Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 63, No. 41

MODIFIES STATEMENT
Murray Recommends
Standardized Rules

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Lewis C. Murray, Board
of Regents member from
Orlando, said Friday he would
recommend regulations
pertaining to campus
publications in the state
universities be standardized
through the state.
Murray, in modifying an
earlier statement, said student
newspapers should be made as
free as possible.
HE CLAIMS regulations for
campus publication are different
through the state, with each
university having its own rules
and regulations.
Murray cited the difference
between the positions of the
administrations in handling
student publications at the
University of South Florida
(USF), and UF.
At USF, unlike UF, there is
no board regulating publications;
the authority of the USF
president, as publisher of the
student newspaper, is delegated
to the faculty adviser.
THE USF NEWSPAPER,
The Oracle, was hit by a staff
walk out early this month when
the faculty advisor decided to
pull a cartoon from the editorial
II Th-e Gator
THE SECRET Service is
investigating the passing
of a bogus bill at a
campus store page 6
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 10
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 10
Sports I 4
Whats Happening 4
World Wrap-Up 13

Recorder May Explain Marshall U. Crash

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. (UPI) The charred bodies of
75 persons, 38 of them Marshall University football
players, were taken Sunday from the scattered wreckage
of a chartered DC9 jetliner that crashed just short of
landing in what federal officials described as one of the
greatest tragedies in aviation history.
A 35-MAN team of federal investigators recovered an
in-flight recorder and a badly-damaged tape of the cockpit
conversation from the twin-jet Southern Airways plane,
which skimmed across two small hills and fell into a deep,
foggy Appalachian valley Saturday night just short of the
Tri-State Airport. The plane exploded and burned for
nearly five hours, lighting up the sky, witnesses said.
Chartered by Marshall University, the plane was ending
a 40-minute flight from N.C., carrying 38
football players, five coaches, one team trainer, and
members of a booster club** including one newly-elected
state legislator and six physicians. All perished, along with

University of Florida, Gainesville Monday,

pages he considered would
inflame an already tense
situation on the Tampa campus.
Murray, who said last week he
would recommend tighter
control on Regents policy
concerning recognition of
student groups at the state
universities and colleges, said last
Thursday he wanted the boards
of publications at the
universities to exercise more care
in their publications.
When he was contacted
Friday, Murray said he referred
particularly to yearbooks. He
indicated the yearbooks had
more exposure to the public.
HE SAID THE student
newspaper was for the students,
but yearbooks were usually seen
by the parents of students and
sometimes they did not like
what they saw in them.
- He said, however, his
recommendation would not
interfere with the freedom of
actions of newspapers at state
universities.
Under present Regents
policy, student newspapers in
the state universities are
regulated by rules set down by
the administration, or as in the
case in UF, under a Board of
Student Publications (BSP)
which sets official policy.
THE BSP also has under its
jurisdiction the yearbook, The
Seminole, and The Florida
Quarterly.
If a decision handed down by
a federal district court stands in
Massachusetts last February,
board of student publications or
their equivalents cannot
interfere with the freedom of
the newspapers.
The case concerned the
censoring of the student
newspaper at Fitchburg State
College. The court ruled the

administration could not censor
the newspaper, The Cycle.
IT WOULD be inconsistant
with basic assumptions of the
First Amendment freedoms to
permit a campus newspaper to
be simply a vehicle for ideas the
state or the college
administration deems
appropriate, Judge W. Arthur
Garrity Jr. wrote in his decision.
Garrity added, ... there is
no right to editorial control by
administration officials flowing
from the fact that The Cycle is
college-sponsored and
state-supported.
REGENTS CHANCELLOR
Robert Mautz, said Thursday
there was no contradiction
between Regents* policy and this
decision.
Our policy is consistent with
the opinion (of the
Massachusetts court), Mautz
said. It recognizes the value of
student publications for
students, and free and
responsible discussion of ideas. I
cant see there is any
inconsistency.

Policy Voice Strengthened
By UC Advisory Council

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writar
University College (UC)
students now have a greater
voice in shaping UC policy.
An advisory council for UC,
which will serve to strengthen
the program, has been set up
under the leadership of Dr.

four crewmen and a baggage handler. The team had
played East Carolina earlier in the day, losing 17-14.
Federal officials said it would be about a month
before they could determine the cause of the mysterious
crash, the nations worst this year and the second in six
weeks involving a college football team.
THE SKY was overcast with light rain, smoke and fog
- what pilots called a ragged ceiling but the control
tower said there was no indication of trouble as the
plane headed for a landing. It crashed one and one-half
miles short of the runway.
Men worked for about 12 hours combing through the
wreckage, which was scattered about 200 feet in every
direction.
The bodies, all of them burned beyond recognition,
were placed in plastic bags and taken to a temporary
morgue set up in a National Guard armory at the Tri-State
Airport. -- -----

November 16, 1970

F ~. J
'^jp%, <*
iwli% y ijw I ;
4 % PHIL COPE
APPLE MAN WAS THERE
Good food, good music, and good fun was the scene at the Plaza of
the Americas Sunday afternoon when nearly 1,000 people grooved in
an atmosphere of complete congeniality at the Hogtown Co-op folk
fest.
The fest was held to make money for the three-day Thanksgiving
fest to be held beginning this Thursday, and also to provide an
opportunity to have a "together" happening featuring jamming on
stage by area singers and musicians for all the people of Hogtown
(Gainesville).
Healthy-looking food, such as potato-green bean soup, tampura
(fruit and vegetables dipped in batter and fried), fruit salad, oranges
and apples (above), was served throughout the fest.
Madman and Barrister, spokesmen for the co-op, said much of the
food had been donated by people interested in seeing the fest come
off well.

Frank Taylor, associate
professor of humanities.
The council is composed of
14 faculty members and 14
students from UC. Os that
council, two faculty
representatives and two students
will have a vote in the UC
Executive Council, which is the
decision-making body of the
institution.

STATE POLICE Capt. J. D. Baisden said 15 of the
bodies were identified tentatively from personal effects
such as rings.
Walter Rollins, a mortician who helped with the
recoveiy, said he believed death was instantaneous to
every one on the plane.
John Reed, chairman of the National Transportation
Safety Board, headed the team of investigators who came
to the scene.
THE FLIGHT recorder will tell the investigators the air
speed, altitude and general operation of the plane before
the crash. There was some damage to it, but we expect a
read out, Reed said.
The plane was at the outer markers of the airports
radar screen when it crashed, Reed said.. The pilot
reported no malfunction, but witnesses in the area said
the craft appeared to be in trouble immediately before the
fiery crash.

THE EXECUTIVE Council is
headed by UC Dean Frank Doty.
Taylor said the council is in
general a deliberative body to
discuss all areas of interest to
students and faculty in making
UC more truly inter inter,
, inter, disciplinarian in nature.
The council, Taylor said.
(SEE 'UC COUNCIL' PAGE 3)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 16,1970

BLACK MANS PLIGHT
Adonis Portrays Ideas On Canvas

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
A blade man with a rope around his neck and hands tied stood
helplessly on the painted canvas. The American flag adorned the
background as scarlet blood flowed from several open wounds on the
mans ebony body.
The painting expressed on canvas the thoughts of Naomi Adonis on
the plight of the black man in the United States.
MISS ADONIS titles the painting I am the Darker Brother.
It depicts how black people are suffering today in the United
States, she explained, how they suffered in the past and are still
suffering.
Miss Adonis was on campus Sunday as part of an exhibit by the
Miami-based Theatre of Afro Arts.
THE THEATRE, a non-profit organization, is committed to
educating, entertaining and serving blacks.
Wendell Narcisse, producer and founder of the theatre, said the
purpose of the organization was to revamp, rediscover, restore and
exhibit the true black experience through the performing and visual
arts.
The theatre, convinced that the creative accomplishments of the
blade man are stolen, hidden or denied, attempts to provide blacks
with something they can relate to.
NARCISSE CITED black playwright Ed Bullens as an example of
how black creativity is being suppressed in America.
Bullens has written 50 plays and will probably write 200 before he
dies, Nardsse told the audience of 100 students. Maybe then he will
be recognized as a great playwright, but today we seem to overlook
our brothers.
Promoting black drama, art and writing is the concern of the
theatre which conducts periodic workships in all three fields.
WE JUST TRY to show what black people can do when theyre

Fired Pilot Guthrie Speaks
To Environmental Workshop

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Fired Eastern Airiines Pilot W.
L. Guthrie spoke to a crowd of
ISO student environmentalists
Friday during an Environmental
Actior Workshop.
The main goal of the
workshop was to discuss ways of
coordinating the activities of all
the environmental groups at the
schools represented.
THERE WERE 15 state
colleges represented, and several
high schools sent delegates.
Guthrie spoke to the delegates
about environmental action and
said Pure air and water are like
happiness; you can never get
them by chasing them or
thinking about them.
We are going to get dear
skies and waters by attending to
our work to dear up the
management of processed
materials,'Guthrie said.
GUTHRIE WAS FIRED from
his job as a pilot with Eastern

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Galnefvllle, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

for refusing to dump excess jet
fuel into the atmosphere.
The 50 year old pilot
discussed this subject and
mentioned that many
governmental agencies and
groups want to set an
acceptable limit for pollution,
when there should be no
pollution whatsoever.
The company (Eastern) was
closer to the law and national
understanding because, as they
put it, the addition of 1.3
gallons of kerosene to the air
would not measurably increase
air pollution.'
This is where the nation is
losing the ball game, Guthrie
said. Each man is saying this
amount would not measurably
increase pollution.
IN MY VIEW, Guthrie said,
we are not in the business of
measuring the air pollution at
all. We are to measure the
kerosene as property, assign
responsibility to the owner, and

I,- | ... .. n -....
I ""Ml
f BMk M
* mi
if II
it ijfl iHi
it 1 f fll
r m ISf 1 K
If M Twk tmm m HI
I mm ]
h # m - MWMmmm MWMmmm?
? MWMmmm? hi
11& iH 4 mm
f BMHB
B If
W Ms
wk BBSSPI wm v
PHIL COPE
A BROTHER DISPLAYS
... I Am The Darker Brother'
given the materials, Nardsse said. We need something we can call
ours.
Miss Adonis painting of the Madonna and Child seeks to solve this
lack of something to relate to espedally among our younger brothers
and sisters.
Everyone has seen a painting of the Madonna and Child, Miss
Adonis said. Well I decided to paint one too, but mine is a black
Madonna and Child.

then insist he not dump it in the
public domain.
The delegates also heard two
other speakers Friday evening:
Loring Lovell, Executive
Director of Conservation '7os,
spoke on Conservation 70, and
George Gardner spoke on
Florida's Environmental
Crisis.
Games People Play
Visitors to a new exhibition
called Fun and Games at Fifth
Avenues Hallmark Gallery can
join the fun by playing games on
out-size versions of chess,
checkers, backgammon,
ticktacktoe and solitaire. For
kids, there are marbles, jacks,
tiddly winks, hopscotch,
dominoes, beanbag toss and
other amusements.
The exhibit covers the history
of games and pastimes. Also on
view are American Indian
playing cards made of rawhide,
the first Monopoly set and a
priceless antique French chess
game with figures of solid gold
and silver.

