Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text

Spectators Asked To Leave Meeting

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
Approximately 50 students,
mostly members of the Florida
Student Movement (FSM), were
asked to leave a meeting of the
University Committee on
Student Organizations and
Social Affairs (SOSA) Thursday
afternoon. Their conduct as
spectators at the meeting was
termed disruptive by members
of the committee.
After ten minutes of the
meeting had elapsed committee
member Prof. Milton Christian

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COMMITTEE MEMBER DR. EDWIN KIRKLAND
... seems non-plussed by presence of toy gun

Functions Office Attacked
At Fee Committee Meeting

By CARLOS J. LICEA
AKHptar Staff Writer
The Public Functions Office
of the Reitz Union came under
attack Thursday from the
Activity Fee Committee, and
also from Union Director
William Rion.
I was astonished to find that
SO cents of our activity fee goes
to the operation of the Public
Functions office, given the fact
its operations go far and above
that which can be justified as
student activities," Ralph
Glatfelter, chairman of the
committee said.

interrupted discussion calling the
meeting a farce. Christian said
he was referring to the disruptive
nature of the students present.
HOLDING UP BALLOONS,
passing out candy and taking
occasional shots with water
pistols and toy guns the
students were asked to leave
following a motion by Christian.
I am not a masochist and I
dont intend to sit through this
meeting until the students are
requested to leave, he said.
The students, mostly
members of the Florida Student
Movement (FSM), did not

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

THE MONEY, Glatfelter
contends, can be used for other
needy areas on campus, such as
the infirmary.
I see no justification for 50
cents to go to the Public
Functions Office, he said.
Glatfelter indicated 'the
committee will recommend the
Public Functions Office receive
no money from the $32.50
activity fee paid by UF students,
and that this money be
redirected to other areas
showing a need for it.
The Public Functions Office,
is responsible for the sale of

disperse as requested, prompting
committee secretary William
Cross to say, unless these
students leave now I will
exercise my authority (assistant
director of the Union) and have
authorities brought in to remove
them.
THE STUDENTS
subsequently left the meeting
room and congregated outside
the closed doors for a few
minutes before leaving.
The committee had initially
intended to discuss whether or
not FSM Would receive a
recommendation for recognition

University of Florida, Gainesville

SAYS MILLIKAN
r ., .* i
'Tomato Age Arrives

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
Thursday marked the
dawning of a new age the age
of the Electric Tomato.
These were the words of
philosophy intructor Dr. James
Millikan yesterday morning as he
spoke to a small group on the
Plaza of the Americas.
THE SMALL group discussion
took the place of a rally or other
form of demonstration because
the ad hoc student movement
group interested in stopping
repression on campus decided
earlier this week that rallies and
talks with administrators were
futile.
It doesnt make sense to talk
to people like UF Vice President
Harry Sisler, Millikan said.
Hes not a human being hes
a robot.
Sisler spoke to the student
movement members who

tickets through the ticket office,
for all activities in the Union,
handle the Florida Players, and
other duties.
STUDENTS PAY double,
Glatfelter said. They pay 50
cents from the activity fee, and
five cents from every ticket to
maintain its operation.
Rion said he had
recommended earlier the Public
Functions Office be transferred
from Union responsibility, to be
put under the academic budget
of UF.
The Public Functions Office
(SEE 'BUDGET', PAGE 6)

as a campus organization.
The committee decided to
hold a special hearing at which
time three members of the FSM
will be permitted to address the
committee. The public will be
permitted to attend that hearing,
as long as they are not
disruptive, the committee
decided.
A MOTION PASSED by the
committee stipulated that at any
meetings at which spectators
become disruptive to the
business at hand, all
non-committee members will be
asked to leave.

occupied Norman Hall for a
short time Tuesday following a
support-Robert Canney-destroy Canney-destroyrepression
repression Canney-destroyrepression rally.
THE STUDENTS had gone
to Norman and said they would
occupy the hall until an
administration spokesman came
to talk to them.
But the students were
dissatisfied with Sislers answers
to their questions. They said he
was vague and gave them stock
answers instead of his personal
opinion when, for instance, they
asked why Canney was relieved
of his teaching duties.
Sisler told the group it was in
the best interest of the students
that Canney was removed. The
student movement members
called his answers evasive and
mouthpiece type answers.
MILLIKAN SAID Thursday it
might make more sense to
throw tomatoes* at
adminstration spokesmen
instead of trying to negotiate
with them.
To try to negotiate with the
university doesnt make sense
because nothing ever comes of
it, Millikan said.
Moreover, Millikan said, if
you make demands you give the
university the opportunity to go
through many motions that
mean nothing they just
frustrate us.
INSTEAD OF TRYING to
relate to the university, Millikan
said, it is more important to
relate to one another.
He said solidarity among
people in the movement is
important and that each person
should attempt to get to know
every other person better.
We need more spontaneous
reactions from smaller groups
of people, Millikan said. It does
no good, he said, to harangue
people over a big mike and
try laying guilt trips on
students not taking an active
part in doing away with
repression.
HE SAID THE youth

In other committee action:
o United Student Action, i
UF student lobbying group, was
approved for recognition as a
campus organization, pending
announcememt of the groups
faculty advisor.
Music Students Council
and the International Club were
passed for recognition.
Approval of an application
from the controversial Union of
Florida Athletes ((hanging its
name to UF League of Athletes)
asking for recognition was
postponed pending completion
of application procedures.

Friday, November 13, 1970

movement in this country is
developing in two parts. One
part, he said, is centering on the
future and formulating long
range goals to bring about social
change.
This is the political activist
development, he said.
The other part of the
movement involves people who
are trying to change their life
styles so they can still live here
and yet be happy in their own
ways.
THE TWO SECTIONS are
coming together, the former
Yale teacher said, and the most
important thing (among people
in such movements) is to
become friends.
He said if movement members
avoid confrontations with
authorities and just do things
(such as working for the Eye
or attending food feasts) to keep
together and stay out of trouble,
then the rip off would be
reversed.
The rip off would also be
reversed by little hit and run
tactics such as:
o Letting air out of tires of
certain cars.
Painting certain cars with
washable paint.
Sending registration fees to
the university in several separate
checks made out in odd amounts
to cause more work for the
accounting department.
Bending IBM computer
card!i
Inside
IBMil
MY|-MiYirrmMmimYirir,y^
ALL ARE INVITED to
the Hogtown food test
at the Plaza today and
Sunday page 2
Classified* 17
Editorials 8
Entertainment 22
. Letters 9
Movies 17
Page of Record 12
Sports 24
Whatll Happening 4
World Wrap-Up 21



Page 2

!. Tke Boride AMgeSer, Friday, November 13,1970

Free Food Feasts Today And Sunday

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PHIL COPE
HIGH PROTEIN MAD SOUP
... 'builds strong bodies and potent minds'
ROTC Sunland
Program To End
By BRUGH PETTRY
Alligator Writer
ROTC means different things to different people.
To the kids at Sunland Training Center for the Retarded, ROTC
means a friend, someone to help organize a fast basketball game, take
a walk with, or simply kid around with.
ON WEDNESDAY and Thursday afternoons, groups of about 25 to
50 senior cadets go to Sunland. There are about 100 patients waiting
when the ROTC cadets arrive.
The cadets visit Sunland for two reasons. Due to a decreasing
number of ROTC enlistments in past years, there is now a
disproportionately large number of seniors in ROTC.
USUALLY SOME of these seniors are in charge of drill teams. But
now, because of their excess number, another use had to be found. In
addition, some of the cadets were unhappy with what they say is the
relative uselessness of weekly drill.
Most cadets see the work as rewarding and a desirable alternative to
**p]aying cops and robbers out on the drill field.**
The cadets provide two hours a day, two days a week of attention
for the kids. This attention will be absent next week when the
program ends for this quarter. It was in operation a total of two
weeks.
One of the patients at Sunland is a little red-haired guy named
Bobby, who likes to slap people on the back. When asked if he liked
the cadets, he said, Yeah, I like those guys. Theyre going to be here
every week!
Bobby didnt know the program will end next week.
*
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is tIM official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is 610.00 per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (l) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
Two positive experience
food feasts, with free food
provided by the Hogtown Food
Co-op, are scheduled for today
and Sunday.
Todays feast, beginning at 8
p.m. at the University
Auditorium, is presented by the
Rose Coirimunity Center.
MUSIC WILL BE provided by
Oz, a group recording for
Mercury Records, and a light
show will be put on by Krishna
Light with Yin and Yang.
Tea and brown rice will be
served at the concert.
Admission is 50 cents.
Sundays feast will be in the
form of a folk fest at 5 pjn.
in the Plaza of the Americas.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR players
will provide entertainment.
The food co-op will serve
high protein mad soup
guaranteed to build strong
bodies and potent minds in 199
ways, and fruit.
The Co-op is directed by the
Candle People, a group
interested in bringing people
together for positive
experiences.
THE POINT OF the feasts is
to raise money for the three-day
Thanksgiving feast beginning
next Thursday.
A spokesman for the Candle
people, called Madman, said
money made by the co-op will
be donated to any program
anyone can think of to do
anything constructive in the
community.
Among the programs the
co-op would like to support is
lunch and breakfast programs
for disadvantaged people.
MADMAN SAID he believes
Hogtown (Gainesville) can be
made into a model community if
everyone takes his positive
experiences into the community
to make it a better, happier
place to live.
Another objective of the
co-op is to teach people about
eating.
Madman said most food is
ODK Maguin
Ready Mowky
The Omicron Delta Kappa
Course and Teacher Evaluation
Magazine will be distributed in
dorms, fraternities and sororities
over the weekend.
THE MAGAZINE is free.
Other copies will be placed in
the Tigert Hall registration area
Monday.
Were asking that students
hang on to these copies of the
magazine. Our supply is limited
and we had hoped they could be
used for registration for winter
and spring quarters, Managing
Editor Ken Driggs said.
Only At
Kiser's Office Equipment
SBS Executive Swivel Chair
Gray, used, but clean
$2950
S6O Side chair with arms to
match, used but clean
$1950
Special Special
(Only 10 of oach typo)
604 N. MAIN

r*
Money made by the
co-op will be donated to
any program anyone
can think of to do
anything constructive in
the community.
Madman I
robot food. That is, most of
the food we eat is too processed.
THE CO-OP sends out recipe
sheets and newsletters to about
120 people involved in the co-op
to teach them about preparing
more natural food.
Local merchants and people

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'Holy Trinity Episcopal \Z7
116 N.E. lit St. CNurstw provided.)
SLY & {
FAMILY STONES
GREATEST HITS $3.99
} NEW 808 DYLAN
"NEW MORNING $3.99 t
£ WHILE THEY LAST J
£ FRIDAY, SATURDAY
S I OPEN SUNDAY 1-6 PM NOW TILL CHRISTMAS | $
| RECORDSVILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL Z
STUDENT
POETRY
READINGS I
On Monday, November 16 at 1/ \ \
7:30 pjn. James Lee, Andy // I 1
Tepperberg, Steve Toskar and Larry // I I
Woldenberg wfll be reading their If I 1
own work in the Reitz Union J| 11
lounges on the first floor. II (II H
sponsored by R.lt2 union & Florid. Qu.rt.rty

who attend the feasts support
the co-op, which expects to
spend about SI,OOO on the
Thanksgiving feast.
Madman emphasized that the
food feasts are a total
community thing to which
anyone is invited.
For the Thanksgiving feast,
the co-op has the cooperation of
the local police who will
barracade the street between the
Methodist and Presbyterian
student centers, where the feast
will be held, to facilitate a large
assemblage.
The co-op urges all students
and members of the community
to support those who support
you!



'Both Sides Now' For Seminole

By JEANNE ORFINI K
Alligator Writer
Yearbooks are no longer
what they used to be, said
Seminole Editor Jim Okula.
And wow, has the Seminole
changed!
THIS YEAR, following the
basic theme of Both Sides
Now, the yearbook will present
both sides of the student in his
institutional environment and
also his individual encounters.
Not only will this be done in
copy, but also physical format
of the book. There will literally
be both sides of the Seminole
with the front section
highlighting UF and how it
influences people.
Reaching the middle graphic
display, close the book, turn it
over and the reader can start
again on a different section of
individualism and what a person
gets out of being a person here.
THIS INVERSION or
two-for-the-price-of-one book
all has to do with the two sides
of people on this campus.
This university is here
because of one thing people.
The Seminole is attempting to
show the two natural sides of
everyone here the
understanding of one, which has
two parts, which makes up the
whole, explained Okula.
The first section of the
yearbook, dealing with the
university, is not going to be in
chronological or subject order as
in the past years.
THOUGHT ORDER
encompassing essays on
Environment, Art, Music,
Drama, Academics, University
Services and Sports will
emphasizethe student involved in
the institution.
The biggest change will occur
in the Academics section
featuring an outstanding faculty
member from each college that
the students have voted on. Plus,
graduating senior pictures will be
GIANT BLOW-UP 1
2x3 ft. Poster (black & white)
J jJBf
Send any black
& white or color
photo up to
(no negatives
please) to:
RONALD JAYE Poster Service
P.0.80x 43
Plainview, N.Y. 11803
Enclose cash, check or money
order (no C.O.D.'s) in the ambunt
of $3.50 for each blow-up.
Original material returned un undamaged.
damaged. undamaged.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Allow 30
days for delivery. Add 450 for
postage & handling.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY- STATE ZIP

PHIL AND PHIL TOM KENNEDY
... they faced each other, drew their cameras and shot

under each of their respective
college sections, instead of
grouping them together in

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Professional Service Guarantee
Couch's guarantees that you our customer will receive prompt, courteous, profes professional
sional professional eJectronics service by our team of Nationally Recognized CERTIFIED ELEC ELECy\
y\ ELECy\ .IRONLCS TECHJKI I ,lU ""%
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endless rows of mug shots.
Highlights of the individual
and his role among other people

If you already own a Dual,
you may not need
the 1209.

If you own a Dual you're
already getting the smooth quiet per performance
formance performance that has made Dual the personal
choice of hi-fi professionals. And you're
already enjoying such features and
refinements of the 1209 as pitch control,
cueing and anti-skating.
But in addition to the many exclusive
features it shares with earlier Duals, the
1209 has some refinements that every
serious record owner will appreciate.
For example:
On the 1209, the anti-skating system
is separately calibrated for elliptical and
conical styii.
The tonearm counterbalance has a

click stop for every hundredth-gram
ad|ustment.
The !209's newly developed motor
combines high starting torque with
synchronous speed constancy.
And all the controls, including cueing,
are up front for greater operating
convenience.
These and other features of the 1209
are described in detail on the other side.
They're not likely to seduce you away
from your present Dual.
They're not intended to.
But if you don't already own a Dual,
it's time you talked with someone
who does.

will be detailed in the second
section, after the reader turns
over the book.

Friday, Nov am bar 13,1970, Tha Florida Attlprtor,

GOVERNMENT, STUDENT
publications, leadership, events,
after-hours, Homecoming and
Greeks are among the topics that
are looked at behind the scenes
emphasizing again the real hero
of this book, the individual.
To acquaint the student body
with the new image of the
Seminole through the use of
graphics and special techniques
to display emotional and mental
participation in print media,
has embarked on its first
advertising campaign to get the
message across.
Starting with the mystery
pictures, working up to Have
you had your PHIL?, and
finally introducing the
yearbooks photographers Phil
Cope and Phil Bannister, the
Seminole has brought out the
relations of photography, the
yearbook, and you!
Where is the Seminole? Phil
is where the Seminole is and
you, the students, are the
Seminole, concluded Okula.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 13,1970

WHAT'S HAPPENING

EXPOSING THE BIBLE:
Inter-Varity Christian
Fellowship will hold the second
in a series of Bible expositions
on the New Testament book of
Peter tonight at 8 pm. in room
349 of the Union
BOYS IN BLUE: The Boys in
Blue from Apalachee
Correctional institution will
present a free rock concert
Sunday at 8 pm. in the
University Auditorium,
sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ.
o
GO GATOR GO: The Gator Go
Club will have a meeting tonight
for all those interested in
learning how to play the oriental
game of Go. The meeting will be
at 7:30 pm. in room 150 C in
the Union.
COED SWABLES: The Gator
Sail Club will host their second
powder puff regatta of the fall
season, the Gator Tail Regatta.
Coed member of the club should
provide their own male crews for
the event. There will be lunch at
the lake, trophies, and a party.

