretary ; and Jack S. Gamble,
treasurer.



Askew Readies Staff For New Term

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
small sign over the door says
Senator Askew. President pro
tempore.
But inside, in a suite of four
offices off of a reception room,
Gov.-elect Reubin Askew is
working to shape his
administration so it can start
rolling right after he is sworn in
Jan. 5.
THE MAKE-SHIFT offices
were provided by General
Services, and permanently are
used when the legislature is in
session by Sens. Ken Myers of
Miami and Dan Scarborough of
Jacksonville.
The misleading sign was
brought over from Askews old
Senate office where, before the
election made him governor, he
was second in command of the
state senate.
We needed a sign, said Mrs.
Margaret Ireland, who is helping
out temporarily in the Askew
offices.
SHE IS THE wife of Kenneth
Ireland, long-time chief of the
Senate appropriations
committee, who reportedly will
be offered a job with the Askew
administration.
As chairman of the
Appropriations committee in the
past, Askew became close to
Ireland and relied heavily on him
in financial matters. He
reportedly is being considered
for secretary of administration
or some other top job relating to
budgets and finances.
Askews former Senate aide,
George Sheldon, is still with him
and presumably will be on his
staff after the inauguration.
ALSO EXPECTED to be his
secretary is his Senate secretary
Mrs. Cappy LAmoreaux, wife of
Ray LAmoreaux, head of the
division of transportation. She
has been with Askew for years.
Most consistent rumor, and
aides said it is still strictly
rumor, is that Askew will ask
Nathaniel Reed to stay on as
head of the State Pollution
Control Department, one of
only a hand full of appointees of
ROTC Plans
Sunland Visit
Although activites of ROTC
at Sunland Training Center for
the Retarded have ended for this
quarter, they will begin again
during the winter quarter, a
spokesman for ROTC has
announced.
These activities included
organizing and supervising games
for the patients at Sunland by
senior cadets of the ROTC unit.
***+**+***
; FRATERNAL
: FAMISH
* k While studying for
* f those exams* frats and
* sororities must "nash"
* Knockworst
* Brownies Cheese
* cake
* BENCH and BAR l
CALL 376-3302
* FREE DELIVERY

MAKESHIFT OFFICES MAKE DO

outgoing Gov. Claude Kirk
under consideration.
Reed confirmed that he has
an appointment to meet with
Askew.
THE GOVERNOR-ELECT
met with his campaign finance



i
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The lampyridae beetle family.
Delight of small boys. Biological
light bulb. And prime source of
raw material for another Du Pont
innovation.
Luciferase, an enzymatic protein
with intriguing properties, obtain obtainable
able obtainable only from fireflies. Lucifer in,
an organic molecule also found in
fireflies, but synthesizable. Adeno Adenosine
sine Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a common
energy-yielding substance found in
all living cells.
Those are the three main ingre ingredients
dients ingredients in lampyridaes love light.
And because ATP is common to all
living cells, university researchers
discovered they could produce an

chairman today to work on the
campaign accounts that it can be
closed out and a final report
made to the secretary of state.
Asked if Askew might find
himself with the kind of deficit
which has plagued some previous

0 |
Du Pont Company
Room 7890, Wilmington, DE 19898
Id like your latest information on opportunities at
Du Pont for graduates with degrees in
Name ___
University
Degree Graduation Date i
Address_ [
City_ State Zip
An Equal Opportunity Employer (M/F)
I

artificial glow by mixing luciferin
and luciferase wherever life is
present.
Noting that phenomenon, Du Pont
scientists and engineers went on
to develop it into a practical ana analytical
lytical analytical system. Correlating the in intensity
tensity intensity of the artificial glow" with
the amount of ATP present in
bacteria, they designed a means of
measuring the reaction.
The result is the luminescence
biometerthe first really basic im improvement
provement improvement in bacteria-counting
methods since the time of Louis
Pasteur. Rather than waiting days
for a culture to demonstrate growth
density, a doctor or technician can

governors, Sholdon said we are
solvent. We were solvent after
the first primary. We were
solvent after the second primary.
One thing senator Askew
insisted upon was that we be
solvent.

Thurfcby, Nowarnbar 19,1970,Tha Florida AdigtfOff,

now get a digital readout of bacteria
concentration in a matterof minutes.
Other potentially lifesaving uses
for the biometer are being sug suggested
gested suggested every daysuch as diagnos diagnosing
ing diagnosing metabolic rates, enzyme de deficiencies
ficiencies deficiencies and nerve damage.
Innovationapplying the known
to discover the unknown, inventing
new materials and putting them to
work, using research and engineer engineering
ing engineering to create the ideas and products
of the futurethis is the venture
Du Pont people are engaged in.
You can become onb of them,
and advance professionally in your
chosen field. See your Du Pont'
Recruiter. Or send us the coupon.

can)
Ventures for better living.

Up to the last week of the
primary when the last
pre-election report was required,
Askew had spent $271,369 and
collected $336,306, leaving a
comfortable $64,937 balance for
paying outstanding bills.

Page 5



>, He Hwl* ABpter, Thursday, Woaambar 19,1970

Page 6

He Seeks Prison Reform . With Pictures

(EDITORS NOTE : John H.
Ricardo iR fee speaking today
at Maa la Accent's Day in
DW paapaai on the Flaza of
By ANNE Bw FREEDMAN
Whfle John Ricardo was in
priMO he learned photography
and much, modi more.
AS ANIMATE, he used his
camera training'' to shoot a
documentary on prison life
called Yerteidays Man." Prison
authoritiea mistakenly believed
he had tbe blessings of a stte
official for Iris project a
compilation of still photographs,
a sound track, music and a
script.
But Ricardo really didn't have
anyone's okay for what he was
doing except moral and
equipment support from the
Miami television station who
ultimately showed the film.
A free man since September,
Ricardo has embarked on a
one-man campaign to seek

JOHN H. RICARDO
... speaks at Plaza at 12 noon

I We've bagged the handmade I
l I nj. f Keep in step with the times I
I with Suede Fringe by I
l Univeitity Plata 1620 W i t Univtrsily Av I

reforms for she Florida prison
system. He is seeking a grant to
enable him to show his film to
schools and organizations
throughout the state.
CURRENTLY HE IS a
student at Santa Fe Junior
College. He has shown his film in
UF education classes.
The system is rotten, he
says without a trace of bitterness
in his deep, raspy voice.
The authorities think I'm
just a smart con trying to get
even, he said. But*that's not
true.
A SMALL but well-built man,
Ricardo walks with long, free
strides and smiles often and
quickly. Nothing in his casual
appearance especially his full
beard and mustache indicates
his age 35 years or his
recent stint at Raiford.
Except, perhaps, the prison
jargon he slips into when he
describes his experiences at
Raiford and his suggestions
for reform.

Once the judge cuts you
loose (you are released), he
says,youre not ready to do
anything.
They take away your
individuality, and regiment
you.
RICARDO CALLED
prisoners zombies because
you don't think for yourself.
Ricardo was luckier than most
prisoners because his work
assignment in the print room
really did teach him something
useful, he says. He learned to
take pictures and technical
printing techniques for the
annual prison report and for the
inmate's newspaper, The
Raiford Record.
My boss was better than the
average, he admits. Mr.
(Charles) Weimer let me do more
than most bosses would have.
MOST OF THE on-the-job
training is token, Ricardo said
and wholly inadequate.
Most of the men make
license plates, he pointed out.
What's that going to do for you
when you get out?
He advocates a Big Brother
relationship with industry. The
inmates could learn the skills
and produce the things they
(industry) need.
IF THE INMATES were paid
for their work, Ricardo says,
part of the costs of prison
upkeep could be alleviated.
Ricardo criticizes the lack of
provision in the prison system
for halfway houses to make
the transitions to outside life
smoother.
You havent been able to
choose simple things like what
to eat or what to wear for
years, he said. And all of a
sudden youre supposed to
know what to do.
ABOUT THE ONLY things all
inmates have freedom in

choosing are memories, dreams,
and hopes for the future.
You are yesterdays man,
he says quietly.
You dont grow in prison
and you remember your friends
in terms of how they were when
you left, he said.
RICARDO SAYS THERE are
millions of things you can do
to help the prisons that dont
cost too much money.
He dted tension outlets in the
forms of dramatical groups,
music, more practical, useful
products coming from work

STUDENT WIND ENSEMBLES
v j
presented by the Department I
of Music and the J. Wayne
Union Thursday,
November 19 at 8:15 p.m. in P'wr*
the Union Ballroom m
ffiSSBI'
S Evening Star I
A shoe as special as the |
evening itself. This I
well-trimmed fabric pump I
will make him yours if 1
f SHOE SALON I

groups, and more educational
opportunities.
Ten per cent of the inmates
get a high school education
but what the hell does that do
for anybody?
HE BLASTS THE
mismanagement of funds
allocated for the prisons.
The dogs and horses are kept
in stables roomier and cleaner
than the cells are.
Ricardo says he doesnt daim
to have the answers.
There is no one answer,
Ricardo said seriously. Im just
trying to get people to help that
can do something.



V
Washington
Comes To UF

Religion Dept. Plans
More Indian Studies

Gene R. Thursby was
appointed assistant professor of
the Department of Religion
recently in a plan to expand
and emphasize the Indian aspect
of Asian religion and culture,
according to Religion Dept.
Chairman, Dr. D. L. Scudder.
Thursby has extensive training
in the study of the Far East.
After receiving his B. A. and B.
D. degrees from Oberlin, he
undertook doctoral study in the
Program for Comparative
Studies on Southern Asia at
Duke University. He studied
further at the Universities of
Chicago and Delhi.
THURSBY ALSO spent the
past two years in India on a
Fulbright-Hays Center grant for
research on Hindu-Muslim
relations, where he acquired a
linguistic background as well.
We are delighted to
strengthen work which we have
been doing for some years in the
study of Indian religions and to
have a role in fostering study of
India in the University,
Scudder said.
Thursby will teach the course
Traditional India (RN/HY 485)
during the winter quarter and
Contemporary India (RN/HY
486) in the spring. He joins Dr.
Austin B. Creel in teaching one
of the most popular courses on
Indian traditions, Hinduism and
Islam (RN 321) which is offered
each quarter.
Once every 17 seconds an
American home or business is
burglarized, according to the
Street and Highway Safety
Lighting Bureau. More than 81.9
per cent of the burglaries occur
at night, yet less than 2 per cent
of the nations residential streets
and fewer than 15 per cent of all
downtown streets are adequately
lighted, the bureau reports.

)ELECTRONIC MUSIC j
I Concert with commentary by Reid %
J Poole, Chairman Department of (
\ Music. Thursday, November 19,4-5 1
# p.m. in the Reitz Union Music f
1 Listening Room. Admission is free; I
f but due to limited seating, please I
1 obtain a ticket from the librarian in f
\ the Music Listening Room 1
f Sponsored by J. Wayno*lt*Unlon^^^^V^"|""*^j^^J

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
A little bit of Washington D.C. is
coming to the UF campus Dec. 14.
Florida State Museum will be open
temporarily during the next few months
to display exhibits circulated by the
Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Service.
FIRST IN A series of several exhibits is
Malay Archipelago, scheduled from
Dec. 14 to Jan. 10. The exhibit
commemorates the 100th anniversary of
the publication of British naturalist
Alfred Russel Wallaces 1869 travel and
natural history work on Malay
Archipelago.
The exhibit- is prepared by the
Smithsonians Office of Exhibits in
collaboration with the Smithsonian
Institution Library.