***************
* JUICE UP!
* with $3.00 order
* free party bottle
* of soda or 25 cents
* a bottle special
: CALL 376-3302 1
BENCH end BAR
* FREE DELIVERY
***** * * .* & *

[ STCfllc SHfilC~!
Student Special
| (With The Coupon) I
I ur *9ular 93< Steakburger i
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90<" i
\*wsm n
*JUe douche*, 9hc.
GAINESVILLES LARGEST STOCK OF
SI&HSUD OF THE WEST SINCE 1879
Style shown No. 3857
Justin s Natural Ruff-out Re-tan boots are the in-style
for this years foot-wear. Rugged and tough in looks and
wear. Come in today and see Gainesville's largest stock of
JUSTIN BOOTS.
i U n Bank Americard
Mastercharge .
just northeast of Dub's 7
4821 N.W. 6th S. 376-4595

Advertise:
Its Good
Business

SWING
AROUND
TO
Budget:
Rent a Gar
OF GAINESVILLE
CALL
376-1245
FOR
Free pickup and
delivery anywhere
in Alachua County
GAINESVILLE/JACKSON VILLE
ONE WAY SPECIAL
15-00 FLAT RATE
Includes Air conditioning
A free pickup and delivery.
24 Hours Maximum
Budget
tentaCwF
WE RENT
BETTER CARS
FOR LESS!



[from page one!
would ensure the cohesiveness of
the UC program.
UCS CHANCES OF surviving
as an independent unit of UF
were virtually assured Oct. 14,
when the Curriculum Committee
of the University Senate voted
to retain the 3 5-year-old
institution at UF.
It was after the committee
met that the decision to begin an
advisory council was made by
UC officials.
Taylor indicated the council

UF Employee Donations Up

Provost for Agriculture Dr. E.
T. York, Jr., chairman of the UF
United Fund Drive, said
contributions and pledges from
UF personnel are approximately
40 per cent ahead of last year,
and represent the biggest
increase in the history of the
program.
Total UF contributions,
exclusive of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, amounted to
approximately $68,000
compared to some $48,000
given last year. York said the
increased UF participation has
been a major factor in enabling
the Alachua County United
Fund to meet or possibly exceed
its 1970 goal.
I want to sincerely thank all
of those who assisted in this
campaign for their dedicated
efforts. We are also deeply
grateful to each individual whose
contribution has made this
splendid record possible. This
UF Gradvate
Assames AiS
Presidency
By Alligator Services
Dr. Solon T. Kimball, UF
graduate research professor of
anthropology, assumes the
presidency of the American
Ethnological Society (AES) this
month.
Kimball was voted
president-elect at the annual
business meeting in November
1969, in Ottawa, Canada. He
will assume office during the
AES business meeting Nov.
19-22 in San Diego, Calif.
THE AES, group of about
1,200 anthropologists, is the
oldest enthnological society in
the world. For more than 100
years, the AES has published
monographs and sponsored
symposia and publications of
work in anthropology. Kimball
is the first person from Florida
to hold the presidency.
*
+ rKCC (for a change)
* party bottle of soda
* with $3.00 order
* or 25 cents if you don't
J have $3.00
: CALL 376-3302 j
* BENCH and BAR
* FREE DELIVERY
*

UC COUNCIL ...

will be a pilot project, which
will be used as a model for the
future of undergraduate
education as a whole.
UC IS undergoing a
profound change, therefore the
UC council has a marvelous
opportunity to assist in the
remaking of the college, along
lines that would put it in the
forefront of similar efforts that
are being made at all major
universities in the whole country
in the 70s, Taylor said.
Richard Henry, a student
member of the council, said the
main objectives, from the
students point of view, is to

participation will contribute
substantially to making our total
community a better place in
which to live and work, York
said.
He also said the total
contributions will probably

ROBERTS SPECIAL
Reg* $179.95 £0095
BUY NOW ONLY W
BUT NOW &>Qf\ 00
AND SAVE \J
hurry! supply limited!
Model 30
yK AM/FM Stereo Receiver
Handsome 30 watt stereo receiver in a automatic frequency control, automatic
genuine walnut case. Tape output and input stereo FM signal seeking light. 46 solid state
jacs, stereo headphone jac, input for ceramic elements for long life,
or magnetic phono input. Tuning meter,
~ - ~ -
Professional Service Guarantee
Couch's guarantees that you our customer will receive prompt, courteous, proses proses.
. proses. sional electronics service by our team of Nationally Recognized CERTIFIED ELEC- ttUc
/\ TRQNICS TECHNICIANS. j /* X
A ,5 COUCH'S %s'
X 608 n. main "Serving Gator Country Since 1933" Ph. 378-1562

make suggestions to the UC
Executive Council.
The council, which is still in
the process of formation, will be
investigating the different UC
departments and will make
recommendations as X what to
do to improve them.
HENRY SAID the job now
before the council is to see what
problems exist within UC to
alleviate the problems facing
the different departments in UC.
I am interested in conserving
a good general education
program, Henry said. I want
to point out to students the
necessity of such a program

increase still further because, for
the first time, new employes will
be given an opportunity to begin
participating when they are
employed instead of waiting
until next year for the annual
United Fund Drive.

Sound rs Color
v : H
Light display/receiver can be used with Model 3460
translator to flash in rhythm to music or by itself for a
random display of dancing colors. Just turn it on to
produce an interesting and unusual lighting effect in any
room in your home. Size (HWD) 24 x 12 x 10.
Model 3455 Wired $29 95
AUDIO VISUAL LIGHTING COMPONENTS
by EICO
See Sound n Color at
COUGHS INC
Serving Gator Country Since 1933
608 N. MAIN ST. Ph. 378-1562

Monday, November 16,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 16,1970

Page 4

Transcendental Meditation
Lecture Given By Lucas

By BRUGH PETTRY
Are you bothered by
mosquitoes?
Freedom from mosquitoes is
just one of the many benefits of
transcendental meditation, Miss
Bobbi Lucas informed her
audience in an introductory
lecture held Thursday at 7:30
pjn. at the Reitz Union.
MISS LUCAS, who is
associated with the Student
International Meditation
Society, studied under the
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, for eight
months.
Meditation has several
interesting physiological effects.
Blood pressure is lowered and
oxygen consumption is

By MARY ANNE GILLIS

OF FLYING SHIPS: The
American Institute of
Aeronautics and Astronautics
(AIAA) will hold its regular
bi-weekly meeting tonight at
7:30 pjiL in room 303 of the
Aerospace Building. The speaker
will discuss The Electrodeless
Discharge." All interested
persons are invited.
HADASSAH BAZAAR:
Hadassah of Gainesville is
sponsoring a bazaar Thursday
from 10 am to 4 pm. Beautiful
handcrafted boutique items,
cakes, cookies and knitted and
cloth garments will be sold.
Lunch will be served. The bazaar
will be held at the Jewish Center
3115 NW 16th Ave.
SING FOR YOUR SUPPER:
The Womens Glee Chib will
present another in their series of
Supper-time Sings on the
Colonnade of the Reitz Union
Tuesday at 6 pm. This casual
presentation will include
mountain ballads and a selection
from the Broadway musical,
Youre a Good Man, Charlie
Brown.
DRUGSTORE ENCOUNTERS:
An encounter group is being
offered at the Comer Drugstore.
Want to try? If you want to see
what its all about, call Henry
Boudin 392-0755 or 392-0702.
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
IN THE AIR
378-2646

decreased. Skin tension is
lessened.
IN ADDITION, some studies
have indicated that the brain
produces more alpha waves
during meditation. This increase
in alpha waves is usually noticed
only in monks who have been
practicing meditation for up to
40 years.
Transcendental meditation
has a calming effect on the
nerves. Words of the ancient
Sanskrit language are repeated
many times to produce this
soothing effect.
IN ANSWER TO those who
doubt the usefullness of
withdrawing from the worid into
oneself, Miss Lucas cited the
Maharishis allegory, which
compares this withdrawal to the

DARK THOUGHTS: Tryouts
for the Gainesville Little
Theatres next production A
Shot in the Dark will be held at
the Little Theatre on NW 16th
Blvd. Nov. 22 and 23 at 7:30
pm. Four men and three women
are needed for the production to
be put on Jan. 28, 29, 30 and
Feb. 3,4,5.
BRUNCH WITH THE
PRESIDENT: Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder will
speak at the Hillel Foundation
brunch at 11 a.m. Nov. 22 at the
foundation.
Only At
Kiser's Office Equipment
SBS Executive Swivel Chair
Gray, used, but clean
$2950
S6O Side chair with arms to
match, used but clean
$1950
Special Special
(Only 10 of each type)
604 N. MAIN

EATONS J f\
FINE LETTER / f
PAPERS. y i
This season, /
give the gift thatAP**ks so eloquently of your good taste. Os thought thoughtfulness
fulness thoughtfulness that will be remembered throughout the year. Smart letter papers <
in all the "in" designs and "now shades. Your gifts say more ... your
letters say more... on Eaton's. From one to five dollars at our stationery
department.
CHESNUTS
106 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
AND IN THE MALL

drawing back of a bow string in
order to hit a target.
Before beginning the series of
meditation lectures, one must
attend an initiation ceremony,
which Miss Lucas said is very
beautiful and moving.
The initiate must take four
items to the ceremony. These
are a dozen fresh flowers, a new
whitehandkerchief,two pieces of
sweet fruit and the monetary
donation, which is $35 for
students and $75 for
non-students.
NO DRUGS SHOULD be
used for 15 days prior to the
ceremony. Miss Lucas said that
many people stopped using
drugs voluntarily after learning
the transcendental method of
meditation.