UF Market Open For Crafts

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Staff Writer
Pottery and leather work.
Paintings and clothing. Preserves
and quilts. Ties, beads and
candles.
These are just some of the
wares that will be sold in the
Plaza of the Americas at a
Panhellenic-sponsored Open
Market shortly after
Thanksgiving vacation. The
market will bring together Vista
volunteers, local co-ops and UF
student craftsmen.
A DEFINITE DATE for the
Open Market has not yet been
set.
According to Shirley Lasseter,
director and originator of the
project, each individual or group
will have its own table to display
its wares. Individual students are
welcome to participate, and Miss
Lasseter hopes to see a wide
variety of merchandise.
UFs Open Market will be
limited to co-ops from Alachua
County. Vista sponsors many
such communal groups in the
area, in the hope that individuals
will earn enough capital from
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
M Hfli AIR
378-2646
M

For more information, call
Nancy Yoder 276-8552 or
Randy Richardson 392-2143.
MOVING ON SUNDAY: The
Florida Student Movement will
hold a meeting Sunday at 7:30
pm. in McCarty Auditorium.
Child care will be provided.
FINANCIAL AFFAIRS: The
Secretary of Finance reminds all
organizational presidents that
their monthly financial reports
are past due. If you have any
problems with the report, please
call Eliot Abbott at 392-1622.
FEEDBACK: The Curriculum
and Instruction .Student
Organization will hold a
colloquium on Student
Feedback about the Dissertation
Experience today at 11 am. in
room 237 of Norman Hall.
ANGLO HISTORY: Dr. CJI.
Fairbanks, chairman of the
anthropology department, will
report and discuss his
archaeological adventures in
England at the first fall
symposium of the Anthropology

co-op profits to go into business
for themselves.
Miss Lasseter added
Panhellenic Council
unanimously endorsed the
project when they realized that
Vista was in need of a market

THE
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 21
FLORIDA GYM
TWO SHOWS: 7:30 & 10:30 PM $2.50 per person
Tickets on sale at: JWRU Box Office Record Bat
A STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRODUCTION

ASPIRING PRODUCERS:
Today is the last day to turn in
applications for the positions of
general chairman and assistant
general chairman of Student
Government Productions will be
accepted. Applications may be
obtained from the Student
Activities desk in the Union.
YOU CAN HEAR THOSE
VOICES: The Womens Glee
Club will present another in
their series of Supper-time Sings
on the Colonade of the Union
Tuesday at 6 p.m. This casual
presentation will include
mountain ballads and a selection
from the Broadway musical,
Youre A Good Man, Charlie
Brown.
LATIN AMERICAN EVENTS:
The final session of a study of
Latin America will be held this
morning from 9:30 am. to noon
in the lounge of the University
Methodist Church. Special guests
are students who have lived
and worked in Latin America.
They will present their views on
current events there.

place.
Individual students interested
in participating either by selling
their own merchandise or by
helping with the organization
should call Miss Lasseter at
378-8922.

WORLD MEETING ON THE
GRASS: The Council of
International Relations will meet
Sunday from 3:30-5 p.m. in the
Plaza of the Americas. If
weather is not permitting, the
meeting will be moved to room
118 of the Union.
AERO AND ASTRO: The
American Institute of
Aeronautics and Astronautics
(ALAA) will hold its regular
bi-weekly meeting Monday at
7:30 p.m. in room 303 of the
Aerospace Building. The speaker
will discuss The Electordeless
Discharge. All interested
persons are invited.
LEADERSHIP LESSONS:
Campus Crusade for Christ
leadership training class will be
held at 7 p.m. tonight in the
Union.

i DO YOUR OWN THINGS 1
1 FOR CHRISTMAS ]
I Complete supplies for do it 1
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by Maryann* Gillis

THE GREATEST DRAMA: A
Course in Greek Drama in
Translation will be taught
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
at 2nd period in Williamson Hall,
winter qurter. There are no
pre-requistes.
PRESIDENT SPEAKS: UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
will speak at Reid Hall, Monday
at 4 pjn. OConnell will Speak
about things that concern
students, stated Gordon
Taylor, a student from Yulee
Area.
LETS GET TOGETHER: The
Council of International
Organizations will have a get
together tonight in the Union
rooms 122 and 123 at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited.



Tenants Union
Meeting At 7
With Askew

SG Collecting
For Migrants
And Prisoners
Student Government is
sponsoring a drive to collect
food, clothing and magazines for
the migrants and those in jail in
Alachua county, according to
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder.
All contributions can be taken
to the Student Services Booth
across from the Hub.
Articles collected will be
distributed at Thanksgiving.
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By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Staff Writer
The Service Employees Union
Local 626 representing the
non-academic employees of UF
will hold a meeting on Friday at
7 p.m.
The purposes of the meeting,
according to Dave Smith, union
Business Agent, are to discuss
plans for dealing with Gov.-elect
Askew, discuss how students and
other people can help the union,
and to get an official charter
presentation by the Service
Employees International Union,
an AFL-CIO union.
THE UNION, made last
March, needs Askews support to
have a representational election.
President OConnell said it
was not part of his job to handle
labor relations so he handed the
issue over to Gov. Kirk who
rejected the unions request for a
representative election.

ft"':
h am 9 |
****** i* ***

The Florida Constitution says
state employees have the right to
collective bargaining and union
representation. The majority of
non-academic personnel (except
clerical) signed cards asking to
be represented by the service
union.
DAVE SMITH
... business agent

mam
FLORIDA
TUNE-IN ZENITH!

THEY ASKED KIRK to
authorize a secret ballot election
to be supervised by an impartial
third party to find out whether
the workers wanted to be
represented by the union. This is
the standard procedure for
union recognition. He refused to
authorize such a move.
The major reason Kirk gave
for refusing this proposal was
the workers did not want a
union.
Askew said he is in favor of
collective bargaining for state
employees because it is in the
constitution.
At Fridays meeting the
Union is going to decide how to
put the most pressure on Askew
and how to approach him.
All members of UF and
Gainesville communities who
support the union are invited to
attend the meeting to show a
general demand for the union.

Friday, November 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

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i '^f
REUBIN ASKEW
... agrees with bargaining

Page 5



Page 6

>, Th> Florida Alfiya tar, Friday, November 13,1970

Probe To Return To Campus

By JEAMNE HUTTO
AiiMln, My,rt nr
Ampior nnici
The Probe isnt dead.
For the past few months the
situation looked pretty grim for
die offset publication, but it is
not on the cooling board yet.
THE 81-WEEKLY
MAGAZINE is recovering from
financial difficulties due to lack
of advertising personnel and
publication will resume Dec. 1,
according to Marian Jedrusiak,
managing editor of the Probe.
We hope to continue with an
in-depth approach to items of
interest to college students since
the staff is made up of
students, Miss Jedrusiak said.
So much is happening in
terms of changes in education
and in the university
community, that it is vital to get
as many viewpoints as possible
to put things in perspective, she
. added.
THE PROBE originated last
spring as the result of
controversy over the selection of
Alligator editors. Carol Sanger,

BUDGET ...

ONE^I
and Camp Wauburg, operate
under the Union budget. Right
now the Union receives $9 from
the activity fee, but only $8 is
actually used for Union
upkeeping. Both Wauburg and
public functions get 50 cents.
THE PROJECTED budget for
the 1970-71 fiscal year has
indicated a deficit which could
rise as high as $76,000, or be as
low as $30,000, depending how
much money snaking operations
of the Union, such as the guest
rooms or the games area, make
for the Union.
The Union budget, which was
presented to the committee on
Thursday, is only a projection.
The committee also studied
other areas which could possibly
save money, but nothing definite
was decided. Rion said the
Union was not overstaffed, as

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B 123 BEST IHIIVEBSITY SVEHUE [

former Alligator executive editor
and Sam Pepper, current
Alligator editor were the Probes
first editors.
Three issues appeared last
spring covering such topics as
the Dr. Robert Cade, inventor of
Gatorade, controversy, the
Arab-lsraeli conflict, and a
special edition on last years
Student Government-produced
Super-Show.
This years editor of the Probe
is Leslie Fox.
AN ORIENTATION issue
appeared at the beginning of this
quarter with a circulation of
13,000.
Although the Probe is staffed
entirely by students, it is not an
official UF publication.
I feel very strongly that
there is a need for an
autonomous student publication
on this campus free of Board of
Student Publication
jurisdiction, Chris Schauseil,
news editor for the Probe, said.
THERE IS a need for a
magazine that goes into depth on

had been suggested by a member
of the committee.
A SUGGESTION OF charging
iion-student organizations for
the use of rooms at the Union
was termed by the Union
director as being a P.R.
problem, and that it would be
impractical in many cases to
collect a nominal fee.
However, he said the
suggestion will be considered as
a possible way of raising the
Union income.
Rion denied that use of guest
rooms had been denied for
student use. He said that more
than 50 per cent of the rooms are
used by students for relatives or
friends.
However, for the Homecoming
game and others, a number of
rooms are kept by Rion, who
saves them for use by members
of the Board of Regents or other
state VIPs.

W -I
"S'*v V'
m t9| M

V S
ILmH.
...
M 4 JK
MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
... Probe managing editor
this campus, Miss Schauseil
said.
The emphasis in the Probe is
on perspective, as opposed to a
daily such as The Alligator, with
more time to work on stories,
she added.
Plans for the December issue
center around the theme, The
Role of a University.
In future issues it is hoped

BSU To Bring Afro Arts

The Theatre of Afro-Arts will
present an afternoon of drama,
art and poetry that exhibits the
true black experience, Sunday
at 4 p.m. in the Medical Science
Building Auditorium.
Sponsored by the Black
Student Union (BSU), the
Theatre of Afro-Arts is a
Mi ami-based touring group,
committed to educating,
entertaining and serving the
black community, according to
one of their pamphlets.
BSU is concerned that
students on this campus and the
people in this community
over-look the accomplishments
and talents of black people,
Carl Smart, BSU minister of
culture, said. Many times these
ac c omplishments are hidden
from people.

t ill In
£ and the S
| Florida Alligator 1
j is now £

that exchange columns with
other state universities can be
arranged.
The Probe is distributed in the
Sin City area, the Reitz Union,
and the College of Journalism
and is free.
Hoffman Tickets
Scarce At FSU
Only 1,600 tickets are
available for Abbie Hoffmans
speech at FSU Monday,
according to David McMullen,
FSU Flambeau associate editor.
McMullen said UF students
who want to attend the speech
should purchase their tickets in
advance at the University Union
ticket office between 9 a.m. and
4:30 p.m. Monday.
Tickets cost $1 each to hear
Hoffman speak at 8 p.m. at
Ruby Diamond Auditorium in
Tallahassee.

The program Sunday is open
to the public. There is no
admission charge.

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DeGaulle Buried
Quietly Thursday
I 'Charles de Gaulle I
1890 T97o' I
*
COLOMBEY-LES-DEUX-EGUSES, France (UPI) Charles de
Gaulle was buried Thursday as he had wished, in a village graveyard
without fanfare or eulogy. But in Paris a hundred miles away world
leaders paid homage at a Requiem Mass in Notre Dame Catheral.
As he directed in his testament, the ordinary Roman Catholic burial
service was said over his pale oak coffin by Father Claude Jaugey, the
village priest, assisted by Francois de Gaulle, a Dominican friar and
nephew of the general.
THE SERVICES WERE simple as De Gaulle had directed but tens
of thousands of his countrymen surrounded the cemetery with a final
outpouring of emotion that was an act of homage as well as an
expression of grief. Some estimated the crowd at 25,000.
He had asked for silence but today the bells of Frances 40,000
churches tolled a requiem for the man who restored the nations
honor in World War 11. The last time they had done so was in 1944
when their joyous peals marked Frances liberation from the Nazis.
He had asked there be no state funeral but the ceremonies in Notre
Dame were close to that.
AND THURSDAY night in Paris, a million Frenchmen prepared to
march the length of the Champs Elysees and relight the flame at the
tomb of the Unknown Soldier in another expression of grief for the
man who died in the country village Monday night of a heart attack
13 days before his 80th birthday.
De Gaulles body was borne the 300 yards from his home Le
Boisserie to the village church in a coffin draped with the tricolor and
carried by an armored half track, a symbol of De Gaulles career in the
armored corps. Behind the coffin rode his widow, Yvonne, their two
children and other close relatives.
A detail of soldiers carried the coffin in. After the services 10 farm
hoys carried it out a side door to the De Gaulle family plot beneath a
granite cross.
The inscription was simple: Charles de Gaulle 1890-1970.

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Friday, November 13, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 13,1970

EDITORIAL
Think About It
State Senator Mallory Horne, a Democrat from
Tallahassee, has said that his Senate Judiciary Committee is
going to investigate the selection of speakers at state
universities.
In a letter to University System Chancellor Robert
Mautz, Home wrote, the committee is interested in
determining whether or not a balanced program was
available in the sense that varied points of view were
represented.
Horne also requested that Mautz supply a list of speakers
invited to state university campuses and how much the
speakers were paid and by whom.
Meanwhile in Orlando, Dr. Lewis Murray, a member of
the Board of Regents, said he would recommend at the next
meeting that a policy be established whereby a student
organization could not be recognized by a state university if
any official of the organization had been convicted of
disruptive activity at any campus.
We believe it necessary to raise the following questions:
Concerning the speakers, just what is meant by proper
balance?
Does this mean that for every radical left speaker on
campus, there must be a similar spokesman for the radical
right?
Doesnt Senator Home believe the university capable of
regulating its own policies on such matters?
Why bring the money matter into it at this time?
Why the investigation in the first place, particularly a
few days before Yippie Abbie Hoffman is to speak at
Florida State?
What does he mean by disruptive activity? Isnt this a
little vague?
Will such a policy deny the applicant its "due process"?
Isnt such action hasty? Why the rush?
Think about it.

Chiles Allende Alarms The State Department

To say that the State
Department is holding its breath
over Chiles new president,
admitted Marxist-Leninist,
Salvador Allende, is an
understatement.
Indeed, the whole Western
world will be following Mr.
Allendes efforts to, in his own
words, Lay the foundations for
socialism.
Allende is a vastly different
man from the typical American
image of the bomb-throwing
Communist. He has worked
within Chiles historic (120 years
old) democratic system. He won
his six-year presidential term by
only 40,000 votes, a slight 1.4
per cent plurality over two
other candidates.
ALLENDE LOST the 1958
presidential election by an even
smaller margin than he won this
one with (that election was won
by Jorge Alessandri who was
runner-up this time). Because no
candidate had a clear maijority
in both elections, the final
decision was made by the
Chilean Congress.
With apparent faith in the
democratic system, Allende
immediately pledged support to
Alessandri, who was a
Conservative candidate, in 1958.
Alessandri was obliged to return
the gesture this time.
American government is

probably most alarmed at the
new president because he has
pledged to nationalize all
American industry in Chile.
Those holdings total over S6OO
million.
ALLENDE reasons that those
American industrial interests are
robbing Chile of her natural
resources (most of the American
plans are mining facilities).
Though those plants pay among
the highest wages in Chile, they
still return only a tiny fraction
of the worth of those minerals
to Chileans.
Allende states flatly that
Chilean natural wealth should
serve to enrich Chileans, not
Americans. Such is the kind of
reasoning that gives American
Copper industrialists a bad case
of the twitch.
Americans often find it hard
to understand that foreign
peoples in poor nations hate the
Yanky. Certainly a lot of
money comes to those peoples
as a result of American
investments; but that income is
pure chicken feed compared to
the natural wealth exported
from those nations to make
General Motors or American
Telephone and Telegraph
Company rich. State
Department foreign aid serves
more to irritate than to appease
under those circumstances.
IF ALLENDE is being candid,

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Wheres your I. D. kid?

and his political history is one of
complete openess, a key word he
has used is socialism. There is
a vast world of difference
between Communism and
Socialism.
While Communism comes
with totalitarianism and an
economy determined by the
dictators, Socialism is an
economic system entered into
freely by the populace and based
on democracy. In many ways
the United States has been
slipping into limited socialism
beginning with efforts to beat
the depression.
The Western wotld has several
partially socialist nations, among
them Britain and Sweden.
The closest thing to
Moscrow-style Communism that
has come about since Allendes
election has been the wild
rumors and national panic
infecting Chile. Controled panic
seems to have been the order of
the day in our State Department
where Allende is concerned.
CHILES South American
neighbors are worried about the
borders they must now share
with- a suspected Communist
nation. Perhaps there is some
basis for concern in light of
Allendes close friendships with
Cubas Fidel Castro and Che
Guevara. While serving as
president of Chiles Senate

it o;

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

'- *\ *,i i ,; ;;,- ',. '*f .'
r
* wf
KEN DRIGGS
' : .

(1965-69), he was a founder of
and leading participant in the
Havana-based Castroite Gurrilla
front 0. L. A. S. (Organization
of Latin-American Solidarity).
Even if we must assume the
worst and label Allende a
C astro-who-wo n-through n-throughthe-system,
the-system, n-throughthe-system, we must realize that
that very system is strong
enough to withstand at least six
years of Communist efforts.
Chiles democratic tradition is
considerably stronger than any
of her Latin American
neighbors. Its Congress is 120
years old and some of its
political parties are 110 years
old. In the past it has strictly
adhered to the results of its free
elections.
WHEN ARMY General Rene
Schneider was assasinated a few
weeks ago he was the first such
political assasination in modem
Chilean history, more than any
other South American country
can claim.
Chile is one of the few
Latin-American nations where a
Communist political party was
permitted to participate in the

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

democratic process. It would
appear they had faith in their
system.
Finially, Chiles military has
traditionally kept its nose out of
politics, nothing short of a
Latin-American miracle.
IF FIDEL Castro had been
freely elected President of the
United Staes, he could not even
begin to transform this country
into a Communist state.
American Democratic traditions
simply are too strong to permit
such a take over. The situation is
much the same in Chile, only
Allende is not nearly so
fearsome as Castro.
The guess would be that the
new Chilean president will make
some real strides toward
economic equality in his country
and maybe the lesson will be
learned by other nations.
Perhaps it will also serve as a
stern lesson to American
industry that natural resources
belong to the country they
origionate in. There is something
immoral about stealing that
wealth, especially when you
consider wealthy America
doesnt need it.