SBafc mk
GENE THURSBY
... religion assistant professor
A new course, Philosophies of
India, is pending for 1971-72.
Additional study on Indian
thought and culture is available
through the course Special
Studies in World Religions (RN
501) which is currently taught
by Dr. Creel as a seminar on
Mahatma Gandhi.
Os the new emphasis on India,
Thursby said, It is our hope
that other departments will add
specialists who are prepared to
offer courses dealing with India
so that our work in the religious
traditions will become part of a
wider program of studies.
**
: SEXY I
*
* delivery boys who care
* about the soup, the
soda special. We send
4 HE-MEN to your door.
* BENCH and BAR
t CALL 376-3302
* FREE DELIVERY

During an eight year excursion, Wallace
conceived the theory of evolution by
natural selection. He corresponded with
Charles Darwin who was working
privately on an identical theory.
WALLACE AND Darwin combined
their efforts to produce the paper in 1858
which presented the first modern theory
of evolution to the world.
Augmenting the exhibit will be
selections from the University Libraries,
co-sponsors of the exposition.
An exhibit entitled the Historic
Architecture and Urban Design of
Nantucket will be on display from Jan.
13 to Feb. 7. Nantucket, discovered by
English seamen early in the 17th century,
is a small island about 25 miles south of
Cape Cod, Mass.
A JOINT EFFORT by the Nantucket

I YOU Can be I
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Thursday, November 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Historical Trust and the Historic
American Buildings Survey, the exhibit
reflects how the architecture of medieval
England influenced the building of
Nantucket homes, churches and other
structures.
Another display, the Captain Albert
Wood collection of 18th and 19th
century carpenter and shipbuilding tools,
will be added to the Nantucket exhibit.
The Wood collection is property of the
UF Department of Architecture.
The museum will only be open for the
various traveling exhibits and will be
closed during the interim periods between
expositions.
Museum personnel are currently
arranging permanent displays in
preparation for its official opening late in
1971.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 19,1970

Page 8

EDITORIAL
Candlepeople:
Light Os Hope
The attitude of the Candlepeople implementing change
for the betterment of all is refreshing and unlike that of
most people seeking reform. They are not haters and this
is refreshing in itself.
The Candlepeople are actually seven people who make
and sell, not surprisingly, candles. Profits the little there is
are used to finance Food Feasts, like the one today at
14th St. and W. University which begins at 5 p.m.
The Candlepeople focus on the community. They stress
the positive. They believe in hope.
In order to resolve the national crises, they believe, the
community crises must first be resolved. To do this, the
Candlepeople attempt to make the most of the strengths of
the people in the Gainesville community, rather than curse
and protest the weaknesses.
It is the attempt of the Candlepeople, we believe, to bring
all people of the community together, to pool their
strengths and apply them to make life happier right here in
Gainesville. They attempt to make life a little better by
instituting free breakfast and lunch programs in the
ghettoes.
They finance these programs through their food feasts.
The feasts are free but donations are appreciated.
The Candlepeople invite the entire community to their
Thanksgiving Festival which begins today, in the hopes
that each person will bring ideas and energy to share with
every other person.
We urge UF students and the Gainesville community to
support this noble effort.
$1 Equals $9
The UF basketball team will make its first public
appearance Friday night at the Florida gymnasium in an
intra-squad scrimage. Admission is $ 1.
We urge UF students, faculty, and community to attend
this game. And you do not have to be a basketball freak
either.
The profits from the game will go to the Gator Loan
Fund. Each dollar will be matched by nine dollars from the
federal government through the National Defense Student
Loan Fund.
According to basketball coach Tommy Bartlett, even
squad members and coaches will pay admission. He is
hoping that at least 7,000 people attend, which would
generate $70,000 in loan funds for any needing students.
We hope Bartlett is right.
Tom seem detached tonight, my dear

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

DONT LET IT BOTHER YOU
... its just another bomb scare.
In Spite Os Frustrations

Pursuit of a more or less
routine newspaper feature story
had me crossing paths with Dr.
Leonardo Ricci of architecture
fame, and suddenly there was
nothing routine about it any
more.
Ricci's brilliance cannot be
masked by his apparent struggle
with the English language. He
struggles to find the right words,
but even when he picks up the
wrong ones his ideas come
through clearly.
The man has approached his
didpline, architecture or more
correctly urban design, and has
applied it toward humanity
BY DESIGNING and seeking
to build cities, utilizing inert
concrete and steel, he seeks to
realize all the potential of his
race. He dreams of cities that
will free men, allowing them to
change and grow in all
dimensions in a natural manner.
My questions concerned
model city projects which were
planned, and unfortunately
aborted, in three Florida cities,
Tallahassee, Tampa and Miami.
Certainly his very explicit
answers dealt with those three,
but in addition they applied to
all places man chooses to dwell
in.
HIS IMPACT on people like

Alligator Staff

Denise Valiants
Assignment Editor

Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Boerd of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suita
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

KEN
DRIGGS

myself, ignorant to his field and
able to comprehend only
glimpses of the total picture, is
great.
But more importantly, his
impact on his students is simply
beyond measure. The handful
that I talked to today are
completely dedicated to the
man, and because of him,
completely dedicated to
architecture as a means of easing
society's ills today.
Ricci speaks of a social
revolution, a complete upheaval
in culture which is still mindfull
of its past. His thoughts are
nothing short of brilliant.
SO THE immediate question
to me is what is a man of those
awesome capabilities doing at
the University of Florida?
Ricci is internationally known
and recognized for his work. A
native Italian, he came to the
United States because he felt
this was the one nation with the
economic and technological
ability to initiate this cultural

Craig Hyl
Editorial Assistant

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
\
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609

revolution. He has taught in the
nations leading universities, yet
chose to stay here. Why?
His students tell me he was
promised an Urban Studies
Institute here. A place from
which to prepare for city
renewal. Not just a place to
work with theoretical models,
but one where American cities
could seek real answers to real
problems.
APPARENTLY THAT offer,
suggested by no other university,
was granted verbally.
Unfortunately it has never been
realized and UF is in danger of
loosing a professor who brings
much more than simple prestige
to Gainesville.
One of Riccis graduate student
aids told me Its a crime what
they have done to that man; or
rather it's a crime what they
haven't done with him..."
Ricci spoke to me of the
discouragement of the aborted
Florida model city projects. He
admitted he found himself
Much more frustrated than
furious at the setbacks.
He could not help feeling
thankful, and somehow a bit
ashamed, that Dr. Ricci had
elected to remain at the
university in spite of the
frustrations.



ISRAEL . . Land Os Polarities

By ROBERT J. SCHOLES
Alligator Guwt Columnist
(EDITOR*S NOTE: An associate Professor of
Speech and linguistics at UF, Robert J. Scholes is now
a visiting professor at the University of Tel Aviv in
Israel. Scholes relates his feelings about Israel's people,
places and history.)
Israel is a country which must, really must, be
described in terms of opposites.
Despite a natural reluctance to conform to touristy
titles Kke The Two Israels, there is really no choice.
THE POLARITIES of the place hit you with the
force of the desert sun. For any aspect you choose,
there are the schisms blatant and meaningful: the
young and the old, the sacred and protane, the
primitive and the ultra-sophisticated, the colorful
vitality of the city and the lunar dessolation of the
countryside, and the serenity of this country totally
and constantly on the brink of anihilation.
The military preparations of a country involved in
the ultimate war are everywhere obvious.
Strollers in the main streets of any city include
many young men in uniform, their semi-automatic
weapons slung casually over their shoulders, the
30-caliber steel jacketed sheels that can rip the middle
out of a man or horse are taped to the rifle stock.
ROADS ARE patrolled by half-tracks, smiling
Israelis per died on top of blunt, gray-green tubes.
There are frequent roadblocks. Everywhere packages
and purses are searched for terrorist bombs. And yet
there is none of the propaganda (Remember Pearl
Harbor, Better Dead than Red), none of the vocal
hatred of the enemy (dirty Japs), and none of the
ostentatious patriotisms that 1, at least, have come to
associate with a country at war.
I search for an analogy which might make the
situation dear to Americans, but cannot find one; but
let us suppose that the blacks of the world had
formally declared that they would not rest until White
America had been obliterated, the people killed, the
dties leveled, and the ashes thrown to the winds.
AND TO help them in this noble effort, some
powerful ally had lent weapons and military skill, and
then in the midst of all this New Yorkers took
their families and friends on shopping tours in Harlem.
Incredible?
Yes, I know.
On a hill in Haifa or Jerusalem or Tel Aviv you can
lode upon a scene so verdant and alive it takes a
moment to remember where you are.
THE PARKS are lush, the broad streets shaded, the
avenues and squares full of people on their way to do
something else.

Picking Leaves
MR. EDITOR:
Has it come to the point
where if one walks down the
street, one is liable to be
arrested?
I was stopped Sunday night
by a University policeman in
front of the stadium (opposite
Yon Hall), where I was almost
taken in for PICKING LEAVES.
There are about four
eucalyptus trees in this
particular area, where I was
gathering leaves for purposes of
I preparation of drinking tea.
I was told that I was reported
by someone in the building and
that he (the policeman) was to
check out if I had discovered
some new breed of drug.
I had to explain to him for
approximately ten minutes my
purposes for having the tea
leaves. Afterwards, I was finally
dismissed.

It appears my paranoia has
increased even greater than what
it was in the past.
When it comes down to a
situation such as this, I become
afraid that maybe its too late to
live here without fears from the
authorities.
What can one do?
Picking leaves, man!
MICHAEL HARGRAVES, 1 UC
Changing Needs
MR. EDITOR:
One of my undergraduate
journalism professors, the
incomparable Buddy Davis, once
told me in JM-508, that not all
editorial comment on public
officials should be critical. It
takes a favorable comment of a
commendable action once in a
while, or those officials will turn
you off aaa crackpot.
Crack pot though 1 may be, a
comment is sfll in order for Vice

And then, a mile or two north or south, the utter
emptiness.
The Dead Sea, still and foul, salt dust blowing in the
desert wind. The vast expanse of rode and sand. A
lonely figure in flowing blade rides upon his camel a
million miles away; a creature from another age and
space.
THROUGHOUT Israel there are institutes of higher
learning that accept no second place.
The sdence, technology, and scholarship here are
first-rate and expanding. They are not isolated,
ivory-towered social curiosities as they are in the
States.
Here the discoveries of sdence are at once motivated
by, and applied to the desperate needs of the country.
Such needs as developing a sound industrial base, an
abundant agriculture, and a viable place in the world's
economic power structure.
THE ARTISTS, writers, musicians, the sodal
sdentists are respected by the most pedestrian of
shopkeepers and laborers.
It is a Jewish credo that learning is priceless and
irretrevable, and that credo is rapidly making Israel
what so many of us wanted, but did not gain in the
United States.
And yet, between these centers of intellect, the Arab
farmer lives his life in ignorance and fear among the
children bom in abundance to dirt, disease, and
primitive acceptance of a thousand years of fate.
IF ISRAEL is the repository of the history and
meaning of Western religion, it is also one of the most
flagrant abusers of ritual. While the hassidim dance in
joy in celebration of the reading of the last verse of
Torah, the young are pressing body to body in the
cavernous shadows of discoteques like Tyffany's at the
Dan.
Behind the solemn crosses and menora, the boys and
girls of Israel learn the pain and heat of love while their
elders count the day's receipts.
Every city seems to have two parts: the old and the
new. There is old Jerusalem behind the walls; its
mosques and churches, its crowds of sights and sounds
and smells.
THE DEVOUT of many faiths dressed in clean and
tailored best, families and prayer-books in hand,
making pilgrimage to holy places the Mosque of
Omar, where Muhammed rose to Heaven; the church of
the Sepulcher, where Jesus lay; the western wall of the
Second Temple.
And tourists, in yellow and greens, money and
cameras bulging from pockets and purses the
husbands tired and wishing they were watching a
football game on TV, their children screaming above
the talk of buy and sell, and their women, animated,
eyes sparkling with the thrill of getting things so cheap.

READERS FORUM

President Lester Hale and Dean
of Student Development, Frank
Adams.
On Oct. 30,1 wrote a column
about two fraternities, the Betas
and Pi Kaps, who had elected
not to have housemothers this
year. At that time university
administrators had put the heat
on them about it.
But Dean Adams and Vice
President Hale took the time to
consider the arguments of those
fraternities and IFC President
Charlie Brackins. Consequently
an old policy was changed in
favor of a set up where fraternal
alumni approval would allow
fraternities to do with a graduate
assistant or faculty member.
Students have strangely short
memories and occasionally need
such a reminder that the
system still responds to
changing needs.
Vice President Hale and Dean
Adams have reminded some
people of that; and they have

The sellers, the dark and clever Arabs, Armenians,
and Jews, their eyes sparkling with the thrii of
thievery.
AND, just outside this gross cacophany of each old
city" of Jerusalem or Tel Aviv or Haifa, the quiet
elegance of now.
The Hiltons and the shops with Londons latest and
Tokyos best.
No pushing and bargaining here.
At a hundred bucks a day, one need not haggle.
Here the past is gone and the affluence of now
makes it indestinguishable from any other center of
our contemporary world.
AS STRIKING as these polar aspects are, they are
not, at least for me, the real meaning of Israel.
There is something else that is felt more heavily,
something that gets beyond the senses and is,
somehow, perceived without the need of being heard
or seen: a oneness with the past.
I have seen the ages of America; I have walked the
cold stone steps of the Castle of San Marcos, stood
upon the Plymouth Rock, stared at Independence Hall
and Boston Common, and driven the route of the
Conestoga.
BUT THESE were things one sees and photographs,
perhaps. They are static, uninhabited, and dead.
No one really needs them now, they have served
their purpose and are gone.
Not so the past of Israel.
Here Solomon and Abraham, Jesus Christ and the
Prophet Muhammed lived and worked and felt, just as I
feel, the beauty of this land.
THE STREETS and wells and foods that served
them in their lives serve me; the desert winds they felt
drive me to shade and rest; the sights that met their
eyes in travelling from capital to province meet my
eyes.
The fears they had of robbery by black-robed
beduins, of being stranded in the noonday sun, of
finding no fresh water where it once had been, of the
wrath of a god unkind to youthful anarchies these
are my fears too.
Their hope, their faith that people can be better;
that cruelty need not reign; that love, if given half a
chance, could overcome the obstacles of tongue and
race and temperment this is my hope too.
The hihistory of Israel is not just past; it is the
present and the future of us all.
Here you know know ultimately and in clarity
that, although the mode of travel may have changed
from horse to supersonic jet, the habitation from a tent
to multileveled homes, and recreation from a camel
race to film, that living does not change. The crests and
depths of life are everywhere and every time the same.