COMPUTER MEDICINE: Alpha
Epsilon Delta, a pre-med
honorary, will meet Thursday at
7:30 pjn. in room 362 of the
Union. The speaker will be Dr.
Ewen Clark, medical director of
the Computer Health Testing
Center.
CUBAN MORALS: The Latin
American Colloquium will meet
Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the
Colloquium Room, Library East.
Dr. Carmelo Mesa-Lago of the
University of Pittsburgh, will
speak on economic versus moral
incentives in Cuba.
Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 +-TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 AIL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information t all
JL, 3 76-0080
o teoNwoop
Ni ItttiAVtNUt

ORGANIC FOOD
If youre concerned about
health and nutrition come jY^ra^v
listen to Dorothy and ask f
some questions Wednesday, | fw
Nov. 18, 8:15 Union lounges, / ( V*K }
Ist floor sponsored by J.W. \ / I S||*f J
Reitz Union
DIRECTION SHIRTS
CLOTHS 5 fPIBI ON" SALE
if UWj 'NOW
SI PHONE
Ave 373-/2800
Lindsey
Your Happy Shopping Store
f Famous
Name
White
Stretch
Jeans
Reg. ***.
$0 Q 0
opair0 pair
SIZES 28 to 38
>VER 400
> CHOOSE
| FROM. #' r
.-'i ?f ; >
Mk ImTa
BELK LINDSEY
" Ae Gainesville Shoppin S Center



UF Writers Conference
Features Literary Elite

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Eight noted figures from the
literary world will be at UF Feb.
22-24 for the second annual
Florida Writers* Conference.
The conference, to be held in
the Reitz Union, is sponsored by
Dr. Smith Kirkpatrick, associate
professor of English.
THE PURPOSE of the
conference, according to Harry
Crews, assistant professor of
English and author of the
best-selling novel The Gospel
Singer, is to bring the student
journalist in closer contact with
professional writers.
There are many functions
that a university can serve and
one is to take literature out of
the textbooks, to make it alive
and real to the students, said
Crews.
Speakers at the conference,
according to Crews, will be John
Nims, a poet who uses the pop
or subjective style of
journalism, Dan Wakefield,
author of Super Nation and
contributing editor of Atlantic
Monthly, and Henry Van Dyke,

Orange And Blue Tickets On Sale

Tickets go on sale at the Reitz
Union Box Office today through
Friday for the annual Orange
and Blue basketball game.
SPONSORED BY the Gator
Loan Fund, the scrimmage starts
at 8 p.m. Friday at the Florida
Gym.
Allowing the public to see the

WANTED
CONTESTANT FOR
MISS U.S.A. BEAUTY PAGEANT
Must Have
C
well-proportioned figure
attractive features
pleasant personality
bring recent photo
Pageant will be seen on CBS TV. SSOOO
in prizes to the winner. Miss USA will compete
in the Miss Universe Pageant held in Miami Beach
INTERVIEWS HELD TUESDAY, NOV. 17
at Floridian Forge
2407 S.W. 13th St. in the Village Square
378-0330

novelist and writer-in-residence
at Kent State University in Ohio.
ALSO PRESENT will be
Howard Nemerov, poet, novelist,
essayist and consultant in poetry
for the Library of Congress,
Seymour Epstein, novelist and
short story writer who has had
his works published in
Saturday Review, Esquire,
and Playboy.
Maxine Kumin, poet and
novelist, James Landis, senior
editor of William and Morrow
Publishing Company, and John
Hawkins, literary agent will also
be present.
Two to three lectures will be
given by the speakers from 9:30
to 3:30 each morning of the
conference, followed by group
discussions with the authors.
LECTURE TOPICS will
include discussions of what an
editor is, what a writer can
expect from an editor,
publishing contracts and legal
arrangements, according to
Crews.
There is a lot of romantic
nonsense about how writers
work and what theyre like. The

UF basketball team in action
before their first game, the
Gator team will be split in two
and will play a full regulation
game.
According to Gator Loan
Fund Chairman Larry Green,
all proceeds from the game will
go to the Gator Loan Fund

conference can clear the air for
students who have only had help
from English teachers for most
of their lives, said Crews.
Morning sessions will be open
only to conference members,
but evening lectures, held at 8
p.m., will be open to the
university community.
APPLICATIONS FOR
membership in the conference
may be sent to W. T. Coram,
UF, Continuing Education, 807
Seagle Building, Gainesville. A
S3O registration fee is required
from all applicants.
A quota of 40 manuscripts
will be accepted for study and
criticism by the authors,
however, an additional fee of
$lO is charged.
Essays, short stories, poems or
30 pages of a novel must be
submitted by Jan. 10. All work
must be typed, double-spaced
and come with a self-addressed,
stamped return envelope.
Manuscripts received after the
quota is filled will be returned to
the writer.
Brochures on the conference
will be available within two
weeks, according to Crews.

which helps financially burdened
students.
THE FLORIDA Gym doors
will open at 7 pjm. for advance
ticket sales.
Tickets are 75 cents for UF
students; $1 for other students
under 21, and $1.50 for the
general public.

/ SebastiansN. J
| /sho P sr"\ |
Month s Special for V. W. Drive/X
oil changt, clean air & oil filter, and Just dip Out\ I
X dutch and brake adgurtment all for $3.96 a< |_ \ >
/ Normal coat 511.50 a savings of $755 present it SI \
|fy Sebastians 535 S.W. 4h Ave. andUj I
L take advantage of this special
I / A PHONE r
\ / W7MJIW
I omt s oSerh I
lira
WHOLtSW.E < 'RET/mI.TI 1
WE I MANDCRArTQp V
s TW L f father 1
1122 W. j
I Today
1 is the first day of
I Panhellenic
| Rush Sign-up
for Winter Quarter
Sign up anytime thru
j Friday Nov. 20 at
sign-up areas located in:
the union, N0v.16-20, 1-5 pm
Panhellenic office Rm 325 |
Graham & Broward I
every night 7-9 pm 0
space between Little and
Walker Nov. 16-20, 11-2 pm.
registration fee $3 .00...
if you havent paid before.
._^V.-

Monday, November 16,1970, The Florida AWgator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 16,1970

Secret Service Investigating
Bogus Bill Passing At UF

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligetor Staff Writer
The Secret Service has been
called in to investigate a bogus
bill passed at the Broward
branch of the Campus Shop and
Book Store.
Termed by the Secret Service
as being a raised bill, the one
dollar currency was passed off as
a $lO note. /'
A police spokesman
speculated that one end was cut
off each of four ten dollar bills,
and then pasted on to the four
removed ends of a dollar bill.
THE CRIME, punishable by
15 years in prison, was not
uncovered until hours after the
bill was passed, when someone
walked in and was handed the
bogus bill after cashing a check.
He refused to accept it and the
cashier, realizing what had
happened, called her supervisor.
She was not able to recall ever
receiving the bill, nor whether
the person had been a man or a
woman.
The likelihood is that
someone had entered the
Broward Book Store, walked up
to the woman behind the
counter, and after picking out
some item, purchased it with the
raised bill. The cashier returned
the proper change, and put the
note in the register.
Two discrepancies which
werent noticed at the time, were
the fake bill had the George

Speech Students
Meet Tonight
There will be a meeting tonight for all students majoring in, or
interested in, majoring in speech communications, according to Dr.
Donald E. Williams, coordinator of rhetoric and public speaking in the
College of Arts & Sciences.
The purpose of the meeting is to acquaint students with the speech
communications curriculum and to meet the professors in the
department.
INTERESTED STUDENTS need not be enrolled in the College of
Arts & Sciences to attend the meeting.
Education majors or students enrolled in University College are also
invited.
The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. in room 219 of the College of
Arts & Sciences.
If you buy a Volvo 145,
mechanics won't dways
be fixing your wagon.
~iM r/ 111 WBy |[ v\ '| m
Volvos reputation for holding up wasn't earned by breaking
down: 9 out of every 10 Volvos registered here in the last
eleven years are still on the road. We cant guarantee every
Volvo will last that long. but.we can tell you this: Buy
a Volvo 145 and you'll have more than a wagon you can get
a lot of stuff into. You'll have a wagon you can get a lot of
years out of.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS
506 E. University
Your New Volvo
, JPepjer in .Gamesville

Washington face on it, and
immediately below it the words
one dollar.
THE SECRET Service,
handling all cases 4 involving
counterfeit and raised bills, and
defaced American currency, has
assigned the Jacksonville office,
and specifically Secret Service
man Forest Guthrie to the case.
At present no suspect has
been charged with the crime, but
there is a man in custody in
another section of the state
charged with the same offense.
**>
The frequency of raised bills
being passed is extremely rare,
for a number of reasons.
Producing a reasonably accurate
bogus bill is extremely difficult,
and usually is not accepted by a
cashier.
THE UNIVERSITY Police
Department (UPD) has notified
all local banks plus any campus
organizations dealing with
money to be on the alert for
these fake ten dollar bills.
The police spokesman warned
if a merchant or a cashier comes
across one of the notes he
should not accept it, and if
possible stall for as long as
possible while contacting the
police.
The Campus Shop and Book
Store came close to running into
more serious problems than just
absorbing the ten dollar loss.
SAM GETZEN, director of

the Campus Shop and Book
Store, said, One of our
employes wanted to make sure
that everyone knew what the
bogus bill looked like, so he
erroneously xeroxed several
copies of the bills.
The bills were unknowingly
posted at the cashiers stations,
in full view of all customers.
Only later did they find out
that it was a federal offense to
duplicate, in any manner
whatsoever, American currency.
Lt. Gene Watson removed and
confiscated the bills from the
cashiers desks.
THE BILLS had been taped
on for approximately a full day
before their UPD removal.
Getzen, a UF employe for 22
years, said he cannot remember
a raised or counterfeit bill ever
being passed before in the book
store.
Correction
An Alligator article appearing
in last Fridays issue which
attributed suggestions of use of
guerilla tactics by a student
movement group to Dr. James
Millikan was in error.
The hit-and-run tactics
were actually suggested by
students in the movement to let
the administration and students
know they were still around
even though they abandoned use
of rallies and confrontations to
make their ideas known.

r %
i r "\
t\i i i
t 1 t
i; / /
;: : ; :
; \ i/ ( h
tli \ i
\\\, } i
CUT ON DOTTED LINE \ \ I > } / f I
\ \ I / / /
.\/ i / >
/"N ** fit
, \ lWe thought i I I
\ \ J wed give you /
\ \ i busy bug owners hand. /
\ \ / YOU NEED IT! DID YOU KNOW THAT THE
I 1 / average HAND HAS A SURFACE AREA /
\ 0F 24 SQ ,N ? THE AVERAGE mini-auto /
% HAS A SURFACE AREA OF 900,759,327.092 /
\ SQUARE INCHES. IT TAKES 857,329,456,948.01,DR0PS OF/
\OF WATER, PLUS 910 CANS OF ELBOW GREASE AND /
* 3,600,000,000.00 MICROSECONDS OF TIME JUST TO
1 WASH A LITTLE BUG! /
\ OR /
WE WILL DO IT FOR A FILL UP (8 GAL.
MINIMUM) OF OUR GREAT PHILLIPS 66
\ GASOLINE AT NORMAL PUMP PRICES /
\ IF YOUR BUG ISN'T THIRSTY BUT /
% NEEDS A BATH, WE'LL DO IT /
\ FOR JUST a BUCK! /

GAS NSAVE GAR WASH
616 N.W. 13th St.
PSST! WE CAN HANDLE BIG CARS TOO!

The difference between a
raised and a counterfeit bill is a
raised bill is real but tampered
with, and a counterfeit bill is
entirely fake.
We gave an orientation
about bogus bills and counterfeit
notes to all our people, either
through our head cashier or
through the employes
immediate supervisor, Getzen
said.