Tastes Differ
MR. EDITOR:
Does a university
administration have an
obligation not just to listen, but
to follow, the advice of a
self-selected group of
students?
Nowhere can 1 recall hearing
that a university was a
democratic institution.
Should students be active in
the selection and promotion of
faculty members?
As much as Id like to say yes,
I cant in fair consciousness.
Whether one is a good teacher is
not a matter for the majority to
decide. Individuals tastes in
teachers differ as they do in
cigarettes, girls, and music.
We, as students, cannot judge
whether a man is a good teacher
because it is often years before
we discover that Mr.
was a good or bad teacher.
We can judge whether a man
is intelligent, stimulating, and
sympathetic to our mode of
thought, but we do not know
whether he is giving us the best
information available or whether
he is presenting it in the most
competent manner.
Only other members of the
faculty can judge that.
Teaching is not a popularity
contest; it is a professional
relationship. If students did
participate in selection of
teachers in other ways than
registering for their course it
would create a student-teacher
relationship inappropriate to
teaching.
If students would really like
to get involved I feel they should
concern themselves with
national problems (e.g. cruel and
ridiculous war, broken
Government promises, Civil
rights, foreign policy, and
national budget), rather than
local conflicts.
Jordan Weiss, lUC
-
Law Os The Land
MR. EDITOR:
A school teacher named
Pickering was once fired from an
Illinois high school for writing a
letter to a local newspaper,
criticizing his school boards
methods of handling school
finances.
Perhaps John Parkers
problem with the Athletic
Association is not too far
removed from the United States
Supreme Courts observations
concerning Pickerings discharge:
In a case such as this present
one, in which the fact of
employment is only tangentially
and insubstantially involved in
the subject matter of the public
communication made by a
teacher, we conclude that it is
necessary to regard the teacher
as the member of the general
public he seeks to be.
... In sum, we hold that,in a
case such as this absent proof of
false statements knowingly or
recklessly made by him, a
teachers exercise of his right to
speak on issues of, public
importance may not furnish the
basis for his dismissal from
public employment. (Pickering

v. Board of Ed., as quoted in
Lockhart, et. al., Constitutional
Law)
One cannot assume with
certainty that an assistant
track coach will be
accorded a lesser degree of
Constitutional protection than
his teacher counterpart.
Neither can it be categorically
denied that advocation of the
right of students to organize
themselves with regard to a voice
in their own affairs relates only
in tangential and insubstantial
fashion to Mr. Parkers
admittedly superior performance
of his duties as an assistant track
coach.
Mr. Graves, and presumably
those to whom he answers,
remain demonstrably unmoved
by community indignation over
the summary termination of
John Parkers employment with
the University.
Shall we conclude the Athletic
Associations mandate arises
fiom some Law of the Land
more supreme than the
Constitution of the United
States?
Bill Guzzetti, ILW
Atilla Ilkson, ILW
Bikes Are Predators
MR. EDITOR:
Alper vs. Parker? Kelly vs.
Uhlfelder? SMC vs. YAF?
No This time its me
against our oppressed minority
for the month.
Os course, Im referring to the
many bicycle riders who take
their life into their hands every
time they venture forth onto the
streets of our campus. I dont
intend to start a typical Alligator
conflict by this letter, but I
would like to bring a few points
to the endangered species of
bicycle riders.
First, let me say I like bicycles
and I like people who ride
bicycles. But put them together
and you have a deadly animal on
your hands.
Let me make one point before
I continue, and that is that I
drive an automobile and pollute
the air. I use an unleaded
gasoline and try to diminish the
effect of the harmful exhaust.
If people can accept what I
have to say without using an
argument ad hominum, I will
continue.
I am amazed how bicycle
riders use the privilege of taking
up a full car lane while only
going about eight miles per hour
and then have the gall to go
through a red light.
If they want to act like a car
in one respect, then they can act
like a car in the other, more
annoying ways also.
Many bicycle riders also claim
about being run off the road by
vicious motorists whos only
intent is to run them down.
However, its more often the
case that the bicycle rider has
drifted so far out into the
middle of the lane that either a
motorist must force him over to
the side of the road, or end up
having a head-on with a Denny
Concrete truck approaching in
the opposite lane.
Os course, he can slam on his
brakes and have the fellow
behind him slam into his rear.
I would like to briefly

READERS FORUM

re-count a true story which
happened to me about three
weeks ago. I was calmly walking
on the sidewalk (which I think is
for pedestrians) in front of
McCarty Hall, when a poor
oppressed bicycle rider ran me
down.
I was fortunate in the way
that he hit me that he ended up
on the ground and I was
standing. I helped him up and
we both went our own ways.
Moral of the story bikes,
like cars can be predators; the
whole point being that if
everyone, including the bicycle
riders, would be more careful
and more considerate, maybe it

Support Womens Lib!

Really, I just wanted to be
helpful.
Just the other day I showed
my support of Womens Lib by
burning a bra. Unfortunately a
Womens Libite (I guess thats
what you call them) was wearing
it at the time.
All considered, though, this
type of thing has to be expected
as the sexes jockey for adjusted
role positions.
I stand in firm support of
Womens lib, for several
reasons.
FIRST, I am probably going
to get drajfted.
If women were made equal
they would get drafted and with
their vast numbers added to the
pool would take the pressure off
guys like me. I, for one, would

1
U I thought I told you to stay out of the ocean!"

Alligator Staff
Denise Valianta Craig Heyl
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

would turn out safe and
complacent for all ... just
maybe.
When bicycle riders learn that
they too are an object of
extreme annoyance and possible
danger to others, maybe they
will be able to understand the
position of we, inconsiderate car
drivers, (and pedestrians!)
ED ALBANESI, 3UC
50,000 People
MR. EDITOR:
In reply to the letter by Mr.

REG CROWDER j|j|

just as soon wait anxiously at
home. I dont dig rifles or
marching or any of that stuff.
SECOND, the alimony and
child support laws in this state
are out of the stone age.
An amazing number of guys
are now making license plates at
Raiford because they got
hornswaggled into a marriage
with some chick (Lady, excuse
me) too expensive for him. She
hippity-hopped over to her
mothers lawyer who soon sold
the poor sap into debtors prison.
An equal woman couldnt do
that.

Friday, Nwtwbar 13,1970, Th> Florida AWigitor,

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392*1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609

Pete Hobbs on Wednesday,
November 4: Mike Kelley may
have blackened Steve
Uhlfelders name and reputation
in front of 50,000 people, but
what has Uhlfelder done for the
University of Florida athletic
program?
He certainly hasnt made it
look very bright.
Uhlfelder started the
blackening and has helped to
downgrade the name and
reputation of Florida athletics in
front of -more than 50,000
people.
Mary Wilkins, 3PE

THIRD, as it is now women
live longer than men. Some
people say thats something to
do with glands and having babies
and stuff. I happen to think the
male life style has more to do
with it.
Some anthropologists theorize
that the female was once the
dominant sex but all these little
cave girls got together and
agreed it wasnt worth it.
Fourth, I can cook better
than most women as it is. My
chocolate chip pancakes blew
Betty Crockers mind.
Go to it girls.

Page 9



Page 10

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Novambar 13,1970

Theatre Becomes Civic Center

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
A community center to serve as a base for
projects by and for the black people of the
community will become a reality next January,
according to UF student Bruce Nearon.
Nearon and Gainesville lawyer Carol Scott, a
recent UF graduate, are working on legal forms to
incorporate a board of directors responsible for Rose
Community Center now known as Rose Theatre.
THE THEATRE located on NW 5 Avenue in the
heart of a Gainesville blade community, is not very
impressive from the outside. On the inside it is
undoubtedly even less impressive it was gutted by
fire several years ago and has been inactive since
then.
But Nearon, an architecture student, envisions
UF students and black citizens working together to
rebuild the center and then to locate community
projects and community service organizations there.
Before the building begins, a corporation must be

Bomb Policy Questioned
By Administrative Council

By ELIZABETH MALTZ
Alligator Writer
Bomb threats were the main topic of discussion
at the Administrative Council meeting on Thursday.
As of 1 pjn. there had been three the
Mechanical Engineering building, Reitz Union and
Peabody Hall, respectively.
THE QUESTION IS whether or not to evacuate a
building if it is under the threat of a bomb. Most of
the Council members felt the university had a moral
responsibility to announce a bomb threat to its
students.
In the past, action taken during a bomb scare was
evacuation of the building until a search was
completed and police felt the building to be safe to
enter. Because of the prevalence of bomb threats
occuring lately a new policy was deemed necessary.
0
The only two things that can be done are to
evacuate at all times or warn the students and let

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PROJECT BENEFITS BLACK COMMUNITY

them decide, Steve Uhlfelder, student body
president, said.
DEAN FRANKLIN DOTY of University College
said he would like to see a policy of evacuation with
discretion. But most felt that no one would want to
be responsible for making such an important
decision.
Bomb scares are becoming a great annoyance to
many individuals. Disruption of classes is the result.
One of the members of the Council said that he
would like to see a policy of no evacuation.
Uhlfelder said he would be worried about the
boy who called wolf*. Although no bombs have
been found in the past one day there might be a real
one. If no evacuation were the policy, tragedy might
be the result.
The policy adopted by the Administrative
Council concerning bomb threats is to announce to
everyone in the building the possibility of a bomb
and to give each person the option to remain or
leave.

set up, Nearon said. The corporation would remove
liability from any individual
NEARON ADDED the formation of a non-profit
corporation would be beneficial for tax purposes.
The owner of the theatre has agreed to lease the
theatre at a low price to a corporation which would
operate the building as a community center, Nearon
said.
The UF student was told this week by Miss Scott
that the papers of incorporation should be finalized
by Dec. 6.
HE HAS TALKED to persons in the community
and people have expressed an interest in rebuilding
the theatre, especially the young blacks, he
said.
We want* the participation of the black
community, because then after the thing is built
they will feel they have a stake in it, Nearon said.
Gary McClain, assistant director of Outreach, a
group of UF black students organized to work in
Gainesville black communities, was contacted by
Nearon and promised his groups support.
TO GATHER MONEY for the project, the UF

students involved have contracted local bands to
play for less than normal cost, with profits from
admissions prices to go to the project. The project
now has more than S2OO and several more
performances for the benefit of the project are
scheduled for later this quarter, Nearon said.
Membership of the board of directors is not yet
determined, but Nearon said several of the UF
students who have worked on the project would
probably be board members.
He also hoped black community leaders, black
students, or other citizens from the black
community might beome members of the board.
Nearon has his own ideas on what projects
might be set up. He has spoken of the center as a
place for concerts and films, or to house a day care
center or an arts and crafts center. Office space
could be provided for black organizations devoted
to the community interest.
But I dont know what projects actually will be
set up, he said. Thats up to the people.

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Auto Insurance 'Major Social Issue

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) V
Escalating automobile insurance
rates are having their greatest
impact on the poor and the
problem is increasing with every
new car on Floridas streets and
highways, a special legislative
committee was told Wednesday.
THE AUTOMOBILE is the
biggest problem of all, said
John Parker, a staff member of
the Legislative Service Bureau
who specializes in insurance
legislation.
Parker made the comments at
the first working session of the
Joint Committee on Insurance
appointed by House and Senate
leaders after the legislature
passed a bill imposing a 120-day
moratorium on auto insurance
rate increases.
Gov. Claude Kirk announced
Tuesday he was abandoning

Measures Proposed
On Campus Violence
By MARY ANN WHITLEY
Alligator Writer
Dr. R. L. Johns, director of the National Education Finance Project
disclosed Wednesday a survey conducted by the Education
Commission of the States on proposed measures to curb campus
violence.
In the past year, 32 states introduced and adopted resolutions and
bills designed to prevent campus unrest. In many, jail sentences and
fines up to $15,000 for offenses such as rioting and burning or
destroying property were stated.
OTHER LEGISLATION relating to promotion of or participation
in riots enables university authorities to name security officers and
give them full police powers; to make rules for maintaining order and
to ban violators of these regulations from campuses.
Other anti-violence legislation revokes scholarships or financial aid
from participants in campus disorder.
California, the state with the most campus unrest in 1969,has in introduced
troduced introduced 120 bills and resolutions in two years. Some relatively calm
states, riot-wise, have, as preventative medicine, passed anti-violence
legislation.
Though some states, such as Pennsylvania, have extremely strict
anti-riot legislation, they are showing themselves receptive to student
requests for more voice. Students will have more say in policies and
operations. Kentucky is adopting similar measures and as yet has no
campus unrest legislation.
Twenty-two states have considered campus violence legislation for
1971, Florida among them. Other states feel their present statutes are
sufficient to cover possible problems.
Efwii: NOVEMBER
M 8-12 P.M.-UNIV. AUDITORIUM
ffam MONEY raised will go to the hoqtown feast

COMMITTEE TO STUDY PROBLEM

plans to call a special 10-day
session on insurance beginning
next week because of opposition
from legislative leaders and the
fact that a new governor and
new insurance commissioner will
take office in January.
SEN. WELBORN Daniel,
D-Clermont, the committee
chairman, said he hopes there
will be no special session until
late January at the earliest,
giving the committee plenty of
time to study all facets of the
problem and make meaningful
recommendations.
He said the committee will
hold at least two more day-long
work sessions in the next two
months and probably will not
consider specific legislation until
January.
Parker opened the meeting by
reporting that auto insurance has

become a major social issue of
the times, especially in such
populous areas as Dade County
where traffic problems are
compounded by tourists.
PARKER SAID there would
be no long-range solution to the
insurance problems until mass

THE
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1718 W. Univ. Ave.
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Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376-9334 8 am-9 pm

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transportation or other
alternatives are found to offset
the growing need for private
passenger motor vehicles.
He noted that accidents have
continued to increase despite the
passage by the 1967 legislature
of virtually every highway safety

| 2 Guitars, 2 vocals, and lots |
I of original material
| SAT. NOV. 14 2-5 PM
| S. TERRACE, REITZ UNION |
sponsored by J.W.R. Union

Friday, Nov am bar 13,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

law proposed.
There can be no doubt that
highway safety legislation has
had a restraining effect on the
increase in motor vehicle
accidents, but it has certainly
not proven to be a panacea,
Parker said.

Page 11



Page 12

l Tlm Florida Allietor, Friday, November 13,1970

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

GRE APPLICATION
DEADLINE DATE
Tuesday, Nov. 24, is the last day
for receipt by the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, N. J.
06540 of the registration form
to take the Dec. 12 Graduate
Record Examination without
paying the $3 penalty fee.
BANKERS LOANS'
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Board of Trustees of the
Florida Bankers Educational
Foundation will meet on Dec. 9
to review scholarship/loan
applications for the winter
quarter. All applications and
supporting papers must be in the
finance and insurance office by
Nov. 25. Applications for this
scholarship/loan may be
obtained from the office of the
Department of Finance and
Insurance, Room 204, Matherly
Hall.
CUBAN STUDENT LOANS
Cuban Student Loan borrowers
who are leaving the University at
the end of this quarter are
requested to see G. A. Farris,
International Center, for an
interview required by the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare.
LIBRARY HOLIDAY
SCHEDULE
The library schedule for the
Thanksgiving Holidays has been
announced as follows:
Wednesday, Nov. 25:
Libraries East & West,
Architecture & Fine Arts,
Chemistry, Engineering and
Physics, Health & Physical
Education, Hume and
Journalism, 8 a.m.s p.m. P. K.
Yonge Library of Florida History
and Special Collections, 8:30
a.m-5 p.m. Education, 8
a.m.-10:30 p.m.; Health Center
Library, 8:306 p.m.; Law, 8
a.nx-11 p.m.; Mead, 8 a.m.4
p.m.; Teaching Resources
Center, 8 a.m.-12 noon; 1-5
p.m.
All libraries will be closed
Thursday, Nov. 26, with the
exception of the Law Library
which will be open from 8
a.m.-11 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 27, and
Saturday, Nov. 28; Libraries
East and West, 9 a.m.s p.m.;
Education, 8 a.m.s p.m. (Sat.
9 a.m.s p.m.); Health Center,
8:30-12 midnight (Sat. 8:30
a.m.-5 p.m.); Law, 8 a.m.-11
p.m. All others closed.