sought to make university policy
flexible to changing times.
KEN DRIGGS, 7JM
Future Os Man
MR. EDITOR:
After reading Alligators,
article The Price of Shame/* I
agreed very much with Mr.
Miller except for one point.
In the last paragraph he said,
We just might shoot back/*
That is just what they want.
They want the students to be
like the trigger happy people
who shoot to kill. In War, we
and they dont know who were
shooting, but remember,
theyre the Enemy, and we
must kill.
Why have students become
Enemies?
When Politicians such as Mr.
Agnew and_Mr. Nixon
(PRESIDENT) cafi Students

Thuradky, Novombor 19,1970, Tho Florida AMpaor,

names, condemn them for belief
and ideas, and degrade them,
these men are showing ignorance
and prejudice which they cannot
afford, yet this Ignorance and
Prejudice cannot and shall not
be ignored.**
Students make up 1/3 of the
population in the United States,
and someday they will be voters.
Students also represent the
Future of Man.
Mr. Agnew and Mr. Nixon and
all other Politicians may not
realize it, but a University is the
stepping stone to Future Man
and His Establishment.
It is a place of Education,
which is learning, expressing
belief and ideas. Politicians
should not fight or abuse
students but work side by side
to help and understand our
United States.
We cannot let ourselves fall
into another Civil War among
each other.
TERRI S. WEISS
Wife of Law Student

Page 9



Page 10

Tf* Florida T nursdiy, Novombar W, 1970

USSR Moonwalker
Transmitting Photos
MOSCOW Lunokhod 1,
Russias robot moonwalker,
prowled the Sea of Rains for soil
samples Wednedsay and sent
home television pictures of its
own trail through the lunar dust,
the Soviets said.
Space commentators, exulting
over the latest milestone of the
Soviet re-entry into the moon
race, said this eight-wheeled
silver teakettle was the
forerunner of fancy
spacemobiles that would
criss-cross the planets with
tracks like those.
Shortly after Luna 17
touched down, Lunokhod
buzzed to life and rolled down a
gangway out onto the surface of
the moon, where the Soviets said
it would gather soil samples,
analyze them with its own
equipment and plant scientific
devices in the lunar soil.
Government Will Ask
More Defense Funds
NEW YORK Defense
Secretary Melvin R. Laird has
confirmed speculation the
government will ask for an
increased defense budget next
year. But he did not say how
much it would be incieased.
I see strong and convincing
evidence for possible defense
budget increases in order to
meet urgent requirements, many
of them too long deferred,
Laird said in a speech at the
Economic Club of New York
Tuesday night.
Laird said the increases would
be caused by inevitable upward
pressures such as increased
civilian and military pay. But he
also said another pressure is for
improved deterrent weapons,
particularly in the Navy, to
combat advances made recently
by the Soviet Union.
5 Americans Killed
By VC Booby Trap
SAIGON A Viet Cong
booby trap killed five Americans
in South Vietnam Wednesday,
raising to 30 the number of U.S.
troops slain by such devices in
the past 11 days, military
spokesmen said.
The 30 deaths by booby traps
and mines account for more
than half the 55 American
combat fatalities during the
11-day period, they said.
Communist ground offensives
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
M THE AIR
378-2646

am JF
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dropped to their lowest point in
nine months. The spokesmen for
the U.S. military command said
Communists launched only four
shelling attacks during the
24-hour period ended at 8 a.m.
Wednesday, the fewest since last
Feb. 6 when there were two.
Pakistan Aid Slowed
By Flooded Roads
DACCA, East Pakistan
Tons of relief supplies arrived
here Wednesday but only a
trickle reached hungry and
homeless survivors of the
cyclone-tidal wave disaster that
took a huge toll along the abay
of Bengal.
The stricken area was largely
inaccessible by road and airdrops
were impossible.
Some locally published
reports said the storm last
Thursday night may have killed
650,000 persons. One account
said 100,000 migrant farm
workers may have been swept
from a group of 200 small
islands which simply disappeared
under a wall of water 20 feet
high.
Dr. Mustafa Haque, deputy
director of government health
services, said water pollution
from decomposing bodies
remained a serious disease
problem but he added there was
no cholera epidemic as reported
by some newspapers.
Quota Bill Blocked
In House Move
WASHINGTON House free
traders dealt a crucial and
possibly fatal blow to the
controversial trade bill

November 15th. to 21st. |
MORE BOOKS IN THE HOME I
SEC OUR DISMAY Or SCORES OF THE I
FIMEST CHIUREITS 100 KS IN PRINT! I
About Him time of year a chllds heart bests just $
a little foster with the mysteries of Christmas
growing near. A child thrives on imagination and
dreams. What better way to nourish this appetite
than through a good childrens book? f
available in Medical Center store)
Eh campus shopand I

UPI: Around The World

Wednesday by refusing to let the
House consider it under a
no-amendment rule.
On a procedural showdown,
the House voted 204-189 to
block consideration of the
textile and shoe quota bill under
The no-amendment procedure,
the vote paved the way for
immediate consideration and
another vote on a rule that
would allow separate votes to
kill various sections of the bill.
The bill would set up shoe
and textile quotas, provide new
machinery for possible other
quotas if imports mount, give a
tax break to U.S. exporters, and
provide relief for import-injured
U.S. firms.
Telephone Company
Tries Rate Increase
WASHINGTON The
American Telephone and
Telegraph Co. has proposed an
increase in some long distance
rates aimed at boosting its
revenue by $385 million a year,
about 6 per cent.
The increases if approved by
the government would come in
pay phone calls, daytime
direct-dial calls, and
operator-assisted calls such as
collect and peraon-to-person.
Hotlines Not Bugged,
Telephone Co. Says
WASHINGTON The
Telephone company says that
despite a wiring mistake that
allowed the civil defense
hotline telephone in Maryland
Gov. Marvin Mandels office to
continue to pick up
conversations after it was hung
up, no conversation ever could

.-j^M^n

have been overheard.^^^^
A spokesman for American
Telephone and Telegraph Co.
said special terminal boxes in the
wiring system of the telephones
connecting state capitals with
civil defense headquarters
prevented any stray talk from
getting onto the civil defense
network.
UAW Locals Pass
Quarter-Way Mark
DETROIT United Auto
Workers locals passed the one
quarter mark in ratifying a new
national contract agreement

SPK?
it's not
subversive

Today I
| is the first day of j
I Pmkdhm j
iiJidk Qimlk S
up tMjim. tft/ui
Thilag. Mon. 20 at
a jn-up am ImM mi:
tfet union, JJm 16-20,1-5 p J
PMtm 325
j Graham & Broward |
wt/uj. nklat 7-9 pw
Apm feetktM, Little 0 d
Walker Mon. 16-20, 11-2pi 11-2pi---1
--1 11-2pi---1 j
[a $ 3.00...
i[ ijpiL kmt pail feeW.

with General Motors Wednesday
while the international union
warned that benefits being paid
to strikers would have to end by
Nov. 30.
The strike against GM is now
in its tenth week even though a
national contract was reached
one week ago. The local unions
have until Friday night to vote
on ratification with total results
due on Saturday.
Thirty-nine locals around the
country had ratified the
agreement by Wednesday noon,
but a large number of other
locals scheduled ratification
votes later in the day.



Witness Saw Soldier Kill Civilians

FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI)
A former Army combat
photographer testified
Wednesday that he watched an
American soldier pump
automatic-weapon fire into a
large group of Vietnamese
civilians, including a woman
with a baby in her arms.
THE WITNESS, Ronald L.
Haeberle of Los Angeles, now a
free-lance photographer, was the
fourth called by the government
in its attempt to convict Ist Lt.
William L. Calley Jr. of the
premeditated murder of 102
civilians at My Lai 4 village on
March 16,1968.
Haeberle was called in the
second day of testimony in
Calleys court-martial before a
board of six officers, five of
them Vietnam veterans.
Haeberle said that he and an
Army writer, Jay Roberts, had
been assigned by brigade

Chiles, Kennedy Named
To Top Inaugural Jobs

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) U.S. Sen.-elect Lawton
Chiles and Vice Mayor David Kennedy of Miami
were tapped Wednesday for key roles in the Jan. 5
inauguration of Reubin Askew as Floridas 37th
governor.
Chiles, one of the new faces elected with
Askew last month and a longtime colleague in the
state senate, will be master of ceremonies.
Kennedy, Askews state finance chairman, was
appointed general chairman of the inaugural, which
includes the noon swearing-in ceremony as well as a
parade and formal ball.
Chiles will play the role handled in the last
inauguration by Republican Sen. Edward Gurney
who, with Chiles election as the freshman senator
from Florida, moves up to senior status.
Askew, given SIOO,OOO by the legislature to
finance interim expenses plus the inauguration, is
working out of a suite of four offices in the
legislative office building.
Over the door is a sign reading Senator Askew.
President Pro Tempore.

Complaint
Department
During its first six months a
government committee set up to
investigate complaints by private
citizens handled 5,200
complaints. Most of them were
directed against ministries in the
fields of agriculture, education
and local administration, the
government said.

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headquarters to accompany C
Company of Task Force Barker
on a sweep of the hamlet. Calley
commanded the first platoon of
that company.
HAEBERLE SAID that he
saw near the village quite a
large group of people 50 to 75
- sitting in a squat, the
Vietnamese position.
There were five soldiers facing
them, and three of these walked
way into the distance.
I heard firing' and looked
over to my right and saw some
people trying to get up and run,
and they just fell down,
Haeberle told the prosecutor,
Capt. Aubrey M. Daniel HI.
THE SOLDIERS were in
front of them, facing south. It
was rapid fife, Id say
machinegun fire.
Answering a question from
Daniel, Haeberle said he could


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DIDNT IDENTIFY CALLEY

The sign was brought over from his old senate
office in the capital, along with most of the
furniture to make-do until he moves to the
governors office in the Capitol Jan. 5.
His staff includes Mrs. Ray LAmoreaux, wife of
a top division head in the Department of
Transportation, Margaret Ireland, wife of the chief
of the Senate Appropriations Committee, and
George Sheldon who was Askews legislative aide.
Askew said he has not made any decisions on
department heads as yet, despite rumors that he will
retain Nat Reed as head of the State Pollution
Control Department and consider Kenneth Ireland
for a major budget role, perhaps even head of the
Department of Administration.
Askew said that Hazel Tally Evans of St.
Petersburg, the national Democratic
committeewoman, will be executive director of the
inauguration committee and William McAbee, a
Pensacola accountant, treasurer.

not tell the difference between
the sound of machinegun fire
and that of a rifle on automatic
fire. He said the group was about
100 yards from him.
Daniel asked him if he could
tell the sex of the Vietnamese.
I DISTINCTLY remember
one of them standing up and
going away was a woman, he
replied. She appeared to have a
small baby in her arms.
Did any of these people have
arms weapons? Daniel asked.
I did not see any arms,
Haeberle replied.
THE AUTOMATIC fire,
Haeberle said, was coming from
one of the two soldiers
remaining he was firing south
toward the people.
Haeberle said that some of
the people were falling and this
woman stood up and tried to
make it she appeared to have a

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376-0315
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baby in her arms they didnt
make it.
Make it? Col. Reid W.
Kennedy, the military judge,
questioned.