$1 OFF lag
Clip the ppr
Pizza Inn
JSudT
below for a special treat!
PIZZA INN DOUGH ]
1(4(1 / \ Redaemabia with thlfJ \\
Will | / \purchae of any if 111 I
JL\*\\ lnWrnyfl;; |; AQa Ijw ilm ptua or A/H
per family \ 16th
(og£zZ===^
(^gy/ _ONEPIZZAI^BUCT^^/pY

THE
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
4< Xerox 3<
Thesis & Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376-9334 Bam -9 pm
PATRONIZE
GATOR ADVERTISERS



BSU AND AASA

Black Organizations
In Gainesville Unite

By GWEN JONES
Alligator Correspondent
The Black Student Union
(BSU) at UF and Gainesville
High School (GHS), along with
the Afro-American Student
Association (AASA) at Santa Fe
Junior College, are now a
coalition.
The groups united officially at
a UF BSU meeting, Oct. 28, at
the Reitz Union.
The informal coalition has as
its main purpose the
confrontation of racial problems
in the city as well as on campus.
WE RECOGNIZED that the
struggles on campus related to
the struggles in the community,
and we wanted to work as one
to combat them, William
Holden, president of AASA,
said.
There are approximately 150
members in the UF BSU, 75
members in the AASA, and 100
members in the BSU at GHS.
Each organization has
basically the same structure. The
only difference is some of the
names given to different offices.
But each operates with the same
goal in mind, to help do away
with racism, Arnetta Williams,
UF BSU deputy minister of
defense, said.
WE HAVE joined together
so that we might create a sense
of awareness among our
people, Samuel Taylor,
president of the UF BSU, said.
Earl Wilcox, UF BSU minister
of information said two areas in
which the coalition, which he
termed a Pan-American
Alliance in Gainesville, could

Heading home? If you re under 22, you can qualify
for Shawnees special youth fare. Just bring us
identification showing proof of age and you II get
your ticket for 25% off regular rates. Theres no
place like home and no better way to get there than
on Shawnee where you dont have to pay to fly
for less.
For reservation information see your travel agent pr
call Shawnee Airlines in Gainesville, 378-1633
SHAWNEE AIRLINES
The convenient commuter.
h.:z :

address itself are in the racist
practices in economics and
education.
There has been a
misrepresentation of blacks in
Gainesville, Wilcox said.
HE SAID there are only a few
prominent black people in
business in Gainesville, such as
Charles Chestnut 111. This,
Wilcox said is not a significant
number in relation to the
number of blacks in the city.
A main problem in the black
community lies in the fact they
are being exploited by the white
businessmen. That is, the small
grocery stores and
minit-markets, he said.
The coalition plans to help
blacks in the community to take
action against the small
businesses.
WILCOX SAID he feels the
small businesses should be run
out of the black community.
They have done nothing but
reap money from the
community, and they dont put
it back in, he said.
Blacks face further problems
in education in Gainesville.
No one really represents the
views of blacks on the Alachua
County School Board, Thomas
Sippio, minister of defense, UF
BSU, said.
IN THE AREA of black
studies, there are different
opinions as to its worth in the
public school system and on the
college level.
Wilcox said there is a
misunderstanding of the black
studies program at GHS.
Black studies at GHS is just
something to do to appease the

blacks for the closing of Lincoln
High School, he said.
WILCOX ADMITTED,
however, that Miss Carolyn
Green, advisor for the black
studies program at GHS, is the
person who could make the
program worthwhile.
Wilcox also said changes are
needed in the area of city
government. He said there
should be more and better
representation of blacks in city
government.
* BANANAS!
* Go Judy and Nikki
£ over their homemade
* soup and chili.
* So will you I
* CALL 376-3302 J
; BENCH and BAR
FREE DELIVERY
*+* + + *** + *****+ +

There are only
...FIVE TEM||piieig
, mimmmm
lv!vX's;%X;.vw*w*Vy/XXv!w//M Xv' !vy.vXy!'!^vl;.;AW*;.X?v;-;vXv! !v! ;v'.v.v!v! !v
MM
apM
'' s
:\ Ilf : d>
THE TEMPTATIONS
IN CONCERT
Saturday November 21
FLORIDA GYM
TWO SHOWS: 7:30 & 10:30 PM
$2.50 per person
Tickets on sale at: Record Bar JWRU Box Office
PRESENTED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIONS
:: ... ' :

ad hi ifU QcU^
C& ft*

STUDENT
POETRY
READINGS i
On Monday, November 16 at //I I
7:30 pjn. James Lee, Andy 1| I 1
Tepperberg, Steve Toskar and Larry If I \
Woldenberg will be reading their II M m
own work in the Reitz Union II M n
lounges on the first floor. n I U Hi
sponsored by Reitz Union A Florida Quarterly

Monday, November 16,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Novambar 16,1970

EDITORIAL
Give Athletes
Recognition
The UF League of Athletes (LOA) will seek approval of
their application for campus recognition on Thursday.
We urge the university committee on Student
Organizations and Social Affairs to accept the LOA,
formerly called the Union of Florida Athletes, as a campus
organization.
The belief that the LOA is a subversive group, dedicated
to the destruction of the athletic program and all discipline
in that program has no basis.
The LOA can only help athletics on campus. As we
pointed out in a November 6 editorial, students no longer
relate to athletics or athletes. Athletes have the dumb
jock image. The LOA wishes to eradicate that image.
In its charter, the LOA states that we organize ourselves
to represent the athlete to the student at large, to the
public, and to our coaches and administrators. For too long
the athlete has stood silent, when he has been one person
who should have been heard from.
At the same time, the LOA believes, as we do, that it is
time that athletes be treated as human beings by the athletic
department not just the cogs in the machine that brings
one more victory to Florida U.
This is a basic right. Too often do coaches take their
athletes for granted.
The LOA is dedicated to the athlete as a human being. In
its charter it states: What we have to say is simply that
athletes are human; no more, and hopefully, no less.
The LOA is not asking that athletes be able to do exactly
what they please. They just wish to be treated as men yes,
as individuals in, paradoxically, a team context.
We would like to have all rights restored to us, the
charter states, that do not in some way interfere with our
performance on the field of athletics.
Father Michael Gannon of the Catholic Student Center,
and an associate professor of history, is the faculty adviser.
He says the motto of LOA is Mens sana in corpore sano
the classical balance between the mind and the body or
to paraphrase, a sane mind in a sane body.
We presume the athletes have healthy bodies. Now give
them a mind.

[other colleges comment

'
How You Win
Is What Counts
In college football, sportsmanship is one of the most
important elements of winning. When a team has met with a
tragedy such as the plane crash that took the lives of 13 and
injured 10 of the Wichita State football players, the other
teams should show respect for their loss.
A week ago Arkansas played Wichita in its first game
since the tragedy. The final score was 62-0, favor of
Arkansas.
This is a disgrace. It certainly should not give any team
satisfaction to know it had trounced a team which was
nearly wiped out.
It took a great deal of strength of character for the
remaining members of the Wichita team to even consent to
finish their football schedule.
The Arkansas coach used very poor judgement in
allowing his team to come away with such a huge victory.
No team needs to build its ego at the expense of common
courtesy. It represents a sad lack of sportmanship and
respect.
Victory is more than just winning a game, it is how you
win that counts. Lets hope the other teams on the Wichita
schedule this year are more cognisant of the elusive emotion
which makes sportmanship more important than the score.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

"i DGCURoH I REFUSE IK APKWCE
1990-1970
M

Darwinian Struggle

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first installment of a three
part series devoted to the
criticism of the New Left, by
Alligator Columnist David
Miller.)
The major' fault with Karl
Marxs the Communist
Manifesto is that it was written
toward the end of the Industrial
Counter-Revolution, and with
the passing of that age, the
relevance and accuracy of the
Manifestos observations passed
away.
Marxs place of residence at
the time was industrialized
London (the site of Dickens
Hard Times, and the
inspiration for poets such as
Blake and Hood), but the
Revolution, achieved by a
perversion of Marxism known as
Marxist-Leninism, occurred in
Czarist Russia, which was hardly
capitalistic.
The Tory (i.e.,
Conservative) Disraeli
government enacted measures
for the enfranchisement and
economic amelioration of the
British working class; these
liberal reforms (continued by
Gladstone), rather than allowing
the petit bourgeoisie to slip into
the proletariat, allowed the
latter a little mobility, so as to
be able to move into the
so mew hat-propertied middle
class.
In fact, there is no
1848-vintage proletariat in
modem capitalized nations,
because such nations as the U. S.
and Great Britain have instituted
a socialized capitalism, not a
rigid capitalism.
The New Deal, which
undermined the popularity of
Norman Thomas and Earl
Browder by adopting many of
their policies, qualified FDR for
membership In what Marx
labeled the socialistic bourgeois:
The socialistic bourgeois want
all the advantages of modern
social conditions without the

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

struggles and dangers necessarily
resulting therefrom. They desire
the existing state of society
minus its revolutionary and
disintegrating elements. They
wish for a bourgeoisie without a
proletariat. (Emphasis mine
DJd.)
Marx wrote: . the
proletariat alone is a really
revolutionary class. Yet he also
wrote: The lower
middle-class . are
reactionary. This is, however,
entities in Marxs day (I believe
that when he used the phrase
lower-middle-class he was
referring to the petit
bourgeoisie), but today the
working class IS the
lower middle-class.
Yes, they ARE reactionary
because they fight to preserve
their existence as fractions of
the middle class. Since the
lower middle-class is the working
class, there is no proletariat to
be used as a target of the
reactionary lower middle-class.
The target of the blue-collar
lower middle-class, therefore, is
the Lumpenproletariat, the
dangerous class about which
Marx wrote.
He thought that the latter
could be swept into a
proletarian revolution but is not
really revolutionary. It seems,
therefore, that there is no
chance of revolution, for there is
no revolutionary working class
under a rigid form of capitalism.
If the workers DO revolt, it
will be to strike down those
connected with Marxism, with
revolution, with the promise of
elevating the Lumpenproletariat.
There will be no revolution,
but, probably, many skirmishes

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

DAVE MILLER

between those who advocate the
transition from ghetto rebellion
to black liberation (to borrow a
phrase from Claude Lightfoot of
CPUSA) and those who want to
keep the Lumpenproletariat in
their place. There may, then,
be sporadic rebellion but not
proletarian revolution.
Marx wrote: All the
preceding classes that got the
upper hand, sought to fortify
their already acquired status by
subjecting society at large to
their conditions of
appropriation.
I am reminded of Darwins
theory of survival of the
fittest; apparently the class
struggles*. (the history of all
hitherto existing society is the
history of class struggles)
constitute just one more
manifestation of mans desire for
dominance over the other
members of his species.
Frantz Fanon wrote that the
colonized man desires only to
take the place of the colonizer
(The Wretched Os The Earth).
He wrote, in Black Skins,
White Masks: When there are
no longer slaves, there are no
longer masters. But will there
be a time when there are no
longer slaves?
Fanon added: Man is human
only to the extent to which he
tries to impose his existence on
another man in order to be
recognized by him In other
(no pun intended) words* man
cannot exist without what Sartre
refers to as The Other.
There must be a Darwinian
struggle, no- struggle-ending
revolution as the final dialectical
antithesis. 1 3 *\'
(TOMORROW PART 2)



Union Movie
MR. EDITOR:
It appears that the University
of Florida has outgrown the
Union movie. Almost every
Friday and Saturday showing so
far this year has been sold out
well before show time. There
just seems to be too many
people who want to see the
movie.
With the price of almost
everything else increasing wildly,
the Union movie is truly an
entertainment bargain.
Coupling this with the quality
and appeal of the movies
selected this year, the limited
capacity of the auditorium, and
the small number of
performances of each film, a
situation develops where
demand far exceeds supply.
I have no instant, original
solutions to the problem, merely
a few suggestions. I have often
wondered about the possibility
of using Constans Theater for
showing films, since it seems to
be rarely used.
Perhaps the screen and
projection equipment for this
arent now installed, but Im
sure that they could be arranged
without interfering with the
other users of the theater, such
as the Florida Players. Some sort
of compromise should be
possible.