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA tide I Home Improvement
loans, and Share loans
Call 392-0393 for monthly payment data for any type loan. -
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNfOM

Sunday, Nov. 29: Libraries
East and West, 2ll p.m.;
Architecture and Fine Arts,
6lo p.m.; Chemistry and
Engineering and Physics, 2-5
p.m., 7lo p.m.; Education,
2 10:30 p.m.; Health and
Physical Education, 7lo p.m.;
Health Center, 2 p.m.l2
midnight; Hume, 7ll p.m.;
Law, 8:30 a.m.ll p.m.;
Teaching Resources Center, 2-5
p.m., 6lo p.m. Others will be
closed.
GATOR GO CLUB
BEING FORMED
The Gator Go Club will meet
Friday, Nov. 13, at 7:30 p.m. in
Rooms 150 C and 150 D, Reitz
Union. Go is an intellectually
challenging game of Oriental
origin comparable to chess.
FROSH HONORARY
INITIATION
Phi Eta Sigma freshman
honorary fraternity will have its
fall quarter initiation Sunday,
Nov. 22, at 2 p.m. in Room 346,
Reitz Union.
Yonge Library
GRADUATING SENIORS
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
SENIORS WITH LOANS
If you are a graduating senior
and have a National Defense
Student Loan or a S.A.F.E.
Loan, you must complete the
exit interview procedure prior to
graduation in order to keep your
account current.
NATIONAL DEFENSE LOAN
PROGRAM
Students with approved release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan program for the
winter quarter, and who have
pre-registered for that quarter,
may have fees deducted from
the loan. Fee cards should be
brought to Student Accounts
Office as soon as possible.

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

DEPOSITORY HOURS
Student Accounts in the Hub
will be open from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m., Jan. 4,1971. If lines are as
long as they have been in the
past, the lines will be regulated
so that there will be enough time
to wait on everyone inside by 3
p.m. There is an envelope drop
on the east wall of the
depository for students'
convenience.
ATHLETIC ASSOC. PLANE
AVAILABLE
The University Athletic
Association has a 24 passenger
DC-3 airplane which is used
primarily for athletic team trips
other than football. This leaves
considerable time when it is
available for other use.
The use of this plane by
University groups has been
approved by the Department of
General Services, State of
Florida, and may be paid for
from state funds, provided the
utilization of its large seating
capacity can provide a savings to
the state. Trips involving 10 or
fewer passengers would probably
be scheduled on state planes
other than the DC-3.
The cost of the plane will be
$175 per hour flying time with
an additional layover charge of
$125 per day of the trip
involved more than one day.
Each seat is insured for
SIOO,OOO under the basic plan
with maximum limit of
$5,000,000 per accident. State
employees are eligible for
Workmen's Compensation. In
insurance terminology, this
aircraft is identified as
non-scheduled. Some personally
owned insurance policies do not
cover the holder while a
passenger on a non-scheduled
aircraft.
Only groups officially
connected with the University
may use the plane and its use by
such groups must be on official
University business or an activity
sponsored by the University. All
requests for reservations must be
made through the Office of
Administrative Affairs, 202
Tigert Hall, telephone 392-1336.
At that time a determination
will be made as to the most
economical mode of
transportation-utilizing state
planes or the DC-3.
Questions should be addressed
to the Office of Administrative
Affairs.

university calendar

Friday, Novemer 13
Curriculum & Instruction
Student Organization
Colloquium: Speaker on
"Student Feedback about the
Dissertation Experience",
Norman Hall 237,11:00 a.m.
Rathskellar Special Band
Anthropology Club First Fall
Symposium, ASB 3C, 4 p.m.
Union Movie, "In the Heat of
the Night", Union Aud.,
5:30, 8,10:30 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Leadership Training Class,
Union, 7 p.m.
EAG Meeting, Walker Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Federation of Cuban Students
Discussion on Cuban, "Past
and Present", Union 361, 8
p.m.
C. 1.0. "Get together", Union
122,123,8 p.m.
Rose Community Center
Concert, Univ. Aud., 8 p.m.
Murphree Area Council Dance,
"The Brothers Grimm",
Murphree Area, 9 p.m.
MENSA Party, 1130-79 S. W.
16th Ave., 9 p.m., anyone
interested invited!
Fla. Players, "Man for All
Seasons", Constans Theatre,
8 p.m.
Saturday, November 14
Folk Singers, Union South
Terrace, 2 p.m.
Rathskellar Show, Special Band
Union Movie, "In the Heat of
the Night", Union Aud.,
5:30, 8,10:30 p.m.
Gator Football: Univ. of Fla., vs.
Kentucky, Tampa
Fla. Players, "Man for All
Seasons", Constans Theatre,
8 p.m.

For those of
you who Click Camera i
never saw a SSiSEi,*.
Quarterly SS, 800 ** 0
outside the Design Shop 1
library Little-Walker Plaza
florida quarterly
m onl M did it for you

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

Sunday, November 15
BSU Afro Art Show, Univ. Aud.,
12:00 Noon
Rose Community Center
Concert, Plaza, 12:00 Noon
Union Movie, "Jules & Jim",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8, 10:30
p.m.
Cl RUN A Meeting, Plaza, 3:30
p.m.
Duplicate Bridge Meeting, Union
150 C & D, 6:30 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ,
"Boys in Blue", Univ. Aud., 8
p.m.
Monday, November 16
Union Movie, "Genesis III",
Union Aud., 5:30, 7:45,
10:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, Union
357, 361, 7 p.m.
Student Poetry Reading, Union
122,123,7:30 p.m.
Speech Dept. Meeting, "Speech
Communication", ASB-216,
7:30 p.m.
Science Fiction Club Meeting,
Union 356,8 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, E & I Bldg 525, 8
p.m.
AA UP Executive Committee
Meeting, Little Hall 358, 8
p.m.
r v
BOX OFFICE SALES
"Temptations", $2.50 per
person
Union Movies, "In the Heat of
the Night" & "Jules & Jim",
$.50



Heerre Comes
The Art Cart

'New Directions In Orientation
Theme Os Directors Conference

New Directions in Orientation is the theme of
the 23rd annual National Orientation Directors
Conference to be held at UF Nov. 15,16, and 17.
This is the first time the conference, which meets
at a different campus each year, has been hosted by
a Florida school.
THE CONFERENCE, sponsored by the Office
for Student Affairs and the Division of Continuing
Education, is expected to draw more than 200
participants from universities and colleges
throughout the United States.
Our emphasis this year is clearly toward total
involvement with the student and his interests,
concerns, hang-ups and needs. We want to talk to,
not about, him hear from, not about, him,
Donald Mott, assistant dean for student
development and conference chairman, said.
Dr. Arthur W. Combs, professor of education at
UF will set the theme for the participants with his

The Minis A Safety Skirt

A girl wearing a mid-thigh
high miniskirt is likely to be a
safer driver than one wearing a
mid-calf length midi-skirt,
according to Graham Gardner, a
safety engineer for British
Levland Motors in the U.S.

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By Alligator Services
The rumble and squeaking of wheels
and excited chatter filling the pediatric
halls of UFs Shands Teaching Hospital
and Clinics all signify one thing here
comes the Art Cart.
What is the Art Cart?
A MOBILE WOODEN cart brimming
with a paraphernalia of pictures for
children to brighten up their hospital
rooms and their spirits as well.
The Art Cart concept, a lending
service, was instigated at Shands last
spring by Mrs. Charles Weiss, Mrs. Gerold
Schiebler, and Mrs. Gerald Bloom all
wives of pediatricians at the J. Hillis

The mini allows more
freedom of leg movement
making it possible for a woman
to reach the brake pedal in
minimum time in an emergency,
he explained.

keynote address on Orientation: The Persons in
the Process. Following sessions will emphasize the
human approach to human problems.
HIGHLIGHTS OF the opening program include a
media message featuring seven silent films shown
simultaneously by Charles Babst, UF graduate
student.
The group will retreat to Rainbow Springs on
Monday for a free-wheeling look at the student of
the 70s.
Other UF speakers for the three-day session
include: Dr. William E. Kline, counseling
psychologist; Dr. Harold C. Riker, director of
housing; Dr. Betty Cosby, assistant to the vice
president for student affairs; Dr. Marlin Schmidt,
assistant professor of education; Dr. Travis Carter,
associate professor of logic, and James B. Bostwick,
program coordinator of the Division of Continuing
Education.

Miller Health Center.
We wanted to make the children feel
more at home away from home, Mrs.
Weiss said. Colorful pictures of animals,
circus figures, mother goose characters
and an assortment of educational prints
seemed an excellent way to decorate the
rooms and reduce the sterile hospital
atmosphere.
EACH WEEK, one or more of the
three volunteers traverse the entire
seventh floor of the hospital displaying
the Art Carts wares. Patients select the
picture they want and if they are
hospitalized for an extended time, they
can swap and select another picture the
following week.

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goes all out and 1412 N. Main St.
|to please the Student tfa L ]

EUROPE-
Summer 71
Go to Europe next summer at lowest
rates published.
Scheduled air service guaranteed to
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Don't be disappointed book now to
assure yourself of space.
For further information call the >
professional travel agents at:
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Friday, Novambar 13,1970, Tha Florida AKplnr.

Besides the hospital rooms, the Art
Cart has decorated the seventh floor
hallways, the pediatric X-ray room and
the parents waiting room.
Dr. James L. Talbert, chief of the
pediatric surgery, liked the results so we!,
that he requested we decorate the
hospitals new pediatric intensive care
unit also, Mrs. Weiss stated.
AND THE PARENTS are expressing
their approval too.
The response to the Art Cart by the
childrens parents has been very
gratifying. Our pictures have been
credited for helping depressed children
come out of their shells and take an
interest again, said Mrs. Weiss.

Page 13



Page 14

, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, Nowambar 13,1970

Students Tell
It Like It Is
To Baptists

The only way the
church is going to
accomplish its
commission is for
Christians to have "an
obsession for serving
Jesus Christ.
Rev. William Lawson

Floridas Population
Up 34.7% From 1960

By Alligator Services
Floridas absolute population
growth of the 1960s was less
than that of the previous
decade, but it still amounted to
six per cent of the nations total
population gain of 26 million.
Writing in the current issue of
Economic Indicators, Mrs.
Diane H. Rush, managing editor
of UFs Bureau of Economic and
Business Research, reports that
according to a preliminary count
of the 1970 Census of
Population, Floridas resident
population is 6,671,162,
representing an increase of
1,719,602, or 34.7 percent from
1960.
MOST OF THE states
high-increase counties are
located along the coastlines of
the peninsula in a U shape,
the bottom of the U being
Collier, Broward, and Dade
counties.
Interestingly enough, the
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BySTEVE STRANG
Assistant Assignments Editor
More than 1,500 people attended the annual
Florida Baptist Convention Pastor-Student
dinner in Florida Gym Wednesday, and heard
Baptist students tell it like it is concerning the
church and its relationship to students.
The dinner was part of the 109th annual
Florida Baptist State Convention being held at
the First Baptist Church in Gainesville this week.
DURING THE dinner, the Rev. A. Douglas
Watterson, pastor of the First Baptist Church in
Tallahassee, in an unprecidented move, opened
the floor to students who had something to say
to the people there. Students spoke, and some
severely criticized the church for being phoney
and hypocritical.
One UF Baptist student, who asked not to be
named, accused Baptists of equating
fundamentalism with Americanism, conservatism
and the staus quo.
The Baptist Church is afraid of change. It has
aligned itself with the rich against the poor; with
white against black, with short hair and being
clean cut against long hair and odd dress, the
student said.
YOU HAVE refused to open your hearts to
the ones who need you most. You have said
poor man take our Christmas basket, but dont
talk to me about medical care, food stamps or
inadequate welfare.
You have said black man stay in your place.
We dont want your kind; Im sure there are
pastors here whose churches wouldnt let a black
into full church membership. You are hypocrites.

pattern of these high-increase
counties represents part of the
area of Floridas projected
megalopolis for 1985, she says.
The five leading counties in
order of absolute population
gain are Dade, Broward, Pinellas,
Duval and Hillsborough all
coastal counties in the
megalopolis pattern.
The total population gain
from these five counties
accounts for almost one million
of Floridas 1.7 million
population gain.

of a...make that
N.W. 16th

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Baptists, you are going to have to bend a
little, the student said.
OTHER STUDENTS accused the church of
not equipping them to meet the intellectual
requirements of the university in order to stand
up for their faith.
They accused many Baptists of being phony.
And they questioned if the religious experience,
professed by many Baptists, is valid.
A student from Florida Baptist Institute also
spoke and said despite its faults, the Baptist
Church was pretty good.
You cant find God in a book or in an
argument, discussion or classroom, he said.
You can only find God in your heart arid by
faith.
TWO UF students delivered scheduled talks
during the program. Phil Ware spoke on The
Outreach to Students Before College. Neil
Sherouse talked about The Outreach of Home
Missions.
The main speaker was the Rev. William A.
Lawson, a black pastor from Wheeler Avenue
Baptist Church in Houston.
Lawson said the only way the church is going
to accomplish its commission is for Christians to
have an obsession for serving Jesus Christ.
The purpose of the dinner Wednesday was to
bring college students together with their pastors
in order that students could tell it like it is to
their pastors, according to the Rev. Bob Smith,
UF Baptist Campus Center.
The dinner was the only part of the Florida
Baptist State Convention devoted to students.
Approximately one third of those at the dinner
were students.

The Baptist Church is
afraid of change. It has
aligned itself with the
rich against the poor;
with white against black,
with short hair and being
clean cut against long
hair and odd dress.

You can't find God
in a book or in an
argument, discussion or
class room. You can find
God only in your heart
and by faith.



Blue Goose Available For Use

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Writer
The Blue Goose, UFs 33 year
old DC-3 airplane, formerly
restricted for the sports
department use, can now be
used by other groups that are
officially connected with the
university and are on official
university business.
The cost of the plane will be
$175 per hour flying time with
an additional layover charge of
$125 per day of the trip, if more
than one day is involved.
THIS CHANGE in policy is
because the plane spends a large
amount of its time on the
ground between sports, which
other groups connected with the
university could make use of
according to Mr. Percy Beard,
assistant director of the Athletic
Department.
Another reason is that its
better for the plane if its used.
he said.
The Blue Goose, so called
because of its speed and color,
was donated to the UF two

Psychology 300 Festival
Plays Human Tranquilizer

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Have you stroked and soothed your soma lately?
TWELVE GRADUATE students will be working
with Dr. Sidney Jourard, professor of psychology,
and his class to present a Psychology 300 Festival
today from 1 to 5 p.m.
Alfred L. Richards, one of the twelve graduate
students working on the festival, said the students
will create a laboratory exercise in multiple ways
of being and relating in the world.
COMING TOGETHER on the grounds just
north of the Reitz Union, they will celebrate the
possibility of creating a mini-community based on
shared openess, mutual trust and respect.
Students from Jourards class will be working at

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At 807 W. University Ave. Presents: Friday
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I
H

i
THE BLUE GOOSE
... is still running after 33 years of faithful service

years ago by Bradley Aviation of
Houston, Texas.
RAY DANIEL, business
manager of the athletic
department, said UF has spent
$17,000 during the last year to
fix up and maintain the Blue
Goose.
Dr. Robert Braswell of the
College of Engineering and
chairman of the plane
committee for the athletic
department said that when the
Blue Goose was acquired it was

the festival, and will volunteer to give and receive a
massage as warm up for self-disclosure games.
OTHER STUDENTS will be singing and playing
guitars, painting murals, reading poetry and
putting themselves together with others.
At 5:30 pjm. the students will gather at the
Rathskeller to share their reactions to the days
events.
RICHARDS INVI TED students to show up and
show off!
Take a break and break out of that routine way
of being in the world, he said, soothe and enliven
that tired, hungry soma.
THE HUMAN tranquilizer takes place on the
grounds just north of the Reitz Union.
Richards also invited students to join a hundred
other people in the experience of painting a mural
four feet high and 24 feet long.

in pretty bad shape.
We replaced thousands of
bolts, every light in the aircraft,
some of the instruments,
overhauled both engines, and
put new fabric on the control
section. When we were finished
we had a dam fine aircraft.
DANIEL SAID the Blue
Goose, and its passengers are
insured for $3 million dollars.
The Blue Goose carries 24
passengers and costs about $175
an hour to operate. The UF

sensitivity and selectivity with a new Field Effect Transistor (FET) and
3-gang capacitor frontend. Plus automatic stereo switching with a high
stereo separation figure of better than 30dB. Other features that make
the 350 a standout in any price range include a new noise canceler,
short-free speaker output terminals and the ability to power up to two
speaker systems at the same time. For a new experience in stereo
listening pleasure, make it a point to hear the Sansui 350.

saves almost 60% of the cost of
leasing an aircraft by owning the
plane.
So far no one has called to use
the Goose since its
transformation from a sports
plane to a university business
plane.
ALL REQUESTS for
reseivations must be made
through the Office of
Administrative Affairs, 202
Tigret Hall, telephone 392-1336.
The Blue Goose is manned by

Cant Find That Book?
Weve Got It.
WSBk
Twelve Years of Christmas
by Rod McKuen
A collection of poems
originally written
for his Now
to
Books make an ideal lasting gift.
Our selection is the most complete
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Friday, November 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

a Federal Aviation Agency
certified ciew and is equipped to
go to any airport in the country.
Advertise:
Its Good
Business

Page 15



Page 16

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday, Novambar 13,1970

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UF Fire Alarm System
Undergoing Renovations

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF is slowly and
comprehensively renovating its
campus-wide fire alarm system
The first step, in the UPD
radio room, will be completed
early next week, according to a
University Physical Planning
official.
THIS IS A monitoring system,
connecting the entire campus to
a maze of points in the radio
room All manual and automatic
fire alarms on campus will be
inter-connected.
The main advantage of this,
according to Chief A. Shuler, of
the UPD, Us to have an effective
monitoring system at all times of
the day and night.**
Instead of depending on
outdoor alarms, and cruising
police officers late at night, the
alarm will be immediately
relayed to the UPD.
POLICE OFFICERS on duty
can then contact the Fire
Department and thus possibly
save several valuable minutes.*
There has never been a
system of this type in the past,**
Shuler said. But the central
alarm monitor will still be in
effect in several situations now
under manual alarm control.
These alarms could only be
relayed following manual
activation.
A few years ago the Physical
i &.*>:<<<:<<<*:*&sgwwwwwwww
GATOR |
ADS
SELL!