\\m 1 j i i i h
QESr jM T ; rF /x-'J
WITH MAX SHUoIaN*
(Bv /** author of Raltt Round tkt Plat, 80f... DokitGillit... tie.)
Money: The Story of Higher Education
Not long ago it was no big problem for a college to raise money.
The president simply went out and put the mooch on some fat alumnus.
But that wont work today. Most alumni, shaky about whats hap happening
pening happening on American campuses, are sewing up their pockets. And even
those few who can still be snowed are driving hard bargains. Not long
ago, for instance, Walter Boola McMeekin, Yale 'O7, got a new
gymnasium named after him:and all he gave was three dollars and
forty cents.
Well sir, whats a college to do? If they try to raise tuition just
once more, the remaining buildings will surely be levelled. By the
parents, I mean. Nor can colleges cut operating costs any further be because
cause because they long ago eliminated all the frills like, for example, heating
the dormitories. So where will they find the money they so desperately
need?
Well sir, if yours happens to be a college where beer is sold in the
student union, youve got it licked. All you have to do is put in a
plentiful supply of Miller High Life and stand back. Youll see business
boom beyond your most hopeful dreams because every undergrad in
the country is positively bananas about Miller High Life! And why
wouldnt he be? Is any other beer so tasty? So zesty? So trusty? So
gutsy? So feisty? So feasty? So yeasty? So maltsy? So hopsy?
No, dear friends, Miller stands alone, light-years above the others.
And the others will never equal it, for they will never learn Millers
marvelous brewing formula, a jealously guarded secret for more than
115 years. In fact, the formula today is known to only one man on
earthMillers chief brewmasterwho will never, never talk because
he is not only a deaf-mute, he is also a Transylvanian who, as you
know, can turn into a bat if he is ever captured.
j.. v ..C s v
But I digress. Supposing you dont sell beer in the union, where
then can you raise the money? Well sir, heres what they did at the
Idaho State College of Belles Lettres and Spot Welding.
What they did was add a six-dollar cover charge to each meal in
the student cafeteria. Naturally they had to justify the charge, so they
started doing floor shows during meals. Believe me, folks, if youre ever
in the neighborhood, be sure to drop in. Its worth every penny.
The show opens with Professor Norman Glebe, the ever-popular
head of the sociology and weather-stripping department, doing several
chucklesome stunts and imitations. First he sings Trees as it might be
done by Jos6 Feliciano, Georges Pompidou, and Woody Woodpecker.
Next he sings School Days as it might be done by the Lennon Sisters,
the Mayo Brothers and Mark Rudd. For his last number he does that
old reliable, cant-miss, sure-fire crowd pleaser: he wrestles a naked bison.
A tough act to follow, right? But wait. After him comes Professor
Nirvana Sigafoos, the ever-popular head of the Finnish and other gut guttural
tural guttural languages department, whose specialty is swallowing. She starts
commonplacely enough by swallowing a sword, and at this point the
audience always yawns and says, Ho-hum. Another sword swallower.
But she soon disabuses them of that notion, you may be sure! Next she
swallows two Ph.D. theses and a Buick. But wait. She finishes by in ingesting
gesting ingesting the entire buildings and grounds department! Well sir, all I can
say is if Ed Sullivan ever catches this act, therell be a bright new star
in the Broadway firmament!
After Professor Sigafooss act the audience is naturally half-dead
from applauding, so the finale is a welcomely quiet act. Three spores
come out and float for twenty minutes. Then, spent but happy, the
student body retire to their pallets and sleep the clock around.
' And so to those of you who despair of solving the fiscal problems
of our colleges, I say fie! Just remember one thing: America did not
become the worlds foremost producer of wing nuts and nylon pie piefilling
filling piefilling by running away from a fight!
* *
f
If wing nuts and nylon pie-filling don't grab you, how about trying
Miller High Life, the Champagne of Beers and the sponsor of this column?
Miller is available in cans, bottles, kegs ... and delicious everyway.

Thursday, Nomtoar 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

TRYING TO run, stood up,
Haeberie said.
Did you see any people
standing up when the firing was
over? Daniel asked.
No, I didn't see anyone.

Page 11



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 19,1970

Page 12

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3'Aijc|S.. OOc ASI f 2 4QC
lt # / y A7 J | *47 J
ROUNTY MY T EINE GLENN FARMS PIECES A STEMS NEUMANN'J
Paper Towels .3 M 00 Puddings .... 2 *T 00 Mushrooms .. 4 *1 #0 Mayonnaise ... 65*
DIXIE DARLING ROCKINGHAM WHOLE PUNCH 14140
Cake Mixes .. 4 ,, 1 00 Chicken ....... 99* Detergent ..... "~ 68* Wesson 0i1 .... V. 88*
RITTER CLEANER PIIISRURY * c ONI
Tomato Juice 3 Formula "409" .vs* Pancake Mix... 33' Cheddar Dinner' 17*
SPECIAL HOLIDAY ITEMS m
Pie Mix.. 39* Stuffings it 33* |sPg| THRIFTY VI !/ jk R
Fruit Coke '' *2 Appls . * 39 \_l- ^
Oranges 4SS>I Oenries 3 iJTOSaTJ mSm^^SgBMS^S^SSSaSSI
rarr:4jsi-coeom* mm?, m \
eAi iTM PR IQIMII DHL M ak , i
WHY MAW CRUSHED PINE- JOUmi.w rA, I **. :HSs. :
Apple 4SS *1 Sticks . . 53* ...........
3is *l Sugars.. 22*
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. 130 N.W. 6th ST
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS '4Ol N. MAIN ST.



W-D HAND USD* CRADI A" QUICK KOZIN (11 Ik A UP) S^^jSsjieHjj|HMiLff^iS3Sfr M£ ,i iBjSF /^
Tl IDIfEYC REDI ib. 11*
IvL! | BASTED TALMADGE FARMS COUNTRY GEESE, ROASTERS, CAPONS,
prices good thur., nov. 19 wed., nov. 25 HAMS & ia 99 e DUCKLINGS AND SEtF-BASTING TURKEYS
AfisH mucious po*k 'Vp.
HAMS rn TURKEY M Gr. Beef
WHOLE ROAST I Thighs... . 49 c yrnf Bj I
QOC Brumsticks 39 e I
| SUNNYIANO SMOKED PORK SHOULDER 9 Hi) till l QUARTER LOmUCEP INTO SUNNYIAND THIN I
[PanicsT.l 49!F V J Chops. 69 *J* Bacon 49j
rDAi'KMj'CWMiaii iiAvnic - COPCIANOSMOKED(HaIforWhaia)
Cookies 4~ s l Sirloin Tip Steaks $ 1 Cream Cheese £ 39 c Slab Bacon ... 39 c
a ayAUu aua^UM
FRESH STANDARD W-D GRAND CURE BEEF PAtMITTO FARMS mwwwwmhwiou ___
Oysters £ 79 Steakettes ... >. 89 e Pirn. Cheese. .£ 69 e Sausage -7
/ C Off LAND AU MfAT
SINGLETON'S COCKTAIL GRADE A QUICK FROHN WD RRAND SUFERRRANO CRf AMID COTTAGE >C|. I I A Shrimp 3 79 e Baking Hens .. 45 e Cheese 2S 69 c Sliced Bologna -. 69 e
SUNNYIAND FORK ROLL QUICK FROZEN TUttOT MERICO RUTTER-AMI-NOT W B HAND MUD OAISY STYLE CMEOOAR
Sausage 69 c White Fish ... 59 e Biscuits .... 22£ 39 c Cheese 79 c
Quantity Right! Ratarvad
WQUIDOUC ITOMI nc-conroT-l*t
f GOLDIN RIM rRKSH SWIITYIUOW f YOU NO A TENDER A
I BANANAS MwCQRN Pole Beans Ifll ".I
i Ists A, 4D POTATOESI
i-10 C Jri69 c 23 £ ir -*
MIGHTY NfOH STRAWBERRY MORTON PUMPKIN or MINCE MEAT MI*HTTHIGH NEAPOLITAN OR LEMON ASTK MORTON PIE
I PIES WK CNS I
- WHOIIIW aim nun
SB, 13 m *1 ## Avocados .... s> *1 ## Coconuts 3-89* Onions 3 29*
Oranaes s£. 49 ( Cucumbers... s* 39 Potatoes 3 *4s Salad Items.... 10*
Crisp Celery... ~23 Grapes 4 *1 ## Cranberries 3 ~ l ## Ambrosia is 89
' WE HAVE A COMPUTE VAIIHY OF HOUOAY
CAKE materiau
St .tlufTZ OHEN GIANT Wn UAIW
LB* Jy' / -* cimm ui,.,, iuoiipiaiioi
r./ 3SJS/ Peas .. 39* Broccoli 3- 89 c
' V I
V 3; HI Aj.l!a||l FEDOi wm:F
Potatoes '. 45 e Topping uT. 61*
! mil] MvKfw£ft;BTiTlTiHill/ T .q-Y***g[Topping 49 Oleo . 3 89 c
V3S| gAi BIhM >HR| xM.-.mi *- co**ie iAMiti'a '*iiii
.y&E =; HS JSe. jPich ... 2 *1 Cake S 69*
Bars .. 3 *l Shrimp.. i* 2 7
M *va >l, Cue. G a Beans 2 89* Rolls . 3~ *l
3421 W^LJS I wSS?r ,TY AVL PricM Good Thursday Hmi Wednesday Night
? HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS



The
Florida
Alligator

The Byrds And Stills Untitled

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Ah, the Byrds. Erratic,
brilliant, petulant, individual, an
American thumb thrust against
the British flood during those
wild days of 65. Freaky. A
different word in 1965 when
they appeared on one of the
cellophane popular** music
shows, disheveled and grubby
and outstanding when compared
to all the cute, matching suit,
velvet collared dandies who
wanted so much to be Beatles
but couldn't.
Remember McGuinn with his
long hair and those weird granny
glasses peering into the camera
like some myopic spinster,
singing Dylan off-key? No they
weren't cute and neither was the
music they played. They played
songs by Bob Dylan and like it
or not in those days Dylans
genius was obscured by his voice
and his non-top 40 sound and
except for some unrepentant
folkies or nascent heavies, was
aU but unknown to the mass of
young people. The Byrds
brought Dylan to that mass.
They did not copy him but
devised what would later be
called folk-rock to interpret
Dylan in a rock medium. It was
fantastic, exciting music. They
were the American group from
1965 to 1967.
SINCE then there have been
about 13 Byrds. They have
slipped from our commercial
consciences, appearing now and
again to reveal another new
approach to interpreting rock
and roll. Critics have made
careers coining terms for those
interpretations, folk-rock,"
acid-rock, country-rock.
The Byrds were never so much a
group as they were an
approach. That is members
could come and go and the rock
world could go on. That was
because the repository of that
approach, the genius of
interpreting rock and roll
remained and caused the Byrds
to transcend transient
membership. Roger McGuinn is
that repository and possesses
that genius, a man who could
argue with David Crosby and
live! McGuinn, erratic, brilliant,
petulant and individual. Winning
us with electric twelve string
Dylan and occasionally losing us
with space-rock, taunting us. So
you want to be a rock and roll
star? and leaving for awhile

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Lum's features
Famous Beer on draft
Schlitz, Budweiser, Ballantine
Michelob
Featured Sandwich plus 16 oz. Schooner
I SI.OO |
- Lum's Famous
e Sub
e Pastrami and French Fries
e Ham and French Fries

. *
" afllSL Jsam&a*. '/a Ms m M j ** iMk Ax Ht,
Mart BS B WLam, Bjflf ¥m
i< W | 4 8 T ? |

when he didn't, to find country
roots.
Well this well traveled group
has released a double album, one
side live and one side studio. The
music is testament to the Byrd
experience, it is accumulation of
all the music that the Byrds have
tried and played.
The first record, recorded live
in concert sounds like the Byrds
greatest hits. It features golden
oldies like Mr. Tambourine Man,
So You Want To Be A Rock and
Roll Star, Mr. Spaceman and an
incredible jam structured around
Eight Miles High that takes up
an entire side. Side One starts
off righteous with a throaty
incantation called, Lover of the
Bayou. This is as good as
anything the Byrds have done. It
begins with a brooding bass and
a cracking lead as McGuinn
lashes out with a gutteral,
ominous voice. He fairly bites
off each verse and the band is
tight.
A ROUND of applause and
they are in to Dylans Positivly
Fourth Street. This is vintage
Byrd treatment of Dylan with
some country flourishes thrown
in. McGuinn's voice is a link
with the past. By the time they
get into Rock and Roll Star,
Skip Batten's bass playing stands
out, controlled, always right and
always there. Rock and Roll Star
is different from the enthusiastic
version that was first recorded.
This time around some years
have gone by and the song is
sung by men tinged with the
cynicism of having been there
and having seen the shadows.
The song was prophetic when
written and each succeeding
year, each break-up, each death
lends credence to the bitter
lyrics. The band does justice to
those lyrics.
Side Two is Eight Miles High.
The song was a first effort into
extended improvisational rock
and roll as well as an early
venture into the newly
discovered drug possibility.
Since then countless bands have
tried to improvise and extend
and with few exceptions have
made concerts endurance tests,
suffocating the audiences with
improvised boredom. But Eight
Miles High was a first and a
classic. Now the Byrds have
devoted a whole side to
exploring the outer reaches of
that song. But then the song is
strained through 13 Byrds and
several musical directions so that

variety inspires excellence, and
the several landmarks of the
Byrds, folk, acid and country
rock are there to provide the
structure for the experiment.
The studio record continues
to demonstrate the tightness of
the band and their control of the
music but the material itself
never reaches the quality of the
live sides. The best cut is
Country Mare, a gentle talk-song

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WARD BRISICK GREG JONES
Entertainment Editors

Page 16

that is perfect for McGuinns
unique brand (byway of Dylan)
of enthusiastic understatement.
Truck Stop Girl is very country
and All Things is a pretty piece.
On the last side Just A Season
stands out as pure Byrds, twelve
string strumming folk-rock and
all and is a good cut not at all
harmed by nostalgia.
WHI LSI tarrying in Muntz
Stereo the other day I heard the
tape of Steve Stills new album.
Well at least the long awaited
album is out. It is hard to pin
down. There are many
conflicting musical influences at
work.
On Love the One Youre
With, Stills uses a female-gospel
chorus like he would CN&Y
with da-das from Judy Blue
Eyes. It is an infectious rocker
and Stills smooth-ragged voice is
in great form. On Church he uses

i, Th* Florid* Alligator, Thursday, Nowmter 19,1970

a chorus again but more like Joe
Cocker did on his first album.
The song has a honky-tonk
piano and lush violins, if you can
handle that. Old Times is typical
Stills, quietly autobiographical
like Four and Twenty and then
evolving a really raunchy jam
ending with screaming organ and
piercing lead.
The best song is Go Back
Home. Home opens low with a
snakey wah-wah lead, gets
blusey with a heavy bass line and
a whining chant that sings with
the guitar and then falls into an
extended break with bottle-neck
over wah-wah, thumping- bass
and drums and a short blues
finish. The rest is pretty much
imitation Cocker, Young and
most unfortunately, Phil
Spector. Missing most of all is
the clean sound associated with
Stills.



OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY /M __ .
irs;s su ,> v,!o Ami 3736 NEWBERRY ROAD
Price* effective thru Wed., Nov. 25 I I
CHANGE TO BIG STAR...
AND keep the change;
We will be m I
f f J A brand new sugar marfcaUplb loads m
y wm> > an ewe niarw* I
I its own individual low price. No two-for-this or three-for-that con-
HI
I Ideas like prices that are rock-bottom low Monday through
I Saturday. Prices that stay low no matter what day you shop.
g^M >|| Ideas like unlimited sayings-no minimum totouy
and a lot easier on your pocketbook.
. I £X77?A VALUE BUY! 1
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF U.S.D.A. INSPECTED "HOUSE OF RAEFORD"
CHUCK ROAST 48< GRADE A TURKEYS
l--35d sa. 39d I
EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI FLORIDA GRADE "A FRESH (POLY BAG) I LB w Y lb.< W >
111 B _ I U.S.D.A. INSPECTED SWIFTS 10 POUNDS AND UP
Whole rKYcKd LsZ/y .-IwjnfMAujnwicEj^
EXTRA VALUE BUY!
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE FROSTY MORN FULL SHANK HALF
Smoked HAMS -48< I CAN HAMS I
EVERYDAY LOW PRICE KELLEY'S Carlings Black Label I cudahy-s & a I
SLICED BACON 49< nP p n AA A I 7lb 5 9 99 |
CHUNK BOLOGNA 39< nl" T n flMl. I CAN * I
everyday low price palm river M 0 MM MM V M 0 M 0
Skinless FRANKS 39< SAVE 38< EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! I EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 5 CENTS ON CAMPBELL'S EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 6 CENTS ON WHITEHOUSeI U.S.D.A. CHOICE FULL-CUT BEEF
TOMATO SOUP m 10< APPLE JUICE iwk29<| I
CAN TOMATOES a 13< GREEN BEANS a 12*1 KUUIN Uo I tAlv I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 3 CENTS ON HUNTS EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 5 CENTS ON ROSEDALE mm m\
TOMATO SAUCE t lit LIMA BEANS m. 14tl u 88{ I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 25 CENTS ON EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 3 CENTS ON SHOWBOAT
WESSON OIL * 88{ PORK & BEANS ia Kuk H
I EXTRA VALUE BUY! I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 6 CENTS ON EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI SAVE 2 CENTS ON FARM CHARM
LeSUEUR PEAS 25< EVAP. MILK a*l3{| save 20 cents on farm charm I
PEACH HALVES bv 17< GOLDEN CORN 15 l PURE BUTTER I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 60CENTS ON JVERVOAV LOW PRICei-SAV* 10 CENT* ON OUR .RIDE
GAIN Detergent &'fl?99< PANCAKE MIX £o.l9t| J' Qjl I
Fresh SALTINES *. 19< MAXWELL x I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI SAVE 6 CENTS ON CRANBERRY SAUCE LOW ASSORTED STRAINED
OCEAN SPRAY lAN BABY FOODS Ui- 7<| EXTRA VALUEBUY! I
EXTRA VALUE BUYI-OR CHARD CHARM NATURAL FLA. EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI BlO STAR FRESH TWIN-PACK I LARGE FARM GOLDEN RIPE
GFRUIT JUICE *ar 39< POTATO CHIPS BANANAS |
Extra Value Buy! Save 10 cents On No-Return Bottle Soft Drinks
COCA-COLA, SPRITE, on. I l VV |
TAB OR FRESCA SIZE BOTTLE LeHHBBMMhI
TH|SUPERMARKETTHmiLmTUKEjTB!

Truifui.> Si>>M"!* 19 1970 Th* f-ionOj AihjgUu

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florid* Alligator, Thursday, November If, 1970

prices effective weds Hj?*^^^^^; : i Hershey's Kisses .', r, 75 c 3&f*t**
I POBUX c3IS Three Musketeers X 47* Chopped Horn 59
QUANTITY RIGHT* Bl 1 HH Delicious Slice* Cooked
" .iff Marshmallows... .'ST 22*
A Potato Salad 39*
__ A Flavorful Fresh-Made
f Carrot Salad eee e e round 39*
Zfrj Linio Supreme ... 59*
A Marvelous Taste Treat, pound
Marshmallow Delight .69*
pr
teady-ta-take-out. Southern
daily for those who don't FrioCl CHldcGll
WFTS PREMIUM ia-pc. s|49 $2 33 M-JC. s 2 9*
tarvelous! No matter how you Kraft's Individually-Wrapped
rour turkey tomes out golden tvcoplprcis ,I M AO c
id beautiful, tasting as marvelous 3IIVQ MlllwrlCQil ee e pkp. dr
ks ... a total personal triumph! Wisconsin Cheese tar
?t is inner hastingdown deep Longhorn Cheese .? 89*
*ere hand-basting t an t reach Delicious Dairi-Fresh
esult is unheard of tenderness, fnitrmn f tinnf*' 2-lb. AT*
and flavor all through this woO* # op O/
in Florida, Publix means quality, Assorted Cookies e e site 98*
re than proud to present the Tasty Dairi-Fresh
. with our very warmest wishes Sour Cream '£* 42*
* jfjfdnv/ /)p
FROM OUR WINE DEPT. A^Doveieed
p^. Bwi i 99 Fiorida Oysters .... :i. *l*
Gallo Vine Rose, Rhine Garten For tmMt 9nd relish treys, Publix offers Bested,
4/5-S ,99cents leof, bib end iceberg lettuce, reuse!.*, endive, *-
rerel,redl.fc., t re. <, Pr.Ur, oumhh,
r>T ,/ , ~ ~_,
V. n^Nd'%fU
fi y) ,-r ns i v r* nti .m <-... >u- t~.
Am jMmr Mxi* Orange Juice ... 'Jr 44*
Cranberries £29* | Coconut*... 33*
Onions 3£29* >Tm njffwmryimNJUA MnnTni .Tl o.
For the Holiday, larxe Crisp Pascal | < fl/f WICOT e ee e each 38*
Celery ... ,5 MPBhI
Tender Velbw Flertda lOter lOtS 45<
L J Com e Mrs. Fried
For Pins er Sauce. AH-Purpese Qfl|Qff P ir>Q< :> MA (
York Apples... 4£ 49* fVK I* Isl ST 9$ f 9
Carron\T.T:Vr... ... 13* J i KÂ¥l Cut Green Beans..
Oranges 5 £ 39* /sh ., ,'LJ^iWFI i Froxen Waffles ....£- 25*
Grapefruit B39* £J[ f l\ IK Honey Buns £29*
TrepUane Delicious Flertda V | ** hot yeur favorite sguesb* yellow, sue- Sara iae Frusua AH Duster
I 1 Orancpo 3liic eee * 99 end buttercup! Round Cake £ 77*



ItMT IOW PMCIjtaM Druitai
VERYDAY LOW PRK^Seo
IVERYDAY LOW Pepperidge Form
everyday low
IVERYDAY IOW
PRICE! Sort-Ply Whit*
,onci)l\LSiiitAiv}iO || H =r d |SSasKiw....s*#-
GAINESVILLE MALL I MM I " D *",! ..,
i ffnrT/ I I Peaaawt Butter *. 69*
\ P f L/J Jellv Roll if gilon of I everyday low prick eema.Ee
VI i L 40 I I Instant Coffee V*1 M
J | J | wch a .dHRm
*SAI | Regularly 7*c, Filled with Almond Filling &nanMmaMnMnMn|MmaMnnnmmMgmMmmnammm|M *VYDAV LOW PRICII Carnation
\J:| .. f' I, A^;y^£-':;l:rr;'^- l Evaporated Milk ... I:. IS*
|/)ffn?f Krinael 0~1A..1 W 1, EVEAYOAE LOW RAKE! Vlct.ry D~.A **>
Coffee Cake Listerlne 7 Cherries
Vs *-C2sil 69 Tooth Paste ST 62* Deep Brown Beans.. ... 20*
Arrid Extro-Ory, 10< off labol EVERYDAY LOW PRICEI Su*h'. So.t
J Deodorant Blackeye Pern 12*
tfer e perfect holiday entre, be sere to pick
ep extra supplies of delicious Belri-fresb
Sear Cream . e wonderful topplwp far
|BilnaniMMindH=3ndmiLHAlDOH your buked potatoes or e superb base far
Swift'* Premium Proton Roof Rib er 9 dipsl
Sirloin Stooks eeeeee " lfrrmChr /(rmetrum firji /.
Swift'* Premium Proton Senate** 7 Sparby Hurdwood
swift s premium Imperial Beast r 99* Charcoal 20 £ 88*
proten gov T. Swift'* Premium Proton Senate** Som*onito Wood Oroin
PHUlnpinil inspected heavy English-Cut Roast...::' *l* Card Tables *3
WESTERN BE swirtvpy.wi.wr*w.. i.mh-111 w4 Or.l*
IQmQiIB Beef Short Ribs IV 59* Card Chairs *3**
p| PUBLIX ill
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL It/,,-,
' w Uni Am 130 H S- IW4 N. Main Sir.EE t3O M.W. US Url < /'/''"

9

Thursday, November 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Sylvanla TV 18" black-white must
sell reasonable good condition
392-7680 (A-3t-42-p)
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy kongo pet 475-2546
(local) (A-tfc)
Building your own color organ?
Control one kilowatt per channel for
less than $2 with a trlac from TAU
Inc. 717 NW Ist St. 376-0624
(A-st-43-p)
63 Mercury 390 rebuilt engine a/c
power aut trans, very clean, excellent
mechanically, new tires, belts tune
up. 378-3326 after 4:30 wk. day.
(A-st-43-p)
Excellent Christmas gift: one am/fm
sterio radio tape deck w/Speakers
Only 4 mos old Reasonably priced
Getting married need the money call
Bob at 373-2812 after 7 p.m.
(A-3t-43-p)
PHOTO ENLARGER the heart of
your darkroom $25. Call Bob at
378-7479 for details. (A-st-43-p)
Dual 1212 Turntable, Shure
Cartridge, SC 35 Dynaco Amplifier.
One year old. $l4O. Call after 5 pm
378-0507 (A-3t-43-p)
Olympus pen-f half frame SLR,
telescopic lenses, strobe lite, cases
and other goodies, ex. cond. please
call. Ill tell more 372-5961 1-3 pm
Dally. (A-lt-43-p)
67 Solex motor bicycle. Great
condition. Goes 240 miles per gal.
Must sell, need cash bad! S7O. Call
378-6353 after 5 p.m. (A-3t-43-p)
1969 HONDA 450 5800 miles new
rear tire & chain excellent mechanical
condition hl-rise bars, helmet. $5lO
CALL 392-9488 (A-3t-42-p)
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcaser. 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
Quality Tape Cartridge Recording
accumulate 4 tapes and sth Is Free
.2) of your albums $6 Inc cartridge
averages to only $2.40 per album.
Figure the savings! 378-5916 4-8 pm
(A-st-41-p)
Garrard SL6SB changer with base,
dust cover, and Shure M9IE
cartridge. Dale 376-2909 (A-st-41-p)
Big sounding stereo for a low, low
price. Craig cassette stereo tape deck.
Call Bob at 392-9972 (A-st-42-p)
HOUSE TRAILER 10x50 excellent
shape, covered patio, utilltlty room,
carpet, furnished, air cond, very good
TV ant, $1950 call 392-0914 before
5:00, 376-1824 after 5:00
(A-st-41-p)
68 Triumph 650 Bonneville. 6
extended forks, megaphone pipes,
velocity stacks, excellent cond. SBSO.
Call 392-7357. (A-st-40-p)
Nlkkormat FTN with 50mm f/1.4
normal lens and case Excellent Cond.
$225 call 378-9968 after 5 P.M.
(A-st-44-p)
Set I-all-sale; Masterwork Am-Fm
sterephono fin. wood cab. separates,
like new, 4 speakers, 1 yr-old $130;
girls 3 speed bike $35, plckett loglog
slide rule $20., fan, drapes, sewing
fabric, more; Roxann, 378-3687, or
come by 1414 NW 2nd Ave.
(A-2t-44-p)
Garage Sale Frl & Sat 10:00 am-7:00
pm clothes etc. 5 cents $20.00
Book case $30.00 Archer rd Village
Lot B 31 Phone 372-1821
(A-2t-44-p)
Auto Tape Deck. Craig Pioneer (SIOO
new) with 4 speakers only SSO. Will
help you install It, tool Must sell!
Call Bob after 4 pm 372-3849
(A-2t-44-p)
Heath kit HR-10 amateur radio-gets
SSB, AM, CW, 80-10 meter. Used
very little-llke new. SSO or best offer.
Call Steve at 376-7829. (A-lt-44-p)
qberbh