We Only Kid Ourselves

Some thoughts on the passing
of Veterans Day ...
As long as man has lived in
collective groups he has sought
to curb the viciousness and
hostility of his nature. The most
primative and savage act against
his fellow man was murder, to
willfully take the life of another
human being.
FOR CENTURIES he fought
the concept of murder with
equal barbarism, he sought to
take the life of one who had
committed murder. It was the
classic application of the Law of
Moses, an eye for an eye.
Only recently have we at least
had the humanity to lift
ourselves above the level of the
murderer by electing not to take
his life.
But while man has sought to
control the willfull destruction
of his own fellow man within a
small societal unit, he has
condoned and even rewarded
those who would most viciously
destroy human beings of another
society.
AND THUS we glorify the
soldier.
The soldier is societys
butcher. He is that human
machine charged with the
organized, willfull and
systematic destruction of other
living men ... innocent as well
as guilty.
AH wars are holy wars and
the victorious army is always in
the right. The forces of evil are
always represented by those we
war against and they are always
defeated. We survive because
God is the backer of our cause
and wishes us to destroy his
earthlyenemies.
AMERICAN soldiers are
steeped with integrity, honor

Another change that would
help, and perhaps could be
effected more immediately, is an
increase in the number of
showings of each film.
Shows on Wednesday and
Thursday in addition to the
weekend would surely allow
more people to enjoy the films.
Os course Friday and Saturday
would continue to draw large
crowds, but at least there would
be some alternative.
Unless something is done, a
deplorable situation will
continue and perhaps worsen. I
wonder if its possible to
purchase season tickets to the
Union movie? It may soon be
necessary.
JAMES E. GARDNER 11, 4AS
Barbaric Concept
MR. EDITOR:
Y our recent editorial on
abortion presented only one side
of the argument. In the interests
of objectivity and the search for
truth, shouldnt you consider
both sides? I cant in these few
lines begin to present the other
side, but I do want to mention
one point that is perhaps the
principal one for many of us
who oppose abortions.
That point relates to the
rights of the unborn children.
When you say that an
abortion should be a personal

and respect for human life; they
only kill because it is necessary.
Such are the fantasies we
Americans choose to dwell
upon. We, who claim to be a
Christian nation, must somehow
rationalize our complete
ignorance of the most basic of
the teachings of Christ.
We must satisfy our
conscience as a nation, we have
acted justly and have not
ignored what we claim as a
spiritual heritage. We have killed
in the name of God, not in spite
of God.
SO WE decorate the most
vicious of our killers; we praise
those who have been able to kill
the most of our enemies.
Enemies who include the
women and children of My Lai.
Our children play war and
measure their imaginary bravery
by their imaginary body counts.
The societal butchers we have
decorated ride in convertible
autos in parades amid cheers and
flag waving, for they have acted
to save humanity from those
who certainly are evil.
WE ARE SICK. At the very
best we are grossly hypocritical.
Certainly the blame for our
hypocracy cannot be rested on
the shoulders of each individual
veteran or soldier among us.
Those soldiers have directly
contributed to the deaths of
human beings, most of them
innocent creatures by any moral
standards.

READERS FORUM

KEN D HIGGS

matter between a woman and
her doctor, then you are saying
that two people have the right to
make a life and death decision
for a third person (here the
unborn child) without the state,
other people, but most of all the
third person havmg anything to
say about it.
That concept is barbaric.
Os course, you may not
believe that the unborn child is a
person having any rights. This
belief is best considered under
what most would probably
consider to be the worst-case
condition an abortion in the
ninth month, which, I believe, is
permitted in some states.
Can you rationalize the belief
that this unborn child, one
second before birth, has
absolutely no rights and can be
chopped up and removed from
.the woman without the act
being criminal, and yet a few
minutes later, say a second after
birth, if the chopping is delayed
till then, the act is murder or at
least some type of homicide?
Isnt that giving an
extraordinary amount of
significance to this natural act of
birth letting it determine life
and death for the child?
Surely logic compels us to
believe that the child was just as
much a person one second
before birth as it was one second
after.
No doubt that having children
is an inconvenience and in some

We as a people, as a race, have
to answer for our barbarism. We
did not actively seek to
condemn butchery.
MOST OF US have perscribed
to Christs teachings; the rest of
us have adhered to some faith of
peace and respect for life.
Where were we, all through
the history of man, when the
time came to seek peace and life
in this temporary existence?
God was not pleased with My
Lai or that whole hypocritical
war. He was not pleased with
World War II or the
Franco-Prussian War or the
Crusaides or the Arab*Jewish
wars in the mideast.
We only kid ourselves into
thinking so.

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiante Craig Heyl
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

cases a real hardship for women.
But in all cases it is a lot more
important that a hardship for
the children involved it is a
matter of life and death.
JOHN OMALLEY
Associate Professor
Misnomers
MR. EDITOR:
Both the UF Senate and UF
Constitution are misnamed.
The senate actually is a
Committee of Full Professors,
and the constitution is a manual
of operating procedures.
The present so-called senate
is not really a legislative body
but only makes recommen recommendations
dations recommendations to the President of the
university. The so-called
constitution was not drafted
nor adopted by the total
university community it
attempts to govern.
We should continue the Full
Professors Committee to make
the useful contributions as it has
in the past, and let them
reorganize themselves as they
wish. Others, such as students,
assistant professors, etc. may
wish to form similar committees
and make their contributions,
too.
The university at large should
take the necessary and legally
correct steps to establish
acceptable legislative, executive
and judicial branches, which
would be authorized by all to be
governed; including students,
faculty and career personnel
from all campus and off-campus
units. Also, to organize along
traditional democratic lines with
fair representation of all would
appear to be worthwhile and
progressive.
A MEMBER OF THE SENATE
Kelley Not A God
MR. EDITOR:
Re: Article, Blackened
Names, written by Pete Hobbs,
student senator, in Nov. 4
Readers Forum.
First I would like to answer
Pete Hobbs question.
No, Mike Kelley is not a god.
He is an American citizen, who
has exercised his right to
express an opinion.
As for giving Uhlfelder equal
time for rebuttal, I believe
Hobbs has been watching too
much television lately.
Since when does one have to
insure another individual equal
time in order to express an
opinion (with the exception of
political party candidates of

Monday, November 16,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. 8. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609

course), but then Mike Kelly
isnt running for an office.
Mike Kelly in no way
degraded Uhlfelder. He only
stated a fact that Uhlfelder had
already made public for some
time and that is, the de-emphasis
of athletics.
So, Mike Kelley has done
nothing to Uhlfelders
reputation that Uhlfelder has
not already done himself.
I cannot conceive of how a
mature adult (perhaps I am
assuming too much) and in a
position such as student senator,
could waste his time writing
such garbage. If those such as
Pete Hobbs, who are in a
position to accomplish
something meaningful, would
quit wasting time on such trivial
matters and apply themselves to
more relevant problems,
perhaps we could better the sad
state of affairs we find ourselves
in.
I believe the Blade mayor
from Indiana, who was a guest
speaker here during
homecoming, put his finger on it
when he stated that, Reason is
being replaced by rhetoric.
GEORGE PICKETT
Right Track
MR. EDITOR:
It seems as though your
columns are always knocking
someone or something.
At last your getting on the
right track!
I am referring to Bruce
Alpers, Nov. 5, column.
Uhlfelder is the bad guy and
its about time. The point is well
make by Mr. Alper that most of
Uhlfelders causes and crusades
seem more designed for his
excitement than our needs as the
student body.
I would like to see the
STUDENT BODY President get
a bit more involved in
STUDENT BODY needs, instead
of his political opinions.
Indeed it is presumptuous, as
well as unwise to attempt to
speak for the student body as a
whole on national political
issues.
If I had wanted Uhlfelder to
represent me in this manner I
would have voted for him in the
Senatorial or Gubernatorial
elections.
Enough said on Steve
Uhlfelders inadequacies.
I only hope that he can take
and benefit by criticism as well
as he can dish it out.
BRETT R. DUCH

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcaser. 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
G.E. Sterephonlc portable record
player w/speakers S3O also one
4-speaker cabinet $25. Such a deal,
cotton! Call 392-7452 (A-st-37-p)
1970 Yamaha Enduro 175 cc ctl good
condition 4 months old 1600 ml
SSOO call 373-3350 (A-st-39-p)
Full size mattress and springs $45;
gold brocade mediterranean couch
and chair $100; call 378-7943 after 5
(A-3t-39-p)
1969 Honda cl-350 scrambler
excellent condition $595. or best
offer call 378-5996 for more
information (A-3t-39-p)
1967 HONDA CB 160 low mileage,
gd. cond, $l9O. ALSO 2 Herald
speakers 40 watt for stereo set S4O
ea. Call Larry 372-7240. (A-3t-40-p)
Stereo System In Cabinet Includes
AR turntable, Elco amp & tuner, E-V
speakers-perfect cond. SSOO, trade or
best offer. 373-3890. (A-3t-40-p)
68 Triumph 650 Bonneville. 6 M
extended forks, megaphone pipes,
velocity stacks, excellent cond. SBSO.
Call 392-7357. (A-st-40-p)
For Sale Men's 3 spd *69 Schwnn,
Rollaway bed. Curtin molecule-chem
models. Dletzgen T sqr & board.
Selmer clarinet. Call Tully 378-6886.
(A-st-38-p)
Super-dyno bike 10 speed almost
new Columbia $75. Call 378-7198.
(A-3t-40-p)
68 Honda 305 Scrambler. Good
condition. $350.00 (A-2t-40-p)
Gerts a gay girt ready for a whirl
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Electric upholstery shampoos
also available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
Camper-Trailer 6 x 10, Toilet and
elec., S4OO call 373-3867 (A-3t-41-p)
Stereo: Garrard turntable, Fisher 175
T receiver, 2 Fisher XP 60 B
speakers,, Never used. Cost $535
now $385 or parts. 378-9192
(A-3t-41-p)
Quality Tape Cartridge Recording
accumulate 4 tapes and sth is Free
(12) of your albums $6 Inc cartridge
averages to only $2.40 per album.
Figure the savings) 378-5916 4-8 pm
(A-st-41-p)
Garrard SL6SB changer with base,
dust cover, and Shure M9IE
cartridge. Dale 376-2909 (A-st-41-p)
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy kongo pet 475-2546
(local) (A-ts-c)
HOUSE TRAILER 10x50 excellent
shape, covered patio, utilltlty room,
carpet, furnished, air cond, very good
TV ant, $1950 call 392-0914 before
5:00, 376-1824 after 5:00
(A-st-41-p)

Todays
more for your money meal
atmORRISOITS
CAFETERIA
r- 1
MONDAYS FEATURE
BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
j WITH HASH
5 J BROWN 70 A 8
g j POTATOES f7 V 5
l | TUESDAYS FEATURE \ l
a I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN | 5
| ALL YOU CAN EAT |
: 99 i i
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Page 10