Planning Division undertook a
comprehensive study of the
entire fire-alarm operations on
campus. According to planning
officials, the study soon became
too big for Physical Planning to
handle.
THEY REQUESTED and
were appropriated a grant from
the Board of Regents to hire a
consultant to carry out the
study. The final report should be
completed and submitted next
month.
Several basic objectives of the
report include both a complete
system within every building and
more extensive use of the
automatic alarm.
Presently the automatic alarm
is only used incidentally on
campus. It is not the primary
system. The planning official
spoke of several spots on
campus, where it is used,
though, and is considered the

Friday, Saturday, Sunday Nov. 13, 14, 15
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best means of alerting officials
to a fire.
THERE ARE THREE basic
automatic alarms. The ionstatic
alarm, termed most effective by
the official, reacts to changes in
air motion and particles. This
motion occurs just before the big
heat build-up can take place, and
before a raging fire breaks out.
Another alarm used around
campus is a smoke detection
unit in air-conditioning ducts.
The automatic alarm detects the
smoke particles in the air and
clangs to life.
Hopefully, the planning
official said, the new system will
be completely enforced with
automatic alarms.
But for now, the monitoring
system, in the final stages of
telephone line tie-in and
completion, is an interim
measure to speed up fire-fighting
effectiveness.

INMATES

"The Boys in Blue/' inmates from Apalachee Correctional
Institution, will present a free rock concert Sunday at 8 p.m. in
University Auditorium. The group has been touring the Southeastern
United States and performing every day. The men relate their lives
through words and music. The inmates face a total of five years for
heroin addiction, 20 for armed robbery, five years for marijuana
possession and 10 years for breaking and entering. St. Petersburg
Times reported, "6000 high school students heard*'Boys in Blue' at
the Bayfront Center Arena." "Boys in Blue scored a big hit in their
program before students," said Tampa Tribune. The rock concert is
sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ.

Hospitality Is Thanksgiving

Foreign students currently
enrolled at UF and Santa Fe
Junior College have been invited
to participate in a hospitality
dinner on Thanksgiving day.
Some Gainesville residents are
opening their homes to the
foreign students, according to
Glenn Farris, advisor to the
foreign student group.
WE ARE TRYING to show
foreign students how Americans

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celebrate the tradition of
Thanksgiving, Farris said.
Farris is currently gathering
names and addresses of the
students to send- to the
Gainesville Council of
International Friendship,
sponsors of the dinner.
Any student wanting to
attend the dinner can turn his
name in at the International
Center, Farris said.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
1968 Firebird gold w/black interior
take over payments call 376-2530
(A-st-36-p)
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcaser 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
If you think a transistor is a gay
female sibling, we cant help you, but
if you know its a three legged fuse
then come to T.A.U. Inc. for your
replacements. 717 NW First St.
Phone 376-0624 (A-st-37-p)
USED ROOMS for sale (with wheels
yet!) 8, 10 and 12 ft. wide, drive &
save! HWY 20-10 m E. of Hawthorne
Cooper Lake Trailer Sales.
(A-st-36-p)
Miranda sensorex 50 mmf 1.8 w. case
+ 2 filters latest model $195. Black
leather jacket argentine hand made
S3O. Baby stroller $lO. Call
378-4126 (A-3t-38-p)
For Sale Mens 3 spd 69 Schwnn
rollaway bed. Curtin molecule chem
models, dietzgen T sqr & board.
Selmer clarinet. Call Tully 378-6886.
(A-st-38-p)
U.S. Diver Complete outfit, 2
regulators, plus extras, excel cond
Asking S9O Call Skip 392-7911 keep
trying. (A-4t-37-p)
STEREO components-Eico AM-FM
tuner $75; 80-watt amp $75: Roberts
997 tape recorder $275 D F Dunson
ph. 904-684-2531 collect after 6 p.m.
(a-st-36-p)
G.E. Sterephonic portable record
player w/speakers S3O also one
4-speaker cabinet $25. Such a deal,
cotton! Call 392-7452 (A-st-37-p)
1970 Yamaha Enduro 175 cc ctl good
condition 4 months old 1600 mi
SSOO call 373-3350 (A-st-39-p)
Full size mattress and springs $45;
gold brocade mediterranean couch
and chair $100; call 378-7943 after 5
(A-3t-39-p)
1969 Honda cl-350 scrambler
excellent condition $595. or best
offer call 378-5996 for more
information (A-3t-39-p)
1967 HONDA CB 160 low mileage,
gd. cond, $l9O. ALSO 2 Herald
speakers 40 watt for stereo set S4O
ea. Call Larry 372-7240. (A-3t-40-p)
Womans LASSIE Winter coat
camel wool double-breasted. Worn
only a few months. Size 14-16. Best
Offer. Call Sue 373-3021. (A-lt-39-p)
Stereo System in Cabinet includes
AR turntable, Eico amp & tuner, E-V
speakers-perfect cond. SSOO, trade or
best offer. 373-3890.
1% NW Bth AvV. £ t
WEST UNIVERSITY K l
1 Q j UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA £ /
2nd WEEK! I I 2nd WEEK! I I
3:20 5:55 8:30 I I "One of the most exquis- I I
THE #1 NOVEL OF THE YEAR- I I ~ Los An eles Times I I
NOW A MOTION PICTURE! I I 3n affection I I
r P E | I jiff MONTE l
umusieimnw 11 la WALSH I I
JAMUEUNEBISSn I I Real Western I I
I Hsl:'|| IBP), mamumi I
II i?££J hnMM

1-
FOR SALE
DONT merely briten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them .. eliminate rapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer. sl. Electric
upholstery shampooers also available.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
68 Triumph 650 Bonneville. 6
extended forks, megaphone pipes,
velocity stacks, excellent cond. SBSO.
Call 392-7357. (A-st-40-p)
For Sale Men's 3 spd 69 Schwnn,
Rollaway bed. Curtin molecule-chem
models. Dietzgen T sqr & board.
Selmer clarinet. Call Tully 378-6886.
(A-st-38-p)
Super-dyno bike 10 speed almost
new Columbia $75. Call 378-7198.
(A-3t-40-p)
68 Honda 305 Scrambler. Good
condition. $350.00 (A-2t-40-p)
FOR RENT
Roommate wanted IMMEDIATE or
winter qtr. 3 bdrm share room 1
other $53.75 + V* utilities, la bonne
vie. KAREN 373-2923 will negotiate.
(B-3t-40-p)
3-bedroom house unfurnished, stove
+ frige, AC + gas furnace, wooded
lot, Hawthorne $125/mo. Call after 6
p.m. 372-5613 couple preferred.
(B-st-40-p)
Need 1 or 2 roommates for Dec or
winter quat. Village Park apts. $47 a
month. Call 378-0968 or Apt. 1
Village Park. Will negotiate
(B-3t-38-p)
Must sublet apt by winter quarter
$l5O per month for 2 or 3 persons
May move in before Christmas Call
Karen or Terry after 8 pm 378-0768
(B-st-36-p)
Furnished 2-bedroom apt. available
December 1. Couples or graduate
students only. slls monthly call
376-5828 after 6 pm (B-st-36-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom AirCond furnished
apt. Beginning Jan 1 sllO mo. Cal!
376-4877 1404 SW 10th Terr apt. 19
Very clean (B-st-36-p)
2- Townhouse Apt Hawaiian
Village. Available Dec 12. Call
372-7396. (b-st-39-p)
Sublet I bedroom furnished air cond
apt. pool couples only. Available Nov
17 close to campus sllO mo. Call
373-1489 anytime (B-st-38-p)
1 bedrm furn apt for rent starting
Dec 15. A/C 105 per month. Call
Gretchen 373-1526 (B-2t-39-p)

Friday, November 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
Apartment available Dec. 14, 1
bedroom, a-c, pool, $92/month,
inquire evenings 1530 NW 4th Ave.,
University Apartments, number 29,
close to school (B-3t-38-p)
WANTED
Male roommate wanted for winter
and spring quarter. 127 Gatortown
Apts. Call 372-3247. (C-4t-40-p)
Female roommate to share garage
apt. w/fireplace $37.50 mo. plus Vi
utilities N.E. 7th St. Jan 372-1532
after 6 must like pets & freaks.
(C-2t-39-p)
Need one hip neat male roommate to
shan a 2 bdrm. apt. with 4. $42.50
per mo. + util, at Univ. Gardens. Call
Marc 373-3423. Bgn. Dec. 15.
(C-3t -40-p)
Wanted one female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apt. S4O month.
For information call 372-7390.
(C-3t-40-p)
Immediately: Female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apt. for remainder
of this quarter. Butler Gdns. SW 16
Ave. $41.25 per mo. Call
378-8634.(C-3t-40-p)
2 females to sublet Landmark Apt.
beginning winter quarter $47.50 mo.
A/c, carpeting, pool Good
roommates Call Linda or Kathy
373-4319 (c-st-38-p)
WANTED 2 Female Roommates ft>r
Jan. Landmark Apts, number 136
47.50 mo + utilities. Call 373-1487.
(C-st-38-p)
Sublet THE PLACE starting
December. Mature male needed in 4
bedroom penthouse 82.50/month all
utilities included 372-6272 after 6
pm (C-st-38-p)
Female roommates wanted winter
and spring quarters for house V 2 block
behind Norman; call 376-7993
(C-3t-38-p)
Female roommate wanted for
Hawaian Village apt. $57.50 a month
+ utilities. Call after 6 pm, 378-8037
(C-6t-37-p)
Male to share 2 br trailer. Own room.
Vz utilities + 55 mo. Close to U of F
Call 378-9682 (C-3t-39-p)
Wanted: Mens ten-speed bike call
anytime 392-0993 (C-4t-37-p)
Needed One Female roommate for
The Place. $76 per month incl. util.
Immediate occupancy. Call 378-0756
(C-3t-39-p)

Page 17

QjT
starring Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger
§ this Friday and Saturday
5:30, 8:00, 10:30 p.m.
m Union Aud. 50 cents pontored by JWRI) [
3rd
GREAT pggJiWi wore I
WEEK! 11 m| DAYS
######## ########
IM THE JOE THATS I
CAUSING ALL THE TALK I
IN GAINESVILLE!... I
TALK LIKE YOU NEVER I
HEARD BEFORE! I
"A BEAUTIFUL PERFORMANCE. THE I
IS NOTHING SHORT OF PERFECT! 9 9 I
-JUDITH CRIST
"BOYLE IS SUPERB. HE PERFORMS WITH AS
MUCH HARSH POWER AS THE YOUNG BRANDO
AND IS FUNNIER THAN BRANDO COULD
T | ME magazine
I THE BEST \f FEATURE AT ... I
M **4MÂ¥k
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COLOR A CAIMON KUAKO [R] HELD 2nd \
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JOE NAMATH
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Him J loving, brawling and Jl
*******Aa^l
cowfiflwy4^y
7:56 AN AVCO IMIAMY MUAM|
9 50 I TdS'w.AY!gil



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Wanted liberated roomate $45.00 mo
private room share kit. Bath living
area lake front call 378-0038 10-7
Carolyn (C-3t-39-p)
Room mate wanted Immed. plus la
bonne vie apt. $53 month call
378-5823 or stop by apt. number
361 dishwasher brush carpet pool
tennis court boxes (C-st-36-p)
2 hip chicks needed for Green-mar
apt. number 13 Jan-June. A/C, close
to campus, $127. each a quarter. Call
373-3740 or 372-8986 (C-st-39-p)
Roommate wanted 2 bedroom
Fredrick Gardens Apt. call Bill at
392-2331 or 376-0803 leave message
will call back (C-4t-37-p)
Any FREAKS or VEGATARIANS
out there that need a place to
LIVE?? John & Frank need 1 or 2
(dudes or chicks) roommates contact
378-7950 after 5 (C-2t-39-p)
Roommate own room wall to wall
carpet, ac, furnished, private entrace.
Share utilities + food bills. Call
373-1754 or visit 8351 N.E. 4th Ave.
(C-st-39-p)
HELP WANTED
Part time secretary good dictation
typing and spelling required 15 hrs
per wk time flexible $2.00 per hour
Call 378-2823 except Tues.
(Ej3t-38-p)
AUTOS
69 Chevy Nova-red, power steering
vinyl top, V-8,10000 miles, excellent
condition. Getting married, must sell.
S2OOO. Call 5-7 pm. 372-0539
(Q-st-38-p)
yNOTKICOMMINDtP
I FOR CHILDRIN^TBrm/K:
I MCQUEEN I
I 'BULLITT' I
1 TECHNICOiOR* Qp
HUS i WARREN BEATTY
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I | I MICHAEL J POLLARD
l /ffiKfIIuutuI IBANDOVER J
ylDs checked!
Wmf* 4
precious
JEWELS

Page 18

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 13,1970

AUTOS
1963 Olds Stn. Wgn. a steal, must sell
graduating, 4 new tires, radio, ww,
a/c. runs good, first $250 takes It etc
Bob 378-7007 or 392-0472
(G-3t-39-p)
1963 International Travelall wagon,
V 8 engine, man. shift, pwr. brakes,
heater, $395 cash. 392-1444 morning
466-3538 evenings & weekends.
(G-st-39-p)
1964 TRIUMPH TR-4, good
condition. MUST SELL. $650. Call
376-6072 after 4:00 p.m. (G-st-40-p)
Must sell Jeep pickup truck VB, 4
wheel dr., low mileage, excellent
cond., wood cabin optional, 2858
N.W. 4th Lne. 378-1121 after 5 p.m.
(G-st-40-p)
1960 Volkswagon Bus In good
running shape. Call 378-7678 after 5
p.m. (G-4t-40-p)
HEARSE *52 Bulck, dependable
outrageous transportation S3OO or
will consider trade for Human
skeletons. Call John 378-6766, 10
a.m. 6 p.m. (G-3t-40-p)
PERSONAL
Hey Tiger Been a long 5 months. I
know its best this way but I still miss
you so much. Guess Ill always love
you. Tiny Tiger (J-at-40-p)
Oo you sculpt? Batik? Paint?
Whittle? Make something nobody
else does? The Reitz Union Is having
a Christmas Sale of International gifts
and original crafts. We want It to be
an open sale of Interesting Items so
everyone Is Invited to sell their
creations. No fees, registration, or
Insurance. No businesses either. Nov.
30 and Dec. 1 Union ballroom
11 to 9. Questions? Call 392-1655.
(J-st-36-p)
It took man his first million years to
acquire one billion of himself ... It
only took 80 years to acquire the
second billion. Ftopulatlon Is leading
to a bizarre, nightmarish ending.
Please limit your families to two
children. If you're not part of the
solution then you are part of the
problem. (J-lt-40-p)
Gatorette KAC: till 4:20 a.m. on a
Thurs? at 32 deg? Chocolate cake
and Mason Williams. By the way,
party at rm. 535. Little green elf.
(J-lt-39-p)
Purple Diana, Happy Birthday from
your pet fish Agape Agape.
(J-lt-40-p)

Southern States Premiere
Screenings Next Week
a very heavy collection of award-winning
new experimental films
r v
RpCL
... A CINEMUS MAXIMUS w9nriM£>(cutsiMs
Some very serious films: LESS IS MORE, A
MATTER OF CONSCIENCE; some just for fun:
Al RPLANE GLUE, I LOVE YOU; and a few just plain
beautiful films: RUNS GOOD.
November 16 & 17
Union Auditorium
5:30, 7:45, 10:00
SI.OO Students
$1.50 Non-Students
edvence tickets eveileble todsy, Monday, end
Tuesdey et the Constens Box Office,
12 to 4:30 p.m.
sponsored by the J.W.R. Union