FOR SALE
Practically new schwinn 10 speed
bike $70.00 ($130.00 new). Another
older bike in good condition $15.00.
392-7536 (A-3t-44-p)
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Electric
upholstery shampoos also available.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-9-c)
FOR RENT
VA%V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V. # .Y.VtV.V.V.V.*.V
Quiet, spacious one bdrm furn apt,
ideal for couple or 2 roommates,
available Dec. 15. Call 378-0279 after
7 (B-st-42-p)
1 bedroom furnished apt. $l2O/mo
quiet close to campus sublet after
Dec. 15 call 372-0674 after 5:30
(B-st-41-p)
Sublease effi apt from Dec 15 $65
mo or $187.50 quarter Inc utilities
carpet AC TV pool 1 min walk from
Tlgert call 373-3749 (B-2t-43-p)
Near campus 1403 NW sth Ave 1
Bedroom kitchen furnished couples
or grads no dogs or children SIOO
mo. Lease till Sept, call 378-4498
(B-3t-43-p)
SUBLEASE nice two bedroom apt.,
close to campus, available Dec. 15,
lease ends June 15. 135/mo. Call
376-7251 (B-2t-43-p)
3-bedroom house unfurnished, stove
+ frige, AC + gas furnace, wooded
lot, Hawthorne $125/mo. Call after 6
p.m. 372-5613 couple preferred.
(B-st-40-p)
Sublet immediately male roommate
private bedroom $75 per mon.
Inc. La Mancha Call 373-2149 after 5
p.m. (B-3t-44-p)
Need 4 people to sublet La Mancha
apt. $75 per mo. private bedroom
utilities included. Occupy starting
winter quarter. Call 378-3615
(B-3t-44-p)
Available Immediately La Mancha
male roommate wanted private
bedroom 70 per mo Inc utls. Nov
paid see Dan apt 3 or manager
378-7224 (B-2t-44-p)
Sublet 1 bdrm frnshd apt sllO
month 1404 SW 10th Terrace
376-9612 bonus included!
(B-3t-44-p)
Married couple needed to sublet 1
BR apt available In Dec. Good
location, AC. Call 378-3526 after
7:30 pm. (B-3t-44-p)
WANTED
Help male roommate wanted Immed.
winter and spring quarter Gatortown
Apts. 4750 Call Bill 373-2255
(C-3t-43-p)
Hip roomate male or female for Jan.
5 Br house 1 room SSO close to U.F.
call Jim 376-6597 One hip female wanted to share plush
2 bedroom trailer. A/C, heat, own
room. $65/mo. plus Vt utilities.
376-4184 (C-3t-43-p)

r i
Todays 1
more for your money meal I
moisorrs
CAFETERIA I
{THURSDAYS FEATURE*] I
JPORK CUTLET PARMESAN* I
WITH A a
§ I SPAGHETTI 77L | ?
*! Y |
I I FRIDAYS FEATURE I I I
& I Morrison's famous I £
S | ROAST TURKEY Q /r | 3
I WITH |
! MASHED POTATOES, I
J DRESSING. GRAVY. I
[and cranberry sauce J I
LUNCH: Tl til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
Lmoisons
CAFETERIA ...beyond comparison! j
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall JM

Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. November 19, 1970

WANTED
LANDMARK 104 needs female
roommate start winter qt 47.50 mo.
ALSO couple needs apt or house
under 100. call Nancy 373-4250.
(C-st-41*p)
WANTED ROOMATE: female hip
SSO utilities 17th st and 6th Ave
N.W. furnished equlped call
373-2186 *C-2t-43-p)
Three roommates for Jan. Have your
own room for 60.00 or share a room
for 40.00 monthly. Call Wayne at
378-8293 University Gardens Apt.
(C-st-44-p)
Female roommate to share
1-bedroom Sin City apt. Winter and
spring. Color TV, pool, air
conditioning, $62.50 month, >/a
utilities. 372-7937 (C-st-44-p)
Come again! Listeners wanted Will
pay $2.00 for one hour session. Must
be native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Susan
between 8 and 5 for appointment.
392-2049. (C-Bt-44-p)
Quiet, Mature, Studious roommate
your own room, $57.50, mo. begin
Jan. I, or share room til then. Call
any evening 378-5401 (C-2t-44-p)
LANDMARK APT. 40 Need one
liberal roommate (male) for the rest
of the year. 2 bdr. 47.50/mo. call
378-9638 or 378-8411 (C-4t-44-p)
Female roommate wanted for winter
quarter Landmark apts 47.50 mo +
utilities Call 373-3364 Apt. 51
(C-3t-44-p)
Sublet female roommate for winter,
spring term 2 bdrm, furnished apt.
Share room with 1 other. Close to
campus Call Denise 373-2980
(C-st-44-p)
Female roommate to share modern 1
bdrm apt. next to Camelot. no
deposit. $65/mo. + Vz util, option to
leave or keep for self In Jan. Call
378-9774 (C-st-42-p)
AUTOS
1967 Pontiac Firebird automatic
OHC 6 cyl radio and heater 32000
miles metallic blue call 376-0240
Asking $1295.00 (G-st-41-p)
BMW, 1966 1800 TI recent engine
overhaul, with air, am-fm portable,
polyglas. Excellent buy at $1195.
Call Ron at 372-6740 (G-st-41-r)
1969 Firebird 350 radio heater air
conditioned 2 new tires all power
green with white top great shape
$2400 Call 376-5141 Bill Flader
(G-st-41-p)
1965 MGB, good condition, MUST
SELL, need money, best offer, Call
372- (G-3t-42-p)
1964 OLDS HOLIDAY 88. White.
Full power, factory air, radio. Just
tuned. Good clean car. Asking $675.
378-5430 evenings. (G-4t-42-p)
1966 Mustang hdtp a A fact air many
new parts new paint clean $975 call
373- evenings (G-3t-43-p)
1965 ford XL pr. st. air new tires 352
60,000 ml good condition call Jim
378-6597 (G-2t-43-p)

AUTOS
VIS 66 sedan, tires 4. Patters under
guaranty, radio, inspection sticker,
taq. 70,000 careful mi. witn VW
servicing every 3000, dependable
transportation, $644 firm. 376-0036
Dr. Mayer (G-3t-44-p)
1966 VW Karmann Ghia convertible
good condition SBSO 372-3964 after
6 (G-st-44-p)
66 Corvair, 4spd trans, 140 HP, well
maintained. Needs paint, otherwise
excellent. Call Roy, 378-4998 aft.
evening. (G-st-44-p)

E!:10 4:35 7:00 9:25 II AT 3:00 5:10 7:20 9:30 I
A MIKE NICHOLS FILM I M Jm' I
pattm- 111"
M Sr
AISAM, KH3URO OENJMMN, ARTMOH CAREWKE; | A Real Western
M; tUCXKNRY; NSNEVMART, ANTHONYPEAMNS| CO STARRING
BdlSSi MARTIN SHEEN; JMVMHTI I JACK PALANCE
KHaiES soEENPtAif by BUCK henkyl jeaNNE MOREAU
TEtMEMI* NMAHISHN tfchnicoio-
[pWSmwaiEKsar!
:sl m u.$ L i .. fix so. V<;.
tertlf CMr AwiSvl V
SHOWS SIOMEY6UZIEN
3:30 BpTh.||.
9BH Definitely The Hitchcock
RnRRRRI *
Ibml iTIVi j*U
SHOWSJ il WALT DISNEYS jk
1.30 fJ|||V|V|*J EXPERIENCE
3:30 M. Ul TECHNICOLOR*
5:30 .... ~ lir
7:30-
L
i
tibbs DeUwe* UmtadVtLt* j
*£ : 'Cotton Comes to Harlem' \
50 cents*

autos
N*ut sell JeP ptefcup truck VS. 4
vtheei tJ.. low miieaee. excellent
cond.. mood cibin optional, 2850
N.V.. 4th Lni. 378 1 121 !' 5 P- 1 "-
(Gbt-40-O)
/
68 OLDS 442 lihe new, auto, trans.,
A.C, neater, radio, tape. Must leave
us., $1995. Call K.C. 376-1877
(G-st-43-p)
1964 TRIUMPH TR-4. 900<1
condition. MUST SELL. $650. Call
376-6072 after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)



GATOR classifieds

PERSONAL
Anything and everything to arouse
your curlouslty and satisfy your
hidden wants white elephant sale.
Sat., Nov. 21-9:30-12:30 1921 NW 2
Ave (J-lt-43-p)
BABY FLYING SQUIRRELS, hand
raised, tiny, tame, affectionate, odor
free, easy to care for, dynamite for
xmas $5 376-0968 (Jr2t-43-p)
COOK FOR US EAT FREE! Four
guys seek coed to prepare homestyle
dinners, 6-7 days a week. We wash
dishes. Call 378-7479 (J-5tr43-p)
Ride wanted to LA or Detroit. Lv.
after finals, ret. for Jan. classes.
378-2828 6-10 pm (J-3t-42-p)
373-2771 Dave Depew will listen.
The Student Senate may be able to
help with your problems. Let me
hear your views. (J-st-42-p)
The Alligator cartoonist is raffling
himself off for 1 full day will do
anything within reason (which is a lot
of stuff) 25 cents a shot females
only Call 378-6329 1022 NE 3rd
Ave. ask for Frank (J-3t-42-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS! Meet more
members of the opposite sex at U.F.
All dates In Gainesville. Free details
write: Nationwide Dating Service,
P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-15t-41-p)
Happiness is a new SGA
representative Elect David H. Chu for
S.F.J.C. SGA representative. Nov.
18-19 (J-2t-43-p)
Do you sculpt? Batik? Paint? whittle
Make something nobody else does?
The Reitz Union Is having a
Christmas Sale of International gifts
and original crafts. We want it to be
an open sale of interesting Items so
everyone Is Invited to see their
creations. No fees, registration or
insurance. No businesses either. Nov.
30 and Dec. 1 Union Ballroom 11 to
9. Questions? Call 392-1655
(J-st-36-p)
Mate to eookrroo poor for an *K?
CLO nas openings for the whiter
ouarter. 8195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-e)
Co Eds Facial Hah removed to rev*.
I fi..i HAaaAla ShaMCr aOMkilaa
wi. iow-co*x gtmit itair remow*
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. CaH 372-0039 for
appointment. (J-3ltfc)
TALMADGE I saw you In the Plaza
Sunday, but you disappeared. I'd
love to see you again, but dont know
how to reach you P.M. (J-2t-44-p)
GO Club Invites you to learn GO.
Rules easy, strategy more complex
than Chess, Friday Nov. 20 7:30 PM
In Rm 150 C In the Union (J-lt-44-p)
COMPUTER DATING Meet your
Ideal date. Special Introductory price.
Now serving leading colleges and
universities throughout the U.S.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702
(J-23t-44-p)
MY DEAR ARLENE, HAPPY
BIRTHDAY LOVE you're just too
good to be true Your Hubby Hen
(J-lt-44-p)
Seminole sales staff meeting Tuesday,
November 24, 8:00 p.m. Important
call Jan if unable to come
(J-4t-44-nc)
ROC discount records specializing In
progressive rock $4.19 albums
reduced to $3.25 located at 424 N.W.
13th St. 12 to 9 pm (J-st-44-p)
Lost your reason for living? Many
hve found It at university lutheran
oiurch, 1826 west university avenue
11:00 a.m. Sundays, 376-7514
(J-lt-44-p)
Eye Reading As Hobby No Charge
Singly or Group 378-8490 Or
f/6-217 Leave Phone number
(J-st-44*p)
Students do not be quick to judge
maintenance personnel from
* learned they are honest
"* 'Pful thanks again. E.M.C.
(J-lt-44-p)
re ~7 %
r -r
** re? l
A'
>r'.W- f |

LOST Sc POUIV O
LOST pair of heavy rim glasses in a
brown case. The frames are
redish-brown In color. Please call Dan
at 378-8580 If found. (L-st-44-p)
LOST. Brown tri-fold wallet in
vicinity of union please return to
union lost and found or call
392-9534. Need enclosed IDs badly
Reward (L-2t-44-p)
Lost Friday on Med Center bus about
noon Dugsdale comp. bk. with med
surge syllabus and important papers
please call 373-1754 Reward!
(L-4t-42-p)
Found: ladys wristwatch on Beta
field last Weds., Nov. 11. Call
392-1864 during the day to identify.
Ask for Fred Taylor or leave message.
(L-3t-43-p)
Found: dog beagle/basset male quiet
well-mannered free to anyone must
go or be impounded 711 NE 5 Terr.
378-5468 (L-3t-43-p)

I
I BpgJl 2-00 W 3-52 5:44 7:39 9:35
iMrWI "DARKER
mUmJPWI THAN AMBER
technicolor*
' wL anaTkinai general PICTURES RELEASE
flHDHreK|r TH ACINEMACENIEHfILMSPRfS£NTATION[RjaP
I EXCELLENT!
TANTALIZING!
FANTASTIC! Wre
superior!
super! regrere
RUN TO JrflEyre
Gannett Syndicate
THE
~~ r
LAST TIMES TODAY "C. C. and COMPANY"

Diunday. November 19. 1970. The Florida Alligator,

LOST St FOUND
Found: small tan dog wearing flea
collar outside of Towers Sunday nite.
Ask for Bronc, 392-7512 (L-3t-43-p)
LOST: Gold ladies watch in Norman
Hall area. REWARD offered please
Mil Nancy 373-3360. (L-4t-41-p)
SERVICES
:XtXwx*X:Xx*xxx*x-XvX-X ; X ; X ; X ; X
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.
across from Greyhound Bus Station.
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Planning on flying home for the
holidays? Save 25% and still get a
reserved seat with an Eastern Youth
Card. Only $3. Call your Eastern
Campus Rep. at 378-9792, evenings.
(M-st-44-p)

Page 21

X-X-X-X-X-X-X*X-X-X-X-X*X-X-X-X-:-:-X-:-
SERVICES
XvX*X:XXIX-X-X-X-X*X-X-!-SX-X-7-XXvX
Alternators, generators. starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service. 1111 S. Main.
378-7330. Now! Bank Amerlcard 4
Master Charge (M-tfc)

$2.50 per person £1
0 j|| Record Bar W ||i % I
V HI Production p vl

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refuhds.