FOR SALE
GAME of dimensional analysis.
Clarify science, expand creativity as
you play. Give the appropriate RACE
THRU SPACE game 111 for thinking
adults SIO.OO, II for Inquiring
students s6.9s, I for junior
spacemen @ $5.95. Send orders &
checks Inc. 10% (tax & mall to
Universal Field Foundation, 435
Crescent Ave., Buffalo 14 N.Y.
(A-lt-41-p)
BIKE for sale 10 Speed one week old
SBO or best offer 808 JACKSON
378-7841 (A-2t-41-p)
Must sell two portable stereos one
combination radio both need work
$lO. and $7.50 one oldish typewriter
needs cleaning $lO. 376-7402 Bob
(A-lt-41-p)
FOR RENT
Roommate wanted IMMEDIATE or
winter qtr. 3 bdrm share room 1
other $53.75 + V* utilities, la bonne
vie. KAREN 373-2923 will negotiate.
(B-3t-40-p)
3-bedroom house unfurnished, stove
+ frige, AC + gas furnace, wooded
lot, Hawthorne $125/mo. Call after 6
p.m. 372-5613 couple preferred.
(B-st-40-p)
2-Bedroom Townhouse Apt Hawaiian
Village. Available Dec 12. Call
372- (b-st-39-p)
Sublet I bedroom furnished air cond
apt. pool couples only. Available Nov
17 close to campus sllO mo. Call
373- anytime (B-st-38-p)
Sublet La Mancha. Female
roommate wanted, private bedroom
$75 per mon. utls. Inc. Dec. rent free.
Call 372-7477 after 7 p.m.
(B-3t-41-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom furnished apt, end
of Fall quarter, carpeting, N.E.
section only S9O. month Call Jim or
Lee 378-9847. (B-3t-41-p)
1 bedroom furnished apt. $l2O/mo
quiet close to campus sublet after
Dec. 15 call 372-0674 after 5:30
(B-st-41-p)
WANTED
j-l'l'X'l'l/Xviv/wXvlvlv/Lv.'v/lvlvAv;
Male to share 2 br trailer. Own room.
Vi utilities + 55 mo. Close to U of F
Call 378-9682 (C-3t-39-p)
DORM I
YIICHS?
try the best sandwich
in town, juicy!
CALL 376-3302
BENCH and BAR
FREE DELIVERY

I, The Florida AHigator, Monday, November 16,1970

%V*V?.%W.VWV.VAV.V.V. .V.V.V.V.
WANTED
Male roommate wanted for winter
and spring quarter. 127 Gatortown
Apts. Call 372-3247. (C-4t-40-p)
Female roommate to share garage
apt. w/flreplace $37.50 mo. plus Vi
utilities N.E. 7th St. Jan 372-1532
after 6 must like pets & freaks.
(C-2t-39-p)
Need one hip neat male roommate to
share a 2 bdrm. apt. with 4. $42.50
per mo. + util, at Unlv. Gardens. Call
Marc 373-3423. Bgn. Dec. 15.
(C-3t-40-p)
Wanted one female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apt. S4O month.
For information call 372-7390.
(C-3t-40-p)
Immediately: Female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apt. for remainder
of this quarter. Butler Gdns. SW 16
Ave. $41.25 per mo. Call
378-8634.(C-3t-40-p)
Sublet THE PLACE starting
December. Mature male needed In 4
bedroom penthouse 82.50/month all
utilities Included 372-6272 after 6
pm (C-st-38-p)

sdfdfdfsd

s V jf wHk
B[ 1 M
jfl
V v&BiF
c.-ofTtwH* voMMsisfu-sttt A CINEMUS MAXIMUS new short film excursions
New Experimental Film Program Premieres Tonight
ten heavy new experimental, documentary, and comedy short films
MARIJUANA EDUCATION; INDUCTION; LESS IS MORE; DELINEATION ;RUNS GOOD-
A MATTER OF CONSCIENCE; AIRPLANE GLUE. I LOVE YOU; CINEMANIA- OMEGA
One hour, fifty-two minutes and thirty seconds of wild new films. Tonight & Tomorrow
Night. Union Auditorium. 5:30.. 7:45, 10:00 Tickets on sale at Constans Box Office
12:00 to 4:30 and at the door. SI.OO-- students $1.50 non-students
-- Sponsored by the J.W.R. Union

WANTED
Female roommate wanted for
Hawaian Village apt. $57.50 a month
+ utilities. Call after 6 pm, 378-8037
(C-6t-37-p)
WANTED 2 Female Roommates fbr
Jan. Landmark Apts, number 136
47.50 mo + utilities. Call 373-1487.
(C-st-38-p)
Needed One Female roommate for
The Place. $76 per month incl. util.
Immediate occupancy. Call 378-0756
(C-3t-39-p)

Fou Must Be 18 Years of

Â¥ Guns Sunt Gum >;
wjr 4SO.
at Sell Trade, nepair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
2 reloading. Harry Beckwith, M
* gun dealer, Micartopy.
/* 466-3340.
. '** *.* *. .* .* *.*. -*.
OWRHAUttO 5cl
alacSW^Wty
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011



gator classifieds

WANTED
2 femaies to sublet Landmark Apt.
oMinnlng winter quarter $47.50 mo.
a/c. carpeting, pool Good
roommates Call Linda or Kathy
373-4319 (c-st-38-p)
Roommate own room wall to wall
carpet, ac, furnished, private entrace.
Share utilities + food bills. Call
373-1754 or visit 8351 N.E. 4th Ave.
(C-st-39-p)
LANDMARK 104 needs female
roommate start winter qt 47.50 mo.
ALSO couple needs apt or house
under 100. call Nancy 373-4250.
(C-st-41-p)
wanted liberated roomate $45.00 mo
private room share kit. Bath living
area lake front call 378-0038 10-7
Carolyn (C-3t-39-p)
2 hip chicks needed for Green-mar
apt. number 13 Jan-June. A/C, dose
to campus, $127. each a quarter. Call
373-3740 or 372-8986 (C-st-39-p)
Hip couple seeks same, or single hip
chick to share two bedroom house
type apt. 1 blk behind Norman. AC
pvt. bk yd $75.00 call Bonnie
372-0124 (C-2t-41-p)
Girl needs ride to Chicago,
Thanksgiving urgent will go anywhere
on route, anytime, share expenses.
Call Bonnie 372-0124 (C-2t-41-p)
jl j J3H-* WjflL JD
Female, Interview work no
experience necessary, must enjoy
meeting people, short evening hours
2.25 per hour. Call 378-0682 or
378-8466 (E-lt-41-p)
Equal Opportunity. Anyone" can
Improve their financial situation.
Interesting part or full-time work.
Appointment 378-9987 after 5:00
pm (E-lt-40-p)
HURRY!
] LAST 2 DAYS!
FEATURE AT M
1:40 3:37 5:34 7:36 9:43
l ACTION
FEATURE AT...
2:18 4:10 6:02
7:56 9:50
ccxo

ton c o Kl 3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30
THE #| NOVEL OF THE YEARN /
NOW A MOTION PICTURE! B
B|
IMMVOf fXjl
I MONTE W\
ISsftSSrfl
| ALINfMAQNW FIIMSPffStNMIION

Monday. November 16.1970. The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS
Sl c hevy w r l ova re Y^ B, OOOO miles, excellent
on Gettln 9 married, must sell.
C an 5 7 pm 372-0539
(G-st-38-p)
1963 International Travetall wagon,
V 8 engine, man. shift, pwr. brakes,
cash. 392-1444 morning
(G-5t 39 8 p) evenln9S & weekends.
1963 Olds Stn. Wgn. a steal, must sell
graduating, 4 new tires, radio, ww,
a/c, runs good, first $250 takes It etc
Bob 378-7007 or 392-0472
(G-3t-39-p)
1964 TRIUMPH TR-4, good
condition. MUST SELL. $650. Call
376-6072 after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)
Must sell Jeep pickup truck VB, 4
wheel dr., low mileage, excellent
cond., wood cabin optional, 2858
N.W. 4th Lne. 378-1121 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-40-p)
1960 Volkswagon Bus In good
running shape. Call 378-7678 after 5
p.m. (G-4t-40-p)
HEARSE '52 Buick, dependable
outrageous transportation S3OO or
will consider trade for Human
skeletons. Call John 378-6766, 10
a.m. 6 p.m. (G-3t-40-p)
1967 Pontiac Firebird automatic
OHC 6 cyl radio and heater 32000
miles metallic blue call 376-0240
Asking $1295.00 (G-st-41-p)
BMW, 1966 1800 TI recent engine
overhaul, with air, am-fm portable,
polyglas. Excellent buy at $1195.
Call Ron at 372-6740 (G-st-41-r)
1969 Firebird 350 radio heater air
conditioned 2 new tires all power
green with white top great shape
$2400 Call 376-5141 Bill Flader
(G-st-41-p)
Lose Pounds and Inches Easier,
Faster, in Privacy. Medically
approved plan used successfully by
over one million men and women.
Positive weight reduction. Firms up
muscle tone. No Pills. No exercises.
Specify men's or womens Kit.
Complete Kit SI.OO K.T. Products
Company P.O. Box 535 Evanston,
Illinois 60204 (J-st-38-p)
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)
Led Zeppelin 3, Santana Abraxas &
most top 8 Track Tapes 3.50 Catalog
10 cents. Need salesmen Sharaf Box
39 Hallandale Fla 33009 (J-st-39-p)
APOLLONIAN ALTERNATIVE.
Good things custom made In Bras
and leather. Fur coats! 108 N.W. 7th
St. (J-3t-40-p)
Hate to cookTToo poor for an *pt?
CLO has openings for the snte
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-3Q-p)
NEED RIDE TO BOSTON or
anywhere near, Thanksgiving break.
Can leave as early as Monday Will
share expenses. 372-7614 (J-3t-41-p)

PERSONAL
SINGLE STUDENTS! Meet more
members of the opposite sex at U.F.
All dates in Gainesville. Free details
write: Nationwide Dating Service,
P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta, Ga. 30309.
(J-15t-41-p)
LOST 6c FOUND