PERSONAL
Lose Pounds and Inches Easier,
Faster, in Privacy. Medically
approved plan used successfully by
over one million men and women.
Positive weight reductitlon. Firms up
muscle tone. No Pills. No exercises.
Specify mens or womens Kit.
Complete Kit SI.OO K.T. Products
Company P.O. Box 535 Evanston,
Illinois 60204 (J-st-38-p)
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologlst ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)
Will the guy who was hitch-hiking
last Friday at 10 am when the wreck
happened by Reed Hall please call
373-1275 (J-2t-39-p)
GREAT SHAKES Happy
Birthday!!! The Rose Is dead...
Long live the Vine! SOMEDAY It
will happen. Love Bill. (J-lt-39-p)
Led Zeppelin 3, Santana Abraxas &
most top 8 Track Tapes 3.50 Catalog
10 cents. Need salesmen Sharaf Box
39 Hallandale Fla 33009 (J-st-39-p)
Maxi skirts for all occasions only
$3.50 plus cost of material. Write
Robin Colllson, 1720 S.E. 45th Terr.
Great for Gins. (J-lt-40-p)
APOLLONIAN ALTERNATIVE.
Good things custom made In Bras
and leather. Fur coats! 108 N.W. 7th
St. (J-3t-40-p)
COMPUTER DATING Meet your
Ideal date. Special Introductory price.
Now serving leading colleges and
universities throughout the U.S.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702 (J-3t-38-p)
LOST: blue leather purse belonging
to Susan Pounsford with Important
I.D.s In the La Bonnavle area Call
392-9860 (L-3t-39-p)
Lost brown wallet near plaza I
theatre, finder please return all Ids to
Tham Box 12867 Unlv stat or call
378-9841, 392-0867 reward keep
cash (L-st-38-p)
LOST: Omega gold watch at ladies
room In graduate library has
sentimental value please call
392-9767 will greatly appreciate
return (L-3t-39-p)
LOST: 2 rings of great sentimental
value In east library ladles restroom
If found, please call 392-9443.
Reward. (L-2t-39-p)

mm effort.. now they are a musical fact! * |gg
I CHAKRA a A
'-os m
II HANSEN & ALGER jg jMj ggj
HI Free concert on the |T ||||
Union Terrace South
in
* "The IMAGE" M
I :§
I Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union and Student Government Productions $
I more for your money meal I
I moRR isons I
I CAFETERIA I
I r FRIDAYS FEATURE T I
Morrison's Famous I
I f j ROAST TURKEY jl I
I | | With Mashed Potatoes | | I
I a. | Dressing, Gravy |
I o | and Cranberry Sauce § I
l LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING I
I moisons I
| CAFETERIA .. beyond comparison! I
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

r&M bkt.'sS
"cwonau M *tSS! J
aho the m Jfc MYS FOR
i i
9 HA. M J
OdbMsvUto I
CLAY (I SEE THE PUNCHES)
3*25 \TTHAT WON the J
6:40 Championship
9'55 MUHAMMAD AU
Am II TC< AKA > "CASSIUS CLAY"
ADULTSjl_ andtheideals j
$1.25
4:46 / Sidney Poitier in I
8:00 THE
[gp] (I LA ST man )
I = 7T .. / fl

**
i;i jiiTiiTn?nii
SHOWS 1:30 3:30| UUAAMiiU|If
4=34J
i THE MAGNANIMOUS EXPERIENCE 5
l OF COLOR AND SOUND
*4*mwmw w MW¥WW¥¥ j

HI COUGAR HI
M COPNTRYijBI;
1:30-3:30-5:30 ||
[li
iy MioWeAN NATIOeUN. IIIIIW jg|



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
So Club meets Nov. 13, 7:30 150 CD
Reitz Union. Go Is a game of oriental
> r |gln and Is comparable to chess In
ntellectual challenge. All Invited.
j-lt-40-P)
-late to cookTToo poor for an apt?
:LO has openings for the winter
luarter. $195/qt for room and board.
:al Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-p)
Dearest 800 800, See? I have not yet
forgotten you 11 I Just want everyone
:o know I love you even tho youre
far away! Love, N. (J-lt-40-p)
lost <& FOUND
LOST: Sliver Toy Poodle, named
Pixie, in vicinity of N.W. 21 Lane and
5 St. If found, PLEASE call
373-3422. (L-3t-40-p)

______
I -MV 'unnQQrF* S V
lovestor/endandthe
PENTHOUSE
Mention this ad for special early bird price of 35 cents every nightl J
before 6:30 p.m. end Sat. A Sun. Matinees at Penthouse 2 and (
Penthouse 3 only. Regular Price SI.OO Penthouse number 2 $1.50 1

I The Typewriter 1
Is Mightier Than... j
I A Newspaper Is Many Things To Many Different People. i
I One Little Old Lady From Memphis Won A Contest By Listing 41 7 Different |
I Ways To Use Old Newspapers. You Know... Things Like Swatting Flies, Lining I
I Garbage Pails, Wrapping Fish, Making Paper Dolls; Etc. |
But Newspapers Are So Much More...Or Should Be. They Should Defend, Ex- 1
tol, Criticize And Just Plain Tell A Story. One Major Service That The Florida 1
Alligator Brings You, Along With These Others, Is Through Advertising. Not <
| Only Do Our Advertisers Feel That YOU Are Worth Speaking To, But Their |
Products And Services Are Offered With You And Your Particular Needs In I
I Mind. f

SERVICES
HAND DONE! Restore your autos
shine excellent results on any finish.
Complete satisfaction guaranteed call
facu, ty discounts.
(M-3t-38-p)
Expert tutoring Spanish german
psychology all levels by grad
student, babysitting by student
spouse ba grad, call 378-4126.
(M-3t-38-p)
Rubys alterations apt. 217-100 N E
Bth Ave. Gainesville, F| a 32601 Mrs*
Ruby Miller (M-st-36-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave.
across from Greyhound Bus Station.
378-4480. (m-tfc)

Friday, November 13.1970, The Florida Alligator, I

******
V #, 'v i
SERVICES
VlvXvX.Xv.v.;^^
OVER THE HILL YET? If you
arent 22 yet you are still eligible for
an eastern youth card. For flight
info/or youthfare cards call Rick
Steans 378-9792 Eastern Campus
Rep. (M-st-38-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Nowl Bank Americard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Typing done, theses, term papers,
etc. Guaranteed accuracy & neatness.
-Electric typewriter. $.50 per page.
Good references 378-7493
(M-st-36-r)
111;!
ill iilll II
111
F7j

Page 19

%7q/^
Sunday Film Classic
- >Wwg
Sun. Nov. 15
5:30, 8, 10:30 p.m.
Union Aud. 50 cents
sponsored byJWRU
[ ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Daodn* >3OO pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
o for sale <.*> STUDENT £ RHONE.
O torrent 1 dav
Q wanted O 2 days ADDRESS
Q help wanted O 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos 4 days (*lO% discount) Qjy STATE ZIE
personal q 5 days and over
lost-found (20% discount) |
services
u WORDING
iu 1 11 1iiii ii n 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 1 rnTT
ai r
3fl
4nm 1 11 1ii 11 11 lii l ll l1 11 1 11 1 MTT



I, The Florida Alligator. Friday, Novambar 13,1970

Page 20

Possible Juror Calls
Cona Life Valueless

FT. BENNING, Ga. (UPI)
A nervous career Army officer
who is a potential juror in the
murder trial of Ist Lt. William L.
Calley Jr., said under oath
Thursday he put no value at
all on the lives of Viet Cong or
their sympathizers.
COL. LAMAR A. Welch, 56,
was the first potential juror
questioned by attorneys trying
to seat a panel of at least five
officers to hear the trial of
Calley, charged with
premeditated murder in the
deaths of 102 South Vietnamese
civilians in the alleged My Lai
massacre on March 16,1968.
The gray-haired,
distinguished-looking Welch,
who was wounded in the Battle
of the Bulge during World War
11, said My answer would be
affirmative when asked if he
placed a different value on the

Russian Author Sent To Labor
Camp For Book Slander

MOSCOW (UPI) Andrei
Amalrik was convicted Thursday
of slandering the state in his
book Will The Soviet Union
Survive Until 1984? and
sentenced to three years in a
labor camp, friends reported.
In his book, which was
published in the West, Amalrik
predicted war with China that

vj V
SPECIE
ROUND TRIP JET ... O GENEVA. SWITZERLAND VIA D.C. 8 JET WITH COMPLIMENTARY
MEALS AND BEVERAGE SERVICE.
6ROUNO TRANSFERS transportation from and to geneva, Switzerland via deluxe
TOURING BUSES (2 HOURS OF BEAUTIFUL SCENERY):
EIGHT NIGHTS in the argentiere-chamonix valley, France, argentiere is a
charming alpine village located alongside the arve river at
THE BASE OF THE FAMOUS "GRAND MONTETS" SKI RUNS. THIS AREA IS
FAMOUS FOR THE "MONT BLANC", HIGHEST MOUNTAIN IN EUROPE (15,500 FT.).
HERE SKI IS KING WITH 8 CABLE CARS. 5 GONDOLAS. 3 CHAIRLIFTS. 16 POMAS
ANO 1 COG TRAIN. IN ARGENTIERE. YOU WILL SLEEP AT 3.000 FEET AND
YOU CAN SKI ALL THE WAY UP TO 12.600 FEET. NOVICE, INTERMEDIATE
AND EXPERT SKiERS WILL FINO NUMEROUS TRAILS TO SUIT THEM. FOR
EXAMPLE. THE WORLD FAMOUS 12 MtLE LONG "VALLEE BLANCH RUN" AND
THE "GRANO MONTETS* WHERE THE RUNS WERE DESIGNED BY WORLO
CHAMPION JAMES COUTTET. ON THESE RUNS EMILE ALLAIS WON THE WORLD
CHAMPIONSHIP. YOU WILL FIND 120 INSTRUCTORS. 2 SKATING RINKS. DISCO DISCOTHEQUES.
THEQUES. DISCOTHEQUES. CASINO. CURLING. ETC. THE OLD FASHIONED MOUNTAIN TOWN OF
CHAMONIX HAS BEEN THE CAPITAL OF ALPINE SPORTS SINCE THE VISIT OF
EMPEROR NAPOLEON 111 IN 1862- CHAMONIX AND ARGENTIERE ARE LOCATED
ONLY MINUTES FROM BOTH SWITZERLAND ANO ITALY.
LODGING ENJOY THE ADVANTAGES AND COMFORT OF YOUR OWN MODERN APARTMENT.
ALL WITH BATH. KITCHENETTES ANO INDIVIDUAL BEDS. AFTER SKIING
SPLASH IN A HEATED POOL.
LESSONS RENTALS .. 12 hours of group lessons included.
RENTALS: METAL SKIS AND POLES $2.00 PER DAY.
SKI LIFTS SIO.OO WORTH OF ski pass COUPONS included, or a COMPLETE 8 AREA
TICKET FOR ONE WEEK i-OR 523.00.
yjf RACE A GIANT SLALOM RACF FOR THE GROUP WITH A PRESENTATION PARTY
/|C COMPLETE WITH PRIZES AND TROPHIES FOR THE WINNERS.
GUIDES two multilingual, guides w meet your group in geneva ano will
BE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST YOU AT ALL TIMES UNTIL DEPARTURE-
for information please contact
Leonard Tanner, Room 310 J.W.R. Union, 392-1618

lives of Viet Cong than on
friendly peoples.
I put no value at all on their
lives whatsoever, said Welch,
who gestured nervously and
shifted in the witness stand.
WELCH, WHO served in
Vietnam in 1962 and 1963, said,
The use of terror by the Viet
Cong is hard to understand
unbelievable.
The atrocities Im aware of
are shocking, really, In my day
when I was young, we had an
enemy who was in uniform.
Over there (Vietnam) you never
knew who the enemy was until
he pulled out a weapon and
started shooting at you. Young
people, kids, its a strange way
of fighting a war. Some friendly
smiling people could suddenly
be shooting you down.
This is the most difficult war
weve ever put a U. S.

would lead to the collapse of the
Soviet state.
He said the Soviet Union
already is distending itself and
disintegrating like sour dough,
and said that sometime between
1980 and 1984 it would explode
in anarchy, violence and
intense national hatred.
The sources said Amalrik, 31,

serviceman in. When your life is
in immediate danger you dont
know who to shoot, he said.
IN CONTRAST to the Viet
Cong, Welch was asked his
feelings abou the South
Vietnamese people.
I admire them, I sympathize
with them and I love them, he
said.
You asked me if Im
predisposed toward the
defendant, Welch said. I have
compassion for people. Its not
my nature to sit in righteous
judgment on a fellow man, but I
am trained to make the hard
decisions.
Welch, like other prospective
jurors, for nearly a year has been
under a court order not to
discuss the Calley case or to
read, listen to or see anything
dealing with the alleged
massacre.

was convicted by a court in
Sverdlovsk of preparing and
disseminating falsehoods
derogatory to the state and
specified that he be kept under a
stern regime during his
detention.
Advertise
Its Good Business

ymnmmmtti DAYTONA BEACH *******%
I Blacks List Demands 1
!v v
| DAYTONA BEACH (UPI) A group of about 60 black
residents met in this racially-troubled resort Wednesday nigh
* and adopted some 40 demands to be presented to the city and
$ Volusia County, including the immediate release of all persons g
& arrested during recent racial disturbances. ;g
CHARLES CHERRY, director of the citizens committee, said gj
5% the demands deal with issues responsible for the recent wirest. |
1 We are saying to the white establishment you are going to g
g: do something about these issues, not next week, next month, or g
$ next year. You are going to do it now, Cherry told the g
*! gathering. i*.
Marvin Davies, state field director of the NAACP, urged the g
group to follow their local black leaders. There are a lot of g
people in jail now who should not be there, said Davies. They g
are nothing more than political prisoners. :§
CHERRY SATO the primary demands included restoration of g
city bus service which has been discontinued since Sept. 9, an g
end to police brutality, an end to discrimination in hiring g
§ practices, and an end to discrimination in the schools. :g
Other demands included more black policemen,
discontinuance of the use of Mace in making arrests, : g
:g establishment of a police community relations committee with g
g investigative powers, enforcement of city housing codes in the jg
black community, decentralized welfare services with accessible g;
:g. offices in the black community, and the hiring of additional :*
g black faculty members and administrators at Daytona Beach
Junior College and elimination of racial identification gj
:j:i characteristics of the college. ; g
Some 50 persons were arrested during a weekend of unrest g|
last weekend which included sniper fire and firebombings. There gj
were no serious injuries.

Anti-Mafia Law May
Close Fla Race Tracks

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Floridas anti-Mafia law
aimed at breaking up
corporations infiltrated by
organized crime was described
before the State Supreme Court
Thursday as so broad it might
close Floridas race trades.
In the first test of the

Depart December 18 Q HA VC Return December 27 1
From Atlanta w mJ I &
AKII V 4070 PLUS SIB.OO TAX & I
VIILI JL Service Charge
SIGN UP EARLY SPACE LIMITED
Minimum deposit $50.00, balance due before December 3. This trip is offered by
the University of Florida Student Government limited to students, faculty, and
staff of the University of Florida and to members of their immediate family.
RESPONSIBILITY AND CANCELLATION I
Group Travel Associates and cooperating agents act only in the capacity of agents
for the passenger in all matters pertaining to hotel accommodations, sightseeing
tours and transportation whether by railroad, motor bus, motor car, steamship, or
plane, and as such, they shall not be liable for any injury, personal injury, damage,
loss, accident, delay, or irregularity which may be occasioned either by reason of
any defect in any vehicle, or through the acts or default of any company or
person engaged in conveying the passenger, or In carrying out the arrangements of
the tour(s), or otherwise in connection therewith. Airlines concerned are not to
be held responsible for any act, omission or event during the time passengers are
not on board their aircraft. In the event of cancellation, refund will be made in
full up to December 3, 1970. If written notice of cancellation is not received by
Group Travel Associates by December 3,1970, then a refund will be made only if
an eligible substitute is available from the waiting list. In this event a refund will
be made less a $25.00 service fee. If the amount of air fare collected exceeds the
pro rata amount needed, the excess will be refunded. The total tour price includes
the new $3 U.S. International Transportation tax (as of 7/1/70) but Foreign
Departure taxes (presently $1.25) are not included.
j ?iETSsrpRWr 1 |
| Last Name First Name I
| Student Q Faculty DStaff QFamlly | I
Home Address I
I Zip Phone I
| Campus Address | §
1 7 Ip Phone I
I Q Male QFemale Q Single Q Married I
| Age | I
1 Average apartment capacity is four persons (individual beds).
I I want to room with: I I
B There will be a $25.00 per person 2 ....
(supplemental charge for twin accommo- 3. _I
dations. (Two persons per apartment Instead 4. B
a o,four) Check Here For Twin. I I
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
SKI THE ALPS SPECIAL
Price $272 Plus SIB.OO tax I
I (Minimum deposit $50.00 ln case of deposit the
balance will be due before December 3,1970.) 1
I:. I I
Signature
I application I
Mail To |
Group Travel Associates Inc.
| 53 W. Jackson Chicago, 111. 60604 | I
. Enclosed is my check for $ .Make check payable to I
I Group Travel Associates Inc. 1
Applications will be accepted and receipts mailed in the order they are received. |

constitutionality of the law
before Floridas highest court,
Miami attorney Arthur Stark
said the law also might keep
multi-millionaire Howard
Hughes from holding a corporate
charter in Florida because he
owns gambling casinos in
Nevada.