Deadline -300 pun. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

J
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
for sale (concuiw) STUDENT # PHONE
for rent
wanted 2 days ADDRESS
help wanted O 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos 4 days (*lO% discount) Qjy STATE ZIR
Q personal q 5 days and over
O lost-found (*20% discount)
Q services
WORDING
l I M l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I m i I I I I I ITTTT
2i 1 11 11 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 it m~
n 1 11 11 n m 11 1 1 r i n r 11 11 11 11 1 1 1 IT T
4l I I I I I I MJIMJ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I r

SERVICES
Homt ooirMd ttl your norsa out of
th cold and into a nail at tiaapy
nollow HORSE FARM comp lota cara
training ilghtad ring trails Pn
373-1059 (M-St-41-p)



Page 22

r. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, November 19,1970

-
wtmTTfTA r f iJM
VHhHHHHHHHHHHHHHIHHHIH
*
r GOLDEN RIPE ) f FRESH CRISP O ]
IHASH#S2^|-
( LUSCIOUS f SWEET FLORIDA ]
EMPEROR ORANGES or
MMAPES I I^NGERINES it
* <*
Wl ALSO CARRY A COMPLETE VARIETY OP
HOLIDAY FRUIT A NUTS PUIS ALL THE IflffnVnfPiniA |BH!H!fFfWI.IIIJ|A
MAKINGS FOR YOUR HOUDAY BAKINO, UttliplfitalMllfl UJiU^UUiiiMUi
FAVORITE! fc^l
PUMPKIN SU MIS WS
I InSM EG El BP M I AU PURPOSE EATING OR COOKING
Imi WES APPIES 4-451
I " 3Qt ONIONS 3-281
v J SW. POTATOES -121



Jamm]
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I SIRLOIN I f BONELESS?u )
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I jiiWiiliHHl ml f I hsh i wiir 2 BK.
I LD B 11 llUhiMihl l ufnici!} LB 7
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iPnTTfVMfiHMixnTh tfirnstTEtiwnink nvnrfTMnPwnntk
Hi
\ COMPARE! |i? f.'
| *H*SJ / Plumrose Cooked Ham.;; 59c < .
II fyf&yo/iy*l ASI( Chipped Sliced Meats ASS T J 02Jk0 35 c 39* 4
LB y Deveined Shrimp s ?v,7% 89c si. o9 20*
v Shrimp Cocktail <,*. 3/79 c si.oo au

BONELESS cut

Thursday, November 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23



. Tha Florida AlUfator, Thursday'. Novembar'l9, I*l7o

Page 24

Players To Present 'One Acts'

By WARD BRISICK
AlHfptor Entertainment Editor
An evening of 4> Fun and
merriment in the form of four
one act plays opens this Sunday
in the H. P. Constans Theatre.
The Florida Platers will
present a series of student acted
and directed one act plays to run
from Nov. 22 through Nov. 24.
THE ACTORS in these plays
are not all particularly theatre
students, said Richard Lake,
theatre faculty member and
public relations director for the
Florida Players.
Auditions wer6 given in the
form of open readings in the
theatre earlier this year. All
students were eligible to try out.
Thus we have a cross
representation of actors in these
up and coming one act plays,
Lake said.
The one acts are mostly slice
of life dramas which parody and
exaggerate daily life. Since the
plays are one acts, even those
who arent regular theatre goers
will enjoy the total movement
and message of the dramas.
THE FOUR PLAYS are as
follows:
Gallows Humor, a
tragicomedy written by Jack
Richardson and directed by Joan
Mead. This play represents fully
all facets of the theatre spectrum
in one compact act. 'Hie play
features Melissa Shepard as
Martha, Rusty Sailing as Phillip,
and Jack Farrell as Warden.
Red Cross, by Sam Shepard
features Andrew Banker as Jim,
Beti Sechen as Carol, and Susan
Krieger as the Maid. Banker and
Miss Sechen were standouts in
the earlier production
Pasacaglia and should prove to
make an interesting performance
under the direction of Chet
Meisner.
The Elephant Calf, by
Bertolt Brecht and directed by
Sherri Blodgett stars Sue Owens
and Steve Rehberg as Polly and
Uriah.
EPIPHANY, stars Ron
Femee as The Man, and Marilyn
Wall as The Woman. The play

11 r>T lii CTI/ *i )
1 Porterhouse 6a
(Round Ib.^^^B^B
i /&s\ m
V I Aomwt'l i IHBI
H AIE S
IMlMCiw ** kmm .< -mp Mm. *-** M*t yy
XMIUe AT M. MAM IT 175.2040 7 Mon Sat.

i- 'l*
f ,<*
Jr wm mmm
t \ M Mfcalii To \
m
m irk &
MARTHA AND PHILLIP
... "Gallows Humor" action

was written by Lewis Cailino
and is under the direction of
Kay Gore, also a UF student.
Curtain is at 7 for all
performances. Due to the nature
of these plays there will be no
reserved seats. Tickets are 25
cents for students, 75 cents for
general public.
I OMftSMC "1:
* I*
* flavor in our chili, I*
* coming to your door I*
* hot said spicy I I*
* BENCH and BARI*
: CALL 376-3302 \*
: free J:
* iHRHHHHHHHnmr k

Go fish!
L
I
al> I
URGIR^I

WM
M" Jig
- lip JH
Mr - If jjj|
"ELEPHANT CALF"
.. .featuring Debbie Kondelik

rodSTguUsho?
WE FIX-TRADE-SELL
WCHERW^HW^^ITiNG
1378-16961
1223 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Honda Quarterly
11ERE NOW!
at bookstores.



JL \ WHOLE or SHANK HALF FULLY
|ljpPp|y Sup#r Riflhr pure Rorv b 9
J Pric. in this Ad are .H.cfiv V Ra| Aflnn I,k /L Qc ' W
from 19 through W* \J I\JUII\J .. . Pkg Q jHQA 4Q(
in tho following f JF JT
1130 NE 16th Ave. I-* e *
>y QuonHty Right. oorv.d" f || | Q KOQSt t
Super-Right Freshly [ Old Milwaukee IMI Beef Stew 2 -69* SF
DEED H Chili w/Beans 3" *1 §g
*9 Oysters "- 1- * ccl HI Potted Meat 227 35
ygj Cured Hams^99 c t x Corned Beef Hash 39*
Sugar Q Lm
She Bacon "* 59 c k 12 oi. c*n S y r^sgk^il
Plain or Self-Rising Flour (With Newspaper Coupon) Mushroom, Beef, Chicken, or Shrimp &jM|
Gold 5 AQt aw Mein.. !S 99 t :||n
CT M* 4 " -V| 00 Soy Sauce 39* Chow Meins9*
25c or more order) Noodles cJ?* 29* Vegetables 3- 1
<. mm, w l(?
Shave Cream 39c Protein 21 J| 3c #r Decorated or Ticiuo I I
wli
9> T 'TY.VT?f* I Pure Vegetable Shortening (Limit I w/$5 or more food order) Viya Towels 2 D e4T9c Scotties 32^'79c
Lo = SNOWDRIFT V 69' .
ICT,1 C T, : ; MONEY SAVING COUPON lttA^Ld^TX
ff\ Coupon Good Thru *£s '-" ?if
mmmmmmmmrn || eight o'clock COFFEE v ||
ml li V 49< ca l b 9B< Sl
I CALO CAT FOOD 1 -< <*
* Chk TM, '*"*' Gerber 4 10*
Jane Park Delicious Special
Span. Bar ~3 9
WsTrffWsTdfWtT^fXMWiTrffW** Wi&WM VhirffWiTrffWTnMeigg*?WToXTOT
[| g *| WH it# e sSBeTo t!w)o7'i
POTATOES 10 bag 49 c Let Plaid Stamps §
Apples*23* Celery 5... J7 e | be your I
w i Cmi6#i I i
Coldwator Detergent 8 jfJJ | J q S
t#fl mm 1)01.% J% v Plaid will mall your Plaid
Sil with Face doth i|JC holiday gifts FREE to your
jM H uyjw Condensed % home or to the home of a
WIS K ALL H friend or relative, if more than
JS: 83c % 41C I 25 miles from the |
M Us Duhwmhin, f Plaidland Redemption Store. jk
' iUr 1 f^f| Y ALL LUX L| QU!D J 77/'s offer exp/res December 2,1970 S I
-_ .. -sa-nrs, *J yl isSsJ£_JffiSE ^£ji
Baby Feed TT c- 33c Mint Morsels *, 22 Oi. 40 o*. AA 11
,o
wBNCaa CSB BC fe*

Thu*idy. No*emb*>9. 1970. Th f torxta Alligator.

Page 25



The
Florida
Alligator

Harriers Hampered By Ineligibilty

By MARTY PE RLM UTTER
Baaatftiv* Sporti Editor
Five was the magic number
for the Gators in last Mondays
Southeastern Conference cross
country championship. UF
finished fifth with five promising
runners absent from the meet,
which was won by Kentucky.
We lost five runners this year
because of either ineligibility or
by the draft, assistant coach
Roy Benson said Wednesday.
Three of our top five runners
were declared ineligible, while
John Brown was drafted and
Mark Bir was red-shirted.
BENSON NAMED Don
Laene, Frank Betz and Jack
Nason as the ones with grade
problems. Laene was seventh
last year in the SEC, Nason fifth
while Betz ran a 4:07 mile last
season.
After we learned that these
five wouldnt be with us this
year, we had to move our other
five runners up to the top five
and use freshmen to round out
the squad, Benson said.
Roy Benjamin was the leader

Thetas Lead Sorority Volleyball

Sororities are playing
volleyball again, and in Orange
League play, the Thetas are out
in front after victories over
DDD, DG, and XO.
Last week against DDD, the
serving by Laurie Laughlins and
the play of Linda Tonsk and
Julis Crawford delivered the
Thetas a 15-11, 154 victory to
keep them in front.
THE ZETAS are right behind,
however, having lost only one
game to a fired-up DDD team.
The darling Deltas, lead by
captain Janice Karst nipped the
Zeta pickers in the first game by
a narrow 15-13 score. Indy
Shriner shined as super server |
and wrapped up the second
game 15-10 for the win.
In the Blue League, there is
currently a four way tie for the
top spot between Delta Phi
Epsilon, Phi Mu, Phi Sig Sig, and
Alpha Chi Omega.
Last Thursday afternoons
play had AXO sweeping past the
AEPhis in an easy victory, 15-1,
15-6. But the highlight of the
day was the game between
Sigma Kappa and Phi Mu. Ruth
Pierce served nine points in the
second game, and Marcia King
finished the scoring for the SK
WILIER Isj
BROWN
4222 N.W. 13th
ST.
' -.% **
VSr
808 STACY .lUC
378-5222 |
CAMPUS REP

GATOR SPORTS

K
pt
If, w
lb- m
Jbl 1
ROY BENJAMIN
... top finisher in meet
for the Gators in the 33rd
Annual SEC meet finishing 19th
with Benny Vaughn 25th, Jim
McQuinn 26th, Ron Nabors
28th, Ken Bumsett 33rd, Jack
Stewart 34th and George Bridges
37th.
IF WE HAD had those five
running this year, and with
Benjamins performance we

serving six points.
Although the 15-1,15-1 score
sounds bad, Phi Mu played the
game to the end and made a
good game out of a
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could have been right up there
with Kentucky, Benson said.
Kentucky was the victor with 41
points followed by Alabama
with 44 and Tennessee third
with 47 points.
Tennessee, the SEC cross
country champ for the past five
years, and Florida (131 points),
runner-up three of the past five
years, both were defeated
handily by Kentucky and
Alabama.
It isnt that Tennessee and
Florida are getting any worse,
but that the other schools in the
conference are beginning to
improve their cross country
programs, Benson said.
ALABAMA WENT out two
years ago and hired the assistant
cross country coach from Kansas
and began to recruit runners out
of the junior colleges.
And with the facilities at
LSU, they have quite a program
going also, Benson said.
I dont think that of the top
five schools finishing in the meet
at Birmingham, not one of them
can really run away from the
rest of the conference, they are

disheartening loss.
Girls interested in running
track should meet with the
Womens Track Club today at 4
pjn. at Florida Track.
Yaw 6enrtw
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Executive Sports Editor