LOST: Sliver Toy Poodle, named
Pixie, in vicinity of N.W. 21 Lane and
6 St. If found, PLEASE call
373-3422. (L-3t-40-p)
LOST: blue leather purse belonging
to Susan Pounsford with important
I.D.'s in the La Bonnavie area Call
392-9860 (L-3t-39-p)
LOST: 2 rings of great sentimental
value in east library ladies restroom
if found, please call 392-9443.
Reward. (L-2t-39-p)
LOST: Omega gold watch at ladles
room In graduate library has
sentimental value please call
392-9767 will greatly appreciate
return (L-3t-39-p)
Lost brown wallet near plaza I
theatre, finder please return all Ids to
Tham Box 12867 Unlv stat or call
378-9841, 392-0867 reward keep
cash (L-st-38-p)
LOST: Gold ladies watch in Norman
Hall area. REWARD offered please
call Nancy 373-3360. (L-4t-41-p)
SERVICES
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.
across from Greyhound Bus Station.
378-4480. (m-tfc)
OVER THE HILL YET? If you
arent 22 yet you are still eligible for
an eastern youth card. For flight
info/or youthfare cards call Rick
Steans 378-9792 Eastern Campus
Rep. (M-st-38-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Nowl Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
COtOH
IM 0 ENDS
TOMORROW
- FEATURES
1:30 3:30 5:30
7:30 9:30
FSTittmir VfflHbiSp
THE MAGNANIMOUS * W
"EXPERIENCE OF SOUND.
i / r i/iflfliHHil
mW. Mwnlhf 4ve. L^ ST |
ei-Rf- 3:28 -6:40-9:5S QAYS |
MAN 1:30-4:45
;M
| IM THE GREATEST I
| MOTION PICTURE EVER MADE |
Z MUHAMMAD ALI in |
(A.KA) "CASSIUS CLAY" B
- PLUS
| A $250,000 CAPER.
Sidney Poitier in |
"THE LOST MAN"
! ALL DAY ADULTS $1.25 J
1 CHILDREN-50 CENTS G 1

Page 11

SERVICES
EUROPEAN HOSTLIN informal
meeting for anyone interested in
hostling in Europe during summer of
1971 Plaza of the Americas weds. 3
p.m. Nov. 18 (M-lt-41-p)
Housewives: will do ironing and
mending for three dollars a week.
Call after 5:30 and before 10 p.m.
372- (M-ts-C)
Del-ray typing service former
secretary at & grad of Bklyn college
NY term papers, theses, dissertations
50 cents and up 373-1984, 9-5,
373- aft. 6 (M-st-41-p)
Horses boarded get your horse out of
the cold and Into a stall at sleepy
hollow HORSE FARM complete care
training lighted ring trails Ph
373-1059 (M-st-41-p)
MUNCHIES?
when you've got
those night time highs.
CAU 376-3302
BENCH and BAR
FREE DELIVERY

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DeadEna -3:00 pm 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE_
o for sale (coe-cuta* STUDENT # PHONE
O torrent O 1 dav
q wanted 2 days ADDRESS
help wanted O 3 days (*lO% discount)
O autos 4 days (*lO% discount) Qjy STATE ZIR
personal q 5 days and over
lost-found (* 20% discount|
D "ices WORDING
Mill l l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TTITTTT
ai 11 1 1 11 11 11 11 1 rnm m 1 11 1 11 11 1 1 ir
I I I I I I I I I I I I I ITTTT
rrii 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 11 imun

M RE. B
Studant Special j
*

Any car or color!
12 mo. Guarantee
j |
:
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
j Ph. 373-1105 j
I ADM SI.OO HITS
NIM9II.niS72S)
ACnom FROM MALL *||r
You put in the
You open the d00r...
And you wateh spellbound...
Ban
d*
"HOTEL
i-upiMDonl
l#slmease
PENTHOUSE 2__ PENTHOUSE 3 m
RRCNTION tarty Mf* prtca of St coot* avovy MflH
Man : SO p.m. m*o tat. a ton. Matlnoo* at PmMmih 1 ana NrlHmm 3



Page 12

I, Th Fktrkh AHigator, Monchy, Novembar 16,1970

*
Campus Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Help Someone Give A Little
The Student Govt. Office of Community Affairs is in the midst of a Thanksgiving Food and Clothing
Drive for the benefit of migrant workers. The program suffered from a slow start due to a lack of
student support. To help make it a success everyone is urged to donate clothing and food at the drop
stations around campus. For pick-up of good, call 392-1665 and ask for Dave McGriff.
Budget Deadlines Approach
tearaarv* . ......
'. .
Any chartered Student Government organization wishing to sub mit a budget request for the 1971-72
school year should be advised that the hearings will be held next quarter. All budgets must be
submitted to John Dodson no later than Dec. 1.
Marx Bros. at the Rat "Horse Feathers Prtxi Thnco Tirlretc rtr Cleo
will be shown Wed. night at 7:30, 9:00, and ru i I IVlvei9V/r
10:30. Admission is 25 cents.
The Traffic Justice has issued a warning to any student who has received 3 or more traffic tickets and
those tickets are still outstanding. If the campus police see your car on campus, it will be towed away.
O.D.K. Needs You To Evaluate Teachers
Omicron Delta Kappa is looking for students interested in participating in the Teacher Evaluation
Program. Both Faculty and Courses will be evaluated; administrative positions in the program are
open. Come by Rm 304 in the Union any day this week or call 392-1678.
Consumer Protection Works For You
The Student Govt. Office of Consumer Affairs urges all students with any consumer complaints
whatsoever to report these to this Office. If the complaints are valid they will be dealt with. Call
392-1665 and ask for Lee Schwartz.
Thanksgiving Dinner For Foreign Students

Foreign students desiring to accept hospitality in a Gainesville home around Thanksgiving Day (Nov.
26) are requested to sign up for these dinners at the International Center.
- V .
S. G. Tutoring Continues
(
The Student Govt. Tutoring program is still in operation. Any student wishing to be tutored or offer
his services as a tutor should call 392-1665 and obtain the necessary information.
Insurance I. D.s Now At The Blue Cross Office
l'- r i..
Student Identification Cards for Blue Cross Blue Shield must now be picked up at the Blue Cross
office which is located at 222 N.E. Ist St.
An Indian Movie But No Tonto
The India Club will present Dilip Kumar in and starring as "Ram Aur Shyam". The film is in color
with Engluh subtitles. Presentation will be on Saturday, Nov. 21, at 2 p.m. Admission is 50 cents.
r
Bulletin Space Available
Any student may use bulletin board space. You need only apply for it on the 3rd floor of the Union.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON,S:OOOF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS JT
, ~ ... -~ BRUCE SCHWACK (R.GB> ~
I- = ... '
' : %... STUDENT GOVERNMENT ....



VIIIIII VVI 11 1111

HEW Head Pledges
Help For Head Start
WASHINGTON HEW
Secretary Elliot L. Richardson
Sunday pledged to do all he
could to keep the popular Head
Start program for needy
preschool children at its present
level even if it gets only the
$339 million requested by the
Nixon administration.
The $339 million is
considered to be $11.6 million
short of the amount necessary to
maintain Head Start at its
present level. But to maintain
the quality of the program, Dr.
Edward F. Zigler, director of the
office of child development, has
told local administrators to
cutback enrollment rather than
the scope of the program.
Venereal Disease
Declared Pandemic
NEW YORK For the first
time in the penicillin era, the
incidence of veneral disease has
been declared pandemic in the
United States, it was disclosed
Sunday.
The American Social Health
Association (ASHA), meeting in
annual session here, said the
situation is so serious that it will
ask President Nixon to appoint a
commission on veneral disease.
Dr. James McKenzie-PoHack
medical director of the ASHA,
said only twice before in its 58
years has the association
declared the prevelence of social
disease syphyllis and
gonorrhea to be pandemic.
The two times were at the end
of World War I and toward the
end of World War 11.
* "v v ;
Jury Selection Goes
Into Fourth Day
COLUMBUS, Ga. The slow
jury selection process for the
court martial of Lt. William L.
Calley, Jr. goes into its fourth
day Monday at the hour when
the former combat platoon
leader was to have gone on trial
for his life in the alleged murder
of 102 South Vietnamese
civilians.
Only four jurors out of 16
called had been selected
following an unusual Saturday
session, and Col. Reid W.
Kennedy, the trial judge,
ordered seven more officers
empaneled.

' m^p
With a Fiat 850 Spider
thcr:
Ji P ISSaa
Harfred Auto Imports
Your NEW. Fiot JDeoler
? 73 1

Vietnam Death Toll
Highest In Month
SAIGON U.S. battle deaths
rose last week to 44 the
highest level in more than a
month with the majority of
the victims killed by mines and
booby traps.
The increase in war victims
came after a lull in fighting
which saw battlefield deaths

1 season's .Vftewft'--. gs ji§ Sp % ami
I GREETINGS "IW
CAMERA SHOP
1232 W UNIV 376-7657

drop to 24 two weeks ago, the
lowest seven-day figure in more
than five years.
Mines and booby traps
normally account for about 40
per cent of all U.S. battle deaths
in Vietnam, the sources said.
They said the percentage was
higher, however, during the
monsoon season when explosives
could more easily be hidden in
the soil.

BRASlliljffN fll
USEpIICTSiIBcARS
1970 CADILLAC.Sadan de VilU. $6295
4 door hardtop, full power. Blue with leather interior.
1969 CADILLAC.FIeetwood $5295
Unexcelled luxury cost SB,OOO when new. Full power and all
the comfort options.
OLDSMOBILE. Cutlass $2695
4 door sedan. Blue. Full power and air conditioned. Factory
warranty.
1969 MUSTANG. Mach l $2895
Fastback coupe. VB, power steering, power front disc brakes, air
conditioned. Automatic transmission.
CADILLAC Sedan de ville .$3995
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, full power. White with blue
interior.
1968 CADILLAC Sedan de Vi11e.... 44195
Four door hardtop. Blade vinyl top over turquoise. Air
conditioned, full power, cruise control, leather interior with
bucket seats.
1968 FORD Foirlane 500 $1795
Four door sedan, dark green with white vinyl interior, radio,
heater, automatic transmission, air conditioned, power steering.
1968 OLDSMOBILE Delta ..$2495
"88" four door hardtop. Blue with matching interior. Radio,
heater, automatic transmission, power steering and brakes, air
conditioned. Electric seats.
1968 OLDSMOBILE Delmont $2495
Air conditioned sedan with electric seat, automatic transmission,
power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
1967 OLDSMOBILE.DeImont $2095
Four door hardtop. Gold. 425 VB, radio, heater, automatic
transmission, power steering and brakes. Clean. Local owner.
1967 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass $1995
Two door hardtop. Automatic transmission, air conditioned,
power steering, power brakes, electric windows. Gold.
1967 CHEVROLET.ImpaIa 41495
2 door hardtop, automatic transmission, power steering power
brakes, radio and heater.
1967 FORD. Fairlane $1595
2 door hardtop, 390 VB, 4 speed, air conditioned, power brakes,
radio, heater.
1966 FORD FALCON $995
Two door sedan, white, six cylinder, three speed column shift,
radio, heater.
1966 COMET Capri $1395
Two door hardtop, white with blue interior. Radio, heater,
automatic transmission, air conditioned, power steering. 289 VB.
1966 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass Supreme $1495
Four door hardtop, blue with matching blue interior. Air.
conditioned, automatic transmission, power steering, radio,
heater.
1966 CHEVROLET. Nova $1095
4 door sedan, 6 cylinder, automatic transmission, radio, heater.
1965 CHEVROLET Malibu $995
Convertible, air conditioned, automatic transmission, radio,
heater, power steering.
1965 BUICK RIVERIA $1595
Two door hardtop, white with blue interior. Automatic
transmission, air conditioned plus full power equipment.
1965 FORD Country Squiro $995
Station wagon, gold with beige interior. New reconditioned V 8
engine, automatic transmission, air conditioned, power steering,
power brakes. Very dean car.
1965 CADILLAC Sudan da Villa $1795
Four door hardtop. Turquoise with matching interior, air
conditioned full power.
1965 OLDSMOBILE Vista Cruisor $1395
Nine passenger station wagon. Turquoise. Automatic
transmission, air conditioned, power steering, power brakes,
radio, heater.
1965 OLDSMOBILE Dynamic "887. M 51195
Four door hardtop, automatic transmission, air conditioned,
power steering, power brakes, tilt wheel, radio, heater. Turquoise
with matching interior.
1969 VOLKSWAGEN ...^dp69s
Automatic stick ditt Whits. ||
1969 VOLKSWAGEN .5%995
"Bug" green with radio and heater.
BRASINGTON
Cad iliac-Old smobile, Inc.
2001 NW 13th Straat 378-5301