Word Wrap-Up

U.S. Deaths Lowest
In Five Years
SAIGON American
battlefield casualties dropped
last week to the lowest level in
more than five years, the U. S.
Command announced Thursday.
A spokesman said 31
servicemen were killed in action
and 104 wounded for a total of
135 battlefield casualties in the
seven days that ended last
Saturday.
It was the lowest casualty toll
in a single week since Oct. 23,
1965, when 84 American troops
were killed or wounded.
The latest report brought the
total U. S. war dead in Vietnam
to 43,959 and the wounded to
291,559. The first casualties
were in 1961.
Nixon To Emphasize
Domestic Issues
NEW YORK Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew said Wednesday
the Nixon administration will
start paying more attention to
domestic issues in preparation
for the 1972 election.
Agnew, speaking to editors
and executives of the Daily
News, the nations largest
newspaper, conceded that the
administrations domestic record
may have been at least partially
responsible for 11 governorships
going Democratic in last weeks
elections.
But the losses in the state
houses were not catastrophic,
Agnew said, and with a strong
domestic program, the trend
may be reversed, the Daily
News said.
v r
15,808,000
COLLEGE
STUDENTS
CANT r3|.
Vfllw JULIUS CAESAR
WRONG ill
Byconserva Byconservative
tive Byconservative estimate
more than fifteen million college
students have used Cliffs Notes
since we became Americas first
literary study aid. This prefer preference
ence preference continues to build-for
two big reasons:
1 / QUALITYThe easy-to easy-tounderstand
understand easy-tounderstand commentary and
explanation you get from Cliffs
Notes result from painstaking
work by our board of authors.
Predominantly Ph.D.s, these
scholars are specially selected
for their knowledge of particular
works and for their ability to
make these works meaningful
to you.
2 / AVAILABILITY-Cliff's Notes
concentrate on giving you all the
plays and novels most frequently
assigned in college. If your dealer
is temporarily out of the title you
need, ask him to call us on his
special Hot Line."
Buy Cliffs Notes today-theyre a
bargain in understanding college
literature assignments.
$1 at your bookseller or write:
c KfIMTK
Box 80728
Lincoln. Nebraska 6850 L

UAW Examines
Tentative Contract
DETROIT The General
Motors Council of the United
Auto Workers met today to
examine the tentative contract
agreement reached Wednesday
with GM and to recommend
acceptance or rejection by the
375,000 union members who
have been on strike for 59 days.
Traditionally, the council
representing UAW members who
have been on strike against a
particular auto company has
recommended they accept the
tentative agreement their
bargainers worked out.
Savings and Loans
To Change Role
SAN FRANCISCO The
chairman of the House Banking
and Currency Committee
suggested today savings and loan

Dotson gives you
something exxtro.
v **v
"L >
We stand five-square in favor of exxtras. But we dont
DATSUN^
Drive a Datsun...then decide. u.irmmnn
H*| r. 1
Iijr
iKlmiiliLL
SEE MAP. 2ND AVE A 2ND ST S.E. 378-2311

associations be allowed to do
more of the type of business
that banks do to get more
money for housing.
Rep. Wright Patman, D-Tex.,
called for changes in regulations
to let the savings and loan
associations offer checking
accounts and make more
consumer loans.
Patman told the United States
Saving and Loan Leagues annual
convention his staff is working
on legislation which he intends
to introduce early in the 92nd
Congress.
IRS To Exempt
Public Law Firms
WASHINGTON The
Internal Revenue Service (IRS),
rushing its study under strong
pressure, announced today it
would grant tax exemptions to
public interest law firms under

guidelines prohibiting any profit
whatsoever.
So long as within the
organization, it is agreed that the
litigation would be in the public
interest and not for private gain,
it can be classified as charitable
and tax exempt, IRS
Commissioner Randolph W.
Thrower said at a news
conference.
Thrower said the IRS would
not pick and choose among
causes but grant exemptions if
the organization itself was
honestly motivated by public
concern.
Nixon Said Ahead
In Consumer Aids
WASHINGTON Virginia H.
Knauer boasted today that the
Nixon administration is running
ahead of Congress in pushing for
consumers. She said Democrats
have tried to grab headlines

Friday, November 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

with criticism but little action.
In an interview with UPI, Mrs.
Knauer, President Nixons
adviser on consumer affairs, said
the administration inherited
chaos in the consumer field
from its Democratic predecessor.
She scoffed at attacks in
Congress on the administrations
consumer proposals and noted
that the House and Senate had
wrangled without acting on
administration or rival
Democratic programs.
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!
at bookstores.

Page 21



The
i
Florida
Alligator

Jules And Jim And Muhammad Ali

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
As the quarter begins to falter
so do the movies. With
Thanksgiving looming up the
end cant be too far away so the
theaters are perhaps relaxing.
This is no time to relax! The
demands of this most desultory
of all quarters require excellence
and variety from the movie
houses to bolster flagging spirits
and provide truth where there is
no truth. True enough, WUSA is
coming and so is Catch-22, but
in the meantime where is
Performance?
Joe Namath and Ann-Margret
are great athletes in their own
rights but why are they on the
screen when Frank Langella,
Carrie Snodgrass and Richard
Benjamin (Dairy of a Mad
Housewife) are not? How can
Charlie Cougar please when
Jack Nicholson is out there
somewhere saying, Im sitting
here while some red-necked,
cracker compares his life
to mine? (Five Easy Pieces) Its
all-right to be patriotic and
decent and everything but why
is Airport here for what seems a
decade when Bunel is working
his magic with Deneuve in
Tristana is not?
The quarter has had a
munificence of fine movies and
everyone is happy. But to coast
through the final weeks on
holdovers, repeats and
gimp-kneed quarterbacks is too
much to ask a weary student
body. I mean now is the time we
actually have to study all the
crap weve been assigned.
Theaters dont, in the words of
Lennon, let us down. Help us to
endure finals.
THE UNION. On Friday and
Saturday the Union features In
the Heat of the Night. Night
stars Sidney Poitier and Rod
Steiger. Steiger was given an
Oscar for his role as the beefy
Southern sheriff who torments
but Comes To Understand the
black detective from up north,
Virgil (pronounced Vuhgil)
Tibbs. The movie was directed
by facile Norman Jewison who
always looks better than he
really is. Still the film does
manage to catch some of the
southern life style without
falling into cartooning and the
film is worth the confrontation
of acting between Steiger and
Poitier. Ray Charles puts grits
into the soundtrack.
On Sunday night Jules and
Jim. One of the best films by
Francois Truffaut, an artist
whose medium is feeling and
emotion. Jules and Jim stars
Jeanne Moreau and Oskar
Werner. Moreau is of course one
WLJr

ENTERTAINMENT

of the great faces of the screen.
Her impact is non-verbal, her
face is a mirror of emotions,
sentiments and passion. Oskar
Werner became known to
American audiences through
Ship of Fools. He too is a
physical evocation of emotion
and sentiment. His face has a
vulnerable, bruised air that his
spirit tries to overcome but
usually fails. Moreau and Werner

SERRE, MOREAU AND WERNER
... as Jim, Kathe and Jules

perfectly reflect the romantic
lyricism of Truffaut.
Jules and Jim takes place in
the doomed, romantic world of
Europe prior to the first world
war. Jules and Jim are friends
who are introduced to Kathe, a
beautiful, smiling enigma who is
at once the symbol and illusion
of all women. They both court
her and Truffaut captures the
poetry of courtship among
friends in the dream of pre-war
Europe. The movie follows the
course of a twenty year

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love-affair between the three of
them and watches love grow,
fade and remain unfulfilled.
THE FLORIDA. The Honda
brings a documentary on Ali, the
great athlete of our time. The
subject matter alone precludes a
bad movie and the reviews Ive
read say that it is in fact quite
good.
ROYAL PARK. Airport and

*** * **** / : V *- 4

Monte Walsh stay over. The
more 1 think afiout Airport
(which is very little) the less I
like it. It was so coyly
gratuitous. Ross Hunter
certainly knows how to get a
cheap laugh. Two of the
outstanding examples in a
technically exciting but
dreadfully planned movie, the
nun guzzling booze and the
priest gapping the hysterical
fool and crossing himself in the
same motion. I must say that the
audience I was a part of laughed

WARD BRISICK GREG JONES
Entertainment Editors

Page 22

uproariously at those two
scenes, the juxtiposition of
religion and humanity being too
exquisite to ignore I suppose.
Then Hunter has the imagination
to go on TV and inveigh against
pornography and European
films. Give me an erect nipple
anytime and let the audience
laugh at that.
The more I think about
Monte Walsh (which is often)
the more I like it. It was truly a
beautiful movie. William Fraker
who directed it was formerly a
noted cinematographer who shot
the race scenes in Bullitt. He out
does himself in Monte Walsh
with a ten minute bronc-busting
ride by Lee Marvin that almost
destroys a town. For the
statisticians in the crowd that
one scene took ten days to shoot
and cost half a million. Dont
miss the movie.
The CENTER. Fantasia was
better than I remembered. It was
great to see the long lines of
people outside the theater, those
family ads didnt fool anybody.
The movie itself was fantastic.
The music was broken down
into that which told a story and
that which was just for
imagination. Disney began the
film with animated colors
responding to the music, a light
show from fourty years ago. The
colors and concepts used are too

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!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 13,1970

beautiful to describe, from
mushrooms that turn into
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finish with the arch-fiend in a
sequence that cries out for
Disney to do Tolkien.
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CLASSIFIEDS



By GREG JONES
Aligator Entertainment Editor
H e was the movie man. He
went to movies alot and he
talked movies alot and he even
watched movies on TV. In those
respects he was not unlike many
of his contemporaries, of the
first movie and TV generation.
Movies were a big part of his life.
But that was not his problem.
His problem was that somewhere
along the line he had begun to
suspect, well not even to suspect,
to feel that his life was simply a
part in some monsterous movie
or even a series of parts in alot of
little movies. The fact that his
conscious life might be an
unconscious role in somebodys
unknown and unnamed film did
not surprise him, in fact it
explained a whole lot about his
life. And besides he was never
sure, his awareness or
unawareness of the possibility
came and left quietly like a
dream you are so sure of but
cant remember.
His earliest recollection of the
possibility was rooted in a
childs fantasy. Many times as a
child he had wished that time,
whether it was unpleasant or
simply in the way of something
pleasant could be extinguished
like a scene change, that it could
be summed up like a screen
direction that said Later that
same year, and be done away
with. He used to lie awake on
Christmas Eve and strain to hear
a voice-over that said. Next
morning when he awoke, and
would look to see if night had
segued into morning.
When his brother died and his
grief was overshadowed by the
extreme annoyance he felt at the
disruption of normal routine,
what with the funeral and the
relatives and the melancholy of
his parents, he fervently desired
that somehow the camera would

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cut away and the voices would
say,The year passed quickly
and when summer
came... The way movies
economized time appealed to
him very much. As time did pass
and he looked back he could not
remember the slow passage of
time and the suggestion that
someone or something was
editing his life occured briefly to
him.
As he grew up certain parallels
presented themselves to him. He
found that education was
mostly memory work and
sometimes he felt that he was
learning lines for some future
part or something. But since
everyone talked about preparing
for roles in adult life anyway he
soon forgot about it. By the
time he entered college he
noticed that he could hear a
whirling in the background at
times and if he looked sideways
fast enough he could see bright
lights. He had an interview with
a college dean and he observed

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that the dean never looked
directly at him but rather just
beyond his ear, focusing on
what, a camera? The dean spoke
slowly and amused himself with
little bits of stage business, like
dramatically lighting a cigarette,
striking certain poses and
squinting. Without ever knowing
why he felt that the dean had
stolen a scene from him.
Like everyone else he
experienced deja vu but he
wondered if it was just a retake.
As he became acquainted with
life he realized that it dealt in
movie cliches. There were
golden-hearted hookers and
laconic cowboys and
herringborne business men and
irrascible priests and a whole
world of people from central
casting. He met judges with
bulldog faces and white hair who
worked their jaw muscles
furiously while making decisions
and tweedy professors who
forgot where they lived and

reeked of pipe tobacco. But
where did he fit in? If he was in
a movie, who was producing it
and what was it about? Was it
his story or did he simply have a
bit part in someone elses?
When he went 1 through his
rebellious phase he wasnt sureif
his parent's arguments about
duty and career were to get him
back on the set or just another
scene in the Movie. It was
hard to tell how to act. Was he
supposed to be natural or should
he act out the role that any
particular moment demanded?
He began to worry about his
career. When he talked to people
he would turn his head slightly
so his best side would be
towards the camera. He was
afraid that his friends were
getting better roles than he was
and began to be bitter that he
had never won an award. Mostly
the pointlessness of it all got him
down. He didnt know the plot,
didnt know the director and

Friday, Novambar 13,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

wasnt even sure what movie he
was in. Besides he was starting
to be concerned with being
typecast. His friends told him to
be patient and have faith. Faith!
He wasnt sure he had a part.
He sort of had a breakdown.
The doctors told him he was side
but would get better. Time
passed quickly just like in the
movies. They told him he
suffered from paranoia,
alienation and overwork. The
pressures of society had
unnerved him. Soon the
thoughts of movies left him an d
he realized that he had been
sick. He had used the movies to
escape the real world.
On the day he was released he
was to meet with his doctor. He
sat in the waiting room, calm,
happy and cured. He heard a
noise behind the doctors door.
A clap-board dapped behind
him, a voice whispered action
and the doctor opened the door.
There was makeup on his collar.

Page 23



The
Florida
Alligator

Peaches Becoming Gator Favorites

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
The Gators arent eating any
more peaches this week than
they were before the 24-17
victory over Georgia in the
Gator Bowl last Saturday. But
they may start eating a few more
at their training table -a PR job
on the Peach Bowl people.
BUT THE triumph over
Georgia placed the Gators into a
beam of light a light that is
searching the country for bowl
candidates.
The Peach Bowl, from
Atlanta, isnt the only bowl that
has been suggested for the
Gators this fall. The Lemon,
Pinapple, Toilet and Banana
Bowls all have had scouts here
looking for the right team to put
in their bowl.
But the Lemon Bowl quickly
scratched the Gators from their
list when Florida defeated
Georgia in the last two minutes
of the game. (Lemon Bowl
officials have a policy that
prohibits teams with winning
records).
FLORIDA WONT have such
a bad season after all if it does
receive a bowl bid. However, it
must win and win big against
Kentucky in Tampa Saturday.
Like the Gators, Kentucky
has had discipline problems. It
had to suspend a player for
breaking training regulations.
Lee Clymer, the Wildcats
leading rusher this year with 441
yards on 118 carries was
suspended this week when he
missed curfew this past
weekend.
This should delight the Gator
defense. No other Kentucky
runner has accumulated over
200 yards this fall.
THE GATOR defensive
secondary will not be pushed
against Kentucky either. The
Wildcats leading receiver has
made 20 catches.

SIRLOIN PIT
where you get a break
on steak and
' '} *' , t : ./ everything else ;
[Anger makes dull men witty, but it kee^hetr^oor?B
-,' - " "" r ~ ~" :

GATOR SPORTS

SCOUTS TO WATCH KENTUCKY GAME CAREFULLY

David Hunter, a converted
safety who holds the Kentucky
record for returning an
interception 100 yards in 1968,
is a threat coming out of the
Wildcat backfield. Against LSU
this year, Hunter teamed with
quarterback Bernie Scruggs for a
70 yard touchdown pass.
However, Scruggs may hurt
the defense with his passing, as
noted by his 979 yards this
season. Completing over 57 per
cent of his passes, Scruggs is
among the Southeastern
Conference leaders for passing
percentage (completed 100 of
175).
HEAD COACH John Ray will
alternate his quarterbacks if the
going gets tough. With back-up
quarterback Stan Forston, Ray
has two quarterbacks that rate
only behind Alabamas Scott
Hunter and Neb Hayden in the
SEC.
Forston has completed 31 of
65 passes for 301 yards in his
limited action this season.
Arabs Plan Six
In Twelve Months
The Egyptian Cinema
Organization, leading film
producer in the Arab world, will
make six films in the next 12
months in conjunction with the
Soviet Union, Jordan, Syria, and
Tunisia. The pictures include
The Crescent Slave Girl, El
Karameh Battle and A
Vacation in Cairo.
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!
at bookstores.

The Wildcats have won only
two of nine games. They lost to
Mississippi (20-17), LSU (14-7)
and Vanderbilt (18-17) but it
looked like they had the games
won until the last quarter.
KENTUCKY WILL want to
salvage the year by spoiling
Ironwood
Golf Club
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Marty Perlmutter
Executive Sports Editor

Page 24

Floridas bowl chance, but John
Reaves and Carlos Alvarez will
have a lot to do with the
outcome.
Alvarez, has been off his
record-setting ace when he
caught 88 passes as a
sophomore. But his moves in the
Georgia game proved he is still

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, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 13,1970

Phil Pettijohn
Sports Editor

Carlos Alvarez and still one of
the best in the SEC.
The Gators are at full
strength. They will be trying to
get that big victory they need to
receive the bowl bid.
A loss in Tampa will put the
Gators back on the list of the
Lemon Bowl.



STEVE WIUMMS

By CHUCK KELLER
ARigator Sports Writer
Steve Williams, the first black
UF basketball signee, is playing
organized basketball with
strangers for the first time.
In direct contrast with his
Pensacola Washington High
teammates, who together won
the state class AA championship
last year, Williams finds the
freshman Gators a different
breed.
ALL OF us last year were
real close friends, Williams said
of the six other seniors who
helped carry Washington. We
had been playing organized
basketball together ever since
the seventh grade and even
before then.
The only exception to the
Jack Nicklaus
To Compete In
Fla. Tourney
The Coral Springs $125,000
PGA (Professional Golfers
Association) golf championship
scheduled to begin Nov. 30 has
announced the signing of Jack
Nicklaus to compete in the
tournament.
Already signed to play include
Gibby Gilbert, Dave and Mike
Hill, Bert Yancey, Lee Trevino,
Bob Murphy, and over 100 other
touring pros.
On the first day of the
tournament, Monday, over 200
pros will be competing to fill the
final spots in the 144 player
field.
The regular tournament starts
Thursday, Dec. 3 and continuing
through to Sunday, Dec. 6.