Page 26

so evenly matched, he said.
There is only one more meet
this year for the cross country

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I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday. November 19.1970

PHIL PETTIJOHN
Sports Editor

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Five Vols Selected For All-SEC

Special To The Alligator
cr
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Five
Tennessee Vols, including two
unanimous selections, were
named to the second annual
Hustler All-Southeastern
Conference football team,

Hustlers First Team

Voting (firsts-seconds-pointt)
OFFENSE
RECEIVERS Beasley 8-2-18,
Smith 7-1-15, Poole 5-2-12, Carlos
Alvarez (Florida) 3-3-9, Jim Yancey
(Florida) 2-3-7, Karl Weiss (Vandy)
2- David Bailey (Alabama) 0-7-7,
Floyd Franks (Ole Miss) 1-3-5,
Charles Whittemore (Georgia) 0-3-3,
Jim Cunningham (Vandy) 1-0-2,
Andy Hamilton (LSU) 1-0-2, Vernon
Studdard (Ole Miss) 0-1-1, Ken
Kavanaugh 0-1-1, Ronnie Ross
(Auburn) 0-1-1.
TACKLES McClure 8-2-18,
Hannah 2-5-9, Tom Nash (Georgia)
3- -T, Steve Robinson (Tennessee)
2-1-5, Buddy Mitchell (Ole Miss)
0-4-4, Mike Wright (LSU) 1-2-4, Glen
Alexander (LSU) 1-1-3, Bill Dowdy
(Florida) 2-1-3, Joe Balthrop 2-0-4,
Danny Speigner (Auburn) 0-2-2,
Mike Lopatka (Georgia) 0-1-1, Hal
Hamrick (Auburn) 0-1-1.
GUARDS Kell 10-0-20, Jernigan
6- Reid Drinkard (Alabama)
2-0-4, Jimmy Speigner (Auburn)
1-6-8, Donny Williams (Florida)
1-1-3, Jim Elkins (LSU) 0-1-1, Don
Denbo (Tennessee) 0-1-1, Larry Hill
(Auburn) 0-1-1, Mike DeMarie (LSU)
0-3-3, Royce Smith (Georgia) 1-1-3.
CENTER Lyons 6-2-14, Wimpy
Winther (Ole Miss) 2-5-9, Mike
Bevans (Tennessee) 1-3-5.
QUARTERBACKS Sullivan
9-1-19, Archie Manning (Ole Miss)
1-7-9, John Reaves (Florida) 0-1-1,
Joe Reed (Mississippi State) 0-1-1.
RUNNINGBACKS Watson
7- Musso 9-1-19, Art Cantrelle
(LSU) 2-5-9, Wallace Clark (Auburn)
i niiiHHf
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VOLS'JACKIE WALKER
... unanimous choice

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TOUNOBLOOD picked to first team

according to Don Hemke,
Vanderbilt Hustler sports editor.
Jack Youngblood was the
only Florida player selected to
the first team.
Vols Jackie Walker, a junior
linebacker, and Chip Kell, a

/fx
1- Randy Reed (Ole Miss) 1-5-7,
Tommy Durrance (Florida) 0-1-1,
Lee Clymer (Kentucky) 0-1-1.
KICKERS Braswell 6-3-15,
Gardner Jett (Auburn) 4-4-12, Mark
Lumpkin (LSU) 0-1-1, George Hunt
(Tennessee) 0-1-1, Cloyce Hinton
(Ole Miss) 0-1-1.
DEFENSE
ENDS Youngblood 8-1-17,
Millican 5-2-12, Dennis Coleman (Ole
Miss) 3-5-11, Dave Hands (Kentucky)
3-3-9, Chuck Heard (Georgia) 0-1-1,
Neal Detterming (Auburn) 0-1-1,
George Abernathy (Vandy) 0-1-1,
Arthur Davis (LSU) 0-1-1, Bob
Brown (Auburn) 0-1-1, Robin
Parkhouse (Alabama) 1-3-5, Bob
Duval (Vandy) 0-1-1.
TACKLES Rollen 8-2-18, Sage
7-2-16, Brasher (Georgia) 0-1-1 Mike
Eaton (Mississippi State) 0-1-1,
Dennis Watson (Georgia) 1-0-2, Jerry
Conrad (Mississippi State) 0-1-1,
Tommy Yearout (Auburn) 2-1-5,
Don Dristow (Auburn) 0-4-4, Keith
Green (Auburn) 0-3-3, Ronnie Estay
(LSU) 1-1-3, John Robinson (Vandy)
0-3-3, Terry Rowell (Alabama) 0-1-1.
LINEBACKERS Walker
10-0-20, Anderson 7-2-16, Strickland
7- Chip Wisdom (Georgia)
3-4-10, Joe Federspiel (Kentucky)
2- Jeff Rouzie (Bama) 0-1-1,
Wilbur Hackett (Kentucky) 0-2-2,
Mike Kelley (Florida) 0-3-3, Steve
Fritts (Vandy) 0-2-2, Steve Kitchens
(Georgia) 1-1-3, Sam Kiser (Vandy)
0-1-1, Fred Brister (Ole Miss) 1-1-3,
Ray Nettles (Tennessee) 0-2-2,
Crowell Armstrong (Ole Miss) 2-1-5,
Jim Krapf (Alabama) 0-1-1, Louis
Cascio (LSU) 0-1-1.
DEFENSIVE BACKS Priest
8- Majors 8-2-18, Willingham
9- Casanova 5-0-10, Tommy
Wade (Alabama) 2-4-8, Ray Heidel
(Ole Miss) 0-5-5, John Burns
(Florida) 0-3-3, Buzz Rosenberg

senior offensive guard, were the
only unanimous picks on the
24-man team chosen by the
sports editors of the 10 campus
newspapers.
JOINING WALKER and Kell
on the team were teammates
Curt Watson at runningback,

(Georgia) 1-3-5, Buck Swindle
(Georgia) 0-3-3, Frank Dowsing
(Mississippi State) 0-1-1, Ken Stone
(Vandy) 0-1-1, Ken Stone (Vandy)
0-2-2, Craig Burns (LSU) 2-2-6, Steve
Higginbotham 2-0-4, Emile Petro
(Mississippi State) 0-1-1, Wylie Neely
(Ole Miss) 0-1-1, Bill Darby (Georgia)
2-1-5.
PUNTER Smith 8-1-17, Dave
Hardt (Kentucky) 1-2-4, Frank Mann
(Alabama) 1-3-5, Bobby Majors
(Tennessee) 1-0-2, John James
(Florida) 0-1-1.
, HUSTLER ALL-SEC 1970
Pos.-Name (School)
OFFENSE Yr.
SE Terry Beasley (Auburn) Jr.
T Worthy McClure (Ole Miss) Sr.
G Chip Kell (Tennessee) Sr.
C Tommy Lyons (Georgia) Sr.
G Skip Jernigan (Ole Miss) Sr.
T John Hannah (Alabama) So.
TE Jim Poole (Ole Miss) Jr.
QB Pat Sullivan (Auburn) Jr.
RB Curt Watson (Tennessee) Jr.
RB Johnny Musso (Alabama) Jr.
FB David Smith (Miss. State) Sr.
KS Kim Braswell (Georgia) So.
DEFENSE r
E Jack Youngblood (Florida) Sr.
T Dave Roller (Kentucky) Sr.
T John Sage (LSU) Sr.
E- Buddy Millican (LSU) Sr.
LB Jackie Walker (Tennessee) Jr.
LB Bobby Strickland (Auburn) Sr.
LB Mike Anderson (LSU) Sr.
DB Larry Willingham (Auburn) Sr.
DB Tim Priest (Tennessee) Sr.
DB Bobby Majors (Tennessee) Jr.
DB Tommy Casanova (LSU) Jr.
P Steve Smith (Vandy) Sr.
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Tim Priest at defensive back
and Bobby Majors at .safety.
LSU was next in. players
selected with four, all defensive
men, then followed Auburn, also
with four; Ole Miss three, all in
the offensive line; Georgia and
Alabama, with two each; and
Florida, Vandy, Mississippi State
and Kentucky, with one each.
Only two sophomores were
chosen on the team, Alabama
offensive tackle John Hannah,
who barely edged out Georgia
sophomore Tom Nash for the
second tackle slot, and Georgia
placekicker Kim Braswell, a
narrow winner over Gardner Jett
of Auburn.
OF THE 24, eight are
repeaters from last years Hustler
ALL-SEC. Repeating are

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Thursday, November 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

offensive tackle Worthy McClure
(Ole Miss), Kell, runningback
Curt Watson (Tennessee),
flanker David Smith (Mississippi
State), defensive tackle David
Roller (Kentucky), and
defensive backs Priest, Majors
and Tommy Casanova (LSU).
However, four members of
last years team, again eligible
this year, didnt repeat. They
were Ole Miss quarterback
Archie Manning, who was beaten
by Auburns Pat Sullivan;
Florida runningback Tommy
Durrance who gave up his slot to
Johnny Musso (Alabama);
Florida flanker Carlos Alvarez,
who ran behind Terry Beasley
(Auburn); and wide receiver
Sammy Milner of Mississippi
State.

Page 27



The All-Campus Doubles
Tennis Tournament has started
with most teams having
completed two rounds of play.
The following teams will play
this Sunday in the championship
side of the draw: Linda Voss and
Skip Lees, Andrea Genna and
Wayne Fieler, Patty Potter and
Ingo Krieg, Judy Feinberg and
Henry Spira, and Lloyd Shoop
and Tina Lowell.
IN THE CONSOLATION
tournament, Jack Taylor and
Jeanie Grist will play Donna
Gripe and Joe Drescher. Henry
Morales and Cory Walker will
play the winner of that first
match. Also in the semis are
Kirk Hubbard and Sue Conolly.
In Blue League fraternity
action, the Chi Phis knocked the
Theta Chis out of the
undefeated rank by winning on
first downs in an 18-18 tie. The
Theta Chis were one touchdown
and two first downs behind
when they went in for a score
with minutes left to tie the game
Turkey Shoot
Set Saturday
At Broward
A turkey shoot, open to
anyone who can handle a bow,
will begin at 10:30 ajn.
Saturday on the Broward Range.
The shoot, sponsored by the
University Archery Club, will
award turkeys for first and
second places for both men and
women. There is no entry fee,
and equipment will be provided
for those who need it.
After a short practice
beginning at 10 a.m., the line
will form at 10:30.

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Intramurals

score-wise and in first downs.
But when the Chi Phis got the
ball they rang up one first down
and then ran the clock out for
the win.
The Delts had little trouble
crushing the Phi Kappa Psis,
46-0. The Delts are on their way
to a bracket championship and a
first place spot in the league.
IN OTHER GAMES in .the
league, the AGRs downed the
Delta Sigs, 19-0, and the Tekes
edged the Sammies, 13-12.
In a limited Orange League

THE MEN OF PI TjATVTBDA PHI
FRATERNITY CORDIALLY INVITE THE STUDENTS.
FACULTY AND STAFF OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA TO ATTEND OUR FIFTH CONSECUTIVE VICTORY
OVER THE MEN OF TAU EPSILON PHI IN THE
ISunday, November 221. I2:QQPMI
ISia Ep Field

by Harvey Spooner

schedule, the Betas beat the Phi
Delts by scoring 21 points in the
opening half and then holding
on for a 21-18 win. All-Campus
quarterback Hank Salzler once
again spearheaded the attack.
Champ Madigan played an
outstanding game for the Phi
Delts. The Betas must face the Pi
Kappa Phis in a rematch Friday,
as the initial encounter in which
the Betas won was reversed on a
protest.
In the meantime Pi Kappa Phi
prepared for the game with a
33-18 win over the Lambda Chi
Alphas.

Sports Letters
Sports Editor:
As a Foosball spectator, I 3m familiar enough with the to
recognize the gross oversight which your Foosball Editor, Chuck
Keller, made in his 3rticle of Nov. 11. It is obvious to all serious
Foosball students that there can be no true world championship
without the participation of Johnny Quickwrist McGivem of
Buffalo, N. Y., long recognized the countrys No. 1 Foosball player by
Foosball World Magazine.
Nevertheless, one could overlook this error, if it weren t for the fact
that the best Foosball teams in Gainesville were also ignored. I refer to
the Boron Bombers Hot Shot Abate and Flick McMaster, who
are among the players in the Chemical Research Building. Among
others in the CRB, which houses the top Foosball players on campus,
there are Whizzer Wentz and partner Killer Kulig.
I was, therefore, quite disappointed to note the KA challenge was
issued to any dorm floor or fraternity house on campus. One can
only wonder why the challenge didnt extend to all groups on campus.
Was it because they know they are not the best?
WILLIAM H. MYERS (7 AS)

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Novambar 19,1970

Page 28