Monday, November 16,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

" jar m l9Mf*
& m
T # H P
* la JH 1
*2 ~' J
< t| f 'WT 'Wi % > ~ : MI ,% S JIHr |
A. Ml BbEI J| jt frr A
PHIL BANNISTER
YANCEY SCORES TWO

Tight end Jim Yancey (photos
above and right) scored on
identical plays against Kentucky
in Tampa Saturday to lead the
Gators to 24-13 triumph. In the
photo above, Yancey scores the
final touchdown of the game

Gators Use Breaks To Beat Wildcats

In the photo in the center,
Willie Jackson (22) catches a
pass in front of tight end Jim
Yancey and in back of two
Kentucky defenders. He then
outran the Wildcats safety man
(not shown) for a 70 yard
touchdown pass-run that tied
the score at 10-10 just before
halftime.
The defense, who last week
against Georgia had a goal line
stand that ended on the two
foot line, outdid themselves
Saturday when they stopped
Georgia on the one foot line. In
the photo below, Houston Hogg
(42) is stopped by the Gator
defense, although the Wildcats
protested that Hogg did score.

Hp* jnmg
HIT s
"'Hitnniirn 9pEf **;. v/. ; ...
f i a ,,
IbHmh 1 / r Jnpfl| jHk^^lH

lii X>lv| M J f#^VU
HM Ban MM

mm im^m
. .* a^^K/mb' *. |B .*.^h*.

9h
t jmMMBMBLWHi WM
Hi m m MM
K s 111 I
La
mS Jtl #*% ,", Bit
* 9 K V -. mm
Up £ w a JffiumUmgMs djL,
WBLyJ? jf j& a Bb&|
P jfi Sp*- R HE
I W m iSHNb Ilf y | Bfx.
< -%L V k>y > / * * * ||Pp' \
.i* jH
**P J|| ?' V *" |jp 5 ' ? -' |? '>.*l- 2 H V q.-M_Ji>.* * |1 I £ f l J*Zf "pzlp* f "//vi t- M S j!-^
PHIL COPE PHIL COPE PHIL COPE

I Airplane Rentals I
I 1969 Cassna 150 I
I $12.00/1 Hour I
Inmwiwiiiwniinnminimnmw
I Piper J-3 SB.OO/Hour I
I Champion Citabria
$ll.OO/Hour
I Flying Hawks Corp. I
I Stengel Field 3760011
5 minutes from Campus.

while to the right, the official
indicates the occasion Yancey
has brought up with his
reception. Both touchdown
passes were thrown by
quarterback John Reaves while
Yancey was wide open.

THINK!
i
your own home,
fully furnished,
complete set-up
in park of your
choice.
LOW DOWN/LOW MONTHLY
3600.00
only at
Mustang
MOttlf HOMES kA
4820 N.W. 13th St 378-1346

-
AjMfcfc. :y- >M "' /^i|i r
^ fe '''
li JV
£|jggg. ;"i,-.".5.-.:'.^.' ; ni?,f MB 9R *1 |!|
i £;.; 1§ 1 Jr' fH |9flp 'H| Jffl B9H HR ' ||
>3& iSSF 5> ., .:< _ HMMMBBEMPMWKMNr^hBMMMMP%
PHIL BANNISTER

" ~ ;
w b
HM| |
£ 3| Jhm fcdfj I
rJ2w #\B
HMHHB t lHHin

Marty Perl mutter
Executive Sports Editor

Page 14

I TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
I SAVE!
I 1 STARKE?FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER *
1- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM-6PM
SATURDAY BAM rPM
BY appointment!

~ The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 16,1970

Phil Pettijohn
Sports Editor

Ever since two members of
the starting offensive line were
graduated by the university last
year, there has been constant
criticism from members of the
press concerning the 1970
offensive line's inability to hold
off the rush by opponents.
The line played the way the
press said they would in the
early stages of the season, but
once they got some playing time
together, they have improved.
In the photo below,
quarterback John Reaves (7),
has time to set up and look for
his receivers down field while
Fred Abbott (58), Richard
Kensler (55) and Bill Dowdy
(79) fight off the Kentucky
defense.



24-14, LSU
/
* L .' i ;
Fumbles Cost Baby Gators
Victory In Baton Rouge

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Sports Writer
Floridas fired-up Baby Gators
outhustled and outscored a
bigger LSU freshman team
Friday only to be beaten by
their own costly mistakes,
24-14.
Playing in cold, rainy and
windy weather in Baton Rouge,
La., 2,800 Tiger fans saw the
Baby Gators win in every way
but on the scoreboard.
LSU BEGAN the scoring in
the first quarter when Florida
fumbled a punt reception at the
Gator 25 yard line. LSU
quarterback Gene Kneckt led
the Tigers to the four, but had
to settle fro a field goal.
Floridas first scoring play
culminated an 82-yard drive
which began when linebacker
Bill Rebol blocked an LSU field
goal attempt. Quarterback Chan
Gainley took the Gators to the
two yard line and with fourth
and goal, dragged two Tiger
defenders into the end zone for
the score.
But with 1:07 left in the half,
second string quarterback Billy
Broussard tossed a 62-yard
bomb to split end Norman
Hodgins to bring the Tigers into
the half with a 10-7 lead.
FOLLOWING A fumbled
punt by Vince Kendrick, LSU

Here Are A Few Os
Our Select Import Used Cars
00 C 69 FIAT 124 Coupe 2165
64 VOLVO 122 S By:>
46,000 actual miles. We can
give you original name of
owner #l oc 65VWBug $795
64 VOLVO P 1800 Sport Coupe $1495
Nice car Air conditioned 62 AUSTIN HEALEY Roadster $995
66 AUSTIN HEALEY Sprite $695
69 FIAT 850 Spyder $1695
tteae 69 MG MIDGET Roadster $1695
69 AUSTIN HEALEY Sprite convert
S10 5 65 MGB Roadster $895
67 SAAB Stationwagon
68 FlATsoSpyder $1395
SIOSO convertible, exceptionally
68 DATSUN Pick-up Truck nice car
j 7 95 69 FIAT 1244 dr. Sedan $1495
65 TRIUMPH TR 4 70 CITROEN one owner, radio $4195
Cl *l9 5 heater, Air condition,
66 VOLVO Stationwagon Air Cond. really loaded, only 3,000
Roof Rack and other m '* eS
extras
w. hov. ..or i-e- ' i H arfred Auto Imports
1946 North Main
See Arden Streit
Tl "- or call him at
~*r 378-7085

scored in four plays, went for
the two point conversion and
was ahead 18-7 midway through
the third period.
With just two minutes gone
into the fourth quarter, LSU put
the game away after yet another
fumbled punt reception this
one on the Florida 32 yard line.
Knecht needed but five plays to
get six more points on the
board.
The Baby Gators added
another touchdown with a
Gailey to A1 Dorminy
touchdown pass covering 15
yards. Elwood Aust then
attempted an onside kick but
LSU was waiting for it,

LUMS DAILY SPECIALS!
GOOD Mondoy and Tuesday
Lums features
FAMOUS BEER on draft
SCHUTZ, BUDWEISER, BALLANTINE,
MICHELOB
Any Sandwich plus 16 oz. Schooner
only SI.OO
Lums Famous
eROAST BEEF
eFISH SANDWICH FRENCH FRIES
TURKEY SANDWICH FR. FRIES

recovered, and i.i, ihe clock out.
DESPITE THE loss, the Baby
Gators look impressive
throughout the game, but
mistakes at crucial times proved
costly. Overall, the squad looked
quick and had good team speed.
The defense exhibited good
pursuit with David Hitchcock a
real spark plug. Offensively, it
looks as if several players will
put somebody on the bench
next year when they move up
to the varsity.
Florida States freshmen is the
last game on tap this year for the
Baby Gators. Game time is 2
p.m. Friday, Nov. 20 at Florida
Field.

JUL STEAK HOUSED
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9.00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
I MISTER DONUT HAS IT . .1
I APPLE I
BLUEBERRY % 1
RASPBERRY
I CHERRY WliSter I
PEACH rvinilt 8 I
CINNAMON WUriUA* |
I BUTTERCRUNCH DONUTS
I POWDERED
SUGAR RAISED M
CHOCOLATE |*
I A A VARIETIES 111 cd I
1 44 IN ALL I
| 1 PLUS: A FANCY I jl |U I
I SPECIAL GOOD IES 1 | I
I MON.-TUES.-WED. ONLY I
I WS OPEN 24 HOURS I
I 2111 N.W 13thST. 372-1049___J
wmt

Monday. November 16,1970, The Florida Alliflitor,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 16,1970

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
'THERE IS ONLY ONE A
B|i|K 2445 S.W. 13 ST.
bonanza r a ke out 378-0946 SSm
"Congratulates the r- l^sT o77 1
Player of the Week PloySt Os The \Afk
" Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks,
X famous
ETC Bonanzaburger lOO% beef, French
IE 111 B9
TAKE-OUT Our steaks are served with a steaming-hot, buttery I
Texas
\J|v Bunkhouse Special V2 lb. 100% chopped
**"'~~~ Rib Eye 6 oz., tender cut steak
Sirloin Strip ll oz., savory, hearty meat, I
Top Hand a 15 oz. T-bone for a huge,
rugged appetite 2.99
OPEN DAILYFROM 11-9 PM PLUS OTHERS
.
-t?- y S ; S< j'J s * v '
Sg==ji \ including a7O yard pass to Willie Jackson before
the half ended, just one of three touchdown passes B
Besides winning the player of the week, Reaves
received the game ball from head coach Doug
The other two passes went to tight end Jim
Yancyfor 10and 14yards. INDIVIDUAL EFFORT
-,v
v 4 ; j
|B 1 1 |% a MON* FRI. Teams must work together to win. But when
I I B I B *B 0-3 it comes down to the wire, it comes down to
Wm | m m Jk q. t the individual. You have to do your job, and do
Imm #| it well or the team won't hold together. The
I# VIIIII Ilf V I IkiaU 9*12 same holds true in clast. The professor and
students all have their jobs to do and for it to
work all must do their part well. Let us help
VH I"P |\ I" ||IIF H w you do your job, come to 'Your on Campus
I" ££ U I y I Store" for your school supplies.
ID Call 376-2487 Dj El CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE
1710 S. W. 13th ST. SB? |C| the Hub