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rule was honorable all-American
seven-foot Lawrence McCray,
who started playing basketball in
the ninth grade. But, as Williams
agreed, someone as good as
McCray can be spotted two
years of teamwork.
The other six, as Williams did,
jumped to collegiate basketball
teams after high school
graduation.
THREE OF them, Larry
Drake, Cameron White and
Lemuel Jones shipped out to
Indian River Junior College.
Indian River, coached by former
Pensacola prep and junior
college and Gator star Mike
Leatherwood, plays the Gator
freshmen twice this season.
McCray, who was supposed to
be a package college deal with
Williams, skipped over to Florida
State University.
The night before we were to
sign with Florida, he (McCray)
said he was going to FSU,
Williams said. I didnt ask any
questions. I wasnt going to let
him make any decisions for me.
DONT GET me wrong.
Lawrence and I are real good
friends, he said. Why, we used
to go to Sunday school together.
The others went, too, only when
I could get them there.
Williams said he chose UF
over FSU because I believed I
would get a better chance to
play here.
Coach Tommy Bartlett has
every intention to regularly play
the 6-2, 180-pound wing-guard.
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Teamwork Makes A Winner

WE WERE very pleased to
get Steve, Bartlett said. Hes
one of our better players on the
freshman team, and I think he
has a good future.
I feel hes made a good
adjustment here. Hes a great
leaper, has good quickness and
has been working on his outside
shooting. Hes gonna be a good
one.
Actually Williams is not the
first black eager to sign a Gator
basketball scholarship, for he is
attending UF via financial aid
until he can pass two college
board tests required for the
athletic grant.
HOWEVER, WILLIAMS
academic background did
project a 1.6 grade average
required for athletic
participation.
Roommate Malcolm Meeks,
signed three days after Williams
as the first black basketball grant
recipient.
Williams attended UFs
summer session and pulled a B
and C in his first university
courses.
I PICKED up better study
habits here in the summer,
Williams said. I didnt have any
in high school.
But the trail blazing idea of
being Floridas first black
basketball player didnt affect
Williams decision.
I just wanted to play
basketball, Williams said.
>XvXv*X*X*>X*X*X X*X%*X £x?.v£x%*Cvs
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PHIL COPE
STEVE WILLIAMS IS FIRST BLACK UF CAGER
... finds freshman Gators a different breed

IT APPEARS that Williams
can play basketball. In his high
school career Williams scored
1,300 points, was named all-city
three times, all-state twice
(junior and senior years),
all-region (junior and senior
years) and honorable
all-American last year.
Williams gets his chance to
play more basketball when the

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Friday, November 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

freshman Gators open their
season on Dec. 1 against visiting
Orlando Junior College.
However, this time Williams
will be depending on new
teammates for a winning season.
The teamwork is coming but
its not here yet, Williams said
of the freshman team. Its the
most important thing.
Teamwork makes a winner.

Page 25



Page 26

i, Th Florida Allifator, Friday, Novombar 13,1970

Kentucky Right Situation For Gators

By PHIL PETTI JOHN
Alligtor Sports Editor
Whether you be a Gator fan
or one of the doubters that
passed up a ride on the Doug
Dickey band wagon, you cant
help but take a more positive
attitude toward Floridas
encounter with Kentucky
tomorrow in Tampa.
The win over Georgia last
week was a shot in the arm for a
failing team morale. The team
seemed reassured after the win
that given the right situation
they could win a ball game.
KENTUCKY IS the right
situation.
The Wildcats, unlike Alabama,
Tennessee and Auburn, are in
the same class with Georgia, and
the Gators.
Florida knows that if there is
any truth to the rumors of a bid
to a minor post season bowl,
they must look good, and beat
Kentucky.
THE GATORS offensive line,
the questionable factor in
Floridas attack all season,
seemed to get a mental boost
from the confidence the coaches
showed in them by running the
entire first half of the Georgia
contest.
Physcially the line is in good
shape. They have played
together for a couple of weeks
without any changes. Even
injured center David Peek will be
dressed for the game.
The offensive line will have to
provide quarterback John
Reaves with the time he needs to
throw.

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tom KENNEDY
GENE CONRAD (61) LEADS INTERFERENCE FOR DURRANCE
... offensive line improved with victory over Georgia

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TOM KENNEDY
DONNIE WILLIAMS (60) WITH TOMMY DURRANCE
... physically offensive line is in good shape

THE LINE will also have to
handle the big strong Kentucky
defensive line enough to
maintain a respectable ground
game to counter Reaves passing.
Both assignments are tough,
but since the Gators dont plan
to run up the middle on the
Wildcats too often, the offensive
line may be up to the challenge.
Kentuckys defense has kept
them in every game they played
including Auburn, who they led
at the half, and Big Eight
contender Kansas State, who the
Wildcats beat early in the season.
TO BEAT Kentucky, the
Gators will have to beat their

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defense, and it is one of the
stingiest Florida has faced all
year.
Offensively Kentucky is quite
similar to Georgia.
They will pass, effectively
when needed, into Floridas
loose secondary.
THEY WILL send average
sized running backs crashing off
tackle behind one of the largest
and strongest offensive lines
Florida has faced.
Fortunately, Kentuckys team
speed, an important factor in the
Gators three loses, is also in the
Georgia-Florida class.
The Gators wont out muscle

very many people, and are at an
extreme disadvantage when
confronted with a team with
speed. Auburn graphically
demonstrated this.
THE FLORIDA defensive line
has managed, since its early
inability to handle the draw play
was cured, to stay in there most
of the time.
Kentucky will run on Florida,
but they will not runover them.
The Gators have the most
positive mental attitude they
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have displayed since they began
losing games by big scores.
THE BOWL rumors may be
just that, but it is a positive
factor in the Gators mental
readiness.
Florida may be going to a
bowl. The Wildcats are going
nowhere, although they have
been quite impressive in the
process.
The game, a battle between
two Southeastern Conference
also-rans should be a good, close
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UF To Bring Healthy Squad To Tampa

By KEN MCKINNON
Alligator News Editor
For the first time in weeks
Doug Dickey will have a
near-complete healthy squad of
Florida Gators ready to go
before the end of a practice
week.
Dickey said Thursday, after a
light one and a half hour
workout, this has been a good
week of practice for the Gators,
that the team has exceptionally
good morale going into the game
in Tampa with Kentucky
Saturday, and that having so
many healthy definitely helps a
lot.
WE EVEN have some boys
coming back to play with us that
have been hurt for more than a
month, Dickey said.
Dickey said defensive back
Ted Hager, out for four weeks
with a pulled hamstring, and
David Peek, who has been out
since the week before the
Richmond game, would make
the trip to Tampa. He said that
it was likely both would play
some, too.
Southeastern Conference
passing leader John Reaves,
formerly of Tampa Robinson
High School, said after
yesterdays practice that the
rumors of a jinx being over
Tampa Stadium as far as the
Gators were concerned was
ridiculous.
LAST YEAR Reaves pulled
the Gators to a last minute
victory over the up-to-then

r I rate Frat-Man
Blasts Spooner

Dear Mr. Harvey Spooner,
It has come to our attention
that this years* carnival sports
writer has neglected specific
facts concerning orange league
sports. According to Harvey, the
SAES and the TEP*S are the
best and only competitors in the
league race. The TEP*S lost on
Nov. 10 to the FUIS,
supposedly a sub-par team,
20-19. While the SAES
encountered a 12-0 defeat at the
hands of the unknown Pi Lam
seven.
Where are the Sigma Chis,
Delta Chis, Pi Lams, and other
lesser known houses?
IN SEPTEMBER, you
promised this years coverage

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HAGER, PEEK TO RETURN AGAINST KENTUCKY

sluggish Tulane Green Wave,
18-17. That victory came on the
heroics of Reaves passing and
All-American buddy Carlos
Alvarez, who caught a two-point
conversion pass from Reaves
with less than two minutes
remaining.
The year before last, another
Tampan, Larry Smith, led a
fourth quarter charge that
overcame the Air Force
Academy Falcons, 23-20.
Reaves was a freshman then.
During Reaves senior year,
Robinson lost to Coral Gables in
the state semi-final playoff
action, 55-0. The only other
time Reaves has played in
Tampa Stadium was also during
his senior year at Robinson,
when they beat Dixie Hollins
48-6.
SO, REAVES is 2-1 in his
hometown stadium, and he says
there is absolutely no truth to
the fact that the Gators are
jinxed while playing there. He
did say that he was glad to be
going home to play again.
Reaves would not make any
comment about the outcome of
Saturdays game, but did say
that the teams attitude seemed
more positive than it has in
previous weeks.
Offensive coordinator Jimmy
Dunn, going back to his
hometown, also, for the first
time since he was with the
Tennessee team that helped
dedicate Tampa Stadium in
1967, defeating the Tampa
Spartans 38-0, said he was glad

would be the best in years.
If you are unaware that 28
fraternities now exist on the
campus, please consult this years
Gator Guide for disadvantaged
frat-men. It seems the only
coverage that you solicit
concerns your own affiliation.
Another consideration that
should be given greater thought
is the selection of all-campus
athletes. Why arent the
selections from a random sample
of the players, which would be a
fair procedure. Open your eyes,
Harve.
Come out and watch the next
game, if you want?
Interested Frat Man

to be going home again.
DUNN SAID he thought the
Gators were high now,
coming off the big win over
Georgia last week.
Theyll play as hard as they
can to try to uphold their
confidence, Dunn said. Weve
gotta chance to end up with a
real good season, but weve had
low spots all year. Weve been up
and down all year.
Dunn expressed concern,
earlier in the week, over the size
and strength of the Kentucky
defensive front line, saying that
he did not see how the Gators
could run on them, something
that they finally did well against
Georgia last week.
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PHIL COPE
JOHN REAVES (7) IN ACTION AGAINST TULANE
... QB had rough time against Green Wave in Tampa last year
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"

Friday, Novambar 13,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 27



Page 28

I, The Florida AHiprtor, Friday, November 13,1970

On. Item FREE on any On. Item FREE on any
pizza with this coupon- I I pizza with this coupon couponsis
sis couponsis i Dominos Pizza j %
daluxa pizza at good thru > 1 raauiar prica I Nov- I*7o
regular prtca Not. 19,170 j J L L.
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J n Call 376-2487 H L
H FREE DELIVERY fQ
: Mk" The Harmon Football Forecast m?)
' W?\V INOTRE DAME 6STANFORD 11 MISSISSIPPI 16NORTHWESTERN
V Vi\i V\\ 2TEXAS 7MICHIGAN 12 ARIZONA STATE 17AIR FORCE //i J UU /
VVfR)) X 3OHIO STATE BARKANSAS 13 ALABAMA 18 WASHINGTON y/vW/
4NEBRASKA 9L.S.U. 14U.C.L.A. 19 DARTMOUTH
) "\ S-TENNESSEE 10AUBURN 15-GEORGIA TECH 20 SAN DIEGO STATE ( V^A
\ Saturday, Nov. 14 Major Colleges Those top ten powerhouses just refuse to y
\ Arizona 3 state 2I Utah I '' Ra 12 be budged! All of them won, held their lofty l f
11$ j \ Arkansas 35 s.m.u. 10 spots on the national football ladder, and / | ||l
\ J Auburn 28 Georgia 14 ... (I
\ ( Boston College 22 Pittsburgh 21 continue to challenge all comers. I I $| M
i / California 21 pan Jo-se state o And three challengers in particular will I f
1 I Cincinnati 28 Louisville 57 II
y= \ / Citadel 26 Furman 17 answer the call Saturday. 16th-ranked \ I
fs==Sli \ \ Colorado State 22 Pacific 3 St3t6 io Georgia Tech will be the first non-breather / /
X Dartmouth 38 Cornell 7 for Notre Dame since they met Missouri four 7J
. £1 Paso 23 Arizona zz z ~
Wnfe Florida state 23 v.p.i. 15 weeks ago. The Irish finally moved into the s||
Ife Kws a t?n 45 Wyoming 13 Throne Room of college football... they
111 Kentucky 17 Mississippi state are Number One, and should beat back the
Marshall 20 East'Carolina io Yellow Jackets by 22 points.
wSSSSSi? !!Si hi ( S ohiS te 26
Michigan 34 lowa 7 17th-rated Air Force as they host 6th-ranked
MiS'Spp? 4816 42 o Stanford. The Indians will be the favorite by BI^NBIVI#^
HOURS St', 3 KSJFsw. 17 13 points, but the Falcons will be tough HOURS
New Mexico 22 Brigham Young 13 after dropping their first game of the season
New Mexico State 17 Lamar Tech 7
_ _ North Carolina 21 Clem son 7 last weeK.
5:00pm1:00am Sun -Thur & cSrail Tech w Number three challenge battle will be 5:00pm1.00 am Sun-Thur
Ohio state 31 Purdue 7 within the Southeast Conference. The
s:OOpm-2:OOam Fri & Sat oSST* S £? m t 3 Georgia Bulldogs tackle loth-ranked 5:00 pm2:ooam Fri & Sat
Oregon state 33 Washington state 7 Auburn, still rankling over their upset loss to
nOAAIhIfVC pSSSSS 1 <,rj a u L.S.U. a couple of weeks ago. Georgia has nnMlKinC
U\Jrf\m\J O Rice 15 Texas a&m 6 b f our times, but will only be a
__ Rutgers 14 Holy Cross 8 1 4-point underdog to the Tigers of Auburn.
louthCarolina tC 23 Duk? Bartara 20 After another vigorous polishing of the
A southern Mississippi 28 Louisiana Tech 17 crystal ball two weeks ago, the season's \A/LI A T*C k ir\ A/
lyracuse 27 West Virginia 22 forecasting average bounced just a bit higher. I 5 :
I /% I I Texas'* 38 t.cu 1 0 14 1,145 winners and 349 losers through games
A I Texas Tech 24 Baylor 13 Q f October 31st make for a rather happy
I Toledo 31 Dayton 12
I U.C.L.A. 24 Washington 23 .766 percentage. m ||^
has I vm.ur 3 N. a w 17 y, he k rest Saturday's underdog will DCCp A III)
f| I Virginia 20 Colgate 7 really have to become Super Dogs to knock Hill/
I west Texas 24 Bowling Green 21 off other members of the Top 20. Texas,
UC A \/\/ DI"F7 AC I western Michigan 30 ,l,inois back in the Number 2 position, will tie into
II Wisconsin ary 27 Illinois 14 T.C.U., winning by 24 points. 3rd-ranked U/llir IIAUI II
I Yale 25 Pr,nceton 13 Ohio State, with only two hurdles remaining YfINF Will
I for that trip to Rose-land, is favored over ** *"
I Other Games South and Southwest Purdue by the same difference ... 24 points.
C I Angela Christian 24 £2£ t % exas 21 And, though a strong 16-point favorite to AT
TV C I Arkansas am & n 21 Bishop 12 win, 4th-ranked Nebraska might have to |
I Arkansas iSh Io HardinS n 7 ke *P P eerin 9 over their collective shoulders
nCI IV/CD I SS7e ba S SSiiSS. *7 at Kansas Ste The Wildcats can be very
W tIV I East Tennessee 22 Middle Tennessee 20 troublesome. Fifth-ranked Tennessee has the H jb m
I Gardner-Webb 20 Georgetown 17 M M
I Hampden-Sydney 21 Drexel Tech 13 week ott. mm m mm tmm^L
nNN. I ? e c n< IJ Ark H Michigan, No. 7, Arkansas, No. 8, and MM M_ MM 18. 1
' s o!SSNs I Jacksonville 35 Liviogston 7 L.S.U., No. 9, will continue to win. The
NS I MalSn' Rhyn6 23 Florence Io Wolverines will top the lowa Hawkeyes by
I Mumy** 1 24 EvaSvMte State 20 S.M.U. by 25... and the Tigers will tame #l||h
Xrl o^cldS i!iana 3 3 S e Bulldogs by eleven f f Ilf n MVH
OOOsN I Presbyterian 21 Carson-Newman 14 points.
VCs\ I Randolph-Macon 20 Millsaps 14 T hn r m ,; n ;nn n Un H
N>v> | s f Austin 23 Tarieton 7 I be remaining members of our elite group
>N V' I v ** state 2 i are quite heavily favored. 11-rated
Sam Houston 14 McMurry 7 ...... ...... ~
I samtord 19 Newberry 7 Mississippi will chew-chew Chattanooga
liw Tejas ,ana su! Ross S an 24 b V 42 points while Arizona State, No. 12, is
mm mm mmm mm I Tampa 31 Idaho state 13 16 points stronger than Utah. Alabama,
3/ 3-3377 I T " i IS rated thirteenth in spite of four losses, will
W 9 I w" h i^!*,7 n ?i I beat Miami by 32. There'll be one "nipper:"
V i Western Kentucky 45 Butler o U.C.L.A., No. 14, by 1 over Washington, No. O ALONG WITH
I Wofford 28 Appalachian 17 jg
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